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Sample records for edwards mira bileaflet

  1. Wonderful Mira.

    PubMed

    Wareing, Christopher John

    2008-12-13

    Since being named 'wonderful' in the seventeenth century for its peculiar brightness variability, Mira A has been the subject of extensive research and become the prototype for a whole class of 'Mira' variable stars. The primary star in a binary system, Mira A is reaching the end of its life and currently undergoing an extended period of enhanced mass loss. Recent observations have revealed a surrounding arc-like structure and a stream of material stretching 12 light years away in opposition to the arc. In this article, I review recent modelling of this cometary appearance as a bow shock with an accompanying tail of material ram pressure stripped from the head of the bow shock, place Mira in an evolutionary context, predict its future with reference to the similar star R Hya and planetary nebula Sh 2-188, and speculate some avenues of research both on Mira itself and on other 'Mira-like' stars with bow shocks and tails. I also discuss the implications of this discovery for our own star, the Sun. PMID:18812301

  2. Flares on Mira stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1991-01-01

    Fourteen cases of flares reported on Mira type stars have been collected. These flares typically have an amplitude of over half a magnitude, a rise time of minutes, and a duration of tens of minutes. Nine of the 11 stars represent a normal cross section of the Mira population, while the remaining two are in symbiotic systems (CH Cyg and RX Pup). The flares were observed photographically (five cases), photometrically (three cases), visually (three cases), and with radio telescopes (two cases), while CH Cyg has had flares observed by many techniques. The evidence for the existence of flares on Miras is strong but not definitive. It is possible to hypothesize a variety of background or instrumental effects that could explain all 14 events; however, there is no evidence that suggests the data should be taken at other than face value, and there are good arguments for rejecting the possibility of artifacts. It is felt that the current data warrant systematic observational and theoretical investigation of the possibility of flares on Mira stars.

  3. Leaflet escape in a revised Edwards-Duromedics mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mert, Murat; Ozkara, Ahmet; Hatemi, AliCan

    2003-07-01

    The original Duromedics-Edwards bileaflet valve was withdrawn from the market in 1988 after 12 reports of leaflet escape. The leaflet was modified by the manufacturer, and the revised Edwards-Duromedics and Edwards TEKNA valves were introduced in 1990 and 1993, respectively. However, problems of leaflet escape have now been reported with the new models. A case is reported of sudden leaflet fracture of a revised Duromedics mitral valve 86 months after implantation; this was managed successfully by emergency replacement with a St. Jude Medical mechanical prosthesis. The fracture had occurred transversely, with the two fragments embolizing bilaterally to the right common iliac and left external iliac arteries. In the absence of an exact diagnosis, but with a high index of suspicion, the key to survival of patients with leaflet escape is immediate reoperation. PMID:12918855

  4. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  5. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  6. Mira: Argonne's 10-petaflops supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Papka, Michael; Coghlan, Susan; Isaacs, Eric; Peters, Mark; Messina, Paul

    2013-07-03

    Mira, Argonne's petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system, ushers in a new era of scientific supercomputing at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops supercomputer is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. As a machine for open science, any researcher with a question that requires large-scale computing resources can submit a proposal for time on Mira, typically in allocations of millions of core-hours, to run programs for their experiments. This adds up to billions of hours of computing time per year.

  7. Mira: Argonne's 10-petaflops supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    Papka, Michael; Coghlan, Susan; Isaacs, Eric; Peters, Mark; Messina, Paul

    2014-06-05

    Mira, Argonne's petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system, ushers in a new era of scientific supercomputing at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops supercomputer is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. As a machine for open science, any researcher with a question that requires large-scale computing resources can submit a proposal for time on Mira, typically in allocations of millions of core-hours, to run programs for their experiments. This adds up to billions of hours of computing time per year.

  8. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (< 5%). However, patients still face the risks of blood cell damage, thromboembolic events, and material failure of the prosthetic device. One mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested. PMID:25571278

  9. Fatal leaflet escape in an Edwards TEKNA aortic prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Heidi; Bertolini, Julia; Scheld, Hans Heinrich; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    The case is reported of a 26-year-old male patient who died eight years after the replacement of an aortic valve with a bileaflet mechanical valve (TEKNA; Edwards, USA). Following prosthesis implantation, the patient had been in a good state of health, and his death occurred unexpectedly. Forensic autopsy revealed a leaflet escape, with two fragments of the leaflet being found bilaterally in the common iliac arteries. Death occurred due to an acute cardiac insufficiency. Immunohistochemical investigations revealed fresh myocardial fiber necroses. Stereomicroscopic and scanning electron microscopic investigations demonstrated surface erosions of the leaflet. Although the valve was withdrawn from the market in June 2000, it had previously been implanted in over 18,000 patients. Thus, from a clinical viewpoint, the question of using a prophylactic replacement in affected patients must be discussed. PMID:16480019

  10. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application Project (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grubbs, Rodney P.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA) Project. A detailed description of the MIRA camera service software architecture, encoder features, and on-board communications are presented. A description of a candidate camera under development is also shown.

  11. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  12. Measurements of flow past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2013-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve has been inserted in an axisymmetric model of the aorta within a mock circulation apparatus with physiological pressure and flow variations. The velocity field behind the valve has been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The results closely match those reported by similar studies. A triple jet emanated from the valve's orifices and regions of reverse flow formed in the sinus region. Velocity fluctuations were greatest in the shear layers of the jets. The average r.m.s. streamwise velocity fluctuation over the turbulent period was 0.22 m/s; its maximum value was 0.53 m/s and occurred at the onset of deceleration. Measurements with the valve inserted in an anatomical model of the aorta are planned for the near future. The present and future measurements will be compared to determine the effects of the aorta anatomy on the characteristics of flow through bileaflet valves. In particular, measurements of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses will be analyzed to identify possible locations of blood element damage, and regions of recirculation and stagnation will be identified as locations favourable to thrombus growth. The effects of flows in branching arteries and valve orientation will also be investigated. Supported by NSERC.

  13. Introducing Mira, Argonne's Next-Generation Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-19

    Mira, the new petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system installed at the ALCF, will usher in a new era of scientific supercomputing. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops machine is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second.

  14. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Lindolfo; Rich, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives include: I. Prototype a camera service leveraging the CCSDS Integrated protocol stack (MIRA/SM&C/AMS/DTN): a) CCSDS MIRA Service (New). b) Spacecraft Monitor and Control (SM&C). c) Asynchronous Messaging Service (AMS). d) Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN). II. Additional MIRA Objectives: a) Demo of Camera Control through ISS using CCSDS protocol stack (Berlin, May 2011). b) Verify that the CCSDS standards stack can provide end-to-end space camera services across ground and space environments. c) Test interoperability of various CCSDS protocol standards. d) Identify overlaps in the design and implementations of the CCSDS protocol standards. e) Identify software incompatibilities in the CCSDS stack interfaces. f) Provide redlines to the SM&C, AMS, and DTN working groups. d) Enable the CCSDS MIRA service for potential use in ISS Kibo camera commanding. e) Assist in long-term evolution of this entire group of CCSDS standards to TRL 6 or greater.

  15. The Bright Symbiotic Mira EF Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margon, Bruce; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas; Monroe, TalaWanda

    2016-02-01

    An incidental spectrum of the poorly studied long-period variable EF Aquilae shows [O III] emission indicative of a symbiotic star. Strong GALEX detections in the UV reinforce this classification, providing overt evidence for the presence of the hot subluminous companion. Recent compilations of the photometric behavior strongly suggest that the cool component is a Mira variable. Thus EF Aql appears to be a member of the rare symbiotic Mira subgroup.

  16. Edward Hopper: The Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on Edward Hopper, focusing on his use of watercolors. Explores five of his watercolor paintings: (1) "The Mansard Roof"; (2) "House on Pamet River"; (3) "Light at Two Lights"; (4) "Saltillo Mansion"; and (5) "Roofs of Washington Square." Addresses the exhibition "Edward Hopper: The Watercolors." (CMK)

  17. Is Mira a magneto-dusty rotator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Anand; Heyl, Jeremy S.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the possibility that a magnetic field may be present in the star o-Ceti (hereafter Mira) and that the field plays a role in the star's mass loss. The model presented here is an application of an earlier derived theory that has been successfully applied for modelling the wind of a generic intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star and that of the red supergiant star Betelgeuse, and is now extended to the low-mass end AGB stars, Mira. The modelling shows that it is possible to obtain a hybrid magnetohydrodynamic-dust-driven wind scenario for Mira, in which the magnetic field in the equatorial plane of the star is dynamically important for producing a stellar wind. The wind velocity and the temperatures obtained from the model appear consistent with observational findings elsewhere.

  18. Atmospheric structure and mass loss in Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    The cool molecular region of late-type stellar atmospheres, the ‘MOLsphere’ located between the photosphere and expanding circumstellar shell, is explored by using time series of near-IR spectra of one large amplitude AGB (Mira) variable. The ∼⃒1400 K MOLsphere of the Mira R Cas is shown to undergo large amplitude velocity changes that are aperiodic with time scales many times longer than the photospheric pulsation. The mass of the MOLsphere is ∼⃒3×10‑5 M⊙. Initial analysis suggests that MOLsphere is thin compared to the stellar radius.

  19. Mira's role in RR Tel revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, A.; Manfroid, J.

    The present uvby data, IUE FES measurements and American Association of Variable Star Observers visual estimates of the very slow nova RR Tel show that the object has gone through periodic variations in visual light since it started fading in 1949 after the outburst it incurred in 1944. The period is, however, not constant, and varies between 350 and 410 days, confirming Mayall's (1957) statement and contradicting the conclusions of later investigators. Synchronized variations of a Mira in the infrared and of a blue component indicate that the Mira mass outflow probably varies in a phase with its pulsations. Large variations occur in visual light on a time scale of a few weeks.

  20. Edward Everett Hale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The first known proposal for a marned-satellite appeared in a story by Edward Everett Hale entitled The Brick Moon. The story involved a group of young Bostonians who planned to put an artificial satellite into polar orbit for sailors to use to determine longitude accurately and easily.

  1. A novel computational model for the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical valves in the opening phase.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2015-03-01

    A powerful alternative means to study the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is the computational fluid dynamics method. It is well recognized that computational fluid dynamics allows reliable physiological blood flow simulation and measurements of flow parameters. To date, in almost all of the modeling studies on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a velocity (mass flow)-based boundary condition and an axisymmetric geometry for the aortic root have been assigned, which, to some extent, are erroneous. Also, there have been contradictory reports of the profile of velocity in downstream of leaflets, that is, in some studies, it is suggested that the maximum blood velocity occurs in the lateral orifice, and in some other studies, it is postulated that the maximum velocities in the main and lateral orifices are identical. The reported values for the peak velocities range from 1 to 3 m/s, which highly depend on the model assumptions. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the importance of the exact anatomical model of the aortic root and the realistic boundary conditions in the hemodynamics of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The model considered in this study is based on the St Jude Medical valve in a novel modeling platform. Through a more realistic geometrical model for the aortic root and the St Jude Medical valve, we have developed a new set of boundary conditions in order to be used for the assessment of the hemodynamics of aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The results of this study are significant for the design improvement of conventional bileaflet mechanical heart valves and for the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves. PMID:25833999

  2. The Spectra of Mira Variable Stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Richard Alan

    The catalog of Keenan, Garrison and Deutsch (1974) has been extended by the addition of 483 blue spectrograms of 72 Southern Hemisphere Mira variables. About 190 direct and image-tube plates at a dispersion of 120 (ANGSTROM)/mm were obtained in Chile between 1977 and 1982. Spectral types, emission-line ratios for H(delta) 4101/H(gamma) 4340/H(beta) 4861 and eye-estimated intensities of the absorption lines Ca I (lamda)4226, Cr I (lamda)4254 and Sr II (lamda)4077 have been tabulated. Spectral montages for six stars are used to illustrate changes in the visual spectra of Mira variables through their respective cycles. Radial velocities of absorption and emission line systems have been determined for 22 Northern Hemisphere Mira variables. These were measured from approximately 65 spectra obtained on baked IIa-O plates at a dispersion of 12 (ANGSTROM)/mm with the DDO 1.88-m telescope. Most of these Northern Hemisphere stars were observed close to maximum light, and so only in a few cases (for example, R Trianguli) is there any useful phase information available. It can be shown from this data that the irregular behaviour of absorption features in Mira variables is the consequence of a second shock front which is higher up in the atmosphere than the one producing Balmer emission, as has been proposed by Hill and Willson, 1979b). We present evidence that strong emission is associated with weak-line cycles (when overlying TiO absorption is also weaker) and that the velocity gradient is directly responsible for the weakening by the escape enhancement process (Mihalas, 1978). Since the shock strength varies from cycle to cycle, we do not expect the affected lines to maintain the same equivalent width at the same phase in different cycles. There is, however, a great deal of internal scatter from star to star which confuses the interpretation. The separation of Mira variables into two groups (namely, those with spectral types earlier and later than M5e at maximum light) helps

  3. The radio continuum spectrum of Mira A and Mira B up to submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planesas, P.; Alcolea, J.; Bachiller, R.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We present new measurements of the flux densities at submillimeter wavelengths based on ALMA band 7 (338 GHz, λ0.89 mm) and band 9 (679 GHz, λ0.44 mm) observations to better constrain the origin of the continuum emission of the Mira AB binary system and to check its orbit. Methods: We have measured the Mira A and Mira B continuum in ALMA band 7, with a resolution of ~0.̋31, and for the first time in ALMA band 9, with a resolution of ~0.̋18. We have resolved the binary system at both bands, and derived the continuum spectral index of the stars and their relative position. We also analyzed ALMA Science Verification data obtained in bands 6 and 3. Measurements at centimeter wavelengths obtained by other authors have been included in our study of the spectral energy distribution of the Mira components. Results: The Mira A continuum emission has a spectral index of 1.98 ± 0.04 extending from submillimeter down to centimeter wavelengths. The spectral index of the Mira B continuum emission is 1.93 ± 0.06 at wavelengths ranging from submillimeter to ~3.1 mm, and a shallower spectral index of 1.22 ± 0.09 at longer wavelengths. The high precision relative positions of the A and B components are shown to significantly depart from the current (preliminary) orbit by ~14 mas. Conclusions: The Mira A continuum emission up to submillimeter wavelengths is consistent with that of a radio photosphere surrounding the evolved star for which models predict a spectral index close to 2. The Mira B continuum emission cannot be described with a single ionized component. An extremely compact and dense region around the star can produce the nearly thermal continuum measured in the range λ0.4-3.1 mm, and an inhomogeneous, less dense, and slightly larger ionized envelope could be responsible for the emission at longer wavelengths. Our results illustrate the potential of ALMA for high precision astrometry of binary systems. We have found a significant discrepancy between the ALMA

  4. Edward Teller's Scientific Life

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Weiss, M S

    2004-04-15

    Edward Teller was one of the great physicists of the twentieth century. His career began just after the key ideas of the quantum revolution of the 1920's were completed, opening vast areas of physics and chemistry to detailed understanding. Thus, his early work in theoretical physics focused on applying the new quantum theory to the understanding of diverse phenomena. These topics included chemical physics, diamagnetism, and nuclear physics. Later, he made key contributions to statistical mechanics, surface physics, solid state, and plasma physics. In many cases, the ideas in these papers are still rich with important ramifications.

  5. Large stellar interferometer MIRA-ST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Masanori; Sato, Koichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Ohishi, Naoko; Kotani, Takayuki

    2003-02-01

    We propose a millisecond of arc optical/infrared array for stellar territory, MIRA-ST, with nine 4m-aperture off-axis telescopes, whose maximum baseline length is about 600 m. MIRA-ST will have the photon collecting area equivalent to that of a single-dish telescope of 12 m diameter, and the imaging capability better than 1 millisecond of arc resolution at 2.2 micrometers with a high dynamic range of reconstructed images. Combining the light beams from each pupil telescope efficiently is one of the most difficult tasks. We compare the relative merits among a so-called pair-wise beam combining, an all-on-one beam combining, and a tree-structured beam combining. As for transferring the beams from individual telescopes to a beam combining facility with the loss of photons as small as possible, an optical fiber system is a most interesting substitute for the current mirror-and-vacuum-pipe combination. Specifically, the nature of spatial filtering of optical fibers has been under study in the light of deepening the limiting magnitude attainable without introducing an adaptive optics to each telescope. With MIRA-ST we will be able to zoom in the stellar territory to unveil the detailed structures and lifecycles of stars of various kinds, and to examine the universality and/or diversity along the coarse of their evolutionary paths. The specific targets of most interesting for us are, among others, T Tauri stars, AGB and post-AGB stars, Cepheids, brown dwarfs, white dwarfs, stellar atmosphere/envelope of low temperature stars, accretion disks, and fundamental structures of main sequence stars.

  6. Edward Teller Biographical Memoir

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Sessler, A M

    2009-07-27

    Edward Teller died on September 9, 2003 in Stanford, California at the age of 95. He was both one of the great theoretical physicists of the twentieth century and a leading figure in the development of nuclear weapons and broader defense advocacy. Teller's work in physics, spanning many decades of the twentieth century, includes some of the most fundamental insights in the quantum behaviors of molecules and their spectra, nuclei, surfaces, solid state and spin systems, and plasmas. In the defense arena, Teller is best known for his key insight that made thermonuclear weapons possible. Teller was both a great scientific collaborator and physics teacher at all levels, known for his openness, generosity, personal warmth, and powerful physical intuition. Many of his graduate students went on to illustrious careers.

  7. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Schneider in the cockpit of an F-104. Schneider served as a U.S. Navy pilot from 1968 to 1983, during which time he trained at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, and received assignments as an engineering test pilot, as a test pilot school instructor, and as a Naval Liaison Officer at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center). Schneider joined NASA as a research pilot in 1983. Over the next 17 years, he was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA SR-71s. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  8. Pulsation and mass loss in Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of pulsation in the outer layers of a typical Mira variable was studied in the adiabatic and isothermal limits. A shock wave propagates outward once per period and the radial velocity obtained from observations of hydrogen emission lines is identified with the velocity of gas in the post shock region. In the adiabatic case, mass loss in the form of a steady stellar wind was produced. In the isothermal case, no continuous mass loss was produced but occasional ejection of shells occur. Pulsation introduced into a star undergoing steady mass loss as a result of radiation pressure acting on grains caused the mass loss rate to increase by a factor of approximately 40, while the terminal velocity of the flow was almost unaltered.

  9. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    ScienceCinema

    Edward Moses

    2010-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  10. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Moses

    2009-07-02

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  11. Edward Bancroft's "Torporific Eels".

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley

    2009-01-01

    Edward Bancroft was a medical apprentice in Connecticut before running off to Guiana in 1763. While in South America, he practiced medicine and collected material for a lengthy book on the region, which he published after he settled in London. Bancroft's Essay (1769) contains a description of the "torporific eels" found in the warm rivers of Guiana, along with a series of experiments suggesting that the eel's powers are electrical. It also calls for studies to determine whether saltwater torpedo rays might demonstrate the same properties, which Bancroft expected would be the case. Today, Bancroft is best remembered for serving Benjamin Franklin and the American delegation in France during the War of Independence, and for being a double agent. But what this colorful man wrote about the South American eels helped to make an early case for animal electricity and stimulated Franklin to encourage John Walsh to conduct his landmark electrical experiments on torpedoes and electric eels in the 1770s. These efforts led to new way of thinking about the physiology of the nervous and muscular systems, even in nonspecialized fish. PMID:19168945

  12. Edward A. Bouchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    2002-04-01

    Edward A. Bouchet was the first African American to receive the doctorate in any field of knowledge in the United States and that area was physics. He was granted the degree in 1876 from Yale University making him at that time one of the few persons to hold the physics doctorate from an American university. His prior education included the Hopkins Grammar School and Yale College (BA in 1874). After Yale, Bouchet taught mathematics, physics, and chemistry for over twenty-five years at the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia. During the following two decades, he was employed in positions ranging from high school principal to employment by the federal government. Bouchet played a significant role in the education of African Americans through his teaching and mentoring activities. He was one among a small group of African Americans who achieved advanced training and education within decades of the American civil war. These individuals provided direction, leadership, and role models for what eventually became the civil/human rights movements. The year 2001 marks the 125th celebration of his receiving the doctorate. We present details of his life and career with an emphasis on the influence of the political and social forces exerted on him by society.

  13. Discovering Mira Ceti: Celestial Change and Cosmic Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Robert Alan

    In the short narrative that follows I introduce two new heroes. Although we begin with Fabricius's first sighting in 1596, the new pivot point in the drama is the collaboration between Hevelius and Boulliau that began around 1660. As it happens, Learned Europe paid little attention to Mira in the generation after the first scattered sightings of 1596, indeed, nearly 70 years passed before the New Star was given a working identity. Like Columbus discovering America, Fabricius and Holwarda saw different things - for convenience, I call them Fabricius's Star and Holwarda's Star. Hevelius's Historiola (Danzig, 1662) and Boulliau's Ad astronomos (Paris, 1667) presented a different vision. It made Mira famous. As I shall argue, if Hevelius gave Mira a history, Boulliau gave Mira a future.5 In the end, the New Star not only challenged the ancient cosmos, it became an enduring icon for the New Science, a returning reminder of celestial continuity and cosmic order.

  14. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  15. MIRA: mutual information-based reporter algorithm for metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Cicek, A. Ercument; Roeder, Kathryn; Ozsoyoglu, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Discovering the transcriptional regulatory architecture of the metabolism has been an important topic to understand the implications of transcriptional fluctuations on metabolism. The reporter algorithm (RA) was proposed to determine the hot spots in metabolic networks, around which transcriptional regulation is focused owing to a disease or a genetic perturbation. Using a z-score-based scoring scheme, RA calculates the average statistical change in the expression levels of genes that are neighbors to a target metabolite in the metabolic network. The RA approach has been used in numerous studies to analyze cellular responses to the downstream genetic changes. In this article, we propose a mutual information-based multivariate reporter algorithm (MIRA) with the goal of eliminating the following problems in detecting reporter metabolites: (i) conventional statistical methods suffer from small sample sizes, (ii) as z-score ranges from minus to plus infinity, calculating average scores can lead to canceling out opposite effects and (iii) analyzing genes one by one, then aggregating results can lead to information loss. MIRA is a multivariate and combinatorial algorithm that calculates the aggregate transcriptional response around a metabolite using mutual information. We show that MIRA’s results are biologically sound, empirically significant and more reliable than RA. Results: We apply MIRA to gene expression analysis of six knockout strains of Escherichia coli and show that MIRA captures the underlying metabolic dynamics of the switch from aerobic to anaerobic respiration. We also apply MIRA to an Autism Spectrum Disorder gene expression dataset. Results indicate that MIRA reports metabolites that highly overlap with recently found metabolic biomarkers in the autism literature. Overall, MIRA is a promising algorithm for detecting metabolic drug targets and understanding the relation between gene expression and metabolic activity. Availability and

  16. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  17. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  18. A Model of Mira's Cometary Head/Tail Entering the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; Cantó, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; López-Cámara, D.; Velázquez, P. F.; De Colle, F.

    2010-12-01

    We model the cometary structure around Mira as the interaction of an asymptotic giant branch stellar wind from Mira A with a streaming environment. Our simulations introduce the following new element: we assume that after 200 kyr of evolution in a dense environment, Mira entered the Local Bubble (low-density coronal gas). As Mira enters the bubble, the head of the comet expands quite rapidly, while the tail remains well collimated for a >100 kyr timescale. The result is a broad-head/narrow-tail structure that resembles the observed morphology of Mira's comet. The simulations were carried out with our new adaptive grid code WALICXE, which is described in detail.

  19. Maxima and O-C Diagrams for 489 Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Maxima for 489 Mira stars have been compiled. They were computed with data from AAVSO, AFOEV, VSOLJ, and BAA-VSS and collected from published maxima. The result is presented in a mysql database and on web pages with O-C diagrams, periods and some statistical information for each star.

  20. Transapical off-pump Neochord implantation on bileaflet prolapse to treat severe mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Bellu, Roberto; Pittarello, Demetrio; Gerosa, Gino

    2015-10-01

    A 74-year old lady was admitted for the presence of a symptomatic severe mitral regurgitation (MR) due to bileaflet prolapse. The patient refused any surgical conventional procedure because of severe arthrosis and osteoporosis documented by previous fractures requiring knee and hip replacements, and was sent directly to us for transapical off-pump mitral valve repair with Neochord implantation (TOP-MINI procedure). The TOP-MINI procedure was performed under general anaesthesia and transoesophageal echocardiographic guidance. Four Neochordae were implanted on the posterior leaflet and two on the anterior leaflet in order to correct a residual anterior prolapse that was not seen at preoperative screening. After 11 months of follow-up, the patient presented with recurrence of symptomatic moderate MR due to rupture of one of two neochordae implanted on the anterior leaflet and new onset of atrial fibrillation. The patient underwent uneventful mitral valve replacement. PMID:26180097

  1. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  2. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of Mira Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, P. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-04-01

    Observations of 12CO(3-2) emission of the circumbinary envelope of Mira Ceti, made by ALMA are analysed. The observed Doppler velocity distribution is made of three components: a blue-shifted south-eastern arc, which can be described as a ring in slow radial expansion, ˜1.7 km s-1, making an angle of ˜50° with the plane of the sky and born some 2000 years ago; a few arcs, probably born at the same epoch as the blue-shifted arc, all sharing Doppler velocities red-shifted by approximately 3±2 km s-1 with respect to the main star; the third, central region dominated by the circumbinary envelope, displaying two outflows in the south-western and north-eastern hemispheres. At short distances from the star, up to ˜1.5″, these hemispheres display very different morphologies: the south-western outflow covers a broad solid angle, expands radially at a rate between 5 and 10 km s-1 and is slightly red shifted; the north-eastern outflow consists of two arms, both blue-shifted, bracketing a broad dark region where emission is suppressed. At distances between ˜1.5″ and ˜2.5″ the asymmetry between the two hemispheres is significantly smaller and detached arcs, particularly spectacular in the north-eastern hemisphere are present. Close to the stars, we observe a mass of gas surrounding Mira B, with a size of a few tens of AU, and having Doppler velocities with respect to Mira B reaching ±1.5 km s-1, which we interpret as gas flowing from Mira A toward Mira B.

  3. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of Mira Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, P. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-07-01

    Observations of 12CO(3-2) emission of the circumbinary envelope of Mira Ceti, made by Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array, are analysed. The observed Doppler velocity distribution is made of three components: a blueshifted south-eastern arc, which can be described as a ring in slow radial expansion, ˜1.7 km s-1, making an angle of ˜50° with the plane of the sky and born some 2000 years ago; a few arcs, probably born at the same epoch as the blueshifted arc, all sharing Doppler velocities redshifted by approximately 3±2 km s-1 with respect to the main star; thirdly, a central region dominated by the circumbinary envelope, displaying two outflows in the south-western and north-eastern hemispheres. At short distances from the star, up to ˜1.5 arcsec, these hemispheres display very different morphologies: the south-western outflow covers a broad solid angle, expands radially at a rate between 5 and 10 km s-1 and is slightly redshifted; the north-eastern outflow consists of two arms, both blueshifted, bracketing a broad dark region where emission is suppressed. At distances between ˜1.5 and ˜2.5 arcsec the asymmetry between the two hemispheres is significantly smaller and detached arcs, particularly spectacular in the north-eastern hemisphere are present. Close to the stars, we observe a mass of gas surrounding Mira B, with a size of a few tens of au, and having Doppler velocities with respect to Mira B reaching ±1.5 km s-1, which we interpret as gas flowing from Mira A towards Mira B.

  4. Effect of the sinus of valsalva on the closing motion of bileaflet prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Kikuta, Y; Shimooka, T; Mitamura, Y; Yuhta, T; Dohi, T

    2000-04-01

    Conventional bileaflet prosthetic mechanical heart valves close passively with backflow. Naturally, the valve has problems associated with closure, such as backflow, water hammer effect, and fracture of the leaflet. On the other hand, in the case of the natural aortic valve, the vortex flow in the sinus of Valsalva pushes the leaflet to close, and the valve starts the closing motion earlier than the prosthetic valve as the forward flow decelerates. This closing mechanism is thought to decrease backflow at valve closure. In this study, we propose a new bileaflet mechanical valve resembling a drawbridge in shape, and the prototype valve was designed so that the leaflet closes with the help of the vortex flow in the sinus. The test valve was made of aluminum alloy, and its closing motion was compared to that of the CarboMedics (CM) valve. Both valves were driven by a computer controlled hydraulic mock circulator and were photographed at 648 frames/s by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Each frame of the valve motion image was analyzed with a personal computer, and the opening angles were measured. The flow rate was set as 5.0 L/min. The system was pulsed with 70 bpm, and the systolic/diastolic ratio was 0.3. Glycerin water was used as the circulation fluid at room temperature, and polystyrene particles were used to visualize the streamline. The model of the sinus of Valsalva was made of transparent silicone rubber. As a result, high speed video analysis showed that the test valve started the closing motion 41 ms earlier than the CM valve, and streamline analysis showed that the test valve had a closing mechanism similar to the natural one with the effect of vortex flow. The structure of the test valve was thought to be effective for soft closure and could solve problems associated with closure. PMID:10816206

  5. Mass loss and OH maser emission from Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1978-01-01

    The mass, radius, and luminosity of 26 Mira variables that are known OH sources of radio emission at 1612 MHz have been estimated. The time-independent solution of Salpeter's (1974) stellar-wind equation and a period-density relation are used to solve for basic stellar parameters, with the aid of the terminal expansion velocity of the OH maser cloud. Masses obtained from these calculations are consistent with other estimated values for masses of Mira variables. Good agreement is obtained when comparing the rate of mass loss as determined from Reimers's (1977) semiempirical relation with estimates of the mass-loss rate as deduced from theoretical models involving radiation pressure on grains. These calculations suggest a strong correlation between the mass-loss rate and the pulsation period. Arguments concerning the general properties of silicate grains from radiation-pressure-driven stellar-wind equations are discussed.

  6. Hydrogen Lines in Mira Stars Through Interferometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Chiavassa, A.; Millour, F.; Wittkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Balmer lines in emission are the most prominent features in Mira stars spectra and have a strong potential as a proxy to study the lower atmosphere's dynamics. In Fabas et al. ([1]), we accumulated spectropolarimetric observations of Balmer lines in emission. As the shock is propagating outwards, linear polarization rate increases and the angle of this polarization evolves. Assuming that linear polarization arises from anisotropic scattering, it has the potential of telling us about the geometric structure of the shock as it propagates and the study of such atmospheric structures can typically be performed with interferometry. In 2012, AMBER data on the Mira star omicron Ceti were collected in which the Brackett γ line is studied. The data show signatures in the interferometric observables around this line. Olivier Chesneau was in the jury evaluating the PhD thesis of N. Fabas and he was seduced by the idea to study these shock waves with interferometry and use polarimetry as a complementary study.

  7. Mg II line profiles of the Mira S Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugel, Edward W.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Brown, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    High-dispersion IUE observations obtained to investigate the evolution of the shock structure of the Mira S Carinae (S Car) produced, despite very limited phase coverage, a set of five spectra of the Mg II h and k lines. There is significant emission from both the h and k lines at velocities of -150 km/sec relative to the stellar photosphere. The h-to-k ratio of the Mg II doublet remains below the theoretically predicated values of 2:1 to 1:1, and shows a smooth dependence on the optical phase. Archival studies of other Miras (e.g., R Car) indicate that S Car is not unique in possessing unusual and highly variable Mg II h and k line profiles.

  8. Loops in Bandstrength-Color Diagrams for Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, R. P.

    Narrow-band photometry of Mira variables in the near-infrared (7000-11000 AA) spectral region allows the measurement of colors at relatively good continuum points as well as strong bands of TiO and VO. Several variables including o Cet, chi Cyg, R And, R Cas, R Tri, and IK Tau have been followed through two or more cycles; 27 stars were observed on 10 or more dates. In bandstrength-color diagrams, Mira variables execute large, open loops of varying character and complexity. Several of these are illustrated and discussed. Attempts to model these loops may shed light on the temperature structures of the outer layers of these stars' extended, dynamic atmospheres.

  9. Multi-color interferometric observations of Mira stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Thompson, B. B.; Foresto, V. Coude du; Merand, A.; Ridgway, S.; Perrin, G.

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric observations in the atmospheric windows of the near infrared (1 to 4 microns) can be efficiently used to probe the chemical composition of Miras atmosphere and provide direct measurements of extended gas layers around these stars. This is illustrated by recent Miras observations carried out with the FLUOR instrument of the IOTA interferometer (Mennesson et al. 2002, and Perrin et al. proceedings of this conference) and with the PTI test-bed (Thompson 2002, Thompson et al. 2002). These visibility measurements show evidence for continuum emission from very extended ( 2-3 stellar radii) semi-transparent gaseous atmospheric layers, and large apparent diameter changes with pulsation phase. Interestingly these observations are consistent with the extended molecular gas layers (H20, CO ...) already inferred around some of these objects from IS0 and high resolution ground-based FTS infrared spectra.

  10. Resolving the stellar activity of the Mira AB binary with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Ramstedt, S.; O'Gorman, E.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Wittkowski, M.; Baudry, A.; Karovska, M.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We present the size, shape, and flux densities at millimeter continuum wavelengths, based on ALMA science verification observations in Band 3 (~94.6 GHz) and Band 6 (~228.7 GHz), from the binary Mira A (o Ceti) and Mira B. Methods: The Mira AB system was observed with ALMA at a spatial resolution down to ~25 mas. The extended atmosphere of Mira A and the wind around Mira B sources were resolved, and we derived the sizes of Mira A and of the ionized region around Mira B. The spectral indices within Band 3 (between 89-100 GHz) and between Bands 3 and 6 were also derived. Results: The spectral index of Mira A is found to change from 1.71 ± 0.05 within Band 3 to 1.54 ± 0.04 between Bands 3 and 6. The spectral index of Mira B is 1.3 ± 0.2 in Band 3, in good agreement with measurements at longer wavelengths; however, it rises to 1.72 ± 0.11 between the bands. For the first time, the extended atmosphere of a star is resolved at these frequencies, and for Mira A the diameter is ~3.8 × 3.2 AU in Band 3 (with brightness temperature Tb ~ 5300 K) and ~4.0 × 3.6 AU in Band 6 (Tb ~ 2500 K). Additionally, a bright hotspot ~0.4 AU, with Tb ~ 10 000 K, is found on the stellar disk of Mira A. The size of the ionized region around the accretion disk of Mira B is found to be ~2.4 AU. Conclusions: The emission around Mira B is consistent with emission from a partially ionized wind of gravitationally bound material from Mira A close to the accretion disk of Mira B. The Mira A atmosphere does not fully match predictions with brightness temperatures in Band 3 significantly higher than expected, potentially owing to shock heating. The hotspot is very likely due to magnetic activity and could be related to the previously observed X-ray flare of Mira A. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Clarence Edwards Middle School: Success through Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts 2020, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Just a few years ago, Boston's Clarence Edwards Middle School was on the verge of being shut down. By 2009, a renaissance at the Edwards made it one of the highest performing and most desired middle schools in Boston, dramatically narrowing and even eliminating academic achievement gaps while delivering a far more well-rounded education to its…

  12. Decision-making in aortic valve replacement: bileaflet mechanical valves versus stented bioprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Takkenberg, J.J.M.; Puvimanasinghe, J.P.A.; van Herwerden, L.A.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Habbema, J.D.F.; Bogers, A.J.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Background Valve prosthesis selection for patients who require aortic valve replacement is dependent on several interrelated factors. Often, more than one valve type seems suitable for the individual patient and selection of a valve type may be difficult. Methods The application of an evidence-based microsimulation model as an objective tool to support the choice between a bileaflet mechanical prosthesis and a stented bioprosthesis in the individual patient is described. In addition, a pilot study investigating the effect of knowledge gained by this microsimulation model on prosthetic valve choice by cardiothoracic surgeons and cardiologists is presented for two hypothetical patients. Results After implantation of a mechanical valve, bleeding and thromboembolism are common, especially in the elderly. After implantation of a bioprosthesis, reoperation for structural failure is the most important valve-related complication, especially in younger patients. Life expectancy after aortic valve replacement is markedly reduced compared with the general Dutch age-matched population, regardless of the type of valve implanted. In the pilot study knowledge gained by the microsimulation model caused a shift in the preference towards a mechanical prosthesis in clinical experts. Conclusion Microsimulation incorporating current epidemiological data provides an objective tool to estimate prognosis for individual patients after aortic valve replacement with different valve prostheses. It may develop towards a useful clinical decision support system for valve prosthesis selection. ImagesFigure 6 PMID:25696138

  13. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  14. A biomimetic bi-leaflet mitral prosthesis with enhanced physiological left ventricular swirl restorative capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical heart valve prostheses are often implanted in young patients due to their durability and long-term reliability. However, existing designs are known to induce elevated levels of blood damage and blood platelet activation. As a result, there is a need for patients to undergo chronic anti-coagulation treatment to prevent thrombosis, often resulting in bleeding complications. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the implantation of a mechanical prosthetic valve at the mitral position results in a significant alteration of the left ventricular flow field which may contribute to flow turbulence. This study proposes a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve design (Bio-MHV) that mimics the geometry of a human mitral valve, with the aim of reducing turbulence levels in the left ventricle by replicating physiological flow patterns. An in vitro three-dimensional particle velocimetry imaging experiment was carried out to compare the hemodynamic performance of the Bio-MHV with that of the clinically established ATS valve. The Bio-MHV was found to replicate physiological left ventricular flow patterns and produced lower turbulence levels.

  15. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  16. Manipulation of the closing transients of bileaflet mechanical heart valves using passive, surface-mounted elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helene

    2005-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using PIV measurements that are phase locked to the leaflet motion. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. The valve is subjected to physiological flow conditions: a heart rate of 70 bpm; a cardiac output of 5 l/min; and a mean aortic pressure of 90 mmHg. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs.

  17. Effect of vortex generators on the closing transient flow of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Dasi, Lakshmi; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2006-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Two vortex generator designs were investigated: one design comprised staggered rectangular fins and the other one staggered hemispheres. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using phase locked PIV measurements. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  18. Numerical Investigation of the Performance of Three Hinge Designs of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Hélène A.; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications (TECs) of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are believed to be due to the nonphysiologic mechanical stresses imposed on blood elements by the hinge flows. Relating hinge flow features to design features is, therefore, essential to ultimately design BMHVs with lower TEC rates. This study aims at simulating the pulsatile three-dimensional hinge flows of three BMHVs and estimating the TEC potential associated with each hinge design. Hinge geometries are constructed from micro-computed tomography scans of BMHVs. Simulations are conducted using a Cartesian sharp-interface immersed-boundary methodology combined with a second-order accurate fractional-step method. Leaflet motion and flow boundary conditions are extracted from fluid–structure-interaction simulations of BMHV bulk flow. The numerical results are analyzed using a particle-tracking approach coupled with existing blood damage models. The gap width and, more importantly, the shape of the recess and leaflet are found to impact the flow distribution and TEC potential. Smooth, streamlined surfaces appear to be more favorable than sharp corners or sudden shape transitions. The developed framework will enable pragmatic and cost-efficient preclinical evaluation of BMHV prototypes prior to valve manufacturing. Application to a wide range of hinges with varying design parameters will eventually help in determining the optimal hinge design. PMID:20571852

  19. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage of Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves using Embedded Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of the mechanical prosthetic bileaflet aortic heart valve, is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for complications, associated with thrombosis and thromboembolism. These flow transients are investigated using phase and time-averaged PIV in a low-volume (about 150 ml) test setup that simulates the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 23 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The PIV measurements are accompanied by continuous monitoring of the ventricular and aortic pressures and valve flow rate. Following the valve closure, the leakage flow between the valve leaflets is caused by the pressure buildup across the leaflets, leading to the formation of a regurgitation jet starting from the BMHV B-datum line. As in a typical starting jet, a counter-rotating vortex pair is formed along each leaflet edge and the vorticity sheet is associated with high shear stress that may be result in blood platelet activation. The present investigation demonstrates that the placement of arrays of mm-scale vortex generators near the edges of the leaflets diffuses the vortex sheet and suppresses the formation of these vortices, weakening the local velocity gradients and small-scale vortical structures. Supported by NIH and NSF.

  20. Three-Dimensional Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Flow Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Rui; Lai, Yong G.; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2005-01-01

    The wall shear stress induced by the leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase has been implicated with thrombus initiation with prosthetic valves. Detailed flow dynamic analysis in the vicinity of the leaflets and the housing during the valve-closure phase is of interest in understanding this relationship. A three-dimensional unsteady flow analysis past bileaflet valve prosthesis in the mitral position is presented incorporating a fluid-structure interaction algorithm for leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase. Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian method is employed for incorporating the leaflet motion. The forces exerted by the fluid on the leaflets are computed and applied to the leaflet equation of motion to predict the leaflet position. Relatively large velocities are computed in the valve clearance region between the valve housing and the leaflet edge with the resulting relatively large wall shear stresses at the leaflet edge during the impact-rebound duration. Negative pressure transients are computed on the surface of the leaflets on the atrial side of the valve, with larger magnitudes at the leaflet edge during the closing and rebound as well. Vortical flow development is observed on the inflow (atrial) side during the valve impact-rebound phase in a location central to the leaflet and away from the clearance region where cavitation bubbles have been visualized in previously reported experimental studies. PMID:15636108

  1. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  2. Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. (1922-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; McPherron, Robert L.; Birn, Joachim

    2013-02-01

    Space physicist Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. died on 17 September 2012 at his home in Los Alamos, N. M. He was 90 years old. The cause of death was a heart attack that came following a brief hospitalization.

  3. Sturckow Recaps Last Shuttle Landing at Edwards

    NASA Video Gallery

    When Space Shuttle Discovery touched down at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California on Sept. 11, 2009 to conclude mission STS-128, no one foresaw that it would be the last of 54 such landing...

  4. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  5. Mg II line profiles of the Mira S Carinae

    SciTech Connect

    Bookbinder, J.A.; Brown, A.; Brugel, E.W.; Colorado Univ., Boulder )

    1989-07-01

    A series of high-dispersion IUE observations obtained to investigate the evolution of the shock structure of the Mira variable S Carinae have produced (despite limited phase coverage) a set of five exceptionally interesting spectra of the Mg II h and k lines. The two primary findings of these observations are (1) there is significant emission from both the h and k lines at positions corresponding to velocities of -150 km/s relative to the stellar photosphere and (2) the k/h flux ratio of the Mg II doublet remains below the theoretically predicted values which lie in the range 2:1 to 1:1 and shows a smooth dependence on the optical phase. Archival studies of other Miras (e.g., R Car) indicate that S Car is not unique in possessing unusual and highly variable Mg II h and k line profiles. Several possible physical processes that may explain these results, including radiative transfer effects in a shocked atmosphere, circumstellar scattering, and circumstellar absorption, are discussed. 10 refs.

  6. Mg II line profiles of the Mira S Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.; Brown, Alexander; Brugel, Edward W.

    1989-01-01

    A series of high-dispersion IUE observations obtained to investigate the evolution of the shock structure of the Mira variable S Carinae have produced (despite limited phase coverage) a set of five exceptionally interesting spectra of the Mg II h and k lines. The two primary findings of these observations are (1) there is significant emission from both the h and k lines at positions corresponding to velocities of -150 km/s relative to the stellar photosphere and (2) the k/h flux ratio of the Mg II doublet remains below the theoretically predicted values which lie in the range 2:1 to 1:1 and shows a smooth dependence on the optical phase. Archival studies of other Miras (e.g., R Car) indicate that S Car is not unique in possessing unusual and highly variable Mg II h and k line profiles. Several possible physical processes that may explain these results, including radiative transfer effects in a shocked atmosphere, circumstellar scattering, and circumstellar absorption, are discussed.

  7. Annual parallax measurements of a Mira variable star, U Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    We have measured the annual parallax of the water maser around a Mira star, U Lyncis (U Lyn) with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The value of the parallax is 1.27 ± 0.06 mas, corresponding to a distance of 786^{+40}_{-36}pc. This is the first VLBI measurement of the parallax of U Lyn. We obtained the period and the apparent magnitude of U Lyn based on near-infrared observations with the Kagoshima University 1 m telescope. The period and the mean magnitude of the K' band are 437.9 day and +1.15 ± 0.09 mag, respectively. Using our measured parallax and period, we find that the location of U Lyn on the period-luminosity plane is consistent with its nature as a Mira variable fundamental mode pulsator. Also, we estimated the distance using the period-luminosity relationship, our period and apparent magnitude and this gave a difference of about 100 pc between our parallactic distance and the distance estimated by using the period-luminosity relationship. We estimated the luminosity, radius, and mass of U Lyn to be 10100 ± 420 L⊙, 391 ± 34 R⊙, and 1.9 ± 0.7 M⊙, respectively. We found 50 water maser spots with a distribution ˜ 13 au around the star and the motion implies the existence of an outflow.

  8. Monitoring of Select Mira-Type Stars for Microvariability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, J. A.; Henson, G. D.

    2002-12-01

    We report here on continued efforts to detect and characterize the occurrence of microvariability in Mira-type stars. Broadband photometry in B, V, R, and I filters was performed on four stars suspected of exhibiting microvariability from an analysis of HIPPARCOS data by De Laverny et al. (1998, A & A). Light curves for these four stars (RR Boo, RX Mon, SV And, and X Crb) are provided for all observing nights between September 2001 and June 2002. Observations during summer 2001 of RR Boo detected one extremely large amplitude event near minimum light for the star (Guenther and Henson 2001, B.A.A.S.). However, observations of this star during 2002 detected no significant events with the star at brighter phases. The nature of detected variations for all stars in this sample and their relation to the phase of the stars' pulsation light curve is discussed as well as possible mechanisms for the cause of microvariability in Mira stars. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-0097616 for the Southeastern Association for Astronomical Research (SARA) Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  9. The Application of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves in the Polish Ventricular Assist Device: Physical and Numerical Study and First Clinical Usage.

    PubMed

    Malota, Zbigniew; Sadowski, Wojciech; Krzyskow, Marek; Stolarzewicz, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    The Polish ventricular assist device (Polvad) has been used successfully in clinical contexts for many years. The device contains two single-disc valves, one at the inlet and one at the outlet connector of the pneumatic pump. Unfortunately, in recent years, a problem has occurred with the availability of single-disc valves. This article presents the possibility of using bileaflet mechanical heart valve prostheses in the Polvad to avoid a discontinuity in clinical use. The study is based on experimental and numerical simulations and comparison of the distribution of flow, pressure, and stress (wall, shear, and turbulent) inside the Polvad chamber and the inlet/outlet connectors fitted with Sorin Monodisc and Sorin Bicarbon Fitline valves. The type and orientation of the inlet valve affects valve performance and flow distribution inside the chamber. Near-wall flow is observed for single-disc valves. In the case of bileaflet valves, the main jet is directed more centrally, with lower shear stress but higher turbulent stress in comparison with single-disc valves. For clinical usage, a 45° orientation of the bileaflet inlet valve was chosen, as this achieves good washing of the inlet area near the membrane paste surface. The Polvad with bileaflet valves has now been used successfully in our clinic for over a year and will continue to be used until new assist devices for heart support are developed. PMID:26365391

  10. STS-66 Edwards Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis approaches runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on

  11. SiO MASERS IN ASYMMETRIC MIRAS. II. R CANCRI

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Danchi, W. C.; Traub, W. A.; Lacasse, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    This is the second paper in a series of multi-epoch observations of the SiO masers at 7 mm wavelength in several asymptotic giant branch stars from a sample of Mira variable stars showing evidence of asymmetric structure in the infrared. These stars have been observed interferometrically in the infrared by the Infrared Optical Telescope Array and with Very Long Baseline Array measurements of the SiO masers. In this paper, we present the observations of R Cancri (R Cnc). The systemic velocity of R Cnc is estimated to be 15.8 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1}. A comparison is made with the model calculations of Gray et al. which predict some but not all observed features.

  12. Variations of IR Spectra in carbon Mira, T Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, H.-I.; Lee, S.-G.

    We have studied variations of physical parameters in the circumstellar envelope of carbon-rich Mira variable, T Dra, at different pulsation phases. After comparing the ISO/SWS spectra of T Dra with spectral energy distributions (SEDs) calculated in models, we could find the best fitted parameters for the physical state of the dust envelope at each phase. The variations of parameters, effective temperature, fraction of SiC grains, mass loss rates and inner radius of shell are found to have nearly the same trend as that of light curve. The other parameters, grain size, optical depth, radius of central star and dust temperature at the inner boundary of envelope, are inversely varing to the light curve. We have found that most physical parameters vary within factor 2, while mass loss rate varies more than factor 3 during pulsation period.

  13. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down on the lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert Tuesday, 3 December 1985 at 1:33:49 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, concluding the STS 61-B international mission. The eight-day mission successfully deployed three communications satellites including the Mexican Morelos B, the Australian Aussat 2 and an RCA Satcom K-2 satellite. In addition, two spacewalks were performed to experiment with construction of structures in space. Crew of the 61-B mission included Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr.; Pilot Bryan D. O'Connor; Mission Specialists Mary L. Cleave, Sherwood C. Spring and Jerry L. Ross; and Payload Specialists Rudolfo Neri Vela of Mexico and Charles Walker of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories

  14. STS-68 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour glides to a landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful STS-68 mission dedicated to radar imaging of the earth's surface as part of NASA's Mission To Planet Earth program. The landing was at 10:02 a.m. (PDT) 11 October 1994, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather at Kennedy. The Endeavour crew was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy the morning of October 10, but mission planners decided early in the flight to extend the mission by one day. Mission commander was Michael A. Baker, making his third flight, and the pilot was Terrence W. Wilcutt, on his first mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  15. STS-68 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The shuttle Endeavour comes in for a landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful STS-68 mission dedicated to radar imaging of the earth's surface as part of NASA's Mission To Planet Earth program. The landing was at 10:02 a.m. (PDT) 11 October 1994, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather at Kennedy. The Endeavour crew was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy the morning of 10 October, but mission planners decided early in the flight to extend the mission by one day. Mission commander was Michael A. Baker making his third flight and the pilot was Terrence W. Wilcutt on his first mission. The four mission specialists were Thomas D. Jones, payload commander making his second flight; Steven L. Smith on his first flight; Daniel W. Bursch making his second flight; and Peter J.K. Wisoff making his second flight. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only

  16. STS-66 Edwards Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis approaches runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on

  17. Shuttle Discovery Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission lands at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch of a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five-man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout

  18. STS-68 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour glides to a landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful STS-68 mission dedicated to radar imaging of the earth's surface as part of NASA's Mission To Planet Earth program. The landing was at 10:02 a.m. (PDT) 11 October 1994, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather at Kennedy. The Endeavour crew was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy the morning of October 10, but mission planners decided early in the flight to extend the mission by one day. Mission commander was Michael A. Baker, making his third flight, and the pilot was Terrence W. Wilcutt, on his first mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  19. STS-64 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery settles to the main runway at Edwards, California, at 2:13 p.m. (PDT) 20 September 1994, to conclude mission STS-64. The spacecraft, with a crew of six, was launched into a 57-degree high inclination orbit from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 3:23 p.m. (PDT), 9 September 1994. The mission featured the study of clouds and the atmosphere with a laser beaming system called Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE), and the first untethered space walk in over ten years. A Spartan satellite was also deployed and later retrieved in the study of the sun's corona and the solar wind. The mission was scheduled to end Sunday, 18 September, but was extended one day to continue science work. Bad weather at the Kennedy Space Center on September 19, forced a one-day delay to September 20, with a weather divert that day to Edwards. Mission commander was Richard Richards, the pilot Blaine Hammond, while mission specialists were Jerry Linenger, Susan Helms, Carl Meade, and Mark Lee. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders

  20. Shuttle Discovery Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission lands at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch of a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five-man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout

  1. STS-55 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia completes the STS-55 Spacelab D-2 mission 6 May with a landing at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, at 7:30 a.m. (PDT). The landing was scheduled for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but was diverted to Dryden during the final hours of flight because of unacceptable weather at the Florida facility. The STS-55 mission began with the launch from Kennedy at 7:50 a.m. (PDT), 26 April. Aboard Columbia were commander Steve Nagel; pilot Tom Henricks; mission specialists Jerry Ross, Charles Precourt, and Bernard Harris; and payload specialists Hans Schlegel and Ulrich Walter, both from Germany. During Columbia's flight the NASA space shuttle fleet logged more than one year of combined flight time in space, including the time of all previous orbiters and Columbia on this flight. That mark was reached at 7:01:42 (PDT) on 5 May, and with Columbia's landing the total flight time had reached 365 days, 23 hours, and 28 minutes. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles

  2. Vanadium Oxide in the Spectra of Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Piontek, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Over the last three years, we have made spectroscopic measurements of twenty Mira variable stars, as a function of phase, probing their stellar atmospheres and underlying pulsation mechanisms. Measurement of variations in TiO and VO with phase can be used to help determine whether these molecular species are produced in an extended region above the layers where Balmer line emission occurs or below this shocked region. Piontek & Luttermoser (1999 IAPPPC, submitted), produce synthetic spectra for three Mira variables, R Leo, V CVn, and R CVn as a function of phase. Comparison of their synthetic spectra to our observed spectra yield the fundamental astrophysical parameters of effective temperatures and surface gravities. Spectra are synthesized with LTE stellar stmospheres code ATLAS, using the 6.6--million Indiana University atomic and molecular line dataset. Piontek & Luttermoser point out that the IU dataset does not include vanadium oxide (VO). Thus, there is a noticeable difference between the synthetic spectra and observed near-IR spectra corresponding to the B-X bands of VO (Mahanti 1935, Proc. Phys. Soc., 47, 43; Keenan & Schroeder 1952,L. W., ApJ, 115, 82). In order to incorporate the VO bands in the synthetic spectra, we need to establish tables of wavenumbers, lowest energy levels, and oscillator strengths. Producing the tables is non-trivial. Laboratory measurements of wavenumbers are used in the Just-Overlapping Line Approximation (JOLA; Tsuji 1966, PASJ, 18, 127) to calculate oscillator strengths. The JOLA technique and preliminary results will be presented. MWC greatly appreciates support from the National Science Foundation grant AST-9500756. RAP acknowledges the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy 1998 Summer REU program supported by the National Science Foundation and thanks DGL for being his mentor.

  3. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those in need." ...

  4. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 BRICKWORK DETAILS from the collection of Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, AIA Architects - Barrows-Coatsworth Building, 122 Main Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  5. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 NORTHWEST ELEVATION from the collection of Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, AIA Architects - Barrows-Coatsworth Building, 122 Main Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  6. Flow in a mechanical bileaflet heart valve at laminar and near-peak systole flow rates: CFD simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Leo, Hwa-Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-10-01

    Time-accurate, fully 3D numerical simulations and particle image velocity laboratory experiments are carried out for flow through a fully open bileaflet mechanical heart valve under steady (nonpulsatile) inflow conditions. Flows at two different Reynolds numbers, one in the laminar regime and the other turbulent (near-peak systole flow rate), are investigated. A direct numerical simulation is carried out for the laminar flow case while the turbulent flow is investigated with two different unsteady statistical turbulence modeling approaches, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and detached-eddy simulation (DES) approach. For both the laminar and turbulent cases the computed mean velocity profiles are in good overall agreement with the measurements. For the turbulent simulations, however, the comparisons with the measurements demonstrate clearly the superiority of the DES approach and underscore its potential as a powerful modeling tool of cardiovascular flows at physiological conditions. The study reveals numerous previously unknown features of the flow. PMID:16248308

  7. DISCOVERY OF MIRA VARIABLE STARS IN THE METAL-POOR SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2012-12-10

    We report the discovery of two Mira variable stars (Miras) toward the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). We performed optical long-term monitoring observations for two red stars in the Sextans dSph. The light curves of both stars in the I{sub c} band show large-amplitude (3.7 and 0.9 mag) and long-period (326 {+-} 15 and 122 {+-} 5 days) variations, suggesting that they are Miras. We combine our own infrared data with previously published data to estimate the mean infrared magnitudes. The distances obtained from the period-luminosity relation of the Miras (75.3{sup +12.8}{sub -10.9} and 79.8{sup +11.5}{sub -9.9} kpc, respectively), together with the radial velocities available, support memberships of the Sextans dSph (90.0 {+-} 10.0 kpc). These are the first Miras found in a stellar system with a metallicity as low as [Fe/H] {approx} -1.9 than any other known system with Miras.

  8. Edward Weston and the "Modern" Galvanometer Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  9. Prince Edward Island. Reference Series No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Prince Edward Island and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography, climate, history, early trade, development, agriculture, the potato industry, forests, fisheries, aquaculture, industry, tourism, energy,…

  10. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down on the lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert Tuesday, 3 December 1985 at 1:33:49 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, concluding the STS 61-B international mission. The eight-day mission successfully deployed three communications satellites including the Mexican Morelos B, the Australian Aussat 2 and an RCA Satcom K-2 satellite. In addition, two spacewalks were performed to experiment with construction of structures in space. Crew of the 61-B mission included Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr.; Pilot Bryan D. O'Connor; Mission Specialists Mary L. Cleave, Sherwood C. Spring and Jerry L. Ross; and Payload Specialists Rudolfo Neri Vela of Mexico and Charles Walker of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories

  11. STS-40 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Space Shuttle Columbia nears its touchdown on Runway 22 at Edwards, California, at 8:39 a.m., 14 June 1991, as the STS-40 life sciences mission comes to an end at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center) after nine days of orbital flight. Aboard Columbia during the extended mission were Bryan D. O'Connor, mission commander; Sidney M. Gutierrez, pilot; mission specialists James P. Bagian, Tamara E. Jernigan, and Margaret Rhea Seddon; and payload specialists Francis Andrew Gaffney and Millie Hughes-Fulford. STS-40 was the first space shuttle mission dedicated to life sciences research to explore how the body reacts to a weightless environment and how it readjusts to gravity on return to earth. Columbia was launched on the STS-40 mission 5 June 1991, from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused

  12. STS-68 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A drag chute slows the shuttle Endeavour after landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful STS-68 mission dedicated to radar imaging of the earth's surface as part of NASA's Mission To Planet Earth program. The landing was at 10:02 a.m. (PDT) 11 October 1994, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather at Kennedy. The Endeavour crew was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy the morning of 10 October, but mission planners decided early in the flight to extend the mission by one day. Mission commander was Michael A. Baker and the pilot was Terrence W. Wilcutt. The four mission specialists were Thomas D. Jones, payload; Steven L. Smith; Daniel W. Bursch; and Peter J.K. Wisoff. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific

  13. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    , provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site

  14. STS-55 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia completes the STS-55 Spacelab D-2 mission 6 May with a landing at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, at 7:30 a.m. (PDT). The landing was scheduled for the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but was diverted to Dryden during the final hours of flight because of unacceptable weather at the Florida facility. The STS-55 mission began with the launch from Kennedy at 7:50 a.m. (PDT), 26 April. Aboard Columbia were commander Steve Nagel; pilot Tom Henricks; mission specialists Jerry Ross, Charles Precourt, and Bernard Harris; and payload specialists Hans Schlegel and Ulrich Walter, both from Germany. During Columbia's flight the NASA space shuttle fleet logged more than one year of combined flight time in space, including the time of all previous orbiters and Columbia on this flight. That mark was reached at 7:01:42 (PDT) on 5 May, and with Columbia's landing the total flight time had reached 365 days, 23 hours, and 28 minutes. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles

  15. STS-68 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The shuttle Endeavour comes in for a landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful STS-68 mission dedicated to radar imaging of the earth's surface as part of NASA's Mission To Planet Earth program. The landing was at 10:02 a.m. (PDT) 11 October 1994, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather at Kennedy. The Endeavour crew was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy the morning of 10 October, but mission planners decided early in the flight to extend the mission by one day. Mission commander was Michael A. Baker making his third flight and the pilot was Terrence W. Wilcutt on his first mission. The four mission specialists were Thomas D. Jones, payload commander making his second flight; Steven L. Smith on his first flight; Daniel W. Bursch making his second flight; and Peter J.K. Wisoff making his second flight. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only

  16. SIO MASERS IN ASYMMETRIC MIRAS. I. R LEONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Pluzhnik, E.; Danchi, W. C.; Traub, W. A.; Lacasse, M. G.

    2009-10-10

    This is the first paper in a series of multi-epoch observations of the SiO masers at 7 mm wavelength in several asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. This is a sample of Mira variable stars showing evidence of asymmetric structure in the infrared which were observed interferometrically in the infrared by Infrared Optical Telescope Array and with Very Long Baseline Array measurements of the SiO masers. In this paper, we present the observations of R Leonis (R Leo). During the period of observations, this star shows extended emission with large-scale coherent patterns in the radial velocity, possibly the result of ejecting a substantial amount of material, largely to the west. This is interpreted as an event in which material is expelled in a collimated flow, possibly following an energetic event. If common, these events may help explain the asymmetric nature of the planetary nebulae that develop from AGB stars. The systemic velocity of R Leo is estimated to be +1.0 +-0.3 km s{sup -1}. All observed radial velocities are well below the escape velocity.

  17. Laboratory evaluation of the COBAS MIRA S random access analyser.

    PubMed

    Kanluan, T; Intaramanee, S; Tangvarasittichai, S; Tangvarasittichai, O; Suwanton, L; Manochiopinij, S; Tantrarongroj, S; Leangphibul, P

    1991-01-01

    The random access analyser COBAS MIRA S (Roche Diagnostics) was evaluated for two months. The instrument is a computer-controlled discrete analyser which can be run in a combination profile and single test mode. This instrument has special features, including an automatic cuvette segment changer, a reagent rack cooling system, an external keyboard and monitor, as well as a bar-code facility for the entry of test parameters, worklists and sample identification numbers. Study of within-run and between-run precision gave values of % CV 0.54-3.37 and 0.61-3.65, respectively, for a variety of assays. Linearity testing to the upper limit of each test was also studied and were found to cover the necessary pathological range. Within the two-month period, no major problems were encountered. The instrument required minimum operator attention during operation. Correlation studies with the Hitachi 705 using six clinical chemistry tests (glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, ALP, AST, ALT) gave correlation coefficients ranging from 0.95-0.99 and slopes of 0.91-1.17. PMID:18924890

  18. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  19. 1995 Edward teller lecture. Patience and optimism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.

    1996-05-01

    Remarks made in the author's acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. ``Patience'' and ``optimism'' are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the ``zig-zag'' path to fusion energy production.

  20. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF☆

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-01-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed, preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’s impact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’ priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility. The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction. The early life and career of Robert Edwards are described and re-evaluated in the light of documentary evidence. His early interest in the genetics of development provided the major motivation behind his goal of achieving IVF in humans. Through this work, he aimed to understand and hopefully to reduce the transmission of genetic disease in humans. His meeting with Patrick Steptoe, the details of which are re-examined, increased the significance for Edwards of infertility as an outcome of IVF. It also led to a creative long-term research partnership, initiated a long-term programme of public education in the UK about reproductive science and stimulated the development of

  1. A turbulent wake as a tracer of 30,000 years of Mira's mass loss history.

    PubMed

    Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Neill, James D; Schiminovich, David; Forster, Karl; Rich, R Michael; Welsh, Barry Y; Madore, Barry F; Wheatley, Jonathan M; Morrissey, Patrick; Barlow, Tom A

    2007-08-16

    Mira is one of the first variable stars ever discovered and it is the prototype (and also the nearest example) of a class of low-to-intermediate-mass stars in the late stages of stellar evolution. These stars are relatively common and they return a large fraction of their original mass to the interstellar medium (ISM) (ref. 2) through a processed, dusty, molecular wind. Thus stars in Mira's stage of evolution have a direct impact on subsequent star and planet formation in their host galaxy. Previously, the only direct observation of the interaction between Mira-type stellar winds and the ISM was in the infrared. Here we report the discovery of an ultraviolet-emitting bow shock and turbulent wake extending over 2 degrees on the sky, arising from Mira's large space velocity and the interaction between its wind and the ISM. The wake is visible only in the far ultraviolet and is consistent with an unusual emission mechanism whereby molecular hydrogen is excited by turbulent mixing of cool molecular gas and shock-heated gas. This wind wake is a tracer of the past 30,000 years of Mira's mass-loss history and provides an excellent laboratory for studying turbulent stellar wind-ISM interactions. PMID:17700694

  2. Dust around Mira variables: An analysis of IRAS LRS spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial extent and spectral appearance of the thin dust shell around Mira variables is determined largely by the dust absorptivity, Q(sub abs)(lambda), and the dust condensation temperature T(sub cond). Both Q(sub abs)(lambda) and T(sub cond) are extracted from IRAS low-resolution spectra (LRS) spectra. In order to do this, the assumption that the ratio of total power in the 10 micron feature to that in the 20 micron feature should be equal to that measured in other amorphous silicates (e.g., synthesized amorphous Mg2SiO4). It was found that T(sub cond) decreases with decreasing strength of the 10 micron feature, from T(sub cond) = 1000 K to 500 K (estimated error 20 percent). A value for the near-infrared dust absorptivity could not be determined. Although this parameter strongly affects the condensation radius, it hardly affects the shape of the LRS spectrum (as long as the optically thin approximation is valid), because it scales the spatial distribution of the dust. Information on the magnitude of the near-infrared dust absorptivity may be deduced from the unique carbon star BM Gem. This star has a LRS spectrum with silicate features indication an inner dust shell temperature of at least 1000 K. However, on the basis of observations in the 1920s-30s one may infer an inner dust shell radius of at least 6x10(exp 12)m. To have this high temperature at such a large distance, the near-infrared absorptivity of the dust must be high.

  3. Are the Current Doppler Echocardiography Criteria Able to Discriminate Mitral Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Malfunction? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Evin, Morgane; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Rieu, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Malfunction of bileaflet mechanical heart valves in the mitral position could either be due to patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) or leaflet obstruction. The aim of this article is to investigate the validity of current echocardiographic criteria used for diagnosis of mitral prosthesis malfunction, namely maximum velocity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index. In vitro testing was performed on a double activation left heart duplicator. Both PPM and leaflet obstruction were investigated on a St. Jude Medical Master. PPM was studied by varying the St. Jude prosthesis size (21, 25, and 29 mm) and stroke volume (70 and 90 mL). Prosthesis leaflet obstruction was studied by partially or totally blocking the movement of one valve leaflet. Mitral flow conditions were altered in terms of E/A ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) to simulate physiologic panel of diastolic function. Maximum velocity, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index are shown to be insufficient to distinguish normal from malfunctioning St. Jude prostheses. Doppler velocity index and effective orifice area were 1.3 ± 0.49 and 1.83 ± 0.43 cm(2) for testing conditions with no malfunction below the 2.2 and 2 cm(2) thresholds (1.19 cm(2) for severe PPM and 1.23 cm(2) for fully blocked leaflet). The mean pressure gradient reached 5 mm Hg thresholds for several conditions of severe PPM only (6.9 mm Hg and mean maximum velocity value: 183.4 cm/s) whereas such value was never attained in the case of leaflet obstruction. In the case of leaflet obstruction, the maximum velocity averaged over the nine pulsed-wave Doppler locations increased by 38% for partial leaflet obstruction and 75% for a fully blocked leaflet when compared with normal conditions. Current echocardiographic criteria might be suboptimal for the detection of bileaflet mechanical heart valve malfunction. Further developments and investigations are required in order

  4. R Aquarii - The large-scale optical nebula and the Mira variable position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Oliversen, R. J.; Hollis, J. M.; Kafatos, M.; Crull, H. E.

    1988-01-01

    The R Aquarii symbiotic star system is surrounded by a large-scale optical nebula. Observations of the nebular forbidden O III structure are presented and its morphological significance are discussed in context with previously observed small-scale radio-continuum features, which may be related. It is suggested that a precessing accretion disk may explain the global features of both the large-scale optical emission and the small-scale radio emission. Moreover, an accurate position has been determined of the system's Mira, which suggests that a recent theoretical model, yielding an egg-shaped central H II region for symbiotic systems with certain physical parameters, may apply to R Aquarii. The optical position of the 387 d period Mira variable is consistent with previous findings in the radio, that SiO maser emission is far removed from the Mira photosphere.

  5. DATA COLLECTION MANAGER MODULE OF REGION III'S MULTI-CRITERIA INTEGRATED RESOURCE ASSESSMENT (MIRA) ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proposal pertains to the on-going development of the Data Collection Manager (DCM) module, which is one of three modules that compose MIRA, Multi-criteria Integrated Resource Assessment. MIRA is Region III's newly conceived and continually developing decision support approac...

  6. 26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED TEST TRACK." Drawing No. 10-259. One inch to 400 feet plan of original 10,000-foot sled track. No date. No D.O. series number. No headings as above. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration–rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5–2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2–2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected

  8. Ethical reflections on Edward Jenner's experimental treatment.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hugh

    2007-03-01

    In 1798 Dr Edward Jenner published his famous account of "vaccination". Some claim that a Research Ethics Committee, had it existed in the 1790s, might have rejected his work. I provide the historical context of his work and argue that it addressed a major risk to the health of the community, and, given the devastating nature of smallpox and the significant risk of variolation, the only alternative preventative measure, Jenner's study had purpose, justification and a base in the practice of the day. PMID:17329392

  9. 1995 Edward teller lecture. Patience and optimism

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1996-05-01

    Remarks made in the author{close_quote}s acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. {open_quote}{open_quote}Patience{close_quote}{close_quote} and {open_quote}{open_quote}optimism{close_quote}{close_quote} are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the {open_quote}{open_quote}zig-zag{close_quote}{close_quote} path to fusion energy production. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. STS-66 Atlantis Landing Approach at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis approaches runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) November 14, 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather.

  11. Experimental investigation of the flow field past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in pulsatile flow within an anatomical aorta model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2011-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) has been mounted at the inlet of an anatomical model of the human aorta, and placed within a mock circulation loop that simulates physiological flow conditions. The working fluid matches the refractive index of silicone, from which the aorta model and other parts of the test section are made, and the viscosity of blood. Flow characteristics past the BMHV are measured using stereoscopic and planar particle image velocimetry and laser Doppler velocimetry. In contrast to previous experiments, in which heart valves have been tested in simplified aortic geometries, this arrangement permits the study of the dependence of flow past the valve upon recirculation in the sinuses of Valsalva, the flow rate through the coronary arteries, and the aorta curvature. The effect of valve orientation will also be investigated with the objective to determine a hemodynamically optimal configuration with potential benefits to implantation procedures. The measured viscous shear stress distribution will be analyzed towards predicting the initiation of thrombosis in patients and identifying regions of stagnation, which could facilitate thrombus attachment.

  12. Simulation of the three-dimensional hinge flow fields of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under aortic conditions.

    PubMed

    Simon, Hélène A; Ge, Liang; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-03-01

    Thromboembolic complications of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV) are believed to be due to detrimental stresses imposed on blood elements by the hinge flows. Characterization of these flows is thus crucial to identify the underlying causes for complications. In this study, we conduct three-dimensional pulsatile flow simulations through the hinge of a BMHV under aortic conditions. Hinge and leaflet geometries are reconstructed from the Micro-Computed Tomography scans of a BMHV. Simulations are conducted using a Cartesian sharp-interface immersed-boundary methodology combined with a second-order accurate fractional-step method. Physiologic flow boundary conditions and leaflet motion are extracted from the Fluid-Structure Interaction simulations of the bulk of the flow through a BMHV. Calculations reveal the presence, throughout the cardiac cycle, of flow patterns known to be detrimental to blood elements. Flow fields are characterized by: (1) complex systolic flows, with rotating structures and slow reverse flow pattern, and (2) two strong diastolic leakage jets accompanied by fast reverse flow at the hinge bottom. Elevated shear stresses, up to 1920 dyn/cm2 during systole and 6115 dyn/cm2 during diastole, are reported. This study underscores the need to conduct three-dimensional simulations throughout the cardiac cycle to fully characterize the complexity and thromboembolic potential of the hinge flows. PMID:19960368

  13. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices. PMID:25070372

  14. The effect of implantation orientation of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve on kinematics and hemodynamics in an anatomic aorta.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-11-01

    We carry out three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions implanted at different orientations in an anatomic aorta obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a volunteer. We use the extensively validated for heart valve flow curvilinear-immersed boundary (CURVIB) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver in which the empty aorta is discretized with a curvilinear, aorta-conforming grid while the valve is handled as an immersed boundary. The motion of the valve leaflets are calculated through a strongly coupled FSI algorithm implemented in conjunction with the Aitken convergence acceleration technique. We perform simulations for three valve orientations, which differ from each other by 45 deg and compare the results in terms of leaflet motion and flow field. We show that the valve implanted symmetrically relative to the symmetry plane of the ascending aorta curvature exhibits the smallest overall asymmetry in the motion of its two leaflets and lowest rebound during closure. Consequently, we hypothesize that this orientation is beneficial to reduce the chance of intermittent regurgitation. Furthermore, we find that the valve orientation does not significantly affect the shear stress distribution in the aortic lumen, which is in agreement with previous studies. PMID:21034146

  15. CFD simulation of a novel bileaflet mechanical heart valve prosthesis: an estimation of the Venturi passage formed by the leaflets.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Y; Medart, D; Hormes, M; Schmitz, C; Hamilton, K; Kwant, P B; Takatani, S; Schmitz-Rode, T; Steinseifer, U

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the flow characteristics of the novel Helmholtz-Institute Aachen Bileaflet (HIA-BL) heart valve prosthesis. The curved leaflets of the HIA-BL valve form a Venturi passage between the leaflets at peak systole. By narrowing the cross section the flow accelerates and the static pressure at the central passage decreases according to the Venturi effect. The low-pressure zone between the leaflets is expected to stabilize the leaflets in fully open position at peak systole. To investigate the Venturi passage, the flow fields of two valve geometries were investigated by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics): one geometry exhibits curved leaflets resulting in a Venturi passage; the other geometry features straight leaflets. The flow profiles, pressure distribution and resulting torque of both passages were compared and investigated. Although flow profiles downstream of both valves were similar, the flow passages between the leaflets were different for the investigated leaflet geometries. The straight leaflet passage showed a large boundary layer separation zone near the leaflets and the lowest pressure at the leading edge of the leaflet. The Venturi passage showed a reduction of the boundary layer separation zones and the lowest pressure between the leaflets could be found in the narrowest flow cross section of the Venturi passage. Additionally, the resulting torque showed that the Venturi passage produced an opening momentum. The results demonstrate that the Venturi passage stabilizes the leaflets in open position at peak systole. PMID:17219353

  16. Device Thrombogenicty Emulator (DTE) – Design optimization Methodology for Cardiovascular Devices: A Study in Two Bileaflet MHV Designs

    PubMed Central

    Xenos, Michalis; Girdhar, Gaurav; Alemu, Yared; Jesty, Jolyon; Slepian, Marvin; Einav, Shmuel; Bluestein, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Patients who receive prosthetic heart valve (PHV) implants require mandatory anticoagulation medication after implantation due to the thrombogenic potential of the valve. Optimization of PHV designs may facilitate reduction of flow-induced thrombogenicity and reduce or eliminate the need for post-implant anticoagulants. We present a methodology entitled Device Thrombogenicty Emulator (DTE) for optimizing the thrombo-resistance performance of PHV by combining numerical and experimental approaches. Two bileaflet mechanical heart valves (MHV) designs – St. Jude Medical (SJM) and ATS were investigated, by studying the effect of distinct flow phases on platelet activation. Transient turbulent and direct numerical simulations (DNS) were conducted, and stress loading histories experienced by the platelets were calculated along flow trajectories. The numerical simulations indicated distinct design dependent differences between the two valves. The stress-loading waveforms extracted from the numerical simulations were programmed into a hemodynamic shearing device (HSD), emulating the flow conditions past the valves in distinct ‘hot spot’ flow regions that are implicated in MHV thrombogenicity. The resultant platelet activity was measured with a modified prothrombinase assay, and was found to be significantly higher in the SJM valve, mostly during the regurgitation phase. The experimental results were in excellent agreement with the calculated platelet activation potential. This establishes the utility of the DTE methodology for serving as a test bed for evaluating design modifications for achieving better thrombogenic performance for such devices. PMID:20483411

  17. The Effect of Implantation Orientation of a Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve on Kinematics and Hemodynamics in an Anatomic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2011-01-01

    We carry out three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions implanted at different orientations in an anatomic aorta obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a volunteer. We use the extensively validated for heart valve flow curvilinear-immersed boundary (CURVIB) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver in which the empty aorta is discretized with a curvilinear, aorta-conforming grid while the valve is handled as an immersed boundary. The motion of the valve leaflets are calculated through a strongly coupled FSI algorithm implemented in conjunction with the Aitken convergence acceleration technique. We perform simulations for three valve orientations, which differ from each other by 45 deg and compare the results in terms of leaflet motion and flow field. We show that the valve implanted symmetrically relative to the symmetry plane of the ascending aorta curvature exhibits the smallest overall asymmetry in the motion of its two leaflets and lowest rebound during closure. Consequently, we hypothesize that this orientation is beneficial to reduce the chance of intermittent regurgitation. Furthermore, we find that the valve orientation does not significantly affect the shear stress distribution in the aortic lumen, which is in agreement with previous studies. PMID:21034146

  18. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-08-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed,preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’simpact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility.The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction. PMID:21680248

  19. An Analysis of Retention and Attrition at MiraCosta College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ronald

    A study was conducted at MiraCosta College (MCC), in Del Mar, California, to investigate various aspects of retention and attrition and to make recommendations for possible program enhancements. The study sought to determine when students drop out of classes, which students drop out of school completely, and the drop out rate for various…

  20. The age and structure of the Galactic bulge from Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchpole, Robin M.; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Feast, Michael W.; Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Irwin, Mike; Alard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We report periods and JHKL observations for 643 oxygen-rich Mira variables found in two outer bulge fields at b = -7° and l = ±8° and combine these with data on 8057 inner bulge Miras from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, MACHO and Two Micron All Sky Survey surveys, which are concentrated closer to the Galactic Centre. Distance moduli are estimated for all these stars. Evidence is given showing that the bulge structure is a function of age. The longer period Miras (log P > 2.6, age ˜5 Gyr and younger) show clear evidence of a bar structure inclined to the line of sight in both the inner and outer regions. The distribution of the shorter period (metal-rich globular cluster age) Miras appears spheroidal in the outer bulge. In the inner region these old stars are also distributed differently from the younger ones and possibly suggest a more complex structure. These data suggest a distance to the Galactic Centre, R0, of 8.9 kpc with an estimated uncertainty of ˜0.4 kpc. The possible effect of helium enrichment on our conclusions is discussed.

  1. Search for surface magnetic fields in Mira stars: first results on χ Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lèbre, Agnès; Aurière, Michel; Fabas, Nicolas; Gillet, Denis; Herpin, Fabrice; Petit, Pascal; Konstantinova-Antova, Renada

    2014-08-01

    So far, surface magnetic fields have never been reported on Mira stars, while observational facilities allowing detection and measurement of weak surface fields through the Zeeman effect have become available. Then, in order to complete the knowledge of the magnetic field and of its influence during the transition from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) to Planetary Nebulae (PN) stages, we have undertaken a search for magnetic fields at the surface of Miras. We present the first spectropolarimetric observations (performed with the Narval instrument at Télescope Bernard Lyot-TBL, Pic du Midi, France) of the S-type Mira star χ Cyg. We have detected a polarimetric signal in the Stokes V spectra and we have established its Zeeman origin. We claim that it is likely to be related to a weak magnetic field present at the photospheric level and in the lower part of the stellar atmosphere. The origin of this magnetic field is discussed in the framework of shock waves periodically propagating throughout the atmosphere of a Mira.

  2. The Chromosphere/Shock Dilemma of Non-Mira, Late-Type Variable Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Lee Anne

    1997-01-01

    An investigation of the atmospheric structure of non-Mira, asymptotic giant branch stars through NLTE radiative transfer modeling applied to hydrodynamic models is discussed. Synthetic spectra resulting from these calculations were compared with IUE observations of these stars to test the validity of the models. The development of the hydrodynamic models is detailed.

  3. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is <90 beats/min; however, these values significantly increase in the St. Jude Medical valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as

  4. Modelling of dust around the symbiotic Mira RR Telescopii during obscuration epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, T.; Kotnik-Karuza, D.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Symbiotic Miras represent a class of peculiar binaries whose nature is still not well understood. Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding the evolution of symbiotic binaries and the interaction between their components. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the symbiotic nova RR Tel based on the near-IR terrestrial photometry and infrared ISO spectra. Aims: Our goal is to find a comprehensive and consistent model of the circumstellar inner dust regions around the Mira component that can explain the observed photometric and spectroscopic features in the near- and mid-infrared. Methods: Available JHKL photometric observations from South African Astronomical Observatory were collected and corrected for Mira pulsations as well as for interstellar reddening to follow temporal changes of the near-infrared colours. Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 1 to 13 μm during obscuration epoch were reconstructed with the simultaneously available ISO/SWS spectra and JHKL magnitudes. The dust properties were determined by modelling both the reconstructed SEDs and the near-IR colours using the DUSTY numerical code. This 1D code solves radiative transfer through the circumstellar dust by calculating the dust temperature profile assuming spherical symmetry. Results: The Mira pulsation period of 387 days was found and confirmed with two independent fitting methods. A long-term variation of ~7000 days, which cannot be attributed to orbital motion, was obtained from the analysis of the near-IR magnitudes. Reconstructed infrared SEDs were modelled successfully by a single dust shell with dust distribution enhanced by radiatively driven stellar winds. Mira temperature, dust sublimation temperature, grain diameter, density distribution, and optical depth have been obtained. Our model shows a maximum dust grain diameter of 4 μm, which is larger than expected

  5. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography,…

  6. Efficacy of Edwards' Cognitive Shift Approach to Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine A.; Hartl, Alan J.

    1987-01-01

    Noting the lack of experimental evidence substantiating the efficacy of educational strategies designed to exploit the right hemisphere of the brain, a study was designed to assess the cognitive shift model of the Edwards' training procedure. Results showed no difference between the Edwards' procedure and a placebo procedure. Implications for the…

  7. 76 FR 76710 - Baine, Edward H.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Baine, Edward H.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 1, 2011, Edward H. Baine submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking...

  8. Modelling the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G.; Paladini, C.; Hron, J.; Aringer, B.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Nowotny, W.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir using the mid-infrared high spatial resolution interferometric observations from VLTI/MIDI. Aims: The aim of this work is to analyse the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir with hydrostatic and dynamic models, in this way deepening the knowledge of the dynamic processes at work in carbon-rich Miras. Methods: We compare spectro-photometric and interferometric measurements of this carbon-rich Mira AGB star with the predictions of different kinds of modelling approaches (hydrostatic model atmospheres plus MOD-More Of Dusty, self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres). A geometric model fitting tool is used for a first interpretation of the interferometric data. Results: The results show that a joint use of different kinds of observations (photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry) is essential for shedding light on the structure of the atmosphere of a carbon-rich Mira. The dynamic model atmospheres fit the ISO spectrum well in the wavelength range λ = [2.9,25.0] μm. Nevertheless, a discrepancy is noticeable both in the SED (visible) and in the interferometric visibilities (shape and level), which is a possible explanation are intra-/inter-cycle variations in the dynamic model atmospheres, as well as in the observations. The presence of a companion star and/or a disk or a decrease in mass loss within the past few hundred years cannot be excluded, but these explanations are considered unlikely. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs: 085.D-0756 and 093. D-0708.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Multiepoch Interferometric Study of Mira Variables. I. Narrowband Diameters of RZ Pegasi and S Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. R.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; van Belle, G. T.

    2002-09-01

    As part of the long-term monitoring of Mira variables at the Palomar Testbed Interferometer, we report high-resolution narrowband angular sizes of the oxygen-rich Mira S Lac and the carbon-rich Mira RZ Peg in the near-infrared. The data set spans three pulsation cycles for S Lac and two pulsation cycles for RZ Peg (a total of 1070 25 s observations) and represents the first study to correlate multiepoch narrowband interferometric data of Mira variables. When the calibrated visibility data are fitted using a uniform disk brightness model, differences are seen in their angular diameters as a function of wavelength within the K band (2.0-2.4 μm), the source of which is believed to be molecular absorptions in or above the photospheres of the two chemically different Miras. Using visible photometric data provided by the Association Francaise des Observateurs d'Etoiles Variables (AFOEV), the continuum minimum size of RZ Peg lags this by 0.28+/-0.02 in pulsation, similar to the phase lag found in Correlation Radial Velocities (CORAVEL) data. However, for S Lac, the continuum minimum size tracks the visual maximum brightness. Based on the mean of the continuum angular diameter cycloids, basic stellar parameters are computed for both RZ Peg and S Lac, with both showing maximum atmospheric extension with respect to the 2.0 and 2.4 μm diameters near phase 0.9. Using the mean value of the fitted cycloids, RZ Peg has a radius Rmean=377+/-111 Rsolar and a mean Teff=2706+/-36 K; S Lac has a radius Rmean=292+/-73 Rsolar and a mean Teff=2605+/-47 K. The dominant source of error in the radii is the large uncertainty in the distances to these two stars.

  10. STS-4 landing at Edwards Air Foce Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    STS-4 landing at Edwards Air Foce Base, California. Actor Roy Rogers with Astronauts Jerry L. Ross, left, and Guy S. Gardner at Edwards for the STS-4 landing on July 1, 1982. Also present (behind Gardner at extreme right) was former Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. (33226); President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan meet Astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly, II., right, and Henry W. Hartsfield, Jr., after the landing of the Columbia at Edwards (33227,33230); Space Shuttle Columbia, followed by two T-38 chase planes, touches down on Edwards Air Force Base's Runway 22 to complete mission. In this view, one chase plane appears to be directly above and behind the Columbia, whose nose wheels have not yet touched ground. The other plane appears to be further up front (33228); The rear wheels of the Columbia touch down on the Edwards AFB runway. There are no chase planes in sight in this photo (33229).

  11. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Edward T. Lu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Lu became interested in the space program, the events that led to his interest, the transition from an engineer to research scientist, and finally to getting selected into the astronaut program. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the STS-106 mission, its scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS), making the Zvezda Service Module ready for entrance, and crew training both in the United States and Russia. Lu mentions his responsibilities during the much-anticipated docking as well as his scheduled space-walk with Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko. Lu also discusses the use of the Robotic Arm during his space-walk, installation of a magnetometer on the Zvezda Module, and work that will have to take place inside the Service Module.

  12. Edward jenner and the small pox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kendall A

    2011-01-01

    Edward Jenner, who discovered that it is possible to vaccinate against Small Pox using material from Cow Pox, is rightly the man who started the science of immunology. However, over the passage of time many of the details surrounding his astounding discovery have been lost or forgotten. Also, the environment within which Jenner worked as a physician in the countryside, and the state of the art of medicine and society are difficult to appreciate today. It is important to recall that people were still being bled at the time, to relieve the presence of evil humors. Accordingly, this review details Jenner's discovery and attempts to place it in historical context. Also, the vaccine that Jenner used, which decreased the prevalence of Small Pox worldwide in his own time, and later was used to eradicate Small Pox altogether, is discussed in light of recent data. PMID:22566811

  13. MD-11 PCA - First Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This McDonnell Douglas MD-11 transport aircraft approaches its first landing under engine power only on Aug. 29, 1995, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The milestone flight, flown by NASA research pilot and former astronaut Gordon Fullerton, was part of a NASA project to develop a computer-assisted engine control system that enables a pilot to land a plane safely when its normal control surfaces are disabled. The Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system uses standard autopilot controls already present in the cockpit, together with the new programming in the aircraft's flight control computers. The PCA concept is simple--for pitch control, the program increases thrust to climb and reduces thrust to descend. To turn right, the autopilot increases the left engine thrust while decreasing the right engine thrust. The initial Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft studies by NASA were carried out at Dryden with a modified twin-engine F-15 research aircraft.

  14. MD-11 PCA - First Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This McDonnell Douglas MD-11 approaches the first landing ever of a transport aircraft under engine power only on Aug. 29, 1995, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The milestone flight, flown by NASA research pilot and former astronaut Gordon Fullerton, was part of a NASA project to develop a computer-assisted engine control system that enables a pilot to land a plane safely when it normal control surfaces are disabled. The Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system uses standard autopilot controls already present in the cockpit, together with the new programming in the aircraft's flight control computers. The PCA concept is simple--for pitch control, the program increases thrust to climb and reduces thrust to descend. To turn right, the autopilot increases the left engine thrust while decreasing the right engine thrust. The initial Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft studies by NASA were carried out at Dryden with a modified twin-engine F-15 research aircraft.

  15. Comparison of hinge microflow fields of bileaflet mechanical heart valves implanted in different sinus shape and downstream geometry.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yee Han; Kabinejadian, Foad; Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Su, Boyang; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) hinge microflow fields is a crucial step in heart valve engineering. Earlier in vitro studies of BMHV hinge flow at the aorta position in idealized straight pipes have shown that the aortic sinus shapes and sizes may have a direct impact on hinge microflow fields. In this paper, we used a numerical study to look at how different aortic sinus shapes, the downstream aortic arch geometry, and the location of the hinge recess can influence the flow fields in the hinge regions. Two geometric models for sinus were investigated: a simplified axisymmetric sinus and an idealized three-sinus aortic root model, with two different downstream geometries: a straight pipe and a simplified curved aortic arch. The flow fields of a 29-mm St Jude Medical BMHV with its four hinges were investigated. The simulations were performed throughout the entire cardiac cycle. At peak systole, recirculating flows were observed in curved downsteam aortic arch unlike in straight downstream pipe. Highly complex three-dimensional leakage flow through the hinge gap was observed in the simulation results during early diastole with the highest velocity at 4.7 m/s, whose intensity decreased toward late diastole. Also, elevated wall shear stresses were observed in the ventricular regions of the hinge recess with the highest recorded at 1.65 kPa. Different flow patterns were observed between the hinge regions in straight pipe and curved aortic arch models. We compared the four hinge regions at peak systole in an aortic arch downstream model and found that each individual hinge did not vary much in terms of the leakage flow rate through the valves. PMID:25343223

  16. Computational simulations of flow dynamics and blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve scaled to pediatric size and flow.

    PubMed

    Yun, B Min; McElhinney, Doff B; Arjunon, Shiva; Mirabella, Lucia; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-22

    Despite pressing needs, there are currently no FDA approved prosthetic valves available for use in the pediatric population. This study is performed for predictive assessment of blood damage in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) with pediatric sizing and flow conditions. A model of an adult-sized 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent(™) valve is selected for use in simulations, which is scaled in size for a 5-year old child and 6-month old infant. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow with thousands of suspended platelets for cases of adult, child, and infant BMHV flows. Adult BMHV flows demonstrate more disorganized small-scale flow features, but pediatric flows are associated with higher fluid shear stresses. Platelet damage in the pediatric cases is higher than in adult flow, highlighting thrombus complication dangers of pediatric BMHV flows. This does not necessarily suggest clinically important differences in thromboembolic potential. Highly damaged platelets in pediatric flows are primarily found far downstream of the valve, as there is less flow recirculation in pediatric flows. In addition, damage levels are well below expected thresholds for platelet activation. The extent of differences here documented between the pediatric and adult cases is of concern, demanding particular attention when pediatric valves are designed and manufactured. However, the differences between the pediatric and adult cases are not such that development of pediatric sized valves is untenable. This study may push for eventual approval of prosthetic valves resized for the pediatric population. Further studies will be necessary to determine the validity and potential thrombotic and clinical implications of these findings. PMID:25011622

  17. Resolving the extended atmosphere and the inner wind of Mira (o Ceti) with long ALMA baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. T.; Kamiński, T.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High angular resolution (sub)millimetre observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, now possible with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), allow direct imaging of these objects' photospheres. The physical properties of the molecular material around these regions, which until now has only been studied by imaging of maser emission and spatially unresolved absorption spectroscopy, can be probed with radiative transfer modelling and compared to hydrodynamical model predictions. The prototypical Mira variable, o Cet (Mira), was observed as a Science Verification target in the 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign, offering the first opportunity to study these physical conditions in detail. Aims: With the longest baseline of 15 km, ALMA produces clearly resolved images of the continuum and molecular line emission/absorption at an angular resolution of ~30 mas at 220 GHz. Models are constructed for Mira's extended atmosphere to investigate the physics and molecular abundances therein. Methods: We imaged the data of 28SiO ν= 0, 2J = 5-4 and H2O v2 = 1JKa,Kc = 55,0-64,3 transitions and extracted spectra from various lines of sight towards Mira's extended atmosphere. In the course of imaging the emission/absorption, we encountered ambiguities in the resulting images and spectra that appear to be related to the performance of the CLEAN algorithm when applied to a combination of extended emission, and compact emission and absorption. We addressed these issues by a series of tests and simulations. We derived the gas density, kinetic temperature, molecular abundance, and outflow/infall velocities in Mira's extended atmosphere by modelling the SiO and H2O lines. Results: We resolve Mira's millimetre continuum emission and our data are consistent with a radio photosphere with a brightness temperature of 2611 ± 51 K. In agreement with recent results obtained with the Very Large Array, we do not confirm the existence of a compact region (<5 mas) of

  18. 14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long Island Windmills,' American Machinist, 17 October 1918, p. 728 STONE CRANE AT THE SHELTER ISLAND WINDMILL - Shelter Island Windmill, Manwaring Road, Shelter Island, Suffolk County, NY

  19. 4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey Edward M. Rosenfeld, Photographer. April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey Edward M. Rosenfeld, Photographer. April 20, 1934 GALLERY AND ENTRANCE FROM SOUTH PORCH - Holy Trinity Church, Seventh & Church Street, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  1. 5Q4: Chris Edwards - Child Presence Sensor

    NASA Video Gallery

    Five Questions For (5Q4) Chris Edwards, NASA engineer who was the team lead of a group that invented a child presence sensor designed to alert parents if they've inadvertently left their child in h...

  2. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Edward Mills Purcell, August 30, 1912-March 7, 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigden, John S.

    2011-03-01

    I discuss the life, education, personality, and contributions of Edward Mills Purcell (1912-1997) to physics, radio astronomy, astrophysics, biological physics, physics teaching and education, and to the nation.

  11. SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Fuel & Water Tank, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by Mrs. Arthur Williams, owner of the house in 1960. JOSHUA DYER HOUSE FROM THE REAR - Joshua Dyer House, North Pamet Road, Truro, Barnstable County, MA

  13. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 3. SOUTH SIDE. Edwards Air Force Base, South Base ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. MIRA: review of inputs from updated results of the phobos mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, V. I.; Korablev, O. I.; Rodin, A. V.; Titov, D. V.

    1999-01-01

    The future Mars International Reference Atmosphere (MIRA) is intended to replace the present COSPAR Mars Reference Model compiled in 1979 on the basis of Mariner 9 and Viking 1,2 missions results. At the moment, several sources of the post-Viking data potentially useful for MIRA are available. Among them is a data set obtained during Phobos mission in 1989. The interpretation of these data has undergone thorough refinement, so final recommendations for MIRA can be made. The principal points are: 1) vertical profile of water vapor with a ``knee'' at the height about 25 km retrieved in the spring equinox season near equator; 2) variations of water vapor column density including peculiarities on the slopes of high mountains; 3) vertical profiles of ozone; 4) new estimates of CO abundance; 5) surface pressure/height mapping (CO2 altimetry) in selected regions; 6) optical depths of aerosols; 7) vertical profiles of aerosol between surface and 40 km; 8) properties of high altitude ice layers and clouds above mountains; 9) microphysical properties of aerosol particles (size, composition, and number density estimates). The data have been obtained by means of instruments AUGUSTE (UV and NIR spectrometers for limb sounding of the atmosphere using solar occultations), ISM (NIR scanning spectrometer), TERMOSKAN (thermal IR scanning radiometer), KRFM (near-UV and visible multi-band photometer). The observations were performed in equatorial regions during northern spring (solar aerocentric longitudes 8° < Ls < 18°).

  19. New Measurements of the Radio Photosphere of Mira Based on Data from the JVLA and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-07-01

    We present new measurements of the millimeter wavelength continuum emission from the long period variable Mira (o Ceti) at frequencies of 46, 96, and 229 GHz (λ ≈ 7, 3, and 1 mm) based on observations obtained with the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The measured millimeter flux densities are consistent with a radio photosphere model derived from previous observations, where flux density {S}ν \\propto {ν }1.86. The stellar disk is resolved, and the measurements indicate a decrease in the size of the radio photosphere at higher frequencies, as expected if the opacity decreases at shorter wavelengths. The shape of the radio photosphere is found to be slightly elongated, with a flattening of ∼10%–20%. The data also reveal evidence for brightness non-uniformities on the surface of Mira at radio wavelengths. Mira’s hot companion, Mira B was detected at all three observed wavelengths, and we measure a radius for its radio-emitting surface of ≈ 2.0× {10}13 cm. The data presented here highlight the power of the JVLA and ALMA for the study of the atmospheres of evolved stars.

  20. Resolving asymmetries along the pulsation cycle of the Mira star X Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, X.; Wittkowski, M.; Perrin, G.; Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Thiébaut, E.; Ridgway, S. T.; Ireland, M.; Scholz, M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The mass-loss process in Mira stars probably occurs in an asymmetric way where dust can form in inhomogeneous circumstellar molecular clumps. Following asymmetries along the pulsation cycle can give us clues about these mass-loss processes. Aims: We imaged the Mira star X Hya and its environnement at different epochs to follow the evolution of the morphology in the continuum and in the molecular bands. Methods: We observed X Hya with AMBER in J-H-K at low resolution at two epochs. We modelled squared visibilities with geometrical and physical models. We also present imaging reconstruction results obtained with MiRA and based on the physical a priori images. Results: We report on the angular scale change of X Hya between the two epochs. 1D CODEX profiles allowed us to understand and model the spectral variation of squared visibilities and constrain the stellar parameters. Reconstructed model-dependent images enabled us to reproduce closure phase signals and the azimuthal dependence of squared visibilities. They show evidence for material inhomogeneities located in the immediate environment of the star. Based on observations obtained with the ESO VLTI/ATs telescopes under the program ID 084.D-0326. Figures 7-12 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. Miras and Semiregular Variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszynski, I.; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Zebrun, K.; Szewczyk, O.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2005-12-01

    We use the OGLE-II and OGLE-III data in conjunction with the 2MASS near-infrared (NIR) photometry to identify and study Miras and Semiregular Variables (SRVs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We found in total 3221 variables of both types, populating two of the series of NIR period--luminosity (PL) sequences. The majority of these objects are double periodic pulsators, with periods belonging to both PL ridges. We indicate that in the period -- Wesenheit index plane the oxygen-rich and carbon-rich AGB stars from the NIR PL sequences C, C' and D split into well separated ridges. Thus, we discover an effective method of distinguishing between O-rich and C-rich Miras, SRVs and stars with Long Secondary Periods using their V and I-band photometry. We present an empirical method of estimating the mean K_s magnitudes of the Long Period Variables using single-epoch K_s measurements and complete light curves in the I-band. We utilize these corrected magnitudes to show that the O-rich and C-rich Miras and SRVs follow somewhat different K_s-band PL relations.

  2. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  3. Episodic karstification, Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kastning, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Edwards Plateau and Llano Basin of central Texas form one of the largest contiguous regions of karst in North America (>80,000 km/sup 2/). Solutional phenomena show that several major episodes of karstification are documentable from late Cambrian to Holocene. Relict landforms representing intervals of solutional activity correlate well with the accepted geomorphic chronology for central Texas. Secondary porosity are vertically controlled by lithology, topographic incision of streams, position of the potentiometric surface, and attitude of bedding. Areally, development of karst is strongly influenced by the extent, density, and orientation of fractures and by hydrodynamic characteristics such as points of recharge and discharge, degree of integration of groundwater flow paths, and hydraulic gradients. Early episodes of karstification correspond to intervals of subaerial exposure of carbonate rocks during marine regression or following regional uplift. Paleokarst is prevalent in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences. Infilled dolines and solution-collapse breccias have been exhumed by extensive regional denudation during the Cenozoic Era. Subaerial conditions during the middle Cretaceous account for infilled solutional cavities within lower Cretaceous carbonate beds. The most extensive karstification began with regional uplift in the early Miocene. Enhanced relief along the Balcones escarpment promoted incision of streams, lowering of water tables, steepened hydraulic gradients, and increases in discharge. Caves at various-elevations attest to sequential dissection of the plateau during the late Quaternary.

  4. MD-11 PCA - First Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A transport aircraft lands for the first time under engine power only, as this McDonnell Douglas MD-11 touches down at 11:38 a.m., Aug. 29, 1995, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The milestone flight, flown by NASA research pilot and former astronaut Gordon Fullerton, was part of a NASA project to develop a computer-assisted engine control system that enables a pilot to land a plane safely when its normal control surfaces are disabled. The propulsion-Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system uses standard autopilot controls already present in the cockpit, together with the new programming in the aircraft's flight control computers. The PCA concept is simple--for pitch control, the program increases thrust to climb and reduces thrust to descend. To turn right, the autopilot increases the left engine thrust while decreasing the right engine thrust. The initial Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft studies by NASA were carried out at Dryden with a modified twin-engine F-15 research aircraft.

  5. MD-11 PCA - First Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A transport aircraft lands for the first time under engine power only, as this McDonnell Douglas MD-11 touches down at 11:38 a.m., Aug. 29, 1995, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The milestone flight, flown by NASA research pilot and former astronaut Gordon Fullerton, was part of a NASA project to develop a computer-assisted engine control system that enables a pilot to land a plane safely when its normal control surfaces are disabled. The Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system uses standard autopilot controls already present in the cockpit, together with the new programming in the aircraft's flight control computers. The PCA concept is simple--for pitch control, the program increases thrust to climb and reduces thrust to descend. To turn right, the autopilot increases the left engine thrust while decreasing the right engine thrust. The initial Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft studies by NASA were carried out at Dryden with a modified twin-engine F-15 research aircraft.

  6. Infrared variability of the symbiotic Mira V407 Cygni and the structure of its dust envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, B. F.

    1999-03-01

    We perform an in-depth analysis of the infrared variability of the symbiotic Mira V407 Cyg resulting both from its pulsations and from a secular trend in its mean brightness. The two effects are shown to be similar in nature and are attributable to a change in the bolometric luminosity of the Mira in combination with a change in its temperature and/or in the optical depth of its dust envelope. In the last fourteen years, the mean bolometric luminosity has risen by ~30%, which must have been reflected in an increase of the pulsation period by delta P/P >= 0.1. The optical depth tau(J) of the dust envelope decreased by ~0.06, or the temperature of the Mira rose by ~100 K. Both of these effects result in approximately the same displacement of the star in the (J-L, K) diagram, which is most suitable for estimating variations in the parameters (L, T, tau). The changes in the shape of the energy distribution observed during pulsations of the Mira can be explained in terms of the dust-envelope model in which a new dust layer condenses during the pulsation minimum at a distance of ~3.5 R*. It consists of a mixture of silicate and graphite grains with a total mass of ~7 x 10^-9 M_solar. At this time, more than half of the optical depth of the entire dust envelope is concentrated in this layer, which changes by a factor of ~2 in half the pulsation period (~745d). Near the pulsation maximum, tau(J) ~0.25 and the inner radius of the dust envelope is R_in ~ 5 R*. Over the past ~10^4 years, the Mira has lost its mass at an approximately constant rate of ~5 x 10^-7 M_solar yr^-1 for M_gas/M_dust ~200. The dust envelope may be composed either of small (~0.01 micron) or large (~0.1 micron) grains. In the latter case, it should be kept in mind that these grains rather than medium-sized (~0.05 micron) ones determine its optical depth. We analyze the dust-envelope models in detail in terms of their possible observational verification.

  7. X-31 in Flight over Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    One of two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Demonstrator aircraft, flown by an international test organization at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, turns tightly over the desert floor on a research flight. The aircraft obtained data that may apply to the design and development of highly-maneuverable aircraft of the future. The X-31 had a three-axis thrust-vectoring system, coupled with advanced flight controls, to allow it to maneuver tightly at very high angles of attack. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight

  8. STS-66 Edwards Landing with Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis lands with its drag chute deployed on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to

  9. Are anticoagulant independent mechanical valves within reach—fast prototype fabrication and in vitro testing of innovative bi-leaflet valve models

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    Background Exploration for causes of prosthetic valve thrombogenicity has frequently focused on forward or post-closure flow detail. In prior laboratory studies, we uncovered high amplitude flow velocities of short duration close to valve closure implying potential for substantial shear stress with subsequent initiation of blood coagulation pathways. This may be relevant to widely accepted clinical disparity between mechanical and tissue valves vis-à-vis thrombogenicity. With a series of prototype bi-leaflet mechanical valves, we attempt reduction of closure related velocities with the objective of identifying a prototype valve with thrombogenic potential similar to our tissue valve control. This iterative design approach may find application in preclinical assessment of valves for anticoagulation independence. Methods Tested valves included: prototype mechanical bi-leaflet BVs (n=56), controls (n=2) and patented early prototype mechanicals (n=2) from other investigators. Pulsatile and quasi-steady flow systems were used for testing. Projected dynamic valve area (PDVA) was measured using previously described novel technology. Flow velocity over the open and closing periods was determined by volumetric flow rate/PDVA. For the closed valve interval, use was made of data obtained from quasi-steady back pressure/flow tests. Performance was ranked by a proposed thrombogenicity potential index (TPI) relative to tissue and mechanical control valves. Results Optimization of the prototype valve designs lead to a 3-D printed model (BV3D). For the mitral/aortic site, BV3D has lower TPI (1.10/1.47) relative to the control mechanical valve (3.44/3.93) and similar to the control tissue valve (ideal TPI ≤1.0). Conclusions Using unique technology, rapid prototyping and thrombogenicity ranking, optimization of experimental valves for reduced thrombogenic potential was expedited and simplified. Innovative mechanical valve configurations were identified that merit consideration

  10. STS-66 Edwards Landing with Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis lands with its drag chute deployed on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to

  11. STS-67 Endeavour Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour slips to a smooth landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful record-setting STS-67 mission. The landing was at 1:46 p.m. (PST) 18 March 1995, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather. Launched into space at 10:38 a.m. (PST) 1 March 1995, the Endeavour crew conducted NASA's longest shuttle flight to date and carried unique ultraviolet telescopes (ASTRO-2) which captured views of the universe impossible to obtain from the ground. Mission Commander was Steve Oswald making his third flight and the Pilot was Bill Gregory on his first mission. Mission Specialist 1 was John Grunsfeld making his first flight and Specialist 2 was Wendy Lawrence on her first flight. Tamara Jernigan served as Specialist 3 on her third flight and the two payload specialists were Samuel Durrance and Ronald Parise, both on their second flight. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads

  12. STS-29 Landing Approach at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission approaches for a landing at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload

  13. STS-29 Landing Approach at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission approaches for a landing at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload

  14. STS-37 Shuttle Crew after Edwards landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The crew of the Space Shuttle Atlantis gives the 'all's well' thumb's-up sign after leaving the 100-ton orbiter following their landing at 6:55 a.m. (PDT), 11 April 1991, at NASA's Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, to conclude mission STS-37. They are, from left, Kenneth D. Cameron, pilot; Steven R. Nagel, mission commander; and mission specialists Linda M. Godwin, Jerry L. Ross, and Jay Apt. During the mission,which began with launch April 5 at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, the crew deployed the Gamma Ray Observatory. Ross and Jay also carried out two spacewalks, one to deploy an antenna on the Gamma Ray Observatory and the other to test equipment and mobility techniques for the construction of the future Space Station. The planned five-day mission was extended one day because of high winds at Edwards. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space

  15. Dependence of SMOS/MIRAS brightness temperatures on wind speed: sea surface effect and latitudinal biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaobin; Boutin, Jacqueline; Martin, Nicolas; Spurgeon, Paul

    2013-04-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) has been successfully launched in November 2009 and its only payload, Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument, is the first interferometric radiometer at L band (1.4GHz) in orbit. MIRAS employs aperture synthesis in 2D with a Y-shaped antenna structure to create an image of emissions from the Earth surface at L-band over a range of incidence angles (0° to 65°) with a spatial resolution of 35 to 110 km. More than two years after launch the level 1C (L1C) brightness temperatures (TBs) reprocessed with the up-to-date ESA level 1 processing version (the Level 1 processor V5.04 and V5.05), have been released. It has been shown during the commissioning phase that the receivers onboard of MIRAS are affected by a short-term drift during each orbit, and a seasonal variation due to the thermal drifts of the antenna patch. Although a new antenna model is incorporated in the ESA L1 V5 processing to account for these variations, latitudinal and seasonal drifts in L1C TBs are still observed. In this presentation, we first investigate the impact of the TB drifts on the sea surface emissivity roughness model we derived in Yin et al. (TGRS 2012) from multi-latitude level 1 V3.17 TBs. We then study dependencies of TBs at multi-incidence angles with wind speed separately for various latitudinal bands and different seasons in order to separate artificial effects of TB drifts from sea surface effects. We then propose a new roughness/foam forward model. We estimate the quality of SMOS retrieved SSS by comparing it with ARGO measurements, and discuss SSS quality given the imprecision of the forward model and of the wind speed used as prior value in the level 2 ocean salinity processor.

  16. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  17. Time Variation Observations of Mid-Infrared Spectra of Mira Variables in NEP and LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Miyata, Takashi; Okada, Yoko; Sakon, Itsuki; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Yamamura, Issei

    2004-09-01

    We propose to derive the optical properties of their circumstellar dust grains and dust formation process based on variability observations of mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of oxygen-rich Mira variables with the IRS SL and LL modules. Mass-loss of stars in the asymptotic-giant branch is an important process for the evolution of matter in the Galaxy. However, there are still large uncertainties in the optical properties of silicate grains and the dust formation process in their circumstellar envelopes. Based on variability observations with the ISO of MIR spectra of a Mira variable we were able to derive the dust optical properties and the inner dust shell temperature independently, which have clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of variability observations of MIR spectra. However, they also indicate that the variability and dust properties in Mira variables have diversity and it is quite important to apply the same method to other targets and extend the investigation. We selected 3 target stars in the north ecliptic polar (NEP) region and 2 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Both regions are located in the constant viewing zones and all the target stars can be observed for more than 11 months in a year. We propose to make observations in the intervals of 1/5 of the period over a variability cycle. Three targets in the NEP have periods less than 300 days and they can be observed over a variability cycle in Cycle-1. Two target stars in the LMC have periods longer than 500 days and we request multi-cycle observations to cover a variability cycle of the LMC targets. We allow +/-15 days for the NEP stars and +/-30 days for the LMC stars for each observation epoch and thus the timing constraint is not severe. The IRS on board the SST provides a unique opportunity to carry out this study, which enables us to investigate the diversity of properties and formation process of silicate grains in Mira variables and extend our understanding to those in the nearby galaxy LMC.

  18. Search for surface magnetic fields in Mira stars. First detection in χ Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lèbre, A.; Aurière, M.; Fabas, N.; Gillet, D.; Herpin, F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Petit, P.

    2014-01-01

    Context. So far, surface magnetic fields have never been detected on Mira stars. Only recently have the spectropolarimetric capabilities of measuring it via the Zeeman effect become available to us. Then, to complete the knowledge of the magnetic field and of its influence during the transition from asymptotic giant branch to planetary nebulae stages, we have undertaken a search for magnetic fields on the surface of Mira stars. Aims: Our main goal is to constrain - at this stage of stellar evolution - the surface magnetic field (presence and strength) and to define the magnetic field strength dependence along the radial distance to the star, above the photosphere and across the circumstellar envelope of cool and evolved stars. Methods: We used spectropolarimetric observations (Stokes V spectra probing circular polarization), collected with the Narval instrument at TBL, in order to detect - with the least squares deconvolution (LSD) method - a Zeeman signature in the visible part of the spectrum. Results: We present the first spectropolarimetric observations of the S-type Mira star χ Cyg, performed around its maximum light. We detected a polarimetric signal in the Stokes V spectra and established its Zeeman origin. We claim that it is likely to be related to a weak magnetic field present at the photospheric level and in the lower part of the stellar atmosphere. We estimated the strength of its longitudinal component to about 2-3 gauss. This result favors a 1/r law for the variation in the magnetic field strength across the circumstellar envelope of χ Cyg. This is the first detection of a weak magnetic field on the stellar surface of a Mira star, and we discuss its origin in the framework of shock waves periodically propagating throughout the atmosphere of these radially pulsating stars. Conclusions: At the date of our observations of χ Cyg, the shock wave reaches its maximum intensity, and it is likely that the shock amplifies a weak stellar magnetic field during

  19. Untersuchung der Mira-Sterne RT Boo, TV Peg und VX Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, Kerstin; Berthold, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The light-change of the Mira stars RT Boo, TV Peg and VX Aur was analyzed on three ways for a long time. In the first period I estimated the brightness of the variables on sky monitoring photo plates (red spectral range) from Sonneberg Observatory with Argelander¥s Method, in the last years I measured scanned photo plates with a photometry program and in addition I used visual observations from A.A.V.S.O. for the analysis. The behavior of the periods of the tree stars from 1965 to 2013 is described here.

  20. Mathematical Existence Results for the Doi-Edwards Polymer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupin, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present some mathematical results on the Doi-Edwards model describing the dynamics of flexible polymers in melts and concentrated solutions. This model, developed in the late 1970s, has been used and extensively tested in modeling and simulation of polymer flows. From a mathematical point of view, the Doi-Edwards model consists in a strong coupling between the Navier-Stokes equations and a highly nonlinear constitutive law. The aim of this article is to provide a rigorous proof of the well-posedness of the Doi-Edwards model, namely that it has a unique regular solution. We also prove, which is generally much more difficult for flows of viscoelastic type, that the solution is global in time in the two dimensional case, without any restriction on the smallness of the data.

  1. Spectroscopy and Photometry of the Mira Variables R Leo, R CVn, and V CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingerfelt, E.; Clark, C. J.; Castelaz, M. W.

    1997-12-01

    Spectra of Mira stars from about 6200 Angstroms to 8800 Angstroms were taken in a search for anticorrelation between the Hα emission feature and the CaII infrared triplet. This anticorrelation is indicative of the flourescence of Hepsilon photons by CaII, which may explain the near absence of Hepsilon when the other Balmer emission lines are present (Castelaz & Luttermoser 1997, AJ, 114, 1584). The spectra also provides a measure of effective temperature. We will present spectra for R Leo, R Cvn, and V CVn taken in February, March, and May of 1997 using a low resolution spectrograph onboard the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. We will also present an initial set of differential BVRI photometry of the Mira stars taken nearly simultaneously with the spectra. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant AST-9500756. Eric Lingerfelt and Clayton Clark are undergraduates at ETSU who greatly appreciate support from an NSF REU Supplement grant.

  2. A high-speed bipolar outflow from the archetypical pulsating star Mira A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meaburn, J.; López, J. A.; Boumis, P.; Lloyd, M.; Redman, M. P.

    2009-06-01

    Optical images and high-dispersion spectra have been obtained of the ejected material surrounding the pulsating AGB star Mira A. The two streams of knots on either side of the star, found in far-ultraviolet (FUV) GALEX images, have now been imaged clearly in the light of Hα. Spatially resolved profiles of the same line reveal that the bulk of these knots form a bipolar outflow with radial velocity extremes of ±150 km s-1 with respect to the central star. The south stream is approaching and the north stream receding from the observer. A displacement away from Mira A between the position of one of the south-stream knots in the new Hα image and its position in the previous Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS I) red plate was noted. If interpreted as a consequence of expansion proper motions, the bipolar outflow is tilted at 69° ± 15° to the plane of the sky, has an outflow velocity of 160 ± 10 km s-1 and is ≈1000 y old.

  3. High-angular-resolution stellar imaging with occultations from the Cassini spacecraft - III. Mira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of spectral and spatial data of Mira obtained by the Cassini spacecraft, which not only observed the star's spectra over a broad range of near-infrared wavelengths, but was also able to obtain high-resolution spatial information by watching the star pass behind Saturn's rings. The observed spectral range of 1-5 microns reveals the stellar atmosphere in the crucial water-bands which are unavailable to terrestrial observers, and the simultaneous spatial sampling allows the origin of spectral features to be located in the stellar environment. Models are fitted to the data, revealing the spectral and spatial structure of molecular layers surrounding the star. High-resolution imagery is recovered revealing the layered and asymmetric nature of the stellar atmosphere. The observational data set is also used to confront the state-of-the-art cool opacity-sampling dynamic extended atmosphere models of Mira variables through a detailed spectral and spatial comparison, revealing in general a good agreement with some specific departures corresponding to particular spectral features.

  4. Annual parallax and a dimming event of a Mira variable star, FV Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the trigonometric parallax of water masers associated with a Mira star, FV Bootis (FV Boo) using VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). Based on our multi-epoch VERA observations, we derived the parallax to be 0.97 ± 0.06 mas, which corresponds to a distance of 1.03^{+0.07}_{-0.06} kpc. The water masers around FV Boo were spatially distributed over an area of 41 au × 41 au, and their internal motions indicate the presence of an outflow. Using the Kagoshima University 1 m optical/infrared telescope, we determined the period to be 305.6 d and the mean apparent magnitude to be +2.91 mag in the K'-band. On the period-luminosity plane, the obtained period and K'-band magnitude puts FV Boo slightly below the sequence of Miras, possibly due to circumstellar reddening. Combining our photometric data with COBE and 2MASS datasets spanning over 20 years, we found in the near infrared that FV Boo was significantly fainter in 2005 compared with preceding and later phases. Its color, however, did not show a large variation through this change. We infer that the dimming could be caused by an eclipse due to a cloud in a binary system.

  5. Introducing Edward L. Bernays, the "Father of Public Relations."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Relates some of the public relations achievements and techniques of Edward L. Bernays. Sees modern public relations proceeding from an understanding of individuals, institutions and social groups, and their interrelationships. Considers the information dissemination, persuasion, and attitude integration functions of public relations. Lists…

  6. Edward Lear, Limericks, and Nonsense: A Little Nonsense. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    British poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) is widely recognized as the father of the limerick form of poetry and is well known for his nonsense poems. In the first lesson for grades 3-5, which focuses on Lear's nonsense poem "The Owl and the Pussy Cat," students learn about nonsense poetry as well as the various poetic techniques and devices that poets…

  7. The Small Rural Schools of Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, E. L.

    In 1973, there were 56 one- and two-room elementary schools in Prince Edward Island (Canada). As part of a descriptive survey of these schools, now closed by consolidation, researchers visited each school in 1973 and recorded details of the buildings, facilities, and school organizations. Teachers from 47 schools and their 737 students in grades…

  8. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  9. Edward Christopher Williams and His Impact on Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Carlos

    Edward Christopher Williams had a major impact on librarianship, not only as the first documented African American to graduate from a library school, but also as a developer of education for librarians and as an active member of the American Library Association (ALA) and the Ohio Library Association. This study used the historical methodology…

  10. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed in this view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it completes a mission of almost 17 days duration in space on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995.

  11. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour, after completing a mission of almost 17 days duration in space, touches down on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995. In this photo the nose gear is still in the air as the orbiter touches down.

  12. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear is on the ground and the nose gear is about to touch down as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  13. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  14. Mary Edwards Walker: the soul ahead of her time.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atiq; Rahman, Naba G; Harris, Sharon M; Cheema, Faisal H

    2015-02-01

    Mary Edwards Walker was a gallant woman who stood for women's rights, embodied the true American spirit, and served the Union Army in the Civil War as a surgeon. She later became the first and only woman in United States history to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. PMID:25535874

  15. Quality in Higher Education: The Contribution of Edward Demings Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Richard; Curtis, Elizabeth; Noone, Tom; Keenan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--There can be little doubt about the importance and relevance of quality for any service industry. One of the most influential contributors to service quality developments was W. Edwards Deming (1900-1993). An important component of Demings philosophy is reflected in his 14-principles for transforming a service as they indicate what…

  16. What's Wrong with "Edward the Unready"? Our Responsibility for Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes how Rosemary Wells's new books about "Edward Unready" explain children and readiness; explores the problems with her message, and suggests new endings that are more supportive of all children. Asserts that variability in development should not be mistaken for deficit, and recommends changing the focus from judging children to judging…

  17. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  18. Edward Teller and Nuclei:. Along the Trail to the Neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.

    2010-01-01

    I discuss two of Edward Teller's contributions to nuclear physics, the introduction of the Gamow-Teller operator in β decay and the formulation of the Goldhaber-Teller model for electric dipole transitions, in the context of efforts to understand the weak interaction and the nature of the neutrino.

  19. Obituary: Donald Edward Osterbrock, 1924-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    Donald Edward Osterbrock, one of the leading figures of post-World War II astronomy, died suddenly of a heart attack on 11 January 2007, while walking near his office at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was 82 years old. His initials spelled D.E.O. (God in latin!), but he was known simply as Don to his many friends and colleagues. Don's long and productive career spanned five decades. His scientific work helped shape our understanding of lower main-sequence stars, the ionized interstellar medium, and active galactic nuclei. He was also a highly respected historian of astronomy who shed new light on 19th- and 20th-century astronomy. Don was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 13 July 1924. Both of his parents were of German descent and valued hard work, education, and science. They both completed their high-school education at night while working full-time during the day. His father eventually became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Cincinnati. Don's plan to become an astronomer was put on hold when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. After graduation from high school, Don joined the United States Army and trained as a meteorologist, taking all of the physics and mathematics courses required for a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Chicago. He was eventually sent to islands in the Pacific Ocean but never was in harm's way. After three years of service, Don returned to Chicago to obtain his bachelor's degree in 1948, his M.S. in astronomy in 1949, and a Ph.D. in astronomy in 1952. Don's years at the University of Chicago and the University's Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, were pivotal for his career and personal life. He came in contact with such luminaries as Otto Struve, Bengt Strömgren, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, and William W. Morgan. At Yerkes, he also met and married Irene L. Hansen, a native of Williams Bay, who was employed as a member of the Yerkes staff. They had a son, William, now

  20. Obituary: Harrison Edward Radford, 1927-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, James Michael; Kirby, Kate Page; Chance, Kelly V.; Brown, Campbell

    2003-12-01

    Harrison Edward ``Harry" Radford, a noted laboratory spectroscopist and pioneer in the application of magnetic resonance techniques to spectroscopy, died on 5 May 2000, after a long battle with amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During a 37-year career at the National Bureau of Standards and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harry measured the frequencies of numerous molecular transitions which aided the emerging field of astrochemistry. Harry was both an excellent theoretician and a preeminently skilled experimentalist. He has several major spectroscopic achievements to his credit. He performed the first study of a short-lived molecular free radical, OH, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, opening up a huge and important field of research. Together with colleagues he made the first observation of the rotational spectrum of CH by far infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy and extended the technique to other molecules such as CH3O. Harry was born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, on 26 July 1927. He was the son of Harrison Edwin Radford, a roofer, and Dorothy (née Cole) Radford. He dropped out of high school to join the Navy in 1944 as an electronics technician's mate. After his discharge in 1946 he worked in the family construction business for four years as a roofer. In 1950 he entered the University of New Hampshire and graduated four years later, Summa Cum Laude, with a degree in physics. As a graduate student at Yale from 1954 to 1959 he wrote his PhD thesis under the supervision of V.W. Hughes on the microwave Zeeman spectra of oxygen and fluorine where he used the technique of paramagnetic resonance absorption in atomic vapors. In 1954 he married Mildred Spofford. They had three daughters, Susan (born in 1955), Amy (1957), and Sarah (1960). In 1974 he married Alfa Goldthwaithe Morrison, who survived him. From 1959 until 1969 Harry worked at the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology

  1. STS-67 Endeavour Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour slips to a smooth landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful record-setting STS-67 mission. The landing was at 1:46 p.m. (PST) 18 March 1995, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather. Launched into space at 10:38 a.m. (PST) 1 March 1995, the Endeavour crew conducted NASA's longest shuttle flight to date and carried unique ultraviolet telescopes (ASTRO-2) which captured views of the universe impossible to obtain from the ground. Mission Commander was Steve Oswald making his third flight and the Pilot was Bill Gregory on his first mission. Mission Specialist 1 was John Grunsfeld making his first flight and Specialist 2 was Wendy Lawrence on her first flight. Tamara Jernigan served as Specialist 3 on her third flight and the two payload specialists were Samuel Durrance and Ronald Parise, both on their second flight. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads

  2. Mass-loss Rate by the Mira in the Symbiotic Binary V1016 Cygni from Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekeráš, M.; Skopal, A.

    2015-10-01

    The mass-loss rate from Mira variables represents a key parameter in our understanding of their evolutionary tracks. We introduce a method for determining the mass-loss rate from the Mira component in D-type symbiotic binaries via the Raman scattering of atomic hydrogen in the wind from the giant. Using our method, we investigated Raman He ii λ 1025\\to λ 6545 conversion in the spectrum of the symbiotic Mira V1016 Cyg. We determined its efficiency, η = 0.102, 0.148, and the corresponding mass-loss rate, \\dot{M}={2.0}-0.2+0.1× {10}-6, {2.7}-0.1+0.2× {10}-6 {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1, using our spectra from 2006 April and 2007 July, respectively. Our values of \\dot{M} that we derived from Raman scattering are comparable with those obtained independently by other methods. Applying the method to other Mira-white dwarf binary systems can provide a necessary constraint in the calculation of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution.

  3. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  4. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in the Mira star o Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2011-11-01

    Context. In the spectra of variable pulsating stars, especially Mira stars, the detection of intense hydrogen emission lines has been explained by the presence of a radiative and hypersonic shock wave, periodically propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. Previous observation of the Mira star o Ceti around one of its brightest maximum light led to the detection of a strong level of linear polarization associated to Balmer emissions, although the origin of this phenomenon is not fully explained yet. Aims: With the help of spectropolarimetry, we propose to investigate the nature of shock waves propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere and present, for o Ceti (the prototype of Mira stars), a full observational study of hydrogen emission lines formed in the radiative region of such a shock. Methods: Using the instrument NARVAL mounted on the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) in Pic du Midi Observatory (France), we performed a spectropolarimetric monitoring of o Ceti during three consecutive pulsation cycles. For this survey, the four Stokes parameters (I for intensity, Q and U for linear polarization, and V for circular polarization) were systematically collected, with a particular emphasis on the maxima of luminosity, i.e. when a radiative shock wave is supposed to emerge from the photosphere and starts to propagate outward. Results: On hydrogen Balmer lines, over a large part of the luminosity cycle, we report clear detection of polarimetric structures in Q and U Stokes spectra (and also in V Stokes spectra but to a lesser extent). We report a temporal evolution of these spectropolarimetric signatures, which appear strongly correlated to the presence of an intense shock wave responsible for the hydrogen emission lines. We establish that the hydrogen lines are polarized by a physical process inherent to the mechanism responsible for the emission line formation: the shock wave itself. Two mechanisms are thus considered: a global one that implies a polarization

  5. Pollution by oestrogenic endocrine disruptors and β-sitosterol in a south-western European river (Mira, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria João; Cruzeiro, Catarina; Reis, Mário; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The Mira River is a Portuguese water body widely known for its wilderness and is advertised as one of the less polluted European rivers. On this presumption, the levels of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in Mira waters were never measured. However, because environmentalists have claimed that the Mira could be moderately polluted, a range of 17 EDCs were measured not only at the estuary but also along the river. The targeted EDCs included natural and pharmaceutical oestrogens (17β-oestradiol, oestrone and 17α-ethynylestradiol), industrial/household pollutants (octylphenols, nonylphenols and their monoethoxylates and diethoxylates and bisphenol A), phytoestrogens (formononetin, biochanin A, daidzein, genistein) and the phytosterol sitosterol (SITO). For this propose, waters from six sampling sites were taken every 2 months, over a 1-year period (2011), and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly high levels of oestrogens and of industrial/household pollutants were measured at all sampling sites, including those located inside natural protected areas. Indeed, the annual average sum of EDCs was ≈57 ng/L for oestrogens and ≈1.3 μg/L for industrial/household chemicals. In contrast, the global average levels of phytoestrogens (≈140 ng/L) and of SITO (≈295 ng/L) were lower than those reported worldwide. The EDC concentrations were normalised for ethynylestradiol equivalents (EE2eq). In view of these, the oestrogenic load of the Mira River attained ≈47 ng/L EE2eq. In addition, phosphates were above legal limits at both spring and summer (>1 mg/L). Overall, data show EDCs at toxicant relevant levels in the Mira and stress the need to monitor rivers that are allegedly less polluted. PMID:27004433

  6. Obituary: Donald Edward Osterbrock, 1924-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    Donald Edward Osterbrock, one of the leading figures of post-World War II astronomy, died suddenly of a heart attack on 11 January 2007, while walking near his office at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was 82 years old. His initials spelled D.E.O. (God in latin!), but he was known simply as Don to his many friends and colleagues. Don's long and productive career spanned five decades. His scientific work helped shape our understanding of lower main-sequence stars, the ionized interstellar medium, and active galactic nuclei. He was also a highly respected historian of astronomy who shed new light on 19th- and 20th-century astronomy. Don was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 13 July 1924. Both of his parents were of German descent and valued hard work, education, and science. They both completed their high-school education at night while working full-time during the day. His father eventually became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Cincinnati. Don's plan to become an astronomer was put on hold when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. After graduation from high school, Don joined the United States Army and trained as a meteorologist, taking all of the physics and mathematics courses required for a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Chicago. He was eventually sent to islands in the Pacific Ocean but never was in harm's way. After three years of service, Don returned to Chicago to obtain his bachelor's degree in 1948, his M.S. in astronomy in 1949, and a Ph.D. in astronomy in 1952. Don's years at the University of Chicago and the University's Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, were pivotal for his career and personal life. He came in contact with such luminaries as Otto Struve, Bengt Strömgren, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, and William W. Morgan. At Yerkes, he also met and married Irene L. Hansen, a native of Williams Bay, who was employed as a member of the Yerkes staff. They had a son, William, now

  7. SMOS L1PP Performance Analysis with MIRAS Data from Validation Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, R.; Barbosa, J.; Candeias, H.; Catarino, N.; Freitas, J.; Freitas, S.; Gutierrez, A.; Lucas, B.

    2009-04-01

    Deimos Engenharia has been involved in the SMOS mission since 2003 and has played an important role in the project since then. The two main software packages that Deimos Engenharia has maintained during the past years are a) the Level 1 Processor Prototype (L1PP), where the scientific algorithms are implemented and verified; and b) the SMOS End-to-end Performance Simulator - Ground Segment (SEPS-GS), derived from the original simulator from the Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC) but with emphasis on Ground Segment capabilities. These tools have been widely used by the scientific community, as well as by the Deimos Engenharia's SMOS team, in preparation for the operational period of the SMOS mission. In May/June 2007, Image Validation Tests (IVT) were conducted in the Maxwell Anechoic Chamber at ESA/ESTEC, in Noordwijck. This campaign provided the first set of data available measured by the MIRAS instrument itself, instead of being generated by the SEPS-GS simulator. This data has now been extensively analysed by Deimos Engenharia, and several studies have been performed and released, aiming at the validation and improvement of the L1PP. The results have shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical expectations, confirming that the L1PP is well prepared for the upcoming commissioning phase. The IVT data analysis was mainly based on the study of reconstructed flat scenes obtained in the Maxwell chamber. This allowed the test of several optional calibration algorithms and alternative methods for image reconstruction and foreign sources removal. The L1PP was adapted specifically for the analysis of IVT data, through the implementation of a Near Field reconstruction algorithm. The Level 1 processing has then been evaluated with real data taken with MIRAS. The results have been consistently better than expected, since the theoretically predicted value for the radiometric accuracy (or pixel bias) of an averaged flat scene is estimated to be roughly 1 K and

  8. Development of LM10-MIRA LOX/LNG expander cycle demonstrator engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnykh, Mikhail; Carapellese, Stefano; Liuzzi, Daniele; Arione, Luigi; Caggiano, Giuseppe; Bellomi, Paolo; D'Aversa, Emanuela; Pellegrini, Rocco; Lobov, S. D.; Gurtovoy, A. A.; Rachuk, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    This article contains results of joint works by Konstruktorskoe Buro Khimavtomatiki (KBKhA, Russia) and AVIO Company (Italy) on creation of the LM10-MIRA liquid-propellant rocket demonstrator engine for the third stage of the upgraded "Vega" launcher.Scientific and research activities conducted by KBKhA and AVIO in 2007-2014 in the frame of the LYRA Program, funded by the Italian Space Agency, with ELV as Prime contractor, and under dedicated ASI-Roscosmos inter-agencies agreement, were aimed at development and testing of a 7.5 t thrust expander cycle demonstrator engine propelled by oxygen and liquid natural gas (further referred to as LNG).

  9. Time variations of IR spectra and dust properties in carbon-rich Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyun-Il; Lee, Sang-Gak

    2004-05-01

    We have studied variations of physical parameters in the circumstellar enveloped of carbon rich Mira variables at different pulsation phases. After comparing the ISO/SWS spectra of these stars with spectral energy distributions calculated from models, we could find the best-fitted parameters for the physical state of the dust envelope at each phase. The variations of the parameters effective temperature, fraction of SiC grains, mass-loss rates, and inner radius of shell, are found to have nearly the same trend as that of the light curve. The other parameters grain size, optical depth, radius of central star and dust temperature at the inner boundary of envelope, are inversely varying to the light curve.

  10. [It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees: Emilio Mira y López and the social revolution].

    PubMed

    Mülberger, Annette; Jacó-Vilela, Ana Maria

    2007-01-01

    Although the socialist ideology of the Catalan psychiatrist Emilio Mira y López (1896-1964) is relatively well known, his psychological-political contribution has been ignored. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, Mira's psychological analysis of the social revolution is situated in the historical context of Catalonia and Spain before Franco's Dictatorship, taking account of biographical and political as well as scientific and cultural aspects. Second, the way in which Mira related psychology to politics is explored by examining the extent to which his scientific work reflected his socialist ideas. PMID:18351169

  11. Parallax of a Mira variable R Ursae Majoris studied with astrometric VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Akiharu; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Matsui, Makoto; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Honma, Mareki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Sato, Katsuhisa; Jike, Takaaki

    2016-08-01

    We have measured an annual parallax of the Mira variable R Ursae Majoris (R UMa) with the VLBI Exploration for Radio Astronomy (VERA). From the monitoring VLBI observations over a span of about two years, we detected H2O maser spots in the LSR velocity range from 37 to 42 km s-1. We derived an annual parallax of 1.97 ± 0.05 mas, and this gives a corresponding distance of 508 ± 13 pc. The VLBI maps revealed 72 maser spots distributed in an ˜110 au area around the expected stellar position. Circumstellar kinematics of the maser spots were also revealed by subtracting a systemic motion in the Hipparcos catalog from proper motions of each maser spot derived from our VLBI observations. Infrared photometry was also conducted to measure a K-band apparent magnitude, and we obtained a mean magnitude of mK = 1.19 ± 0.02 mag. Using the trigonometric distance, mK is converted to a K-band absolute magnitude of MK = -7.34 ± 0.06 mag. This result gives a much more accurate absolute magnitude for R UMa than previously provided. We solved a zero-point of the MK-log P relation for the Galactic Mira variables and obtained a relation of MK = -3.52 log P + (1.09 ± 0.14). Other long-period variables, including red supergiants, whose distances were determined with astrometric VLBI, were also compiled to explore the different sequences of the MK-log P relation.

  12. New antenna feed revitalizes Space Shuttle tracker at NASA Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrin, J. W.; Sullivan, A.

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the upgrading of a 12-ft-diameter single-channel monopulse tracking system, which had been relegated to slaved backup status at NASA Edwards, to support research flights for Ames Dryden Research Center and for tracking orbital passes of the Space Shuttle and Shuttle landings both at Edwards and at White Sands. The improved system is now a stand-alone telemetry tracking system. A new conical scanning feed (known as Radscan) replaces the single channel monopulse feed in the upgraded system. Where previously the system would not autotrack at elevation angles below 5 degrees, it now automatically acquires the Space Shuttle when it appears on the horizon and autotracks from approximately 2 degrees in elevation to touchdown, and does so virtually unattended.

  13. STS-92 - Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    With its drag parachute deployed to help slow it down, the Space Shuttle Discovery rolls down the runway after landing at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California at the conclusion of mission STS-92 on October 24, 2000. STS-92 was the 100th mission since the fleet of four Space Shuttles began flying in 1981. (Due to schedule changes, missions are not always launched in the order that was originally planned.) The almost 13-day mission, the 46th Shuttle mission to land at Edwards, was the last construction mission for the International Space Station prior to the first scientists taking up residency in the orbiting space laboratory the following month. The seven-member crew on STS-92 included mission specialists Koichi Wakata, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao, pilot Pam Melroy and mission commander Brian Duffy.

  14. Brief Reflections on Edward Teller's Scientific Life at Livermore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, C. Bruce

    2010-01-01

    As George Miller indicated in his welcoming remarks the theme of today's symposium is the scientific and educational legacy of Edward Teller. I will say a few words about his activities in those areas during the 50 plus years he spent at the Livermore Laboratory, Sig Hecker will touch on his re-engagement with the Los Alamos Laboratory during the last couple of decades of his life, and then we will show you a video with excerpts from the Memorial Service we held on November 3, 2003 after he passed away in September of that year. On the video you will get to hear comments by many of the people who knew Edward throughout much of his life, Hans Bethe, John Wheeler, Harold Agnew and many others ...

  15. Bibliography of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, through 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menard, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography comprises 1,022 multidisciplinary references to technical and general literature for the three regions of the Edwards aquifer, Texas-San Antonio area; Barton Springs segment, Austin area; and northern segment, Austin area. The references in the bibliography were compiled from computerized data bases and from published bibliographies and reports. Dates of references range from the late 1800's through 1993. Subject and author indexes are included.

  16. STS-84 M.S Edward Tsang Lu suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu gives a 'thumbs up' as he dons his launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Lus first space flight. Lu and six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir.

  17. F-1 Engine Test Firing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    This photograph depicts the Rocketdyne static firing of the F-1 engine at the towering 76-meter Test Stand 1-C in Area 1-125 of the Edwards Air Force Base in California. The Saturn V S-IC (first) stage utilized five F-1 engines for its thrust. Each engine provided 1,500,000 pounds, for a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds with liquid oxygen and kerosene as its propellants.

  18. Selected Scientific and Technical Contributions of Edward C. Polhamus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Edward C. Polhamus joined the NACA Langley Research Center staff in 1944 and was active in a broad range of aerodynamic research related to high-speed aircraft technology, aerodynamic prediction methods, and cryogenic wind-tunnel development. This lecture will focus on his 'leading-edge suction analogy' for the prediction of vortex-lift effects on slender wings. Briefer treatment of his contributions to variable-sweep aircraft and cryogenic wind tunnels is also included.

  19. Astronaut Edward Gibson trains with Earth Resources Experiments Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Edward G. Gibson, Skylab 4 science pilot, turns on a switch on the control box of the S190B camera, one of the components of the Earth Resources Experiments Package (EREP). The single lens Earth Terrain Camera takes five-inch photographs. Behind Gibson is the stowed suits of Astronaut Gerald P. Carr, commander for the third manned mission. The exercise took place in the Orbital Workshop one-G trainer at JSC.

  20. Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Carrara, Sabina; Filippi, Valentina

    2011-06-01

    The Roman Catholic Church reacted negatively to the announcement that the Nobel Prize for Medicine had been awarded to Robert G Edwards. Thirty-three years ago, Cardinal Albino Luciani, on the eve of his election to become Pope, stated that, whereas progress is certainly a beautiful thing, mankind has not always benefited from progress. Catholic criticism has raised seven points: (i) God wants human life to begin through the 'conjugal act' and not artificially; (ii) artificial interventions at the beginning of human life are dangerous and ethically unacceptable; (iii) limits can be imposed even upon an individual's freedom to achieve a legitimate goal, such as having a child within marriage; (iv) the massive loss of preimplantation embryos characterizing IVF must be considered as a tragic loss of 'nascent' human persons; (v) Edwards bears a moral responsibility for all subsequent developments in assisted reproduction technology and for all 'abuses' made possible by IVF; (vi) there can be deleterious consequences for offspring of assisted reproduction technology; and (vii) Edwards' discovery did not eliminate the causes of infertility. This article elaborates from the Roman Catholic perspective on each of these points, some of which are found to be more substantial than others. PMID:21498122

  1. Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards Test Station as it looked in 1945. To the immediate right of the Test Stand 'A' tower stands a concrete monitor building or blockhouse (now Building 4203/E-4) for observation and control of tests. Other frame buildings housed workshop and administrative functions. Long structure behind automobiles was designated 4207/E-8 and was used for instrument repair and storage, a cafeteria, machine and welding shops. To the immediate south of 4207/E-8 were 4200/E-1 (used as an office and photographic laboratory) and 4205/E-6 (guardhouse, with fire extinguisher mounted on it). To the northeast of 4205/E-6 was 4204/E-5 (a propellant storage dock, with shed roof). Buildings 4200/E-1, 4205/E-6 and 4207/E-8 were demolished in 1983. Note the absence of trees. (JPL negative no. 383-1297, July 1946) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Geomorphology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Plateau karst, central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastning, E. H., Jr.

    The Edwards Plateau is one of the largest continuous karst regions of the United States; yet, its geomorphic evolution has previously received little systematic study. The overall objectives of this investigation are to: (1) describe the physical characteristics of karst features, (2) determine which geomorphic and hydrogeologic controls and processes have governed their development, and (3) relate genesis of karst spatially and chronologically to the geomorphic evolution of the Edwards Plateau. Cavern development provides a record of evolution of karst and the development of major carbonate aquifers of the region. Some control on cavern development are region-wide; nevertheless, many caves exhibit characteristics that suggest a strong influence of local factors. Development of cave chambers and passages has responded to the lithic character of bedrocks. Solution conduits were guided by variations in calcite and dolomite content, thickness of strata, and frequency of bedding-plane partings. This is particularly true of the Glen Rose Formation, limestone beds of the Edwards Group, and the Gorman Formation, the three principal cave-forming units.

  3. The origin and evolution of short-period Miras in the solar neighborhood: Constraints on the life cycle of old stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the short-period (P less than 300 days) oxygen-rich Miras in the solar neighborhood can be fitted with an exponential scale height above the Galactic plane of about 600 pc. Using the Gliese catalog of local main-sequence stars, we estimate that the density of suitable G-type progenitor dwarfs within 20 pc of the Sun for these short-period Miras is 6 x 10(exp -4)/cu pc. The portion of the H-R diagram near the main-sequence turnoff of these velocity-selected Gliese stars is intermediate between that of the old open cluster NGC 188 and that of the metal-rich globular cluster, 47 Tuc. We infer that the main-sequence progenitors of the short-period Miras have masses near 1.0 solar mass, and we estimate that these Miras have ages approximately 9 x 10(exp 9). We also identify a few old disk red giants in the neighborhood of the Sun. On the basis of very limited information, we estimate that the total amount of mass lost from these stars during their first ascent up the red giant branch is less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass. We derive a duration of the short-period Mira phase of close to 5 x 10(exp 5) yr. This estimate for the duration of the short period Mira phase is longer than our estimate of 2 x 10(exp 5) yr for the duration of the Mira phase for stars with periods longer than 300 days. From their infrared colors, we estimate a typical mass-loss rate from the short-period Miras of approximately 1 x 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr.

  4. Behavior of Mira Variables in Bandstrength-Color Diagrams. Comparison of Dynamic Models with Calibrated Spectral Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, R. F.; Alvarez, R.; Plez, B.; Yuan, Y.

    We compare 26-color scanner observations of Mira variables (Wing 1967, recently rereduced and recalibrated) with model calculations. The measurements were made through a 30 AA exit slot at 26 selected wavelengths between 7800 and 11000 AA. They include the best available continuum points, and points sensitive to the presence of bands of TiO, VO, CN, ZrO, and H_2O. We present molecular bandstrength-color diagrams in which the variables execute loops. This behavior was first shown in a review article (Spinrad & Wing 1969) and discussed further by Wing (1980). Here we present comparisons with model calculations, following the work of Alvarez & Plez (1998). Detailed synthetic spectra from hydrostatic models reproduce the observed colors. The loops followed by the Mira variables in color-color diagrams are reasonably well reproduced by hydrodynamic model atmospheres. We show the effects of pulsation on the behavior of the different molecular bands seen in this spectral region.

  5. MIRAS characterization and monitoring during the SMOS In-Orbit Commissioning Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Martin-Neira, M.; Duffo, N.; González-Gambau, V.; Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.

    2009-04-01

    1 Introduction The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) is the single payload of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The instrument was completed in early 2007 and thoroughly tested both in anechoic chamber and vacuum thermal chamber during 2007. It was integrated to the platform in early 2008 and re-tested, including compatibility, during 2008. At present, the whole satellite is stowed and waiting to be launched during 2009. In two weeks after launch, the satellite will be in the final orbit with all deployments completed. Then the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase will start, having an estimated duration of 5.5 months. During this phase, the instrument modes of operation will be systematically checked and the calibration parameters will be fully characterized in real conditions. Also, the first brightness temperature images will be obtained in order to assess the overall retrieval procedures including inversion. In the end, the objective of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is to provide verification that the payload meets the scientific requirements of the mission. The general design and planning of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is given in [1]. This abstract presents the foreseen activities to be performed during this phase by the UPC team. Just after the start of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase, the instrument will be commanded to perform a sequence of operations oriented at providing a full characterization in terms of calibration parameters. The idea is to reproduce the results obtained during the tests carried out on ground [2]. In particular, the following issues will be covered: Thermal Stability: To provide understanding of both the intra-orbit and inter-orbit temperature variations. The instrument will be continuously operating during a number of orbits while all temperature sensors being monitored. Electrical Stability: To re-compute all internal calibration parameters (gains, offsets, receiver noise temperatures

  6. Ground winds and winds aloft for Edwards AFB, California (1978 revision)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ground level runway wind statistics for the Edwards AFB, California area are presented. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the two major Edwards AFB runways. Also presented are Edwards AFB bivariate normal wind statistics for a 90 degree flight azimuth for altitudes 0 through 27 km. Wind probability distributions and statistics for any rotation of axes can be computed from the five given parameters.

  7. Reduction of procoagulant potential of b-datum leakage jet flow in bileaflet mechanical heart valves via application of vortex generator arrays.

    PubMed

    Murphy, David W; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-07-01

    Current designs of bileaflet mechanical heart valves put patients at an increased risk of thromboembolism. In particular, regurgitant flow through the b-datum line is associated with nonphysiologic flow characteristics such as elevated shear stresses, regions of recirculation, and increased mixing, all of which may promote thrombus formation. We have previously shown that passive flow control in the form of vortex generators mounted on the downstream leaflet surfaces can effectively diminish turbulent stresses. The objective of the current work is thus to determine the effect of vortex generators on the thromboembolic potential of the b-datum line leakage jet and to correlate that effect with the vortex generator-induced changes to the flow structure. Flow experiments were performed using a steady model of the transient b-datum line jet. These experiments encompassed flow visualization to gain an overall picture of the flow system, particle image velocimetry to quantify the flow field in detail, and in vitro experiments with human blood to quantify thrombus formation in response to the applied passive flow control. Thrombus formation was quantified over time by an assay for thrombin-antithrombin III (TAT III). In comparing results with and without vortex generators, significantly lower mean TAT III levels were observed at one time point for the case with vortex generators. Also, the TAT III growth rate of the case with vortex generators was significantly lower. While no differences in jet spreading were found with and without vortex generators, lower peak turbulent stresses were observed for the case with vortex generators. The results thus demonstrate the potential of applying passive flow control to cardiovascular hardware in order to mitigate the hemodynamic factors leading to thrombus formation. PMID:20590289

  8. Effect of hinge gap width of a St. Jude medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve on blood damage potential--an in vitro micro particle image velocimetry study.

    PubMed

    Jun, Brian H; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Yun, B Min; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-01

    The hinge regions of the bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) can cause blood element damage due to nonphysiological shear stress levels and regions of flow stasis. Recently, a micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) system was developed to study whole flow fields within BMHV hinge regions with enhanced spatial resolution under steady leakage flow conditions. However, global velocity maps under pulsatile conditions are still necessary to fully understand the blood damage potential of these valves. The current study hypothesized that the hinge gap width will affect flow fields in the hinge region. Accordingly, the blood damage potential of three St. Jude Medical (SJM) BMHVs with different hinge gap widths was investigated under pulsatile flow conditions, using a μPIV system. The results demonstrated that the hinge gap width had a significant influence during the leakage flow phase in terms of washout and shear stress characteristics. During the leakage flow, the largest hinge gap generated the highest Reynolds shear stress (RSS) magnitudes (~1000 N/m²) among the three valves at the ventricular side of the hinge. At this location, all three valves indicated viscous shear stresses (VSS) greater than 30 N/m². The smallest hinge gap exhibited the lowest level of shear stress values, but had the poorest washout flow characteristics among the three valves, demonstrating propensity for flow stasis and associated activated platelet accumulation potential. The results from this study indicate that the hinge is a critical component of the BMHV design, which needs to be optimized to find the appropriate balance between reduction in fluid shear stresses and enhanced washout during leakage flow, to ensure minimal thrombotic complications. PMID:24976188

  9. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2011-05-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) and Edward Pigott (1753-1825) are credited with determining the first accurate periods for several important variable stars. Goodricke's name is associated with the determination of the period of the eclipsing binary Algol (Beta Persei); for this he was awarded the Copley Prize of the Royal Society of London. He also determined the periods of the contact binary Beta Lyrae and of Delta Cephei, the prototype Cepheid variable. Around the same time, Edward Pigott obtained the period of Eta Aquilae, another Cepheid. In actuality, the two collaborated on all these observations; today we would call them co-discoverers. Goodricke is the better known of the two, in part because he won the Copley Medal, in part because of his tragically short life, and in part because he was deaf. Edward Pigott was the more experienced observer, having worked with his father Nathaniel on determining the longitudes of several cities on the Continent. Evidence shows, however, that Goodricke had some astronomical experience while a student at the Warrington Academy. The journals of the two show that they developed a partnership that made the most of both their talents over the brief time (less than five years) they worked together before Goodricke's death. Today, the two are remembered as having suggested eclipses as the cause for the periodic dimming of Algol. This explanation is accepted today as the correct one. In their day, however, most eminent astronomers believed that starspots were a more likely cause for the dimming. By the time of John Goodricke's death, he seems to have accepted that explanation as well. A study of the work of Goodricke and Pigott contains many lessons for today's observers of variable stars. This work was supported by an AAS Small Research Grant and by the Pollack Award of the Dudley Observatory.

  10. Edwards Thermodynamics for a Driven Athermal System with Dry Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradenigo, Giacomo; Ferrero, Ezequiel E.; Bertin, Eric; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    We obtain, using semianalytical transfer operator techniques, the Edwards thermodynamics of a one-dimensional model of blocks connected by harmonic springs and subjected to dry friction. The theory is able to reproduce the linear divergence of the correlation length as a function of energy density observed in direct numerical simulations of the model under tapping dynamics. We further characterize analytically this divergence using a Gaussian approximation for the distribution of mechanically stable configurations, and show that it is related to the existence of a peculiar infinite temperature critical point.

  11. Minimum flow unit installation at the South Edwards Hydro Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.; Bates, D.

    1995-12-31

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. owns and operates the 3.3 MW South Edwards Hydro Plant in Northern New York. The FERC license for this plant requires a minimum flow release in the bypass region of the river. NMPC submitted a license amendment to the FERC to permit the addition of a minimum flow unit to take advantage of this flow. The amendment was accepted, permitting the installation of the 236 kw, 60 cfs unit to proceed. The unit was installed and commissioned in 1994.

  12. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2012-06-01

    John Goodricke and Edward Pigott, working in York, England, between 1781 and 1786, determined the periods of variation of eclipsing binaries such as Algol and Beta Lyrae and speculated that the eclipses of Algol might be caused by a "dark body," perhaps even a planet. They also determined the periods of variation of the first two known Cepheid variables, the stars whose period-luminosity relation today enables astronomers to determine distances to distant galaxies. Goodricke holds special interest because he was completely deaf and because he died at the age of 21. The lives and work of these two astronomers are described.

  13. STS-66 Atlantis Landing and Chute Deployment at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis lands with its drag chute deployed on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) November 14, 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather.

  14. FE Line Diagnostics of Multiply Shocked Stellar Atmospheres: The Mira S. Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Extensive LWP-HI spectra were obtained of the Mira S Car at a rapid time cadence as compared with the shock cycle time of S Car. These spectra were obtained in an attempt to understand the velocity structures in the shocked wind using the fluoresced iron lines. Data analysis of the IUE observations, which included the primary calibration of all of the IUE spectra obtained of S Car, was carried out. In addition, line identifications, flux calculations, background subtractions, and line profile analysis as a function of S Car's pulsational phase were performed. The database incorporated all line identifications as a function of pulsation phase for all IUE LWP-HI observations to date of S Car. At least 45 separate iron line features are identified in the S Car spectrum at one or more phases of the shock cycle, including those due to Fe II (UV 161) which is pumped by three different iron lines; Fe I(UV 44) which is pumped by the Mg II k line. Other strong multiplets that have been identified include UV(1), UV(2), UV(5), UV(32), UV(60), UV(63), UV(161), UV(207), and UV(399). Over 300 weaker lines have also been tentatively identified with Fe line transitions.

  15. A Stellar movie: VLBA monitoring of SiO masers around the Mira variable TX Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, P. J.; Kemball, A. J.

    1998-12-01

    Single dish monitoring of SiO masers around stars have revealed strong, cyclic variations of the spectra. The peak flux of the SiO masers appears to occur at a phase of 0.2 after the optical maximum, from phase 0.3 to 0.8 the average velocity of the spectrum appears to be slightly redshifted with respect to the mean velocity indicating infall of material. Recently Boboltz et al (1997) showed, using VLBA observations, that for the star R Aquarii the SiO masers were infalling at 4.3 km/s from optical phase 0.78 to 1.04. To date this has been the basis of our understanding of the nature of SiO variability. We have been performing regular VLBA observations of the SiO masers around the Mira variable TX Cam. We have been taking data every two weeks and will eventually obtain 50 epochs covering 1.25 cycles of the star's phase. We shall present a movie of the structural changes occurring for the first 80% of our program, covering phases 0.3 to 1.3. We see complex structural changes including both infalling and outflowing gas. We also have information on the changing polarization structure of the masers. We shall discuss our observations in the context of the hydrodynamic models of Bowen.

  16. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of the Mira binary W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Hoai, Do; Tuyet Nhung, Pham; Diep, Pham Ngoc; Thi Phuong, Nguyen; Tuan-Anh, Pham; Thi Thao, Nguyen; Darriulat, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We analyse ALMA observations of the 12CO(3-2) emission of the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the Mira variable binary star W Aql. These provide, for the first time, spatially resolved Doppler velocity spectra of the CSE up to angular distances to the central star of ∼ 5″ (meaning some 2000 AU). The exploratory nature of the observations (only five minutes in each of two different configurations) does not allow for a detailed modelling of the properties of the CSE but provides important qualitative information on its morphology and kinematics. Emission is found to be enhanced along an axis moving from east/west to north-east/south-west when the angular distance from the central star projected on the plane of the sky increases from zero to four arcseconds. In parallel, the Doppler velocity distribution displays asymmetry along an axis moving from east/west to north-west/south-east. The results are discussed in the context of earlier observations, in particular of the dust morphology. ) operated by the NAOJ.

  17. Edwards polaron formation : From one to three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, M.; Mohanta, N.; Taraphder, A.; Min, B. I.; Fehske, H.

    2016-04-01

    Employing a self-consistent (optimized) variational diagonalization scheme, we investigate the formation of polaronic quasiparticles in a spinless fermion-boson transport model that couples the movement of charge carriers to fluctuations and correlations of a background medium. The background is parameterized by bosonic degrees of freedom. The variational fermion-boson Hilbert space is constructed to achieve high accuracy in one to three spatial dimensions with modest computational requirements. To characterize the ground-state properties of the Edwards model in the single-particle sector, we present exact numerical results for the polaron band dispersion, quasiparticle weight, Drude weight, mass enhancement, and the particle-boson correlations in a wide parameter regime. In the Edwards model, transport will be quasifree, diffusive or boson-assisted in the weakly fermion-boson coupled, fluctuation-dominated or strongly correlated regimes, respectively. Thereby correlated transport is not only assisted but also limited by the bosonic excitations. As a result, the Drude weight remains finite even in the limit of very small boson frequencies. For a strongly correlated background, closed loops are important, in any dimension, to generate a finite effective particle mass even when the free fermion has an infinite mass.

  18. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  19. The discovery of a second species of Mallophthiria Edwards (Diptera, Bombyliidae, Crocidiinae) from Chile.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Carolina; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2014-01-01

    The Neotropical genus Mallophthiria Edwards is restricted to Chile (Concepción and Choapa) and comprises M. lanata Edwards, 1930 and M. elguetai sp. nov. The new species is described and illustrations of the external morphology of adults and male and female terminalia are also included. PMID:25543730

  20. 77 FR 6595 - In the Matter of Edward G. Johnson; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28... COMMISSION In the Matter of Edward G. Johnson; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately) I Mr. Edward G... must file an exemption request, in accordance with 10 CFR 2.302(g), with their initial paper...

  1. A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on May 1, 2001. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards would subsequently service the shuttle and mount it on a 747 for the ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  2. Credit USAF. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. View of Motor Repair Shop (originally T-16), probably shortly after completion in 1943 - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Motor Repair Shop T-16, Third & C Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 2. Credit USAF, 1943. Original housed in the AFFTC/HO, Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Credit USAF, 1943. Original housed in the AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. View looks north northwest at south and east facades of hangar as it nears completion. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar No. 1, First & B Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Evaluation of the Edwards Lifesciences SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve.

    PubMed

    Minha, Sa'ar; Waksman, Ron

    2014-11-01

    Severe aortic stenosis is a common valvular disease and is associated with both morbidity and mortality. Surgical aortic valve replacement was the only available therapeutic option until technological advances allowed for the development of a transcatheter heart valve system. The first available THV was the Edwards SAPIEN. The merits of this system in terms of safety and efficacy were explored in the pivotal Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) randomized trial whose results then led to the approval of this device for commercial use in the US. The valve is now indicated for inoperable patients and may be considered an alternative for surgery for high-risk patients. Two successive models, the XT and more recently the S3, were developed with the intent to improve procedural outcomes. In this article, the SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve family is described in terms of technology, scientific data and future directions. PMID:25109297

  5. Phenotypic extremes in liveborn monozygotic twins with mosaic Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Neidin; Cunningham, Katie; Green, Andrew; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mosaic trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in monozygotic diamniotic liveborn twins is rare. We describe such a case involving preterm male infants. Although both infants had a low percentage of trisomy 18 cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, their varied phenotypic presentation of mosaic trisomy 18 resulted in one twin surviving, with the other twin's demise at 1 month of age. Despite the presence of trisomy 18 in peripheral leucocytes, further analysis of a buccal smear and skin biopsy of the surviving twin did not show evidence of trisomy 18. Establishing such diagnoses in a timely manner is imperative for the child, parents and clinicians. The clinical course of these twins reflects the unpredictable prognosis associated with the diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 18, and emphasises the challenges that can be encountered when counselling parents. PMID:26561224

  6. A psychoanalytic study of Edward de Vere's The Tempest.

    PubMed

    Waugaman, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    There is now abundant evidence that Freud was correct in believing Edward de Vere (1550-1604) wrote under the pseudonym "William Shakespeare." One common reaction is "What difference does it make?" I address that question by examining many significant connections between de Vere's life and The Tempest. Such studies promise to bring our understanding of Shakespeare's works back into line with our usual psychoanalytic approach to literature, which examines how a great writer's imagination weaves a new creation out of the threads of his or her life experiences. One source of the intense controversy about de Vere's authorship is our idealization of the traditional author, about whom we know so little that, as Freud noted, we can imagine his personality was as fine as his works. PMID:20001197

  7. Lungworm (Crenosoma vulpis) infection in dogs on Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed Central

    Bihr, T; Conboy, G A

    1999-01-01

    Crenosoma vulpis is a nematode lungworm that is highly prevalent in the red fox population of Atlantic Canada. Dogs are susceptible to infection with clinical signs consisting primarily of a chronic cough. A recent report of C. vulpis infection in 3 dogs on Prince Edward Island prompted an investigation into the importance of this parasite as a cause of chronic respiratory disease in Island dogs. A general prevalence was determined through the necropsy of dogs euthanized at the local humane society. Lungs were removed and examined for parasites using a lung flush technique. Rectal feces was collected and examined for first-stage larvae using the Baermann technique and zinc sulfate centrifugal flotation. Ten of 310 dogs (3.2%) were positive with 0-35 worms (mean = 11.0 +/- 13.4) recovered. First-stage larvae of C. vulpis were recovered in the rectal feces of the one animal in which no worms were recovered on lung flush. A second survey was conducted examining fecal samples with the Baermann technique from afebrile dogs with presenting signs of chronic cough that had no history of recent anthelmintic treatment and showed no signs of cardiac disease, based on physical examination. Fifteen of 55 dogs examined (27.3%) were definitively diagnosed as C. vulpis-positive. All of the infected dogs were treated with fenbendazole (50 mg/kg body weight, p.o. q24 h for 3-7 days). Clinical signs resolved in all of the dogs and fecal samples were negative 2-4 weeks posttreatment. It was concluded that C. vulpis infection was a significant cause of upper respiratory disease in dogs on Prince Edward Island and should be considered in all dogs with presenting signs of chronic cough. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:12001335

  8. STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  9. Enhanced recharge and karst, Edwards aquifer, south central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, W.W. Jr. . Center for Water Research)

    1993-02-01

    Enhanced recharge is a water management strategy which can add significant quantities of ground water to the available water resources of the San Antonio region by utilizing the immense storage capacity of the unconfined zone of the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer presently is the sole source of water for a population of over 1,200,000, meeting public supply, industrial, and irrigation demands over a wide area of south central Texas. Valdina Farms Sinkhole is located adjacent to Seco Creek in Medina County and is in the recharge zone of the aquifer. Initial studies indicated that the sinkholes was capable of taking flood flows from Seco Creek and functioning as a recharge structure. Stream channels in the cavern system associated with Valdina Farms Sinkhole were incised into cave deposits and flood debris was present in the caverns at some distance from the sinkhole. Chemical analyses of samples of water from the cave and from nearby wells showed nitrate concentrations that decreased with distance from the cavern. Gradient of the potentiometric surface in the vicinity of the cave was very low, indicating high values of hydraulic conductivity for the aquifer. Based on evidence from these field studies a dam was constructed in 1982 on Seco Creek and a flood diversion channel was excavated to the sinkhole. Reservoir capacity is 2 acre-feet and design recharge rate is 3.8-6.7 m[sup 3]/sec. Annual recharge at the sinkhole has varied from 0 during periods of low runoff to 12,915 acre-feet.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A study of dust nucleation in Mira. Part I. (Kaminski+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, T.; Wong, K. T.; Schmidt, M. R.; Muller, H. S. P.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Cherchneff, I.; Menten, K. M.; Keller, D.; Brunken, S.; Winters, J. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Files contain ALMA observations of AlO emission in Mira (omicron Ceti) in two rotational transitions, N=6-5 and 9-8, and obtained at different epochs. Spectral cubes, moment-zero maps, and spectra of the entire emission source are provided and correspond directly to those presented in the paper (Figs. 2, 3, and 5). Complementary continuum data are also included in separate files. The data were self-calibrated and therefore their absolute astrometry is inaccurate. Relative spatial coordinates should be used. (2 data files).

  11. Mid-infrared interferometry of the Mira variable RR Sco with the VLTI MIDI instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Bergeat, J.; Driebe, T.; Graser, U.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Köhler, R.; Leinert, Ch.; Lopez, B.; Malbet, F.; Morel, S.; Paresce, F.; Perrin, G.; Preibisch, Th.; Richichi, A.; Schertl, D.; Schöller, M.; Sol, H.; Weigelt, G.; Wittkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of the first mid-infrared interferometric observations of the Mira variable RR Sco with the MID-infrared Interferometer (MIDI) coupled to the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), together with K-band observations using VLTI VINCI. The observations were carried out in June 2003, when the variability phase of the object was 0.6, using two unit telescopes (UT1 and UT3), as part of the Science Demonstration Time (SDT) program of the instrument. Projected baseline lengths ranged from 73 to 102 m, and a spectral resolution of 30 was employed in the observations, which enabled us to obtain the wavelength dependence of the visibility in the region between 8 and 13 μm. The uniform-disk diameter was found to be 18 mas between 8 and 10 μm, while it gradually increases at wavelengths longer than 10 μm to reach 24 mas at 13 μm. The uniform-disk diameter between 8 and 13 μm is significantly larger than the K-band uniform-disk diameter of 10.2 ± 0.5 mas measured using VLTI VINCI with projected baseline lengths of 15-16 m, three weeks after the MIDI observations. Our model calculations show that optically thick emission from a warm molecular envelope consisting of H2O and SiO can cause the apparent mid -infrared diameter to be much larger than the continuum diameter. We find that the warm molecular envelope model extending to ˜2.3 R\\star with a temperature of ˜1400 K and column densities of H2O and SiO of 3 × 1021 cm-2 and 1 × 1020 cm-2, respectively, can reproduce the observed uniform-disk diameters between 8 and 10 μm. The observed increase of the uniform-disk diameter longward of 10 μm can be explained by an optically thin dust shell consisting of silicate and corundum grains. The inner radius of the optically thin dust shell is derived to be 7-8 R\\star with a temperature of ˜700 K, and the optical depth at 10 μm is found to be ˜0.025. Based on observations made with the Very Large Telescope

  12. The Nucleus of the Planetary Nebula EGB 6 as a Post-Mira Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Esplin, Taran L.; Hawley, Steven A.; Liebert, James; Munari, Ulisse

    2016-08-01

    EGB 6 is a faint, large, ancient planetary nebula (PN). Its central star, a hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD), is a prototype of a rare class of PN nuclei associated with dense, compact emission-line knots. The central star also shows excess fluxes in both the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR). In a 2013 paper, we used Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to show that the compact nebula is a point-like source, located 0.″16 (˜118 AU) from the WD. We attributed the NIR excess to an M dwarf companion star, which appeared to coincide with the dense emission knot. We now present new ground-based NIR spectroscopy, showing that the companion is actually a much cooler source with a continuous spectrum, apparently a dust-enshrouded low-luminosity star. New HST images confirm common proper motion of the emission knot and red source with the WD. The I-band, NIR, and MIR fluxes are variable, possibly on timescales as short as days. We can fit the spectral energy distribution (SED) with four blackbodies (the WD, a ˜1850 K NIR component, and MIR dust at 385 and 175 K). Alternatively, we show that the NIR/MIR SED is very similar to that of Class 0/I young stellar objects. We suggest a scenario in which the EGB 6 nucleus is descended from a wide binary similar to the Mira system, in which a portion of the wind from an AGB star was captured into an accretion disk around a companion star; a remnant of this disk has survived to the present time and is surrounded by gas photoionized by UV radiation from the WD. Based in part on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based in part on observations with the 1.5 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

  13. The Nucleus of the Planetary Nebula EGB 6 as a Post-Mira Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Esplin, Taran L.; Hawley, Steven A.; Liebert, James; Munari, Ulisse

    2016-08-01

    EGB 6 is a faint, large, ancient planetary nebula (PN). Its central star, a hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD), is a prototype of a rare class of PN nuclei associated with dense, compact emission-line knots. The central star also shows excess fluxes in both the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR). In a 2013 paper, we used Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to show that the compact nebula is a point-like source, located 0.″16 (∼118 AU) from the WD. We attributed the NIR excess to an M dwarf companion star, which appeared to coincide with the dense emission knot. We now present new ground-based NIR spectroscopy, showing that the companion is actually a much cooler source with a continuous spectrum, apparently a dust-enshrouded low-luminosity star. New HST images confirm common proper motion of the emission knot and red source with the WD. The I-band, NIR, and MIR fluxes are variable, possibly on timescales as short as days. We can fit the spectral energy distribution (SED) with four blackbodies (the WD, a ∼1850 K NIR component, and MIR dust at 385 and 175 K). Alternatively, we show that the NIR/MIR SED is very similar to that of Class 0/I young stellar objects. We suggest a scenario in which the EGB 6 nucleus is descended from a wide binary similar to the Mira system, in which a portion of the wind from an AGB star was captured into an accretion disk around a companion star; a remnant of this disk has survived to the present time and is surrounded by gas photoionized by UV radiation from the WD. Based in part on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based in part on observations with the 1.5 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

  14. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing May 16 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their

  15. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing 16 May on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards AFB with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their

  16. Postdilatation ballooning of an Edwards ELITE rapid deployment bioprosthesis for a severe paravalvular leak.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Marco; Trabattoni, Piero; Polvani, Gianluca; Agrifoglio, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Severe paravalvular leak may be observed following rapid deployment aortic valve implantation. We report an open off-label use of postdilatation ballooning of an Edwards Intuity ELITE aortic prosthesis to manage an intraoperative paravalvular leak. PMID:27346033

  17. Genotypic investigation of Clostridium difficile in Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Martin, H; Abbott, L P; Low, D E; Willey, B; Mulvey, M; Weese, J Scott

    2008-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of disease in Canada; however, little information is available about the disease in the Maritime provinces. The objective of the present study was to characterize C difficile isolates obtained from people hospitalized with C difficile infection in Prince Edward Island. One hundred twenty-six C difficile ELISA toxin-positive stool samples were obtained and cultured using an enrichment protocol. C difficile was isolated from 105 of 126 (83%) samples. Twenty-two different ribotypes were identified. The most common ribotype, ribotype W, was a North American pulsotype 2 (NAP2), toxinotype 0 strain, which represented 18% of isolates. The next most common ribotype was a NAP1, toxinotype III strain, which accounted for 11% of isolates. Ribotype 027/NAP1 only accounted for five (4.7%) isolates. Forty-five per cent of isolates possessed genes encoding production of binary toxin. Three different ribotypes, all NAP1, toxinotype III strains, had a frameshift mutation in the tcdC gene (Delta117), while one isolate (ribotype 078, NAP4, toxinotype V) had a truncating mutation (C184T) in the tcdC gene. PMID:19436570

  18. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  19. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider preparing for an F-104 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Scheider is shown standing in the cockpit of a two-seat F-104. He is wearing a full pressure suit, which is required on all flights above 50,000 feet. Ed served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and graduated in 1973. He was then assigned as an engineering test pilot, and as an instructor at the Naval Test Pilot School. He first arrived at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) as a Navy Liaison Officer on July 5, 1982. He joined NASA as a research pilot a year later. Ed was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA-operated SR-71 Blackbirds. Ed retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  20. The JIM interview. Edward M. Kennedy, United States Senator.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, E M

    2000-05-01

    Senator Edward M. Kennedy has represented Massachusetts in the United States Senate for thirty-six years. He was first elected in 1962 to finish the term of his brother, President John F. Kennedy. Since then, he has been elected to six full terms, and he is now the third most senior member of the senate. The efforts to bring quality health care to every American is a battle that Kennedy has been waging ever since he arrived in the Senate. Recent achievements include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which makes it easier for those who change their job or lose their job to keep their health insurance, and the Children's Health Insurance Act of 1997, which makes health insurance more widely available to children through age 18 in all 50 states. A strong supporter of clinical research, Senator Kennedy cosponsored the Clinical Research Enhancement Act and has been a vocal advocate of stem cell research. He is currently the senior Democrat on the Labor and Human Resources committee in the Senate. PMID:10822894

  1. W. Edwards Deming, quality analysis, and total behavior management

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Richard R.; Saunders, Jay L.

    1994-01-01

    During the past 10 years, the inclusion of the word “quality” in descriptions of production methods, management approaches, educational systems, service system changes, and so forth, has grown exponentially. It appears that no new approach to any problem is likely to be given much consideration today without overt acknowledgment that some improvement in quality must be the outcome. The origins of the importance of quality are primarily rooted in the awakening recognition of the influence of W. Edwards Deming in the post-World War II restoration of Japanese industry. We provide a brief overview of Deming's approach to modernizing management methods and discuss recent criticisms from the field of organizational behavior management that his approach lacks emphasis on the role of reinforcement. We offer a different analysis of Deming's approach and relate its evolution to the contingencies of reinforcement for the behavior of consulting. We also provide an example of problem solving with Deming's approach in a social service setting familiar to many behavior analysts. PMID:22478176

  2. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing May 16 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their

  3. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing 16 May on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards AFB with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their

  4. Edward Burne-Jones' Heavenly Conception: A Biblical Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheney, L. D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Edward Burne-Jones was a Pre-Raphaelite artist and designer, who collaborated with William Morris on many decorative arts (stained glass windows, book illustrations, ceramic and tapestry designs). He was a founding partner in the firm Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company. Burne-Jones composed The Days of Creation between 1870 and 1876 for the Morris firm. These paintings were executed in gouache and gold paint, and cartoons were made for tile and in stained glass, for the Church of St. Editha at Tamworth in Staffordshire. Burne-Jones' creation was highly praised and elegantly described by Oscar Wilde: “The picture is divided into six compartments, each representing a day in the Creation of the World, under the symbol of an angel holding a crystal globe, within which is shown the work of a day.” This paper will examine how Burne-Jones visualized an unusual celestial creation where angels holding magical spheres unveil the divine manifestation for the creation of a terrestrial realm. He created a cosmic utopia of the natural world.

  5. The selenium status of dairy herds in Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Bulk tank milk selenium (Se) concentration was compared with mean serum Se concentration in 15 herds and was found to be an accurate reflection of the herd Se status. The Se status of 109 Prince Edward Island (PEI) dairy herds was monitored for 1 year using bulk tank milk Se concentration. Fifty-nine percent of the herds surveyed were, at some point, found to be marginal or deficient in Se, putting them at risk of disease and suboptimal production. The periods of greatest risk of deficiency were fall and winter, at which time 5% and 4%, respectively, of herds sampled fell in the range considered truly deficient in Se. Herds in which Se supplementation was provided in the form of a commercial dairy concentrate were over 4 times more likely to be Se-adequate than herds not using this method, and adjusted average daily milk yield was 7.6% greater in herds determined to be Se-adequate when compared with Se-marginal herds. We conclude that many dairy producers in PEI are providing insufficient supplementary Se in the ration to meet the recommended Se intake for lactating cows. PMID:15025148

  6. A Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis after 44 years of good performance.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Luca Salvatore; De Feo, Marisa; Della Corte, Alessandro; Cerasuolo, Flavio; Santé, Pasquale; Torella, Michele; Nappi, Gianantonio

    2010-06-01

    The Starr-Edwards caged-ball prosthesis has been widely used to replace cardiac valves. The Model 6120 mitral prosthesis was introduced on the market in 1965 to reduce the high incidence of ball variance and thromboembolism of the previous model. We report the case of a Starr-Edwards Model 6120 which had been in place for 44 years and was still well functioning with no apparent structural damage. PMID:20812436

  7. Thirty years of IVF: the legacy of Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards.

    PubMed

    Brinsden, Peter R; Brinsden, Peter R

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a review of the early collaboration between Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards, gynecologist and scientist, which ultimately led to the birth of Louise Brown in 1978, the first baby to be born as a result of in-vitro fertilisation. Following this momentous event, the author shows how Steptoe and Edwards continued to influence further developments in the treatment of infertile couples, both in the United Kingdom and Worldwide. PMID:19925325

  8. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, T.A.; Hanson, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    All of the hydrogeologic subdivisions within the Edwards aquifer outcrop in Comal County have some porosity and permeability. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided; and hydro- geologic subdivision II, the cyclic and marine members, undivided, of the Person Formation. The two types of porosity in the Edwards aquifer outcrop are fabric selective, which is related to depositional or diagenetic elements and typically exists in specific stratigraphic horizons; and not fabric selective, which can exist in any litho- stratigraphic horizon. Two faults, Comal Springs and Hueco Springs, completely, or almost completely, offset the Edwards aquifer along much of their respective traces across Comal County. Porous and permeable Edwards aquifer limestones are juxtaposed against impermeable upper confining beds along all, or most of their traces across Comal County. These faults could be barriers, or partial barriers, to ground-water flow where the aquifer is offset. In Comal County, the Edwards aquifer is probably most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Possible contamination can result from spills, leakage of hazardous materials, or runoff onto the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristics of the recharge zone.

  9. Compliance through pollution prevention opportunity assessments at Edwards AFB -- Development, results and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Beutelman, H.P.; Lawrence, A.

    1999-07-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), located in the Mojave Desert of southern California, is required to comply with environmental requirements for air pollution emissions, hazardous waste disposal, and clean water. The resources required to meet these many compliance requirements represents an ever increasing financial burden to the base, and to the Department of Defense. A recognized superior approach to environmental management is to achieve compliance through a proactive pollution prevention (P2) program which mitigates, and when possible, eliminates compliance requirements and costs, while at the same time reducing pollution released to the environment. At Edwards AFB, the Environmental Management Office P2 Branch developed and implemented a strategy that addresses this concept, better known as Compliance Through Pollution Prevention (CTP2). At the 91st AWMA Annual Meeting and Exhibition, Edwards AFB presented a paper on its strategy and implementation of its CTP2 concept. Part of that strategy and implementation included accomplishment of process specific focused P2 opportunity assessments (OAs). Starting in 1998, Edwards AFB initiated a CTP2 OA project where OAs were targeted on those operational processes, identified as compliance sites, that contributed most to the compliance requirements and costs at Edwards AFB. The targeting of these compliance sites was accomplished by developing a compliance matrix that prioritized processes in accordance with an operational risk management approach. The Edwards AFB CTP2 PPOA project is the first of its kind within the Air Force Material Command, and is serving as a benchmark for establishment of the CTP2 OA process.

  10. Short-term hemodynamic performance of the mitral Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve. Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Morehead, A. J.; Thomas, J. D.; Smedira, N. G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Marchand, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although long-term durability data exist, little data are available concerning the hemodynamic performance of the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve in the mitral position. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients who were implanted with mitral PERIMOUNT valves at seven international centers between January 1996 and February 1997 consented to participate in a short-term echocardiography follow-up. Echocardiographs were collected at a mean of 600+/-133 days after implantation (range, 110 to 889 days); all underwent blinded core lab analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, peak gradients were 9.09+/-3.43 mm Hg (mean, 4.36+/-1.79 mm Hg) and varied inversely with valve size (p < 0.05). The effective orifice areas were 2.5+/-0.6 cm2 and tended to increase with valve size (p = 0.08). Trace mitral regurgitation (MR) was common (n = 48), 9 patients had mild MR, 1 had moderate MR, none had severe MR. All MR was central (n = 55) or indeterminate (n = 3). No paravalvular leaks were observed. Mitral regurgitation flow areas were 3.4+/-2.8 cm2 and were without significant volumes. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study, these mitral valves are associated with trace, although physiologically insignificant, central MR. Despite known echocardiographic limitations, the PERIMOUNT mitral valves exhibit similar hemodynamics to other prosthetic valves.

  11. X-31 in Banked Flight over Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    One of two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Demonstrator aircraft, flown by an international test organization at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, turns tightly over the desert floor on a research flight. The aircraft obtained data that may apply to the design and development of highly-maneuverable aircraft of the future. The X-31 had a three-axis thrust-vectoring system, coupled with advanced flight controls, to allow it to maneuver tightly at very high angles of attack. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight

  12. X-31 #1 in Flight over Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The first X-31 (Bu. No. 164584) flies over Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1993. Aircraft 584 completed 292 flights during the Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) program before being lost on January 19, 1995 when icing in the nose probe caused the flight control computer to receive bad data. German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang ejected after the aircraft became uncontrollable. The program continued, using the second aircraft (Bu. No. 164585). The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight at a 70-degree angle of attack. On April 29, 1993

  13. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  14. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  15. Validation of the SMOS-MIRAS Soil Moisture Product (SML2UDP) in the Pampean Region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niclòs, Raquel; Rivas, Raúl; Sánchez, Juan Manuel; García-Santos, Vicente; Doña, Carolina; Valor, Enric; Holzman, Mauro; Bayala, Martín Ignacio; Carmona, Facundo; Ocampo, Dora; Soldano, Alvaro; Thibeault, Marc

    2014-05-01

    A validation campaign was carried out to evaluate the SMOS-MIRAS Soil Moisture (SM) SML2UDP product (v5.51) in the Pampean Region of Argentina on February 2013. The study area was selected because it is a vast area of flatlands containing quite homogeneous rainfed croplands, with prevalence of soybean crops, considered SMOS nominal land uses (i.e., crops with vegetation heights not exceeding 1 to 2 m by opposition to trees). Transects of ground SM measurements were collected by Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x SM probes within four ISEA-4H9 DGG SMOS nodes. The SM data obtained by each probe transect in each parcel were checked by collecting soil samples in the same parcels at the same time and measuring their masses. The gravimetric method was used to obtain reference values. An uncertainty of ± 0.03 m3m-3 was obtained for the ML2x probes. Additionally, they were calibrated in the laboratory for different SMs by saturating and drying a specific and representative variety of soil samples collected from the experimental parcels (loam, clay loam and silt loam samples). This calibration showed again accurate operations for the ML2x probes, which even attain uncertainties of ±0.01 m3m-3, in agreement with the manufacturer. The comparison of the SM transect data collected during the campaign with the SMOS-MIRAS SML2UDP product values showed a negative bias between concurrent SMOS data and ground SM measurements, which means a slight SMOS-MIRAS underestimation, and a standard deviation of ± 0.06 m3m-3. The validation sites were selected taking as reference the locations of permanent SM stations property of the Argentinean Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE, National Commission of Space Activities), Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA, National Institute of Farming Technology) and Instituto de Hidrología de Llanuras (IHLLA, Plain Hydrology Institute). During the campaign several transects were carried out in the parcels where permanent SM

  16. Conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, K.J.; Dutton, A.R.; Hovorka, S.D.; Worthington, S.R.H.; Painter, S.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical ground-water flow models for the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region of Texas generally have been based on a diffuse-flow conceptualization. That is, although conduits likely are present, the assumption is that flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of small fractures and openings sufficiently numerous that the aquifer can be considered a porous-media continuum at the regional scale. Whether flow through large fractures and conduits or diffuse flow predominates in the Edwards aquifer at the regional scale is an open question. A new numerical ground-water-flow model (Edwards aquifer model) that incorporates important components of the latest information and an alternate conceptualization of the Edwards aquifer was developed. The conceptualization upon which the Edwards aquifer model is based emphasizes conduit development and conduit flow, and the model can be considered a test of one of two reasonable conceptualizations. The model incorporates conduits simulated as generally continuously connected, one-cell-wide (1,320 feet) zones with very large hydraulic-conductivity values (as much as 300,000 feet per day). The locations of the conduits are based on a number of factors, including major potentiometric-surface troughs in the aquifer, the presence of sinking streams, geochemical information, and geologic structures (for example, faults and grabens). The model includes both the San Antonio and Barton Springs segments of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas, and was calibrated for steady-state (1939-46) and transient (1947-2000) conditions. Transient simulations were conducted using monthly recharge and pumpage (withdrawals) data. The predominantly conduit-flow conceptualization incorporated in the Edwards aquifer model yielded a reasonably good match between measured and simulated hydraulic heads in the confined part of the aquifer and between measured and simulated springflows. The simulated directions of flow in the

  17. [Edward Blyth (1810-1873). Father of the Indian ornitology].

    PubMed

    Malec, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Edward Blyth was born on 23 December 1810. When he was ayoung man he took an interest with the zoology which became his life's passion. As a young naturalist he was a conscientious observer of the nature and a man gifted with a superb memory. Unfortunately his career was not successful in London because of the conflict with the younger of the Gray brothers. Facing the prospect of no employment in The British Museum, Blyth decided to leave England for Calcutta where he was offered a post of a museum curator. The English naturalist spent in India the years from 1841 to 1862. During that time he greatly enriched the zoological collection of the museum and consequently the place had much more visitors. Regarding his private life he got married in 1854 to Elisabeth Mary Turner Hodges. Undoubtedly the next four year were the happiest in Blyth's life. After his wife's death Blyth's health condition deteriorated. The ongoing conflicts he kept having while the first stay in India and constant struggle to improve his financial status made him decide to return to England. Blyth left India in 1862. After coming back to his homeland he continued the naturalistic passions. Nevertheless Blyth was constantly troubled by the financial problems. Also, his health, both mental and physical, systematically deteriorated. Finally the death came on 27 December 1873, in London. Blyth tried in vain to gain the recognition and join the scientific establishment of the 19th century England. Constant lack of satisfactory income and often problems with health prevented the ornithologist to be fully devote to his passion. The aim of this article is to highlight some of the most important and interesting events of Blyth's life. Moreover, another objective is to popularise Blyth and his work since he was one of the greatest naturalists of that time. PMID:25033527

  18. Edward Hitchcock's pre-Darwinian (1840) "tree of life".

    PubMed

    Archibald, J David

    2009-01-01

    The "tree of life" iconography, representing the history of life, dates from at least the latter half of the 18th century, but evolution as the mechanism providing this bifurcating history of life did not appear until the early 19th century. There was also a shift from the straight line, scala naturae view of change in nature to a more bifurcating or tree-like view. Throughout the 19th century authors presented tree-like diagrams, some regarding the Deity as the mechanism of change while others argued for evolution. Straight-line or anagenetic evolution and bifurcating or cladogenetic evolution are known in biology today, but are often misrepresented in popular culture, especially with anagenesis being confounded with scala naturae. Although well known in the mid 19th century, the geologist Edward Hitchcock has been forgotten as an early, if not the first author to publish a paleontologically based "tree of life" beginning in 1840 in the first edition of his popular general geology text Elementary Geology. At least 31 editions were published and those between 1840 and 1859 had this "paleontological chart" showing two trees, one for fossil and living plants and another for animals set within a context of geological time. Although the chart did not vary in later editions, the text explaining the chart did change to reflect newer ideas in paleontology and geology. Whereas Lamarck, Chambers, Bronn, Darwin, and Haeckel saw some form of transmutation as the mechanism that created their "trees of life," Hitchcock, like his contemporaries Agassiz and Miller, who also produced "trees of life," saw a deity as the agent of change. Through each edition of his book Hitchcock denounced the newer transmutationist hypotheses of Lamarck, then Chambers, and finally Darwin in an 1860 edition that no longer presented his tree-like "paleontological chart." PMID:20027787

  19. STS-58 Landing at Edwards with Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A drag chute slows the space shuttle Columbia as it rolls to a perfect landing concluding NASA's longest mission at that time, STS-58, at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 8:06 a.m. (PST) touchdown 1 November 1993 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 14 day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 7:53 a.m. (PDT), October 18, was the second spacelab flight dedicated to life sciences research. Seven Columbia crewmembers performed a series of experiments to gain more knowledge on how the human body adapts to the weightless environment of space. Crewmembers on this flight included: John Blaha, commander; Rick Searfoss, pilot; payload commander Rhea Seddon; mission specialists Bill MacArthur, David Wolf, and Shannon Lucid; and payload specialist Martin Fettman. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space

  20. Conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard J.; Dutton, A.R.; Hovorka, S.D.; Worthington, S.R.H.; Painter, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A new numerical ground-water-flow model (Edwards aquifer model) that incorporates important components of the latest information and plausible conceptualization of the Edwards aquifer was developed. The model includes both the San Antonio and Barton Springs segments of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas, and was calibrated for steady-state (1939?46) and transient (1947?2000) conditions, excluding Travis County. Transient simulations were conducted using monthly recharge and pumpage (withdrawal) data. The model incorporates conduits simulated as continuously connected (other than being separated in eastern Uvalde and southwestern Medina Counties), one-cell-wide (1,320 feet) zones with very large hydraulic-conductivity values (as much as 300,000 feet per day). The locations of the conduits were based on a number of factors, including major potentiometric-surface troughs in the aquifer, the presence of sinking streams, geochemical information, and geologic structures (for example, faults and grabens). The simulated directions of flow in the Edwards aquifer model are most strongly influenced by the presence of simulated conduits and barrier faults. The simulated flow in the Edwards aquifer is influenced by the locations of the simulated conduits, which tend to facilitate flow. The simulated subregional flow directions generally are toward the nearest conduit and subsequently along the conduits from the recharge zone into the confined zone and toward the major springs. Structures simulated in the Edwards aquifer model influencing ground-water flow that tend to restrict flow are barrier faults. The influence of simulated barrier faults on flow directions is most evident in northern Medina County. A water budget is an accounting of inflow to, outflow from, and storage change in the aquifer. For the Edwards aquifer model steady-state simulation, recharge (from seepage losses from streams and infiltration of rainfall) accounts for 93.5 percent of the

  1. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio

  2. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  3. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  4. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  5. SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  6. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider in Front of SR-71 Blackbird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    SR-71 research pilot Ed Schneider is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Schneider became a NASA research pilot at Dryden in 1983. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  7. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design

  8. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  9. STS-58 Landing at Edwards with Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A drag chute slows the space shuttle Columbia as it rolls to a perfect landing concluding NASA's longest mission at that time, STS-58, at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 8:06 a.m. (PST) touchdown 1 November 1993 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 14 day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 7:53 a.m. (PDT), October 18, was the second spacelab flight dedicated to life sciences research. Seven Columbia crewmembers performed a series of experiments to gain more knowledge on how the human body adapts to the weightless environment of space. Crewmembers on this flight included: John Blaha, commander; Rick Searfoss, pilot; payload commander Rhea Seddon; mission specialists Bill MacArthur, David Wolf, and Shannon Lucid; and payload specialist Martin Fettman. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space

  10. Translational mini-review series on vaccines: The Edward Jenner Museum and the history of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A J; Parker, S

    2007-03-01

    Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination must rank as one of the most important medical advances of all time and is a prominent example of the power of rational enquiry being brought to bear during the Age of Enlightenment in 18th century Europe. In the modern era many millions of lives are saved each year by vaccines that work essentially on the same principles that were established by Edward Jenner more than 200 years ago. His country home in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, is where he carried out his work and where he spent most of his life. The building is now a museum in which the life and times of Jenner are commemorated including not only the discovery of smallpox vaccination but also his other important scientific contributions to natural history and medicine. The trustees of the Edward Jenner museum are committed to promoting the museum as a real and "virtual" educational centre that is both entertaining and informative. PMID:17302886

  11. Dryden Fllight Reseach Facility, Edwards, California STA (Shuttle Training Aircraft, Gulf Stream II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dryden Fllight Reseach Facility, Edwards, California STA (Shuttle Training Aircraft, Gulf Stream II) flys chase as STS-41returns from it's mission to Deploy Ulysses Spacecraft... Discovery's main gear is about to touch down at Edwards Air Foce Base to end a four-day mission in space for it's five-man crew. The vehicle landed at 6:57 a.m. Onboard the spacecraft were Astronauts Richard N. Richards, Robert D Cabana, William M Sheperd, Bruce E. Melnick and Thomas D. Akers.

  12. Geologic history and hydrogeologic setting of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.A.; Bush, P.W.; Baker, E.T.

    1994-01-01

    Because the diagenetic effects of cementation, recrystallization, and mineral replacement diminish the hydraulic conductivity of most rocks composing the Trinity and Edwards-Trinity aquifers, transmissivity values average less than 10,000 feet squared per day over more than 90 percent of the study area. However, the effects of tectonic fractures and dissolution in the Balcones fault zone cause transmissivity values to average about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the study area.

  13. Detection of an asymmetry in the envelope of the carbon Mira R Fornacis using VLTI/MIDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, C.; Sacuto, S.; Klotz, D.; Ohnaka, K.; Wittkowski, M.; Nowotny, W.; Jorissen, A.; Hron, J.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: We present a study of the envelope morphology of the carbon Mira R For with VLTI/MIDI. This object is one of the few asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars that underwent a dust-obscuration event. The cause of such events is still a matter of discussion. Several symmetric and asymmetric scenarios have been suggested in the literature. Methods: Mid-infrared interferometric observations were obtained separated by two years. The observations probe different depths of the atmosphere and cover different pulsation phases. The visibilities and the differential phases were interpreted using GEM-FIND, a tool for fitting spectrally dispersed interferometric observations with the help of wavelength-dependent geometric models. Results: We report the detection of an asymmetric structure revealed through the MIDI differential phase. This asymmetry is observed at the same baseline and position angle two years later. The observations are best simulated with a model that includes a uniform-disc plus a Gaussian envelope plus a point-source. The geometric model can reproduce both the visibilities and the differential phase signatures. Conclusions: Our MIDI data favour explanations of the R For obscuration event that are based on an asymmetric geometry. We clearly detect a photocentre shift between the star and the strongly resolved dust component. This might be caused by a dust clump or a substellar companion. However, the available observations do not allow us to distinguish between the two options. The finding has strong implications for future studies of the geometry of the envelope of AGB stars: if this is a binary, are all AGB stars that show an obscuration event binaries as well? Or are we looking at asymmetric mass-loss processes (i.e. dusty clumps) in the inner part of a carbon-rich Mira? Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under program IDs 080.D-0231 and 084.D0361.Tables 1-3 and Figs. 1, 3 are only available in electronic form

  14. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara... located in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California. We provide this notice in..., we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR in Alameda,...

  15. The Dynamic Atmospheres of Mira Stars: Comparing the CODEX Models to PTI Time Series Observations of TU Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    We present our already-published evaluation of the effectiveness of the CODEX models, released in 2011, in representing the atmospheres of M-type Mira variables. We present a high-precision interferometric K-band time series of TU And, consisting of 50 nights that cover eight consecutive pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2μm was obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in five channels across the K band. We show a comparison between these data and the dynamical self-excited CODEX model which gives the closest match in stellar parameters yet available. Both the spectrum and the visibilities are consistently reproduced around visual minimum phases. Near the maximum phases, however, the current models predict a photosphere that is too hot and compact, surrounded by an extended atmosphere that lacks H2O opacity, compared to the observations. A better coverage in the model parameter space is needed to make firm conclusions as to the cause of the discrepancies. In the case of TU And, the discrepancy might be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increased stellar mass and/or a decreased metallicity.

  16. EXTENDED-MIRAS: the instrumental approach for the search of traces of extinct and extant life on Mars, measuring scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, J.; Tarcea, N.; Thomas, N.; Cockell, C.; Edwards, H. W. G.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Hilchenbach, M.; Hochleitner, R.; Hofer, S.; Hoffmann, V.; Hofmann, B.; Jessberger, E. K.; Kiefer, W.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Maurice, S.; Rull Pérez, F.; Schmitt, M.; Simon, G.; Sobron, F.; Weigand, W.; Whitby, J. A.; Wurz, P.

    2004-03-01

    Whether there was or is life on Mars is a question of high interest to man. When looking for evidence of present or ancient life on Mars it might not be sufficient to disclose the chemical composition of the surface or subsurface material. Further information concerning for example the morphology of the sample under investigation or the spatial distribution of the observed chemicals or minerals is of similar relevance. Therefore one needs a reliable, automated, robust and miniaturized apparatus capable of resolving all the above mentioned problems in one effort. EXTENDED-MIRAS is an instrumental approach combining optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy with additional elementary characterization methods such as LIPS/LIBS (laser induced plasma spectrometry/laser induced breakdown spectrometry) or LMS (laser mass spectrometry). Nevertheless an exhaustive investigation usually requires time/energy which is a limited resource for a planetary mission. The size of the dataset produced might also pose a serious problem since the data link budget is limited (energy constraints). In order to maximize the scientific return, a measuring scenario that will make the most out of the reduced time/energy budget has to be implemented. Such a measuring scenario is described here with exemplification at laboratory scale.

  17. Benefits of size dimorphism and copulatory silk wrapping in the sexually cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alissa G; Hebets, Eileen A

    2016-02-01

    In sexually cannibalistic animals, male fitness is influenced not only by successful mate acquisition and egg fertilization, but also by avoiding being eaten. In the cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira, the legs of mature males are longer in relation to their body size than those of females, and males use these legs to aid in wrapping a female's legs with silk prior to and during copulation. We hypothesized that elongated male legs and silk wrapping provide benefits to males, in part through a reduced likelihood of sexual cannibalism. To test this, we paired females of random size with males from one of two treatment groups-those capable of silk wrapping versus those incapable of silk wrapping. We found that males with relatively longer legs and larger body size were more likely to mate and were less likely to be cannibalized prior to copulation. Regardless of relative size, males capable of silk wrapping were less likely to be cannibalized during or following copulation and had more opportunities for sperm transfer (i.e. pedipalpal insertions). Our results suggest that male size and copulatory silk wrapping are sexually selected traits benefiting male reproductive success. PMID:26911340

  18. Healthy Hearts at work: Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program CSC worksite pilot project.

    PubMed

    Herbert, R; White, R

    1996-01-01

    Prince Edward Island experiences a higher-than-average death rate from cardiovascular disease. The Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program is a health promotion/disease prevention research project of Health Canada and the Prince Edward Island Department of Health and Social Services. This paper describes and evaluates a worksite program, based on the principles of community mobilization, that was initiated with the Civil Service Commission of the Prince Edward Island government. The building of a partnership, the risk appraisal session administered in the workplace, the establishment of an Employee Wellness Committee, and subsequent programming which has occurred in the workplace were the key components in the process. Collaboration with the partner agency and participation of employees in the planning process has resulted in the delivery of programs which could not have been achieved by one of the agencies alone, without many additional resources. It is hoped that these characteristics of collaboration and employee participation will also result in sustainability of this initiative when PEI Heart Health is no longer involved. PMID:8900810

  19. STS-111 commander, Ken Cockrell, greets dignitaries and recovery technicians on the runway at Edward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-111 commander Ken Cockrell greets dignitaries and recovery technicians on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base following the landing of the space shuttle Endeavour on June 19, 2002. Behind Cockrell are (from left) mission specialists Philippe Perrin and Franklin Chang-Diaz and Shuttle pilot Paul Lockhart.

  20. The Empty Cup: "Teaching for Understanding" at 21st Century Edward Waters College. Occasional Paper #6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    What happens in a final project that fosters teaching for understanding? That inquiry calls to mind the Taoist belief that emptiness makes a cup useful. In the context of this paper, the inquiry organizes a narrative about how teaching for understanding surfaced in a "Theories of Learning" course at Edward Waters College. At a deeper level, the…

  1. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  2. If Attitudes Were Income, Women Would Thrive: Comment on Acock and Edwards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmond, Marie Withers

    1984-01-01

    Questions whether sex-role attitudes raised income in Acock and Edwards' sample (1982:587) and provides evidence which supports the thesis that occupational structure (not attitudes) determines female income. Concluded that the current challenge for sociologists appears to lie in finding and exploring the middle ground between these two…

  3. Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonastia, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In 1959, Virginia's Prince Edward County closed its public schools rather than obey a court order to desegregate. For five years, black children were left to fend for themselves while the courts decided if the county could continue to deny its citizens public education. Investigating this remarkable and nearly forgotten story of local, state, and…

  4. Landing of STS-59 Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear of the Space Shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base to complete the 11 day STS-59/SRL-1 mission. Landing occured at 9:54 a.m., April 20, 1994. Mission duration was 11 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes.

  5. Race, Ruralism, and Reformation: William J. Edwards and Snow Hill Institute, 1894-1915.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Arnold

    This article examines the Snow Hill Institute, one of several 19th-century industrial schools founded for rural Southern black students, following the model of Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute. This case study provides a sketch of William J. Edwards, an early Tuskegee alumnus and founder of the Snow Hill Institute in Wilcox County,…

  6. A. D. Edwards and V. J. Furlong's "The Language of Teaching."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    This review of "The Language of Teaching" (Edwards and Furlong, 1978) suggests that its most valuable contribution is to the further development of sociolinguistic research in classrooms and to the advancement of sociological analysis of education. The book reports the author's investigation of patterns of classroom communication and language…

  7. Caleb Hillier Parry (1755-1822): clinician, scientist, friend of Edward Jenner (1749-1823).

    PubMed

    Larner, Andrew J

    2005-11-01

    This article summarizes briefly the life and work of Dr Caleb Hillier Parry (1755-1822), a friend of Dr Edward Jenner. He made original clinical observations, including the bradycardic effect of carotid artery compression, and the association of thyroid enlargement with cardiac disease. He also undertook experimental work and published extensively, including the first book devoted to angina. PMID:16244710

  8. The Use of Technology in Prince Edward Island (Canada) High Schools: Perceptions of School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P; Moffatt, Lyndsay; Wiebe, Sean; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; Gabriel, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the perceptions of school leaders regarding the technological use, skills, and attitudes of high school teachers. Using a qualitative research approach, 11 educational leaders from Prince Edward Island (Canada) were individually interviewed. Participants represented the Department of Education, principals,…

  9. Tackling Problems through Lateral Thinking. An Interview with Edward de Bono.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodinsky, Ben

    1985-01-01

    In this interview, Edward de Bono says critical or logical thinking in lockstep fashion is necessary but not sufficient because we need not only the ability to critique ideas, but to create them. Creative or lateral thinking arrives at solutions by attacking problems "laterally" or "sideways." (DCS)

  10. Dyadic Power Theory, Touch, and Counseling Psychology: A Response to Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Norah E.; Abra, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards' (2011) recent article tested dyadic power theory (DPT) by examining the use of touch as a compliance-gaining tactic in the conflicts of married couples. In this response, we raise a methodological issue about the touch behaviors examined by Smith et al. and also pose a theoretical critique that their test of DPT…

  11. Understanding "Together and Apart": A Case Study of Edward's Explorations at Nursery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Cath

    2009-01-01

    Edward was one of 58 children studied by workers and parents as part of a study on Well-being and Resilience at the Pen Green Nursery. Within the larger study, eight children were studied in greater depth in order to explore connections between cognitive and emotional development. Schematic theory and attachment theory were used as frameworks for…

  12. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with mountain range appearing in the background.

  13. "Affection in Education": Edward Carpenter, John Addington Symonds and the Politics of Greek Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Josephine Crawley; Brooke, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines Edward Carpenter's 1899 essay on education that defended the value of powerful same-sex attachments, either between older and younger boys or between teachers and pupils, in the context of Victorian ideologies of same-sex affection. Linda Dowling has described how "a homosexual counterdiscourse able to justify male love in ideal…

  14. Diaspora as Catastrophe, Diaspora as a Mission and the Post-Colonial Philosophy of Edward Said

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappe, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Edward Said the refugee could not easily allow himself to join in the celebration of demythologizing nationalism. His Palestinianism had to coexist, uncomfortably, with his universalism. Time made this necessary coexistence an asset, not a liability, and this in fact was his political legacy for the future: Jews and Palestinians would have to…

  15. It Really Is All about the Child: An Interview with Dr. Edward Hallowell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dane L.

    2012-01-01

    In a decade when brain research has helped people understand learning difficulties in children, and people have seen increased media attention on the use of medications to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults, Dr. Edward (Ned) Hallowell has worked tirelessly to educate the medical profession, parents,…

  16. BOUND FOR FREEDOM--AN EDUCATOR'S ADVENTURES IN PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SULLIVAN, NEIL; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATION OF THE PRIVATELY FINANCED FREE SCHOOLS OF PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, ARE DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOK OF REMINISCENCES. THE SCHOOLS WERE FOUNDED BECAUSE THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS IN THE COUNTY HAD REFUSED TO COLLECT TAXES TO SUPPORT DESEGREGATED SCHOOLS. IN A 3-WEEK PERIOD 100 TEACHERS HAD TO BE FOUND FOR THE MORE THAN…

  17. James Edward Scott: The Leadership Journey of a Senior-Level African American Student Affairs Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Salatha T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, understand, and describe the life, leadership, and influence of Dr. James Edward Scott on higher education and more specifically student affairs; as one of the most well-known and respected African American male chief student affairs officers in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Using a qualitative…

  18. Pickering, Edward Charles (1846-1919) and Pickering, William Henry (1858-1938)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomers—two brothers. Born in Boston, MA, Edward became director of the Harvard College Observatory and observed the brightnesses of 45 000 stars. He hired a number of women, including WILLIAMINA P FLEMING, ANNIE J CANNON, Antonia Maury and HENRIETTA LEAVITT, and produced the Henry Draper Catalog, classifying the spectra of hundreds of thousands of stars. He and HERMANN CARL VOGEL independent...

  19. Enhancing Undergraduates' Capabilities through Team-Based Competitions: The Edward Jones Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umble, Elisabeth J.; Umble, Michael; Artz, Kendall

    2008-01-01

    The Edward Jones Company recently initiated financial sponsorship of team-based competitions in six undergraduate business core classes at Baylor University. The challenges were chosen to take place in an introductory freshman business class, Managerial Accounting, Principles of Marketing, Corporate Finance, Operations Management, and Strategic…

  20. Obituary: Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, 1919-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William M.; Arny, Thomas T.; Trimble, Virginia

    2007-12-01

    Cosmologist Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, emeritus Distinguished University Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, died on 29 January 2007 in his retirement city of Tucson, Arizona, where he was adjunct professor at the Steward Observatory, University of Arizona. The cause of death was colon cancer. He is survived by a sister, brother, and daughter. (A son died in 2000.) Perhaps best known for his work on the growth of fluctuations in the expanding universe and his books on cosmology for the dedicated layperson, Ted had extremely broad interests, and he published more than 200 papers in space sciences, plasma physics, high-energy physics, physical chemistry, and, principally, many aspects of astrophysics. He was a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Institute of Physics (UK). Ted Harrison was born 8 January 1919 in London, England. His parents were Robert Harrison and Daisy Harrison (nee White). His education at Sir John Cass College, London University, was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served for six years with the British Army in various campaigns, ultimately acting as Radar Adviser to the Northern Area of the Egyptian Army. It was during the latter service that he met his wife Photeni (nee Marangas). Following the War, Ted became a British Civil Servant, at first with the Atomic Energy Research Establishment in Harwell and then at the Rutherford High Energy Laboratory. During this period he acquired the equivalent of university degrees, becoming a graduate, then an Associate, and finally a Fellow of the Institute of Physics. His somewhat unorthodox education may have contributed to his broad interests and his very intuitive and physical approach to scientific problems. The latter became the bane of generations of graduate students, who might find themselves asked on their physics qualifying exams to

  1. Perseus B over Edwards AFB on a Development Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A long, slender wing and a pusher propeller at the rear characterize the Perseus B remotely-piloted research aircraft, seen here during a test flight in April1998. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST

  2. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  3. Obituary: Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, 1919-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William M.; Arny, Thomas T.; Trimble, Virginia

    2007-12-01

    Cosmologist Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, emeritus Distinguished University Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, died on 29 January 2007 in his retirement city of Tucson, Arizona, where he was adjunct professor at the Steward Observatory, University of Arizona. The cause of death was colon cancer. He is survived by a sister, brother, and daughter. (A son died in 2000.) Perhaps best known for his work on the growth of fluctuations in the expanding universe and his books on cosmology for the dedicated layperson, Ted had extremely broad interests, and he published more than 200 papers in space sciences, plasma physics, high-energy physics, physical chemistry, and, principally, many aspects of astrophysics. He was a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Institute of Physics (UK). Ted Harrison was born 8 January 1919 in London, England. His parents were Robert Harrison and Daisy Harrison (nee White). His education at Sir John Cass College, London University, was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served for six years with the British Army in various campaigns, ultimately acting as Radar Adviser to the Northern Area of the Egyptian Army. It was during the latter service that he met his wife Photeni (nee Marangas). Following the War, Ted became a British Civil Servant, at first with the Atomic Energy Research Establishment in Harwell and then at the Rutherford High Energy Laboratory. During this period he acquired the equivalent of university degrees, becoming a graduate, then an Associate, and finally a Fellow of the Institute of Physics. His somewhat unorthodox education may have contributed to his broad interests and his very intuitive and physical approach to scientific problems. The latter became the bane of generations of graduate students, who might find themselves asked on their physics qualifying exams to

  4. Concomitant transapical treatment of aortic stenosis and degenerated mitral bioprosthesis with two 29 mm Edwards Sapien XT prostheses.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Leonardo; Farah, Bruno; Tchetche, Didier

    2013-12-01

    An 85-year-old woman was admitted to our institution for effort dyspnea. She had a history of mitral valve replacement with a 29 mm Carpentier-Edwards bioprosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed aortic stenosis and senescence of the mitral bioprosthesis. The heart team opted for a transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and mitral valve-in-valve implantation (m-ViV). Two Edwards Sapien XT (ESXT) 29 mm devices were selected. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the concomitant transapical implantation of two 29 mm ESXTs for a combination of failed mitral bioprosthesis and native aortic stenosis. PMID:24296390

  5. Granular statistical mechanics - Building on the legacy of Sir Sam Edwards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    When Sir Sam Edwards laid down the foundations for the statistical mechanics of jammed granular materials he opened a new field in soft condensed matter and many followed. In this presentation we review briefly the Edwards formalism and some of its less discussed consequences. We point out that the formalism is useful for other classes of systems - cellular and porous materials. A certain shortcoming of the original formalism is then discussed and a modification to overcome it is proposed. Finally, a derivation of an equation of state with the new formalism is presented; the equation of state is analogous to the PVT relation for thermal gases, relating the volume, the boundary stress and measures of the structural and stress fluctuations. NUDT, Changsha, China, Imperial College London, UK, Cambridge University, UK.

  6. Relaxation spectra of binary blends: Extension of the Doi-Edwards theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchesnokov, M. A.; Molenaar, J.; Slot, J. J. M.; Stepanyan, R.

    2007-10-01

    A molecular model is presented which allows the calculation of the stress relaxation function G for binary blends consisting of two monodisperse samples with arbitrary molecular weights. It extends the Doi-Edwards reptation theory (Doi M. and Edwards S. F., The Theory of Polymer Dynamics (Oxford Press, New York) 1986) to highly polydisperse melts by including constraint release (CR) and thermal fluctuations (CLF), yet making use of the same input parameters. The model reveals an explicit nonlinear dependence of CR frequency in the blend on the blend's molecular weight distribution (MWD). It provides an alternative way to quantify polydisperse systems compared to the widely used "double-reptation" theories. The results of the present model are in a good agreement with the experimental data given in Rubinstein M. and Colby R. H., J. Chem. Phys., 89 (1988) 5291.

  7. Hot, cold, and annual reference atmospheres for Edwards Air Force Base, California (1975 version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference atmospheres pertaining to summer (hot), winter (cold), and mean annual conditions for Edwards Air Force Base, California, are presented from surface to 90 km altitude (700 km for the annual model). Computed values of pressure, kinetic temperature, virtual temperature, and density and relative differences percentage departure from the Edwards reference atmospheres, 1975 (ERA-75) of the atmospheric parameters versus altitude are tabulated in 250 m increments. Hydrostatic and gas law equations were used in conjunction with radiosonde and rocketsonde thermodynamic data in determining the vertical structure of these atmospheric models. The thermodynamic parameters were all subjected to a fifth degree least-squares curve-fit procedure, and the resulting coefficients were incorporated into Univac 1108 computer subroutines so that any quantity may be recomputed at any desired altitude using these subroutines.

  8. STS-30 crew egresses OV-104 via stairway at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 crewmembers egress Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, via mobile stairway at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, ending their four-day mission. From bottom of the stairs to the top are Commander David M. Walker, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, Mission Specialist (MS) Norman E. Thagard, MS Mary L. Cleave, and MS Mark C. Lee. OV-104 landed at 12:44:33 pm (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)) on EAFB concrete runway 22.

  9. STS-27 crew egresses Atlantis, OV-104, at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    During post landing activity, the five astronaut crewmembers for STS-27 egress Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. The astronauts, wearing navy blue flight coveralls (jumpsuits), walk down mobile stairway. From bottom of steps to top, are Commander Robert L. Gibson, Pilot Guy S. Gardner, Mission Specialist (MS) Richard M. Mullane, MS Jerry L. Ross, and MS William M. Shepherd. Ground crews look on in background.

  10. STS-48 Discovery, OV-103, lands at night on lit Edwards AFB runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Spotlights illuminate the approach of STS-48 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, above concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) during its night landing sequence. With nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, OV-103 nears touchdown which occurred at 12:38:38 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). Runway marker '2' is visible in the foreground. OV-103's starboard side glows in the runway lights while the rest of the orbiter blends into the shadowy darkness.

  11. Transgender-approximate, lesbian-like, and genderqueer: writing about Edward De Lacy Evans.

    PubMed

    Chesser, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses the story of Edward De Lacy Evans, a person who was born female but who lived most of his life as a man, marrying three times. Evans' story is a well known one, but it is reconsidered here alongside recent theoretical interest from lesbian, queer, and transgendered historical perspectives. Although interest in Evans was and is considerable, the article outlines the ways in which Evans' subjectivity remains elusive. PMID:19830616

  12. Small diameter concentric tubing extends economical life of high water - sour gas Edwards producers

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Seven small-diameter tubing installations have been completed in two Edwards sour gas fields, Texas, which have high water production. Although there has been further decline in reservoir pressure, continuous production has been maintained without stop-cocking. Corrosion inhibition has been effective and the cost has been nominal compared to the previous expense of displacing the inhibitor each month with nitrogen. Thus, the economical life of the wells has been extended. 5 refs.

  13. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The Edwards Aquifer Water Resource Conflict: USDA Farm Program resource-use incentives?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaible, Glenn D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1999-10-01

    This paper summarizes economic and hydrological analyses of the impacts of the 1990 and 1996 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) farm programs on irrigation water withdrawals from the Edwards Aquifer in south central Texas and on aquifer-dependent spring flows that support threatened and endangered species. Economic modeling, a regional producer behavioral survey, as well as institutional and farm characteristic analyses are used to examine likely irrigation water-use impacts. Hydrologie modeling is used to examine spring flow effects. Study results show that 1990 USDA commodity programs caused producers to require less irrigation water, in turn increasing rather than decreasing aquifer spring flows. Market economic factors are the dominant criteria influencing producer irrigation decisions. Farm-tenure arrangements and aquifer management responsibilities of the Edwards Aquifer Authority indicate that the 1996 Farm Act's PFC payment program will not cause an increase in irrigation withdrawals. Broader actions such as long-term water supply enhancement/conservation programs, dry-year water-use reduction incentives and water markets all provide tools for Edwards water-use conflict resolution. USDA farm programs do not apparently play a material part in the total debate.

  15. The Prince Edward Islands pelagic ecosystem, south Indian Ocean: a review of achievements, 1976 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, E. A.; Froneman, P. W.

    1999-01-01

    This review summarizes the main research findings of the multi-year oceanographic and biological studies conducted in the vicinity of the Prince Edward Archipelago during the period 1976 to 1990. The Prince Edward Islands represent a flow-through system on the mainstream of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Although there are no taxonomic differences between the pelagic communities of the upstream, inter-island and downstream regions, these mesoscale subsystems may operate differently. The mesoscale oceanographic and biological processes appear to be affected by the position of the Subantarctic Front (SAF) in the vicinity of the islands. Both the rich benthic community, which is supported by the local enhancement of primary production, and the strong advection of zooplankton/micronekton from the upstream region provide the food resources necessary for the survival of the huge community of land-based predators present on the islands. Collectively this is termed the `life-support system'. Future studies should concentrate on the meridional shifts in the position of the SAF and its influence on background productivity upstream and downstream of the Prince Edward Archipelago.

  16. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer outcrop (Barton Springs segment), northeastern Hays and southwestern Travis Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, Ted A.; Hanson, John A.; Hauwert, Nico M.

    1996-01-01

    The hydrogeologic subdivisions within the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer outcrop in northeastern Hays and southwestern Travis Counties generally are porous and permeable. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; and hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided, of the Person Formation. Hydrogeologic subdivision II, the cyclic and marine members, undivided, of the Person Formation, also is quite porous and permeable in Hays County. The porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer outcrop is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as pore size, shape, distribution, fissuring, dissolution, and interconnection of pores and vugs. The Edwards aquifer rocks that crop out in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer generally have the same lithologic characteristics as the Edwards aquifer rocks that crop out in Comal and southwestern Hays Counties. However, in the northeastern part of the segment in Travis County, the rock unit that is apparently equivalent to the basal nodular member of the Kainer Formation is called the Walnut Formation. Because the units appear to be stratigraphically and lithologically equivalent, the basal nodular member is used instead of the Walnut Formation for this report. Essentially all of hydrogeologic subdivision II, which is about 70 feet thick in Hays County, is missing in Travis County. In the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, the aquifer probably is most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Contamination can result from spills or leakage of hazardous materials; or runoff on the

  17. Regional economic impacts of current and proposed management alternatives for Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Leslie; Huber, Chris; Koontz, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must describe the desired future conditions of a Refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. The Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located at the south end of California's San Francisco Bay and one of seven refuges in the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex, is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed Refuge management strategies. For Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan planning, a regional economic analysis provides a means of estimating how current management (No Action Alternative) and proposed management activities (alternatives) affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of information: (1) it illustrates the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge's contribution to the local community, and (2) it can help in determining whether economic effects are or are not a real concern in choosing among management alternatives. This report first presents a description of the local community and economy near the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Next, the methods used to conduct a regional economic impact analysis are described. An analysis of the final Comprehensive Conservation Plan management strategies that could affect stakeholders, residents, and the local economy is then presented. The management activities of economic concern in this analysis are: * Spending in the local community by Refuge visitors; * Refuge personnel salary spending; and * Refuge purchases of goods and services within the local

  18. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  19. A non-linear mathematical model for a three species ecosystem: Hippos in Lake Edward.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Mauro; Chandía, Kristopher J; Flores, J C

    2016-01-21

    In this work we study a non-linear mathematical model based on three different interacting species. We apply our model to Lake Edward ecosystem consisting in hippos, tilapia fishes and human inhabitants. In this case, we estimate the values of the key parameters using actual data and show the reliability of the proposed model as a predictive tool. We also show, via numerical calculations and parameter values that the ecosystem associated to the lake is very far from reaching a stable equilibrium. Through our analysis we provide the conditions for a possible coexistence among the three species. PMID:26551152

  20. A trap, neuter, and release program for feral cats on Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Karen L.; Keizer, Karen; Golding, Christine

    2002-01-01

    A new program to address the feral cat population on Prince Edward Island was undertaken during the spring and summer of 2001. Feral cats from specific geographic areas were trapped, sedated, and tested for feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus. Healthy cats were neutered, dewormed, vaccinated, tattooed, and released to their area of origin. A total of 185 cats and kittens were trapped and tested during a 14-week period; 158 cats and kittens as young as 6 weeks of age were neutered and released. Twenty-three adult cats were positive for feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, or both, and were euthanized. PMID:12240526

  1. Science and Technology Review, July-August 1998: Celebrating Edward Teller at 90

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smart, J.

    1998-07-01

    On the occasion of Edward Teller's 90th birthday, Science and Technology Review (S&TR) has the pleasure of honoring Lawrence Livermore's co-founder and most influential scientist. Teller is known for his inventive work in physics, his concepts leading to thermonuclear explosions, and his strong stands on such issues as science education, the nation's strategic defense, the needs for science in the future, and sharing scientific information. The articles in this issue also show him, as always, tirelessly moving forward with his new and changing interests.

  2. Perchlorate in the San Antonio Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlquist, L.; Rajagapolan, S.; Jackson, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in drinking-water supplies and can have adverse health effects on humans by disrupting thyroid function. Perchlorate and other constituents were analyzed from ground-water samples that were collected in 2004-06 from 99 wells completed in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The fractured karstic carbonate Edwards aquifer, declared a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplies nearly one-half million acre-feet per year for drinking water and other uses. Wells were located in a variety of land-use settings that included rangeland, agriculture, and urban; well types included domestic, public, and observation. Perchlorate was detected in 98 percent of the samples, and concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Five samples contained concentrations greater than 1 μg/L and were from wells in the urban northern San Antonio area. The results from three samples that contained perchlorate at concentrations greater than 2 μg/L are anomalous. Chloride concentration ranged from 5.6 to 69 milligrams per liter, typical for freshwater in the Edwards aquifer. No significant (r2 greater than 0.7) correlations were observed when perchlorate concentrations were correlated with depth to water, total depth of well, or concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, strontium, and dissolved solids. Tritium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.9 tritium units in 31 of the 99 samples and indicate at least some fraction of modern water (post-atmospheric nuclear tests). No correlation between apparent tritium age and perchlorate concentration was observed, a possible indication that anthropogenic influences are not affecting observed perchlorate concentrations. The molar ratio of chloride to perchlorate ranged from 17,000 to 320

  3. STS-30 crew egresses OV-104 via stairway at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 crewmembers egress Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, via mobile stairway at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Crewmembers who spent just over four full days in space are greeted by NASA Deputy Administrator Dale D. Myers and Acting NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly (waving). From bottom of the stairs to the top are Commander David M. Walker, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, Mission Specialist (MS) Norman E. Thagard, MS Mary L. Cleave, and MS Mark C. Lee. Minutes earlier, OV-104 came to a stop at 12:44:33 pm (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)) on EAFB concrete runway 22.

  4. STS-30 crew egresses OV-104 via stairway at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 crewmembers egress Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, via mobile stairway at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Crewmembers who spent just over four full days in space exit OV-104 for a welcome meeting with terra firma. From bottom of the stairs to the top are Commander David M. Walker, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, Mission Specialist (MS) Norman E. Thagard, MS Mary L. Cleave, and MS Mark C. Lee. NASA Deputy Administrator Dale D. Myers awaits at lower right to greet the crewmembers. Minutes earlier, OV-104 came to a stop at 12:44:33 pm (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)) on EAFB concrete runway 22.

  5. Getting to grips with the cannabis problem: the evolving contributions and impact of Griffith Edwards.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne

    2015-07-01

    Griffith Edwards played an important role in cannabis policy debates within government advisory committees in the United Kingdom from the early 1970s until the early 1980s. This has largely been hidden from public knowledge by the confidentiality of these committee discussions. The purpose of this paper is to use Griffith's writings and the results of recent historical scholarship to outline the views he expressed, the reasons he gave for them, and to provide a brief assessment of his contribution to the development of British cannabis policy. PMID:26042566

  6. STS-36: Breakfast / Suit-Up / C-7 Ex / Launch and Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Live footage shows the crew members of STS-36, Commander John O. Creighton, Pilot John H. Casper, and Mission Specialists Richard M. Mullane, David C. Hilmers, and Pierre J. Thuot, having the traditional breakfast, suiting up, and walking out to the Astro-Van. Scenes include panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad, main engine start, ignition, liftoff, and booster separation. The landing of Atlantis at Edwards Air Force Base is also seen. Several playback views from different cameras of both the launch and landing are also presented.

  7. STS-28 crew egresses Columbia, OV-102, at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 crewmembers are greeted by NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William B. Lenoir, NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly, and Flight Operations Directorate (FCOD) Director Donald R. Puddy as they egress Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. The crew spent five days in Earth orbit for a Department of Defense (DOD) dedicated mission. The astronauts, wearing navy blue flight coveralls (jumpsuits) are, from left to right, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark N. Brown, Pilot Richard N. Richards, MS David C. Leestma, MS James C. Adamson, and Commander Brewster H. Shaw. Visible in the background are OV-102's wing and tail section and ground servicing vehicles.

  8. STS-28 crew egresses Columbia, OV-102, at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    During post landing activity, the five astronaut crewmembers for STS-28 egress Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. The crew spent five days in Earth orbit for a Department of Defense (DOD) dedicated mission. They are greeted by NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William B. Lenoir and NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly. The astronauts, wearing navy blue flight coveralls (jumpsuits), are, from bottom of steps to top, Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Mission Specialist (MS) James C. Adamson, MS David C. Leestma, Pilot Richard N. Richards, and MS Mark N. Brown.

  9. Data on wells in the Edwards Air Force Base area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutcher, L.C.; Bader, J.S.; Hiltgen, W.J.

    1962-01-01

    The data presented In this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as a phase of the investigation of ground-water geology and hydrology of the Edwards Air Force Base area. The study was made in cooperation with the Department of the Air Force but also was coincident with the U.S. Geological Survey investigation of water wells and general hydrologic conditions throughout much of the desert region of southern California. The overall study of general hydrologic conditions in the desert is part of a cooperative program with the California Department of Water Resources.

  10. Flood-prone areas and waterways, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Robert W.; Bowers, James C.

    2002-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) is in the Mojave Desert region of southern California. Although the climate in the study area is arid, occasional intense storms result in flooding on the base, damaging roads and buildings. To plan for anticipated development at EAFB, the U.S. Department of the Air Force (USAF) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a cooperative study to locate flood-prone areas on the base. This report describes flood hazards and shows flood-prone areas of the base.

  11. Edward D. Goldberg's proposal of "the Mussel Watch": Reflections after 40years.

    PubMed

    Farrington, John W; Tripp, Bruce W; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sericano, José L; Wade, Terry L; Knap, Anthony H

    2016-09-15

    We chronicle the extensive influence over the past forty years of Professor Edward D. Goldberg and his call in 1975 for a "Mussel Watch" or bivalve sentinel organism approach to assess geographic status and temporal trends of several chemicals of environmental concern in the coastal ocean. Examples of local, regional, national and international programs are discussed briefly as are examples of interesting useful findings and limitations to the Mussel Watch concept. Mussel Watch continues to provide useful data about status and trends of chemical contamination in coastal ecosystems. PMID:27339743

  12. Posttranscatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Ventricular Septal Defect During Transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Aaron; Hoaglan, Carli; Helman, James

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is gaining favor as a treatment for aortic stenosis in patients at high risk for the open surgical approach. The following is a report of a 95-year-old woman with severe aortic stenosis who presented for TAVR with an Edwards SAPIEN valve. Her medical history included pacemaker-dependent complete heart block and a recent episode of congestive heart failure secondary to a non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. The TAVR was performed successfully through an open left femoral artery approach, and the patient was found to have a new perimembranous ventricular septal defect identified postoperatively. PMID:27243581

  13. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Rear view captures OV-103 as it glides past photographer to wheel stop showing the tail section (speedbrake/rudder) and three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with aircraft hangar appearing in the background.

  14. Identification of the Double Lines in the Photographic-Infrared Spectrum of the Mira-Type Carbon Star U Cygni near Maximum Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, M.

    The author reports the results of further spectroscopic analysis of the double lines which were suggested by Hirai and Nagasawa (1980) in the photographic-infrared spectrum of U Cygni near maximum light. Each line has two components, and the excitation temperatures derived from the short- and long-wavelength components are about 3,000K and 2,520K, respectively. The turbulent velocity of the s-component is 1.26 times larger than of the 1-component. Other physical parameters related to the cool atmosphere are obtained using both the synthetic-spectrum and curve-of-growth methods. Possible models to explain the double-line phenomena in the Mira-type carbon star U Cygni are discussed.

  15. Raman-Scattered HeII 1025 Line in The Symbiotic Binary V1016 Cyg As a Diagnostic Tool of The Wind From Its Mira-Type Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekeráš, M.; Skopal, A.

    2015-12-01

    V1016 Cyg is a symbiotic binary comprising a Mira-type evolved cool giant and a white dwarf (WD). The WD ionizes a part of the surrounding environment consisting mainly of the giant*s wind. We investigated a weak emission feature at 6545 Å - a result of Raman scattering of the HeII 1025 line photons, emitted in the ionized region around the WD, on the neutral hydrogen (H0) atoms located around the giant. Using the scattering efficiency, η, and a simplified ionization model of symbiotic stars (SySs), we determined the mass-loss rate, FX1, from the cool giant in V1016 Cyg to 2 - 3 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1.

  16. Bed-Material Entrainment and Associated Transportation Infrastructure Problems in Streams of the Edwards Plateau, Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation commonly builds and maintains low-water crossings (LWCs) over streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas. LWCs are low-height structures, typically constructed of concrete and asphalt, that provide acceptable passage over seasonal rivers or streams with relatively low normal-depth flow. They are designed to accommodate flow by roadway overtopping during high-flow events. The streams of the Edwards Plateau are characterized by cobble- and gravel-sized bed material and highly variable flow regimes. Low base flows that occur most of the time occasionally are interrupted by severe floods. The floods entrain and transport substantial loads of bed material in the stream channels. As a result, LWCs over streams in the Edwards Plateau are bombarded and abraded by bed material during floods and periodically must be maintained or even replaced.

  17. New insights into the Edwards Aquifer—Brackish-water simulation, drought, and the role of uncertainty analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Linzy K.; White, Jeremy T.

    2016-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer consists of three water-quality zones. The freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer is bounded to the south by a zone of brackish water (transition zone) where the aquifer transitions from fresh to saline water. The saline zone is downdip from the transition zone. There is concern that a recurrence of extreme drought, such as the 7-year drought from 1950 through 1956, could cause the transition zone to move toward (encroach upon) the freshwater zone, causing production wells near the transition zone to pump saltier water. There is also concern of drought effects on spring flows from Comal and San Marcos Springs. These concerns were evaluated through the development of a new numerical model of the Edwards aquifer.

  18. Bed-material entrainment and associated transportation infrastructure problems in streams of the Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation commonly builds and maintains low-water crossings (LWCs) over streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas. LWCs are low-height structures, typically constructed of concrete and asphalt, that provide acceptable passage over seasonal rivers or streams with relatively low normal-depth flow. They are designed to accommodate flow by roadway overtopping during high-flow events. The streams of the Edwards Plateau are characterized by cobble- and gravel-sized bed material and highly variable flow regimes. Low base flows that occur most of the time occasionally are interrupted by severe floods. The floods entrain and transport substantial loads of bed material in the stream channels. As a result, LWCs over streams in the Edwards Plateau are bombarded and abraded by bed material during floods and periodically must be maintained or even replaced.

  19. The Jenner Society and the Edward Jenner Museum: tributes to a physician-scientist.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A J; Poland, Gregory A

    2011-12-30

    Dr. Edward Jenner's discovery and application of vaccination against smallpox was one of the most important medical advances of all time. In the modern era many millions of lives are saved each year by vaccines that work essentially on the same scientific principles established by Jenner more than 200 years ago. Jenner's country home in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, UK, where he carried out his work and where he spent most of his life, is now a museum and something of a shrine for vaccinologists. Jenner's house is also now the focal point of a new international learned society dedicated to advancing modern vaccinology. The aims of the new Jenner Society are to engage, support, and sustain the professional goals of vaccinologists, and to perpetuate the memory of Dr. Edward Jenner. Ultimately it is hoped that the Jenner Society will be recognized as one of the leading academic societies representing and promoting vaccine science around the world. We invite readers to consider joining the society (http://www.edwardjennersociety.org/). PMID:22486976

  20. Oil production and groundwater quality in the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer, Texas.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Paul F

    2003-11-13

    Chloride concentrations and chloride/bromide ratios from 198 water wells in the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer were compiled, mapped, and evaluated within the context of regional geology and land use. The study area occupies eight counties in west-central Texas, within which oil production and agriculture are predominant land uses. Samples from 49 wells had chloride concentrations above the 250 mg/l secondary drinking water standard, 22 samples had greater than 500 mg/l chloride, and 9 samples exceeded 1000 mg/l chloride. Of the 22 samples above 500 mg/l chloride, 10 had relatively low chloride/bromide ratios of less than 300, consistent with oilfield brine, and 2 had ratios above 2000, consistent with groundwater impacted by evaporite dissolution. The remaining ten samples had chloride/bromide ratios ranging from 300 to 2000, consistent with partial mixing of unimpaired groundwater with evaporite-laden water. There were no significant correlations between chloride concentration and well depth, inconsistent with contaminants originating at the land surface. Results of this study suggest that evaporite dissolution and oilfield brine locally impact the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer, but the problem is not regionally pervasive. PMID:14646018

  1. Potential overflow of Mojave Creek near disposal site, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, Randy L.; Harmon, Jerry G.

    1998-01-01

    Sedimentological evidence in Mojave Creek near Edwards, California, indicates that the largest discharge in the last hundred years near the disposal site of the Main Base Landfill at Edwards Air Force Base was a few hundred cubic feet per second. The distal ends of two alluvial fans on the Mojave Creek floodplain near the Main Base Landfill have not been eroded substantially since sediment supply was cut off by a railroad grade completed in 1884. Previous estimates of flood discharges were 4,000 cubic feet per second and larger in this reach; the estimates were calculated by regression equations derived from regional characteristics. However, a 100-year rainfall in 1983 failed to produce erosion in Mojave Creek commensurate with discharges of greater than about 100 cubic feet per second. To test the potential for the creek to overflow and reach the disposal site, a hypothetical discharge was used to determine the depth of flooding at local cross sections. Although the access road from Mojave Boulevard to the Main Base Landfill may be inundated during a flood, the artificial grade at the disposal site would not be reached at a discharge of 2,000 cubic feet per second, which is an order of magnitude greater than the apparent flood discharges that occurred during the past hundred years in Mojave Creek near the present Main Base Landfill.

  2. Insects attracted to Maple Sap: Observations from Prince Edward Island, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The collection of maple sap for the production of maple syrup is a large commercial enterprise in Canada and the United States. In Canada, which produces 85% of the world’s supply, it has an annual value of over $168 million CAD. Over 38 million trees are tapped annually, 6.5% of which use traditional buckets for sap collection. These buckets attract significant numbers of insects. Despite this, there has been very little investigation of the scale of this phenomenon and the composition of insects that are attracted to this nutrient source. The present paper reports the results of a preliminary study conducted on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Twenty-eight species of Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Trichoptera were found in maple sap buckets, 19 of which are known to be attracted to saps and nectars. The physiological role of sap feeding is discussed with reference to moths of the tribe Xylenini, which are active throughout the winter, and are well documented as species that feed on sap flows. Additionally, 18 of the 28 species found in this study are newly recorded in Prince Edward Island. PMID:21594122

  3. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  4. Generalized Deam-Edwards approach to the statistical mechanics of randomly crosslinked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Lu, Bing-Sui; Ye, Fangfu; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2013-08-01

    We address the statistical mechanics of randomly and permanently crosslinked networks. We develop a theoretical framework (vulcanization theory) which can be used to systematically analyze the correlation between the statistical properties of random networks and their histories of formation. Generalizing the original idea of Deam and Edwards, we consider an instantaneous crosslinking process, where all crosslinkers (modeled as Gaussian springs) are introduced randomly at once in an equilibrium liquid state, referred to as the preparation state. The probability that two functional sites are crosslinked by a spring exponentially decreases with their distance squared. After formally averaging over network connectivity, we obtained an effective theory with all degrees of freedom replicated 1 + n times. Two thermodynamic ensembles, the preparation ensemble and the measurement ensemble, naturally appear in this theory. The former describes the thermodynamic fluctuations in the state of preparation, while the latter describes the thermodynamic fluctuations in the state of measurement. We classify various correlation functions and discuss their physical significances. In particular, the memory correlation functions characterize how the properties of networks depend on their method of preparation, and are the hallmark properties of all randomly crosslinked materials. We clarify the essential difference between our approach and that of Deam-Edwards, and discuss the saddle-point order parameters and its physical significance. Finally we also discuss the connection between saddle-point approximation of vulcanization theory, and the classical theory of rubber elasticity as well as the neo-classical theory of nematic elastomers.

  5. Description and Evaluation of Numerical Groundwater Flow Models for the Edwards Aquifer, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard J.; Taylor, Charles J.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial number of public water system wells in south-central Texas withdraw groundwater from the karstic, highly productive Edwards aquifer. However, the use of numerical groundwater flow models to aid in the delineation of contributing areas for public water system wells in the Edwards aquifer is problematic because of the complex hydrogeologic framework and the presence of conduit-dominated flow paths in the aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, evaluated six published numerical groundwater flow models (all deterministic) that have been developed for the Edwards aquifer San Antonio segment or Barton Springs segment, or both. This report describes the models developed and evaluates each with respect to accessibility and ease of use, range of conditions simulated, accuracy of simulations, agreement with dye-tracer tests, and limitations of the models. These models are (1) GWSIM model of the San Antonio segment, a FORTRAN computer-model code that pre-dates the development of MODFLOW; (2) MODFLOW conduit-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (3) MODFLOW diffuse-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (4) MODFLOW Groundwater Availability Modeling [GAM] model of the Barton Springs segment; (5) MODFLOW recalibrated GAM model of the Barton Springs segment; and (6) MODFLOW-DCM (dual conductivity model) conduit model of the Barton Springs segment. The GWSIM model code is not commercially available, is limited in its application to the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and lacks the ability of MODFLOW to easily incorporate newly developed processes and packages to better simulate hydrologic processes. MODFLOW is a widely used and tested code for numerical modeling of groundwater flow, is well documented, and is in the public domain. These attributes make MODFLOW a preferred code with regard to accessibility and ease of use. The MODFLOW conduit-flow model

  6. Potential for Bed-Material Entrainment in Selected Streams of the Edwards Plateau - Edwards, Kimble, and Real Counties, Texas, and Vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation spends considerable money for maintenance and replacement of low-water crossings of streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas as a result of damages caused in part by the transport of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material. An investigation of the problem at low-water crossings was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, and in collaboration with Texas Tech University, Lamar University, and the University of Houston. The bed-material entrainment problem for low-water crossings occurs at two spatial scales - watershed scale and channel-reach scale. First, the relative abundance and activity of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material along a given channel reach becomes greater with increasingly steeper watershed slopes. Second, the stresses required to mobilize bed material at a location can be attributed to reach-scale hydraulic factors, including channel geometry and particle size. The frequency of entrainment generally increases with downstream distance, as a result of decreasing particle size and increased flood magnitudes. An average of 1 year occurs between flows that initially entrain bed material as large as the median particle size, and an average of 1.5 years occurs between flows that completely entrain bed material as large as the median particle size. The Froude numbers associated with initial and complete entrainment of bed material up to the median particle size approximately are 0.40 and 0.45, respectively.

  7. Linking climate change and karst hydrology to evaluate species vulnerability: The Edwards and Madison aquifers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Long, A. J.; Stamm, J. F.; Poteet, M.; Symstad, A.

    2013-12-01

    Karst aquifers present an extreme case of flow along structurally variable pathways, making them highly dynamic systems and therefore likely to respond rapidly to climate change. In turn, many biological communities and ecosystems associated with karst are sensitive to hydrologic changes. We explored how three sites in the Edwards aquifer (Texas) and two sites in the Madison aquifer (South Dakota) might respond to projected climate change from 2011 to 2050. Ecosystems associated with these karst aquifers support federally listed endangered and threatened species and state-listed species of concern, including amphibians, birds, insects, and plants. The vulnerability of selected species associated with projected climate change was assessed. The Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model was used to simulate projected climate at a 36-km grid spacing for three weather stations near the study sites, using boundary and initial conditions from the global climate model Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) and an A2 emissions scenario. Daily temperature and precipitation projections from the WRF model were used as input for the hydrologic Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow (RRAWFLOW) model and the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) model. RRAWFLOW is a lumped-parameter model that simulates hydrologic response at a single site, combining the responses of quick and slow flow that commonly characterize karst aquifers. CCVI uses historical and projected climate and hydrologic metrics to determine the vulnerability of selected species on the basis of species exposure to climate change, sensitivity to factors associated with climate change, and capacity to adapt to climate change. An upward trend in temperature was projected for 2011-2050 at all three weather stations; there was a trend (downward) in annual precipitation only for the weather station in Texas. A downward trend in mean annual spring flow or groundwater level was projected for

  8. Traditional Native American Ball Games in the Early 20th Century Recorded by Edward S. Curtis, Artist with a Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesavento, Wilma J.

    The work of Edward S. Curtis, who studied and recorded American Indian culture with a camera, is described in this paper. Curtis recorded on film, with explanatory text, a photo-history of eighty tribes west of the Missouri River. The role of games and their accompanying mythology was one of the salient features of Curtis's work. The general…

  9. Sediment yield dynamics during the 1950s multi-year droughts from two ungauged basins in the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment yield dynamics on the Edwards Plateau region of Texas was dramatically influenced by a multi-year drought that occurred there during the 1950s. To assess the effect of this drought on sediment yield, we used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to identify the factors that contributed...

  10. Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

  11. Native Agency and the Making of "The North American Indian": Alexander B. Upshaw and Edward S. Curtis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Shamoon

    2007-01-01

    The twenty volumes of ethnographic text and pictorial photography and the twenty portfolios of large, finely printed photogravures that together comprise "The North American Indian" were the product of an extraordinary labor by Edward S. Curtis, an extensive and shifting team of co-workers, and the participation of hundreds of Native Americans. By…

  12. The Writing Life: Narrative, Metaphor, and Emotion in the Spiritual Autobiographies of Teresa of Avila and Sarah Edwards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Elizabeth Ford

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I analyze the spiritual autobiographies of Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) and Sarah Edwards (1710-1758) through the methodological lenses of autobiography studies and cognitive linguistics in order to identify key narratives and metaphors for the spiritual life and explore the significance of the interpretation process for lived…

  13. Learning the Way: Teaching and Learning with and for Youth from Refugee Backgrounds on Prince Edward Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNevin, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    This article presents one component of a qualitative study that explored teaching and learning with and for youth from refugee backgrounds in Prince Edward Island (PEI) intermediate and high schools. Specifically, this article presents data and discussion regarding some of the challenges and professional development needs of teachers working with…

  14. G. Stanley Hall and Edward Thorndike on the Education of Women: Theory and Policy in the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seller, Maxine S.

    During the Progressive Era (late 19th and early 20th Centuries), the theories of educational psychologists G. Stanley Hall and Edward L. Thorndike provided a basis for educational policy formation. It is hypothesized that their educational policies led to separate and unequal educational programs for women. Review of their writing indicates that…

  15. Selected Annotated Bibliography of Recent Research on Rural Life on Prince Edward Island. Community Studies, Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Allan F.; O'Connell, Harold J.

    A review of research literature was the first step in a program of rural development and planning on Prince Edward Island. This bibliography containing 80 annotations of extended research reports from 1960-71 is the result of that search. The bibliography is divided into 4 main subject areas within which the annotations appear in alphabetical…

  16. Sonic booms of space shuttles approaching Edwards Air Force Base, 1988-1993.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    From 1988 to 1993 13 sonic booms of space shuttles approaching Edwards Air Force Base were measured at a site 10 miles west of EAFB, with one to seven different sound level meters for each measurement. Results from five of these measurements are here presented. Maximum differences in measured levels between instruments for the same flight varied from 0 to 6 dB depending on the measurement descriptor and model of sound level meter. The average difference between predicted and measured values was 0.7+/-1.5 dB. For sound level meters with adequate bandwidth the waveforms measured varied from a near perfect N-wave to a more distorted form reflecting the influence of the varying condition of the atmosphere during propagation to the ground. PMID:11837962

  17. Infectious disease prevalence in a feral cat population on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Foley, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Ninety-six feral cats from Prince Edward Island were used to determine the prevalence of selected infectious agents. The prevalence rates were 5.2% for feline immunodeficiency virus, 3.1% for feline leukemia virus, 3.1% for Mycoplasma haemofelis, 8.4% for Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, 2.1% for Bartonella spp. and 29.8% for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii. Oocysts of T. gondii were detected in 1.3% of the fecal samples that were collected. Gender and retroviral status of the cats were significantly correlated with hemoplasma infections. Use of a flea comb showed that 9.6% of the cats had fleas; however, flea infestation was not associated with any of the infectious agents. PMID:22379197

  18. The Elegance of Disordered Granular Packings: A Validation of Edwards' Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Donahue, Carly M.

    2004-01-01

    We have found a way to analyze Edwards' density of states for static granular packings in the special case of round, rigid, frictionless grains assuming constant coordination number. It obtains the most entropic density of single grain states, which predicts several observables including the distribution of contact forces. We compare these results against empirical data obtained in dynamic simulations of granular packings. The agreement between theory and the empirics is quite good, helping validate the use of statistical mechanics methods in granular physics. The differences between theory and empirics are mainly due to the variable coordination number, and when the empirical data are sorted by that number we obtain several insights that suggest an underlying elegance in the density of states

  19. Sir Edward Appleton and Joseph Priestley: two giants of electrical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Excell, P. S.

    The life of Sir Edward Appleton is reviewed, in commemoration of the recent centenary of his birth. Appleton discovered the ionosphere and devoted much of his life to investigations of its properties, receiving the Nobel Prize for physics as a result. He became a senior government scientist in World War II and afterwards was appointed Vice-Chancellor of Edinburgh University. The influence of his roots in the city of Bradford is emphasized and compared with the case of Joseph Priestley, also born near Bradford some 160 yr earlier. Priestley was a major early investigator of electrical phenomena and compiled a comprehensive treatise on the electrical knowledge of his day. He was the first person to present an experimental proof of the inverse-square law of electrostatic force, although he is usually better remembered as the discoverer of oxygen.

  20. Sir Edward Mellanby (1884-1955) GBE KCB FRCP FRS: nutrition scientist and medical research mandarin.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2010-08-01

    Edward Mellanby used the experimental method to investigate medical problems. In 1918, working at King's College for Women, London, he provided conclusive evidence that rickets is a dietary deficiency disease due to lack of a fat-soluble vitamin [D]. In Sheffield he demonstrated that cereals, in an unbalanced diet, produced rickets due to the phytic acid content reducing the availability of calcium. Mellanby became Secretary of the Medical Research Council (1933-49) but continued his research by working at weekends. In the 1930s he campaigned for the results of nutritional research to be used for the benefit of public health. During World War II he acted as a scientific adviser to the War Cabinet and had a strong influence on the food policy which maintained successfully the nutrition of the population during the shipping blockade. Mellanby was a formidable person but with sagacity he promoted new research and guided the expansion of the organization. PMID:20798415

  1. Estimating transmissivity in the Edwards Aquifer using upscaling, geostatistics, and Bayesian updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S. L.; Jiang, Y.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Edwards Aquifer, a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer located in south central Texas, is the sole source of drinking water for more than one million people. Hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements in the Edwards Aquifer are sparse, highly variable (log-K variance of 6.4), and are mostly from single-well drawdown tests that are appropriate for the spatial scale of a few meters. To support ongoing efforts to develop a groundwater management (MODFLOW) model of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards Aquifer, a multistep procedure was developed to assign hydraulic parameters to the 402 m x 402 m computational cells intended for the management model. The approach used a combination of nonparametric geostatistical analysis, stochastic simulation, numerical upscaling, and automatic model calibration based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. Indicator correlograms reveal a nested spatial structure in the well-test K of the confined zone, with practical correlation ranges of 3,600 and 15,000 meters and a large nugget effect. The fitted geostatistical model was used in unconditional stochastic simulations by the sequential indicator simulation method. The resulting realizations of K, defined at the scale of the well tests, were then numerically upscaled to the block scale. A new geostatistical model was fitted to the upscaled values. The upscaled model was then used to cokrige the block-scale K based on the well-test K. The resulting K map was then converted to transmissivity (T) using deterministically mapped aquifer thickness. When tested in a forward groundwater model, the upscaled T reproduced hydraulic heads better than a simple kriging of the well-test values (mean error of -3.9 meter and mean-absolute-error of 12 meters, as compared with -13 and 17 meters for the simple kriging). As the final step in the study, the upscaled T map was used as the prior distribution in an inverse procedure based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. When input to the forward groundwater model, the

  2. Unconventional superconductivity and interaction induced Fermi surface reconstruction in the two-dimensional Edwards model

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dai-Ning; Brink, Jeroen van den; Fehske, Holger; Becker, Klaus W.; Sykora, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    We study the competition between unconventional superconducting pairing and charge density wave (CDW) formation for the two-dimensional Edwards Hamiltonian at half filling, a very general two-dimensional transport model in which fermionic charge carriers couple to a correlated background medium. Using the projective renormalization method we find that a strong renormalization of the original fermionic band causes a new hole-like Fermi surface to emerge near the center of the Brillouin zone, before it eventually gives rise to the formation of a charge density wave. On the new, disconnected parts of the Fermi surface superconductivity is induced with a sign-changing order parameter. We discuss these findings in the light of recent experiments on iron-based oxypnictide superconductors. PMID:26935887

  3. Unconventional superconductivity and interaction induced Fermi surface reconstruction in the two-dimensional Edwards model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dai-Ning; Brink, Jeroen Van Den; Fehske, Holger; Becker, Klaus W.; Sykora, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    We study the competition between unconventional superconducting pairing and charge density wave (CDW) formation for the two-dimensional Edwards Hamiltonian at half filling, a very general two-dimensional transport model in which fermionic charge carriers couple to a correlated background medium. Using the projective renormalization method we find that a strong renormalization of the original fermionic band causes a new hole-like Fermi surface to emerge near the center of the Brillouin zone, before it eventually gives rise to the formation of a charge density wave. On the new, disconnected parts of the Fermi surface superconductivity is induced with a sign-changing order parameter. We discuss these findings in the light of recent experiments on iron-based oxypnictide superconductors.

  4. Wastewater characterization survey, Edwards Air Force Base, California. Final report, 17-28 February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, R.P.

    1992-08-01

    A wastewater characterization survey was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base from 17-28 February 1992 by personnel from the Water Quality Function of Armstrong Laboratory. Extensive sampling of the treatment plant influent wastewater and sludge beds was performed as well as sampling at nine other sites in the base cantonment area. Some sampling of an Imhoff tank on North Base, five evaporation ponds and the lakebed was also conducted. Low levels of organic contamination were found in the influent and industrial sites downstream of Site 7. Site 7 is a manhole located in an identified Installation Restoration Program (IRP) site. Corrective actions were recommended to prevent organic soil contaminants from intruding into this site prior to the operation of a planned tertiary treatment plant. Organic and inorganic contaminants discharged at other industrial sites were found to be in low concentrations and indicated that good shop practices were followed in minimizing contamination of the wastewater with industrial chemicals.

  5. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses. PMID:12682572

  6. Application of Edwards' statistical mechanics to high-dimensional jammed sphere packings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuliang; Charbonneau, Patrick; Meyer, Sam; Song, Chaoming; Zamponi, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    The isostatic jamming limit of frictionless spherical particles from Edwards' statistical mechanics [Song et al., Nature (London) 453, 629 (2008)] is generalized to arbitrary dimension d using a liquid-state description. The asymptotic high-dimensional behavior of the self-consistent relation is obtained by saddle-point evaluation and checked numerically. The resulting random close packing density scaling ϕ∼d2(-d) is consistent with that of other approaches, such as replica theory and density-functional theory. The validity of various structural approximations is assessed by comparing with three- to six-dimensional isostatic packings obtained from simulations. These numerical results support a growing accuracy of the theoretical approach with dimension. The approach could thus serve as a starting point to obtain a geometrical understanding of the higher-order correlations present in jammed packings. PMID:21230456

  7. Unconventional superconductivity and interaction induced Fermi surface reconstruction in the two-dimensional Edwards model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dai-Ning; Brink, Jeroen van den; Fehske, Holger; Becker, Klaus W; Sykora, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    We study the competition between unconventional superconducting pairing and charge density wave (CDW) formation for the two-dimensional Edwards Hamiltonian at half filling, a very general two-dimensional transport model in which fermionic charge carriers couple to a correlated background medium. Using the projective renormalization method we find that a strong renormalization of the original fermionic band causes a new hole-like Fermi surface to emerge near the center of the Brillouin zone, before it eventually gives rise to the formation of a charge density wave. On the new, disconnected parts of the Fermi surface superconductivity is induced with a sign-changing order parameter. We discuss these findings in the light of recent experiments on iron-based oxypnictide superconductors. PMID:26935887

  8. Extensional Tectonics and Paleoclimate of the Albertine and Edward Rifts: Constraints from Integrated Seismic Reflection and Topographic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, T.; McGlue, M. M.; Scholz, C. A.; Kasande, R.; Mugisha, F.

    2004-12-01

    Lakes Albert and Edward are among the largest lakes in Africa and form substantial reservoirs for tropical precipitation within the Upper Nile Watershed (UNW), the equatorial headwaters supporting annual discharge of the main Nile River into the Mediterranean Sea. Extensional processes forming Lakes Albert and Edward have driven landscape evolution, manifested in significant topography and reversed drainages networks. Consequently, the UNW, including Lakes Albert, Edward, Victoria, and Kyoga, and their riverine connections, provide an important case study for drainage basin evolution in actively extending continental lithosphere. In addition to multiple scales of tectonic deformation, high frequency climate change affects the basins in the UNW, which record moisture signals from both the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Paleoclimate proxy data indicate the desiccation of Lake Victoria and cessation of Victoria Nile flow during the Last Glacial Maximum (22 - 18 ka). However, the response of Lakes Albert and Edward during this time period is not fully resolved. In 2003, 1600 line km of multichannel seismic reflection and high resolution echo-sounder data were collected from Lake Albert, while 200 km of 1 kHz seismic reflection data were collected from Lake Edward. In conjunction with recently released digital elevation models, we investigate both tectonic and climatic processes operative in the basins. In Lake Albert, we are able to map depth to pre-rift basement, basin boundary fault as well as intrabasinal fault geometries that control both bathymetry and sediment distribution. Shallow reflections suggest desiccation of the lake, probably during the LGM; these results tie well with published sediment core data. Acoustic data from Lake Edward record two regression events, although this lake apparently escaped LGM desiccation, and may contain a complete, high-resolution archive of Quaternary climate change in its deep-water sequences. Our interpretations provide another

  9. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M; Opsahl, S P; Mahler, B J; Herrington, C; Sample, T L; Banta, J R

    2016-10-15

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3(-)) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3(-) in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008-12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3(-) stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(18)O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3(-) concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3(-) concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3(-) concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3(-). These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3(-) contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008-10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3(-) than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously unrecognized

  10. Valve Replacement with the Starr-Edwards and Hancock Prostheses: Comparative Analysis of Late Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Oyer, Philip E.; Stinson, Edward B.; Griepp, Randall B.; Shumway, Norman E.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Starr-Edwards caged-ball valve remains a standard of comparison for more recently introduced prostheses, a substantial incidence of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications prompted our evaluation of the Hancock glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine xenograft. We have compared the results of 435 aortic valve replacements using the Starr- Edwards valve (SE-AVR), 515 mitral valve replacements (SE-MVR), and 121 double-valve replacements (SE-AVRMVR) with 251 aortic valve replacements using the xenograft aortic valve (X-AVR), 338 mitral valve replacements (X-MVR), and 88 double-valve replacements (X-AVR-MVR). The Starr- Edwards valves were used during the period 1963 through 1973 and the xenograft valves between 1971 and 1976. No significant differences in patient age, sex, or preoperative hemodynamic data were noted between comparable groups. All patients with Starr-Edwards valves received long-term anticoagulation while anticoagulants were used only for specific indications in patients with xenograft valves. Total follow up was 3944 patient years for the Starr-Edwards patients and 947 patient years for the xenograft patients. Hospital mortality was not significantly different for comparable groups: SE-AVR 6.9% vs. X-AVR 6.4%, SE-MVR 9.7% vs X-MVR 8.6%, and SE-AVR-MVR 7.5% vs. X-AVR-MVR 10.2%. Linearized mortality and morbidity data expressed as percent per patient- year are tabulated below. Pairs which differ significantly (p < .05) are italicized. PMID:560824

  11. Groundwater ages from the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas—Insights into groundwater flow and recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Landis, Gary P.; Faith, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Tritium–helium-3 groundwater ages of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas were determined as part of a long-term study of groundwater flow and recharge in the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. These ages help to define groundwater residence times and to provide constraints for calibration of groundwater flow models. A suite of 17 samples from public and private supply wells within Uvalde County were collected for active and noble gases, and for tritium–helium-3 analyses from the confined and unconfined parts of the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from monitoring wells at discrete depths in open boreholes as well as from integrated pumped well-head samples. The data indicate a fairly uniform groundwater flow system within an otherwise structurally complex geologic environment comprised of regionally and locally faulted rock units, igneous intrusions, and karst features within carbonate rocks. Apparent ages show moderate, downward average, linear velocities in the Uvalde area with increasing age to the east along a regional groundwater flow path. Though the apparent age data show a fairly consistent distribution across the study area, many apparent ages indicate mixing of both modern (less than 60 years) and premodern (greater than 60 years) waters. This mixing is most evident along the “bad water” line, an arbitrary delineation of 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids that separates the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer from the downdip saline water zone. Mixing of modern and premodern waters also is indicated within the unconfined zone of the aquifer by high excess helium concentrations in young waters. Excess helium anomalies in the unconfined aquifer are consistent with possible subsurface discharge of premodern groundwater from the underlying Trinity aquifer into the younger groundwater of the Edwards aquifer.

  12. An observational study of dust nucleation in Mira (o Ceti). I. Variable features of AlO and other Al-bearing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, T.; Wong, K. T.; Schmidt, M. R.; Müller, H. S. P.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Cherchneff, I.; Menten, K. M.; Keller, D.; Brünken, S.; Winters, J. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Dust is efficiently produced by cool giant stars, but the condensation of inorganic dust is poorly understood. Observations of key aluminum bearing molecules around evolved stars has enabled us to investigate the nucleation of alumina (Al2O3) dust in the gas. Aims: We aim to identify and characterize aluminum bearing species in the circumstellar gas of Mira (o Ceti) in order to elucidate their role in the production of Al2O3 dust. Methods: We used multiepoch spectral line observations at (sub-)millimeter, far-infrared, and optical wavelengths including: maps with ALMA that probe the gas distribution in the immediate vicinity of the star at ~30 mas; observations with ALMA, APEX, and Herschel in 2013-2015 for studying cycle and inter-cycle variability of the rotational lines of Al-bearing molecules; optical records as far back as 1965 to examine variations in electronic transitions over time spans of days to decades; and velocity measurements and excitation analysis of the spectral features that constrain the physical parameters of the gas. Results: Three diatomic molecules AlO, AlOH, and AlH, and atomic Al i are the main observable aluminum species in Mira, although a significant fraction of aluminum might reside in other species that have not yet been identified. Strong irregular variability in the (sub-)millimeter and optical features of AlO (possibly the direct precursor of Al2O3) indicates substantial changes in the excitation conditions, or varying abundance that is likely related to shocks in the star. The inhomogeneous distribution of AlO might influence the spatial and temporal characteristics of dust production. Conclusions: We are unable to quantitatively trace aluminum depletion from the gas, but the rich observational material constrains time-dependent chemical networks. Future improvements should include spectroscopic characterization of higher aluminum oxides, coordinated observations of dust and gas species at different variability phases

  13. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    DOEpatents

    McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood therethrough with two curved leaflets each of which is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance.

  14. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, D.M.; Peskin, C.S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood with two curved leaflets is described. Each of the leaflets is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance. 26 figures.

  15. SiO MASERS IN ASYMMETRIC MIRAS. IV. {chi} CYGNI, R AQUILAE, R LEO MINORIS, RU HERCULIS, U HERCULIS, AND U ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Danchi, W. C.; Traub, W. A.; Lacasse, M. G.

    2010-06-15

    This is the fourth paper in a series of multi-epoch observations at 7 mm wavelength of the SiO masers in several asymptotic giant branch stars from a sample of Mira variable stars showing evidence of asymmetric structure in the infrared. These stars have been observed interferometrically in the infrared by IOTA and with VLBA measurements of the SiO masers. In this paper, we present the observations of {chi} Cygni ({chi} Cyg), R Aquilae (R Aql), R Leo Minoris (R LMi), RU Herculis (RU Her), U Herculis (U Her), and U Orionis (U Ori). Several radial features with velocity gradients were observed, all with velocities close to systemic furthest from the star and redshifted closer to the stellar surface. Systemic velocities are estimated for several of the stars. No compelling evidence of asymmetry is seen in the maser distributions. All maser rings are approximately twice the near-IR uniform disk diameter and are comparable in size to the extended molecular envelope when such measurements are available.

  16. Ecology of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor in the Canal de Mira (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal): Population dynamics, production and oogenic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrantes, António; Pinto, Fátima; Moreira, Maria Helena

    1999-07-01

    The population of Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller was studied in 1993 and 1994 at three intertidal areas along the estuarine gradient in the Canal de Mira (Ria de Aveiro). The population dynamics, secondary production and growth were followed for the 2-year period, whereas in the second year, a study on the oogenic cycle was also carried out. For the population dynamics and production studies, core samples were collected monthly at each site, and for the study of the oogenic cycle, medium size and large individuals were sampled from the sediment. Mean annual densities were higher (573-718 ind.m -2) at a station located in the middle zone of the channel, followed by the outer (190-275 ind.m -2) and the innermost (43-94 ind.m -2) stations. A cohort analysis by `Bhatta' software enabled the separation of the cohorts present at each date, and two cohorts were followed from recruitment to extinction. The secondary production ranged from 15.9 to 74.2 g ash free dry weight.m -2.year -1 and the P/ overlineBratio from 4.4 to 7.9. The average body growth rate varied between 0.16 and 0.20 mm.d -1 for worms longer than 2 cm. Two recruitment seasons were detected each year. Two spawning periods were also observed, one in the spring and the other in early autumn.

  17. X-43A Undergoing Controlled Radio Frequency Testing in the Benefield Anechoic Facility at Edwards Ai

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The X-43A Hypersonic Experimental (Hyper-X) Vehicle hangs suspended in the cavernous Benefield Aenechoic Facility at Edwards Air Force Base during radio frequency tests in January 2000. Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will be able to carry heavier payloads. Another unique aspect of the X-43A vehicle is the airframe integration

  18. Effects of altered soil moisture on respiratory quotient in the Edwards Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, M. A.; Hawkes, C.; Breecker, D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns around the world. The impacts of altered precipitation on ecosystem function will be partly controlled by soil microbes because of their primary role in soil carbon cycling. However, microbial responses to drought remain poorly understood, particularly local responses that might partly reflect specialization based on historical conditions. Here, we investigated the respiratory response of microbial communities originating from historically wetter and drier sites to both low and high soil moistures. We focused on the respiratory quotient (RQ= moles of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed), which varies with the oxidation state of organic carbon being respired and/or the compounds being synthesized by soil microbes. We hypothesized that there would be a shift in RQ across the gradient of soil moisture. Soils were collected from 13 sites across a steep precipitation gradient on the Edwards plateau in central Texas, air-dried, rewet at low or high soil moisture (6% or 24% gravimetric, respectively), and incubated in an atmosphere of 21% O2, 1% Ar, and balance He. After eight weeks, CO2, O2 and Ar in the headspace of incubation vials were measured by gas chromatography after separation of Ar and O2 at subambient temperature. Because of the high calcite content in soils on the Edwards plateau, we corrected the RQ values by assuming pH was buffered at 8 and then adding the calculated amount of CO2 dissolved in water in the incubations vials to the measured CO2 in the headspace. We found that uncorrected RQ values were slightly less than one and increased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation. In contrast, corrected RQ values were greater than one and decreased with increasing mean annual precipitation. In both cases, we see a shift in RQ across the gradient, suggesting that differences in substrate utilization may vary based on origin across the gradient and with current level of soil moisture

  19. Edward A. Delgado-Romero: Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Edward A. Delgado-Romero, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. "Societies, professions, and individual citizens are enriched by the contributions of those who care. Edward A. Delgado-Romero has demonstrated through his scholarship, leadership in psychological associations such as the National Latina/Latino Psychological Association, and collaborations with universities and school districts in Georgia that he cares and is committed to addressing challenges in the provision of culturally sensitive psychological services to benefit the public interest. His example of servant leadership leaves a legacy to other early career professionals and graduate students alike. Es un hijo honorado." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22082394

  20. Investigation of seismicity and related effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousineau, R. D.; Crook, R., Jr.; Leeds, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters, probability of recurrence, and recommended analogous time-history accelerograms with their corresponding spectra. The recommendations apply specifically to the Dryden site and should not be extrapolated to other sites with varying foundation and geologic conditions or different seismic environments.

  1. 'A disgrace to a civilised community': colonial psychiatry and the visit of Edward Mapother to South Asia, 1937-8.

    PubMed

    Mills, James H; Jain, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    In 1937, Edward Mapother, Medical Superintendent of the Maudsley Hospital in London, took a trip around the mental hospitals of Britain's dominions in South Asia. The result was a series of documents that provide a snapshot of psychiatry in India and Ceylon in the twilight years of the British Empire. This chapter will consider Mapother's reports from a number of perspectives in order to assess the politics and the impact of an expert 'visitor' to a colonial medical system. PMID:19842341

  2. A lone desert Joshua tree greeted the arrival of Space Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A lone desert Joshua tree greeted the arrival of Space Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base, California, May 1, 2001. A large drag chute helped slow Endeavour on the runway. After mounting the shuttle on a converted 747 airliner at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Endeavour will be carried back to the Kennedy Space Center for its next mission. Weather in Florida necessitated landing in California.

  3. Upper bound on the Edwards entropy in frictional monodisperse hard-sphere packings.

    PubMed

    Baranau, Vasili; Zhao, Song-Chuan; Scheel, Mario; Tallarek, Ulrich; Schröter, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    We extend the Widom particle insertion method [B. Widom, J. Chem. Phys., 1963, 39, 2808-2812] to determine an upper bound sub on the Edwards entropy in frictional hard-sphere packings. sub corresponds to the logarithm of the number of mechanically stable configurations for a given volume fraction and boundary conditions. To accomplish this, we extend the method for estimating the particle insertion probability through the pore-size distribution in frictionless packings [V. Baranau, et al., Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 3361-3372] to the case of frictional particles. We use computer-generated and experimentally obtained three-dimensional sphere packings with volume fractions φ in the range 0.551-0.65. We find that sub has a maximum in the vicinity of the Random Loose Packing Limit φRLP = 0.55 and decreases then monotonically with increasing φ to reach a minimum at φ = 0.65. Further on, sub does not distinguish between real mechanical stability and packings in close proximity to mechanical stable configurations. The probability to find a given number of contacts for a particle inserted in a large enough pore does not depend on φ, but it decreases strongly with the contact number. PMID:27020114

  4. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University.

    PubMed

    Veitia, M; McCarty, S; Kelly, P; Szarek, J; Harvey, H

    2001-04-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project was designed to enhance interest in and support of generalism during the first two years of medical education. The original goals at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University included the design and implementation of a core curriculum, Introduction to Patient Care (IPC), and enhancement of teaching excellence through faculty development. The core curriculum facilitated integration with the basic sciences and early introduction of physical examination skills, which were further developed in longitudinal clinical experiences with mentors. Although it was not originally intended to include basic scientists in the preceptor groups, they became important additions and created additional opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and reciprocal learning. The mentor program, another well-received and intended curriculum change, evolved from a structured experience to a more flexible component of the curriculum. The program met the requirements of the IGC Project but 53% of the originally intended mentor time was achievable, due to curriculum constraints. Faculty development, another success, was originally intended to target IPC faculty but ultimately became a university-wide effort. The changes implemented as a result of the IGC Project continue to flourish beyond the funding period and have become integral aspects of the curriculum and the medical school. PMID:11299178

  5. A survey of biological productivity of Prince Edward Island swine herds.

    PubMed Central

    Van Til, L D; Dohoo, I R; Spangler, E; Ogilvie, T H

    1991-01-01

    Sow and feeder pig productivity were measured on a random sample of 32 Prince Edward Island swine farms (each producing over 1000 market hogs per year). Productivity parameters could be arranged in a hierarchy, with the highest level on farrow-finish operations represented by pigs weaned per sow per year. The 17 farrow-finish farms in this study averaged 19.6 (+/- 2.2 SD) pigs weaned per sow per year. Large variation between farms was observed with a range from 16.2 to 24.9 pigs weaned per sow per year. The major opportunities for improving productivity, as compared to reviewed targets, lie in reducing the average weaning age, reducing preweaning mortality, and reducing non-productive sow days per parity. The 14 feeder operations were characterized by 0.58 +/- 0.07 kg average daily gain. Average daily gain was negatively correlated with mortality (r = -0.662, p = 0.010), suggesting that herds that achieved a high rate of gain also had lower mortality. PMID:1884298

  6. Demographics, management, and welfare of nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract There are no detailed, representative, horse-level data about equine management practices in different parts of Canada. To help address this, the demographics, management, and welfare of 312 nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island were examined in a randomized, horse-level survey during summer 2002. Owners completed a pretested questionnaire, and a veterinarian examined each horse. Owners were experienced caregivers and the horses were generally in good condition. Areas for improvement included parasite control, dental and hoof care, and tail docking. The mean fecal egg count was 428 eggs per gram; 76% of owners never removed manure from the pasture. Sixty-two percent of horses had never had a veterinary dental examination. Many horses had hoof defects (excessively long hooves, 26.8%; hoof wall breaks, 32.0%; and white line disease, 8.5%). Many (54.9%) draft horses had docked tails. These results suggest owners might benefit their horses by receiving education in aspects of equine care. PMID:15646847

  7. Management factors affecting stereotypies and body condition score in nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Julie L.; Riley, Christopher B.; McNiven, Mary A.; Dohoo, Ian R.; Bate, Luis A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In North America, there are few representative data about the effects of management practices on equine welfare. In a randomized survey of 312 nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island (response rate 68.4%), owners completed a pretested questionnaire and a veterinarian examined each horse. Regression analyses identified factors affecting 2 welfare markers: body condition score (BCS) and stereotypic behavior. Horses’ BCSs were high (mean 5.7, on a 9-point scale) and were associated with sex (males had lower BCSs than females; P < 0.001) and examination date (P = 0.052). Prevalences of crib biting, wind sucking, and weaving were 3.8%, 3.8%, and 4.8%, respectively. Age (OR = 1.07, P = 0.08) and hours worked weekly (OR = 1.12, P = 0.03) were risk factors for weaving. Straw bedding (OR = 0.3, P = 0.03), daily hours at pasture (OR = 0.94, P = 0.02), and horse type (drafts and miniatures had a lower risk than light horses; P = 0.12) reduced the risk of horses showing oral stereotypies. Some of these results contradict those of other studies perhaps because of populations concerned. PMID:16579039

  8. Management factors affecting stereotypies and body condition score in nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Christie, Julie L; Hewson, Caroline J; Riley, Christopher B; McNiven, Mary A; Dohoo, Ian R; Bate, Luis A

    2006-02-01

    In North America, there are few representative data about the effects of management practices on equine welfare. In a randomized survey of 312 nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island (response rate 68.4%), owners completed a pretested questionnaire and a veterinarian examined each horse. Regression analyses identified factors affecting 2 welfare markers: body condition score (BCS) and stereotypic behavior. Horses' BCSs were high (mean 5.7, on a 9-point scale) and were associated with sex (males had lower BCSs than females; P < 0.001) and examination date (P = 0.052). Prevalences of crib biting, wind sucking, and weaving were 3.8%, 3.8%, and 4.8%, respectively. Age (OR = 1.07, P = 0.08) and hours worked weekly (OR = 1.12, P = 0.03) were risk factors for weaving. Straw bedding (OR = 0.3, P = 0.03), daily hours at pasture (OR = 0.94, P = 0.02), and horse type (drafts and miniatures had a lower risk than light horses; P = 0.12) reduced the risk of horses showing oral stereotypies. Some of these results contradict those of other studies perhaps because of populations concerned. PMID:16579039

  9. Edward Walter Maunder FRAS (1851-1928): his life and times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinder, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    The year 2001 saw the sesquicentenary of the birth of Edward Walter Maunder, and 2004 the centenary of the publication of his Butterfly Diagram and the experiment on the canals of Mars. Despite his holding a pivotal place in the history of British amateur astronomy, so far no major treatment of his life has appeared. Although a prolific writer, virtually no reference appears in any modern work today; even his work in solar astronomy and geophysics is generally unacknowledged. Sheehan's portrayal of Maunder as '...a good example of the way in which fame and oblivion are inequably distributed among scientists... though he accomplished a great deal of... work of the very first rank... he is relatively unknown today' is very pertinent. However this appears to be changing as research is currently in progress respecting his work in solar astronomy and his investigations of the history of the origins of constellations. It is however as the founder of the British Astronomical Association that he is remembered.

  10. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III

    2008-01-01

    NASA prefers to land the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When weather conditions violate Flight Rules at KSC, NASA will usually divert the shuttle landing to Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in Southern California. But forecasting surface winds at EAFB is a challenge for the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) forecasters due to the complex terrain that surrounds EAFB, One particular phenomena identified by SMG is that makes it difficult to forecast the EAFB surface winds is called "wind cycling". This occurs when wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway leading to a challenging deorbit bum forecast for shuttle landings. The large-scale numerical weather prediction models cannot properly resolve the wind field due to their coarse horizontal resolutions, so a properly tuned high-resolution mesoscale model is needed. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model meets this requirement. The AMU assessed the different WRF model options to determine which configuration best predicted surface wind speed and direction at EAFB, To do so, the AMU compared the WRF model performance using two hot start initializations with the Advanced Research WRF and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical cores and compared model performance while varying the physics options.

  11. Muscular and other abnormalities in a case of Edwards' syndrome (18-trisomy).

    PubMed

    Aziz, M A

    1979-10-01

    This paper describes the anatomical variations observed in a specimen exhibiting Edwards' Syndrome (18-trisomy). The clinical and autopsy data are compared with those reported in earlier literature. Aside from having a tracheoesophageal fistula, the viscera were characterized by abnormalities of the heart, lungs, liver and kidneys. The facial musculature was relatively undifferentiated. Only a few abnormalities were recorded in the otomandibular and suprahyoid structures. The infrahyoid region had three pairs of supernumerary muscles, including the "sternohyoideus azygos." The bluk of abnormalities were found in the muscles and nerves of the upper limb. These included the absence of the palmaris longus and brevis, the subclavius and the extensor digiti quinti proprius; the presence of supernumerary muscles, e.g., the "rhomboideus occipitalis," the "latissimocondyloideus," and the "subclavius posticus." The deltoid and the pectoralis major were fused to form the "deltopectoral" complex. A definitive musculocutaneous nerve was found in the right arm only. In the lower extremity supernumerary muscles included the "tenuissimus," "peroneus quinti digiti," and the "extensor primi internodii hallucis." PMID:524303

  12. A serological survey of leptospirosis in Prince Edward Island swine herds and its association with infertility.

    PubMed Central

    Van Til, L D; Dohoo, I R

    1991-01-01

    A serological survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence of leptospirosis, and to investigate associations between leptospiral antibody titers, and herd measures of reproduction. Production records and leptospirosis serology were analyzed for 25 slaughter hogs from each of eleven randomly sampled farrow-finish operations on Prince Edward Island. The effect of selected leptospiral serovars on nonproductive sow days per parity (NPSD/P) and the proportion of pigs born dead was evaluated. The four most common serovars to which antibodies were detected were Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae, L. bratislava, L. autumnalis and L. pomona, with respective prevalences of 57.1%, 35.1%, 3.4% and 1.5% of PEI slaughter hogs. None of these serovars was associated with increased frequency of stillbirths (p greater than 0.05). However, farms with a higher prevalence of L. bratislava antibody titers tended to have more infertility, as measured by NPSD/P (r = 0.738, p = 0.036 with Bonferroni adjustment). Also, farms with L. pomona antibody titers had higher NPSD/P than farms without L. pomona antibody titers (p = 0.0008 with Bonferroni adjustment). There was no association between NPSD/P and antibodies to either L. autumnalis or L. icterohaemorrhagiae (p greater than 0.05). PMID:1790491

  13. Finite-size corrections for ground states of Edwards-Anderson spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Extensive computations of ground-state energies of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass on bond-diluted, hypercubic lattices are conducted in dimensions d=3, ..., 7. Results are presented for bond densities exactly at the percolation threshold, p=pc, and deep within the glassy regime, p>pc, where finding ground states is one of the hardest combinatorial optimization problems. Finite-size corrections of the form 1/Nω are shown to be consistent throughout with the prediction ω=1-y/d, where y refers to the "stiffness" exponent that controls the formation of domain wall excitations at low temperatures. At p=pc, an extrapolation for d→∞ appears to match our mean-field results for these corrections. In the glassy phase, however, ω does not approach its anticipated mean-field value of 2/3, obtained from simulations of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass on an N-clique graph. Instead, the value of ω reached at the upper critical dimension matches another type of mean-field spin glass models, namely those on sparse random networks of regular degree called Bethe lattices.

  14. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III; Hoeth, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This abstract describes work that will be done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in assessing the success of different model configurations in predicting "wind cycling" cases at Edwards Air Force Base, CA (EAFB), in which the wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model allows users to choose among two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). There are also data assimilation analysis packages available for the initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS). Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, creates challenges for local forecasters, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. The goal of this project is to assess the different configurations available and determine which configuration will best predict surface wind speed and direction at EAFB.

  15. Optical scattering simulation of ice particles with surface roughness modeled using the Edwards-Wilkinson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianing; Bi, Lei; Liu, Jianping; Panetta, R. Lee; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.

    2016-07-01

    Constructing an appropriate particle morphology model is essential for realistic simulation of optical properties of atmospheric particles. This paper presents a model for generating surface roughness based on a combination of methods from discrete differential geometry combined with a stochastic partial differential equation for surface evolution introduced by Edwards and Wilkinson. Scattering of light by roughened particles is simulated using the Invariant Imbedding T-Matrix (II-TM) method. The effects of surface roughness on the single-scattering properties, namely, the phase matrix, asymmetry factor, and extinction efficiency, are investigated for a single wavelength in the visible range and for a range of size parameters up to x=50. Three different smooth shapes are considered: spherical, spheroidal, and hexagonal, the latter two in just the "compact particle" case of unit aspect ratio. It is shown that roughness has negligible effects on the optical scattering properties for size parameters less than 20. For size parameters ranging from 20 to 50, the phase matrix elements are more sensitive to the surface roughness than are two important integral optical properties, the extinction efficiency and asymmetry factor. As has been seen in studies using other forms of roughening, the phase function is progressively smoothed as roughness increases. The effect on extinction efficiency is to increase it, and on asymmetry factor is to decrease it. Each of these effects is relatively modest in the size range considered, but the trend of results suggests that greater effects will be seen for size parameters larger than ones considered here.

  16. Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Tomokazu; Jeffries, Emiko; Amano, Misa; Ko, Akihiro C.; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, has previously been considered irremediable. Here, we report findings that euploid cells increased among cultured aneuploid cells after exposure to the protein ZSCAN4, encoded by a mammalian-specific gene that is ordinarily expressed in preimplantation embryos and occasionally in stem cells. For footprint-free delivery of ZSCAN4 to cells, we developed ZSCAN4 synthetic mRNAs and Sendai virus vectors that encode human ZSCAN4. Applying the ZSCAN4 biologics to established cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, most of which had become aneuploid and polyploid, dramatically increased the number of euploid cells within a few days. We then tested the biologics on non-immortalized primary human fibroblast cells derived from four individuals with Down syndrome—the most frequent autosomal trisomy of chromosome 21. Within weeks after ZSCAN4 application to the cells in culture, fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific probe detected the emergence of up to 24% of cells with only two rather than three copies. High-resolution G-banded chromosomes further showed up to 40% of cells with a normal karyotype. These findings were confirmed by whole-exome sequencing. Similar results were obtained for cells with the trisomy 18 of Edwards syndrome. Thus a direct, efficient correction of aneuploidy in human fibroblast cells seems possible in vitro using human ZSCAN4. PMID:26324424

  17. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

  18. [Peter Plett and other discoverers of cowpox vaccination before Edward Jenner].

    PubMed

    Plett, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    Before Edward Jenner tested the possibility of using the cowpox vaccine as an immunisation for smallpox in humans in 1796, at least six people had done the same several years earlier. However, the findings of these six people regarding the cowpox vaccination are either hardly known or have even been forgotten. For the first time, the originally scattered information on the procedures used by these six people has been gathered and will be presented in this article. Detailed attention will be given to the works of the teacher Peter Plett (1766-1823), the only one to recognize the importance of his discovery for mankind. In 1790 and 1791/92, Plett reported his findings to the Medical Faculty of the University of Kiel. The faculty disregarded Plett's reports by neither responding to them nor changing their methods of immunisation, as the faculty at that time was still in favour of variolation. This article contains the available information and references concerning Plett's discovery, including the entire sources from 1802 and 1815 describing his findings. PMID:17338405

  19. Editorial - Climate change impacts on rural poverty in low-elevation coastal zones, Edward B. Barbier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Michael; Wolanski, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In the Invited Feature Article in this issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, we are extremely grateful to Edward Barbier for performing the major task of increasing our awareness of the hazards and risks faced by all communities on low lying coasts but especially the poor, rural communities (Barbier, 2015). Against a background of climate-induced change, we now have a good and increasing evidence of the way the natural estuarine, coastal and marine system will respond (Elliott et al, 2015). However, more importantly Barbier (2015) highlights the way in which poor, rural coastal communities will be affected and will need to respond or will need help from the developed world to respond. It is axiomatic that while those communities are having less impact than more developed countries on the causes of climate change they are more affected and so have to respond to its consequences, what have been called exogenic unmanaged pressures. Hence they need to rely on mechanisms, techniques, technologies and approaches to help them cope with such change (see also Wolanski and Elliott 2015).

  20. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spring, S.E.; Miles, A.K.; Anderson, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 ??l/L of TCE and 0.07 ??l/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

  1. A newly identified apothecary in Boswell's Life of Johnson: Edward Ferrand (1691-1769).

    PubMed

    Caudle, James J; Bundock, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Ever since the publication of James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson (1791), it has been known that Johnson's young servant, the former slave Francis Barber 'ran away' at one point and worked for a London apothecary. But the apothecary was not named by Boswell and has not been identified by any of Johnson's numerous biographers nor in recent studies of Francis Barber. Research in surviving Boswell manuscripts, 18th-century London guides and the archives of the Society of Apothecaries prove the apothecary to have been Edward Ferrand. This article sets out the circumstances in which the reference to the anonymous apothecary came to appear in the Life of Johnson and reconstructs Ferrand's life and career. Examining Ferrand's origins, his social circumstances and his career, a case study is presented of a successful practitioner of the profession of apothecary in early Georgian Britain and a suggestion made as to why the distinguished apothecary came to provide a place of refuge for a teenaged runaway servant who had been a slave until he was about nine years old. PMID:24585592

  2. A cohort study of coagulase negative staphylococcal mastitis in selected dairy herds in Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Davidson, T J; Dohoo, I R; Donald, A W; Hariharan, H; Collins, K

    1992-10-01

    The epidemiology and importance of coagulase negative staphylococcal (CNS) mastitis in Prince Edward Island had not been documented. To investigate this, a cohort of 84 cows at seven farms were quarter sampled eight times over a lactation, commencing with samples taken prior to drying off in the previous lactation. Thirteen species of CNS were isolated. The quarter prevalence of CNS mastitis varied from 4.8% to 6.4% in the first five months of lactation and increased to 14.2 to 16.6% in the last four months of lactation. The geometric mean somatic cell counts (SCC) for quarters infected with CNS and uninfected quarters were 90 x 10(3) and 64 x 10(3) respectively (difference significant at p > 0.005). The two month new infection risk of CNS was 9.0% while the two month elimination risk was 74.4%. Infection with CNS did not alter the risk of subsequent infection with Staphylococcus aureus. The results from this project support the classification of CNS as a minor pathogen in mastitis control programs. PMID:1477796

  3. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Spring, Sarah E; Miles, A Keith; Anderson, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 microl/L of TCE and 0.07 microl/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals. PMID:15378993

  4. Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tomokazu; Jeffries, Emiko; Amano, Misa; Ko, Akihiro C; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S H

    2015-10-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, has previously been considered irremediable. Here, we report findings that euploid cells increased among cultured aneuploid cells after exposure to the protein ZSCAN4, encoded by a mammalian-specific gene that is ordinarily expressed in preimplantation embryos and occasionally in stem cells. For footprint-free delivery of ZSCAN4 to cells, we developed ZSCAN4 synthetic mRNAs and Sendai virus vectors that encode human ZSCAN4. Applying the ZSCAN4 biologics to established cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, most of which had become aneuploid and polyploid, dramatically increased the number of euploid cells within a few days. We then tested the biologics on non-immortalized primary human fibroblast cells derived from four individuals with Down syndrome—the most frequent autosomal trisomy of chromosome 21. Within weeks after ZSCAN4 application to the cells in culture, fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific probe detected the emergence of up to 24% of cells with only two rather than three copies. High-resolution G-banded chromosomes further showed up to 40% of cells with a normal karyotype. These findings were confirmed by whole-exome sequencing. Similar results were obtained for cells with the trisomy 18 of Edwards syndrome. Thus a direct, efficient correction of aneuploidy in human fibroblast cells seems possible in vitro using human ZSCAN4. PMID:26324424

  5. Monitoring stream sediment loads in response to agriculture in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Ashley; St-Hilaire, Andre; Courtenay, Simon C; van den Heuvel, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Increased agricultural land use leads to accelerated erosion and deposition of fine sediment in surface water. Monitoring of suspended sediment yields has proven challenging due to the spatial and temporal variability of sediment loading. Reliable sediment yield calculations depend on accurate monitoring of these highly episodic sediment loading events. This study aims to quantify precipitation-induced loading of suspended sediments on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Turbidity is considered to be a reasonably accurate proxy for suspended sediment data. In this study, turbidity was used to monitor suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and was measured for 2 years (December 2012-2014) in three subwatersheds with varying degrees of agricultural land use ranging from 10 to 69 %. Comparison of three turbidity meter calibration methods, two using suspended streambed sediment and one using automated sampling during rainfall events, revealed that the use of SSC samples constructed from streambed sediment was not an accurate replacement for water column sampling during rainfall events for calibration. Different particle size distributions in the three rivers produced significant impacts on the calibration methods demonstrating the need for river-specific calibration. Rainfall-induced sediment loading was significantly greater in the most agriculturally impacted site only when the load per rainfall event was corrected for runoff volume (total flow minus baseflow), flow increase intensity (the slope between the start of a runoff event and the peak of the hydrograph), and season. Monitoring turbidity, in combination with sediment modeling, may offer the best option for management purposes. PMID:27315128

  6. Herd prevalence and incidence of Streptococcus agalactiae in the dairy industry of Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Keefe, G P; Dohoo, I R; Spangler, E

    1997-03-01

    Herd prevalence and incidence of mastitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae was determined for dairy cattle on Prince Edward Island during December 1992 and June 1994. For each census, bulk tank milk samples from all dairy herds (n = 452) in the province were tested on two occasions, and the results were interpreted in parallel. The combined sensitivity of the testing protocol was estimated to be 91%. The confirmatory latex agglutination test had previously reported specificities approaching 100%. Therefore, the estimated specificity of the testing protocol was assumed to be 100%. The apparent prevalence of S. agalactiae in December 1992 and in June 1994 was 17.7 and 13.1%, respectively. Based on the characteristics of the test, the estimated true prevalence was 18.9% in December 1992 and 14.4% in June 1994. Infection with S. agalactiae was associated with elevated bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC) and elevated standard plate counts. Economic losses associated with S. agalactiae were attributed to production losses (associated with bulk tank SCC), milk quality penalties (associated with bulk tank SCC and standard plate count), and decreases in milk quality (associated with bulk tank SCC). For herds that had been negative for S. agalactiae in December 1992, evaluation in June 1994 yielded an incidence of new infections of 3.51 per 100 herds per year. PMID:9098795

  7. Prince Edward Island: building capacity--the implementation of a critical care/emergency program.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Judith

    2012-03-01

    Like other Canadian provinces, Prince Edward Island has a shortage of experienced nurses, especially in critical and emergency care. To increase the numbers of competent nurses, a PEI-based nursing course in these areas was identified as key to building capacity. This Research to Action pilot program successfully involved nurses in PEI-based emergency and critical care courses developed by the Nova Scotia Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre and funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The programs were offered on a full-time basis, lasted 14 weeks and included classroom and simulation laboratory time, along with a strong clinical component.Sixteen RNs graduated from the courses and became Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) certified. An additional 12 RNs were trained as preceptors. Feedback from participants indicates greater job satisfaction and increased confidence in providing patient assessments and care. Based on the program's success, the RTA partners proposed the establishment of an ongoing, PEI-based critical care and emergency nursing program utilizing 80/20 staffing models and mentorship. Their proposal was approved, with courses set to resume in January, 2012. PMID:22398483

  8. Longitudinal distribution and lateral pattern of megalopal settlement and juvenile recruitment of Carcinus maenas (L.) (Brachyura, Portunidae) in the Mira River Estuary, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Inês C.; Dinis, Ana M.; Francisco, Sara M.; Flores, Augusto A. V.; Paula, José

    2006-08-01

    Settlement is a critical process in the life history of crabs, and thus affecting the abundance, distribution and structure of estuarine communities. The spatial pattern of settlement of megalopae of the shore crab Carcinus maenas along a longitudinal estuarine gradient (Mira River Estuary, Portugal) was examined, as well as its effects on the juvenile population. To measure megalopal settlement, four replicate collectors were deployed in six equally spaced stations along the estuarine axis. Juveniles were collected on the same locations with a quadrat randomly deployed on the substrate. To assess fine-scale megalopal settlement within a curved region of the estuary, replicate collectors were deployed on both margins along Moinho da Asneira curve. Megalopae settled differently along the six longitudinal points, with a tendency to attenuate their settlement upstream. Within the curved region, megalopae preferentially settled on the left margin collectors, probably due to the weaker velocity speeds felt on this margin. Concerning the overall juvenile density, there were significant differences among the stations distributed along the estuary, but they did no reflect a longitudinal dispersion attenuation pattern. Size-frequency distribution of the juvenile population showed that the average size is higher on the left margin. Recruits (carapace length between 1.0 mm and 3.4 mm) were more abundant on the upstream stations. Density of early juveniles (3.4 mm-6.5 mm) and juveniles (6.5 mm-10 mm) was more stable throughout the estuary axis than that of recruits. This distribution pattern may result from tidal excursion processes or mechanisms to avoid biotic interactions, such as predation and competition.

  9. Spectro-Imaging of the Asymmetric Inner Molecular and Dust Shell Region of the Mira Variable W Hya with MIDI/VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao-Geisler, R.; Köhler, R.; Kemper, F.; Kerschbaum, F.; Mayer, A.; Quirrenbach, A.; Lopez, B.

    2015-08-01

    We have observed W Hya, one of the closest and best-studied oxygen-rich evolved stars, in the dust sensitive mid-IR spectral domain with the interferometric instrument MIDI. Images could be obtained for the first time with MIDI in 25 wavelengths bins with the image reconstruction software MiRA using only the modulus of the visibilities. This still remains one of the few cases in which images could be successfully recovered due to the difficulties inherent to optical/infrared interferometry concerning the sparseness of the UV-plane and the missing Fourier phase information. Different regularization terms were compared and the influence of the UV-coverage was investigated. The lack of Fourier phase information, however, still limits the interpretation of the images. W Hya appears clearly nonsymmetric and the size is wavelength dependent. The photosphere, molecular layers, and dust formation zone could be resolved with an photospheric Gaussian FWHM diameter of 42 ± 2 mas (corresponding to 4.1 AU) and a dust layer of presumably amorphous aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at around two photospheric radii. The position angle of the major axis of the elongated structure could be determined to be (15 ± 10)° with a less well defined axis ratio between 0.4 and 0.6 showing that the dust forms primarily along a N-S axis. By comparing the elongated structure seen with MIDI with the Herschel/PACS 70 μm image at much larger scales, one can conclude that the asymmetry in the mass-loss most likely originates in the very close vicinity of the star and is thus not due to an interaction with the ambient media. Based on observations made with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) at the Paranal Observatory under program IDs 083.D-0294, 084.D-0334, and 085.D-0201.

  10. Dolomite dissolution rates and possible Holocene dedolomitization of water-bearing units in the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deike, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Rates of dolomite dissolution can be used to test the concept, based on geomorphologic evidence, that a major part of the Edwards aquifer could have formed within the Holocene, a timeframe of approximately 10,000 years. During formation of the aquifer in the Edwards limestone (Cretaceous, Albian) of the Balcones fault zone, dolomite dissolution and porosity development were synchronous and the result of mixing-zone dedolomitization. Initiation of the mixing zone in the early Holocene (???11,000 years before present) is suggested by the maximum age of formation of major discharge sites that allowed the influx of meteoric water into brine-filled, dolomitic preaquifer units. Dedolomitization, the dissolution of dolomite and net precipitation of calcite, has left aquifer units that are calcitic, and 40 vol.% interconnected pore space. The mass of dolomite missing is obtained by comparison of stratigraphically equivalent altered and unaltered units. One dissolution rate (1.76 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1) is determined from this mass, 104yr reaction time, and a log-linear function describing the increase in mass discharge (three orders of magnitude) during aquifer formation. The second estimated dissolution rate is obtained from the mass transfer of dolomite to solution calculated from the increase in magnesium in pore fluids selected from the modern aquifer to represent a typical flowpath during aquifer formation. A reaction time of 104yr for this mass transfer yields a rate of 0.56 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1. Both of these rates are comparable to modern rates of dolomite dissolution (0.3 to 4.5 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1) calculated from measured reaction times in the Tertiary Floridan aquifer system in Florida and the Madison aquifer in the Mississippian Madison Limestone of the Northern Great Plains. Similarity of these rates to the estimated paleo-rates of dolomite dissolution supports a 104 yr reaction timeframe. The Holocene reaction time also

  11. Groundwater nitrate concentration evolution under climate change and agricultural adaptation scenarios: Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Daniel; Vigneault, Harold; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Qian, Budong

    2016-03-01

    Nitrate (N-NO3) concentration in groundwater, the sole source of potable water in Prince Edward Island (PEI, Canada), currently exceeds the 10 mg L-1 (N-NO3) health threshold for drinking water in 6 % of domestic wells. Increasing climatic and socio-economic pressures on PEI agriculture may further deteriorate groundwater quality. This study assesses how groundwater nitrate concentration could evolve due to the forecasted climate change and its related potential changes in agricultural practices. For this purpose, a tridimensional numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed for the aquifer system of the entire Island (5660 km2). A number of different groundwater flow and mass transport simulations were made to evaluate the potential impact of the projected climate change and agricultural adaptation. According to the simulations for year 2050, N-NO3 concentration would increase due to two main causes: (1) the progressive attainment of steady-state conditions related to present-day nitrogen loadings, and (2) the increase in nitrogen loadings due to changes in agricultural practices provoked by future climatic conditions. The combined effects of equilibration with loadings, climate and agricultural adaptation would lead to a 25 to 32 % increase in N-NO3 concentration over the Island aquifer system. The change in groundwater recharge regime induced by climate change (with current agricultural practices) would only contribute 0 to 6 % of that increase for the various climate scenarios. Moreover, simulated trends in groundwater N-NO3 concentration suggest that an increased number of domestic wells (more than doubling) would exceed the nitrate drinking water criteria. This study underlines the need to develop and apply better agricultural management practices to ensure sustainability of long-term groundwater resources. The simulations also show that observable benefits from positive changes in agricultural practices would be delayed in time due to

  12. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

    PubMed

    Hothem, R L; Crayon, J J; Law, M A

    2006-11-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels--black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)--generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  13. Contrasting types of surtseyan tuff cones on Marion and Prince Edward islands, southwest Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verwoerd, W. J.; Chevallier, L.

    1987-02-01

    Ten surtseyan tuff cones on Marion island (46° 54' S, 37° 46' E) and seven on Prince Edward island (46° 38' S, 37° 57' E) were erupted on shallow submerged coastal plains related to normal faulting. They range from Pleistocene to Holocene in age and exhibit a variable degree of erosion by the sea. Fundamental differences, irrespective of age, exist between two types: Type I cones have diameters of 1 1.5 km, rim heights of about 200 m and steep (27°) outer slopes. Deposits are plastered against nearby cliffs. Beds are thin, including layers of accretionary lapilli and less than 10 % lithic clasts. Numerous bomb sags, soft sediment deformation structures and gravity slides occur. On one of these cones mudflows formed small tunnels which resemble lava tubes, associated with channels sometimes having oversteepened walls. These cones reflect comparatively low energy conditions and probably resulted from extremely wet surges interspersed with mudflows and ballistic falls. Type II cones have smaller diameters (˜0.5 km) but widespread fallout/surge aprons. Rim heights are about 100 m and average slope angles are 18°. Bedding is massive with variable lapilli/matrix ratio and more than 10 % lithic clasts without bomb sags. These cones formed under drier, perhaps hotter and more violently explosive conditions than Type I, though not as energetic as the phreatomagmatic eruptions of terrestrial tuff rings. The two types of surtseyan eruptions are explained by invoking not only different water/magma ratios in the conduit but also different mechanisms of water/magma interaction. The slurry model of Kokelaar is favoured for Type I and a fuel-coolant model for Type II. The decisive factor is considered to be rate of effusion, with rim closure and exclusion of sea water playing a secondary role.

  14. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in three species of wild frogs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Forzán, M J; Vanderstichel, R; Hogan, N S; Teather, K; Wood, J

    2010-09-01

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has resulted in the decline or extinction of approximately 200 frog species worldwide. It has been reported throughout much of North America, but its presence on Prince Edward Island (PEI), on the eastern coast of Canada, was unknown. To determine the presence and prevalence of Bd on PEI, skin swabs were collected from 115 frogs from 18 separate sites across the province during the summer of 2009. The swabs were tested through single round end-point PCR for the presence of Bd DNA. Thirty-one frogs were positive, including 25/93 (27%) green frogs Lithobates (Rana) clamitans, 5/20 (25%) northern leopard frogs L. (R.) pipiens, and 1/2 (50%) wood frogs L. sylvaticus (formerly R. sylvatica); 12 of the 18 (67%) sites had at least 1 positive frog. The overall prevalence of Bd infection was estimated at 26.9% (7.2-46.7%, 95% CI). Prevalence amongst green frogs and leopard frogs was similar, but green frogs had a stronger PCR signal when compared to leopard frogs, regardless of age (p < 0.001) and body length (p = 0.476). Amongst green frogs, juveniles were more frequently positive than adults (p = 0.001). Green frogs may be the most reliable species to sample when looking for Bd in eastern North America. The 1 wood frog positive for Bd was found dead from chytridiomycosis; none of the other frogs that were positive for Bd by PCR showed any obvious signs of illness. Further monitoring will be required to determine what effect Bd infection has on amphibian population health on PEI. PMID:21387987

  15. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hothem, R.L.; Crayon, J.J.; Law, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels-black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)-generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  16. Groundwater nitrate concentration evolution under climate change and agricultural adaptation scenarios: Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Vigneault, H.; Lefebvre, R.; Savard, M. M.; Ballard, J.-M.; Qian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate (N-NO3) concentration in groundwater, the sole source of potable water in Prince Edward Island (PEI, Canada), currently exceeds the 10 mg L-1 (N-NO3) health threshold for drinking water in 6 % of domestic wells. Increasing climatic and socio-economic pressures on PEI agriculture may further deteriorate groundwater quality. This study assesses how groundwater nitrate concentrations could evolve due to the forecasted climate change and its related potential changes in agricultural practices. For this purpose, a tridimensional numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed for the aquifer system of the entire Island (5660 km2). A number of different groundwater flow and mass transport simulations were made to evaluate the potential impact of the projected climate change and agricultural adaptation. According to the simulations for year 2050, N-NO3 concentration would increase due to two main causes: (1) the progressive attainment of steady-state conditions related to present-day nitrogen loadings, and (2) the increase in nitrogen loadings due to changes in agricultural practices provoked by future climatic conditions. The combined effects of equilibration with loadings, climate and agricultural adaptation would lead to a 25 to 32 % increase in N-NO3 concentration over the Island aquifer system. Climate change alone (practices maintained at their current level) would contribute only 0 to 6 % to that increase according to the various climate scenarios. Moreover, simulated trends in groundwater N-NO3 concentration suggest that an increased number of domestic wells (more than doubling) would exceed the nitrate drinking water criteria. This study underlines the need to develop and apply better agricultural management practices to ensure sustainability of long-term groundwater resources. The simulations also show that observable benefits from positive changes in agricultural practices would be delayed in time due to the slow dynamics of nitrate

  17. Re Edwards (2011) 4 ASTLR 392: who owns a dead man's sperm?

    PubMed

    Patel, Jatine; Faunce, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Re Edwards (2011) 4 ASTLR 392; [2011] NSWSC 478 adds to the small line of cases to have considered whether a woman can not only require medical staff to remove sperm from her dead male partner, but whether she is justified in terms of law and international human rights to use it to create children. In this case a Justice of the New South Wales Supreme Court framed the issue as "what right does a woman have to take sperm from the body of her deceased partner so that she may conceive a child?" He did so, despite the manifest ambiguity and difficulty in characterising the legislative rights in this case, without referring to substantive human rights obligations under international Conventions to which Australia is a ratifying party (particularly Art 10 of the United Nations International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Art 23 of the United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Technological advances such as those creating the possibility of capturing a dead person's sperm by electro-ejaculation and creating children by subjecting it to intracytoplasmic sperm injection in connection with in vitro fertilisation have altered the balance of individual and social interests in deciding who should be regarded as owning a dead man's sperm and how that relates to basic common law rights of bodily inviolability without free consent. It is to be regretted that in jurisdictions lacking relevant constitutional human rights, or legislation requiring coherence with international human rights, judges do not avail themselves in cases of statutory ambiguity of interpretative insights to be gained from legally binding human rights treaties to which Australia is a party. PMID:22558900

  18. A Fractal Interpretation of Controlled-Source Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey Data: Seco Creek, Edwards Aquifer, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K. T.; Everett, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Edwards aquifer lies in the structurally complex Balcones fault zone and supplies water to the growing city of San Antonio. To ensure that future demands for water are met, the hydrological and geophysical properties of the aquifer must be well-understood. In most settings, fracture lengths and displacements occur in power-law distributions. Fracture distribution plays an important role in determining electrical and hydraulic current flowpaths. 1-D synthetic models of the controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) response for layered models with a fractured layer at depth described by the roughness parameter βV, such that 0≤βV<1, associated with the power-law length-scale dependence of electrical conductivity are developed. A value of βV = 0 represents homogeneous, continuous media, while a value of 0<βV<1 shows that roughness exists. The Seco Creek frequency-domain helicopter electromagnetic survey data set is analyzed by introducing the similarly defined roughness parameter βH to detect lateral roughness along survey lines. Fourier transforming the apparent resistivity as a function of position along flight line into wavenumber domain using a 256-point sliding window gives the power spectral density (PSD) plot for each line. The value of βH is the slope of the least squares regression for the PSD in each 256-point window. Changes in βH with distance along the flight line are plotted. Large values of βH are found near well-known large fractures and maps of βH produced by interpolating values of βH along survey lines suggest previously undetected structure at depth.

  19. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis prepares to touch down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. Lucid was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 March and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards on the latter date. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was the payload commander and mission specialist-1. Other mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin, and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are

  20. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time on 31 March 1996 after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both March 30 and March 31 necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards AFB. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton. Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Serving as payload commander and mission specialist-1 was Ronald M. Sega. Mission specialist-2 was Richard Clifford. Linda Godwin served as mission specialist-3, and Shannon Lucid was mission specialist-4. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they

  1. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards. This photo shows the drag chute deployed to help the shuttle roll to a stop. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was payload commander and mission specialist-1. Mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be

  2. A Biography of Distinguished Scientist Gilbert Newton Lewis (by Edward S. Lewis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Reviewed By Harold H.

    1999-11-01

    The Edward Mellen Press: Lewiston, NY, 1998. 114 pp + index. ISBN 0-7734-8284-9. $69.95. There may not be a surname better known to students of chemistry than Lewis, from the Lewis electron-dot diagrams and the Lewis theory of acids and bases. More advanced students may know of the groundbreaking textbook Thermodynamics, by Lewis and Randall. Yet few Americans know much about this remarkable U.S.-born scholar, whose contributions equal those of the greatest scientists. He is a chemist-educator of whom we should be as proud and as well informed as we are of Linus Pauling, who was part of the westward movement of science in this country that G. N. Lewis began, or of the recently deceased Glenn Seaborg, who was one of the many students of Lewis who achieved renown. Gilbert N. Lewis was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 1875, but his family moved to near Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1884. He spent two years at the University of Nebraska, but then moved to Harvard when his father became an executive at Merchants Trust Company in Boston. Young Lewis (then only 17) was also said to have been disappointed with the quality of education in Nebraska, and this may have been part of the impetus for the family's move east. After earning his baccalaureate at Harvard, he taught for a year at Phillips Andover Academy before returning to Harvard to study for his doctorate, which he completed 100 years ago, in 1899, under T. W. Richards. Lewis's doctoral work was on the thermodynamics of zinc and cadmium amalgams. At that time, physical chemistry was only beginning to achieve recognition as a branch of science, and its boundaries were ill defined. Edward Lewis quotes his father as often saying, "Physical chemistry is anything interesting." Like many chemists of his time, Lewis went to Europe to complete his preparation for a career; he was in the laboratories of Ostwald in Leipzig and Nernst in Göttingen in 1900-1901. On his return to the United States, he was an instructor at Harvard

  3. Simulation of flow in the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas, and refinement of storage and flow concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, R.W.; Land, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is a complexly faulted, carbonate aquifer lying within the Balcones fault zone of south-central Texas. The aquifer is recharged mainly by streamflow losses in the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer and is discharged by major springs located at considerable distances, as much as 150 mi, from the areas of recharge, and by wells. Groundwater flow within the Edwards aquifer of the San Antonio region was simulated to investigate concepts relating to the storage and flow characteristics. A general purpose, finite difference model, modified to provide the capability of representing barrier faults, was used to simulate groundwater flow and storage in the aquifer. The simulations investigated the effects of complex geologic structures and significant changes in transmissivity, anisotropy, and storage coefficient, with initial values based on concepts developed in previous studies. Results of the simulations confirmed the original estimates of transmissivity values (> 100 sq ft/sec) in the confined zone of the aquifer between San Antonio and Comal Springs. A storage coefficient of 0.05 in the unconfined zone of the aquifer produced the best simulation of water levels and springflow. A major interpretation resulting from the simulations is that two essentially independent areas of regional flow were identified in the west and central part of the study area. Flow from the two areas converges at Comal Springs. The directions of computed flux vectors reflected the presence of major barrier faults which locally deflect patterns of groundwater movement. The most noticeable deflection is the convergence of flow through the geologic structural opening, the Knippa gap, in eastern Uvalde County. A second significant interpretation is that groundwater flow in northeastern Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties is diverted by barrier faults toward San Marcos Springs, a regional discharge point. (Lantz-PTT)

  4. Upper Albian rudist buildups of the Edwards Formation in central Texas: A GPR-assisted reservoir analog study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Damayanti; Khan, Shuhab D.; Sullivan, Charlotte

    2012-03-01

    Albian rudist-associated shallow water carbonates form important hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Middle East, Mexico, and the United States. Outcrops of rudist-bearing shallow water carbonates are common across parts of central Texas, USA, and in places display lateral and vertical relationships that form important analogs for the subsurface distribution and heterogeneity of hydrocarbon reservoirs and seals. In particular, the walls and spillways of several lakes in central Texas provide ideal conditions for the investigation by ground-penetrating radar (GPR) of the three-dimensional geometries of platform interior rudist lithofacies belts. This study integrates outcrop studies and GPR surveys to clarify lateral and vertical facies relations of rudist-bearing lithofacies in the Cretaceous Edwards Formation (Fredericksburg Group) that are partially exposed in spillways and gullies near Lake Georgetown and Belton Lake in central Texas, USA. GPR data illuminated four types of mounds that have distinct three-dimensional geometries, lithofacies, and biota and that record both seaward to leeward changes and vertical changes from below wavebase to within wavebase. The lowermost mounds are high relief circular caprinid mounds that mark the aggradational part of the Edwards lithostratigraphic unit at our study locality. Well cemented, low relief toucasid-foraminiferal mounds and grainstones cap these caprinid-dominated buildups. Weakly cemented, circular, flat-topped radiolitid-caprinid-toucasid mounds developed above the toucasid mounds and low relief, often sucrosic-dolomitized mounds constitute the most shallow water rudist accumulations. Stromatolitic dolomites record final filling of accommodation space on the Edwards platform. GPR provides an unparalleled view of the three-dimensional growth, vertical accretion, and progradation of these mounds and lithofacies through time, and the geoelectrical signatures provide insight on porosity and permeability of the lithofacies

  5. Sample-to-sample fluctuations of the overlap distributions in the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baños, R. A.; Cruz, A.; Fernandez, L. A.; Gil-Narvion, J. M.; Gordillo-Guerrero, A.; Guidetti, M.; Iñiguez, D.; Maiorano, A.; Mantovani, F.; Marinari, E.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Monforte-Garcia, J.; Muñoz Sudupe, A.; Navarro, D.; Parisi, G.; Perez-Gaviro, S.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J. J.; Schifano, S. F.; Seoane, B.; Tarancón, A.; Tripiccione, R.; Yllanes, D.

    2011-11-01

    We study the sample-to-sample fluctuations of the overlap probability densities from large-scale equilibrium simulations of the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin glass below the critical temperature. Ultrametricity, stochastic stability, and overlap equivalence impose constraints on the moments of the overlap probability densities that can be tested against numerical data. We found small deviations from the Ghirlanda-Guerra predictions, which get smaller as system size increases. We also focus on the shape of the overlap distribution, comparing the numerical data to a mean-field-like prediction in which finite-size effects are taken into account by substituting delta functions with broad peaks.

  6. Statistical analysis of water-level, springflow, and streamflow data for the Edwards Aquifer in south-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso

    1976-01-01

    Water-level, springflow, and streamflow data were used to develop simple and multiple linear-regression equations for use in estimating water levels in wells and the flow of three major springs in the Edwards aquifer in the eastern San Antonio area. The equations provide daily, monthly, and annual estimates that compare very favorably with observed data. Analyses of geologic and hydrologic data indicate that the water discharged by the major springs is supplied primarily by regional underflow from the west and southwest and by local recharge in the infiltration area in northern Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties.

  7. Joint min-max distribution and Edwards-Anderson's order parameter of the circular 1/f-noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the joint min-max distribution and the Edwards-Anderson's order parameter for the circular model of 1/f-noise. Both quantities, as well as generalisations, are obtained exactly by combining the freezing-duality conjecture and Jack-polynomial techniques. Numerical checks come with significantly improved control of finite-size effects in the glassy phase, and the results convincingly validate the freezing-duality conjecture. Application to diffusive dynamics is discussed. We also provide a formula for the pre-factor ratio of the joint/marginal Carpentier-Le Doussal tail for minimum/maximum which applies to any logarithmic random energy model.

  8. A multiphased approach to groundwater investigations for the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.

    2014-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses in the Pecos County region of western Texas. Resource managers would like to understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To provide resource managers with that information, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a three-phase study of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. The first phase was to collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic data in the study area and develop a geodatabase of historical and collected data. Data compiled in the first phase of the study were used to develop the conceptual model in the second phase of the study. The third phase of the study involved the development and calibration of a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Analysis of well, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic data contributed to the development of the conceptual model in phase 1. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data was used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater-flow system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Geochemical data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water-rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources in phase 2. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction, as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map

  9. Hydrostratigraphic subdivisions and fault barriers of the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, R.W.; Small, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The karstic Edwards Limestone within the Balcones Fault Zone of south-central Texas forms a productive confined aquifer that consists predominately of dense carbonate rocks and contains several layers of highly permeable and porous honeycombed rocks that have been produced by the leaching of evaporitic, tidal flat or reefal deposits. Fractures have hydraulically interconnected these layers at some places. Faults, however, commonly place rocks of very high-permeability opposite rocks of very low permeability, thus creating a lateral discontinuity and a flow barrier. At places, fault barriers probably cause partial to almost complete blockage of groundwater flow normal to the fault. ?? 1982.

  10. Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 (Crustacea, Decapoda) from Southwestern Atlantic, including the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge area.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Irene A; Burukovsky, Rudolf N

    2014-01-01

    The deep sea shrimp genus Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 includes 47 species, ten of them have been recorded from the Atlantic Ocean. Herein, material sampled during three scientific projects (REVIZEE Central Fishery project; Campos Basin Deep Sea Environmental Project; Evaluation of Environmental Heterogeneity in the Campos Basin) made in the Southwestern Atlantic, off Brazil, is examined. In addition, material sampled from the South Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR-ECO Project) was also examined. Four species are recorded for the first time to the southwestern Atlantic Ocean including Mid Atlantic Ridge area: Nematocarcinus faxoni Burukovsky, 2001; N. gracilipes Filhol, 1884; N. rotundus Crosnier & Forest, 1973 and N. tenuipes Spence-Bate, 1888. PMID:25543942

  11. Economic efficiency and cost implications of habitat conservation: An example in the context of the Edwards Aquifer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillig, Dhazn; McCarl, Bruce A.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Boadu, Frederick

    2004-04-01

    Groundwater management in the Edwards Aquifer in Texas is in the process of moving away from a traditional right of capture economic regime toward a more environmentally sensitive scheme designed to preserve endangered species habitats. This study explores economic and environmental implications of proposed groundwater management and water development strategies under a proposed regional Habitat Conservation Plan. Results show that enhancing the habitat by augmenting water flow costs $109-1427 per acre-foot and that regional water development would be accelerated by the more extreme possibilities under the Habitat Conservation Plan. The findings also indicate that a water market would improve regional welfare and lower water development but worsen environmental attributes.

  12. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for Space Shuttle landings. As defined in the Shuttle Flight Rules (FRs), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMTJ) developed a personal computer based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak-wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. However, the shuttle must land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested that a similar tool be developed for EAFB. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel archived and performed quality control of 2-minute average and 10-minute peak wind speeds at each tower adjacent to the main runway at EAFB from 1997- 2004. They calculated wind climatologies and probabilities of average peak wind occurrence based on the average speed. The climatologies were calculated for each tower and month, and were stratified by hour, direction, and direction/hour. For the probabilities of peak wind occurrence, MSFC calculated empirical and modeled probabilities of meeting or exceeding specific 10-minute peak wind speeds using probability density functions. The AMU obtained and reformatted the data into Microsoft Excel PivotTables, which allows users to display different values with point-click-drag techniques. The GUT was then created from the PivotTables using Visual Basic for Applications code. The GUI is run through a macro within Microsoft Excel and allows forecasters to quickly display and

  13. Identification and Mapping of the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence in the State of Chihuahua Assisted by ten ArcMap Based Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Pina, C.; Granados, A.; Goodell, P.

    2007-05-01

    Edwards Formation is a reef limestone that hosts one of the largest aquifers of the State of Texas. In 2004 the United States and Mexico signed an agreement intended to characterize and identify the shared binational underground resources. Texas Water Development Board Report 360 established for the Edwards Aquifer an area of more than 31,000 km2, half of which is in the State of Coahuila, Mexico (the agreement did not include the State of Chihuahua). This led to the idea that Chihuahua may also have hydrologic potential in the Edwards equivalent, where numerous large cavern systems are already recognized (Naica's Sword Cavern, and the Coyame, Nombre de Dios and Bocagrande Caverns). The objective of this study is to establish the existence, in the State of Chihuahua, of the stratigraphic sequence and geohydrologic properties such as faulting, sinkholes, and springs, within the Edwards equivalent. The Consejo de Recursos Minerales geologic map, INEGI's hydrologic study, petroleum, mining and hydrogeology studies of Chihuahua, and many others, constitute the database used. ArcMap is used to define the geologic framework and construct different thematic layers (structural, lithological, hydrological) that would aid in the identification of the stratigraphic sequence. The results show that all the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence (ESS) exists in Chihuahua; that there are isolated areas of groundwater production in eastern Chihuahua possibly from ESS but this is not well established. Overall the ESS presents an unusual opportunity as a potentially productive aquifer in the State of Chihuahua.

  14. Further contributions to the Hydradephaga (Coleoptera, Haliplidae, Gyrinidae and Dytiscidae) fauna of Prince Edward Island, Canada: new records, distributions and faunal composition

    PubMed Central

    Alarie, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Haliplidae, Gyrinidae and Dytiscidae (Coleoptera) of Prince Edward Island, Canada were surveyed during the years 2004–2005. A total of 2450 individuals from 79 species were collected from 98 different localities, among which 30 species are newly recorded from that region. Among these, Acilius sylvanus Hilsenhoff, Rhantus consimilis Motschulsky and Neoporus sulcipennis (Fall) stand out as representing the easternmost reports of these species in Canada. Once removed, Gyrinus aquiris LeConte (Gyrinidae) is reinstated in the faunal list of Prince Edward Island. According to this study and literature 84 species of Hydradephaga are currently known from Prince Edward Island. The Nearctic component of the fauna is made up of 68 species (80.9%) and the Holarctic component of 16 species (19.1%). Most species are characteristic of the Boreal and Atlantic Maritime Ecozones and have a transcontinental distribution. In an examination of the Hydradephaga of insular portions of Atlantic Canada, we found that despite significantly different land areas and different distances to the neighbouring continental mainland the island faunas of Prince Edward Island and insular Newfoundland are very similar in the number of species (84 and 94 species respectively) despite differences in composition. With a land area significantly larger than that of Prince Edward Island, however, the fauna of Cape Breton Island was 39% smaller consisting of 53 species. This difference could be due to the comparative lack of collecting efforts on Cape Breton Island. PMID:27408603

  15. A Biography of Distinguished Scientist Gilbert Newton Lewis (by Edward S. Lewis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Reviewed By Harold H.

    1999-11-01

    The Edward Mellen Press: Lewiston, NY, 1998. 114 pp + index. ISBN 0-7734-8284-9. $69.95. There may not be a surname better known to students of chemistry than Lewis, from the Lewis electron-dot diagrams and the Lewis theory of acids and bases. More advanced students may know of the groundbreaking textbook Thermodynamics, by Lewis and Randall. Yet few Americans know much about this remarkable U.S.-born scholar, whose contributions equal those of the greatest scientists. He is a chemist-educator of whom we should be as proud and as well informed as we are of Linus Pauling, who was part of the westward movement of science in this country that G. N. Lewis began, or of the recently deceased Glenn Seaborg, who was one of the many students of Lewis who achieved renown. Gilbert N. Lewis was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 1875, but his family moved to near Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1884. He spent two years at the University of Nebraska, but then moved to Harvard when his father became an executive at Merchants Trust Company in Boston. Young Lewis (then only 17) was also said to have been disappointed with the quality of education in Nebraska, and this may have been part of the impetus for the family's move east. After earning his baccalaureate at Harvard, he taught for a year at Phillips Andover Academy before returning to Harvard to study for his doctorate, which he completed 100 years ago, in 1899, under T. W. Richards. Lewis's doctoral work was on the thermodynamics of zinc and cadmium amalgams. At that time, physical chemistry was only beginning to achieve recognition as a branch of science, and its boundaries were ill defined. Edward Lewis quotes his father as often saying, "Physical chemistry is anything interesting." Like many chemists of his time, Lewis went to Europe to complete his preparation for a career; he was in the laboratories of Ostwald in Leipzig and Nernst in Göttingen in 1900-1901. On his return to the United States, he was an instructor at Harvard

  16. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards. This photo shows the drag chute deployed to help the shuttle roll to a stop. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was payload commander and mission specialist-1. Mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be

  17. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis prepares to touch down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. Lucid was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 March and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards on the latter date. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was the payload commander and mission specialist-1. Other mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin, and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are

  18. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time on 31 March 1996 after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both March 30 and March 31 necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards AFB. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton. Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Serving as payload commander and mission specialist-1 was Ronald M. Sega. Mission specialist-2 was Richard Clifford. Linda Godwin served as mission specialist-3, and Shannon Lucid was mission specialist-4. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they

  19. Compilation of hydrologic data for the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio area, Texas, 1981, with 1934-81 summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, R.D.; Maclay, R.W.; Ozuna, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    The average annual ground-water recharge to the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Texas, from 1934 through 1981, was 612,400 acre-feet. The recharge in 1981 was 1,448,400 acre-feet, which is the third highest annual recharge since 1934. A maximum annual recharge of 1,711,200 acre-feet occurred in 1958, and a minimum annual recharge of 43,700 acre-feet occurred in 1956. The calculated annual discharge by wells and springs in 1981 was 794,400 acre-feet. Annual discharge by wells and springs ranged from a maximum of 960,900 acre-feet in 1977 to a minimum of 388,800 acre-feet in 1955. The annual discharge by wells was 387,100 acre-feet in 1981. Although water levels in many of the wells in the Edwards aquifer fluctuated near the midpoint between record high and low levels during the first 5 months of 1981, the volume of ground water in storage in the aquifer was above average for most of the year. Analyses of water samples from 56 wells and 3 springs show that the water is of a significantly better quality than the level established for public water systems.

  20. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination—Edwards aquifer near San Antonio, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Lindgren, Richard J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well field in San Antonio, Texas. The well field consists of six production wells that tap the Edwards aquifer. Typically, one or two wells are pumped at a time, yielding an average total of 20-21 million gallons per day. Water samples were collected from public-supply wells in the well field and from monitoring wells installed along general directions of flow to the well field. Samples from the well field contained some constituents of concern for drinking-water quality, including nitrate; the pesticide compounds atrazine, deethylatrazine, and simazine; and the volatile organic compounds tetrachloroethene (also called perchloroethene, or PCE), chloroform, bromoform, and dibromochloromethane. These constituents were detected in untreated water at concentrations much less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, the study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well field in San Antonio, Texas: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) fast pathways for flow of groundwater through features formed or enlarged by dissolution of bedrock, (3) recharge characteristics of the aquifer, and (4) natural geochemical processes within the aquifer. A computer-model simulation of groundwater flow and transport was used to estimate the traveltime (or age) of water particles entering public-supply well W4 in the well field. Modeled findings show that almost half of the water reaching the public-supply well is less than 2 years old. Such a large percentage of very young water indicates that (1) contaminants entering the aquifer may be transported rapidly to the well, (2) there is limited time for chemical reactions to occur in the aquifer that may attenuate contaminants, and (3) should recharge water become contaminated with

  1. Accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA for detection of Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Freeman, Karoline; Geppert, Julia; Agbebiyi, Adeola; Uthman, Olalekan A; Madan, Jason; Clarke, Angus; Quenby, Siobhan; Clarke, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To measure test accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes using cell-free fetal DNA and identify factors affecting accuracy. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Data sources PubMed, Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and the Cochrane Library published from 1997 to 9 February 2015, followed by weekly autoalerts until 1 April 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies English language journal articles describing case–control studies with ≥15 trisomy cases or cohort studies with ≥50 pregnant women who had been given NIPT and a reference standard. Results 41, 37 and 30 studies of 2012 publications retrieved were included in the review for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes. Quality appraisal identified high risk of bias in included studies, funnel plots showed evidence of publication bias. Pooled sensitivity was 99.3% (95% CI 98.9% to 99.6%) for Down, 97.4% (95.8% to 98.4%) for Edwards, and 97.4% (86.1% to 99.6%) for Patau syndrome. The pooled specificity was 99.9% (99.9% to 100%) for all three trisomies. In 100 000 pregnancies in the general obstetric population we would expect 417, 89 and 40 cases of Downs, Edwards and Patau syndromes to be detected by NIPT, with 94, 154 and 42 false positive results. Sensitivity was lower in twin than singleton pregnancies, reduced by 9% for Down, 28% for Edwards and 22% for Patau syndrome. Pooled sensitivity was also lower in the first trimester of pregnancy, in studies in the general obstetric population, and in cohort studies with consecutive enrolment. Conclusions NIPT using cell-free fetal DNA has very high sensitivity and specificity for Down syndrome, with slightly lower sensitivity for Edwards and Patau syndrome. However, it is not 100% accurate and should not be used as a final diagnosis for positive cases. Trial registration number CRD42014014947. PMID:26781507

  2. Soil Flushing Through a Thick Vadose Zone: Perchlorate Removal Documented at Edwards AFB, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battey, T. F.; Shepard, A. J.; Tait, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    There are currently few viable alternatives for perchlorate remediation in the vadose zone, particularly for the relatively thick vadose zones that are typical in the arid southwest where many perchlorate sites occur. Perchlorate in the vadose zone occurs in the form of highly soluble salts that may represent a risk to human or ecological receptors, and may also represent a threat to the underlying groundwater. A soil flushing treatability study was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of southern California at a site with a 129-foot thick vadose zone consisting primarily of clayey sand. This study utilized an infiltration gallery in conjunction with extraction, treatment, and re-injection of groundwater at the site, which contained perchlorate-contaminated soil and groundwater. The study objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the infiltration gallery to 1) introduce treated groundwater back into the aquifer and 2) wash the perchlorate from the vadose zone soils to the aquifer. The infiltration gallery consisted of slotted PVC pipes within a highly permeable engineered bed of washed gravel. The initial water introduced into the gallery was amended with potassium bromide tracer. A downhole neutron probe was used to track the movement of the wetting front downward and outward from the gallery. Successive neutron measurements in vertical access tubes revealed that the introduced water reached the 125-foot bottom of the access tubes 14 weeks after the water was introduced into the gallery. The bromide tracer was detected in groundwater immediately below the gallery approximately 1 week later. The infiltration gallery was able to sustain an average flow rate of 2.3 gallons per minute. Prior to infiltration, the perchlorate concentration in groundwater below the gallery was 4,500 µg/L. Approximately 18 weeks after the start of infiltration, a perchlorate spike of 72,400 µg/L was detected below the gallery. The increase in perchlorate

  3. Response to Edwards' comments on Origin of British and Irish mammals: disparate post-glacial colonisation and species introductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W. I.; Provan, J.

    2014-12-01

    We are most grateful to Dr Edwards for her lucid summary of recent, calibrated dates for giant Irish deer, red deer, reindeer and brown bear in Irish deposits during the period before and after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Montgomery et al. (2014) dealt largely with the period after the LGM because the physical evidence suggests Ireland was completely covered by ice for at least part of the period between 28 ka and 23 ka (Clark et al., 2012; O'Cofaigh et al., 2012) when Ireland would not have supported any terrestrial mammals. The earliest it was possible for re-colonisation of these species to occur after LGM was probably during the rapid retreat of ice after 23 ka and before 15 ka when the Irish Sea became a complete barrier to terrestrial mammals between Britain and Ireland. There are no dates for any of the four species during the LGM and only one for giant Irish deer (BM-1794, date 18,761-18,034 cal. BP) which is from a site close to the present coast just south of Dublin, between LGM and completion of the Irish Sea, suggesting that conditions generally remained unsuitable for even cold-adapted mammals for many millennia after LGM. Edwards (2014) indicates clearly that all four species are well represented after Ireland became an island although giant Irish deer struggle to make it into the Holocene and the red deer record is broken and perhaps influenced by people (Carden et al., 2012). The sudden reappearance of large mammals around 13-15 ka is consistent with re-colonisation from cryptic refugia lying to the south and west of present day Ireland. The relatively short periods of warming and cooling during the Older and Younger Dryas respectively, followed by warming in the Holocene and the arrival of Mesolithic and Neolithic people remain the major events in the history of Irish mammals until the late 19th Century to the present during which many mammals species have been introduced (Montgomery et al., 2014). Whilst events prior to the LGM are important

  4. Youth Speaks ... P.E.I. Listens! Young Leaders' Forum 2007. Rural Dialogue Summary Report (Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada, March 9-10, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Rural Partnership, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report is a summary of discussions that took place at the Young Leaders' Forum held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island (PEI), on March 9-10, 2007. The event was part of the Rural Dialogue, an on-going, two-way discussion between the Government of Canada and Canadians from rural, remote and northern regions. Launched in 1998, the Rural…

  5. Frontiers in Civil Rights: Dorothy E. Davis, et al. versus County School Board of Prince Edward County, Virginia. Teaching with Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    In 1951 Robert Russa Moton High School in Prince Edward County, Virginia was typical of the all-black schools in the central Virginia county. It housed twice as many students as it was built for in 1939, its teachers were paid less than teachers at the all-white high school, and it had no gymnasium, cafeteria, or auditorium with fixed seats. In…

  6. How Direct Descendants of a School Lockout Achieved Academic Success: Resilience in the Educational Attainments of Prince Edward County's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randolph, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    From 1959 to 1964, approximately 1,700 Black children in Prince Edward County, Virginia were denied schooling, due to the county leaders' decision to close schools--a defiant response to federal racial desegregation mandates stemming from "Brown v. Board of Education" (1954, 1955). Yet from one of the most extreme cases of injustice…

  7. Pedagogy of the Other: Edward Said, Postcolonial Theory, and Strategies for Critique. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 417

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, Shehla

    2012-01-01

    Edward Said has been acknowledged as one of the greatest critics and cultural theorists of our time. His groundbreaking work "Orientalism" initiated the development of postcolonial theory, causing a paradigm shift by re-conceptualizing, deconstructing, and re-presenting the "Orient" as the ultimate "Other" of the "Occident." Despite its influence…

  8. Dryden/Edwards 1994 Thrust-Vectoring Aircraft Fleet - F-18 HARV, X-31, F-16 MATV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The three thrust-vectoring aircraft at Edwards, California, each capable of flying at extreme angles of attack, cruise over the California desert in formation during flight in March 1994. They are, from left, NASA's F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center; the X-31, flown by the X-31 International Test Organization (ITO) at Dryden; and the Air Force F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) aircraft. All three aircraft were flown in different programs and were developed independently. The NASA F-18 HARV was a testbed to produce aerodynamic data at high angles of attack to validate computer codes and wind tunnel research. The X-31 was used to study thrust vectoring to enhance close-in air combat maneuvering, while the F-16 MATV was a demonstration of how thrust vectoring could be applied to operational aircraft.

  9. An assessment of the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule from the perspective of the five-factor model.

    PubMed

    Piedmont, R L; McCrae, R R; Costa, P T

    1992-02-01

    We examined the validity of need scales of the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule (EPPS) by correlating them with a measure of the five basic factors of personality; we also considered test format as a possible source of invalidity. Three hundred thirty (223 women, 107 men) undergraduate students completed both the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI)--a measure of the five factors--and one of two versions of the EPPS. Results show that both ipsative and normative versions of the EPPS could be meaningfully interpreted within the five-factor model, although the ipsative, forced-choice format of the standard EPPS apparently lowered validity coefficients and decreased convergent and discriminant validity. We argue that the five-factor model can provide a useful interpretive context for evaluating many clinical measures. PMID:1545345

  10. Sir James Edward Smith (1759-1828) MD FRS, botanist, co-founder of the Linnean Society of London.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2009-05-01

    James Edward Smith's interest in botany led him to enter medicine at Edinburgh in 1781. Smith was continuing his medical studies in London when Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820) suggested to him that he should purchase the collection of the famous Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus that had just been offered to Banks. Smith bought the Linnean Collection and Library in 1784. In 1786 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Medicine from Leiden. In 1788 Smith, with two associates, founded the Linnean Society of London and became President for life. Smith turned from medicine to natural history as a lecturer and writer. During his lifetime he produced numerous botanical works of high value, including The English Flora (1824-28), and he did much to popularize botany. PMID:19401517

  11. Reproductive biology of the Suez Canal spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834: Crustacea: Brachyura: Majidae).

    PubMed

    El-Serehy, Hamed A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Ibrahim, Nesreen K; Al-Misned, Fahad A

    2015-11-01

    A reproductive biology study of the spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) was conducted in the Suez Canal from July 2012 to June 2013. The annual sex ratio (Male:Female) of S. aspera was female biased with values of 1:1.25. Out of the four ovarian development stages of this crab, two stages were observed in the Suez Canal throughout the whole year. The ovigerous crab's carapace width varied from 28 to 52 mm. This crab species can spawn during most of the year in the canal water, with a peak during late spring and early winter. The fecundity of ovigerous females ranged between 2349 and 13600 eggs with a mean of 5494 ± 1486 eggs. Female crabs that reached sexual maturity exhibited a minimum carapace width varying between 22 and 46 mm, and fifty percentage of all ovigerous females showed a carapace width of 36 mm. PMID:26587008

  12. Biaxial deformation of a polymer under shear: NMR test of the Doi-Edwards model with convected constraint release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Ryan J.; Kilfoil, Maria L.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2001-11-01

    2H NMR quadrupole interaction spectroscopy has been used to measure the deformation of a 670 kD poly(dimethylsiloxane) melt under shear in a Couette cell. The signals were acquired from a per deuterated benzene probe molecule which provides a motionally averaged sampling of the entire segmental ensemble. We have measured the dependence on shear rate of the SXX (velocity), SYY (velocity gradient), SZZ (vorticity), and SXY (shear) elements of the segmental alignment tensor, as well as the angular dependence of the deuterium quadrupole splitting at fixed shear rate. We show that the data agree quite well with the Doi-Edwards theory but significantly better when convected constraint release effects are included. These fits return a value for the tube disengagement time of 100 ms.

  13. A cross-sectional study of Tritrichomonas foetus infection in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Oriana; Greenwood, Spencer; Vanderstichel, Raphael; Gelens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional study examined the occurrence of Tritrichomonas foetus, and other intestinal parasites, in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island (PEI). Fecal samples were collected from 100 feral cats, 100 cats from the PEI Humane Society, and 5 cats from a private residence. The occurrence of T. foetus, based on fecal culture, was 0% in feral and shelter cats. A single positive sample was obtained from an owned Abyssinian cat that was imported to PEI. Intestinal parasites were identified via fecal flotation in 76% of feral cats and 39% of cats from the humane society. Feral cats had a higher incidence of Toxocara cati than cats from the humane society (P < 0.001), conversely, shelter cats had a higher incidence of Cystoisospora spp. (P < 0.001). These results suggest that while T. foetus is not of importance in feral and shelter cats in PEI, imported cats could serve as reservoirs. PMID:26933262

  14. Simulation of flow in the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas, and refinement of storage and flow concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, Robert W.; Land, Larry F.

    1988-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is a complexly faulted, carbonate aquifer lying within the Balcones fault zone of south-central Texas. The aquifer consists of thin- to massive-bedded limestone and dolomite, most of which is in the form of mudstones and wackestones. Well-developed secondary porosity has formed in association with former erosional surfaces within the carbonate rocks, within dolomitized-burrowed tidal and evaporitic deposits, and along inclined fractures to produce an aquifer with transmissivities greater than 100 ft2/s. The aquifer is recharged mainly by streamflow losses in the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer and is discharged by major springs located at considerable distances, as much as 150 mi, from the areas of recharge and by wells. Ground-water flow within the Edwards aquifer of the San Antonio region was simulated to investigate concepts relating to the storage and flow characteristics. The concepts of major interest were the effects of barrier faults on flow direction, water levels, springflow, and storage within the aquifer. A general-purpose, finite-difference model, modified to provide the capability of representing barrier faults, was used to simulate ground-water flow and storage in the aquifer. The approach in model development was to conduct a series of simulations beginning with a simple representation of the aquifer framework and then proceeding to subsequent representations of increasing complexity. The simulations investigated the effects of complex geologic structures and of significant changes in transmissivity, anisotropy, and storage coefficient. Initial values of transmissivity, anisotropy, and storage coefficient were estimated based on concepts developed in previous studies. Results of the simulations confirmed the original estimates of transmissivity values (greater than 100 square feet/s) in the confined zone of the aquifer between San Antonio and Comal Springs. A storage coefficient of 0.05 in the unconfined zone of the aquifer

  15. A cross-sectional study of Tritrichomonas foetus infection in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Raab, Oriana; Greenwood, Spencer; Vanderstichel, Raphael; Gelens, Hans

    2016-03-01

    A cross-sectional study examined the occurrence of Tritrichomonas foetus, and other intestinal parasites, in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island (PEI). Fecal samples were collected from 100 feral cats, 100 cats from the PEI Humane Society, and 5 cats from a private residence. The occurrence of T. foetus, based on fecal culture, was 0% in feral and shelter cats. A single positive sample was obtained from an owned Abyssinian cat that was imported to PEI. Intestinal parasites were identified via fecal flotation in 76% of feral cats and 39% of cats from the humane society. Feral cats had a higher incidence of Toxocara cati than cats from the humane society (P < 0.001), conversely, shelter cats had a higher incidence of Cystoisospora spp. (P < 0.001). These results suggest that while T. foetus is not of importance in feral and shelter cats in PEI, imported cats could serve as reservoirs. PMID:26933262

  16. Shuttle Discovery Overflight of Edwards Enroute to Palmdale, California, Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing

  17. Shuttle Discovery Overflight of Edwards Enroute to Palmdale, California, Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing

  18. Emanuel Edward Klein--the father of British microbiology and the case of the animal vivisection controversy of 1875.

    PubMed

    Atalić, Bruno; Fatović-Ferencić, Stella

    2009-10-01

    The new Appendix A of the European Convention for the Protection of Vertebrate Animals Used for Experimental and Other Scientific Purposes, which gives guidelines for accommodation and care of animals and was approved on June 15, 2006, was the main reason the authors decided to investigate the origins of the regulations of animal experiments. Although one might assume that the regulation had its origin in the United Nations conventions, the truth is that its origins are a hundred years old. The authors present a case of the nineteenth-century vivisection controversy brought about by the publication of the Handbook for the Physiological Laboratory in 1873, in which John Burdon-Sanderson, Emanuel Edward Klein, Michael Foster, and Thomas Lauder Brunton described a series of vivisection experiments they performed on animals for research purposes. It was the first case of vivisection to be examined, processed, and condemned for inhuman behavior toward animals before an official body, leading to enactment of the Cruelty to Animals Act in 1876. The case reveals a specific ethos of science in the second half of the nineteenth century, which was characterized by a deep commitment of scientists to the scientific enterprise and their strong belief that science could solve social problems, combined with an overt insensitivity to the suffering of experimental animals. The central figure in the case was Emanuel Edward Klein, a disciple of the Central European medical tradition (Vienna Medical School) and a direct follower of the experimental school of Brücke, Stricker, Magendie, and Bernard. Because of his undisguised attitudes and opinions on the use of vivisection, Klein became a paradigm of the new scientific identity, strongly influencing the stereotypic image of a scientist, and polarizing the public opinion on vivisection in England in the nineteenth century and for some considerable time afterward. PMID:19690150

  19. Edwards thermodynamics of the jamming transition for frictionless packings: ergodicity test and role of angoricity and compactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Song, Chaoming; Wang, Ping; Makse, Hernán A

    2012-07-01

    This paper illustrates how the tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics can help to describe a far-from-equilibrium problem: the jamming transition in frictionless granular materials. Edwards ideas consist of proposing a statistical ensemble of volume and stress fluctuations through the thermodynamic notion of entropy, compactivity, X, and angoricity, A (two temperature-like variables). We find that Edwards thermodynamics is able to describe the jamming transition (J point) in frictionless packings. Using the ensemble formalism we elucidate the following: (i) We test the combined volume-stress ensemble by comparing the statistical properties of jammed configurations obtained by dynamics with those averaged over the ensemble of minima in the potential energy landscape as a test of ergodicity. Agreement between both methods supports the idea of ergodicity and "thermalization" at a given angoricity and compactivity. (ii) A microcanonical ensemble analysis supports the maximum entropy principle for grains. (iii) The intensive variables A and X describe the approach to jamming through a series of scaling relations as A → 0+ and X → 0-. Due to the force-strain coupling in the interparticle forces, the jamming transition is probed thermodynamically by a "jamming temperature" T(J) composed of contributions from A and X. (iv) The thermodynamic framework reveals the order of the jamming phase transition by showing the absence of critical fluctuations at jamming in static observables like pressure and volume, and we discuss other critical scenarios for the jamming transition. (v) Finally, we elaborate on a comparison with relevant studies by Gao, Blawzdziewicz, and O'Hern [Phys. Rev. E 74, 061304 (2006)], showing a breakdown of equiprobability of microstates obtained via fast quenches. A network analysis of the energy landscape reveals the origin of the inhomogeneities in the uneven distribution of the areas of the basins. Such inhomogeneities are also found in other

  20. Why the Medical Research Council refused Robert Edwards and Patrick Steptoe support for research on human conception in 1971

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin H.; Franklin, Sarah B.; Cottingham, Matthew; Hopwood, Nick

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 1971, Cambridge physiologist Robert Edwards and Oldham gynaecologist Patrick Steptoe applied to the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) for long-term support for a programme of scientific and clinical ‘Studies on Human Reproduction’. The MRC, then the major British funder of medical research, declined support on ethical grounds and maintained this policy throughout the 1970s. The work continued with private money, leading to the birth of Louise Brown in 1978 and transforming research in obstetrics, gynaecology and human embryology. METHODS The MRC decision has been criticized, but the processes by which it was reached have yet to be explored. Here, we present an archive-based analysis of the MRC decision. RESULTS We find evidence of initial support for Edwards and Steptoe, including from within the MRC, which invited the applicants to join its new directly funded Clinical Research Centre at Northwick Park Hospital. They declined the offer, preferring long-term grant support at the University of Cambridge, and so exposed the project to competitive funding mode. Referees and the Clinical Research Board saw the institutional set-up in Cambridge as problematic with respect to clinical facilities and patient management; gave infertility a low priority compared with population control; assessed interventions as purely experimental rather than potential treatments, and so set the bar for safety high; feared fatal abnormalities and so wanted primate experiments first; and were antagonized by the applicants’ high media profile. The rejection set MRC policy on IVF for 8 years, until, after the birth of just two healthy babies, the Council rapidly converted to enthusiastic support. CONCLUSIONS This analysis enriches our view of a crucial decision, highlights institutional opportunities and constraints and provides insight into the then dominant attitudes of reproductive scientists and clinicians towards human conception research. PMID:20657027

  1. Thermostatic and rheological responses of DPD fluid to extreme shear under modified Lees-Edwards boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Moshfegh, Abouzar; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Jabbarzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and rheological interactions between velocity-dependent thermostats of Lowe-Andersen (LA) and Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen (NHLA), and modified Lees-Edwards (M-LEC) boundary condition were studied in the context of Dissipative Particle Dynamics method. Comparisons were made with original Lees-Edwards method to characterise the improvements that M-LEC offers in conserving the induced shear momentum. Different imposed shear velocities, heat bath collision/exchange frequencies and thermostating probabilities were considered. The presented analyses addressed an unusual discontinuity in momentum transfer that appeared in form of nonphysical jumps in velocity and temperature profiles. The usefulness of M-LEC was then quantified by evaluating the enhancements in obtained effective shear velocity, effective shear rate, Péclet number, and dynamic viscosity. System exchange frequency (Γ) with Maxwellian heat bath was found to play an important role, in that its larger values facilitated achieving higher shear rates with proper temperature control at the cost of deviation from an ideal momentum transfer. Similar dynamic viscosities were obtained under both shearing modes between LA and NHLA thermostats up to Γ = 10, whilst about twice the range of viscosity (1 < η < 20) was calculated for M-LEC at larger probabilities (ΓΔt > %). The main benefits of this modification were to facilitate momentum flow from shear boundaries to the system bulk. In addition, it was found that there exist upper thresholds for imposing shear on the system beyond which temperature cannot be controlled properly and nonphysical jumps reappear. PMID:26701709

  2. Configuration of the base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and hydrogeology of the underlying pre-Cretaceous rocks, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Ardis, Ann F.

    1992-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer system is underlain by an extensive complex of rocks, ranging from Late Cambrian through Late Triassic in age, that are typically about 10 to perhaps 1,000 times less permeable than those composing the aquifer system. The Cretaceous rocks of the aquifer system are separated from the pre-Cretaceous rocks by an unconformity that spans about 60 million years of erosion during the Jurassic Period. The upper surface of the pre-Cretaceous rock complex forms the base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system. The configuration of the base reflects the original topography of the eroded pre-Cretaceous land surface plus the effects of subsequent deformation. The most permeable pre-Cretaceous rocks are in the eastern half of the study area where they compose the Hickory aquifer (in Upper Cambrian rocks), Ellenburger-San Saba aquifer (Upper Cambrian- Lower Ordovician), and Marble Falls aquifer (Lower Pennsylvanian). These aquifers are hydraulically connected to the northeastern fringe of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, as their up-turned margins crop out around the flanks of the breached Llano uplift. The Rustler aquifer in rocks of Late Permian age underlies parts of the Trans-Pecos region, where it yields small amounts of greatly mineralized water for industrial and agricultural purposes. The Dockum aquifer in rocks of Late Triassic age directly underlies the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system in western parts of the study area, and locally increases the saturated thickness of the ground-water-flow system by an average of about 200 feet. Despite these notable exceptions, the collective effect of the pre-Cretaceous rocks is that 01 a barrier to ground-water flow, which limits the exchange of water across the base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system.

  3. Edwards thermodynamics of the jamming transition for frictionless packings: Ergodicity test and role of angoricity and compactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Song, Chaoming; Wang, Ping; Makse, Hernán A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper illustrates how the tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics can help to describe a far-from-equilibrium problem: the jamming transition in frictionless granular materials. Edwards ideas consist of proposing a statistical ensemble of volume and stress fluctuations through the thermodynamic notion of entropy, compactivity, X, and angoricity, A (two temperature-like variables). We find that Edwards thermodynamics is able to describe the jamming transition (J point) in frictionless packings. Using the ensemble formalism we elucidate the following: (i) We test the combined volume-stress ensemble by comparing the statistical properties of jammed configurations obtained by dynamics with those averaged over the ensemble of minima in the potential energy landscape as a test of ergodicity. Agreement between both methods supports the idea of ergodicity and “thermalization” at a given angoricity and compactivity. (ii) A microcanonical ensemble analysis supports the maximum entropy principle for grains. (iii) The intensive variables A and X describe the approach to jamming through a series of scaling relations as A→0+ and X→0-. Due to the force-strain coupling in the interparticle forces, the jamming transition is probed thermodynamically by a “jamming temperature” TJ composed of contributions from A and X. (iv) The thermodynamic framework reveals the order of the jamming phase transition by showing the absence of critical fluctuations at jamming in static observables like pressure and volume, and we discuss other critical scenarios for the jamming transition. (v) Finally, we elaborate on a comparison with relevant studies by Gao, Blawzdziewicz, and O’Hern [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.74.061304 74, 061304 (2006)], showing a breakdown of equiprobability of microstates obtained via fast quenches. A network analysis of the energy landscape reveals the origin of the inhomogeneities in the uneven distribution of the areas of the basins

  4. Simulation of advective flow under steady-state and transient recharge conditions, Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Donald A.; Masterson, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed several ground-water models in support of an investigation of ground-water contamination being conducted by the Army National Guard Bureau at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation on western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Regional and subregional steady-state models and regional transient models were used to (1) improve understanding of the hydrologic system, (2) simulate advective transport of contaminants, (3) delineate recharge areas to municipal wells, and (4) evaluate how model discretization and time-varying recharge affect simulation results. A water-table mound dominates ground-water-flow patterns. Near the top of the mound, which is within Camp Edwards, hydraulic gradients are nearly vertically downward and horizontal gradients are small. In downgradient areas that are further from the top of the water-table mound, the ratio of horizontal to vertical gradients is larger and horizontal flow predominates. The steady-state regional model adequately simulates advective transport in some areas of the aquifer; however, simulation of ground-water flow in areas with local hydrologic boundaries, such as ponds, requires more finely discretized subregional models. Subregional models also are needed to delineate recharge areas to municipal wells that are inadequately represented in the regional model or are near other pumped wells. Long-term changes in recharge rates affect hydraulic heads in the aquifer and shift the position of the top of the water-table mound. Hydraulic-gradient directions do not change over time in downgradient areas, whereas they do change substantially with temporal changes in recharge near the top of the water-table mound. The assumption of steady-state hydraulic conditions is valid in downgradient area, where advective transport paths change little over time. In areas closer to the top of the water-table mound, advective transport paths change as a function of time, transient and steady-state paths

  5. ‘Where is the Fault?’: The Starvation of Edward Cooper at the Isle of Wight Workhouse in 1877

    PubMed Central

    Price, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Edward Cooper was a disabled pauper who died of starvation in a workhouse ‘idiot’ ward. His neglect was the result of systemic problems, exacerbated by policy, and the poor law's free market approach to employing doctors in this period. In the 1870s community care came under assault from a policy that is known to historians as the ‘crusade against outdoor relief’. Though it sought to target ‘idlers’ and ‘undeserving’ cases, the withdrawal of vital payments for familial carers drove up the number of institutionalised and vulnerable patients. In turn, workhouse medical officers and nurses were unprepared for disabled patients, such as Edward, and charges of negligence increased. This article will provide a rare and detailed comparison between Victorian workhouse care and care in the community, drawn from extant contemporary affidavits.

  6. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2012-01-01

    A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were

  7. Mercury deposition in ombrotrophic bogs in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Atlantic region surveillance report number EPS-5-AR-98-4

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, L.A.; Matthews, S.L.

    1998-12-31

    A study was conducted to determine historical atmospheric mercury deposition patterns in the Maritime Provinces. Investigators measured mercury concentrations in peat cores from five ombrotrophic bogs in Kejimkujik, Fundy, Kouchibougouac, and Cape Breton Highlands national parks and in East Baltic Bog, Prince Edward Island. Results presented and discussed include deposition rates calculated using lead-210 date estimates, temporal trends in mercury concentrations, and spatial patterns of mercury deposition.

  8. A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2013-01-01

    Several previous studies have been done to compile or collect physical and chemical data, describe the hydrogeologic processes, and develop conceptual and numerical groundwater-flow models of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Trans-Pecos region. Documented methods were used to compile and collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic information that subsequently were used to develop this conceptual model.

  9. A high-resolution geochemical record from Lake Edward, Uganda Congo and the timing and causes of tropical African drought during the late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, James M.; Johnson, Thomas C.

    2005-07-01

    High-resolution analyses of the elemental composition of calcite and biogenic silica (BSi) content in piston cores from Lake Edward, equatorial Africa, document complex interactions between climate variability and lacustrine geochemistry over the past 5400 years. Correlation of these records from Lake Edward to other climatically-forced geochemical and lake level records from Lakes Naivasha, Tanganyika, and Turkana allows us to develop a chronology of drought events in equatorial East Africa during the late Holocene. Major drought events of at least century-scale duration are recorded in lacustrine records at about 850, 1500, ˜2000, and 4100 cal year BP. Of these, the most severe event occurred between about 2050 and 1850 cal year BP, during which time Lake Edward stood about 15 m below its present level. Numerous additional droughts of less intensity and/or duration are present in the Lake Edward record, some of which may be correlated to other lacustrine climate records from equatorial East Africa. These events are superimposed on a long-term trend of increasingly arid conditions from 5400 to about 2000 cal year BP, followed by a shift toward wetter climates that may have resulted from an intensification of the winter Indian monsoon. Although the causes of decade- to century-scale climate variability in the East African tropics remain obscure, time-series spectral analysis suggests no direct linkage between solar output and regional rainfall. Rather, significant periods of ˜725, ˜125, 63-72, 31-25, and 19-16 years suggest a tight linkage between the Indian Ocean and African rainfall, and could result from coupled ocean-atmosphere variability inherent to the tropical monsoon system.

  10. Digital elevation model of King Edward VII Peninsula, West Antarctica, from SAR interferometry and ICESat laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baek, S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Braun, Andreas; Lu, Zhiming; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present a digital elevation model (DEM) of King Edward VII Peninsula, Sulzberger Bay, West Antarctica, developed using 12 European Remote Sensing (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scenes and 24 Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry profiles. We employ differential interferograms from the ERS tandem mission SAR scenes acquired in the austral fall of 1996, and four selected ICESat laser altimetry profiles acquired in the austral fall of 2004, as ground control points (GCPs) to construct an improved geocentric 60-m resolution DEM over the grounded ice region. We then extend the DEM to include two ice shelves using ICESat profiles via Kriging. Twenty additional ICESat profiles acquired in 2003-2004 are used to assess the accuracy of the DEM. After accounting for radar penetration depth and predicted surface changes, including effects due to ice mass balance, solid Earth tides, and glacial isostatic adjustment, in part to account for the eight-year data acquisition discrepancy, the resulting difference between the DEM and ICESat profiles is -0.57 ?? 5.88 m. After removing the discrepancy between the DEM and ICESat profiles for a final combined DEM using a bicubic spline, the overall difference is 0.05 ?? 1.35 m. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  11. Judging Edward Teller: A Closer Look at One of the Most Influential Scientists of the Twentieth Century

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B

    2010-12-29

    Much has been written about Edward TEller, but little of it is objective. Given, on the one hand, his position as one of the most inventive theoretical physicists of the 20th century, and on the other, his central role in the development and advocacy of thermonuclear weapons, one might imagine it impossible at this point in history to write a scholarly, impartial account of Teller's life and his impact. Now, however, Istvan Hargittai, a prominent Hungarian physical chemist and historian of science, has written a balanced, thoughtful, and beautifully research biography that comes closest. Hargittai is uniquely qualified for this difficult task. Coming a generation and a half later from a similar Hungarian-Jewish background, Hargittai understands well the influences and terrible events that shaped Teller. The advent of virulent, political anti-Semitism, first in Hungary and then in Germany, made Teller twice a refugee. Both Teller and Hargittai lost close family in the Holocaust; Hargittai was himself liberated from a Nazi concentration camp as a child. While Teller was in the US by then, his and Hargittai's surviving family members in Hungary suffered mistreatment at the hands of the postwar Hungarian Communist dictatorship. Hargittai's informed Eastern European perspective also provides a fresh viewpoint to the cold war context of the second half of Teller's career. Furthermore, Hargittai's own scientific work in molecular structure clearly makes him appreciate of Teller's breakthroughs in that field in the 1930s.

  12. Quality assessment of Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) grown on Prince Edward Island as a source of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaguo; Tuck, Tina; Ji, Xiuhong; Zhou, Xin; Kelly, Glen; Cuerrier, Alain; Zhang, Junzeng

    2013-07-01

    Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica , also known as Polygonum cuspidatum) is a common invasive plant species on Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, whereas it has been used in Chinese medicine and more recently as a raw material for extracting resveratrol. This paper reports on the quantification of resveratrol, polydatin, emodin, and physcion in roots, stems, and leaves of Japanese knotweed samples from PEI and British Columbia (BC), Canada, and nine provinces of China, by ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The results showed that the root contains a much higher level of resveratrol than the stem and leaf, and it is accumulated in its highest level in October. PEI-grown knotweed contains similar levels of resveratrol and polydatin compared to Chinese samples collected in the month of October, but the contents of the other anthraquinones (emodin and physcion) are different. As such, Japanese knotweed grown in PEI could be a commercially viable source of raw material for resveratrol production; however, caution has to be taken in harvesting the right plant species. PMID:23742076

  13. EUCOLEUS BOEHMI INFECTION IN THE NASAL CONCHAE AND PARANASAL SINUSES OF RED FOX (VULPES VULPES) ON PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, CANADA.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alfonso; Aburto, Enrique; Jones, Kathleen; Robbins, William; Conboy, Gary

    2016-04-28

    Eucoleus boehmi (Nematoda: Capillariidae) occurs in the nasal conchae and paranasal sinuses of wild and domestic canids. We surveyed the red fox ( Vulpes vulpes ) on Prince Edward Island, Canada, for E. boehmi infection and characterized the associated histopathology. Nasal capillarid infections were detected based on histologic examination of three coronal sections of the nasal cavity and by centrifugal flotation examination (CFE) of rectal feces. Capillarids were detected in histologic sections in 28 of 36 (78%) foxes; detection occurred most frequently in the caudal section (28 foxes) and least in the rostral section (10 foxes). Adult worm morphology was typical for capillarids (stichosome esophagus, bacillary bands, bipolar plugged eggs); E. boehmi eggs were specifically identified based on the characteristic pitted shell wall surface. Adult worms were detected in histologic sections in all 28 and E. boehmi eggs in 21 of the positive foxes. No eggs of Eucoleus aerophilus were observed in any of the sections. Affected foxes had an eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis with goblet cell hyperplasia. Eggs of E. aerophilus were detected on CFE in 20 of 36 (56%) foxes; 19 of the histologically positive foxes were coinfected with E. aerophilus. Eggs of E. boehmi were detected on CFE in 26 of 36 (72%) foxes and were consistent in size and morphology with those described from wild canids, but they differed from those reported from cases of infection in dogs. Prevalence based on identification of eggs on histologic section or CFE indicated 27 of 36 (75%) red foxes examined were infected with E. boehmi. PMID:26967142

  14. Transmissivity estimation for highly heterogeneous aquifers: comparison of three methods applied to the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Scott L.; Woodbury, Allan D.; Jiang, Yefang

    2007-03-01

    Obtaining reliable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Although many quantitative characterization techniques exist, experience applying these techniques to highly heterogeneous real-world aquifers is limited. Three geostatistical characterization techniques are applied to the Edwards Aquifer, a limestone aquifer in south-central Texas, USA, for the purposes of quantifying the performance in an 88,000-cell groundwater model. The first method is a simple kriging of existing hydraulic conductivity data developed primarily from single-well tests. The second method involves numerical upscaling to the grid-block scale, followed by cokriging the grid-block conductivity. In the third method, the results of the second method are used to establish the prior distribution for a Bayesian updating calculation. Results of kriging alone are biased towards low values and fail to reproduce hydraulic heads or spring flows. The upscaling/cokriging approach removes most of the systematic bias. The Bayesian update reduced the mean residual by more than a factor of 10, to 6 m, approximately 2.5% of the total head variation in the aquifer. This agreement demonstrates the utility of automatic calibration techniques based on formal statistical approaches and lends further support for using the Bayesian updating approach for highly heterogeneous aquifers.

  15. Hydrologic and geologic data for the Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone near Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas, 1986-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorsey, M.E.; Slagle, Diana L.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a compilation and summary of data related to the interchange of water between the Edwards aquifer and streams, and to the hydraulics of vertical movement of water in the Georgetown Limestone in the Georgetown area of Williamson County. It presents hydrologic, geologic, hydraulic, physical, geophysical, and water-quality data collected from selected wells and stream sites in the study area from January 1986 to June 1987. Included are the results from six streamflow gain and loss surveys, two ground-water-level surveys representing low and high water-level conditions, inorganic chemical analyses of water from selected wells and streams, and bulk specific gravity and permeability tests of cores taken at three test-well sites. Water-level altitudes differed by an average of 38 feet between low and high water-level conditions in the confined zone, and by an average of 13 feet in the unconfined zone. Dissolved solids of water from selected wells ranged from 320 to 1,300 milligrams per liter and from 251 to 290 milligrams per liter in water from selected streams.

  16. The Visual Display of Quantitative Information; Envisioning Information; Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative (by Edward R. Tufte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Harold H.

    1999-02-01

    The Visual Display of Quantitative Information Edward R. Tufte. Graphics Press: Cheshire, CT, 1983. 195 pp. ISBN 0-961-39210-X. 40.00. Envisioning Information Edward R. Tufte. Graphics Press: Cheshire, CT, 1990. 126 pp. ISBN 0-961-39211-8. 48.00. Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative Edward R. Tufte. Graphics Press: Cheshire, CT, 1997. 156 pp. ISBN 0-9613921-2-6. $45.00. Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative is the most recent of three books by Edward R. Tufte about the expression of information through graphs, charts, maps, and images. The most important of all the practical advice in these books is found on the first page of the first book, The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. Quantitative graphics should:

    Show the data Induce the viewer to think about the substance rather than the graphical design Avoid distorting what the data have to say Present many numbers in a small space Make large data sets coherent Encourage the eye to compare data Reveal the data at several levels of detail Serve a clear purpose: description, exploration, tabulation, or decoration Be closely integrated with the statistical and verbal descriptions of a data set
    Tufte illustrates these principles through all three books, going to extremes in the care with which he presents examples, both good and bad. He has designed the books so that the reader almost never has to turn a page to see the image, graph, or table that is being described in the text. The books are set in Monotype Bembo, a lead typeface designed so that smaller sizes open the surrounding white space, producing a pleasing balance. Some of the colored pages were put through more than 20 printing steps in order to render the subtle shadings required. The books are printed on heavy paper stock, and the fact that contributing artists, the typeface, the printing company, and the bindery are all credited on one of the back flyleaves is one

  17. Blood lead concentrations of waterfowl from unhunted and heavily hunted marshes of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Daury, R W; Schwab, F E; Bateman, M C

    1993-10-01

    Blood lead concentrations of juvenile American black ducks (Anas rubripes) sampled in unhunted sanctuaries of Nova Scotia (NS) and Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, usually were < 30 parts per billion (ppb). Based on gizzard content analyses of juvenile American black ducks from hunted areas, eight (24%) of 33 flightless birds contained ingested lead shot. Blood lead concentrations were > or = 100 ppb in seven of eight juveniles with ingested shot; thus we adopted blood lead concentrations 100 ppb as our threshold indicating exposure to non-background lead. The proportion of both American black ducks and ring-necked ducks (Aythya collaris) with elevated blood lead concentrations (> 100 ppb) exceeded 5% in hunted areas sampled in NS and PEI combined. The Canadian Wildlife Service draft policy is to consider replacing lead shot with non-toxic shot for waterfowl and snipe hunting if 5% of American black ducks exceed a blood lead concentration of 200 ppb. American black ducks significantly (P < 0.05) exceeded this threshold but ring-necked ducks did not. The source of lead in hunted areas may have been lead shot; we recommend that it be eliminated and replaced by an acceptable non-toxic shot for waterfowl hunting. Twenty four (96%) of 25 of American black ducks overwintering in Sullivans Pond, Dartmouth, NS, contained elevated (> 100 ppb) blood lead concentrations and 19 (76%) had detrimental concentrations (> 200 ppb). We believe that the source of lead at Sullivans Pond was automobile emissions. PMID:8258857

  18. Reproductive biology of the Suez Canal spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834: Crustacea: Brachyura: Majidae)

    PubMed Central

    El-Serehy, Hamed A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.; Ibrahim, Nesreen K.; Al-Misned, Fahad A.

    2015-01-01

    A reproductive biology study of the spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) was conducted in the Suez Canal from July 2012 to June 2013. The annual sex ratio (Male:Female) of S. aspera was female biased with values of 1:1.25. Out of the four ovarian development stages of this crab, two stages were observed in the Suez Canal throughout the whole year. The ovigerous crab’s carapace width varied from 28 to 52 mm. This crab species can spawn during most of the year in the canal water, with a peak during late spring and early winter. The fecundity of ovigerous females ranged between 2349 and 13600 eggs with a mean of 5494 ± 1486 eggs. Female crabs that reached sexual maturity exhibited a minimum carapace width varying between 22 and 46 mm, and fifty percentage of all ovigerous females showed a carapace width of 36 mm. PMID:26587008

  19. The Balmat-Edwards zinc-lead deposits-synsedimentary ore from Mississippi valley-type fluids.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, J.F.; Rye, R.O.; Delorraine, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Balmat-Edwards Zn-Pb district in New York is in Mid-Proterozoic Grenville marbles. Tabular to podiform, generally conformable massive sphalerite-galena orebodies occur at various horizons in the approx 1 km-thick marbles. Metamorphism obscured or obliterated most primary characteristics, whose reconstruction is attempted through detailed S, C, and O isotope studies of the Fowler orebody, and trace element and S isotope studies of sphalerite concentrates and composite ore samples from 22 orebodies. Sulphur isotope data reflect equilibration at near peak metamorphism with some indication of re-equilibration during retrograde metamorphism. The carbon and oxygen isotope composition of gangue carbonates suggests derivation from the host marbles. The oxygen isotope composition of gangue quartz is compatible with a chert origin or metamorphism-equilibration with other minerals. Sulphur and lead isotopes and sulphide mineralogy suggests that the ore fluids were evolved basin brines, chemically like those responsible for Mississippi Valley-type deposits. The large stratigraphic span (> 600 m) of the Balmat orebodies may be due to basin dewatering of million-year intervals. Stratigraphically increasing 34S values of evaporite-anhydrite are postulated to record hydrothermal events and to imply bacterial sulphate reduction on an unusually large scale. Such a stratigraphic increase may be a general exploration guide where sediment-hosted exhalative deposits or Mississippi Valley-type deposits occur.-G.J.N.

  20. Fecal shedding of Toxocara canis and other parasites in foxes and coyotes on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wapenaar, Wendela; Barkema, Herman W; O'Handley, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of parasites shed by wild canids can assist in recognizing risk to human and domestic animal health. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of patent infections with Toxocara canis and other parasites in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and coyotes (Canis latrans) in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Identification of parasite species was based on microscopic examination of feces, with the use of a sucrose fecal flotation method. Sample collection was performed in winter on carcasses of 271 and 185 hunted or trapped foxes and coyotes, respectively. One or more parasite species were observed in 242 (89%) foxes and 128 (69%) coyotes. Toxocara canis, Uncinaria stenocephala, Capillaria spp., Mesocestoides, Taenidd spp., Alaria spp., Cryptocotyle lingua, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora caninum-like coccidia, and other coccidia were identified. A third of juvenile foxes were shedding T. canis and had a high prevalence of Capillaria spp., especially in juvenile foxes (69%). Taenidd eggs, Alaria spp. and Sarcocystis spp. were more common in coyotes (24, 18, and 9%, respectively) than foxes (8, 11, and 1%, respectively). Despite the limitations of fecal flotation to identify parasite species, the high prevalence of T. canis warrants the attention of public health professionals. PMID:23568915