Science.gov

Sample records for edwardsiella tarda pathogenesis

  1. The role of regulator Eha in Edwardsiella tarda pathogenesis and virulence gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Gao, Daqing; Li, Yuhong; Xu, Zeyan; Sheng, Ankang; Zheng, Enjin; Shao, Zeye; Liu, Nian; Lu, Chengping

    2016-06-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a pathogen with a broad host range that infects both animals and humans. Eha is a new transcriptional regulator identified in ET13, which is involved in the bacterial hemolytic activity. This study explored the effect of the Eha in the pathogenesis of E. tarda and the transcriptional regulation of the bacterial virulence genes (eseC, fliC, pagC and fimA). Our results found that the virulence of the eha mutant was 2.5-fold less than the one of its wild ET13 by LD50 in a murine model of i.p. infection, and the bacterial loads of the mutant displayed a different profile from the one of the wild strain. Most significantly, the mice infected with the mutant have greatly reduced acute inflammation in the liver, spleen and kidney compared to the ones infected with the wild. We further demonstrated that eseC, fliC and pagC were regulated directly by the Eha with qRT-PCR and β-Galactosidase assay, but fimA wasn't done. The promoter regions of the genes modulated and the cly gene reported before had been found to contain a common conserved motif by using software. In addition, we found that the wild strain was more toxic to RAW264.7 macrophages, and induced less the host cell apoptotic responses than the eha mutant did. Altogether, these data suggested that the Eha was required for the bacterial infection and the transcriptive regulation of the important virulence genes of E. tarda. PMID:27038844

  2. Extraintestinal human infection caused by Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed Central

    Clarridge, J E; Musher, D M; Fainstein, V; Wallace, R J

    1980-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is an uncommon enteric bacterium which has been found generally in animal hosts and occasionally in human feces. Three cases of extraintestinal infection caused by E. tarda which are described herein include a typhoid-like illness, peritonitis with sepsis, and cellulitis from a wound acquired while fishing. The microbiology of E. tarda and the previous reports of infection due to this organism are reviewed. PMID:7381019

  3. Edwardsiella tarda EsaE (Orf19 protein) is required for the secretion of type III substrates, and pathogenesis in fish.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Liu, Lu Yi; He, Tian Tian; Laghari, Zubair Ahmed; Nie, Pin; Gao, Qian; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-07-15

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a large macromolecular assembly found on the surface of many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Edwardsiella tarda is an important Gram-negative pathogen that employs T3SS to deliver effectors into host cells to facilitate its survival and replication. EseB, EseC, and EseD, when secreted, form a translocon complex EseBCD on host membranes through which effectors are translocated. The orf19 gene (esaE) of E. tarda is located upstream of esaK, and downstream of esaJ, esaI, esaH and esaG in the T3SS gene cluster. When its domains were searched using Delta-Blast, the EsaE protein was found to belong to the T3SS YscJ/PrgK family. In the present study, it is found that EsaE is not secreted into culture supernatant, and the deletion of esaE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocon proteins EseBCD and T3SS effector EseG. Increased steady-state protein level of EseC and EseD was detected in bacterial pellet of ΔesaE strain although a reduced level was observed for the eseC and eseD transcription. EsaE was found to localize on membrane but not in the cytoplasm of E. tarda by fractionation. In blue gourami fish infection model, 87.88% of blue gourami infected with ΔesaE strain survived whereas only 3.03% survived when infected with wild-type strain. Taken together, our study demonstrated that EsaE is probably an apparatus protein of T3SS, which contributes to the pathogenesis of E. tarda in fish. PMID:27283851

  4. Edwardsiella tarda MliC, a Lysozyme Inhibitor That Participates in Pathogenesis in a Manner That Parallels Ivy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo-Fei; Wang, Chong

    2014-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a bacterial pathogen to farmed fish as well as humans, possesses the genes of two lysozyme inhibitors, ivy and mliC (ivyEt and mliCEt). We recently studied IvyEt and found it to be implicated in E. tarda virulence. In the present study, we characterized MliCEt in comparison with IvyEt in a turbot model. MliCEt contains the FWSKG motif and two cysteines (C33 and C98) that are highly conserved in subgroup 1 MliCs but are of unknown functional importance. To examine the essentialness of these conserved structural features, recombinant MliCEt (rMliC) and its mutants bearing C33S and W79A (of the FWSKG motif) substitutions were prepared. Subsequent analysis showed that rMliC (i) inhibited lysozyme-induced lysis of a Gram-positive bacterium, (ii) reduced serum-facilitated lysozyme killing of E. tarda, and (iii) when introduced into turbot, promoted bacterial dissemination in fish tissues. The C33S mutation had no influence on the activity of rMliC, while the W79A mutation slightly but significantly enhanced the activity of rMliC. Knockout strains of either mliCEt or ivyEt were severely attenuated for the ability of tissue invasion, host lethality, serum survival, and intracellular replication. The lost virulence of the mliC transformant (TXΔmliC) was restored by complementation with an introduced mliCEt gene. Compared to the ΔivyEt or ΔmliCEt single-knockout strains, the ΔmliCEt ΔivyEt double-knockout strain was significantly impaired in most of the virulence features. Together, these results provide the first evidence that the conserved cysteine is functionally dispensable to a subgroup 1 MliC and that as a virulence factor, MliCEt most likely works in a concerted and parallel manner with Ivy. PMID:25404031

  5. Edwardsiella tarda EscE (Orf13 Protein) Is a Type III Secretion System-Secreted Protein That Is Required for the Injection of Effectors, Secretion of Translocators, and Pathogenesis in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin Fang; Wang, Wei Na; Wang, Gai Ling; Zhang, He; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Zhi Peng

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda is crucial for its intracellular survival and pathogenesis in fish. The orf13 gene (escE) of E. tarda is located 84 nucleotides (nt) upstream of esrC in the T3SS gene cluster. We found that EscE is secreted and translocated in a T3SS-dependent manner and that amino acids 2 to 15 in the N terminus were required for a completely functional T3SS in E. tarda. Deletion of escE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocators, as well as the secretion and translocation of T3SS effectors, but did not influence their intracellular protein levels in E. tarda. Complementation of the escE mutant with a secretion-incompetent EscE derivative restored the secretion of translocators and effectors. Interestingly, the effectors that were secreted and translocated were positively correlated with the EscE protein level in E. tarda. The escE mutant was attenuated in the blue gourami fish infection model, as its 50% lethal dose (LD50) increased to 4 times that of the wild type. The survival rate of the escE mutant-strain-infected fish was 69%, which was much higher than that of the fish infected with the wild-type bacteria (6%). Overall, EscE represents a secreted T3SS regulator that controls effector injection and translocator secretion, thus contributing to E. tarda pathogenesis in fish. The homology of EscE within the T3SSs of other bacterial species suggests that the mechanism of secretion and translocation control used by E. tarda may be commonly used by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26459509

  6. Edwardsiella tarda EscE (Orf13 Protein) Is a Type III Secretion System-Secreted Protein That Is Required for the Injection of Effectors, Secretion of Translocators, and Pathogenesis in Fish.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Fang; Wang, Wei Na; Wang, Gai Ling; Zhang, He; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda is crucial for its intracellular survival and pathogenesis in fish. The orf13 gene (escE) of E. tarda is located 84 nucleotides (nt) upstream of esrC in the T3SS gene cluster. We found that EscE is secreted and translocated in a T3SS-dependent manner and that amino acids 2 to 15 in the N terminus were required for a completely functional T3SS in E. tarda. Deletion of escE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocators, as well as the secretion and translocation of T3SS effectors, but did not influence their intracellular protein levels in E. tarda. Complementation of the escE mutant with a secretion-incompetent EscE derivative restored the secretion of translocators and effectors. Interestingly, the effectors that were secreted and translocated were positively correlated with the EscE protein level in E. tarda. The escE mutant was attenuated in the blue gourami fish infection model, as its 50% lethal dose (LD50) increased to 4 times that of the wild type. The survival rate of the escE mutant-strain-infected fish was 69%, which was much higher than that of the fish infected with the wild-type bacteria (6%). Overall, EscE represents a secreted T3SS regulator that controls effector injection and translocator secretion, thus contributing to E. tarda pathogenesis in fish. The homology of EscE within the T3SSs of other bacterial species suggests that the mechanism of secretion and translocation control used by E. tarda may be commonly used by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26459509

  7. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella tarda isolates from fish in the eastern United States suggests the existence of two genetically distinct species, Edwardsiella tarda and Edwardsiella pseudotarda sp. nov

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, is often implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of a collection of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United State...

  8. The macrophage chemotactic activity of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemoattractant capabilities of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products (ECP) were investigated from two isolates, the virulent FL6-60 parent and less virulent RET-04 mutant. Chemotaxis and chemokinesis were assayed in vitro using blind well chambers with peritoneal macrophages obtained from ...

  9. Real-time PCR assays for detection and quactification of Edwardsiella tarda, Edwardsiella piscicida, Edwardsiella piscicida-like sp. in catfish tissues and pond water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have proposed the adoption of 3 distinct genetic taxa among bacteria previously classified as Edwardsiella tarda; namely E. tarda, E. piscicida, and a taxon presently termed E. piscicida–like. Individual real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were developed, based on published...

  10. Complete genome sequence of Edwardsiella tarda (isolate FL95-01)recovered from channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe isolated from fish, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals, including humans. This is a report of the complete and annotated genome of E. tarda isolate FL95-01, recovered from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)....

  11. Pathology of Edwardsiella tarda infection in turbot, Scophthalmus maximus (L.).

    PubMed

    Padrós, F; Zarza, C; Dopazo, L; Cuadrado, M; Crespo, S

    2006-02-01

    Macroscopic and histopathological changes in cultured turbot, Scophthalmus maximus (L.), in Spain caused by infection with Edwardsiella tarda are described. Eye tumefaction, inflammation, haemorrhages, ascites and the presence of a purulent fluid were the main macroscopic lesions observed. Histopathological lesions were found in the kidney, spleen and liver. In the kidney and spleen these were characterized by a severe apostematous inflammatory reaction, with a large number of abscesses. The liver was affected to a lesser degree and only some phagocytes loaded with bacteria were observed. Ultrastructural observations indicated that macrophages were the main cell type implicated in the inflammatory response. Most of the bacteria observed within the phagocyte cytoplasm showed no degenerative changes and some were dividing. Degenerative changes observed in macrophages indicate their failure in preventing the infection. PMID:16436119

  12. The serine protease autotransporter Tsh contributes to the virulence of Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Zhou, Hai-Zhen; Jin, Qian-Wen; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-30

    The temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (Tsh), identified as serine protease autotransporters of the Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) proteins, is an important virulence factor for avian-pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) and uropathogenic E. coli. However, little is known about the role of Tsh as a virulence factor in Edwardsiella tarda, a severe fish pathogen. In this study, we characterized the Tsh of E. tarda (named TshEt) and examined its function and vaccine potential. TshEt is composed of 1224 residues and has three functional domains typical for autotransporters. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that expression of tshEt was upregulated under conditions of high temperature, increased cell density, high pH, and iron starvation and during the infection of host cells. A markerless tsh in-frame mutant strain, TX01Δtsh, was constructed to determine whether TshEt participates in the pathogenicity of E. tarda, Compared to the wild type TX01, TX01Δtsh exhibited (i) retarded biofilm growth, (ii) decreased resistance against serum killing, (iii) impaired ability to block the host immune response, (iv) attenuated tissue and cellular infectivity. Introduction of a trans-expressed tsh gene restored the lost virulence of TX01Δtsh. The passenger domain of TshEt contains a putative serine protease (PepS) that exhibits apparent proteolytic activity when expressed in and purified from E. coli as a recombinant protein (rPepS). When used as a subunit vaccine to immunize Japanese flounder, rPepS was able to induce effective immune protection. This is the first study of Tsh in a fish pathogen, and the results suggest that TshEt exerts pleiotropic effects on the pathogenesis of E. tarda. PMID:27259829

  13. Edwardsiella tarda-Induced Inhibition of Apoptosis: A Strategy for Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ze-jun; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that can infect a wide range of freshwater and marine fish. One salient feature of E. tarda is the ability to survive and replicate in various host cells. In this study, we observed that E. tarda replicated robustly in the zebrafish cell line ZF4, and that E. tarda-infected cells exhibited no detectable signs of apoptosis. Global transcriptome analysis and quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that E. tarda infection generally significantly downregulated pro-apoptotic genes and upregulated anti-apoptotic genes. To investigate the role of apoptosis in E. tarda infection, two upregulated anti-apoptotic genes (Fech and Prx3) and two downregulated pro-apoptotic genes (Brms1a and Ivns1a) were overexpressed in zebrafish. Subsequent infection study showed that Fech and Prx3 overexpression significantly promoted E. tarda dissemination in and colonization of fish tissues, while Brms1a and Ivns1a overexpression significantly reduced E. tarda dissemination and colonization. Consistently, when Fech and Prx3 were knocked down in zebrafish, E. tarda infection was significantly inhibited, whereas Brms1a and Ivns1a knockdown significantly enhanced E. tarda infection. These results indicate for the first time that E. tarda prevents apoptosis in teleost as a strategy for intracellular survival, and that some putative apoptotic genes of teleost function in the apoptosis pathway probably in a manner similar to that in mammalian systems. PMID:27471679

  14. Complete genome sequence of channel catfish gastrointestinal sepicemia isolate Edwardsiella tarda C07-087

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella tarda is the etiologic agent of acute to chronic edwardsiellosis in fish and other species (1). It is a gram-negative facultative anaerobe that is motile by peritrichous flagella. Edwardsiellosis is an important fish disease that negatively impacts aquaculture industries throughout the...

  15. What is a species a species? Genetic variability of Edwardsiella tarda in the Southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intra-specific variability of Edwardsiella tarda isolates from fish in the eastern United States was assessed. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) and multi-locus sequence analysis identified two distinct genotypes (DNA group I; DNA group II). This was supported by fluorometric estimatio...

  16. Retention of virulence in a viable but nonculturable Edwardsiella tarda isolate.

    PubMed

    Du, Meng; Chen, Jixiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Aijuan; Li, Yun; Wang, Yingeng

    2007-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is pathogen of fish and other animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and virulence retention of this bacterium. Edwardsiella tarda CW7 was cultured in sterilized aged seawater at 4 degrees C. Total cell counts remained constant throughout the 28-day period by acridine orange direct counting, while plate counts declined to undetectable levels (<0.1 CFU/ml) within 28 days by plate counting. The direct viable counts, on the other hand, declined to ca. 10(9) CFU/ml active cells and remained fairly constant at this level by direct viable counting. These results indicated that a large population of cells existed in a viable but nonculturable state. VBNC E. tarda CW7 could resuscitate in experimental chick embryos and in the presence of nutrition with a temperature upshift. The resuscitative times were 6 days and 8 days, respectively. The morphological changes of VBNC, normal, and resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were studied with a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that when the cells entered into the VBNC state, they gradually changed in shape from short rods to coccoid and decreased in size, but the resuscitative cells did not show any obvious differences from the normal cells. The VBNC and the resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were intraperitoneally inoculated into turbot separately, and the fish inoculated with the resuscitative cells died within 7 days, which suggested that VBNC E. tarda CW7 might retain pathogenicity. PMID:17189433

  17. Retention of Virulence in a Viable but Nonculturable Edwardsiella tarda Isolate▿

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meng; Chen, Jixiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Aijuan; Li, Yun; Wang, Yingeng

    2007-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is pathogen of fish and other animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and virulence retention of this bacterium. Edwardsiella tarda CW7 was cultured in sterilized aged seawater at 4°C. Total cell counts remained constant throughout the 28-day period by acridine orange direct counting, while plate counts declined to undetectable levels (<0.1 CFU/ml) within 28 days by plate counting. The direct viable counts, on the other hand, declined to ca. 109 CFU/ml active cells and remained fairly constant at this level by direct viable counting. These results indicated that a large population of cells existed in a viable but nonculturable state. VBNC E. tarda CW7 could resuscitate in experimental chick embryos and in the presence of nutrition with a temperature upshift. The resuscitative times were 6 days and 8 days, respectively. The morphological changes of VBNC, normal, and resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were studied with a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that when the cells entered into the VBNC state, they gradually changed in shape from short rods to coccoid and decreased in size, but the resuscitative cells did not show any obvious differences from the normal cells. The VBNC and the resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were intraperitoneally inoculated into turbot separately, and the fish inoculated with the resuscitative cells died within 7 days, which suggested that VBNC E. tarda CW7 might retain pathogenicity. PMID:17189433

  18. Edwardsiella tarda sepsis in a live-stranded sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Cools, Piet; Haelters, Jan; Lopes dos Santos Santiago, Guido; Claeys, Geert; Boelens, Jerina; Leroux-Roels, Isabel; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Deschaght, Pieter

    2013-09-27

    Whale strandings remain poorly understood, although bacterial infections have been suggested to contribute. We isolated Edwardsiella tarda from the blood of a stranded sperm whale. The pathogen was identified with MALDI-TOF MS, confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantified in blood by qPCR. We report the first case of sepsis in a sperm whale. The zoonotic potential of E. tarda and the possible role of bacterial infections in the enigmatic strandings of cetaceans are discussed. PMID:23827352

  19. Insights into the virulence-related genes of Edwardsiella tarda isolated from turbot in Europe: genetic homogeneity and evidence for vibrioferrin production.

    PubMed

    Castro, N; Osorio, C R; Buján, N; Fuentes, J C; Rodríguez, J; Romero, M; Jiménez, C; Toranzo, A E; Magariños, B

    2016-05-01

    Edwardsiella tarda has long been known as a pathogen that causes severe economic losses in aquaculture industry. Insights gained on E. tarda pathogenesis may prove useful in the development of new methods for the treatment of infections as well as preventive measures against future outbreaks. In this report, we have established the correlation between the presence of virulence genes, related with three aspects typically involved in bacterial pathogenesis (chondroitinase activity, quorum sensing and siderophore-mediated ferric uptake systems), in the genome of E. tarda strains isolated from turbot in Europe and their phenotypic traits. A total of 8 genes were tested by PCR for their presence in 73 E. tarda isolates. High homogeneity was observed in the presence/absence pattern of all the strains. Positive results in the amplification of virulence-related genes were correlated with the detection of chondroitinase activity in agar plates, in vivo AHL production during fish infection and determination of type of siderophore produced by E. tarda. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study carried out with European strains on potential virulence factors. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time that E. tarda produces the siderophore vibrioferrin. PMID:26096159

  20. Characterization of Edwardsiella tarda strains isolated from turbot, Psetta maxima (L.).

    PubMed

    Castro, N; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L; Núñez, S; Magariños, B

    2006-09-01

    The biochemical, serological and molecular characteristics of a group of 21 Edwardsiella tarda strains isolated from turbot, Psetta maxima, in two different areas of Europe were analysed and compared with a total of 13 strains of this bacterial species with different geographical and host origins. All the turbot isolates were biochemically identical to the E. tarda strains included as reference. The use of different techniques including microagglutination, dot blot and Western blot of lipopolysaccharides allowed us to determine that all the turbot isolates constitute an homogeneous and distinctive serological group. Genetic analysis by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis demonstrated that although the E. tarda strains from turbot were compiled in a unique group using the primers P3 and P6, two clonal lineages could be detected when oligonucleotides P4 and P5 were employed. PMID:16948704

  1. Multi-locus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) of Edwardsiella tarda isolates from fish.

    PubMed

    Abayneh, T; Colquhoun, D J; Sørum, H

    2012-08-17

    Edwardsiella tarda is an enteric fish pathogen that has caused significant economic losses in a range of fish species residing in diverse ecological conditions. Several molecular methods relying on DNA fingerprinting (RAPD, RFLP and ERIC-PCR) and the gyrB gene marker have been used to characterize E. tarda isolates. However, all had drawbacks in resolving power and reproducibility. The present study was aimed at developing a novel Multi-locus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) scheme for genetic characterization of E. tarda isolates originating from multiple sources. MLSA has been described as an effective molecular tool with superior discriminatory power and reproducibility for exploring intra-species genetic diversity of several bacterial species. Nucleotide sequence fragments of eight protein coding housekeeping genes (gyrB, mdh, adk, dnaK, phoR, metG, pyrG and aroE2) were obtained from 23 fish pathogenic E. tarda isolates of different geographical origins, one human isolate and 3 reference strains. The phylogenetic relationships between isolates in individual gene analyses were not consistent, although some common patterns were apparent. Phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequences of seven gene loci, however, buffered the conflicting phylogenetic signals and resolved isolates according to their geographical origin and/or fish host. The MLSA revealed two major genetically diverging clusters in E. tarda isolates examined, one cluster representing isolates from fish and the other representing (in the main) human isolates, with E. ictaluri cluster situated in between. The results suggest, therefore, that the fish pathogenic E. tarda isolates may have been previously misclassified and probably represent one or more as yet unrecognized taxa within the genus Edwardsiella. The MLSA described here was robust enough in discriminating E. tarda isolates not only with respect to their geographical origins but also within different hosts from the same geographical location

  2. Multiple brain abscesses in neonate caused by Edwardsiella tarda: case report.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hayato; Fujita, Yuri; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Kozue; Toyokawa, Youichi; Yamamoto, Toru; Furukawa, Taizo; Ebisu, Toshihiko

    2009-02-01

    A neonate presented with multiple brain abscesses caused by very unusual infection with the Gram-negative bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda. Serial changes in magnetic resonance imaging findings including diffusion-weighted imaging demonstrated the development from the late cerebritis to late capsule stages. The patient was successfully treated by external drainage, and has since reached normal development milestones. Early diagnosis with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound tomography, and prompt external drainage were essential to the good outcome of this case. PMID:19246871

  3. Identification and immunoprotective analysis of an in vivo-induced Edwardsiella tarda antigen.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xu-dong; Dang, Wei; Hu, Yong-hua; Sun, Li

    2009-11-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a severe aquaculture pathogen that can infect many important fish species cultured worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vaccine potential of an E. tarda antigen, Eta21, which was identified from a pathogenic E. tarda strain via the method of in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT). Eta21 is 510-amino acid in length and shares approximately 58% sequence identity with a putative peptidase of several bacterial species. eta21 was subcloned into Escherichia coli, and recombinant Eta21 was purified as a histidine-tagged protein. When used as a subunit vaccine, purified recombinant Eta21 was effective against lethal E. tarda challenge in a Japanese flounder model. In order to improve the immunoprotective efficacy of Eta21, the chimera AgaV-Eta21 was constructed, which consists of Eta21 fused in-frame to the secretion domain of AgaV, an extracellular beta-agarase. E. coli DH5alpha harboring plasmid pTAET21, which constitutively expresses agaV-eta21, was able to produce and secret AgaV-Eta21 into the extracellular milieu. Vaccination of Japanese flounder with live DH5alpha/pTAET21 elicited immunoprotection that is significantly higher in level than that induced by vaccination with purified recombinant Eta21. Vaccination with DH5alpha/pTAET21 and recombinant Eta21 both induced the production of specific serum antibodies at four to eight weeks post-vaccination. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Eta21, especially that delivered by DH5alpha/pTAET21, is an effective vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:19706328

  4. Analysis of the antibacterial effect of an Edwardsiella tarda LuxS inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boguang; Zhang, Min

    2016-01-01

    LuxS/AI-2 quorum sensing is involved in the virulence of many bacterial pathogens, including the fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda. In a previous study, we identified a small peptide, 5906, which inhibits E. tarda LuxS activity by binding specifically to LuxS in a manner that probably prevents the formation of functional LuxS homodimer. In the present study, using Japanese flounder as the experimental animal, we analyzed the antibacterial effect of 5906 produced by DH5α/p5906 (an Escherichia coli strain that produces 5906) and pID5906 (a mammalian plasmid that functional in flounder constitutively expresses 5906) against different bacterial fish pathogens. We found that fish administered with both DH5α/p5906 and pID5906 exhibited reduced bacterial recovery following E. tarda challenge. We also examined the effect of 5906 on the infection caused by another two fish pathogen, Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi. The results indicated that 5906 produced by DH5α/p5906 inhibited the AI-2 activity of A. hydrophila and V. harveyi, and that fish administered with DH5α/p5906 showed enhanced resistance against challenges with both bacteria. These results suggest that 5906 or its analogues/derivatives may be exploited for the development of broad-spectrum antibacterial agents applied in the prevention and control of fish bacterial diseases. PMID:26848432

  5. Edwardsiella Septicaemias

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Edwardsiella includes two species of bacteria that cause major diseases in fish: Edwardsiella tarda (1965) infects fish and other animals and Edwardsiella ictaluri (Hawke 1979; Hawke et al. 1981) infects primarily fish. A third species, Edwardsiella hoshinae (Grimont et al. 1980), infects ...

  6. Genome Sequence of the Versatile Fish Pathogen Edwardsiella tarda Provides Insights into its Adaptation to Broad Host Ranges and Intracellular Niches

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfan; Wu, Haizhen; Wang, Xin; Lv, Yuanzhi; Xu, Lili; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Shengyue; Zhao, Guoping; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2009-01-01

    Background Edwardsiella tarda is the etiologic agent of edwardsiellosis, a devastating fish disease prevailing in worldwide aquaculture industries. Here we describe the complete genome of E. tarda, EIB202, a highly virulent and multi-drug resistant isolate in China. Methodology/Principal Findings E. tarda EIB202 possesses a single chromosome of 3,760,463 base pairs containing 3,486 predicted protein coding sequences, 8 ribosomal rRNA operons, and 95 tRNA genes, and a 43,703 bp conjugative plasmid harboring multi-drug resistant determinants and encoding type IV A secretion system components. We identified a full spectrum of genetic properties related to its genome plasticity such as repeated sequences, insertion sequences, phage-like proteins, integrases, recombinases and genomic islands. In addition, analysis also indicated that a substantial proportion of the E. tarda genome might be devoted to the growth and survival under diverse conditions including intracellular niches, with a large number of aerobic or anaerobic respiration-associated proteins, signal transduction proteins as well as proteins involved in various stress adaptations. A pool of genes for secretion systems, pili formation, nonfimbrial adhesions, invasions and hemagglutinins, chondroitinases, hemolysins, iron scavenging systems as well as the incomplete flagellar biogenesis might feature its surface structures and pathogenesis in a fish body. Conclusion/Significance Genomic analysis of the bacterium offered insights into the phylogeny, metabolism, drug-resistance, stress adaptation, and virulence characteristics of this versatile pathogen, which constitutes an important first step in understanding the pathogenesis of E. tarda to facilitate construction of a practical effective vaccine used for combating fish edwardsiellosis. PMID:19865481

  7. A multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Tenacibaculum maritimum and Edwardsiella tarda in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nuria; Toranzo, Alicia E; Magariños, Beatriz

    2014-06-01

    A specific and sensitive multiplex PCR (mPCR) method was developed as a useful tool for the simultaneous detection of two important flatfish pathogens in marine aquaculture, Tenacibaculum maritimum and Edwardsiella tarda. In fish tissues, the average detection limit for these mPCR-amplified organisms was 2 × 10 ⁵ ± 0.2 CFU/g and 4 × 10 ⁵ ± 0.3 CFU/g, respectively. These values are similar or even lower than those previously obtained using the corresponding single PCR. Moreover, mPCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against 36 taxonomically related and unrelated strains belonging to 33 different bacterial species. Large amounts of DNA from one of the target bacterial species in the presence of low amounts from the other did not have a significant effect on the amplification sensitivity of the latter. PMID:26418855

  8. Intracellular translocation and localization of Edwardsiella tarda type III secretion system effector EseG in host cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shan; Zhang, Lingzhi; Lou, Ying; Yang, Dahai; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, an important fish pathogenic bacterium, could utilize type III secretion system (T3SS) to transfer multiple effector proteins into host cells during infection. EseG was identified to be an E. tarda T3SS effector, which could be injected by T3SS into non-phagocytic cells. Since E. tarda is a facultative intracellular pathogen that resides and replicates in macrophage, it is interesting to expand our knowledge about EseG translocation and localization within phagocytic cells. Here utilizing murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 as the cell model, we demonstrated that EseG could be transported into J774A.1 via T3SS only after E. tarda was internalized into macrophage cells, indicating that extracellular E. tarda could not inject EseG into host cells. Subcellular fractionation analysis gave the evidence that EseG was specifically localized in the membrane fraction of infected host cells. Furthermore, immunofluorescence detection indicated that EseG specifically targeted the E. tarda-containing vacuoles (ECVs) within macrophage cells. Finally the unique features for EseG were also confirmed in non-phagocytic cells. In summarize, this work illuminates internalization-depending translocation and ECV-targeting localization of E. tarda T3SS effector in both non-phagocytic and phagocytic cells, which might be important to interpret the interaction of EseG with host cells upon infection. PMID:27208750

  9. Edwardsiella tarda Endocarditis Confirmed by Indium-111 White Blood Cell Scan: An Unusual Pathogen and Diagnostic Modality

    PubMed Central

    Litton, Kayleigh M.; Rogers, Bret A.

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a freshwater marine member of the family Enterobacteriaceae which often colonizes fish, lizards, snakes, and turtles but is an infrequent human pathogen. Indium-111- (111In-) labeled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy is an imaging modality which has a wide range of reported sensitivity and specificity (from 60 to 100% and from 68 to 92%, resp.) for diagnosing acute and chronic infection. We describe a case of suspected E. tarda prosthetic aortic valve and mitral valve endocarditis with probable vegetations and new mitral regurgitation on transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms which was supported with the use of 111In-labeled WBC scintigraphy. PMID:26885418

  10. Edwardsiella tarda Endocarditis Confirmed by Indium-111 White Blood Cell Scan: An Unusual Pathogen and Diagnostic Modality.

    PubMed

    Litton, Kayleigh M; Rogers, Bret A

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a freshwater marine member of the family Enterobacteriaceae which often colonizes fish, lizards, snakes, and turtles but is an infrequent human pathogen. Indium-111- ((111)In-) labeled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy is an imaging modality which has a wide range of reported sensitivity and specificity (from 60 to 100% and from 68 to 92%, resp.) for diagnosing acute and chronic infection. We describe a case of suspected E. tarda prosthetic aortic valve and mitral valve endocarditis with probable vegetations and new mitral regurgitation on transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms which was supported with the use of (111)In-labeled WBC scintigraphy. PMID:26885418

  11. Comparative proteomic study of Edwardsiella tarda strains with different degrees of virulence.

    PubMed

    Buján, Noemí; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha; Magariños, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is an enteric opportunistic pathogen that causes a great loss in aquaculture. This species has been described as a phenotypical homogeneous group; in contrast, serological studies and molecular typing revealed a wide heterogeneity. In this work, a proteomic study of differential expression of a virulent isolate from turbot cultured in the Norwest of Spain in comparison with an avirulent collection strain was performed in order to recognize proteins involved in virulence. One hundred and three proteins that presented different abundance were successfully identified and classified into 11 functional categories according to their biological processes: amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, tricarboxylic cycle, stress response and protein fate, protein synthesis, biogenesis of cellular components, cell rescue defence and virulence, cell membrane and transport, signal transduction and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Twenty three protein spots detected only in turbot isolate were identified. It was shown that the same proteins appeared in different spots in the two isolates. Mass spectra obtained by MALDITOF/TOF of some of these proteins and DNA sequencing explained the changes as a result of different amino acid sequences. Several proteins related with the virulence of E. tarda (FliC, ArnA or FeSODI) were only detected in the turbot European isolate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: HUPO 2014. PMID:25979771

  12. ORF13 in the Type III secretion system gene cluster of Edwardsiella tarda binds to the mammalian factor Cugbp2.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Jun; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Yasuda, Masashi; Nakai, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Type III secretion system (TTSS) is essential for the intracellular replication of Edwardsiella tarda in phagocytes of fish and mammals, and a hypothetical gene (orf13) located in the TTSS gene cluster is required for intracellular replication and virulence of E. tarda. Here, we show that under TTSS-inducing conditions, the protein ORF13 was secreted into culture supernatant. Then, using a yeast 2-hybrid screen, we show that the mammalian factor Cugbp2, which regulates apoptosis in breast cancer cells, directly interacts with ORF13. A pull-down assay revealed that ORF13 binds to the C-terminal region of Cugbp2. Our results suggest that ORF13 may facilitate E. tarda replication in phagocytes by binding to Cugbp2. PMID:27137075

  13. A developing model for Edwardsiella ictaluri pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, the causative agent of Enteric Septicemia of Catfish (ESC), belongs to a rather short list of bacteria known to survive and replicate in macrophages. Macrophages are ameboid-like cells that engulf and then digest cellular debris and pathogens, including bacteria. The process, ...

  14. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) against Edwardsiellosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuguo; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC), and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1) the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2) rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4-5 weeks after immunization; and (3) the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:27420049

  15. Computer-aided vaccine designing approach against fish pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare using bioinformatics softwares

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Radha; Jeyabaskar, Suganya; Sitharaman, Gayathri; Michael, Rajamani Dinakaran; Paul, Agnal Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare are two important intracellular pathogenic bacteria that cause the infectious diseases edwardsiellosis and columnaris in wild and cultured fish. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding is an important issue in T-cell epitope prediction. In a healthy immune system, the T-cells must recognize epitopes and induce the immune response. In this study, T-cell epitopes were predicted by using in silico immunoinformatics approach with the help of bioinformatics tools that are less expensive and are not time consuming. Such identification of binding interaction between peptides and MHC alleles aids in the discovery of new peptide vaccines. We have reported the potential peptides chosen from the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. tarda and F. columnare, which interact well with MHC class I alleles. OMPs from E. tarda and F. columnare were selected and analyzed based on their antigenic and immunogenic properties. The OMPs of the genes TolC and FCOL_04620, respectively, from E. tarda and F. columnare were taken for study. Finally, two epitopes from the OMP of E. tarda exhibited excellent protein–peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Five epitopes from the OMP of F. columnare had good protein–peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Further in vitro studies can aid in the development of potential peptide vaccines using the predicted peptides. PMID:27284239

  16. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) against Edwardsiellosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuguo; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC), and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1) the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2) rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4–5 weeks after immunization; and (3) the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:27420049

  17. Computer-aided vaccine designing approach against fish pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare using bioinformatics softwares.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Radha; Jeyabaskar, Suganya; Sitharaman, Gayathri; Michael, Rajamani Dinakaran; Paul, Agnal Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare are two important intracellular pathogenic bacteria that cause the infectious diseases edwardsiellosis and columnaris in wild and cultured fish. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding is an important issue in T-cell epitope prediction. In a healthy immune system, the T-cells must recognize epitopes and induce the immune response. In this study, T-cell epitopes were predicted by using in silico immunoinformatics approach with the help of bioinformatics tools that are less expensive and are not time consuming. Such identification of binding interaction between peptides and MHC alleles aids in the discovery of new peptide vaccines. We have reported the potential peptides chosen from the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. tarda and F. columnare, which interact well with MHC class I alleles. OMPs from E. tarda and F. columnare were selected and analyzed based on their antigenic and immunogenic properties. The OMPs of the genes TolC and FCOL_04620, respectively, from E. tarda and F. columnare were taken for study. Finally, two epitopes from the OMP of E. tarda exhibited excellent protein-peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Five epitopes from the OMP of F. columnare had good protein-peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Further in vitro studies can aid in the development of potential peptide vaccines using the predicted peptides. PMID:27284239

  18. Presenting a foreign antigen on live attenuated Edwardsiella tarda using twin-arginine translocation signal peptide as a multivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yamin; Yang, Weizheng; Wang, Qiyao; Qu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2013-12-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system is a major pathway for transmembrane translocation of fully folded proteins. In this study, a multivalent vaccine to present foreign antigens on live attenuated vaccine Edwardsiella tarda WED using screened Tat signal peptide was constructed. Because the Tat system increases the yields of folded antigens in periplasmic space or extracellular milieu, it is expected to contribute to the production of conformational epitope-derived specific antibodies. E. tarda Tat signal peptides fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was constructed under the control of an in vivo inducible dps promoter. The resulting plasmids were electroporated into WED and the subcellular localizations of GFP were analyzed with Western blotting. Eight signal peptides with optimized GFP translocation efficiency were further fused to a protective antigen glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA) from a fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila. Signal peptides of DmsA, NapA, and SufI displayed high efficiency for GapA translocation. The relative percent survival (RPS) of turbot was measured with a co-infection of E. tarda and A. hydrophila, and the strain with DmsA signal peptide showed the maximal protection. This study demonstrated a new platform to construct multivalent vaccines using optimized Tat signal peptide in E. tarda. PMID:23994481

  19. Comparison of static immersion and intravenous injection systems for exposure of zebrafish embryos to the natural pathogen Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The zebrafish embryo is an important in vivo model to study the host innate immune response towards microbial infection. In most zebrafish infectious disease models, infection is achieved by micro-injection of bacteria into the embryo. Alternatively, Edwardsiella tarda, a natural fish pathogen, has been used to treat embryos by static immersion. In this study we used transcriptome profiling and quantitative RT-PCR to analyze the immune response induced by E. tarda immersion and injection. Results Mortality rates after static immersion of embryos in E. tarda suspension varied between 25-75%, while intravenous injection of bacteria resulted in 100% mortality. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis on the level of single embryos showed that expression of the proinflammatory marker genes il1b and mmp9 was induced only in some embryos that were exposed to E. tarda in the immersion system, whereas intravenous injection of E. tarda led to il1b and mmp9 induction in all embryos. In addition, microarray expression profiles of embryos subjected to immersion or injection showed little overlap. E. tarda-injected embryos displayed strong induction of inflammatory and defense genes and of regulatory genes of the immune response. E. tarda-immersed embryos showed transient induction of the cytochrome P450 gene cyp1a. This gene was also induced after immersion in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa suspensions, but, in contrast, was not induced upon intravenous E. tarda injection. One of the rare common responses in the immersion and injection systems was induction of irg1l, a homolog of a murine immunoresponsive gene of unknown function. Conclusions Based on the differences in mortality rates between experiments and gene expression profiles of individual embryos we conclude that zebrafish embryos cannot be reproducibly infected by exposure to E. tarda in the immersion system. Induction of il1b and mmp9 was consistently observed in embryos that had been systemically

  20. Frequent isolation of Edwardsiella tarda and Pleisiomonas shigelloides from healthy Zairese freshwater fish: a possible source of sporadic diarrhea in the tropics.

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, L R; Vandepitte, J

    1980-01-01

    The intestinal contents of 59 Zairese freshwater fish were examined for the presence of potential human enteric pathogens. Edwardsiella tarda and Plesiomonas shigelloides were isolated from 57 and 59% of them, respectively. For both microorganisms there was a significant difference between the isolation rates from lake and river fish: whereas E. tarda was much more frequently isolated from lake fish than was P. shigelloides, the reverse was observed for river fish. The authors hypothesize that sporadic cases of tropical diarrhea with E. tarda or P. shigelloides can be traced to contact with or consumption of freshwater fish. PMID:7387150

  1. Vaccine efficacy of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Edwardsiella ictaluri against E. tarda in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Trung Cao, Thanh; Tsai, Ming-An; Yang, Chung-Da; Wang, Pei-Chyi; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Gabriel Chen, Hsu-Chung; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), derived from the outer-membrane protein (OMP) fraction, has been used as a potential candidate for vaccine development. The gene-encoding 37 kDa GAPDH outer membrane protein (OMP) from Edwardsiella ictaluri was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting, and nucleotide and amino acid sequencing were used to analyze the expressed antigenic protein and gene encoding this protein. Comparative DNA and protein sequence analysis of GAPDH from E. ictaluri GAPDHs from several Gram-negative bacterial species within the Enterobacteriaceae family revealed that the GAPDHs within this group are highly conserved and share a sequence similarity of 75-100% with E. ictaluri GDPDH. Rabbit antiserum raised against the E. ictaluri recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH) protein recognized purified GADPH, indicating that it has a strong immunogenicity. Tilapia fish were intraperitoneally immunized with formalin-killed E. ictaluri whole cells, and rGAPDH (30 μg fish(-1)) from E. ictaluri, both of which were emulsified in ISA 763A adjuvant. At 3 months after immunization, fish were challenged with the E. tarda strain to assess vaccine efficacy; the relative percent survival (RPS) values were found to exceed 71.4%. The specific mean antibody titer log2 level of groups vaccinated with rGAPDH at 3 months was significantly higher than that of non-vaccinated fish (control group). Therefore, this recombinant protein can be considered a multi-purpose candidate vaccine against several pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25742975

  2. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P <0.001). Therefore, 106 individuals were genotyped using all the SSR markers in LG1 by single marker analysis. Two different analytical models were then employed to detect SSR markers with different levels of significance in LG1, where 17 and 18 SSR markers were identified, respectively. Each model found three resistance-related QTLs by composite interval mapping (CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  3. In vitro quenching of fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda AHL production using marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20J cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Romero, Manuel; Muras, Andrea; Mayer, Celia; Buján, Noemí; Magariños, Beatriz; Otero, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Quorum quenching (QQ) has become an interesting alternative for solving the problem of bacterial antibiotic resistance, especially in the aquaculture industry, since many species of fish-pathogenic bacteria control their virulence factors through quorum sensing (QS) systems mediated by N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). In a screening for bacterial strains with QQ activity in different marine environments, Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20J was identified and selected for its high degradation activity against a wide range of AHLs. In this study, the QQ activity of live cells and crude cell extracts (CCEs) of strain 20J was characterized and the possibilities of the use of CCEs of this strain to quench the production of AHLs in cultures of the fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda ACC35.1 was explored. E. tarda ACC35.1 produces N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OC6-HSL). This differs from profiles registered for other E. tarda strains and indicates an important intra-specific variability in AHL production in this species. The CCEs of strain 20J presented a wide-spectrum QQ activity and, unlike Bacillus thuringiensis serovar Berliner ATCC10792 CCEs, were effective in eliminating the AHLs produced in E. tarda ACC35.1 cultures. The fast and wide-spectrum AHL-degradation activity shown by this member of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes group consolidates this strain as a promising candidate for the control of AHL-based QS pathogens, especially in the marine fish farming industry. PMID:24695235

  4. An invasive and low virulent Edwardsiella tarda esrB mutant promising as live attenuated vaccine in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizheng; Wang, Lixia; Zhang, Lingzhi; Qu, Jiangbo; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a leading fish pathogen haunting worldwide aquaculture industry. In E. tarda, two-component system EsrA-EsrB positively regulates type III and VI secretion systems (T3SS and T6SS) and negatively regulates hemolysin EthA, which has been demonstrated to be essential for the invasion processes in fish. In order to develop a live attenuated vaccine (LAV) with high invasiveness to be practically and economically used as immersion-administered vaccine in aquaculture, here, we generated a random mutation library of esrB sequences by error-prone PCR and introduced them into the E. tarda esrB deletion mutant. The mutant YWZ47 with significantly increased hemolytic activity and low T3SS and T6SS secretion was screened. Phenotypes including extracellular protein profiles, invasion in macrophages, lethality toward fish, and infection kinetics were investigated in the wild-type strain EIB202 and the mutants ΔesrB, ΔT3SS, ΔT6SS, ΔT3SS/ΔT6SS, and YWZ47. Compared to the documented LAV strain ΔesrB, YWZ47 showed higher invasive capability and low in vivo virulence toward fish. Significantly higher relative percent survival (RPS) could be generated in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) against the challenge of the wild-type EIB202 when inoculated through immersion route, and the RPS was comparable with that of ΔesrB through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection inoculation. Two mutated points, K167M and H197L, were found by sequence analysis of EsrBYWZ47 variant. These structural modifications underpin the variations in the regulatory functions of the mutant and wild-type EsrB. This study promoted understanding of virulence regulation by EsrB in E. tarda and presented a promising candidate of invasive attenuated vaccine used in aquaculture industries. PMID:25431010

  5. Type III Secretion System Translocon Component EseB Forms Filaments on and Mediates Autoaggregation of and Biofilm Formation by Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Lu, Jin Fang; Liu, Lu Yi; Xiao, Tiao Yi; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda plays an important role in infection by translocating effector proteins into host cells. EseB, a component required for effector translocation, is reported to mediate autoaggregation of E. tarda. In this study, we demonstrate that EseB forms filamentous appendages on the surface of E. tarda and is required for biofilm formation by E. tarda in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). Biofilm formation by E. tarda in DMEM does not require FlhB, an essential component for assembling flagella. Dynamic analysis of EseB filament formation, autoaggregation, and biofilm formation shows that the formation of EseB filaments occurs prior to autoaggregation and biofilm formation. The addition of an EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures before bacterial autoaggregation prevents autoaggregation and biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of the EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures in which biofilm is already formed does not destroy the biofilm. Therefore, EseB filament-mediated bacterial cell-cell interaction is a prerequisite for autoaggregation and biofilm formation. PMID:26116669

  6. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella isolates from fish in the eastern United States identifies two distinct genetic taxa amongst organisms phenotypically classified as E. tarda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Matt J.; Quiniou, Sylvie M.; Cody, Theresa; Tabuchi, Maki; Ware, Cynthia; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Mauel, Michael J.; Soto, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, has been implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United States. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) using 4 different primer sets (ERIC I & II, ERIC II, BOX, and GTG5) and multi-locus sequence analysis of 16S SSU rDNA, groEl, gyrA, gyrB, pho, pgi, pgm, and rpoA gene fragments identified two distinct genotypes of E. tarda (DNA group I; DNA group II). Isolates that fell into DNA group II demonstrated more similarity to E. ictaluri than DNA group I, which contained the reference E. tarda strain (ATCC #15947). Conventional PCR analysis using published E. tarda-specific primer sets yielded variable results, with several primer sets producing no observable amplification of target DNA from some isolates. Fluorometric determination of G + C content demonstrated 56.4% G + C content for DNA group I, 60.2% for DNA group II, and 58.4% for E. ictaluri. Surprisingly, these isolates were indistinguishable using conventional biochemical techniques, with all isolates demonstrating phenotypic characteristics consistent with E. tarda. Analysis using two commercial test kits identified multiple phenotypes, although no single metabolic characteristic could reliably discriminate between genetic groups. Additionally, anti-microbial susceptibility and fatty acid profiles did not demonstrate remarkable differences between groups. The significant genetic variation (<90% similarity at gyrA, gyrB, pho, phi and pgm; <40% similarity by rep-PCR) between these groups suggests organisms from DNA group II may represent an unrecognized, genetically distinct taxa of Edwardsiella that is phenotypically indistinguishable from E. tarda.

  7. Identification of the interactome between fish plasma proteins and Edwardsiella tarda reveals tissue-specific strategies against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Huang, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Zaohai; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Peng, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the complex pathogen-host interaction is essential for a comprehensive understanding of how these remarkable agents invade their hosts and how the hosts defend against these invaders. During the infection, pathogens interact intensively with host to enable their survival, which can be revealed through their interactome. Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing huge economic loss in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. E. tarda is an ideal model for host-pathogen investigation as it infects fish in three distinct steps: entering the host, circulating through the blood and establishing infection. We adopted a previous established proteomic approach that inactivated E. tarda cells and covalent crosslink fish plasma proteins were used to capture plasma proteins and bacterial outer membrane proteins, respectively. By the combinatorial use of proteomic and biochemical approaches, six plasma proteins and seven outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were identified. Interactions among these proteins were validated with protein-array, far-Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation. At last, seventeen plasma protein-bacteria protein-protein interaction were confirmed to be involved in the interaction network, forming a complex interactome. Compared to our previous results, different host proteins were detected, whereas some of the bacterial proteins were similar, which indicates that hosts adopt tissue-specific strategies to cope with the same pathogen during infection. Thus, our results provide a robust demonstration of both bacterial initiators and host receptors or interacting proteins to further explore infection and anti-infective mechanisms between hosts and microbes. PMID:27458055

  8. EseE of Edwardsiella tarda Augments Secretion of Translocon Protein EseC and Expression of the escC-eseE Operon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jia; Xiao, Shui Bing; Zeng, Zhi Xiong; Lu, Jin Fang; Liu, Lu Yi; Laghari, Zubair Ahmed; Nie, Pin; Yu, Hong Bing; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-08-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is an important Gram-negative pathogen that employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effectors into host cells to facilitate bacterial survival and replication. These effectors are translocated into host cells through a translocon complex composed of three secreted proteins, namely, EseB, EseC, and EseD. The secretion of EseB and EseD requires a chaperone protein called EscC, whereas the secretion of EseC requires the chaperone EscA. In this study, we identified a novel protein (EseE) that also regulates the secretion of EseC. An eseE deletion mutant secreted much less EseC into supernatants, accompanied by increased EseC levels within bacterial cells. We also demonstrated that EseE interacted directly with EseC in a pulldown assay. Interestingly, EseC, EseE, and EscA were able to form a ternary complex, as revealed by pulldown and gel filtration assays. Of particular importance, the deletion of eseE resulted in decreased levels of EseB and EseD proteins in both the bacterial pellet and supernatant fraction. Furthermore, real-time PCR assays showed that EseE positively regulated the transcription of the translocon operon escC-eseE, comprising escC, eseB, escA, eseC, eseD, and eseE These effects of EseE on the translocon components/operon appeared to have a functional consequence, since the ΔeseE strain was outcompeted by wild-type E. tarda in a mixed infection in blue gourami fish. Collectively, our results demonstrate that EseE not only functions as a chaperone for EseC but also acts as a positive regulator controlling the expression of the translocon operon escC-eseE, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of E. tarda in fish. PMID:27271743

  9. Immune response of flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was associated with the concentration of inactivated Edwardsiella tarda and immersion time.

    PubMed

    Du, Yang; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2015-09-15

    In the optimization of immersion strategy, vaccine concentration and immersion time are two key factors needed to be considered, which largely determined the immune efficacy. In this work, the healthy flounder were vaccinated in formalin-killed Edwardsiella tarda at four concentrations (10(6), 10(7), 10(8), 10(9) CFU ml(-1)) for three immersion times (30, 60, 90 min), respectively. At the 6th week post vaccination, the flounders were challenged with live E. tarda, and the relative percent survival (RPS) of flounder in 10(9)-30, 10(8)-60, 10(8)-90 and 10(7)-90 min groups were 70%, 78%, 74% and 65%, respectively, which were much higher than the other vaccination groups. Meanwhile, the sIg(+) cells in the leucocytes of peripheral blood (PBL), spleen (SL), head kidney (HKL) were monitored by flow cytometry, and the specific sera and mucosal antibodies were measured by indirect ELISA for 6 weeks. The results showed that the proportions of sIg(+) cells in PBL, SL and HKL of vaccinated fish were significantly higher than the untreated fish since the 2nd week (P<0.05), and the fish in 10(9)-30, 10(8)-60, 10(8)-90 and 10(7)-90 min groups exhibited stronger responses than other groups, especially the 10(8)-60 min group displayed the strongest response, which reached the peaks (54.63% in PBL, 37.21% in SL, 36.51% in HKL) at the 5th week. ELISA assay showed that the kinetics of specific antibodies in sera were similar to the variation of sIg(+) cells, and the higher antibody levels were also detected in the four groups with higher RPS and stronger sIg+ response, whereas the mucosal antibody showed a faster response, which were significantly higher than the control since the 1st week (P>0.05). These results demonstrated that the higher RPS was closely associated with stronger immune response, and immersion with formalin-inactivated E. tarda under 10(8) CFU ml(-1) for 60 min induced the highest immune response of flounder against E. tarda bacterin, which might be applied for the

  10. TolC plays a crucial role in immune protection conferred by Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines developed from live organisms have better efficacy than those developed from dead organisms, the mechanisms underlying this differential efficacy remain unexplored. In this study, we combined sub-immunoproteomics with immune challenge to investigate the action of the outer membrane proteome in the immune protection conferred by four Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines prepared via different treatments and to identify protective immunogens that play a key role in this immune protection. Thirteen spots representing five outer membrane proteins and one cytoplasmic protein were identified, and it was found that their abundance was altered in relation with the immune protective abilities of the four vaccines. Among these proteins, TolC and OmpA were found to be the key immunogens conferring the first and second highest degrees of protection, respectively. TolC was detected in the two effective vaccines (live and inactivated-30-F). The total antiserum and anti-OmpA titers were higher for the two effective vaccines than for the two ineffective vaccines (inactivated-80-F and inactivated-100). Further evidence demonstrated that the live and inactivated-30-F vaccines demonstrated stronger abilities to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell differentiation than the other two evaluated vaccines. Our results indicate that the outer membrane proteome changes dramatically following different treatments, which contributes to the effectiveness of whole-cell vaccines. PMID:27406266

  11. TolC plays a crucial role in immune protection conferred by Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines developed from live organisms have better efficacy than those developed from dead organisms, the mechanisms underlying this differential efficacy remain unexplored. In this study, we combined sub-immunoproteomics with immune challenge to investigate the action of the outer membrane proteome in the immune protection conferred by four Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines prepared via different treatments and to identify protective immunogens that play a key role in this immune protection. Thirteen spots representing five outer membrane proteins and one cytoplasmic protein were identified, and it was found that their abundance was altered in relation with the immune protective abilities of the four vaccines. Among these proteins, TolC and OmpA were found to be the key immunogens conferring the first and second highest degrees of protection, respectively. TolC was detected in the two effective vaccines (live and inactivated-30-F). The total antiserum and anti-OmpA titers were higher for the two effective vaccines than for the two ineffective vaccines (inactivated-80-F and inactivated-100). Further evidence demonstrated that the live and inactivated-30-F vaccines demonstrated stronger abilities to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell differentiation than the other two evaluated vaccines. Our results indicate that the outer membrane proteome changes dramatically following different treatments, which contributes to the effectiveness of whole-cell vaccines. PMID:27406266

  12. A prebiotic role of Ecklonia cava improves the mortality of Edwardsiella tarda-infected zebrafish models via regulating the growth of lactic acid bacteria and pathogen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, WonWoo; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Kil-Nam; Ahn, Ginnae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the beneficial prebiotic roles of Ecklonia cava (E. cava, EC) were evaluated on the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and pathogen bacteria and the mortality of pathogen-bacteria infected zebrafish model. The result showed that the original E. cava (EC) led to the highest growth effects on three LABs (Lactobacillus brevis, L. brevis; Lactobacillus pentosus, L. pentosus; Lactobacillus plantarum; L. plantarum) and it was dose-dependent manners. Also, EC, its Celluclast enzymatic (ECC) and 100% ethanol extracts (ECE) showed the anti-bacterial activities on the fish pathogenic bacteria such as (Edwardsiella tarda; E. tarda, Streptococcus iniae; S. iniae, and Vibrio harveyi; V. harveyi). Interestingly, EC induced the higher production of the secondary metabolites from L. plantarum in MRS medium. The secondary metabolites produced by EC significantly inhibited the growth of pathogen bacteria. In further in vivo study, the co-treatment of EC and L. plantarum improved the growth and mortality of E. tarda-infected zebrafish as regulating the expression of inflammatory molecules such as iNOS and COX2. Taken together, our present study suggests that the EC plays an important role as a potential prebiotic and has a protective effect against the infection caused by E. tarda injection in zebrafish. Also, our conclusion from this evidence is that EC can be used and applied as a useful prebiotic. PMID:27192145

  13. Starvation beneficially influences the liver physiology and nutrient metabolism in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream (Pagrus major).

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sipra; Chakraborty, Tapas; Shimizu, Sonoko; Urasaki, Shintaro; Matsubara, Takahiro; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Ohta, Kohei

    2015-11-01

    Dietary compromises, especially food restrictions, possess species-specific effects on the health status and infection control in several organisms, including fish. To understand the starvation-mediated physiological responses in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream, especially in the liver, we performed a 20-day starvation experiment using 4 treatment (2 fed and 2 starved) groups, namely, fed-placebo, starved-placebo, fed-infected, and starved-infected, wherein bacterial exposure was done on the 11th day. In the present study, the starved groups showed reduced hepatosomatic index and drastic depletion in glycogen storage and vacuole formation. The fed-infected fish showed significant (P<0.05) increase in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in relation to its starved equivalent. Significant (P<0.05) alteration in glucose and energy metabolism, as evident from hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, was recorded in the starved groups. Interestingly, coinciding with the liver histology, PPAR (peroxisome proliferator activated receptors) α transcription followed a time-dependent activation in starved groups while PPARγ exhibited an opposite pattern. The transcription of hepcidin 1 and transferrin, initially increased in 0dai (days after infection) starved fish but reduced significantly (P<0.05) at later stages. Two-color immunohistochemistry and subsequent cell counting showed significant increase in P63-positive cells at 0dai and 5dai but later reduced slightly at 10dai. Similar results were also obtained in the lysosomal (cathepsin D) and non-lysosomal (ubiquitin) gene transcription level. All together, our data suggest that starvation exerts multidirectional responses, which allows for better physiological adaptations during any infectious period, in red sea bream. PMID:26188170

  14. Immune responses of flounder Paralichthys olivaceus vaccinated by immersion of formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying-Li; Tang, Xiao-Qian; Sheng, Xiu-Zhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wen-Bin

    2015-10-16

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hyperosmotic immersion (HI) vaccination and determine the optimum hyperosmotic salinity for flounder Paralichthys olivaceus by investigating its immune responses following vaccination. Flounder were immersed in 1 of 3 hyperosmotic solutions at 50, 60 and 70‰ salinity, then transferred into 30‰ salinity normal seawater containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for vaccination (3 HI groups), or were immersed in normal seawater as direct immersion (DI group). The results showed that the percentages of surface membrane immunoglobulin-positive (sIg+) cells in peripheral blood leukocytes and spleen leukocytes induced by HI were significantly higher than that with DI (p < 0.05), and the 50‰ salinity group showed the strongest response among the HI groups, which reached peaks at Week 4. ELISA assay showed that the specific serum antibodies gradually increased after vaccination and reached peak at Day 32, and the fish treated with HI showed stronger antibody responses; among the HI groups, a significantly higher specific antibody level was detected in the 50‰ salinity group at Day 32 (p < 0.05). Similarly, the fish treated with HI showed higher specific mucosal antibody levels compared to the DI group, and the mucosal antibody showed a faster response, with peak time arriving 1 wk earlier than for the serum antibody. The relative percent survival (RPS) of flounder treated with HI at 50, 60 and 70‰ salinities were 79, 71 and 57% respectively, while this was 43% in the DI group. These results demonstrated that HI, especially the 50‰ salinity, could efficiently enhance the immune response of flounder and show higher RPS. This has significant value for immunological prevention of edwardsiellosis in flounder. PMID:26480914

  15. Immunomodulation of Lactobacillus pentosus PL11 against Edwardsiella tarda infection in the head kidney cells of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica).

    PubMed

    Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Lee, Joong-Su; Lee, Seung-Jin; Choi, Su-Hee; Hossain, Md Akil; Park, Ji-Yong; Kim, Jong-Choon; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Wild and farm-raised fish can be simultaneously exposed to different types of pathogens in their habitats. Hence, it is important to study their effects, whether isolated or in combination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus pentosus PL11 on the transcription of specific cytokine genes related to immune response, using Japanese eel macrophages as an in vitro model. Head kidney leukocytes were isolated from Japanese eels and cell viability was determined using an MTT reagent. In addition, the Griess reagent was used to determine the nitric oxide (NO) production while, an enzyme-linked immunosobent assay (ELISA) and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were utilized to quantify the level of proinflammatory cytokines. The results of the study indicated that infection by Edwardsiella tarda alone causes a higher rate of cell death and an increase in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, 822.67 ± 29.48 pg mL(-1)), interleukin-6 (IL-6, 13.57 ± 0.55 pg mL(-1)), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 2033.67 ± 84.68 pg mL(-1)). However, co-culture with L. pentosus PL11 downregulates the production of NO and the related IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α by 46%, 88.4%, 59%, and 77%, respectively. Quantification of the mRNA expression level revealed it to be consistent with the ELISA analysis. Hence, we infer that L. pentosus PL11 plays a significant role in the immunmodulation of the inflammatory responses that arise in fish owing to infection by pathogenic bacteria such as Edwardsiella tarda. PMID:27108377

  16. A cDNA microarray analysis to identify genes involved in the acute-phase response pathway of the olive flounder after infection with Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Young; Hong, Yong-Ki; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Woo-Jin; Ji, Young Joo; An, Cheul Min; Nam, Bo-Hye

    2014-09-15

    The acute-phase response (APR) is an important systemic reaction that occurs within hours of an inflammatory signal caused by physical bodily injury or microbial infection. To investigate the APR of the olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) following infection with a pathogen, we established an expressed sequence tag (EST)-based cDNA microarray chip composed of 13,061 PCR-amplified cDNAs encoding unique genes selected from an olive flounder EST analysis. Microarray analyses showed that the set of genes involved in the APR was strongly up-regulated in the liver of the olive flounder after infection with Edwardsiella tarda. Among the up-regulated genes, catechol-O-methyltransferase domain-containing protein 1, six-transmembrane prostate protein, haptoglobin precursor, and toll-like receptor 5 soluble form were particularly strongly up-regulated. Interestingly, the toll-like receptor 5 soluble form, which has not yet been detected in mammals, was up-regulated as much as 250-fold upon E. tarda infection. These results suggest that the APR mechanism of fish may be regulated differently from that of mammals. The data described here contribute toward our collective understanding of APR, especially in fish. PMID:25063225

  17. Impact of co-deficiency of RpoN and RpoS on stress tolerance, virulence and gene regulation in Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enfu; Ye, Jiang; Song, ShanShan; Wang, Keping; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhang, Huizhan

    2014-07-01

    Edwardsiella tarda the etiological agent for edwardsiellosis, a devastating fish disease prevailing in worldwide aquaculture industries was subjected to a molecular genetic study. To research into the influence when RpoN (σ(54) ) and RpoS (σ(38) ) were deleted simultaneously, the double deletion mutant of RpoN (σ(54) ) and RpoS (σ(38) ), namely rnrs, was constructed. Firstly, RpoN and RpoS are both essential for H2 O2 , starvation, high osmotic pressure and acid resistance, which have synergistic effect. Secondly, virulence of rnrs reduces significantly compared to E. tarda EIB 202 WT, ΔrpoN mutant and ΔrpoS mutant. Furthermore, transcriptional control of rpoS by rpoN in stationary phase was observed through qRT-PCR, while rpoS had no influence on rpoN in the level of transcription. Meanwhile, regulation of flagellar sigma factor σ(F) (FliA) and other flagella-related genes including flgA, flgK, flgL, motA, and motB by rpoS, and rpoN was found. fliA and other flagella-related genes were controlled positively by rpoN, while negatively by rpoS. At last, two differential expression genes in transcriptional level of rnrs strain were detected by DD-RT-PCR, namely cheY and narK. This study therefore indicated interaction between sigma factors RpoN and RpoS, which modulates stress response, virulence, motility, and provides new insights into the regulatory networks of E. tarda. PMID:24633758

  18. Recombinant sialidase NanA (rNanA) cleaves α2-3 linked sialic acid of host cell surface N-linked glycoprotein to promote Edwardsiella tarda infection.

    PubMed

    Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Tabata, Mutsumi; Shinyoshi, Sayaka; Oishi, Kazuki; Araki, Kyosuke; Komatsu, Masaharu; Itakura, Takao; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is one of the major pathogenic bacteria affecting both marine and freshwater fish species. Sialidase NanA expressed endogenously in E. tarda is glycosidase removing sialic acids from glycoconjugates. Recently, the relationship of NanA sialidase activity to E. tarda infection has been reported, however, the mechanism with which sialidase NanA aids the pathogenicity of E. tarda remained unclear. Here, we comprehensively determined the biochemical properties of NanA towards various substrates in vitro to provide novel insights on the potential NanA target molecule at the host cell. GAKS cell pretreated with recombinant NanA showed increased susceptibility to E. tarda infection. Moreover, sialidase inhibitor treated E. tarda showed a significantly reduced ability to infect GAKS cells. These results indicate that NanA-induced desialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates is essential for the initial step of E. tarda infection. Among the natural substrates, NanA exhibited the highest activity towards 3-sialyllactose, α2-3 linked sialic acid carrying sialoglycoconjugates. Supporting this finding, intact GAKS cell membrane exposed to recombinant NanA showed changes of glycoconjugates only in α2-3 sialo-linked glycoproteins, but not in glycolipids and α2-6 sialo-linked glycoproteins. Lectin staining of cell surface glycoprotein provided further evidence that α2-3 sialo-linkage of the N-linked glycoproteins was the most plausible target of NanA sialidase. To confirm the significance of α2-3 sialo-linkage desialylation for E. tarda infection, HeLa cells which possessed lower amount of α2-3 sialo-linkage glycoprotein were used for infection experiment along with GAKS cells. As a result, infection of HeLa cells by E. tarda was significantly reduced when compared to GAKS cells. Furthermore, E. tarda infection was significantly inhibited by mannose pretreatment suggesting that the bacterium potentially recognizes and binds to mannose or mannose containing

  19. Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia. A rare but fatal water- and foodborne infection: Review of the literature and clinical cases from a single centre

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Yuji; Asahata-Tago, Sayaka; Ainoda, Yusuke; Fujita, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia (ETB) can be a fatal disease in humans. OBJECTIVES: To determine the significant risk factors associated with death caused by ETB, and to examine the geographical, seasonal, environmental and dietary factors of the disease. METHODS: A retrospective, observational, case control study was performed. The PubMed MEDLINE and Japanese Medical Abstract Society (www.jamas.or.jp) databases were searched for ETB case reports and meeting abstracts. In additon, retrospective chart reviews of patients with ETB at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) were conducted to evaluate the risk factors associated with death using multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 46 publications, comprising 72 cases from the English (n=30), French (n=1), Spanish (n=1) and Japanese (n=14) literature. Five cases at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital were also included. Of the included 77 cases, the mean age was 61 years and 39% of patients were female; 77.2% of the cases occurred between June and November, and 45.5% were reported in Japan. Dietary factors (raw fish/meat exposure) were reported for 10.4% of patients and 12.9% reported environmental (ie, brackish water) exposure. The overall mortality rate was 44.6%; however, this rate increased to 61.1% for ETB patients with soft tissue infections. Liver cirrhosis was determined to be an independent risk factor associated with death (OR 12.0 [95% CI 2.46 to 58.6]; P=0.00213) using multivariate analyses. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, the present analysis was the first and largest multi-language review of ETB. Clinical characteristics of ETB resemble those of Aeromonas, typhoid fever and Vibrio vulnificus infections, in addition to sharing similar risk factors. CONCLUSION: ETB should be categorized as a severe food- and waterborne infection, which results in high mortality for patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:26744588

  20. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P < 0.05), and the highest amount of antigen was detected in flounders immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P < 0.05) compared with the spleen, kidney and liver. Antigen uptake in the gill and skin both peaked at 30 min post immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P < 0.05), and then quickly declined. In contrast, antigen uptake in the spleen, kidney and liver gradually increased 3 h post immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P < 0.05). In the mucosal-associated tissues, the expression of MHC Iα and CD8α genes peaked at 24 hpi, while the expression of MHC IIα and CD4-1 genes showed up-regulation in the gill and skin

  1. Pathogenic properties of Edwardsiella species.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J M; Abbott, S L; Kroske-Bystrom, S; Cheung, W K; Powers, C; Kokka, R P; Tamura, K

    1991-01-01

    The pathogenic characteristics of 35 Edwardsiella strains from clinical and environmental sources were investigated. Overall, most Edwardsiella tarda strains were invasive in HEp-2 cell monolayers, produced a cell-associated hemolysin and siderophores, and bound Congo red; many strains also expressed mannose-resistant hemagglutination against guinea pig erythrocytes. Edwardsiella hoshinae strains bound Congo red and were variable in their invasive and hemolytic capabilities while Edwardsiella ictaluri strains did not produce either factor; neither E. hoshinae nor E. ictaluri expressed mannose-resistant hemagglutination nor elaborated siderophores under the tested conditions. Selected strains of each species tested for mouse lethality indicated strain variability in pathogenic potential, with E. tarda strains being the most virulent; 50% lethal doses in individual strains did not correlate with plasmid content, chemotactic motility, serum resistance, or expression of selected enzyme activities. The results suggest some potential important differences in pathogenic properties that may help explain their environmental distribution and ability to cause disease in humans. Images PMID:1774326

  2. Phylogenomics characterization of a highly virulent Edwardsiella strain ET080813(T) encoding two distinct T3SS and three T6SS gene clusters: Propose a novel species as Edwardsiella anguillarum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shuai; Lai, Qiliang; Liu, Qin; Wu, Haizhen; Xiao, Jingfan; Shao, Zongze; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-02-01

    As important zoonotic organisms causing infections in humans, Edwardsiella bacteria are also notorious leading fish pathogens haunting worldwide aquaculture industries. However, the taxa are now widely recognized to be misclassified, which hurdled the understanding of the epidemiology and development of effective diagnostics and vaccines. Currently the genus Edwardsiella consists of three species Edwardsiella tarda, E. ictaluri, and E. hoshinae. Previous phylogenomic analysis revealed that E. tarda strains display two major highly divergent genomic types (genotypes), EdwGI and EdwGII, and the former represents a genotype of fish-pathogenic isolates and being recently proposed as a novel species E. piscicida, sp. nov. Here multiple phylogenetic analyses and the genome-level comparisons of EdwGI strains disclose that the phylogroup strains from diseased eel formed an obviously distinct cluster that could be equated with a new species status. The phylogenetic evidence for the new species assignment was also supported by corresponding DNA-DNA hybridization estimation values and by phenotypic characteristics. Interestingly, further comparative genomics reveals that these strains have acquired the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes and as a result these bacteria contain at least 2 sets of distinct T3SS and 3 sets of T6SS gene clusters, respectively. It is therefore proposed that the phylogroup strains from diseased eel should be classified as Edwardisella anguillarum sp. nov., and the type strain is ET080813(T) (=DSM27202(T)=CCUG 64215(T)=CCTCC AB2013118(T)=MCCC 1K00238(T)). These findings will contribute to development of species-specific control measures against Edwardsiella bacterium in aquatic animals, while also shedding light on the pathogenesis evolution in Edwardsiella bacterium. PMID:25466920

  3. Identification and characterization of an intervening sequence within the 23S ribosomal RNA genes of Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of the 23S rRNA gene sequences of Edwardsiella tarda and Edwardsiella ictaluri confirmed a close phylogenetic relationship between these two fish pathogen species and a distant relation with the 'core' members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Analysis of the rrl gene for 23S rRNA in E. i...

  4. Fur-Regulated Iron Uptake System of Edwardsiella ictaluri and Its Influence on Pathogenesis and Immunogenicity in the Catfish Host

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Greg; Wanda, Soo-Young; Curtiss, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The ability of bacterial pathogens to take up iron from the host during infection is necessary for their multiplication within the host. However, host high-affinity iron binding proteins limit levels of free iron in fluids and tissues. To overcome this deficiency of iron during infection, bacterial pathogens have developed iron uptake systems that are upregulated in the absence of iron, typically tightly controlled by the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein. The iron uptake system of Edwardsiella ictaluri, a host-restricted pathogen of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and the main pathogen of this fish in aquaculture, is unknown. Here we describe the E. ictaluri Fur protein, the iron uptake machinery controlled by Fur, and the effects of fur gene deletion on virulence and immunogenicity in the fish host. Analysis of the E. ictaluri Fur protein shows that it lacks the N-terminal region found in the majority of pathogen-encoded Fur proteins. However, it is fully functional in regulated genes encoding iron uptake proteins. E. ictaluri grown under iron-limited conditions upregulates an outer membrane protein (HemR) that shows heme-hemoglobin transport activity and is tightly regulated by Fur. In vivo studies showed that an E. ictaluri Δfur mutant is attenuated and immune protective in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), triggering systemic immunity. We conclude that an E. ictaluri Δfur mutant could be an effective component of an immersion-oral vaccine for the catfish industry. PMID:22615248

  5. Acquired Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Andrew; Danby, C. W. E.; Petermann, H.

    1965-01-01

    Currently, the porphyrias are classified in four main groups: congenital porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda hereditaria, and porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica. The acquired form of porphyria (porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica) occurs in older males and is nearly always associated with chronic alcoholism and hepatic cirrhosis. The main clinical changes are dermatological, with excessive skin fragility and photosensitivity resulting in erosions and bullae. Biochemically, high levels of uroporphyrin are found in the urine and stools. Treatment to date has been symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. A case of porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica is presented showing dramatic improvement of both the skin lesions and porphyrin levels in urine and blood following repeated phlebotomy. Possible mechanisms of action of phlebotomy on porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14341652

  6. [Acne tarda. Acne in adults].

    PubMed

    Jansen, T; Janßen, O E; Plewig, G

    2013-04-01

    Acne is one of the most common skin diseases in the general population, especially among adolescents. Acne tarda (adult acne) is defined as acne that develops (late-onset acne) or continues (persistent acne) after 25 years of age. The disease is more common in women. The clinical features are quite specific: inflammatory acne in the lower facial region or macrocomedones (microcysts) spread over the face. Involvement of the trunk is much more common in men. The etiology of acne tarda is still controversial, as cosmetics, drugs, smoking, stress, diet, and endocrine abnormalities have been implicated. Women with acne tarda and other symptoms of hyperandrogenism have a high probability of endocrine abnormalities such as polycystic ovary syndrome. Treatment is similar to that of acne in adolescence. Long-term treatment over years or decades may be required. PMID:23576169

  7. Histologic and molecular characterization of Edwardsiella piscicida infection in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Fogelson, Susan B; Petty, Barbara D; Reichley, Stephen R; Ware, Cynthia; Bowser, Paul R; Crim, Marcus J; Getchell, Rodman G; Sams, Kelly L; Marquis, Hélène; Griffin, Matt J

    2016-05-01

    The genus Edwardsiella is composed of a diverse group of facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria that can produce disease in a wide variety of hosts, including birds, reptiles, mammals, and fish. Our report describes the isolation and identification of Edwardsiella piscicida associated with chronic mortality events in 2 separate captive largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) populations in New York and Florida. Wet-mount biopsies of skin mucus, gill, kidney, and spleen from several affected largemouth bass contained significant numbers of motile bacteria. Histologic examination revealed multifocal areas of necrosis scattered throughout the heart, liver, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, and spleen. Many of the necrotic foci were encapsulated or replaced by discrete granulomas and associated with colonies of gram-negative bacteria. Initial phenotypic and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometric analysis against existing spectral databases of recovered isolates identified these bacteria as Edwardsiella tarda Subsequent molecular analysis using repetitive sequence mediated and species-specific PCR, as well as 16S rRNA, rpoB, and gyrB sequences, classified these isolates as E. piscicida As a newly designated taxon, E. piscicida should be considered as a differential for multiorgan necrosis and granulomas in largemouth bass. PMID:26951328

  8. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on porphyria cutanea tarda and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... on " Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam " that there was sufficient evidence ...

  9. Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis of Edwardsiella ictaluri Identifies Virulence Related Genes, 3 Including a Salmonella Pathogenicity Island-2 Class of Type III Secretion System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is the leading cause of mortality in channel catfish culture, but little is known about its pathogenesis. The use of signature-tagged mutagenesis in a waterborne infection model resulted in the identification of 50 mutants that were unable to infect/survive in catfish. Nineteen...

  10. Three Cases of Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Tarda in One Korean Family

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang Wan; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Ha, You-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) tarda is an inherited skeletal arthropathy. Because SED tarda involves the joints and resemble the clinical findings of chronic arthropathies, this disease is frequently misdiagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report here on three patients (father and his two daughters) in one family with SED tarda. All patients had back pain and polyarthralgia. Their radiographs revealed typical changes for SED tarda including platyspondyly and dysplastic bone changes. This rare disease has major clinical importance in that it is similar with JIA or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27401665

  11. Three Cases of Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Tarda in One Korean Family.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sang Wan; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Ha, You Jung; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-09-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) tarda is an inherited skeletal arthropathy. Because SED tarda involves the joints and resemble the clinical findings of chronic arthropathies, this disease is frequently misdiagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report here on three patients (father and his two daughters) in one family with SED tarda. All patients had back pain and polyarthralgia. Their radiographs revealed typical changes for SED tarda including platyspondyly and dysplastic bone changes. This rare disease has major clinical importance in that it is similar with JIA or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27401665

  12. Hepatitis C, Porphyria Cutanea Tarda, and Liver Iron: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Caballes, F Ryan; Sendi, Hossein; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2012-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is the most common form of porphyria across the world. Unlike other forms of porphyria, which are inborn errors of metabolism, PCT is usually an acquired liver disease caused by exogenous factors, chief among which are excess alcohol intake, iron overload, chronic hepatitis C, estrogen therapy, and cigarette smoking. The pathogenesis of PCT is complex and varied, but hereditary or acquired factors that lead to hepatic iron loading and increased oxidative stress are of central importance. Iron loading is usually only mild or moderate in degree (less than that associated with full-blown hemochromatosis) and is usually acquired and/or due to mutations in HFE. Among acquired factors are excessive alcohol intake and chronic hepatitis C infection, which, like mutations in HFE, decrease hepcidin production by hepatocytes. The decrease in hepcidin leads to increased iron absorption from the gut. In the liver, iron-loading and increased oxidative stress leads to the formation of non-porphyrin inhibitor(s) of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase and to oxidation of porphyrinogens to porphyrins. The treatment of choice of active PCT is iron reduction by phlebotomy and maintenance of a mildly iron-reduced state without anemia. Low-dose anti-malarials (cinchona alkaloids) are also useful as additional therapy or as alternative therapy for active PCT in those without hemochromatosis or chronic hepatitis C. In this review, we provide an update of PCT with special emphasis upon the important role often played by the hepatitis C virus. PMID:22510500

  13. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a HIV- positive patient*

    PubMed Central

    Franzon, Valéria Aparecida Zanela; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Camelo, Fernanda Henriques; Camargo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report about Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and its relationship with the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cutaneous porphyria is an illness caused by enzymatic modification that results in partial deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), which may be hereditary or acquired. Several studies suggest that HIV infection associated with cofactors might trigger the development of porphyria cutanea tarda. In this case report, we present a patient infected with HIV, who after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) enjoyed clinical improvement of porphyria cutanea tarda symptoms. PMID:27579753

  14. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a HIV- positive patient.

    PubMed

    Franzon, Valéria Aparecida Zanela; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Camelo, Fernanda Henriques; Camargo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report about Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and its relationship with the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cutaneous porphyria is an illness caused by enzymatic modification that results in partial deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), which may be hereditary or acquired. Several studies suggest that HIV infection associated with cofactors might trigger the development of porphyria cutanea tarda. In this case report, we present a patient infected with HIV, who after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) enjoyed clinical improvement of porphyria cutanea tarda symptoms. PMID:27579753

  15. Inflammatory effects of Edwardsiella ictaluri lipopolysaccharide modifications in catfish gut.

    PubMed

    Santander, Javier; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Park, Jie-Yeun; Martin, Taylor; Loh, Amanda; Diaz, Ignacia; Rojas, Robert; Segovia, Cristopher; DeNardo, Dale; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are structural components of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and also are potent inducers of inflammation in mammals. Higher vertebrates are extremely sensitive to LPS, but lower vertebrates, like fish, are resistant to their systemic toxic effects. However, the effects of LPS on the fish intestinal mucosa remain unknown. Edwardsiella ictaluri is a primitive member of the Enterobacteriaceae family that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). E. ictaluri infects and colonizes deep lymphoid tissues upon oral or immersion infection. Both gut and olfactory organs are the primary sites of invasion. At the systemic level, E. ictaluri pathogenesis is relatively well characterized, but our knowledge about E. ictaluri intestinal interaction is limited. Recently, we observed that E. ictaluri oligo-polysaccharide (O-PS) LPS mutants have differential effects on the intestinal epithelia of orally inoculated catfish. Here we evaluate the effects of E. ictaluri O-PS LPS mutants by using a novel catfish intestinal loop model and compare it to the rabbit ileal loop model inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LPS. We found evident differences in rabbit ileal loop and catfish ileal loop responses to E. ictaluri and S. Typhimurium LPS. We determined that catfish respond to E. ictaluri LPS but not to S. Typhimurium LPS. We also determined that E. ictaluri inhibits cytokine production and induces disruption of the intestinal fish epithelia in an O-PS-dependent fashion. The E. ictaluri wild type and ΔwibT LPS mutant caused intestinal tissue damage and inhibited proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, in contrast to E. ictaluri Δgne and Δugd LPS mutants. We concluded that the E. ictaluri O-PS subunits play a major role during pathogenesis, since they influence the recognition of the LPS by the intestinal mucosal immune system of the catfish. The LPS structure of E. ictaluri mutants is needed to

  16. Pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda)

    PubMed Central

    Sravanthi, A.; Srivalli, P.; Gopal, K. V. T.; Rao, T. Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a rare type of ectodermal dysplasia further classified into 4 types. Cutaneous manifestations seen in most of the cases of Pachyonychia congenita include palmoplantar keratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, wedge shaped nails, oral leukokeratosis and woolly hair. A 25-year-old male presented to us with thickened nails and scanty scalp hair. On examination, we noticed hyperkeratotic plaques over both the soles, palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and yellowish discoloration, wedging with subungual hyperkeratosis of all the nails. Follicular hyperkeratotic papules and steatocystoma multiplex were also observed over the scalp and face. The patient had history of natal teeth and on dental examination, lower central incisors were absent. All cutaneous changes in our case had manifested first in the 2nd decade except for natal teeth. All the above features suggested the diagnosis of pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda), which is an infrequently reported rare variant. PMID:27559502

  17. Pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda).

    PubMed

    Sravanthi, A; Srivalli, P; Gopal, K V T; Rao, T Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a rare type of ectodermal dysplasia further classified into 4 types. Cutaneous manifestations seen in most of the cases of Pachyonychia congenita include palmoplantar keratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, wedge shaped nails, oral leukokeratosis and woolly hair. A 25-year-old male presented to us with thickened nails and scanty scalp hair. On examination, we noticed hyperkeratotic plaques over both the soles, palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and yellowish discoloration, wedging with subungual hyperkeratosis of all the nails. Follicular hyperkeratotic papules and steatocystoma multiplex were also observed over the scalp and face. The patient had history of natal teeth and on dental examination, lower central incisors were absent. All cutaneous changes in our case had manifested first in the 2(nd) decade except for natal teeth. All the above features suggested the diagnosis of pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda), which is an infrequently reported rare variant. PMID:27559502

  18. Ocular manifestations in porphyria cutanea tarda

    PubMed Central

    Gogri, Pratik Yeshwant; Misra, Neeta Somen; Misra, Somen

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with pain, sticky discharge and loss of vision in the right eye. He has had typical skin manifestations of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) since 6 years and ophthalmological symptom for 6 weeks. On ophthalmological examination, visual acuity was light perception in the right eye and 6/12 in the left. There were bilateral, symmetrical temporal scleromalacia along with temporal corneal melting in both eyes and perforation in the right eye. Ultrasonography B-scan (USG B-scan) revealed a retinal detachment in the right eye. Artificial tear instillation was started every hour along with topical antibiotic coverage in both eyes. Additionally, ultraviolet protective sunglasses and hat for photo-protection was advised. The vision in the right eye improved to 5/60 along with subsidence of retinal detachment on repeat USG B-scan after 3 weeks. PMID:24811555

  19. Edwardsiella tarda and Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from diseased Southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) are virulent to channel catfish and Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study is to identify bacterial pathogens isolated from diseased Southern flounder and determine their virulence to channel catfish and Nile tilapia. Twenty five Gram-negative bacteria isolates were recovered from five tissues (skin lesions, brain, liver, intestine, and posterior kidn...

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda.

    PubMed

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  1. Photodamage of the conjunctiva in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, H; Korom, I

    1992-01-01

    Ninety two patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) were examined ophthalmically in a paired case control study. The incidence of pinguecula and of pterygium was 8 and 2 times higher respectively, in PCT patients than in the control group. The photodamage to the conjunctiva is considered to be a result of the photoactivity of uroporphyrin in the tissues. Images PMID:1358193

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  3. Towards the intelligent design of a vaccine against Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is the leading cause of disease loss in the catfish industry in the United States, accounting for an estimated 20.2 % loss in 2009. Previous work to establish live-attenuated vaccines for E. ictaluri demonstrated a relatively weak channel catfish immune response, with better im...

  4. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with progressive arthropathy associated with subcapsular cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Sanjay Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mondal, Soumya Sarathi; Chatterjee, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with progressive arthropathy is a form of inherited skeletal dysplasia involving the axial skeleton along with swelling and deformities of the peripheral joints that mimics juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of a 14-year-old school boy who presented with dwarfism, spine deformity, ocular anomaly and peripheral arthropathy with characteristic radiological changes in the vertebrae and multiple other joints. PMID:24862418

  5. Influence of lipopolysaccharide outer-core in the intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial peptides and virulence in Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Martin, Taylor; Diaz, Ignacia; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Almarza, Oscar; Segovia, Cristopher; Curtiss, Roy; Santander, Javier

    2016-04-01

    The genus Edwardsiella consists of bacteria with an intrinsic resistance to cyclic cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). Edwardsiella ictaluri, a pathogen of the catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and the causative agent of a systemic infection, is highly resistant to CAMPs. Previously, we determined that the oligo-polysaccharide (O-PS) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) does not play a role in the E. ictaluri CAMP resistance and an intact core-lipid A structure is necessary for CAMPs resistance. Here, we evaluated the influence of the outer-core in the CAMPs resistance and fish virulence. E. ictaluri wabG, a gene that encodes for the UDP-glucuronic acid transferase that links the lipid A-inner-core to the outer-core-oligopolysaccharides, was deleted. Deletion of ΔwabG caused a pleiotropic effect, influencing LPS synthesis, CAMPs resistance, growth, and biofilm formation. E. ictaluri ΔwabG was attenuated in zebrafish indicating the important role of LPS during fish pathogenesis. Also, we evaluated the inflammatory effects of wabG LPS in catfish ligated loop model, showing a decreased inflammatory effect at the gut level respects to the E. ictaluri wild type. We conclude that E. ictaluri CAMPs resistance is related to the molecules present in the LPS outer-core and that fish gut inflammation triggered by E. ictaluri is LPS dependent, reinforcing the hypothesis that fish gut recognizes LPS in an O-PS dependent fashion. PMID:26945561

  6. Adhesive and invasive capacities of Edwarsiella tarda isolated from South American sea lion

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Araceli; Villanueva, María Paz; González, Mario; Fernández, Fabiola; Latif, Fadua; Flores, Sandra Nonier; Fernández, Heriberto

    2014-01-01

    Edwarsiella tarda is a zoonotic bacterium that can be isolated from humans, animals and the environment. Although E. tarda is primarily considered a fish pathogen, it is the only species of its genus considered to be pathogenic for humans as well. A survey of zoonotic intestinal bacteria in fresh feces from South American sea lions (SASL) Otaria flavescens, reported E. tarda as the most frequently isolated species. In this study, we used HEp-2 cells to establish in vitro the adherence and invasive ability of 17 E. tarda strains isolated from SASL fecal material. All the strains were able to adhere and invade HEp-2 cells with adhesion and invasion percentages ranging from 56 to 100% and 21 to 74%, respectively. Despite the expression of these pathogenic factors, further investigation is needed to determine whether this bacterium could play a role as primary pathogen for this and other species of pinnipeds. PMID:25477948

  7. Flagella Structure and Gene Sequences of the Fish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella icatluri the cause of enteric septicemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) are motile by means of peritrichous flagella, a virulence determinant. Molecular composition of this polymeric structure in E. ictaluri remains largely unknown. Methods: Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) develo...

  8. Compounds with Inhibitory Activity Against the Channel Catfish Pathogens Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) and columnaris, the most common channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus diseases in the southeastern United States, are caused by the bacteria Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare, respectively. Although producers may rely on antibiotics and certain the...

  9. Comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages specific to the channel catfish pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri is a primary cause of mortality in channel catfish raised commercially in aquaculture farms. Additional treatment and diagnostic regimes are needed for this enteric pathogen, motivating the discovery and characterization of bacteriophages spe...

  10. [Porphyria cutanea tarda: the benefit of additional diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Vossen, Allard R J V; Boesten, Lianne S M; Siersema, Peter D; Nellen, Ruud G L

    2016-01-01

    The porphyrias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of relatively rare metabolic diseases that result from disorders in the biosynthesis of haeme. Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is the most common type, accounting for 80-90% of all porphyrias, and is essentially an acquired disease, although PCT can also occur on a familial basis. We describe a 71-year-old female and a 62-year-old male patient, both of whom had several risk factors for developing PCT, ranging from iron overload due to a mutation in the hereditary haemochromatosis protein (HFE) gene, alcohol use, smoking, and exogenous oestrogen, to persistent hepatitis C infection. The clinical relevance of the several diagnostic modalities is important in PCT. Diagnostic evaluation is important in order to confirm the diagnosis, but also to evaluate the treatment response in the context of long-term follow-up in the prevention of late complications of PCT, i.e. hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26840933

  11. Evaluation of an in vitro cell assay to select attenuated bacterial mutants of Aeromonas hydrophila and Edwardsiella tarda to channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the feasibility of using an in vitro cell assay to select attenuated bacterial mutants. Using catfish gill cells G1B, the feasibility of using an in vitro assay instead of in vivo virulence assay using live fish to select attenuated bacterial mutants was evaluated in this study. Pearson ...

  12. Edwardsiella piscicida identified in the southeastern United States by gyrB sequence, species specific and repetitive sequence mediated PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new taxa of Edwardsiella has recently been described from fishes of Europe and Asia. Researchers have determined this new strain does not belong to any established taxa within the genus Edwardsiella and have proposed the adoption of a new taxon, E. piscicida. A similar study in the United State...

  13. Chloroquine in the treatment of porphyria cutanea tarda.

    PubMed

    Tsega, E; Besrat, A; Damtew, B; Seyoum, E; Landells, J W

    1981-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is common in Ethiopia and invariably affects the liver. Treatment by abstension from alcohol and avoidance of direct sunlight often failed to achieve lasting improvement. Phlebotomy is unacceptable to most of our patients and impractical as a routine therapy. Chloroquine phosphate 500 mg (300 mg base) given daily for 10 days to 24 patients with confirmed PCT, was found to be uniformly effective. Both clinical and biochemical remissions were complete, The side effects of chloroquine include fever, nausea, vomiting and myalgia which predictably occur on the third day of therapy and subside within 72 hours. Since all other modes of therapy are ineffective or impractical and since the response to chloroquine is prompt, effective and reproducible and the side effects are brief, mild and do not cause permanent hepatic damage, it is suggested that this drug is currently the most practical treatment for PCT in areas where repeated phlebotomy is unacceptable and patient follow-up is unsatisfactory. PMID:7324107

  14. Porphyria variegata and porphyria cutanea tarda in siblings: chemical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C J; Cardinal, R A; Bossenmaier, I; Petryka, Z J

    1975-01-01

    A woman aged 54 was studied because of a severe acute porphyric (neurologic) relapse with clinical and chemical findings characteristic of porphyria variegata. During a family survey, her brother, aged 59, was found to have chemical abnormalities typical of porphyria cutanea tarda, without suggestion of neurologic manifestations. He had mild skin changes compatible with either of these forms of porphyria. The sister exhibited the protocoproporphyria of porphyria variegata, together with a large amount of fecal "x" porphyrin fraction, without demonstrable isocoproporphyrins. The brother had a uro-isocopro-type of porphyria in accord with the diagnosis of porphyria cutanea tarda, and quite at variance with the sister's findings. This occurrence of porphyria variegata and porphyria cutanea tarda in siblings is thus far unique. Certain hypotheses are considered in respect to genetic aspects of the differing prophyrias in this sibling pair. PMID:1061096

  15. Edwardsiella andrillae, a New Species of Sea Anemone from Antarctic Ice

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Marymegan; Rack, Frank; Zook, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the lower surface of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica by the Submersible Capable of under-Ice Navigation and Imaging (SCINI) remotely operated vehicle discovered a new species of sea anemone living in this previously undocumented ecosystem. This discovery was a significant outcome of the Coulman High Project’s geophysical and environmental fieldwork in 2010-2011 as part of the ANDRILL (ANtarctic geologic DRILLing) program. Edwardsiella andrillae n. sp., lives with most of its column in the ice shelf, with only the tentacle crown extending into the seawater below. In addition to being the only Antarctic representative of the genus, Edwardsiella andrillae is distinguished from all other species of the genus in the number of tentacles and in the size and distribution of cnidae. The anatomy and histology of Edwardsiella andrillae present no features that explain how this animal withstands the challenges of life in such an unusual habitat. PMID:24349517

  16. Edwardsiella andrillae, a new species of sea anemone from Antarctic ice.

    PubMed

    Daly, Marymegan; Rack, Frank; Zook, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the lower surface of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica by the Submersible Capable of under-Ice Navigation and Imaging (SCINI) remotely operated vehicle discovered a new species of sea anemone living in this previously undocumented ecosystem. This discovery was a significant outcome of the Coulman High Project's geophysical and environmental fieldwork in 2010-2011 as part of the ANDRILL (ANtarctic geologic DRILLing) program. Edwardsiella andrillae n. sp., lives with most of its column in the ice shelf, with only the tentacle crown extending into the seawater below. In addition to being the only Antarctic representative of the genus, Edwardsiella andrillae is distinguished from all other species of the genus in the number of tentacles and in the size and distribution of cnidae. The anatomy and histology of Edwardsiella andrillae present no features that explain how this animal withstands the challenges of life in such an unusual habitat. PMID:24349517

  17. A porphomethene inhibitor of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase causes porphyria cutanea tarda

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Bergonia, Hector A.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Franklin, Michael R.; Kushner, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), the most common form of porphyria in humans, is due to reduced activity of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) in the liver. Previous studies have demonstrated that protein levels of URO-D do not change when catalytic activity is reduced, suggesting that an inhibitor of URO-D is generated in hepatocytes. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of an inhibitor of URO-D in liver cytosolic extracts from two murine models of PCT: wild-type mice treated with iron, δ-aminolevulinic acid, and polychlorinated biphenyls; and mice with one null allele of Uro-d and two null alleles of the hemochromatosis gene (Uro-d+/−, Hfe−/−) that develop PCT with no treatments. In both models, we identified an inhibitor of recombinant human URO-D (rhURO-D). The inhibitor was characterized by solid-phase extraction, chromatography, UV-visible spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy and proved to be uroporphomethene, a compound in which one bridge carbon in the uroporphyrinogen macrocycle is oxidized. We synthesized uroporphomethene by photooxidation of enzymatically generated uroporphyrinogen I or III. Both uroporphomethenes inhibited rhURO-D, but the III isomer porphomethene was a more potent inhibitor. Finally, we detected an inhibitor of rhURO-D in cytosolic extracts of liver biopsy samples of patients with PCT. These studies define the mechanism underlying clinical expression of the PCT phenotype, namely oxidation of uroporphyrinogen to uroporphomethene, a competitive inhibitor of URO-D. The oxidation reaction is iron-dependent. PMID:17360334

  18. Porphyria cutanea tarda associated with autoimmune hypothyroidism, vitiligo and alopecia universalis.

    PubMed

    Sabán, J; Rodríguez-García, J L; Gil, J; País, J R; Medina, S

    1991-12-01

    The aetiology of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) has not been elucidated, but the possibility of an autoimmune mechanism has been proposed. We report a case of an unknown clinical combination of PCT with autoimmune hypothyroidism, alopecia universalis and vitiligo with thyroid and parietal cell circulating antibodies. This is highly suggestive of underlying autoimmune damage in this patient. PMID:1803247

  19. Cloning, Characterization and Expression of a FK506 Binding Protein from Edwardsiella icatluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Edwardsiella ictaluri is the etiological agent of enteric septicemia of catfish, which is the most common disease of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and is responsible for $50 - 60 million economic losses to catfish producers annually in the Southeastern U.S. In the course of stud...

  20. Overcoming inconsistencies in mortality rates during winter experimental challenges of channel catfish with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the goals of the ARS Catfish Genetics Research Unit is to incorporate disease resistance to ESC, caused by the bacterium, Edwardsiella ictaluri, into our selective breeding program. Through repeated experiments we have determined an optimal challenge dose of E. ictaluri that produces 50-70% ...

  1. Modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine, AQUAVAC-ESC, lacks multidrug resistance plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance was first discovered in Edwardsiella ictaluri in the early 1990’s, and in 2007 an E. ictaluri isolate harboring an IncA/C plasmid was recovered from a moribund channel catfish infected with the bacterium. Due to the identification of multidrug resistance plasm...

  2. Chemical and electroporated transformation of Edwardsiella ictaluri using three different plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transfer of DNA by conjugation has been the method generally used for genetic manipulation of Edwardsiella ictaluri because, previously, attempts to transform E. ictaluri by the uptake of naked DNA has apparently failed. We report here the successful transformation of seven strains of E. ictaluri us...

  3. Global transcription analysis of vaccinated channel catfish following challenge with virulent Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the identities of genes involved in either innate or adaptive immunity, microarray analysis of 65,182 UniGene transcripts were performed to compare gene expression in vaccinated channel catfish after challenge with a virulent Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to that in sham-vaccinated fis...

  4. Construction, characterization, expression and immune responses of flagellar proteins of channel catfish, important pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish, which is the leading disease in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)and is responsible for $50 - 60 million economic losses to catfish producers annually in the southeastern U.S. Bacterial flagella are complex polymeric structu...

  5. Organization and sequence of four flagellin-encoding genes of Edwardsiella icataluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, the cause of enteric septicemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), is motile by means of peritrichous flagella. We determined the complete flagellin gene sequences and their organization in E. ictaluri by sequencing genomic segments selected from a lambda-ZAP phage gen...

  6. Experimental Edwardsiella ictaluri Infection Causes Mortality in White Perch (Morone americana)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, the causative agent of enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), receives considerable attention due to its negative impact on the production and harvest of channel catfish (Ictaluri punctatus). This bacterium was initially considered a specific pathogen of channel catfish and oth...

  7. Susceptibility of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, to Edwardsiella ictaluri challange following copper sulfate exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque) with or without a preliminary 24h exposure to 2 mg copper sulfate L-1, were challenged with 7.5 X 106 colony forming units L-1 of Edwardsiella ictaluri to determine the effect of copper sulfate on disease resistance. Catfish previously exposed to co...

  8. Edwardsiella ictaluri as the causative agent of mortality in cultured Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri was consistently isolated from the spleens, livers, and head kidneys of diseased Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus from a farm experiencing mortality events in several culture ponds. We describe the first published outbreak of E. ictaluri–induced Edwardsiellosis in Nile tilapi...

  9. IncA/C Plasmid-Mediated Florfenicol Resistance in the Catfish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florfenicol has recently been approved for the treatment of enteric septicemia of catfish caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri. Here we report the identification of florfenicol resistance in a clinical isolate of E. ictaluri. Resistance in this isolate is associated with a mobile IncA/C plasmid conferrin...

  10. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis as a potential vector of Edwardsiella ictaluri in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is limited information on whether parasites act as vectors to transmit pathogenic bacteria in fish. In this trial, we used Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and fluorescent Edwardsiella ictaluri as a model to study the interaction between parasite, bacterium and fish host. The percentage (23-39 %)...

  11. Construction, characterization and use of Edwardsiella ictaluri flagella-type three secretion system protein arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish, caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is the leading disease in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) that is responsible for $50 - 60 million economic losses to catfish producers annually in the Southeastern U.S. The flagella and type three secretion system (TTSS) in Gram...

  12. Efficacy of florfenicol for control of mortality associated with Edwardsiella ictaluri in three species of catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of florfenicol against Edwardsiella icatluri infection was studied in channel catfish (Ictalurus puntatus (Delta strain)), hybrid catfish (Ictalurus punctatus (Delta strain) x Ictalurus furcatus (D&B strain)), and blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus (D&B strain) fingerlings in 65L aquaria....

  13. Sequences of a FK-506 binding protein from Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A FK-506 binding protein, a member of the immunophilin superfamily of Edwardsiella ictaluri was partially identified by the in-vivo-induced antigen technology. We further cloned and sequenced this FK-506 binding protein gene using a Universal GenomeWalker kit. The complete sequence consisted of 612 ...

  14. INDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE IN CHANNEL CATFISH ICALUTUS PUNCTATUS BY EDWARDSIELLA ICTALURI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, were injected intraperiloneally with live cells of Edwardsiella ictaluri and held in flow-through tanks for five days. he head kidneys from injected and control fish were removed and the nitric oxide synthase activity measured. ctivities foun...

  15. Chemical and electrophoretic transformation of Edwardsiella ictaluri using three different plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri the cause of enteric septicemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) (ESC), is a bacterial pathogen having a considerable economic impact on the cultured catfish industry. Molecular genetic manipulation of this bacterium is important from the perspective of determining viru...

  16. Transferable green fluorescence-tagged pEI2 in Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pEI2 plasmid of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolate, I49, was tagged using a Tn10-GFP-kan cassette to create the green fluorescence-expressing derivative I49-gfp. The Tn10-GFP-kan insertion site was mapped by plasmid sequencing to 663 bp upstream of orf2 and appeared to be at a neutral site in the pla...

  17. Characterization of the RRN Operons in the Channel Catfish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To advance diagnostics and phylogenetics of Edwardsiella ictaluri by sequencing and characterizing its rrn operons. Methods and Results: The Edw. ictaluri rrn operons were identified from a 5-7 kb insert lambda library and from Edw. ictaluri fosmid clones. We present the complete sequences...

  18. Effects of Bio-Mos on Growth and Survival of Channel Catfish Challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in the catfish farming industry has been high disease loss to enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri (E. ictaluri). Methods to control this disease include antibiotic therapy, vaccinations, and management strategies such as taking the fish...

  19. Identification of differentially regulated proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during iron restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause a significant stres...

  20. Bacterial distribution and tissue targets following experimental Edwardsiella ictaluri infection in nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, a Gram-negative enteric bacterium, is the known etiological agent of enteric septicemia of catfish. In the last few years, different strains have been implicated as the causative agent of mortality events in cultured fish, including Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L. Due to...

  1. Familial and sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda: clinical and biochemical features and risk factors in 152 patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Santos, Carlos; Guilabert, Antonio; Moreno, Nemesio; To-Figueras, Jordi; Badenas, Celia; Darwich, Esteve; Herrero, Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most frequent porphyria and occurs in both sporadic and familial forms. We conducted the current study in a series of 152 consecutive patients with porphyria cutanea tarda attending the Porphyria Unit of the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain, to update the clinical manifestations of the disease and to study the sex differences, the proportion of familial forms, and the role of different risk factors in this population. Patients were classified as familial and sporadic cases according to erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase activity and uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase genotyping. In our cohort, skin fragility and blisters on the hands were the most frequent clinical manifestations. Women more frequently had facial hypertrichosis (84.8%; p = 0.004), affected areas other than the hands and face (33.3%; p = 0.008), and pruritus (27.3%; p = 0.041) compared with men. Of our patients, 11.8% did not present the typical clinical onset of the disease, with facial hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation the more frequent complaints in these cases. Analysis of risk factors showed a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection (65.8%) and alcohol abuse (59.9%), both being more frequent in men (p < 0.001). Hepatitis C virus infection was the only risk factor that showed differences between the sporadic and familial forms in the logistic regression model (odds ratio, 0.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.006-0.46). In conclusion, atypical forms of presentation of porphyria cutanea tarda should be considered in order to prevent delayed diagnosis. We note the sustained role of hepatitis C virus infection in the precipitation of sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda. Therefore, in countries with a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection, the absence of such infection in a patient with porphyria cutanea tarda may suggest a possible familial case. PMID:20517178

  2. Treatment options in acute porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda, and erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    PubMed

    Harper, Pauline; Wahlin, Staffan

    2007-12-01

    The porphyrias are a group of uncommon metabolic diseases caused by enzyme deficiencies within heme biosynthesis that lead to neurotoxic or phototoxic heme precursor accumulation. There are four acute porphyrias characterized by neuropsychiatric symptoms: acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Treatment includes elimination of any porphyrogenic factor and symptomatic treatment. Carbohydrate and intravenous heme administration constitute specific therapies in the disorders' acute phase. The mainstay treatment in the cutaneous porphyrias is avoidance of sunlight exposure. In porphyria cutanea tarda and the two acute porphyrias with skin manifestations, variegate porphyria and hereditary coproporphyria, care of the vulnerable skin is important. In porphyria cutanea tarda, specific treatment is accomplished by a series of phlebotomies and/or by low-dose chloroquine administration. In erythropoietic protoporphyria, light-protective beta-carotene is prescribed. PMID:18221605

  3. [Solarium-induced pseudoporphyria and variegate porphyria as rare differential diagnoses of porphyria cutanea tarda].

    PubMed

    Kochs, C; Mühlenstädt, E; Neumann, N J; Hanneken, S

    2009-10-01

    Three patients presented with typical porphyria cutanea tarda-like vesicles, erosions and scars as well as increased fragility, primarily on the back of the hands. In two of the three, porphyrin workup was normal. Skin biopsy was compatible with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) or pseudoporphyria. The common aspect in the patients' history was the frequent use of solaria for many years, so that UV-induced pseudoporphyria was diagnosed. Treatment was strict abstention from UV radiation and regular dermatologic controls for signs of skin damage. Porphyrin analysis in the third patient showed normal excretion of total urine porphyrins and precursors; however, fecal porphyrins were elevated with dominating coproporphyrins in HPLC and the plasma fluorescence scan yielded a peak at 625 nm. Subsequent mutation analysis showed a mutation in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene, thereby confirming the diagnosis of variegate porphyria. Five months after the initial diagnosis the patient presented with the first acute attack. Further investigations revealed a metastasized carcinoma of the colon, which probably triggered the acute attack. Our cases show rare differential diagnoses in patients presenting with typical PCT-like skin lesions. The discrimination between porphyria cutanea tarda and its differential diagnoses is very important since it has an important impact not only on the treatment modality but also on the course and the prognosis of the disease. PMID:19756434

  4. Precipitating factors of porphyria cutanea tarda in Brazil with emphasis on hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations. Study of 60 patients*

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fatima Mendonça Jorge; Nakhle, Maria Cristina; Abrantes-Lemos, Clarice Pires; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common form of porphyria, characterized by the decreased activity of the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase enzyme. Several reports associated HFE gene mutations of hereditary hemochromatosis with porphyria cutanea tarda worldwide, although up to date only one study has been conducted in Brazil. OBJECTIVES Investigation of porphyria cutanea tarda association with C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Identification of precipitating factors (hepatitis C, HIV, alcoholism and estrogen) and their link with HFE mutations. METHODS An ambispective study of 60 patients with PCT was conducted during the period from 2003 to 2012. Serological tests for hepatitis C and HIV were performed and histories of alcohol abuse and estrogen intake were investigated. HFE mutations were identified with real-time PCR. RESULTS Porphyria cutanea tarda predominated in males and alcohol abuse was the main precipitating factor. Estrogen intake was the sole precipitating factor present in 25% of female patients. Hepatitis C was present in 41.7%. All HIV-positive patients (15.3%) had a history of alcohol abuse. Allele frequency for HFE mutations, i.e., C282Y (p = 0.0001) and H63D (p = 0.0004), were significantly higher in porphyria cutanea tarda patients, compared to control group. HFE mutations had no association with the other precipitating factors. CONCLUSIONS Alcohol abuse, hepatitis C and estrogen intake are prevalent precipitating factors in our porphyria cutanea tarda population; however, hemochromatosis in itself can also contribute to the outbreak of porphyria cutanea tarda, which makes the research for HFE mutations necessary in these patients PMID:24068123

  5. Genome sequence of Edwardsiella ictaluri 93-146 a strain associated with a natural channel catfish outbreak of enteric septicemia of catifsh

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is the cause of extensive mortalities and economic losses to the channel catfish industry of the southeast United States. Here we report the complete genome of Edwardsiella ictaluri 93-146. Whole-genome sequence analysis of E. ictaluri provides a tool for understanding the geno...

  6. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed. PMID:26195305

  7. H-NS binding to evpB and evpC and repressing T6SS expression in fish pathogen Edwardsiella piscicida.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shilei; Xiao, Jingfan; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-09-01

    Edwardsiella piscicida is an important causative agent of hemorrhagic septicemia in fish and infects both cultured and wild fish species. Type VI secretion system (T6SS) was proved to play important roles in pathogenesis of E. piscicida. In this study, it was demonstrated that the expression of T6SS genes evpB and evpC was under control of the global regulator H-NS in E. piscicida and the transcriptional level of evpB and evpC was significantly down-regulated by H-NS. Compared to the wild type, the transcriptional levels of evpB and evpC were up-regulated in hns null mutant, while down-regulated in hns overexpression strain. The results of EMSA and DNase I footprinting revealed that H-NS protein directly bound to upstream region of evpC at multiple sites. A high-affinity motif with a 9-nucleotide sequence 5'-ATATAAAAT-3' was defined for H-NS preferential recognition based on the feature of the binding sites. These results indicated that H-NS acted cooperatively to form extended nucleoprotein filaments on target DNA. Site-directed mutagenesis of H-NS further showed that R86 played an essential role in T6SS gene binding. These findings highlighted the mechanisms underlying the complex regulation network of T6SS by H-NS in E. piscicida. PMID:27125651

  8. Edwardsiellosis Caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri in Laboratory Populations of Zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Hawke, John P.; Kent, Michael; Rogge, Matt; Baumgartner, Wes; Wiles, Judy; Shelley, Johnny; Savolainen, L. Christine; Wagner, Robert; Murray, Katy; Peterson, Tracy S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first cases of Edwardsiella ictaluri causing epizootics in laboratory populations of Zebrafish Danio rerio. Edwardsiella ictaluri is primarily recognized as a disease of catfish species and is known to cause an economically important bacterial disease of farm-raised catfish in the USA and abroad; however, it has been isolated on occasion from 10 other genera of nonictalurid fishes. We isolated E. ictaluri from moribund Zebrafish held in quarantine at two different universities in two states and from a research facility in a third state between February 23 and December 6, 2011. Edwardsiellosis in Zebrafish can be described as a severe systemic disease characterized by tissue necrosis and the presence of large numbers of extracellular and intracellular bacteria, often within macrophages. The kidneys (pronephros and mesonephros), spleen, nares, and forebrain were the most commonly and severely affected tissues. In outbreaks, mortality was acute and numerous fish died over a 1–2 week period. Mortality continued until the majority of the population was lost, at which time the remaining fish were euthanized. In addition to these cases, four cultures of bacteria isolated from Zebrafish by another diagnostic laboratory were submitted to the Louisiana Aquatic Diagnostic Laboratory for identification and were confirmed as E. ictaluri. In total, eight cultures of E. ictaluri from Zebrafish from Louisiana, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Florida were identified. The isolates were confirmed as E. ictaluri by biochemical phenotype, API 20E (bioMérieux), and amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates from Zebrafish are believed to comprise a unique group and were differentiated from catfish isolates by exhibiting weaker motility, autoaggregation in broth, a different plasmid profile (two plasmids of 4.0 and 3.5 kb), a different API 20E code (4204000), and lack of lipopolysaccharide recognition with Mab Ed9

  9. Edwardsiellosis caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri in laboratory populations of Zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Hawke, John P; Kent, Michael; Rogge, Matt; Baumgartner, Wes; Wiles, Judy; Shelley, Johnny; Savolainen, L Christine; Wagner, Robert; Murray, Katy; Peterson, Tracy S

    2013-09-01

    We report the first cases of Edwardsiella ictaluri causing epizootics in laboratory populations of Zebrafish Danio rerio. Edwardsiella ictaluri is primarily recognized as a disease of catfish species and is known to cause an economically important bacterial disease of farm-raised catfish in the USA and abroad; however, it has been isolated on occasion from 10 other genera of nonictalurid fishes. We isolated E. ictaluri from moribund Zebrafish held in quarantine at two different universities in two states and from a research facility in a third state between February 23 and December 6, 2011. Edwardsiellosis in Zebrafish can be described as a severe systemic disease characterized by tissue necrosis and the presence of large numbers of extracellular and intracellular bacteria, often within macrophages. The kidneys (pronephros and mesonephros), spleen, nares, and forebrain were the most commonly and severely affected tissues. In outbreaks, mortality was acute and numerous fish died over a 1-2 week period. Mortality continued until the majority of the population was lost, at which time the remaining fish were euthanized. In addition to these cases, four cultures of bacteria isolated from Zebrafish by another diagnostic laboratory were submitted to the Louisiana Aquatic Diagnostic Laboratory for identification and were confirmed as E. ictaluri. In total, eight cultures of E. ictaluri from Zebrafish from Louisiana, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Florida were identified. The isolates were confirmed as E. ictaluri by biochemical phenotype, API 20E (bioMérieux), and amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates from Zebrafish are believed to comprise a unique group and were differentiated from catfish isolates by exhibiting weaker motility, autoaggregation in broth, a different plasmid profile (two plasmids of 4.0 and 3.5 kb), a different API 20E code (4204000), and lack of lipopolysaccharide recognition with Mab Ed9. PMID

  10. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... veteran who served in the active military, naval or air service in the Republic of Vietnam during the... section dies as a result of chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda, the veteran's survivors shall be paid... most recent departure from the Republic of Vietnam during active military, naval or air service and...

  11. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... veteran who served in the active military, naval or air service in the Republic of Vietnam during the... section dies as a result of chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda, the veteran's survivors shall be paid... most recent departure from the Republic of Vietnam during active military, naval or air service and...

  12. Complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from methanogenic digester sludge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen -Tso

    2014-09-04

    In this study, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  13. Simultaneous Detection of Bacterial Fish Pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri, Flavobacterium columnnare and Aeromonas Hydrophila by Multiplex-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, Flavobacterium columnare and Aeromonas hydrophila are three major bacterial pathogens of fish that cause diseases with significant economic impact on the aquaculture industry world-wide. Rapid detection of multiple infections with these bacteria in the same host is important f...

  14. Feeding Lactobacillus spp. and Bacillus spp. Does Not Improve Growth or Survival of Channel Catfish Experimentally Challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in the channel catfish industry has been high disease loss to enteric septicemia of catfish, caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri. Feeding probiotics may prove beneficial in improving disease resistance. The first study examined the effects of a Lactobacillus probiotic (Flor...

  15. Oral vaccination of channel catfish against enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) using a live attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is the most problematic bacterial disease affecting catfish aquaculture in the southeastern United States. Efforts to develop an effective ESC vaccine have had limited industrial success. In commercial settings, ESC vaccines are t...

  16. Oral vaccination of channel catfish against enteric septicemia of catfish using a live attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is the most problematic bacterial disease affecting catfish aquaculture in the southeastern United States. Efforts to develop an effective ESC vaccine have had limited industrial success. In commercial settings, ESC vaccines are...

  17. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (float...

  18. Edwardsiella ictaluri Encodes an Acid Activated Urease that is Required for Intracellular Replication in Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus Macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic analysis indicated that Edwardsiella ictaluri encodes a putative ureasepathogenicity island containing 9 open reading frames, including urea and ammonium transporters. In vitro studies with the wild-type E. ictaluri and a ureG::kan urease mutant strain indicated that E. ictaluri is significa...

  19. Identification of over-expressed genes in modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to virulent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  20. Roles for mannose binding lectin and rhamnose binding lectin in channel catfish fed essential oils and challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in the catfish farming industry has been high disease loss to enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri. Methods to control this disease include vaccination, antibiotic therapy, and restricted feeding. Another method that has been examined i...

  1. Effects of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis parasitism on the survival, hematology and bacterial load in channel catfish previously exposed to Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) parasitism on survival, hematology and bacterial load in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, previously exposed to Edwardsiella ictaluri was studied. Fish were exposed to E. ictaluri one day prior to Ich in the following treatments: 1)- infected by...

  2. Identification of overexpressed immune-related genes in the anterior kidney of channel catfish induced by Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 57 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from 240 clones of a modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri-vaccinated vs sham-vaccinated channel catfish anterior kidney subtractive library. The transcription levels of the 57 ESTs in response t...

  3. Comparative catfish macrophage function in families expressing high and low survivor phenotype following experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two channel catfish families were identified as displaying a high (>90%) or low (<10%) survival phenotype in repeated experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri. In order to gain understanding of the biological basis of these phenotypes, primary macrophages were prepared from head kidney tiss...

  4. An Attenuated Strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri is Killed by Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) Macrophages and Confers Protection in Few Days

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Edwardsiella ictaluri is able to survive inside macrophages. Several studies have demonstrated that in channel catfish protective immunity against E. ictaluri is mediated by a cellular immune response. Methods: A virulent strain and an attenuated strain (used as a modified live vaccine) ...

  5. Changes of serum myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide in the early stage of Edwardsiella ictaluri infection in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is an important farm-raised channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), disease. The development of a monitoring system for assessing the catfish health status in hatcheries and ponds is in great demanding. Because of the...

  6. Proteomic analysis of head kidney tissue from high and low susceptibility families of channel catfish following challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was performed to compare proteomic profiles of channel catfish from families with high and low susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri following an immersion challenge. Total protein was isolated from head kidney samples, collected at 2 and 6 hours post exposure, and analyzed by 2-D-gel elec...

  7. Binding and Phagocytosis by Opsonized and Nonopsonized Channel Catfish Macrophages of Viable DsRed-fluorescent-labeled Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phagocyte-mediated killing of bacterial pathogens is one of the major defensive mechanisms in fish. The binding, uptake and destruction of recombinant fluorescent protein DsRed transformed Edwardsiella ictaluri by opsonized and nonopsonized channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) macrophages was chara...

  8. Production of a reference transcriptome and transcriptomic database (EdwardsiellaBase) for the lined sea anemone, Edwardsiella lineata, a parasitic cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The lined sea anemone Edwardsiella lineata is an informative model system for evolutionary-developmental studies of parasitism. In this species, it is possible to compare alternate developmental pathways leading from a larva to either a free-living polyp or a vermiform parasite that inhabits the mesoglea of a ctenophore host. Additionally, E. lineata is confamilial with the model cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, providing an opportunity for comparative genomic, molecular and organismal studies. Description We generated a reference transcriptome for E. lineata via high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated from five developmental stages (parasite; parasite-to-larva transition; larva; larva-to-adult transition; adult). The transcriptome comprises 90,440 contigs assembled from >15 billion nucleotides of DNA sequence. Using a molecular clock approach, we estimated the divergence between E. lineata and N. vectensis at 215–364 million years ago. Based on gene ontology and metabolic pathway analyses and gene family surveys (bHLH-PAS, deiodinases, Fox genes, LIM homeodomains, minicollagens, nuclear receptors, Sox genes, and Wnts), the transcriptome of E. lineata is comparable in depth and completeness to N. vectensis. Analyses of protein motifs and revealed extensive conservation between the proteins of these two edwardsiid anemones, although we show the NF-κB protein of E. lineata reflects the ancestral structure, while the NF-κB protein of N. vectensis has undergone a split that separates the DNA-binding domain from the inhibitory domain. All contigs have been deposited in a public database (EdwardsiellaBase), where they may be searched according to contig ID, gene ontology, protein family motif (Pfam), enzyme commission number, and BLAST. The alignment of the raw reads to the contigs can also be visualized via JBrowse. Conclusions The transcriptomic data and database described here provide a platform for studying the evolutionary developmental genomics

  9. Illness Perception and Psychological Distress in Persons with Porphyria Cutanea Tarda.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Janice; Nordin, Karin; Sandberg, Sverre

    2016-06-15

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) requires long-term treatment and follow-up, although many patients experience life-long remission. The aim of this cross-sectional postal survey was to describe and investigate the association between illness perception, health complaints, self-reported symptoms and distress in persons with PCT. The participants perceived PCT as a chronic condition with high levels of personal and treatment control. Persons who reported active symptoms scored higher on perceived illness threat, total health complaints and psychological distress compared with those in remission or latent phases. However, a higher perception of illness threat and the total burden of health complaints were more closely associated with psychological distress than were perceived PCT symptoms activity. This has implications for clinical consultation; dermatologists should be attentive to symptoms activity, but also recognize that patients in remission with a high perceived illness threat and multiple health complaints might be especially vulnerable to psychological distress with regards to PCT. PMID:26775575

  10. Genetic structure of the threatened West-Pannonian population of Great Bustard (Otis tarda)

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Rainer; Spakovszky, Péter; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow of the Great Bustards (Otis tarda) living in Austria-Slovakia-West Hungary (West-Pannonian region), one of the few populations of this globally threatened species that survives across the Palaearctic, has been assessed for the first time in this study. Fourteen recently developed microsatellite loci identified one single population in the study area, with high values of genetic diversity and gene flow between two different genetic subunits. One of these subunits (Heideboden) was recognized as a priority for conservation, as it could be crucial to maintain connectivity with the central Hungarian population and thus contribute to keeping contemporary genetic diversity. Current conservation efforts have been successful in saving this threatened population from extinction two decades ago, and should continue to guarantee its future survival. PMID:26966677

  11. Liver Cirrhosis Induced by Porphyria Cutanea Tarda: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Gyun; Hyun, Jong Jin; Seo, Yeon Seok; Keum, Bora; Yim, Hyung Joon; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2010-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is a metabolic disorder that results in a decrease in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity. It is characterized by photosensitivity, bullae formation, and skin pigmentation. There are four types of PCT: acquired, familial, toxic, and hepatoerythropoietic. Uroporphyrin levels are elevated in the urine of PCT patients. PCT can be differentiated from other porphyrias by its clinical characteristics and the porphyrin levels in the serum, erythrocytes, urine, and feces. This metabolic disorder can lead to liver dysfunction as well as histological changes such as fatty infiltration or hepatic fibrosis. PCT rarely manifests as liver cirrhosis. We report herein a case of PCT-induced liver cirrhosis that progressed to hepatic failure. PMID:21253308

  12. Co-existence of hereditary coproporphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda: The importance of genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Alice; Grant, Janine; Varigos, George; Morgan, Vanessa; Winship, Ingrid

    2013-05-01

    The porphyrias are a group of inherited disorders that result in defects in the enzymes of the haem biosynthetic pathway, causing photosensitive bullous skin eruptions or abdominal and neurological attacks. Enzymatic defects result in specific porphyrin excretory patterns that are diagnosed biochemically and can be confirmed by genetic testing. Defects in the coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) enzyme result in the autosomal dominant hereditary coproporphyria. Multiple mutations have been identified in the CPOX gene and incomplete penetrance is noted. Latent carriers without clinical evidence of disease are at risk of life-threatening attacks. Porphyria cutanea tarda may be inherited, but is more commonly acquired. Occasionally two forms of porphyria may co-exist. The importance of genetic testing is discussed. PMID:23582006

  13. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Dubytska, Lidiya P; Rogge, Matthew L; Thune, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  14. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lidiya P.; Rogge, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  15. Efficacy of Florfenicol for Control of Mortality Associated with Edwardsiella ictaluri in Three Species of Catfish.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Patricia S; Chatakondi, Nagaraj; Gao, Dana; Endris, Richard

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of florfenicol for control of mortality associated with Edwardsiella icatluri was studied in fingerlings of Channel Catfish Ictalurus puntatus (Delta strain), Blue Catfish I. furcatus (D&B strain), and a hybrid catfish (Delta strain Channel Catfish × D&B strain Blue Catfish). On day 0, fish were immersion challenged in 65-L aquaria. For each of the three species of catfish, 10 aquaria were randomly assigned to two treatment groups, either treated with florfenicol at 0 mg/kg of body weight (unmedicated feed) or at 10 mg/kg (medicated feed). Fish were treated for 10 consecutive days, monitored for mortality during this treatment period, and observed for 14 d afterwards. Post observation, all survivors were humanely euthanized in tricaine methanesulfonate, cultured for E. ictaluri, and examined for gross pathology. The mean cumulative percent mortality from enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) challenge among the three genotypes of catfish did not differ between Blue Catfish, hybrid, and Channel Catfish in treated or control groups. However, the florfenicol-treated fish had a significantly lower mean cumulative mortality (6%) than the controls (78%). All genotypes of catfish tested were responsive to treatment with florfenicol-medicated feed for control of mortality associated with ESC. There were no significant differences in mortality associated with hybrid catfish, blue catfish, and Channel Catfish (Delta strain). PMID:26306332

  16. Transcriptome of intraperitoneal organs of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus challenged by Edwardsiella ictaluri JCM1680

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yanli; Sun, Xiuqin; Wang, Bo; Wang, Ling; Li, Yan; Tian, Jinhu; Zheng, Fengrong; Zheng, Minggang

    2014-09-01

    Platichthys stellatus is an economically important marine bony fish species that is cultured in China on a large scale. However, very little is known about its immune-related genes. In this study, the transcriptome of the immune organs of P. stellatus that were intraperitoneally challenged with the pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri JCM1680 is analyzed. Total RNA from four tissues (spleen, kidney, liver, and intestine) was mixed equally and then sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Overall, 28 465 813 quality reads were generated and assembled into 43 061 unigenes. Similarity searches against public protein sequence databases were used to annotate 28 291 unigenes (65.7% of the total), 368 of which were associated with immunoregulation, including 188 related to immunity response. Additionally, the transcript levels of immunity response unigenes annotated as related to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNF receptor, chemokine, major histocompatibility complex, and interleukin-6 were investigated in the different tissues of normal and infected P. stellatus by real-time quantitative PCR. The results confirmed that the unigenes identified in the transcriptome database were indeed expressed and up-regulated in infected P. stellatus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the sequencing and analysis of the transcriptome of P. stellatus. These findings provide insights into the transcriptomics and immunogenetics of bony fish.

  17. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Peterson, Brian C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS) for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05) difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri. PMID:26168192

  18. Porphyria cutanea tarda associated with HFE C282Y homozygosity, iron overload, and use of a contraceptive vaginal ring

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Edwards, Corwin Q.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by decreased uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity in hepatocytes, uroporphyrin I and heptacarboxyl porphyrin III accumulation, photosensitivity dermatitis, and increased storage iron. In women, estrogen therapy, including oral contraceptives, postmenopausal hormone replacement, and tamoxifen for breast cancer treatment, is a risk factor for PCT. We report the case of a woman who presented with PCT, HFE C282Y homozygosity, and hepatic iron overload and was using a contraceptive vaginal ring containing ethinyl estradiol, an estrogen. We discuss this case in the context of characteristics of other persons with PCT, including common HFE mutations, iron overload, and estrogen exposure. PMID:26908385

  19. Porphyria cutanea tarda associated with HFE C282Y homozygosity, iron overload, and use of a contraceptive vaginal ring.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Edwards, Corwin Q

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by decreased uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity in hepatocytes, uroporphyrin I and heptacarboxyl porphyrin III accumulation, photosensitivity dermatitis, and increased storage iron. In women, estrogen therapy, including oral contraceptives, postmenopausal hormone replacement, and tamoxifen for breast cancer treatment, is a risk factor for PCT. We report the case of a woman who presented with PCT, HFE C282Y homozygosity, and hepatic iron overload and was using a contraceptive vaginal ring containing ethinyl estradiol, an estrogen. We discuss this case in the context of characteristics of other persons with PCT, including common HFE mutations, iron overload, and estrogen exposure. PMID:26908385

  20. Viral diseases and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It includes classification of viral infection. It describes common ways of virus entry, replication, and transmission. It introduces the routes of viral invasion and molecular basis for viral pathogenesis....

  1. Mechanisms of intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial peptides of Edwardsiella ictaluri and its influence on fish gut inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Taylor; Loh, Amanda; Pohlenz, Camilo; Gatlin, Delbert M.; Curtiss, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The genus Edwardsiella comprises a genetically distinct taxon related to other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It consists of bacteria differing strongly in their biochemical and physiological features, natural habitats, and pathogenic properties. Intrinsic resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) is a specific property of the genus Edwardsiella. In particular, Edwardsiella ictaluri, an important pathogen of the catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) aquaculture and the causative agent of a fatal systemic infection, is highly resistant to CAMPs. E. ictaluri mechanisms of resistance to CAMPs are unknown. We hypothesized that E. ictaluri lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a role in both virulence and resistance to CAMPs. The putative genes related to LPS oligo-polysaccharide (O-PS) synthesis were in-frame deleted. Individual deletions of wibT, gne and ugd eliminated synthesis of the O-PS, causing auto-agglutination, rough colonies, biofilm-like formation and motility defects. Deletion of ugd, the gene that encodes the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase enzyme responsible for synthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid, causes sensitivity to CAMPs, indicating that UDP-glucuronic acid and its derivatives are related to CAMP intrinsic resistance. E. ictaluri OP-S mutants showed different levels of attenuation, colonization of lymphoid tissues and immune protection in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and catfish. Orally inoculated catfish with O-PS mutant strains presented different degrees of gut inflammation and colonization of lymphoid tissues. Here we conclude that intrinsic resistance to CAMPs is mediated by Ugd enzyme, which has a pleiotropic effect in E. ictaluri influencing LPS synthesis, motility, agglutination, fish gut inflammation and virulence. PMID:23676433

  2. Propioniciclava tarda gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yoshimichi; Ueki, Atsuko; Abe, Kunihiro; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2011-09-01

    Two facultatively anaerobic bacterial strains, designated WR061(T) and WR054, were isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. The two strains were phylogenetically positioned close to one another and had almost the same phenotypic properties. Cells were Gram-reaction-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, irregular rods. Cobalamin (vitamin B₁₂) was required for growth. The strains utilized various carbohydrates, including hexoses and disaccharides, and produced acetate and propionate from these carbohydrates. Pentoses and polysaccharides were not utilized. They grew at 20-37 °C (optimum 35 °C) and pH 5.3-8.0 (optimum pH 6.8-7.5). Catalase and nitrate-reducing activities were detected. Aesculin was hydrolysed. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C₁₅:₀ and C₁₅:₀ DMA, the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone MK-9(H₄) and the genomic DNA G+C content was 69.3-69.5  mol%. The diagnostic diamino acid in the peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the strains in the phylum Actinobacteria. Both strains were remotely related to the species in the family Propionibacteriaceae and Propionibacterium propionicum JCM 5830(T) was the most closely related type strain with a sequence similarity of 91.6 %. Based on phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, the two novel strains together represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Propioniciclava tarda gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WR061(T) ( = JCM 15804(T)  = DSM 22130(T)). PMID:20971831

  3. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus important bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with Edwardsiella ictaluri results in $40 - 50 million annual losses in profits to catfish producers. Early detection of this pathogen is necessary for disease control and reduction of economic loss. In this communication, the loop-mediated isothermal a...

  4. Antibiotic sensitivity and molecular analyses demonstrate a lack of IncA/C plasmid in modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance was first discovered in Edwardsiella ictaluri in the early 1990’s and in 2007, an E. ictaluri strain harboring an IncA/C plasmid was isolated from a moribund channel catfish infected with the bacterium. Due to the recent identification of IncA/C plasmids in aqu...

  5. TLR5, NRAMP, TNF, AND Hepcidin Response to Challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri in Channel Catfish Families with High and Low Susceptibility to Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Responses of toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp), and hepcidin to experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri in two families of channel catfish were measured in order to understand the mechanisms through which E. i...

  6. In vitro and in vivo interaction of macrophages from vaccinated and non-vaccinated channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) to Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages from modified live vaccinated and non-vaccinated catfish were used in in vitro and in vivo studies with red fluorescent Edwardsiella ictaluri to assess phagocytic ability, reactive oxygen and nitric oxide production and bactericidal activity. In the in vitro experiment, macrophages were...

  7. Vaccination of full-sib channel catfish families against enteric septicemia of catfish with an oral live attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the efficacy of an oral live-attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine against enteric septicemia of catfish in 20 full-sib fingerling channel catfish families. Each family was split into vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups. The vaccine was delivered orally by feeding fish diet...

  8. Spleen size and plasma levels of mannose binding lectin in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus families exhibiting different susceptibilities to Flavobacterium columnare and Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two major problems in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) aquaculture industry have been high disease losses to enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri and columnaris disease, caused by the bacterium Flavobacterium columnare. Methods to control these...

  9. IMMUNIZATION OF EYED CHANNEL CATFISH, ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS, EGGS WITH MONOVALENT FLAVOBACTERIUM COLUMNARE VACCINE AND BIVALENT F. COLUMNARE AND EDWARDSIELLA ICTALURI VACCINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of a modified live monovalent Flavobacterium columnare vaccine and bivalent F. columnare and Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccines were evaluated following immersion vaccination of eyed channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) eggs. The modified live F. columnare vaccine was grown in modified Sh...

  10. Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and t...

  11. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  12. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on growth and susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose and rhamnose binding lectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of essential oils (EO) on growth and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Weight gain and food conversion ratio were similar. After exposing fish to virulent E. ictaluri, survival was higher (69.5 vs 48.4%) in fish fed EO (P < 0.05). In ...

  13. Identification and expression profile of multiple genes in the anterior kidney of channel catfish induced by modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 57 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from 240 clones of a modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri-vaccinated vs sham-vaccinated channel catfish anterior kidney subtractive library. The transcription levels of the 57 ESTs in response t...

  14. Growth Performance and Resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri of Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)Fed Diets Containing Distiller's Dried Grains with Solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to examine the effect of dietary levels of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth, body composition, hematology, immune response and resistance of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, to Edwardsiella ictaluri challenge. Five diets containing 0, 10, 20, 30 and ...

  15. Identification and expression profile of multiple genes in the anterior kidney of channel catfish induced by modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 57 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from 240 clones of a modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri-vaccinated vs sham-vaccinated channel catfish anterior kidney subtractive library. The transcription levels of the 57 ESTs in response t...

  16. Spleen index and mannose-binding lectin levels in four channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus families exhibiting different susceptibilities to Flavobacterium columnare and Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare are two bacterial pathogens that impact the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus aquaculture. Some progress has been made at the USDA-ARS Catfish Genetics Research Unit in selectively breeding for resistance to E. ictaluri; however, the susceptibili...

  17. Modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine, AQUAVAC-ESC, lacks multidrug resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Lafrentz, Benjamin R; Welch, Timothy J; Shoemaker, Craig A; Drennan, John D; Klesius, Phillip H

    2011-12-01

    Plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance was first discovered in Edwardsiella ictaluri in the early 1990s, and in 2007 an E. ictaluri isolate harboring an IncA/C plasmid was recovered from a moribund channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with the bacterium. Due to the identification of multidrug resistance plasmids in aquaculture and their potential clinical importance, we sought to determine whether the modified live E. ictaluri vaccine strain in AQUAVAC-ESC harbors such plasmids, so that the use of this vaccine will not directly contribute to the pool of bacteria carrying plasmid-borne resistance. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing of the E. ictaluri parent isolate and vaccine strain demonstrated that both were sensitive to 15 of the 16 antimicrobials tested. Total DNA from each isolate was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a set of 13 primer pairs specific for conserved regions of the IncA/C plasmid backbone, and no specific products were obtained. PCR-based replicon typing of the parent isolate and vaccine strain demonstrated the absence of the 18 commonly occurring plasmid incompatibility groups. These results demonstrate that the vaccine strain does not carry resistance to commonly used antimicrobials and provide strong support for the absence of IncA/C and other commonly occurring plasmid incompatibility groups. Therefore, its use should not directly contribute to the pool of bacteria carrying plasmid-borne resistance. This work highlights the importance of thoroughly investigating potential vaccine strains for the presence of plasmids or other transmissible elements that may encode resistance to antibiotics. PMID:22372247

  18. Immunofluorescent test for simultaneous detection of Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare.

    PubMed

    Panangalal, Victor S; Shelby, Richard A; Shoemaker, Craig A; Klesius, Phillip H; Mitra, Amitava; Morrison, Edward E

    2006-03-01

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) and columnaris disease are 2 bacterial diseases significantly affecting the aquaculture industry, and thus rapid diagnosis of disease is imperative for making judicious management decisions. A rapid indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test with antibody conjugated fluorochromes having 2 different spectral properties (Alexa Fluor 488-emitting green fluorescence, and Alexa Fluor 594-emitting red fluorescence) was compared with bacteriological culture (accepted standard) for simultaneous detection of Edwardsiella ictaluri (EI) and Flavobacterium columnare (FC) in 3 groups of experimentally infected channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque), and a fourth group that acquired an aquarium-infection with F. columnare. A total of 303 samples (derived from kidney, brain and nares) from 101 fish were concurrently examined by both tests. Fish in the 3 experimentally infected groups (I to III) were culture positive for the bacteria with which they were infected, and fish in Group IV, (the spontaneously infected fish) revealed F. columnare only. The IFA test compared favorably in sensitivity (EI= 80.7 %; FC = 87.2%) and specificity (EI = 83.9%; FC = 88.9%) with the standard bacteriological culture. The positive predictive value (EI = 96.2% Group I, 90.8% Group II, 93.7% Groups I and II combined; FC = 95.2% Group II, 95.3% Groups II, III and IV combined) was high, while the negative predictive value (EI = 66.7% Group I, 31.3% Group II, 59.5% Groups I and II combined; FC = 73.7% Group II, 72.7% Groups II, III and IV combined) was relatively low. The IFA test will serve as an efficient tool for rapid simultaneous detection of E. ictaluri and F. columnare in outbreaks of disease. PMID:16610585

  19. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  20. Pathogenesis of Castleman's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Li, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder that comprises at least two distinct clinical subtypes (unicentric and multicentric). Three pathologic variants (hyaline vascular variant, plasma cell variant, and mixed variant) have been recognized. In addition to interleukin-6 and human herpes virus 8, some other cytokines and viruses may also be involved in the pathogenesis of CD. This review summarizes the recent advances in the underlying pathogenesis of CD, with an attempt to provide evidence for new treatment options that may change the current treatment strategies and improve patients' outcomes. PMID:26956866

  1. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease: Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas. PMID:24415861

  3. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  4. [Pathogenesis of hypophosphatemia].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Chronic hypophosphatemia is seriously involved in several disorders of musculoskeletal system. Symptoms of patients are usually non-specific, such as pain with or without muscle weakness on lower extremities and are often hard to be correctly diagnosed. It is clinically important for physicians to understand pathogenesis and clinical features of hypophosphatemia and its related diseases. PMID:26813499

  5. Schwannomas and their pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilton, David A; Hanemann, Clemens Oliver

    2014-04-01

    Schwannomas may occur spontaneously, or in the context of a familial tumor syndrome such as neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), schwannomatosis and Carney's complex. Schwannomas have a variety of morphological appearances, but they behave as World Health Organization (WHO) grade I tumors, and only very rarely undergo malignant transformation. Central to the pathogenesis of these tumors is loss of function of merlin, either by direct genetic change involving the NF2 gene on chromosome 22 or secondarily to merlin inactivation. The genetic pathways and morphological features of schwannomas associated with different genetic syndromes will be discussed. Merlin has multiple functions, including within the nucleus and at the cell membrane, and this review summarizes our current understanding of the mechanisms by which merlin loss is involved in schwannoma pathogenesis, highlighting potential areas for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24450866

  6. Chronic rhinosinusitis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Lee, Robert J; Schleimer, Robert P; Cohen, Noam A

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of medical conditions associated with chronic sinonasal inflammation, including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and cystic fibrosis. In particular, CRS can be divided into 2 major subgroups based on whether nasal polyps are present or absent. Unfortunately, clinical treatment strategies for patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation are limited, in part because the underlying mechanisms contributing to disease pathology are heterogeneous and not entirely known. It is hypothesized that alterations in mucociliary clearance, abnormalities in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, and tissue remodeling all contribute to the chronic inflammatory and tissue-deforming processes characteristic of CRS. Additionally, the host innate and adaptive immune responses are also significantly activated and might be involved in pathogenesis. Recent advancements in the understanding of CRS pathogenesis are highlighted in this review, with special focus placed on the roles of epithelial cells and the host immune response in patients with cystic fibrosis, CRS without nasal polyps, or CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:26654193

  7. [Pathogenesis of psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Schäkel, K; Schön, M P; Ghoreschi, K

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of skin and joints that affects 2-4 % of the adult population and 0.1-1 % of children. Genetic susceptibility, environmental triggering factors, and innate immune processes initiate psoriasis pathogenesis that results in an adaptive autoreactive response. The T cell response is orchestrated by CD 8(+) T cells in the epidermis and by CD 4(+) T cells in the dermis that predominantly produce interleukin-17 (IL‑17). Research of the past 15 years unraveled cellular and molecular mechanisms as well as cytokines like TNF-α or IL‑23 that contribute to psoriatic inflammation. This knowledge has been translated into clinical practice and a number of antipsoriatic small molecules and immunobiologics are now available. Here, we discuss the current principles of psoriasis pathogenesis in the context of modern therapies. PMID:27246016

  8. Complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from methanogenic digester sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen -Tso

    2014-09-04

    In this study, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  9. Pathogenesis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Scott M.; Berryhill, Taylor F.; Ellenburg, James L.; Jilling, Tamas; Cleveland, Dava S.; Lorenz, Robin G.; Martin, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. The pathophysiology is likely secondary to innate immune responses to intestinal microbiota by the premature infant's intestinal tract, leading to inflammation and injury. This review provides an updated summary of the components of the innate immune system involved in NEC pathogenesis. In addition, we evaluate the animal models that have been used to study NEC with regard to the involvement of innate immune factors and histopathological changes as compared to those seen in infants with NEC. Finally, we discuss new approaches to studying NEC, including mathematical models of intestinal injury and the use of humanized mice. PMID:25447054

  10. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  11. Update on mucormycosis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Mucormycosis is an increasingly common fungal infection with unacceptably high mortality. The recent sequencing genome projects of Mucorales and the development of gene manipulation have enabled significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Therefore, we review the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and highlight potential development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities against this lethal disease. Recent findings Much of the work has been focused on the role of iron uptake in the virulence of Mucorales. Additionally, host receptors and fungal ligands involved in the process of tissue invasion as well as sporangiospore size and sex loci and their contribution to virulence of Mucorales are discussed. Finally, the role of innate and adaptive immunity in protection against Mucorales and new evidence about drug-induced apoptosis in these fungi are discussed. Summary Recent discoveries introduce several potentially novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, which are likely to improve management and outcome for mucormycosis. Future preclinical and clinical research is warranted to develop these diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24126718

  12. Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Kleber, Andre G; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a primary myocardial disease. It is characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death typically arising as an early manifestation before the onset of significant myocardial remodelling. Myocardial degeneration, often confined to the right ventricular free wall, with replacement by fibrofatty scar tissue, develops in many patients. ACM is a familial disease but genetic penetrance can be low and disease expression is highly variable. Inflammation might promote disease progression. It also appears that exercise increases disease penetrance and accelerates its development. More than 60% of probands harbour mutations in genes that encode desmosomal proteins, which has raised the possibility that defective cell-cell adhesion might play a role in disease pathogenesis. Recent advances have implicated changes in the canonical wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin and Hippo signalling pathways and defects in forwarding trafficking of ion channels and other proteins to the intercalated disk in cardiac myocytes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ACM and highlight future research directions. PMID:26199027

  13. Controversies in dengue pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B

    2012-05-01

    Research into the pathogenesis of dengue fever has exploded over the last half-century, with issues that were considered simple becoming more complex as additional data are found. This has led to the development of a number of controversies that are being studied across the globe and debated in the literature. In this paper, the following six controversies are analysed and, where possible, resolved: the 1997 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) is not useful; DHF is not significantly associated with secondary dengue infection; DHF results from infection with a 'virulent' dengue virus; DHF is owing to abnormal T-cell responses; DHF results from auto-immune responses; and DHF results from direct infection of endothelial cells. PMID:22668442

  14. Molecular pathogenesis of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2008-02-01

    Emphysema is one manifestation of a group of chronic, obstructive, and frequently progressive destructive lung diseases. Cigarette smoking and air pollution are the main causes of emphysema in humans, and cigarette smoking causes emphysema in rodents. This review examines the concept of a homeostatically active lung structure maintenance program that, when attacked by proteases and oxidants, leads to the loss of alveolar septal cells and airspace enlargement. Inflammatory and noninflammatory mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, as well as the role of the innate and adaptive immune systems, are being explored in genetically altered animals and in exposure models of this disease. These recent scientific advances support a model whereby alveolar destruction resulting from a coalescence of mechanical forces, such as hyperinflation, and more recently recognized cellular and molecular events, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, and failed lung tissue repair, produces the clinically recognized syndrome of emphysema. PMID:18246188

  15. Pathogenesis of glomerular haematuria

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Claudia; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Sevillano, Angel Manuel; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro-Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; Praga, Manuel; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria was known as a benign hallmark of some glomerular diseases, but over the last decade, new evidences pointed its negative implications on kidney disease progression. Cytotoxic effects of oxidative stress induced by hemoglobin, heme, or iron released from red blood cells may account for the tubular injury observed in human biopsy specimens. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for haematuria remain unclear. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) with irregular contours and shape in the urine indicates RBCs egression from the glomerular capillary into the urinary space. Therefore glomerular haematuria may be a marker of glomerular filtration barrier dysfunction or damage. In this review we describe some key issues regarding epidemiology and pathogenesis of haematuric diseases as well as their renal morphological findings. PMID:25949932

  16. Pathogenesis of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    As for most multifactorial disorders, the pathogenesis of osteoporosis is complex, and a different set of mechanisms may be operative in any given individual. However, there are certain common causes of bone loss and increased fracture risk with aging in most people. These include genetic factors contributing to the acquisition of peak bone mass, illnesses affecting skeletal growth and development, sex steroid deficiency following the menopause in women and with aging in men, and intrinsic, age-related changes in bone metabolism. Superimposed on these factors are specific secondary causes of bone loss, such as corticosteroid use or other illnesses affecting bone metabolism that may contribute to fracture risk in individuals exposed to these factors. The past decade has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of each of these various causes of bone loss, leading to the development of novel, mechanism-based therapeutic approaches to prevent and treat this important public health disorder. PMID:25243055

  17. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  18. Microbial pathogenesis meets biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Charles-Orszag, Arthur; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy; Duménil, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    Introducing concepts from soft matter physics and mechanics has largely contributed to our understanding of a variety of biological processes. In this review, we argue that this holds true for bacterial pathogenesis. We base this argument on three examples of bacterial pathogens and their interaction with host cells during infection: (i) Shigella flexneri exploits actin-dependent forces to come into close contact with epithelial cells prior to invasion of the epithelium; (ii) Neisseria meningitidis manipulates endothelial cells to resist shear stress during vascular colonization; (iii) bacterial toxins take advantage of the biophysical properties of the host cell plasma membrane to generate transcellular macroapertures in the vascular wall. Together, these examples show that a multidisciplinary approach integrating physics and biology is more necessary than ever to understand complex infectious phenomena. Moreover, this avenue of research will allow the exploration of general processes in cell biology, highlighted by pathogens, in the context of other non-communicable human diseases. PMID:26849533

  19. Molecular pathogenesis of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2008-01-01

    Emphysema is one manifestation of a group of chronic, obstructive, and frequently progressive destructive lung diseases. Cigarette smoking and air pollution are the main causes of emphysema in humans, and cigarette smoking causes emphysema in rodents. This review examines the concept of a homeostatically active lung structure maintenance program that, when attacked by proteases and oxidants, leads to the loss of alveolar septal cells and airspace enlargement. Inflammatory and noninflammatory mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, as well as the role of the innate and adaptive immune systems, are being explored in genetically altered animals and in exposure models of this disease. These recent scientific advances support a model whereby alveolar destruction resulting from a coalescence of mechanical forces, such as hyperinflation, and more recently recognized cellular and molecular events, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, and failed lung tissue repair, produces the clinically recognized syndrome of emphysema. PMID:18246188

  20. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  1. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  2. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, K. E.; Stevens, W. W.; Tan, B. K.; Schleimer, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  3. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Hulse, K E; Stevens, W W; Tan, B K; Schleimer, R P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  4. Pathogenesis of Candida vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Sobel, J D

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of candida vulvovaginitis (CVV) has been estimated based on statistical data from Great Britain to be an increase to 200/100,000 over 10 years to 1984. CVV in the US is the 2nd commonest cause of vaginal infection, with bacterial vaginosis occurring twice as often. 85-90% of the yeasts isolated from the vagina are candida albicans, based on biotyping rather that the newer methods of DNA hybridization. The pathogenesis of CVV is discussed in terms of the microbiology (virulence factors, adherence, germ tube and mycelium formation, proteinase secretion, and switching colonies), asymptomatic vaginal colonization, transformation to symptomatic vaginitis, host predisposing factors (pregnancy, oral contraceptives, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobes, and other), vaginal defense mechanisms (humoral system, phagocytic system, cell mediated immunity, vaginal flora, other), and pathogenesis of recurrent and chronic CVV (internal reservoir, sexual transmission, vaginal relapse, and experimental models) The discussion of the development of virulent symptoms is capsuled in the following comments. Vaginal cell receptivity varies among individuals, but all strains of C. Albicans adhere to both exfoliated vaginal and buccal epithelial cells, or mucosal surfaces, through the yeast surface mannoprotein. It is suggested from in vitro studies that germ tube and mycelium formation facilitates vaginal mucosal invasion. Exogenous and endogenous factors may enhance germination and precipitate symptomatic vaginitis, or inhibit germination. Increased proteinase secretion may be a result of the transformation from the blastoconidium/colonization phase to the germinated invasive vaginitis stage or an independent virulence factor. It is reported that hereditable spontaneous switching may occur spontaneously in vivo also. Colonizing yeasts with a change in environment can transform to a more virulent phase. Colonization rates vary from 10-25%, and the critical issue is understanding

  5. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions. PMID:24966602

  6. Pathogenesis of rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Eifan, A O; Durham, S R

    2016-09-01

    Rhinitis is a heterogeneous condition that has been associated with inflammatory responses as in allergic rhinitis but can also occur in the absence of inflammation such as in so-called idiopathic (previously 'vasomotor') rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis affects approximately one in four of the population of westernized countries and is characterized by typical symptoms of nasal itching, sneezing, watery discharge and congestion. The intention of this review is to illustrate key concepts of the pathogenesis of rhinitis. Imbalance in innate and adaptive immunity together with environmental factors is likely to play major roles. In allergic rhinitis, initial allergen exposure and sensitization involves antigen-presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes and results in the generation of allergen-specific T cells and allergen-specific IgE antibodies. On re-exposure to relevant allergens, cross-linking of IgE on mast cells results in the release of mediators of hypersensitivity such as histamine and immediate nasal symptoms. Within hours, there is an infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly Th2 T lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils into nasal mucosal tissue that results in the late-phase allergic response. Evidence for nasal priming and whether or not remodelling may be a feature of allergic rhinitis will be reviewed. The occurrence of so-called local allergic rhinitis in the absence of systemic IgE will be discussed. Non-allergic (non-IgE-mediated) rhinitis will be considered in the context of inflammatory and non-inflammatory disorders. PMID:27434218

  7. Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a necro-inflammatory response that ensues when hepatocytes are injured by lipids (lipotoxicity). NASH is a potential outcome of nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), a condition that occurs when lipids accumulate in hepatocytes. NASH may be reversible, but it can also result in cirrhosis and primary liver cancer. We are beginning to learn about the mechanisms of progression of NAFL and NASH. NAFL does not inevitably lead to NASH because NAFL is a heterogeneous condition. This heterogeneity exists because different types of lipids with different cytotoxic potential accumulate in the NAFL, and individuals with NAFL differ in their ability to defend against lipotoxicity. There are no tests that reliably predict which patients with NAFL will develop lipotoxicity. However, NASH encompasses the spectrum of wound-healing responses induced by lipotoxic hepatocytes. Differences in these wound-healing responses among individuals determine whether lipotoxic livers regenerate, leading to stabilization or resolution of NASH, or develop progressive scarring, cirrhosis, and possibly liver cancer. We review concepts that are central to the pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:26928243

  8. Pathogenesis of Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Brad; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection that occurs in patients who are immunocompromised because of diabetic ketoacidosis, neutropenia, organ transplantation, and/or increased serum levels of available iron. Because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, cancer, and organ transplantation, the number of patients at risk for this deadly infection is increasing. Despite aggressive therapy, which includes disfiguring surgical debridement and frequently adjunctive toxic antifungal therapy, the overall mortality rate is high. New strategies to prevent and treat mucormycosis are urgently needed. Understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and the host response to invading hyphae ultimately will provide targets for novel therapeutic interventions. In this supplement, we review the current knowledge about the virulence traits used by the most common etiologic agent of mucormycosis, Rhizopus oryzae. Because patients with elevated serum levels of available iron are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis and these infections are highly angioinvasive, emphasis is placed on the ability of the organism to acquire iron from the host and on its interactions with endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Several promising therapeutic strategies in preclinical stages are identified. PMID:22247441

  9. Recent progress in melasma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ai-Young

    2015-11-01

    Melasma is a common skin pigmentation condition. Given therapeutic difficulty as one of the biggest concerns, understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of melasma becomes essential. UV irradiation, female sex hormones, and inflammatory processes are addressed as triggering factors with genetic predisposition. The mechanism of UV-induced melanogenesis has been extensively investigated as a model system to study melasma pathogenesis. Hitherto, treatment modalities for melasma are similar to other hyperpigmentation disorders. However, individual triggering factors induce a separate pigmentation disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms and clinical phenotypes are different from the ones encountered in melasma. Fortunately, there have been ongoing updates on melasma pathogenesis with regard to major triggering factors. Presence of certain factors working independently of UV exposure and role of dermal factors and microRNAs are being identified as novel discoveries about melasma pathogenesis. In this review, the melasma pathogenesis is reviewed in association with updated and new findings. PMID:26230865

  10. The pathogenesis of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bone, R C

    1991-09-15

    Sepsis and its sequelae (sepsis syndrome and septic shock) are increasingly common and are still potentially lethal diagnoses. Many mediators of the pathogenesis of sepsis have recently been described. These include tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukins, platelet activating factor, leukotrienes, thromboxane A2, and activators of the complement cascade. Neutrophil and platelet activation may also play a role. Other agents that may participate in the sepsis cascade include adhesion molecules, kinins, thrombin, myocardial depressant substance, beta-endorphin, and heat shock proteins. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor and endothelin-1 are released from the endothelium and seem to exert a regulatory effect, counterbalancing each other. A central mediator of sepsis does not seem to exist, although TNF alpha has been commonly proposed for this role. Animal studies are difficult to extrapolate to the clinical setting because of cross-species differences and variations in experimental design. Rather than being caused by any single pathogenic mechanism, it is more likely that sepsis is related to the state of activation of the target cell, the nearby presence of other mediators, and the ability of the target cell to release other mediators. Also important is the downregulation or negative feedback of these mediators or the generation of natural inflammation inhibitors, such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-8. Endothelial damage in sepsis probably results from persistent and repetitive inflammatory insults. Eventually, these insults produce sufficient damage that downregulation can no longer occur; this leads to a state of metabolic anarchy in which the body can no longer control its own inflammatory response. PMID:1872494

  11. The effects of feeding β-glucan to Pangasianodon hypophthalmus on immune gene expression and resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Sirimanapong, Wanna; Thompson, Kim D; Ooi, Ei Lin; Bekaert, Michaël; Collet, Bertrand; Taggart, John B; Bron, James E; Green, Darren M; Shinn, Andrew P; Adams, Alexandra; Leaver, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (striped catfish) is an important aquaculture species and intensification of farming has increased disease problems, particularly Edwardsiella ictaluri. The effects of feeding β-glucans on immune gene expression and resistance to E. ictaluri in P. hypophthalmus were explored. Fish were fed 0.1% fungal-derived β-glucan or 0.1% commercial yeast-derived β-glucan or a basal control diet without glucan. After 14 days of feeding, the mRNA expression of immune genes (transferrin, C-reactive protein, precerebellin-like protein, Complement C3 and factor B, 2a MHC class II and interleukin-1 beta) in liver, kidney and spleen were determined. Following this fish from each of the three diet treatment groups were infected with E. ictaluri and further gene expression measured 24 h post-infection (h.p.i.), while the remaining fish were monitored over 2 weeks for mortalities. Cumulative percentage mortality at 14 days post-infection (d.p.i.) was less in β-glucan fed fish compared to controls. There was no difference in gene expression between dietary groups after feeding for 14 days, but there was a clear difference between infected and uninfected fish at 24 h.p.i., and based on principal component analysis β-glucans stimulated the overall expression of immune genes in the liver, kidney and spleen at 24 h.p.i. PMID:26439415

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates from natural outbreaks of bacillary necrosis of Pangasianodon hypophthalmus in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tu, Thanh Dung; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Baele, Margo; Decostere, Annemie

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro susceptibility of 64 Vietnamese isolates of Edwardsiella ictaluri, the causal agent of the infectious disease Bacillus Necrosis Pangasius in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, using the agar dilution technique. All isolates originated from different farms and were collected between 2002 and 2005. None of the isolates displayed acquired resistance to amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, and nitrofurantoin. Acquired resistance to streptomycin was detected in 83%, to oxytetracycline in 81%, and to trimethoprim in 71% of the isolates, as indicated by a bimodal distribution of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of these antimicrobials. The MICs of enrofloxacin displayed a monomodal distribution with tailing toward the higher MIC values, possibly indicating reduced susceptibility of a minority of isolates (3 out of the 64). For the quinolone antimicrobial agents flumequin and oxolinic acid, acquired resistance was encountered in 8% and 6% of the strains, respectively. All strains were intrinsically resistant to the polypeptide antimicrobial agent colistin. Seventy-three percent of the isolates were shown to have acquired resistance to at least three antimicrobial agents. The results of this study emphasize the strict need to control both the prophylactic and curative use of antimicrobial agents in Vietnamese aquaculture. PMID:19090723

  13. Mortality and pathology in brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus associated with a spontaneous Edwardsiella ictaluri outbreak under tank culture conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Griffin, A.R.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Blazer, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    Brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus (family Ictaluridae) are commonly used as a sentinel of environmental contamination. These fish are not generally cultured under laboratory conditions and little is known about their disease susceptibility. Here we report an outbreak of disease due to Edwardsiella ictaluri in a laboratory population of tank-reared, wild-caught brown bullheads. The isolate was positively identified as E. ictaluri using standard bacteriological substrate utilization tests and a monoclonal antibody specific for this bacterium. This pathogen causes a significant disease in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and is associated with disease in other ictalurid and non-ictalurid fishes. It appears that E. ictaluri is also a significant pathogen in brown bullheads and produces clinical signs and lesions similar but not identical to those observed in channel catfish. Since commercial sources of bullheads for laboratory tank studies are not available, precautions should be taken to prevent potential E. ictaluri disease outbreaks from wild-caught bullheads intended for laboratory research. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  14. Multiplex-PCR for simultaneous detection of 3 bacterial fish pathogens, Flavobacterium columnare, Edwardsiella ictaluri, and Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Panangala, Victor S; Shoemaker, Craig A; Van Santen, Vicky L; Dybvig, Kevin; Klesius, Phillip H

    2007-03-13

    A multiplex PCR (m-PCR) method was developed for simultaneous detection of 3 important fish pathogens in warm water aquaculture. The m-PCR to amplify target DNA fragments from Flavobacterium columnare (504 bp), Edwardsiella ictaluri (407 bp) and Aeromonas hydrophila (209 bp) was optimized by adjustment of reaction buffers and a touchdown protocol. The lower detection limit for each of the 3 bacteria was 20 pg of nucleic acid template from each bacteria per m-PCR reaction mixture. The sensitivity threshold for detection of the 3 bacteria in tissues ranged between 3.4 x 10(2) and 2.5 x 10(5) cells g(-1) of tissue (channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the m-PCR was evaluated with 10 representative isolates of each of the 3 bacteria and 11 other Gram-negative and 2 Gram-positive bacteria that are taxonomically related or ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Except for a single species (A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida), each set of primers specifically amplified the target DNA of the cognate species of bacteria. m-PCR was compared with bacteriological culture for identification of bacteria in experimentally infected fish. The m-PCR appears promising for the rapid, sensitive and simultaneous detection of Flavobacterium columnare, E. ictaluri and A. hydrophila in infected fish compared to the time-consuming traditional bacteriological culture techniques. PMID:17465305

  15. Intraspecific diversity of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates from diseased freshwater catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (Sauvage), cultured in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bartie, K L; Austin, F W; Diab, A; Dickson, C; Dung, T T; Giacomini, M; Crumlish, M

    2012-09-01

    A molecular epidemiology study was conducted on 90 Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates recovered from diseased farmed freshwater catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, cultured in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Thirteen isolates of E. ictaluri derived from diseased channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, cultured in the USA were included for comparison. All the E.ictaluri isolates tested were found to be biochemically indistinguishable. A repetitive (rep)-PCR using the single (GTG)(5) primer was shown to possess limited discriminatory power, yielding two similar DNA profiles categorized as (GTG)(5) -PCR group 1 or 2 among the Vietnam isolates and (GTG)(5) -PCR group 1 within the USA isolates. Macrorestriction analysis identified 14 and 22 unique pulsotypes by XbaI and SpeI, respectively, among a subset of 59 E. ictaluri isolates. Numerical analysis of the combined macrorestriction profiles revealed three main groups: a distinct cluster formed exclusively of the USA isolates, and a major and minor cluster with outliers contained the Vietnam isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid profiling supported the existence of the three groups. The results indicate that macrorestriction analysis may be regarded as a suitable typing method among the E. ictaluri species of limited intraspecific diversity. Furthermore, the findings suggest that E. ictaluri originating from Vietnam may constitute a distinct genetic group. PMID:22804634

  16. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  17. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  18. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    SciTech Connect

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  19. Preonset studies of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda caused by a novel 2-base pair deletion in SEDL encoding sedlin.

    PubMed

    Mumm, S; Zhang, X; Gottesman, G S; McAlister, W H; Whyte, M P

    2001-12-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDT), an X-linked recessive skeletal disorder, presents with disproportionate short stature and "barrel-chest" deformity in affected (hemizygous) adolescent boys. In four reported families to date, mutations in a gene designated SEDL (spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia late) cosegregate with SEDT. We diagnosed SEDT in a short-stature, kyphotic 15-year-old boy because of his characteristic vertebral malformations. Clinical manifestations of SEDT were evident in at least four previous generations. A novel 2-base pair (bp) deletion in exon 5 of SEDL was found in the propositus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of all four coding exons. The mutation ATdel241-242 cosegregated with the kindred's skeletal disease. The deletion is adjacent to a noncanonical splice site for exon 5 but does not alter splicing. Instead, it deletes 2 bp from the coding sequence, causing a frameshift. A maternal aunt and her three young sons were investigated subsequently. Radiographs showed subtle shaping abnormalities of her pelvis and knees, suggesting heterozygosity. X-rays of the spine and pelvis of her 8-year-old son revealed characteristic changes of SEDT, but her younger sons (aged 6 years and 3 years) showed no abnormalities. SEDL analysis confirmed that she and only her eldest boy had the 2-bp deletion. Molecular testing of SEDL enables carrier detection and definitive diagnosis before clinical or radiographic expression of SEDT. Although there is no specific treatment for SEDT, preexpression molecular testing of SEDL could be helpful if avoiding physical activities potentially injurious to the spine and the joints proves beneficial. PMID:11760838

  20. Modulation of Vacuolar pH Is Required for Replication of Edwardsiella ictaluri in Channel Catfish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Wes A.; Dubytska, Lidiya; Rogge, Matthew L.; Mottram, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous in vitro work demonstrated that Edwardsiella ictaluri produces an acid-activated urease that can modulate environmental pH through the production of ammonia from urea. Additional work revealed that expression of the E. ictaluri type III secretion system (T3SS) is upregulated by acidic pH. Both the urease and the T3SS were previously shown to be essential to intracellular replication. In this work, fluorescence microscopy with LysoTracker Red DND-99 (LTR) indicated that E. ictaluri-containing vacuoles (ECV) became acidified following ingestion by head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). In vivo ratiometric imaging demonstrated a lowered ECV pH, which fell to as low as pH 4 but subsequently increased to pH 6 or greater. Inhibition of vacuolar H+-ATPases by use of the specific inhibitor bafilomycin A1 abrogated both ECV acidification and intracellular replication in HKDM. Failure of an E. ictaluri urease knockout mutant to increase the ECV pH in the in vivo ratiometric assay suggests that ammonia produced by the urease reaction mediates the pH increase. Additionally, when the specific arginase inhibitor l-norvaline was used to treat E. ictaluri-infected HKDM, the ECV failed to neutralize and E. ictaluri was unable to replicate. This indicates that the HKDM-encoded arginase enzyme produces the urea used by the E. ictaluri urease enzyme. Failure of the ECV to acidify would prevent both upregulation of the T3SS and activation of the urease enzyme, either of which would prevent E. ictaluri from replicating in HKDM. Failure of the ECV to neutralize would result in a vacuolar pH too low to support E. ictaluri replication. PMID:24664505

  1. The Aspartate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase of Edwardsiella ictaluri and Its Use as Balanced-Lethal System in Fish Vaccinology

    PubMed Central

    Santander, Javier; Xin, Wei; Yang, Zhao; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-01-01

    asdA mutants of Gram-negative bacteria have an obligate requirement for diaminopimelic acid (DAP), which is an essential constituent of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall of these organisms. In environments deprived of DAP, i.e., animal tissues, they will undergo lysis. Deletion of the asdA gene has previously been exploited to develop antibiotic-sensitive strains of live attenuated recombinant bacterial vaccines. Introduction of an Asd+ plasmid into a ΔasdA mutant makes the bacterial strain plasmid-dependent. This dependence on the Asd+ plasmid vector creates a balanced-lethal complementation between the bacterial strain and the recombinant plasmid. E. ictaluri is an enteric Gram-negative fish pathogen that causes enteric septicemia in catfish. Because E. ictaluri is a nasal/oral invasive intracellular pathogen, this bacterium is a candidate to develop a bath/oral live recombinant attenuated Edwardsiella vaccine (RAEV) for the catfish aquaculture industry. As a first step to develop an antibiotic-sensitive RAEV strain, we characterized and deleted the E. ictaluri asdA gene. E. ictaluri ΔasdA01 mutants exhibit an absolute requirement for DAP to grow. The asdA gene of E. ictaluri was complemented by the asdA gene from Salmonella. Several Asd+ expression vectors with different origins of replication were transformed into E. ictaluri ΔasdA01. Asd+ vectors were compatible with the pEI1 and pEI2 E. ictaluri native plasmids. The balanced-lethal system was satisfactorily evaluated in vivo. Recombinant GFP, PspA, and LcrV proteins were synthesized by E. ictaluri ΔasdA01 harboring Asd+ plasmids. Here we constructed a balanced-lethal system, which is the first step to develop an antibiotic-sensitive RAEV for the aquaculture industry. PMID:21209920

  2. Oral Vaccination of Channel Catfish against Enteric Septicemia of Catfish Using a Live Attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri Isolate.

    PubMed

    Wise, David J; Greenway, Terrence E; Byars, Todd S; Griffin, Matt J; Khoo, Lester H

    2015-06-01

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is the most problematic bacterial disease affecting catfish aquaculture in the southeastern United States. Efforts to develop an effective ESC vaccine have had limited industrial success. In commercial settings, ESC vaccines are typically administered by immersion when fry are transferred from the hatchery to rearing ponds. While this approach is a practical method of mass delivery, this strategy administers vaccines to very young fish, which lack a fully developed immune system. To circumvent this limitation, an oral vaccination strategy was evaluated as a means of immunizing catfish at the fingerling stage of production, when fish possess a more complete immune arsenal. A virulent E. ictaluri isolate (S97-773) was attenuated by successive passage on media containing increasing concentrations of rifamycin. In laboratory trials, cultured vaccine was diluted and mixed with feed (100 mL diluted vaccine/454 g feed). This mixture was then fed to Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus fingerlings. Two separate dilutions of cultured vaccine (1:10 and 1:100) were used to create the vaccine-feed mixture, equating to estimated doses of 5 × 10⁷ and 5 × 10⁶ CFU/g of feed, respectively. After 30 d, catfish were exposed by immersion (1 × 10⁶ CFU/mL) to the virulent parental strain of E. ictaluri. The target dose (1:100 dilution, ∼5 × 10⁶ CFU/g of feed) offered exceptional protection (relative percent survival = 82.6-100%). In addition, negligible deaths occurred in fish vaccinated at 10 times the target dose (1:10 dilution, ∼5 × 10⁷ CFU/g of feed). In pond trials, antibody production increased 18-fold in orally vaccinated fish. When compared with nonvaccinated controls, vaccination significantly improved survival, feed fed, feed conversion, biomass produced, and total harvest. This research demonstrates Channel Catfish can be successfully immunized in a commercial setting against E. ictaluri

  3. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments. PMID:21171877

  4. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  5. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  6. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UROD in the liver. Hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder, also can predispose individuals to PCT. Symptoms ... centers regardless of whether there is confirmed iron overload. A phlebotomy is a simple and safe procedure ...

  7. FAMMM syndrome: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Rafał; Placek, Waldemar; Drewa, Gerard; Czajkowska, Aldona; Uchańska, Grazyna

    2004-02-01

    Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable incomplete penetrance of the clinical phenotypes. Pathogenesis of this syndrome has not been fully investigated. Across multiple studies, germline mutations in the INK4a antioncogene encoding p16 protein were found on average in approximately 40% of the FAMMM syndrome. Patients with the FAMMM syndrome are genetically loaded with an increased risk of developing melanoma and other malignant neoplasms, for example, a pancreatic cancer. Melanoma can develop from numerous atypical moles as well as de novo. A proper diagnosis of the syndrome and early application of prophylactics decreases the risk of neoplastic transformation of melanocytes. PMID:14871223

  8. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens. PMID:22229971

  9. Molecular pathogenesis of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqi; Pu, Chunwen; Lang, Lang; Qiao, Liang; Abdullahi, Mohanud Abukar Haji; Jiang, Chunmeng

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an inherited iron overload disorder characterized by normal iron-driven erythropoiesis and abnormal iron metabolism, leading to excess iron deposited in parenchymal cells of liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Iron hormone, hepcidin, plays a critical role in iron homeostasis through interaction with ferroportin (FPN), a major cellular iron exporter. Hepcidin is encoded by hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP). Mutations in hepcidin and any genes that regulate the biology of hepcidin, including hemochromatosis genes (HFE), Hemojuvelin (HJV), transferring receptor 2 (TFR2) and FPN, result in hemochromatosis. The identification of hepcidin and its role will provide a better understanding for pathogenesis of HH. PMID:27031690

  10. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  11. Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Winston; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes a broad clinical-histological spectrum from simple steatosis, cirrhosis, acute alcoholic hepatitis with or without cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma as a complication of cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can be conceptually divided into (1) ethanol-mediated liver injury, (2) inflammatory immune response to injury, (3) intestinal permeability and microbiome changes. Corticosteroids may improve outcomes, but this is controversial and probably only impacts short-term survival. New pathophysiology-based therapies are under study, including antibiotics, caspase inhibition, interleukin-22, anakinra, FXR agonist and others. These studies provide hope for better future outcomes for this difficult disease. PMID:27373608

  12. Pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis: inflammation.

    PubMed

    Van Crombruggen, Koen; Zhang, Nan; Gevaert, Philippe; Tomassen, Peter; Bachert, Claus

    2011-10-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases of the nasal and paranasal cavities either accompanied by polyp formation (CRSwNP) or without polyps (CRSsNP). CRSsNP and CRSwNP are prevalent medical conditions associated with substantial impaired quality of life, reduced workplace productivity, and serious medical treatment costs. Despite recent research evidence that contributes to further unveiling the pathophysiology of these chronic airway conditions, the cause remains poorly understood and appears to be multifactorial. A diverse spectrum of alterations involving histopathology, inflammatory cell and T-cell patterns, remodeling parameters (eg, TGF-β), eicosanoid and IgE production, microorganisms, and epithelial barrier malfunctions is reported in the search to describe the pathogenesis of this heterogeneous group of upper airway diseases. Furthermore, novel evidence indicates considerable heterogeneity within the CRSwNP subgroup determining the risk of comorbid asthma. The characterization of specific disease subgroups is a challenging scientific and clinical task of utmost importance in the development of diagnostic tools and application of individualized treatments. This review focuses on recent evidence that sheds new light on our current knowledge regarding the inflammatory process of CRS to further unravel its pathogenesis. PMID:21868076

  13. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jesper B

    2015-02-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop with no apparent etiological background. The impact of the stromal compartment on tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy is in vogue, and the epithelial-stromal crosstalk may present a target for novel treatment strategies. As such, the complexity of tumor cellularity and the molecular mechanisms underlying the diversity of growth patterns of this malignancy remain a clinical concern. It is crucial to advance our present understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CCA to improve current clinical strategies and patient outcome. This will facilitate the delineation of patient subsets and individualization for precision therapies. Many questions persevere as to the evolutionary process and cellular origin of the initial transforming event, the context of intratumoral plasticity and the causal driver action. Next-generation sequencing has begun to underline the persistent alterations, which may be the trigger of acquired drug resistance, and the cause of metastasis and disease recurrence. A complex issue that remains is to account for the heterogeneous pool of "backseat" aberrations, which in chromosomal proximity to the causative variant are likely to influence, for example, drug response. This review explores the recent advances in defining the molecular pathways implicated in the development of this devastating disease and, which present putative clinical strategies. PMID:25174625

  14. Pathogenesis of Varicelloviruses in primates

    PubMed Central

    Ouwendijk, Werner J.D.; Verjans, Georges M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation. PMID:25255989

  15. Arterivirus molecular biology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Snijder, Eric J; Kikkert, Marjolein; Fang, Ying

    2013-10-01

    Arteriviruses are positive-stranded RNA viruses that infect mammals. They can cause persistent or asymptomatic infections, but also acute disease associated with a respiratory syndrome, abortion or lethal haemorrhagic fever. During the past two decades, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and, to a lesser extent, equine arteritis virus (EAV) have attracted attention as veterinary pathogens with significant economic impact. Particularly noteworthy were the 'porcine high fever disease' outbreaks in South-East Asia and the emergence of new virulent PRRSV strains in the USA. Recently, the family was expanded with several previously unknown arteriviruses isolated from different African monkey species. At the molecular level, arteriviruses share an intriguing but distant evolutionary relationship with coronaviruses and other members of the order Nidovirales. Nevertheless, several of their characteristics are unique, including virion composition and structure, and the conservation of only a subset of the replicase domains encountered in nidoviruses with larger genomes. During the past 15 years, the advent of reverse genetics systems for EAV and PRRSV has changed and accelerated the structure-function analysis of arterivirus RNA and protein sequences. These systems now also facilitate studies into host immune responses and arterivirus immune evasion and pathogenesis. In this review, we have summarized recent advances in the areas of arterivirus genome expression, RNA and protein functions, virion architecture, virus-host interactions, immunity, and pathogenesis. We have also briefly reviewed the impact of these advances on disease management, the engineering of novel candidate live vaccines and the diagnosis of arterivirus infection. PMID:23939974

  16. Pathogenesis and Immunobiology of Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Paul; Ficht, Thomas A.; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Adams, L. Garry

    2016-01-01

    This review of Brucella–host interactions and immunobiology discusses recent discoveries as the basis for pathogenesis-informed rationales to prevent or treat brucellosis. Brucella spp., as animal pathogens, cause human brucellosis, a zoonosis that results in worldwide economic losses, human morbidity, and poverty. Although Brucella spp. infect humans as an incidental host, 500,000 new human infections occur annually, and no patient-friendly treatments or approved human vaccines are reported. Brucellae display strong tissue tropism for lymphoreticular and reproductive systems with an intracellular lifestyle that limits exposure to innate and adaptive immune responses, sequesters the organism from the effects of antibiotics, and drives clinical disease manifestations and pathology. Stealthy brucellae exploit strategies to establish infection, including i) evasion of intracellular destruction by restricting fusion of type IV secretion system-dependent Brucella-containing vacuoles with lysosomal compartments, ii) inhibition of apoptosis of infected mononuclear cells, and iii) prevention of dendritic cell maturation, antigen presentation, and activation of naive T cells, pathogenesis lessons that may be informative for other intracellular pathogens. Data sets of next-generation sequences of Brucella and host time-series global expression fused with proteomics and metabolomics data from in vitro and in vivo experiments now inform interactive cellular pathways and gene regulatory networks enabling full-scale systems biology analysis. The newly identified effector proteins of Brucella may represent targets for improved, safer brucellosis vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:25892682

  17. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  18. Melioidosis: Molecular Aspects of Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Joshua K.; DeShazer, David; Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, a multifaceted disease that is highly endemic in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. This facultative intracellular pathogen possesses a large genome that encodes a wide array of virulence factors that promote survival in vivo by manipulating host cell processes and disarming elements of the host immune system. Antigens and systems that play key roles in B. pseudomallei virulence include capsular polysaccharide, lipopolysaccharide, adhesins, specialized secretion systems, actin-based motility and various secreted factors. This review provides an overview of the current and steadily expanding knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms used by this organism to survive within a host and their contribution to the pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25312349

  19. Neuroblastoma: Molecular Pathogenesis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Chrystal U; Shohet, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a developmental tumor of young children arising from the embryonic sympathoadrenal lineage of the neural crest. Currently neuroblastoma is the primary cause of death from pediatric cancer for children between the age of 1 and 5 years and accounts for approximately 13% of all pediatric cancer mortality. Its clinical impact and its unique biology have made this aggressive malignancy the focus of a large concerted translational research effort. New insights into tumor biology are driving the development of new classification schemas; novel targeted therapeutic approaches include small molecule inhibitors, epigenetic, non-coding RNA, and cell-based immunologic therapies. Recent insights regarding the pathogenesis and biology of neuroblastoma will be placed in context with the current understanding of tumor biology and tumor/host interactions. Systematic classification of patients coupled with therapeutic advances point to a future of improved clinical outcomes for this biologically distinct and highly aggressive pediatric malignancy. PMID:25386934

  20. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field. PMID:25634624

  1. Endothelial Glycocalyx: Shedding Light on Malaria Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Casper; Pasini, Erica M; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is estimated to kill 438 000 people annually, mostly due to severe malaria, which is closely associated with microcirculatory vasculopathy, although its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we propose that the largely ignored glycocalyx of the vascular endothelium plays an important role in facilitating the pathogenesis of severe malaria. PMID:27161599

  2. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Backert, Steffen; Neddermann, Matthias; Maubach, Gunter; Naumann, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is estimated to infect more than half of the worlds human population and represents a major risk factor for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection and clinical consequences are controlled by highly complex interactions between the host, colonizing bacteria, and environmental parameters. Important bacterial determinants linked with gastric disease development include the cag pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS), the translocated effector protein CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, adhesin BabA, urease, serine protease HtrA, secreted outer membrane vesicles, and many others. The high quantity of these factors and allelic changes in the corresponding genes reveals a sophisticated picture and problems in evaluating the impact of each distinct component. Extensive work has been performed to pinpoint molecular processes related to H. pylori-triggered pathogenesis using Mongolian gerbils, mice, primary tissues, as well as novel in vitro model systems such as gastroids. The manipulation of host signaling cascades by the bacterium appears to be crucial for inducing pathogenic downstream activities and gastric disease progression. Here, we review the most recent advances in this important research area. PMID:27531534

  3. Candida albicans, plasticity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The yeast Candida albicans has emerged as a major public health problem during the past two decades. The spectrum of diseases caused by this species ranges from vaginal infections, which affect up to 75% of the women at least once in their lifetime, to deep infections in hospitalized patients which lead to high morbidity and mortality rates. Candida albicans may also play a role in the persistence or worsening of some chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. Active research is now improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and genetic factors in the yeast and its host which influence the development of disease. Despite these advances and the availability of a more extensive therapeutic arsenal, current progress in the control of nosocomial infections due to Candida remains limited, mainly due to the difficulties in diagnosing these infections. The biologist has a key role to play in establishing a dialogue with the clinician in order to identify the saprophyte/pathogen transition in patients as early as possible. This review provides a quick synopsis of the modern concepts of Candida pathogenesis with some representative examples illustrating the specifics traits of this yeast in terms of pathogenic adaptation. PMID:23962107

  4. CELLULAR PATHOGENESIS OF DIABETIC GASTROENTEROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ördög, Tamás; Hayashi, Yujiro; Gibbons, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Gastroenteropathy manifesting in upper gastrointestinal symptoms, delayed gastric emptying, constipation, diarrhea and fecal incontinence occurs frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus and represents a significant health care burden. Current treatments are largely symptomatic and ineffective. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is required for the development of more effective therapies. Recent advances in our understanding of the inherent, high-level complexities of the control systems that execute and regulate gastrointestinal motility, together with the utilization of new experimental models and sophisticated physiological, morphological and molecular techniques have lead to the realization that diabetic gastroenteropathies cannot be ascribed to any singular defect or dysfunction. In fact, these disorders are multifactorial and involve a spectrum of metabolic and dystrophic changes that can potentially affect all key components of motor control including the systemic autonomic and enteric nervous systems, interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle cells. Candidate pathomechanisms are also varied and include imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidative factors, altered trophic stimuli to mature cells and their progenitors, and, possibly, autoimmune factors. The goal of this paper is to review the cellular changes underlying diabetic gastroenteropathies and their potential causes, with particular focus on functional interactions between various cell types. It is proposed that diabetic gastroenteropathies should be considered a form of gastrointestinal neuromuscular dystrophy rather than a “functional” disorder. Future research should identify ways to block cytotoxic factors, support the regeneration of damaged cells and translate the experimental findings into new treatment modalities. PMID:19829287

  5. Pathogenesis of benign adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel

    2010-12-01

    Most adrenocortical tumors (ACT) are benign unilateral adrenocortical adenomas, often discovered incidentally. Exceptionally, ACT are bilateral. However bilateral ACT have been very helpful to progress in the pathophysiology of ACT. Although most ACT are of sporadic origin, they may also be part of syndromic and/or hereditary disorders. The identification of the genetics of familial diseases associated with benign ACT has been helpful to define somatic alterations in sporadic ACT: for example, identification of PRKAR1A mutations in Carney complex or alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli. Components of the cAMP signaling pathway-for example, adrenocorticotropic-hormone receptors and other membrane receptors, Gs protein, phosphodiesterases and protein kinase A-can be altered to various degrees in benign cortisol-secreting ACT. These progress have been important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of benign ACT, but already have profound implications for clinical management, for example in unraveling the genetic origin of disease in some patients with ACT. They also have therapeutic consequences, and should help to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:21115158

  6. Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Herbert; Hensel, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we focus on a group of mobile genetic elements designated pathogenicity islands (PAI). These elements play a pivotal role in the virulence of bacterial pathogens of humans and are also essential for virulence in pathogens of animals and plants. Characteristic molecular features of PAI of important human pathogens and their role in pathogenesis are described. The availability of a large number of genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and their benign relatives currently offers a unique opportunity for the identification of novel pathogen-specific genomic islands. However, this knowledge has to be complemented by improved model systems for the analysis of virulence functions of bacterial pathogens. PAI apparently have been acquired during the speciation of pathogens from their nonpathogenic or environmental ancestors. The acquisition of PAI not only is an ancient evolutionary event that led to the appearance of bacterial pathogens on a timescale of millions of years but also may represent a mechanism that contributes to the appearance of new pathogens within a human life span. The acquisition of knowledge about PAI, their structure, their mobility, and the pathogenicity factors they encode not only is helpful in gaining a better understanding of bacterial evolution and interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells but also may have important practical implications such as providing delivery systems for vaccination, tools for cell biology, and tools for the development of new strategies for therapy of bacterial infections. PMID:14726454

  7. FVIII inhibitors: pathogenesis and avoidance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inhibitory antibodies has been the focus of major scientific interest over the last decades, and several studies on underlying immune mechanisms and risk factors for formation of these antibodies have been performed with the aim of improving the ability to both predict and prevent their appearance. It seems clear that the decisive factors for the immune response to the deficient factor are multiple and involve components of both a constitutional and therapy-related nature. A scientific concern and obstacle for research in the area of hemophilia is the relatively small cohorts available for studies and the resulting risk of confounded and biased results. Careful interpretation of data is recommended to avoid treatment decisions based on a weak scientific platform. This review will summarize current concepts of the underlying immunological mechanisms and risk factors for development of inhibitory antibodies in patients with hemophilia A and discuss how these findings may be interpreted and influence our clinical management of patients. PMID:25712994

  8. Systems approaches to coronavirus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Alexandra; Baric, Ralph S.; Ferris, Martin T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses comprise a large group of emergent human and animal pathogens, including the highly pathogenic SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV strains that cause significant morbidity and mortality in infected individuals, especially the elderly. As emergent viruses may cause episodic outbreaks of disease over time, human samples are limited. Systems biology and genetic technologies maximize opportunities for identifying critical host and viral genetic factors that regulate susceptibility and virus-induced disease severity. These approaches provide discovery platforms that highlight and allow targeted confirmation of critical targets for prophylactics and therapeutics, especially critical in an outbreak setting. Although poorly understood, it has long been recognized that host regulation of virus-associated disease severity is multigenic. The advent of systems genetic and biology resources provide new opportunities for deconvoluting the complex genetic interactions and expression networks that regulate pathogenic or protective host response patterns following virus infection. Using SARS-CoV as a model, dynamic transcriptional network changes and disease-associated phenotypes have been identified in different genetic backgrounds, leading to the promise of population-wide discovery of the underpinnings of Coronavirus pathogenesis. PMID:24842079

  9. Redox biology of tuberculosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Singh, Nisha; Bhat, Shabir Ahmed; Gupta, Pawan; Kumar, Ashwani

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most successful human pathogens. Mtb is persistently exposed to numerous oxidoreductive stresses during its pathogenic cycle of infection and transmission. The distinctive ability of Mtb, not only to survive the redox stress manifested by the host but also to use it for synchronizing the metabolic pathways and expression of virulence factors, is central to its success as a pathogen. This review describes the paradigmatic redox and hypoxia sensors employed by Mtb to continuously monitor variations in the intracellular redox state and the surrounding microenvironment. Two component proteins, namely, DosS and DosT, are employed by Mtb to sense changes in oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide levels, while WhiB3 and anti-sigma factor RsrA are used to monitor changes in intracellular redox state. Using these and other unidentified redox sensors, Mtb orchestrates its metabolic pathways to survive in nutrient-deficient, acidic, oxidative, nitrosative, and hypoxic environments inside granulomas or infectious lesions. A number of these metabolic pathways are unique to mycobacteria and thus represent potential drug targets. In addition, Mtb employs versatile machinery of the mycothiol and thioredoxin systems to ensure a reductive intracellular environment for optimal functioning of its proteins even upon exposure to oxidative stress. Mtb also utilizes a battery of protective enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (KatG), alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpC), and peroxiredoxins, to neutralize the redox stress generated by the host immune system. This chapter reviews the current understanding of mechanisms employed by Mtb to sense and neutralize redox stress and their importance in TB pathogenesis and drug development. PMID:22633061

  10. Rethinking Mechanisms of Autoimmune Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    Why exactly some individuals develop autoimmune disorders remains unclear. The broadly accepted paradigm is that genetic susceptibility results in some break in immunological tolerance, may enhance the availability of autoantigens, and may enhance inflammatory responses. Some environmental insults that occur on this background of susceptibility may then contribute to autoimmunity. In this review we discuss some aspects related to inhibitory signaling and rare genetic variants, as well as additional factors that might contribute to autoimmunity including the possible role of clonal somatic mutations, the role of epigenetic events and the contribution of the intestinal microbiome. Genetic susceptibility alleles generally contribute to the loss of immunological tolerance, the increased availability of asutoantigens, or an increase in inflammation. Apart from common genetic variants, rare loss-of-function genetic variants may also contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Studies of an inhibitory signaling pathway in B cells helped identify a negative regulatory enzyme called sialic acid acetyl esterase. The study of rare genetic variants of this enzyme provides an illustrative example showing the importance of detailed functional analyses of variant alleles and the need to exclude functionally normal common or rare genetic variants from analysis. It has also become clear that pathways that are functionally impacted by either common or rare defective variants can also be more significantly compromised by gene expression changes that may result from epigenetic alterations. Another important and evolving area that has been discussed relates to the role of the intestinal microbiome in influencing helper T cell polarization and the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23809879

  11. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    with relapse. Furthermore, we found that the frequency of translocations involving the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci is low in ocular region MALT lymphoma (2 of 42, 5%), but may predict increased risk of relapse (Sjo et al. 2008b). In conclusion the incidence of ophthalmic lymphoma is increasing at a high rate in Denmark. Ophthalmic lymphoma consists primarily of MALT lymphoma. The molecular pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region rarely involves translocations in the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci. PMID:19178392

  12. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    polishing by Karl Habel (a superb senior virologist who left the National Institutes of Health and came to Scripps), and the gifted postdoctoral fellows who joined my laboratory over four decades form the log of my scientific voyage. The strong friendships and collaborations developed with other young but growing experimentalists like Bernie Fields and Abner Notkins are the fabric of the tale I will weave and were pivotal in the establishment of viral pathogenesis as a discipline. PMID:26514062

  13. Pathogenesis and Management of Buerger's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liew, Ngoh Chin; Lee, Limi; Nor Hanipah, Zubaidah; Gee, Tikfu; Jabar, Mohd Faisal

    2015-09-01

    Buerger's disease or thromboangiitis obliterans causes pain, ulceration, or gangrene in the lower or upper extremity. It is associated with chronic cigarette smoking and is believed to be an immune mediated vasculitis. The pathogenesis is still unknown but recent postulate of its association with odontal bacteria has generated much renewed interest. Despite its recognition more than a century ago, little progress has been made in its treatment. Until the pathogenesis is elucidated, abstinence from cigarette is the only effective therapy. PMID:26264874

  14. Climate envelope predictions indicate an enlarged suitable wintering distribution for Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii) in China for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mi, Chunrong; Falk, Huettmann; Guo, Yumin

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing climate makes humans realize that there is a critical need to incorporate climate change adaptation into conservation planning. Whether the wintering habitats of Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii), a globally endangered migratory subspecies whose population is approximately 1,500-2,200 individuals in China, would be still suitable in a changing climate environment, and where this could be found, is an important protection issue. In this study, we selected the most suitable species distribution model for bustards using climate envelopes from four machine learning models, combining two modelling approaches (TreeNet and Random Forest) with two sets of variables (correlated variables removed or not). We used common evaluation methods area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and the True Skill Statistic (TSS) as well as independent test data to identify the most suitable model. As often found elsewhere, we found Random Forest with all environmental variables outperformed in all assessment methods. When we projected the best model to the latest IPCC-CMIP5 climate scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 in three Global Circulation Models (GCMs)), and averaged the project results of the three models, we found that suitable wintering habitats in the current bustard distribution would increase during the 21st century. The Northeast Plain and the south of North China were projected to become two major wintering areas for bustards. However, the models suggest that some currently suitable habitats will experience a reduction, such as Dongting Lake and Poyang Lake in the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Basin. Although our results suggested that suitable habitats in China would widen with climate change, greater efforts should be undertaken to assess and mitigate unstudied human disturbance, such as pollution, hunting, agricultural development, infrastructure construction, habitat fragmentation, and oil

  15. Climate envelope predictions indicate an enlarged suitable wintering distribution for Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii) in China for the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Chunrong; Falk, Huettmann

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing climate makes humans realize that there is a critical need to incorporate climate change adaptation into conservation planning. Whether the wintering habitats of Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii), a globally endangered migratory subspecies whose population is approximately 1,500–2,200 individuals in China, would be still suitable in a changing climate environment, and where this could be found, is an important protection issue. In this study, we selected the most suitable species distribution model for bustards using climate envelopes from four machine learning models, combining two modelling approaches (TreeNet and Random Forest) with two sets of variables (correlated variables removed or not). We used common evaluation methods area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and the True Skill Statistic (TSS) as well as independent test data to identify the most suitable model. As often found elsewhere, we found Random Forest with all environmental variables outperformed in all assessment methods. When we projected the best model to the latest IPCC-CMIP5 climate scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 in three Global Circulation Models (GCMs)), and averaged the project results of the three models, we found that suitable wintering habitats in the current bustard distribution would increase during the 21st century. The Northeast Plain and the south of North China were projected to become two major wintering areas for bustards. However, the models suggest that some currently suitable habitats will experience a reduction, such as Dongting Lake and Poyang Lake in the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Basin. Although our results suggested that suitable habitats in China would widen with climate change, greater efforts should be undertaken to assess and mitigate unstudied human disturbance, such as pollution, hunting, agricultural development, infrastructure construction, habitat fragmentation, and

  16. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy) may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics. PMID:25617802

  17. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on growth performance, susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brian C; Peatman, E; Ourth, D D; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-05-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE; containing the essential oils carvacrol, thymol, anethol, and limonene) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (floating diet) and EO (floating diet supplemented with essential oils). The fish were fed their respective diets for 6 weeks. At the end of the study, all fish were exposed to virulent E. ictaluri by bath immersion (1.9 × 10(7) cfu/mL; final concentration). Plasma and tissue samples were taken to quantify protein and mRNA expression levels of mannose binding lectin (MBL). Weight gain and food conversion ratio were similar between treatments. After exposing fish to virulent E. ictaluri and monitoring mortality for 21 days, survival was 43% higher (69.5 vs 48.4%) in fish fed EO compared to fish not treated with EO (P < 0.05). One day after challenge, plasma MBL levels were down-regulated in the non-treated fish compared to non-challenged fish. In the EO fish, MBL levels were similar to non-challenged fish but significantly higher than non-treated fed fish (P < 0.001). By d 7, plasma MBL levels increased in non-treated fed fish to levels observed in the EO and non-challenged fish. On d 14, MBL mRNA levels were upregulated 15-fold in fish fed EO compared to non-treated fed fish and non-challenged fish (P < 0.001). The results demonstrate that essential oils improved survival of channel catfish challenged with E. ictaluri. Mechanisms through which essential oils improve survival may involve MBL. PMID:25659231

  18. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27573580

  19. Pathogenesis of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Joseph C; Johnson, Nathan H

    2009-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and mallei are biological agents of military significance. There has been significant research in recent years to develop medical countermeasures for these organisms. This review summarizes work which details aspects of the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and mallei and discusses key scientific questions and directions for future research. PMID:19585782

  20. Osteoporosis in liver disease: pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Holecki, Michał; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Duława, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects a substantial proportion of patients with chronic liver disease. Pathologic fracture in osteoporosis significantly affects quality of life and life expectancy. By some estimates, 40% of patients with chronic liver disease may experience osteoporotic fracture. In this study we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of specific liver disease entities and their relation to osteoporosis. PMID:27293541

  1. Genomic analysis of aspergillus flavus pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides colonize developing maize seeds and contaminate them with mycotoxins. Maize genotypes differ in resistance to these fungi, but incorporation of adequate resistance into desirable hybrids has been challenging.Little is known about pathogenesis of seeds...

  2. Pathogenesis of Machupo virus infection in primates*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, G. A.; Scott, S. K.; Wagner, F. S.; Brand, O. M.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental Machupo virus infection of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys produced a severe illness consisting of an initial clinical phase and a later neurological phase. Cumulative mortality during the two phases was 80% and 95% respectively. Attempts to alter the pathogenesis with decomplementation or immunosuppression resulted in earlier deaths of the monkeys. PMID:182402

  3. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  4. Psoriasis: Pathogenesis, Assessment, and Therapeutic Update.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic condition that affects more than 7 million Americans. This article explores the pathogenesis and physical signs of psoriasis. Over the past 2 decades enhanced understanding of the immunologic basis of psoriasis has led to the development of new systemic agents that have revolutionized the management of this disease, and these modalities, along with traditional therapies, are described. PMID:27215156

  5. Hepatitis E: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subrat K.; Varma, Satya P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a single, positive-sense, capped and poly A tailed RNA virus classified under the family Hepeviridae. Enteric transmission, acute self-limiting hepatitis, frequent epidemic and sporadic occurrence, high mortality in affected pregnants are hallmarks of hepatitis E infection. Lack of an efficient culture system and resulting reductionist approaches for the study of replication and pathogenesis of HEV made it to be a less understood agent. Early studies on animal models, sub-genomic expression of open reading frames (ORF) and infectious cDNA clones have helped in elucidating the genome organization, important stages in HEV replication and pathogenesis. The genome contains three ORF's and three untranslated regions (UTR). The 5′ distal ORF, ORF1 is translated by host ribosomes in a cap dependent manner to form the non-structural polyprotein including the viral replicase. HEV replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate which helps in the formation of the positive-sense genomic RNA and a single bi-cistronic sub-genomic RNA. The 3′ distal ORF's including the major structural protein pORF2 and the multifunctional host interacting protein pORF3 are translated from the sub-genomic RNA. Pathogenesis in HEV infections is not well articulated, and remains a concern due to the many aspects like host dependent and genotype specific variations. Animal HEV, zoonosis, chronicity in immunosuppressed patients, and rapid decompensation in affected chronic liver diseased patients warrants detailed investigation of the underlying pathogenesis. Recent advances about structure, entry, egress and functional characterization of ORF1 domains has furthered our understanding about HEV. This article is an effort to review our present understanding about molecular biology and pathogenesis of HEV. PMID:25755485

  6. Pathology and pathogenesis of Buerger's disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K

    1998-10-01

    Since Buerger's disease, which is also called 'thromboangiitis obliterans', was proposed in 1908 (Buerger, Am J Med Soc 1908;136:567), more cases have been reported from the United States, Europe, and especially from the Orient. However the pathogenesis of this disease remains unclarified, and its acceptance as a specific disease entity has been disputed (Gore and Burrows, Am J Clin Pathol 1958;29:319; Wessler et al., N Engl J Med 1960;262:1149). We histologically examined the surgically resected arterial specimens from 113 cases, 109 males and four females, clinically diagnosed as Buerger's disease in 1975-1976 and reported the results in 1978 (Kurozumi and Tanaka, Vasc Surg 1978;12:63) and proposed that the term 'Buerger's disease' should be replaced by 'Buerger's syndrome'. We reexamined the above-mentioned cases and will report the pathology and propose the possible pathogenesis of Buerger's disease. PMID:9951825

  7. The epigenetic paradigm in periodontitis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Vamsi; Venkatesan, Vettriselvi; Rao, Suresh Ranga

    2015-01-01

    Epigenome refers to “epi” meaning outside the “genome.” Epigenetics is the field of study of the epigenome. Epigenetic modifications include changes in the promoter CpG Islands, modifications of histone protein structure, posttranslational repression by micro-RNA which contributes to the alteration of gene expression. Epigenetics provides an understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions on disease phenotype especially in complex multifactorial diseases. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the supporting structures of the tooth. The role of the genome (in terms of genetic polymorphisms) in periodontitis pathogenesis has been examined in numerous studies, and chronic periodontitis has been established as a polygenic disorder. The potential role of epigenetic modifications in the various facets of pathogenesis of periodontitis is discussed in this paper based on the available literature. PMID:26015662

  8. [Research Advances on Pathogenesis of Myelodysplastic Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Lu, Jia-Hui

    2015-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal marrow stem cell disorder, characterized by ineffective haemopoiesis leading to blood cytopenias. As a disease of grey zone, along with the development of research, the exploration on its pathogenesis have been shifted from molecular genetics and the feature of immunophenotype to the epigenetic and micro environment. But at present, the pathogenesis of MDS is still not clear, the research of the molecular genetics and immunophenotype can not meet the needs of experimental and clinical application any longer. The hematopoietic stem cells, cytokines, epigenetic studies, however, have made a lot of achievements. Targeted medicine such as azacitidine and decitabine had promising response in treating MDS patients. In this article the abnormality of stromal cells, cytokines and epigenetic changes in hematopoietic microenvironment of MDS are reviewed in order to optimize the monitoring MDS progress and guide its clinical medication strategy. PMID:26708914

  9. Autophagy in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ciccia, Francesco; Haroon, Nigil

    2016-06-01

    The pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not well understood, and treatment options have met with limited success. Autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of controlled digestion of damaged organelles within a cell. It helps in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The process of autophagy requires the formation of an isolation membrane. They form double-membraned vesicles called "autophagosomes" that engulf a portion of the cytoplasm. Beyond the role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, autophagy has been demonstrated as one of the most remarkable tools employed by the host cellular defense against bacteria invasion. Autophagy also affects the immune system and thus is implicated in several rheumatic disease processes. In this article, we explore the potential role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:27075464

  10. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  11. Lupus anticoagulants: pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Court, E L

    1997-12-01

    The pathogenesis of the lupus anticoagulant (LA) has been the focus of much research over the past decade, and a plethora of laboratory tests have been developed to detect it. This essay reviews the nature of LA and its pathogenesis, and a number of approaches employed in its diagnosis. These range from well established tests such as the kaolin clotting time (KCT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and tissue thromboplastin inhibition test (TTI), to the 'newer' tests such as the dilute Russell's viper venom time (DRVVT) and more recent snake venom tests such as the textarin/ecarin ratio and Taipan snake venom time (TSVT). The criteria for diagnosis are discussed, including pre-analytical variables such as sample preparation, and the effects of therapeutic anticoagulants used to treat thrombotic manifestations of the syndrome or an underlying disease process. PMID:9624740

  12. Pathogenesis of Aspergillus fumigatus in Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Dagenais, Taylor R. T.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aspergillus species are globally ubiquitous saprophytes found in a variety of ecological niches. Almost 200 species of aspergilli have been identified, less than 20 of which are known to cause human disease. Among them, Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent and is largely responsible for the increased incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in the immunocompromised patient population. IA is a devastating illness, with mortality rates in some patient groups reaching as high as 90%. Studies identifying and assessing the roles of specific factors of A. fumigatus that contribute to the pathogenesis of IA have traditionally focused on single-gene deletion and mutant characterization. In combination with recent large-scale approaches analyzing global fungal responses to distinct environmental or host conditions, these studies have identified many factors that contribute to the overall pathogenic potential of A. fumigatus. Here, we provide an overview of the significant findings regarding A. fumigatus pathogenesis as it pertains to invasive disease. PMID:19597008

  13. Vaccines, reverse vaccinology, and bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Delany, Isabel; Rappuoli, Rino; Seib, Kate L

    2013-05-01

    Advances in genomics and innovative strategies such as reverse vaccinology have changed the concepts and approaches to vaccine candidate selection and design. Genome mining and blind selection of novel antigens provide a novel route to investigate the mechanisms that underpin pathogenesis. The resulting lists of novel candidates are revealing new aspects of pathogenesis of target organisms, which in turn drives the rational design of optimal vaccine antigens. Here we use the discovery, characterization, and exploitation of fHbp, a vaccine candidate and key virulence factor of meningococcus, as an illustrative case in point. Applying genomic approaches to study both the pathogen and host will ultimately increase our fundamental understanding of pathogen biology, mechanisms responsible for the development of protective immunity, and guide next-generation vaccine design. PMID:23637311

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis: where are we?

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presently one of the most investigated human disorders. Expansion of knowledge of its pathophysiology has helped in developing novel medications to combat gut inflammation with a considerably degree of success. Despite this progress, much more remains to be done in regard to gaining a more profound understanding of IBD pathogenesis, detecting inflammation before it clinically manifests, implementing lifestyle modifications, and developing agents that can modify the natural course of the disease. One of the limitations to achieve these goals is the lack of integration of the major components of IBD pathogenesis, that is the exposome, the genome, the gut microbiome, and the immunome. An "IBD integrome" approach that takes advantage of all functional information derived from the detailed investigation of each single pathogenic component through the use of systems biology may offer the solution to understand IBD and cure it. PMID:25827798

  15. Facial Dysostoses: Etiology, Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Paul A.; Andrews, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1% of all live births exhibit a minor or major congenital anomaly. Of these approximately one-third display craniofacial abnormalities which are a significant cause of infant mortality and dramatically affect national health care budgets. To date, more than 700 distinct craniofacial syndromes have been described and in this review, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis and management of facial dysostoses with a particular emphasis on Treacher Collins, Nager and Miller syndromes. As we continue to develop and improve medical and surgical care for the management of individual conditions, it is essential at the same time to better characterize their etiology and pathogenesis. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of the development of facial dysostosis with a view towards early in-utero identification and intervention which could minimize the manifestation of anomalies prior to birth. The ultimate management for any craniofacial anomaly however, would be prevention and we discuss this possibility in relation to facial dysostosis. PMID:24123981

  16. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Dileep K; Prakash, Ravi; Mullen, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder seen in patients with advanced liver disease or porto-systemic shunts. Based on etiology and severity of HE, the World Congress of Gastroenterology has divided HE into categories and sub-categories. Many user-friendly computer-based neuropsychiatric tests are being validated for diagnosing covert HE. Currently, emphasis is being given to view HE deficits as a continuous spectrum rather than distinct stages. Ammonia is believed to play crucial role in pathogenesis of HE via astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, evidence has been building up which supports the synergistic role of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurosteroids in pathogenesis of HE. At present, treatment of HE aims at decreasing the production and intestinal absorption of ammonia. But as the role of new pathogenetic mechanisms becomes clear, many potential new treatment strategies may become available for clinician. PMID:25755319

  17. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Theories on the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Sourial, Samer; Tempest, Nicola; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease defined by the presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue. The aetiology of endometriosis is complex and multifactorial, where several not fully confirmed theories describe its pathogenesis. This review examines existing theories on the initiation and propagation of different types of endometriotic lesions, as well as critically appraises the myriad of biologically relevant evidence that support or oppose each of the proposed theories. The current literature suggests that stem cells, dysfunctional immune response, genetic predisposition, and aberrant peritoneal environment may all be involved in the establishment and propagation of endometriotic lesions. An orchestrated scientific and clinical effort is needed to consider all factors involved in the pathogenesis of this multifaceted disease and to propose novel therapeutic targets to reach effective treatments for this distressing condition. PMID:25763392

  19. Theories on the Pathogenesis of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Samer; Hapangama, Dharani K.

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease defined by the presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue. The aetiology of endometriosis is complex and multifactorial, where several not fully confirmed theories describe its pathogenesis. This review examines existing theories on the initiation and propagation of different types of endometriotic lesions, as well as critically appraises the myriad of biologically relevant evidence that support or oppose each of the proposed theories. The current literature suggests that stem cells, dysfunctional immune response, genetic predisposition, and aberrant peritoneal environment may all be involved in the establishment and propagation of endometriotic lesions. An orchestrated scientific and clinical effort is needed to consider all factors involved in the pathogenesis of this multifaceted disease and to propose novel therapeutic targets to reach effective treatments for this distressing condition. PMID:25763392

  20. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: pathogenesis, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julie A.; McFarland, Janice G.; Curtis, Brian R.; Aster, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, (NAIT) is caused by maternal antibodies raised against alloantigens carried on fetal platelets. Although many cases are mild, NAIT is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in newborns and is the most common cause of intracranial haemorrhage in full-term infants. In this report, we review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis and prenatal and post-natal management of NAIT and highlight areas of controversy that deserve the attention of clinical and laboratory investigators. PMID:23384054

  1. Pathogenesis of human urinary bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, George T.

    1983-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bladder cancer is being analyzed at several levels of biological organization, i.e., population groups, individual whole animal, tissue, cell, molecule, etc. Each of these levels provides opportunities for mechanistic studies. Yet the integration of these several levels into a cohesive fabric is incomplete. From a clinical point of view, the following seem of importance to human bladder cancer pathogenesis. The initiation, promotion, and progression of bladder cancer involves several factors acting concurrently or sequentially. These factors appear to be naturally occurring or synthetically created chemicals present in the external environment. Human exposures to these agents may begin in utero, and varying, dynamic qualitative and quantitative exposure patterns continue through developmental and adult life. Apparent latent periods of development of clinical bladder cancer may be as short as one, or as long as 50 years or more. Individuals may exhibit differential susceptibility to vesical carcinogens, perhaps through phenotypic differences in quantitative biotransformation routes. Differences in bladder epithelial cell susceptibilities probably also occur, as well as varying local tissue and generalized resistance to neoplasia formation. Older individuals do not appear to be more resistant to bladder carcinogenesis. A number of animal model systems have been developed for the study of the in vivo, cellular, and molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer. These models replicate many of the known salient features of human bladder cancer. Through use of appropriate whole animal models in conjunction with investigations of human and animal bladder cells and tissues in culture, controlled mechanistic and quantitative studies of bladder cancer pathogenesis should rapidly develop. PMID:6832092

  2. Pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: An update.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, R; Ghosh, A; Chandolia, A

    2016-01-01

    Genus Mycoplasma, belonging to the class Mollicutes, encompasses unique lifeforms comprising of a small genome of 8,00,000 base pairs and the inability to produce a cell wall under any circumstances. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the most common pathogenic species infecting humans. It is an atypical respiratory bacteria causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children and adults of all ages. Although atypical pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae can be managed in outpatient settings, complications affecting multiple organ systems can lead to hospitalization in vulnerable population. M. pneumoniae infection has also been associated with chronic lung disease and bronchial asthma. With the advent of molecular methods of diagnosis and genetic, immunological and ultrastructural assays that study infectious disease pathogenesis at subcellular level, newer virulence factors of M. pneumoniae have been recognized by researchers. Structure of the attachment organelle of the organism, that mediates the crucial initial step of cytadherence to respiratory tract epithelium through complex interaction between different adhesins and accessory adhesion proteins, has been decoded. Several subsequent virulence mechanisms like intracellular localization, direct cytotoxicity and activation of the inflammatory cascade through toll-like receptors (TLRs) leading to inflammatory cytokine mediated tissue injury, have also been demonstrated to play an essential role in pathogenesis. The most significant update in the knowledge of pathogenesis has been the discovery of Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome toxin (CARDS toxin) of M. pneumoniae and its ability of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosylation and inflammosome activation, thus initiating airway inflammation. Advances have also been made in terms of the different pathways behind the genesis of extrapulmonary complications. This article aims to comprehensively review the recent advances in the knowledge of pathogenesis of this

  3. Pathogenesis of Chronic Urticaria: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic urticaria is not well delineated and the treatment is palliative as it is not tied to the pathomechanism. The centrality of mast cells and their inappropriate activation and degranulation as the key pathophysiological event are well established. The triggering stimuli and the complexity of effector mechanisms remain speculative. Autoimmune origin of chronic urticaria, albeit controversial, is well documented. Numerical and behavioral alterations in basophils accompanied by changes in signaling molecule expression and function as well as aberrant activation of extrinsic pathway of coagulation are other alternative hypotheses. It is also probable that mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis through mechanisms that extend beyond high affinity IgE receptor stimulation. An increasing recognition of chronic urticaria as an immune mediated inflammatory disorder related to altered cytokine-chemokine network consequent to immune dysregulation resulting from disturbed innate immunity is emerging as yet another pathogenic explanation. It is likely that these different pathomechanisms are interlinked rather than independent cascades, acting either synergistically or sequentially to produce clinical expression of chronic urticaria. Insights into the complexities of pathogenesis may provide an impetus to develop safer, efficacious, and targeted immunomodulators and biological treatment for severe, refractory chronic urticaria. PMID:25120565

  4. Update on pathogenesis and treatment of CLE

    PubMed Central

    Privette, Emily D.; Werth, Victoria P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Cutaneous Lupus Erythematous (CLE) is an autoimmune disease in which patients may present with isolated skin findings or have CLE associated with underlying systemic disease. The most significant recent studies on its pathogenesis and therapeutic management are reviewed here. Recent findings Patients with subacute and Discoid Lupus Erythematous had elevated IFN score, about a third of all cases of SCLE could be attributed to previous drug exposure, and smoking may be more closely associated with CLE than Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE). An underlying genetic defect in some subsets of CLE patients may also be shared with SLE. Efficacy of antimalarial therapy is enhanced by increasing treatment duration or maintaining higher blood drug concentrations. Combination antimalarials that include quinacrine, thalidomide analogs, and Mycophenalate Mofetil may also be effective in refractory CLE. Summary The pathogenesis of CLE remains unclear, and is likely multifactorial. Identified associations with subsets of CLE suggest future research questions in CLE pathogenesis. Subsets of CLE associated with interface dermatitis may share an underlying genetic defect in interferon signaling with SLE. The Cutaneous Lupus Disease Area and Severity Index is a valuable and widely used tool allowing for standardized assessment and reporting of cutaneous disease activity and damage. More evidence is available to guide treatment of refractory CLE, but larger studies are needed. PMID:23872903

  5. The Neurobiological Pathogenesis of Poststroke Depression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is an important consequence after stroke, with negative impact on stroke outcome. The pathogenesis of PSD is complicated, with some special neurobiological mechanism, which mainly involves neuroanatomical, neuron, and biochemical factors and neurogenesis which interact in complex ways. Abundant studies suggested that large lesions in critical areas such as left frontal lobe and basal ganglia or accumulation of silent cerebral lesions might interrupt the pathways of monoamines or relevant pathways of mood control, thus leading to depression. Activation of immune system after stroke produces more cytokines which increase glutamate excitotoxicity, results in more cell deaths of critical areas and enlargement of infarctions, and, together with hypercortisolism induced by stress or inflammation after stroke which could decrease intracellular serotonin transporters, might be the key biochemical change of PSD. The interaction among cytokines, glucocorticoid, and neurotrophin results in the decrease of hippocampal neurogenesis which has been proved to be important for mood control and pharmaceutical effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and might be another promising pathway to understand the pathogenesis of PSD. In order to reduce the prevalence of PSD and improve the outcome of stroke, more relevant studies are still required to clarify the pathogenesis of PSD. PMID:24744682

  6. Autoimmune pathogenesis in dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) caused by dengue virus (DV) infection remain unresolved. Patients with DHF/DSS are characterized by several manifestations, including severe thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hepatomegaly. In addition to the effect of virus load and virus variation, abnormal immune responses of the host after DV infection may also account for the progression of DHF/DSS. Actually, viral autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous viral infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, human hepatitis C virus, human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and DV. In this review, we discuss the implications of autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. Antibodies directed against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) showed cross-reactivity with human platelets and endothelial cells, which lead to platelet and endothelial cell damage and inflammatory activation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that anti-DV NS1 is involved in the pathogenesis of DF and DHF/DSS, and this may provide important information in dengue vaccine development. PMID:16817755

  7. A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazear, Helen M; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Platt, Derek J; Fernandez, Estefania; Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-11

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic and unexpected clinical outcomes, including Guillain-Barré syndrome and birth defects, has brought an urgent need for animal models. We evaluated infection and pathogenesis with contemporary and historical ZIKV strains in immunocompetent mice and mice lacking components of the antiviral response. Four- to six-week-old Irf3(-/-)Irf5(-/-)Irf7(-/-) triple knockout mice, which produce little interferon α/β, and mice lacking the interferon receptor (Ifnar1(-/-)) developed neurological disease and succumbed to ZIKV infection, whereas single Irf3(-/-), Irf5(-/-), and Mavs(-/-) knockout mice exhibited no overt illness. Ifnar1(-/-) mice sustained high viral loads in the brain and spinal cord, consistent with evidence that ZIKV causes neurodevelopmental defects in human fetuses. The testes of Ifnar1(-/-) mice had the highest viral loads, which is relevant to sexual transmission of ZIKV. This model of ZIKV pathogenesis will be valuable for evaluating vaccines and therapeutics as well as understanding disease pathogenesis. PMID:27066744

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Genetics, Epigenetics, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are complex, multifactorial disorders characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. Although etiology remains largely unknown, recent research has suggested that genetic factors, environment, microbiota, and immune response are involved in the pathogenesis. Epidemiological evidence for a genetic contribution is defined: 15% of patients with Crohn’s Disease (CD) have an affected family member with IBD, and twin studies for CD have shown 50% concordance in monozygotic twins compared to <10% in dizygotics. The most recent and largest genetic association studies, which employed genome-wide association data for over 75,000 patients and controls, identified 163 susceptibility loci for IBD. More recently, a trans-ethnic analysis, including over 20,000 individuals, identified an additional 38 new IBD loci. Although most cases are correlated with polygenic contribution toward genetic susceptibility, there is a spectrum of rare genetic disorders that can contribute to early-onset IBD (before 5 years) or very early onset IBD (before 2 years). Genetic variants that cause these disorders have a wide effect on gene function. These variants are so rare in allele frequency that the genetic signals are not detected in genome-wide association studies of patients with IBD. With recent advances in sequencing techniques, ~50 genetic disorders have been identified and associated with IBD-like immunopathology. Monogenic defects have been found to alter intestinal immune homeostasis through many mechanisms. Candidate gene resequencing should be carried out in early-onset patients in clinical practice. The evidence that genetic factors contribute in small part to disease pathogenesis confirms the important role of microbial and environmental factors. Epigenetic factors can mediate interactions between environment and genome. Epigenetic mechanisms could affect development and progression of IBD. Epigenomics is an emerging field, and

  9. Intussusception in a Florida manatee.

    PubMed

    Forrester, D J; White, F H; Woodard, J C; Thompson, N P

    1975-10-01

    An intussusception resulting from an embedded fishhook and a mass of nylon cord, monofilament line, and wire was determined to be the cause of death in a Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris). Pathologic findings are given along with information on bacteria (Edwardsiella tarda), pesticide residues (DDE, PCB's and dieldrin), and parasites (Chiorchis fabaceus). PMID:1195505

  10. [General concepts and pathogenesis of the spondyloarthropathies].

    PubMed

    Nissen, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    The spondyloarthritides are a group of interrelated diseases with a close association with the HLA-B27 antigen that share many common articular and extra-articular features. This paper summarizes the different classification criteria that are currently in use. While the exact pathogenesis of these diseases is not yet clearly elucidated, there are a number of hypotheses relating to HLA-B27, modifications of the microbiome and biomechanical stresses. This in turn leads to upregulation of various proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-17, IL-22 and IL-23, which results in further inflammation and osteoproliferation. PMID:27089636

  11. Pathogenesis of postoperative oral surgical pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pain is a major postoperative symptom in many oral surgical procedures. It is a complex and variable phenomenon that can be influenced by many factors. Good management of oral surgical pain requires a detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of surgical pain. This article aims at reviewing postoperative pain from a broad perspective by looking into the nociception, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology of pain. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence from the literature for maximizing the efficacy of pain management techniques for oral surgical pain. PMID:12722900

  12. Pathogenesis of tendinopathies: inflammation or degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Gravare-Silbernagel, Karin; Siljeholm, Carl; Di Iorio, Angelo; De Amicis, Daniele; Salini, Vincenzo; Werner, Suzanne; Paganelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic pathogenetic mechanisms of tendinopathies are largely unknown and whether inflammation or degeneration has the prominent role is still a matter of debate. Assuming that there is a continuum from physiology to pathology, overuse may be considered as the initial disease factor; in this context, microruptures of tendon fibers occur and several molecules are expressed, some of which promote the healing process, while others, including inflammatory cytokines, act as disease mediators. Neural in-growth that accompanies the neovessels explains the occurrence of pain and triggers neurogenic-mediated inflammation. It is conceivable that inflammation and degeneration are not mutually exclusive, but work together in the pathogenesis of tendinopathies. PMID:19591655

  13. Recent advances in understanding norovirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Tibbetts, Scott A

    2016-11-01

    Noroviruses constitute a family of ubiquitous and highly efficient human pathogens. In spite of decades of dedicated research, human noroviruses remain a major cause of gastroenteritis and severe diarrheal disease around the world. Recent findings have begun to unravel the complex mechanisms that regulate norovirus pathogenesis and persistent infection, including the important interplay between the virus, the host immune system, and commensal bacteria. Herein, we will summarize recent research developments regarding norovirus cell tropism, the use of M cells, and commensal bacteria to facilitate norovirus infection, and virus, host, and bacterial determinants of persistent norovirus infections. J. Med. Virol. 88:1837-1843, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27110852

  14. Pathogenesis of nasal polyps: an update.

    PubMed

    Pawliczak, Rafal; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2005-11-01

    The cause of nasal polyp formation is still unknown. Genetic predisposition has been suggested, but there are scanty data to support such theories. Activated epithelial cells may be the major source of mediators inducing influx of inflammatory cells (mostly eosinophils) and proliferation and activation of fibroblasts leading to nasal polyp formation. Infectious agents (including viruses, bacteria, or fungi) may be potential primary factors activating nasal epithelial cells. Proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors play important roles in the persistence of mucosal inflammation associated with nasal polyps. Arachidonic acid metabolites seem to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps in patients with aspirin hypersensitivity rhinosinusitis/asthma syndrome. PMID:16216171

  15. [Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, C; Koczulla, R; Fehrenbach, H; Bals, R

    2006-09-01

    It is currently believed that the most important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is inflammation of the small airways caused by inhaled particles and gases. In this context, a disturbance of the physiological balance between proteases and antiproteases develops that may cause lung emphysema. Moreover, oxidative stress seems to be important, as it may enhance the inflammatory reaction. The development of emphysema may also involve a loss of alveolar cells by apoptosis. Finally, several studies have indicated that a systemic inflammation is induced by COPD that may be of relevance to the development of systemic components that are observed in COPD patients. PMID:16845536

  16. Tubo-Ovarian Abscess: Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Newton G.

    1986-01-01

    That a female patient with abdominal pain is often considered to have pelvic inflammatory disease until proven otherwise is ubiquitous in the medical literature. This view is dangerous and should be challenged because it has resulted in episodes of ruptured appendix, death from ruptured ectopic pregnancies, and serious morbidity from delayed diagnoses of such entities as diverticulitis and endometriosis. Proper diagnostic steps should be taken for all patients with abdominal pain of unclear etiology. This article reviews the pathogenesis of tubo-ovarian abscesses so as to separate and clearly identify fact from fiction. Diagnostic steps and management guidelines are discussed. PMID:3537321

  17. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  18. Atopic dermatitis: epidemiology and pathogenesis update.

    PubMed

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Ellis, Charles N; Mancini, Anthony J; Paller, Amy S; Simpson, Eric L

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) has increased markedly in the United States over the past 5 decades, with current reports varying from 10% to 20% prevalence in US children, and new diagnoses are estimated at almost 11% per year. Recent research in AD pathophysiology and pathogenesis has demonstrated that AD is associated with epidermal barrier dysfunction and that mutations in the filaggrin gene are implicated in barrier defects. These discoveries hold promise for future breakthroughs in the diagnosis and management of AD. PMID:23021783

  19. Nonbacterial Thrombotic Endocarditis: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Joshua; Frishman, William H

    2016-01-01

    Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE), formerly known as marantic endocarditis, is a potentially overlooked condition that involves the formation of sterile, fibrin vegetations on heart valve leaflets. Often confused with classic infective endocarditis during its early stages, NBTE can lead to valvular dysfunction, heart failure, and systemic embolization when unchecked. The pathogenesis is not entirely clear but involves a preexisting hypercoagulable state. Diagnosis requires ruling out infection and establishing the presence of valvular vegetations using echocardiography. Therapy for NBTE includes treating the underlying disease, systemic anticoagulation and surgical intervention. PMID:27501336

  20. Atopic Dermatitis; Etio-Pathogenesis, An Overview.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Khurana, Ananta; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Saxena, Deepti; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a well-recognized clinical entity, several facets of which continue to be mystified. Accordingly, its etio-pathogenesis is largely elusive. It appears to be an outcome of interplay of several undertones, namely: genetics, maternal factor and inheritance, pregnancy/intrauterine, environmental factors, immune dysregulation, immuno-globulins, role of diet, and infection. Besides, recent innovative breakthroughs consisting of nutritional supplementation, the highlights of which were considered worthwhile to take stock of to define its current status. An endeavor to enlighten the audience has been made for their benefit. PMID:26288398

  1. Perinatal Asphyxia I: Pathogenesis of Multisystemic Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Fomufod, Antoine K.; Rahbar, Fariborz; White, Penny L.; Holloway, Albert Z.; Rampersaud, Swami R.; Henry, Lionel A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical and pathologic sequelae of perinatal asphyxia manifested by 17 neonates treated at Howard University Hospital over an 18-month period. Multiple systemic complications, occurring in 76.5 percent of the patients, were the rule rather than the exception. All vital organs were involved, singly or in combination. Understanding the pathogenesis and extent of these complications is of utmost importance not only to those rendering health care to acutely ill newborns, but also to those responsible for prenatal and maternal intrapartum care. PMID:537116

  2. Atopic Dermatitis; Etio-Pathogenesis, An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Khurana, Ananta; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Saxena, Deepti; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a well-recognized clinical entity, several facets of which continue to be mystified. Accordingly, its etio-pathogenesis is largely elusive. It appears to be an outcome of interplay of several undertones, namely: genetics, maternal factor and inheritance, pregnancy/intrauterine, environmental factors, immune dysregulation, immuno-globulins, role of diet, and infection. Besides, recent innovative breakthroughs consisting of nutritional supplementation, the highlights of which were considered worthwhile to take stock of to define its current status. An endeavor to enlighten the audience has been made for their benefit. PMID:26288398

  3. Studies on the pathogenesis of cancer hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Laird Myers, W. P.; Bockman, R.

    1977-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypercalcemia in cancer continues to challenge the clinical investigator. Some aspects of this subject have been reviewed, notably with respect to the possible roles of prostaglandins and osteoclast activating factor, with particular reference to breast cancer. There is considerable evidence that the former humoral factor is operative and beginning evidence that the latter may be also. The hope in this continued work is that with better understanding of the mechanisms of hypercalcemia and bone loclization of tumors we will be in a far better position to control and interdict this localization. Images Fig. 3 PMID:898535

  4. Inflammation in the pathogenesis of lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J; England, John D; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Martin, Dale S; Jacobs, Mary B; Philipp, Mario T

    2015-05-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  5. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management of Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Sumera; Gores, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (CCAs) are hepatobiliary cancers with features of cholangiocyte differentiation; they can be classified anatomically as intrahepatic (iCCA), perihilar (pCCA), or distal CCA (dCCA). These subtypes differ not only in their anatomic location but in epidemiology, origin, etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment. The incidence and mortality of iCCA has been increasing over the past 3 decades, and only a low percentage of patients survive until 5 y after diagnosis. Geographic variations in the incidence of CCA are related to variations in risk factors. Changes in oncogene and inflammatory signaling pathways, as well as genetic and epigenetic alterations and chromosome aberrations, have been shown to contribute to development of CCA. Furthermore, CCAs are surrounded by a dense stroma that contains many cancer-associated fibroblasts, which promotes their progression. We have gained a better understanding of the imaging characteristics of iCCAs and have developed advanced cytologic techniques to detect pCCAs. Patients with iCCAs are usually treated surgically, whereas liver transplantation following neoadjuvant chemoradiation is an option for a subset of patients with pCCAs. We review recent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, of CCA, along with advances in classification, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24140396

  6. Measles Virus Host Invasion and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Laksono, Brigitta M; de Vries, Rory D; McQuaid, Stephen; Duprex, W Paul; de Swart, Rik L

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and conjunctivitis. A hallmark of measles is the transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. At the same time, the disease is paradoxically associated with induction of a robust virus-specific immune response, resulting in lifelong immunity to measles. Identification of CD150 and nectin-4 as cellular receptors for measles virus has led to new perspectives on tropism and pathogenesis. In vivo studies in non-human primates have shown that the virus initially infects CD150⁺ lymphocytes and dendritic cells, both in circulation and in lymphoid tissues, followed by virus transmission to nectin-4 expressing epithelial cells. The abilities of the virus to cause systemic infection, to transmit to numerous new hosts via droplets or aerosols and to suppress the host immune response for several months or even years after infection make measles a remarkable disease. This review briefly highlights current topics in studies of measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis. PMID:27483301

  7. Measles Virus Host Invasion and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laksono, Brigitta M.; de Vries, Rory D.; McQuaid, Stephen; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and conjunctivitis. A hallmark of measles is the transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. At the same time, the disease is paradoxically associated with induction of a robust virus-specific immune response, resulting in lifelong immunity to measles. Identification of CD150 and nectin-4 as cellular receptors for measles virus has led to new perspectives on tropism and pathogenesis. In vivo studies in non-human primates have shown that the virus initially infects CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells, both in circulation and in lymphoid tissues, followed by virus transmission to nectin-4 expressing epithelial cells. The abilities of the virus to cause systemic infection, to transmit to numerous new hosts via droplets or aerosols and to suppress the host immune response for several months or even years after infection make measles a remarkable disease. This review briefly highlights current topics in studies of measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis. PMID:27483301

  8. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  9. Concepts in the pathogenesis of rabies

    PubMed Central

    Dietzschold, Bernhard; Li, Jianwei; Faber, Milosz; Schnell, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic disease that remains an important public health problem worldwide and causes more than 70,000 human deaths each year. The causative agent of rabies is rabies virus (RV), a negative-stranded RNA virus of the rhabdovirus family. Neuroinvasiveness and neurotropism are the main features that define the pathogenesis of rabies. Although RV pathogenicity is a multigenic trait involving several elements of the RV genome, the RV glycoprotein plays a major role in RV pathogenesis by controlling the rate of virus uptake and trans-synaptic virus spread, and by regulating the rate of virus replication. Pathogenic street RV strains differ significantly from tissue culture-adapted RV strains in their neuroinvasiveness. Whereas street RV strains are highly neuroinvasive, most tissue culture-adapted RV strains have either no or only limited ability to invade the CNS from a peripheral site. The high neuroinvasiveness of pathogenic street RVs is, at least in part, due to their ability to evade immune responses and to conserve the structures of neurons. The finding that tissue culture-adapted RV strains replicate very fast and induce strong innate and adaptive immune responses opens new avenues for therapeutic intervention against rabies. PMID:19578477

  10. Pathogenesis of Apical Periodontitis: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lodiene, Greta; Maciulskiene, Vita

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This review article discusses the host response in apical periodontitis with the main focus on cytokines, produced under this pathological condition and contributing to the degradation of periradicular tissues. The pace of research in this field has greatly accelerated in the last decade. Here we provide an analysis of studies published in this area during this period. Material and methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic database. The keywords used for search were pathogenesis of apical periodontitis cytokines, periapical granuloma cytokines, inflammatory infiltrate apical periodontitis. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1999 to December 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the cytokine production, cytokine functions and periapical tissue destruction in the journals and books was performed. Results In total, 97 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The topics covered in this article include cellular composition of an inflammatory infiltrate in the periapical lesions, mechanisms of the formation of the innate and specific immune response. Studies which investigated cytokine secretion and functions were identified and cellular and molecular interactions in the course of apical periodontitis described. Conclusions The abundance and interactions of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules can influence and alter the state and progression of the disease. Therefore, periapical inflammatory response offers a model, suited for the study of many facets of pathogenesis, biocompatibility of different materials to periapical tissues and development of novel treatment methods, based on the regulation of cytokines expression PMID:24421998

  11. Channelopathy pathogenesis in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schmunk, Galina; Gargus, J. Jay

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies) in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole-genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Moreover, animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects. PMID:24204377

  12. The pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and represents an increasing burden on health care resources. Understanding underlying pathogenic mechanisms of OSA will ultimately allow for the development of rational therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review current concepts about the pathogenesis of OSA. Specifically, we consider the evidence that the upper airway plays a primary role in OSA pathogenesis and provide a framework for modelling its biomechanical properties and propensity to collapse during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular factors that modulate upper airway obstruction are also discussed. Finally, we consider models of periodic breathing, and elaborate generalizable mechanisms by which upper airway obstruction destabilizes respiratory patterns during sleep. In our model, upper airway obstruction triggers a mismatch between ventilatory supply and demand. In this model, trade-offs between maintaining sleep stability or ventilation can account for a full range of OSA disease severity and expression. Recurrent arousals and transient increases in airway patency may restore ventilation between periods of sleep, while alterations in neuromuscular and arousal responses to upper airway obstruction may improve sleep stability at still suboptimal levels of ventilation. PMID:26380762

  13. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  14. Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J.; England, John D.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Martin, Dale S.; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  15. Pathogenesis of Rushton bodies: A novel hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Tupkari, Jagdish V; Deshmukh, Revati; Patil, Shankargouda

    2016-08-01

    Rushton bodies (RBs) are one of the characteristic features seen in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts mainly radicular, dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst. It has two different histo-morphological appearances; granular and homogeneous. Although widely investigated, the exact pathogenesis and histogenesis of RBs is still an enigma. Many hypotheses were made in the literature but none has explained conceivably the two histo-morphological appearances of RBs and their association with inflammation. In the present paper the various pathogenesis for the formation of RBs proposed till date are discussed along with proposal for a novel hypothesis. The given hypothesis is mainly related to inflammation and its effect on pore size of basement membrane of odontogenic cystic epithelium. It explains RBs association with inflammation as well as existence of two histo-morphological appearances. The proposed hypothesis also justifies the RB's presence inside the lining epithelium of odontogenic cyst despite its hematogenous origin. Future studies are advocated for isolating RBs using laser capture microdissection and subsequent biochemical, histochemical and electron microscopic analysis to substantiate the proposed hypothesis. PMID:27372880

  16. Pre-eclampsia: its pathogenesis and pathophysiolgy.

    PubMed

    Gathiram, P; Moodley, J

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder that has a worldwide prevalence of 5-8%. It is one of the main causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality globally and accounts for 50 000-60 00 deaths annually, with a predominance in the low- and middle-income countries. It is a multi-systemic disorder however its aetiology, pathogenesis and pathophysiology are poorly understood. Recently it has been postulated that it is a two-stage disease with an imbalance between angiogenic and anti-antigenic factors. This review covers the latest thoughts on the pathogenesis and pathology of pre-eclampsia. The central hypothesis is that pre-eclampsia results from defective spiral artery remodelling, leading to cellular ischaemia in the placenta, which in turn results in an imbalance between anti-angiogenic and pro-angiogenic factors. This imbalance in favour of anti-angiogenic factors leads to widespread endothelial dysfunction, affecting all the maternal organ systems. In addition, there is foetal growth restriction (FGR). The exact aetiology remains elusive. PMID:27213853

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  18. Impact of cocaine abuse on HIV pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Sabyasachi; Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Villalta, Fernando; Dash, Chandravanu; Pandhare, Jui

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.2 million people in the United States are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Tremendous progress has been made over the past three decades on many fronts in the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 disease. However, HIV-1 infection is incurable and antiretroviral drugs continue to remain the only effective treatment option for HIV infected patients. Unfortunately, only three out of ten HIV-1 infected individuals in the US have the virus under control. Thus, majority of HIV-1 infected individuals in the US are either unaware of their infection status or not connected/retained to care or are non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This national public health crisis, as well as the ongoing global HIV/AIDS pandemic, is further exacerbated by substance abuse, which serves as a powerful cofactor at every stage of HIV/AIDS including transmission, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment. Clinical studies indicate that substance abuse may increase viral load, accelerate disease progression and worsen AIDS-related mortality even among ART-adherent patients. However, confirming a direct causal link between substance abuse and HIV/AIDS in human patients remains a highly challenging endeavor. In this review we will discuss the recent and past developments in clinical and basic science research on the effects of cocaine abuse on HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:26539167

  19. Oligodendrocytes in HIV-associated pain pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuqiang; Shu, Jianhong; Liang, Zongsuo; Yuan, Subo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the contributions of microglia and astrocytes to chronic pain pathogenesis have been a focal point of investigation in recent years, the potential role of oligodendrocytes, another major type of glial cells in the CNS that generates myelin, remains largely unknown. Results We report here that cell markers of the oligodendrocyte lineage, including NG2, PDGFRα, and Olig2, are significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horn of HIV patients who developed chronic pain. The levels of myelin proteins myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein are also aberrant in the spinal dorsal horn of “pain-positive” HIV patients. Similarly, the oligodendrocyte and myelin markers are up-regulated in the spinal dorsal horn of a mouse model of HIV-1 gp120-induced pain. Surprisingly, the expression of gp120-induced mechanical allodynia appears intact up to 4 h after myelin basic protein is knocked down or knocked out. Conclusion These findings suggest that oligodendrocytes are reactive during the pathogenesis of HIV-associated pain. However, interfering with myelination does not alter the induction of gp120-induced pain. PMID:27306410

  20. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro–in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:25052757

  1. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: clinical presentation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; O'Shea, Nuala R

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus which has become increasingly recognised over recent years, although it remains underdiagnosed in many centres. It is characterised histologically by a significant eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa (>15 eosinophils per high powered field), and clinically with features of oesophageal dysfunction such a dysphagia, food impaction, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistant dyspepsia. Fibrosis and oesophageal remodelling may occur and lead to oesophageal strictures. An allergic predisposition is common in the EoE population, which appears to be primarily food antigen driven in children and aeroallergen driven in adults. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of EoE is due to a dysregulated immunological response to an environmental allergen, resulting in a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammatory disease and remodelling of the oesophagus in genetically susceptible individuals. Allergen elimination and anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment; however, an increasing number of studies are now focused on targeting different stages in the disease pathogenesis. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms resulting in EoE will allow us to improve the therapeutic options available. PMID:24647582

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  3. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Novakova, Jana; Slaby, Ondrej; Vyzula, Rostislav; Michalek, Jaroslav

    2009-08-14

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  4. Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis: A Review of Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingjiang; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jushi; Hu, Songfeng; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent chronic joint disease, increases in prevalence with age, and affects majority of individuals over the age of 65 and is a leading musculoskeletal cause of impaired mobility in the elderly. Because the precise molecular mechanisms which are involved in the degradation of cartilage matrix and development of OA are poorly understood and there are currently no effective interventions to decelerate the progression of OA or retard the irreversible degradation of cartilage except for total joint replacement surgery. In this paper, the important molecular mechanisms related to OA pathogenesis will be summarized and new insights into potential molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of OA will be provided. PMID:25311420

  5. The Pathogenesis and Immunobiology of Mousepox.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Luis J

    2016-01-01

    Ectromelia virus is a mouse-specific orthopoxvirus that, following footpad infection or natural transmission, causes mousepox in most strains of mice, while a few strains, such as C57BL/6, are resistant to the disease but not to the infection. Mousepox is an acute, systemic, highly lethal disease of remarkable semblance to smallpox, caused by the human-specific variola virus. Starting in 1929 with its discovery by Marchal, work with ECTV has provided essential information for our current understanding on how viruses spread lympho-hematogenously, the genetic control of antiviral resistance, the role of different components of the innate and adaptive immune system in the control of primary and secondary infections with acute viruses, and how the mechanisms of immune evasion deployed by the virus affect virulence in vivo. Here, I review the literature on the pathogenesis and immunobiology of ECTV infection in vivo. PMID:26791861

  6. Environmental predators as models for bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilbi, Hubert; Weber, Stefan S; Ragaz, Curdin; Nyfeler, Yves; Urwyler, Simon

    2007-03-01

    Environmental bacteria are constantly threatened by bacterivorous predators such as free-living protozoa and nematodes. In the course of their coevolution with environmental predators, some bacteria developed sophisticated defence mechanisms, including the secretion of toxins, or the capacity to avoid lysosomal killing and to replicate intracellularly within protozoa. To analyse the interactions with bacterial pathogens on a molecular, cellular or organismic level, protozoa and other non-mammalian hosts are increasingly used. These include amoebae, as well as genetically tractable hosts, such as the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Using these hosts, the virulence mechanisms of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria such as Legionella, Mycobacterium, Pseudomonas or Vibrio were found to be not only relevant for the interactions of the bacteria with protozoa, nematodes and insect phagocytes, but also with mammalian hosts including humans. Thus, non-mammalian model hosts provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of environmental bacteria. PMID:17298357

  7. Psoriasis pathophysiology: current concepts of pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, J; Bowcock, A

    2005-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common skin disorder characterised by focal formation of inflamed, raised plaques that constantly shed scales derived from excessive growth of skin epithelial cells. The disease is defined by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin: hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, vascular hyperplasia and ectasia, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and other types of leucocyte in affected skin. In a relatively short period, psoriasis vulgaris has been conceptualised as a T lymphocyte mediated autoimmune disease and new biological therapies that target T cells have just entered routine clinical practice. Similarly, rapid progress has been made towards dissecting cellular and molecular pathways of inflammation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. This short review presents current pathogenic concepts that have emerged from genetic, genomic, and cellular information obtained in basic studies and from clinical studies of selective immune targeting drugs. PMID:15708932

  8. The Pathogenesis of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galton, D. A. G.

    1966-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was examined in a series of 88 cases observed during a 15-year period. In untreated cases the trend of the absolute lymphocyte counts followed two main patterns. In the type I trend, the counts rose throughout the observation period; in the type II trend, the tendency to rise ceased and the counts stabilized above and below a mean value, the stationary trend being maintained for months or years. The type II trend was associated with relatively benign disease. The development of lymphocytosis was correlated with the progression of lymphadenopathy. It is suggested that lymphocytosis may result from the physiological process of recirculation and that the accumulation of lymphocytes may result from the proliferation of a single slightly abnormal cell-line. The abnormal cells might survive an unusually long time because they are unable to respond to stimuli which cause normal lymphocytes to transform. PMID:4952384

  9. Molecular and cellular pathogenesis of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas (ACPs) are the most common pituitary tumours in children. Although histologically benign, these are clinically aggressive tumours, difficult to manage and associated with poor quality of life for the patients. Several human and mouse studies have provided unequivocal evidence that the over‐activation of the WNT/β‐catenin signalling pathway underlies the molecular aetiology of these tumours. Recently, research using genetically modified mouse models of human ACP have revealed a critical and unexpected non‐cell autonomous role for pituitary stem cells in ACP tumourigenesis, which has expanded the cancer stem cell paradigm. As the result of this basic research, the pathogenesis of ACP is being unveiled, with promising implications for the development of novel treatments against these childhood neoplasms. These benign tumours may additionally represent a unique model to provide insights into the initial steps of oncogenesis. PMID:25611703

  10. Molecular pathogenesis of mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jares, Pedro; Colomer, Dolors; Campo, Elias

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a B cell malignancy in which constitutive dysregulation of cyclin D1 and the cell cycle, disruption of DNA damage response pathways, and activation of cell survival mechanisms contribute to oncogenesis. A small number of tumors lack cyclin D1 overexpression, suggesting that its dysregulation is always not required for tumor initiation. Some cases have hypermutated IGHV and stable karyotypes, a predominant nonnodal disease, and an indolent clinical evolution, which suggests that they may correspond to distinct subtypes of the disease. In this review, we discuss the molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis, and how improved understanding of these molecular mechanisms offers new perspectives for the treatment of patients. PMID:23023712

  11. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuder, Rubin M.; Petrache, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The current epidemic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has produced a worldwide health care burden, approaching that imposed by transmittable infectious diseases. COPD is a multidimensional disease, with varied intermediate and clinical phenotypes. This Review discusses the pathogenesis of COPD, with particular focus on emphysema, based on the concept that pulmonary injury involves stages of initiation (by exposure to cigarette smoke, pollutants, and infectious agents), progression, and consolidation. Tissue damage entails complex interactions among oxidative stress, inflammation, extracellular matrix proteolysis, and apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Lung damage by cigarette smoke ultimately leads to self-propagating processes, resulting in macromolecular and structural alterations — features similar to those seen in aging. PMID:22850885

  12. Pathogenesis of Epilepsy: Challenges in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Hui Yin, Yow; Ahmad, Nurulumi; Makmor-Bakry, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic disorders affecting individuals of all ages. A greater understanding of pathogenesis in epilepsy will likely provide the basis fundamental for development of new antiepileptic therapies that aim to prevent the epileptogenesis process or modify the progression of epilepsy in addition to treatment of epilepsy symptomatically. Therefore, several investigations have embarked on advancing knowledge of the mechanism underlying epileptogenesis, understanding in mechanism of pharmacoresistance and discovering antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying therapy. Animal models play a crucial and significant role in providing additional insight into mechanism of epileptogenesis. With the help of these models, epileptogenesis process has been demonstrated to be involved in various molecular and biological pathways or processes. Hence, this article will discuss the known and postulated mechanisms of epileptogenesis and challenges in using the animal models. PMID:24494063

  13. Study of viral pathogenesis in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Gaska, Jenna M; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Many of the viral pathogens that cause infectious diseases in humans have a highly restricted species tropism, making the study of their pathogenesis and the development of clinical therapies difficult. The improvement of humanized mouse models over the past 30 years has greatly facilitated researchers' abilities to study host responses to viral infections in a cost effective and ethical manner. From HIV to hepatotropic viruses to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus, humanized mice have led to the identification of factors crucial to the viral life cycle, served as an outlet for testing candidate therapies, and improved our abilities to analyze human immune responses to infection. In tackling both new and old viruses as they emerge, humanized mice will continue to be an indispensable tool. PMID:25618248

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae: virulence factors, pathogenesis, and vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    AlonsoDeVelasco, E; Verheul, A F; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1995-01-01

    Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are close to being licensed, a more profound knowledge of the virulence factors responsible for the morbidity and mortality caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is necessary. This review deals with the major structures of pneumococci involved in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease and their interference with the defense mechanisms of the host. It is well known that protection against S. pneumoniae is the result of phagocytosis of invading pathogens. For this process, complement and anticapsular polysaccharide antibodies are required. Besides, relatively recent experimental data suggest that protection is also mediated by the removal of disintegrating pneumococci and their degradation products (cell wall, pneumolysin). These structures seem to be major contributors to illness and death caused by pneumococci. An effective conjugate vaccine should therefore preferably include the capsular polysaccharide and at least one of these inflammatory factors. PMID:8531887

  15. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  16. The Pathogenesis of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suping; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by the clonal expansion of CD5+CD23+ B cells in blood, marrow, and second lymphoid tissues. Gene-expression profiling and phenotypic studies suggest that CLL is probably derived from CD5+ B cells similar to those found in the blood of healthy adults. Next-generation sequencing has revealed recurrent genetic lesions that are implicated in CLL pathogenesis and/or disease progression. The biology of CLL is entwined with its microenvironment, in which accessory cells can promote leukemia cell growth and/or survival. Recently, much attention has been focused on the CLL B cell receptor (BCR) and on chemokine receptors that enable CLL cells to home to lymphoid tissues and to establish the leukemia microenvironment. Agents that can interfere with BCR signaling or chemokine– receptor signaling, or that target surface antigens selectively expressed on CLL cells, promise to have significant therapeutic benefit in patients with this disease. PMID:23987584

  17. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  18. Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael; Grant, Ashley; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), Machupo virus (MACV) is reported to have a mortality rate of 25 to 35%. First identified in 1959, BHF was the cause of a localized outbreak in San Joaquin until rodent population controls were implemented in 1964. The rodent Calomys collosus was identified as the primary vector and reservoir for the virus. Multiple animal models were considered during the 1970’s with the most human-like disease identified in Rhesus macaques but minimal characterization of the pathogenesis has been published since. A reemergence of reported BHF cases has been reported in recent years, which necessitates the further study and development of a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24636947

  19. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans. PMID:27012512

  20. Classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, M E; Gaskin, G; Pusey, C D

    1996-09-01

    Patients with systemic vasculitis (SV), especially Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis, regularly present with renal involvement. Although considered a rare disease, either the incidence of SV is increasing or it is being increasingly recognized. Accurate classification systems are required to allow comparison of data from different groups investigating and treating these patients. Systemic vasculitis is known to be an autoimmune disease, but the mechanisms of pathogenesis have not been established, despite many studies on this topic in recent years. Most of this work has been done in vitro, although development of animal models is underway. Patient and renal survival have improved with aggressive immunosuppressive treatment, but morbidity is high and controversies remain in establishing the most effective regimens with minimum adverse effects. In this review we discuss the classification of SV, review the current knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms, and consider the relative merits of different treatment protocols. PMID:8903093

  1. Hormones and pathogenesis of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fernando M; Bloise, Enrrico; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tânia M

    2016-07-01

    The role of ovarian steroid hormones in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids is supported by epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence. Estradiol and progesterone induce mature leiomyoma cells to release mitogenic stimuli to adjacent immature cells, thereby providing uterine leiomyoma with undifferentiated cells that are likely to support tumor growth. Progesterone action is required for the complete development and proliferation of leiomyoma cells, while estradiol predominantly increases tissue sensitivity to progesterone by increasing the availability of progesterone receptors (PRs). The selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene and the selective PR modulators (SPRMs) mifepristone, asoprisnil, and ulipristal acetate have been shown in clinical trials to inhibit fibroid growth. The role of sex steroids is critical for leiomyoma development and maintenance, but a number of autocrine and paracrine messengers are involved in this process; hence, numerous pathways remain to be explored in therapeutic innovations for treating this common disease. PMID:26725037

  2. Kidney Stones 2012: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Naim M.; Sinnott, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    Context: The pathogenetic mechanisms of kidney stone formation are complex and involve both metabolic and environmental risk factors. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney stone disease. Evidence Acquisition and Synthesis: Both original and review articles were found via PubMed search reporting on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of kidney stones. These resources were integrated with the authors' knowledge of the field. Conclusion: Nephrolithiasis remains a major economic and health burden worldwide. Nephrolithiasis is considered a systemic disorder associated with chronic kidney disease, bone loss and fractures, increased risk of coronary artery disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the metabolic syndrome. Further understanding of the pathophysiological link between nephrolithiasis and these systemic disorders is necessary for the development of new therapeutic options. PMID:22466339

  3. Current frontiers in systemic sclerosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ciechomska, Marzena; van Laar, Jacob; O'Reilly, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterised by vascular dysfunction, impaired angiogenesis, inflammation and fibrosis. There is no currently accepted disease-modifying treatment with only autologous stem cell transplant showing clinically meaningful benefit. The lack of treatment options reflects our lack of understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms occurring in the disease. Recent investigations have begun to decipher the molecular pathways underpinning the different aspects of the disease and may provide a rational clinical target(s). Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of the disease is important in understanding systemic sclerosis treatment. The aim of this review was to examine the current thinking in SSc pathogenesis and will offer novel areas for research which may yield novel therapeutics. PMID:25712746

  4. Understanding the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ryer, Evan J.; Elmore, James R.; Tromp, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Summary An aortic aneurysm is a dilatation in which the aortic diameter is ≥ 3.0 cm. If left untreated, the aortic wall continues to weaken and becomes unable to withstand the forces of the luminal blood pressure resulting in progressive dilatation and rupture, a catastrophic event associated with a mortality of 50 – 80%. Smoking and positive family history are important risk factors for the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Several genetic risk factors have also been identified. On the histological level, visible hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. We expect that large genetic, genomic, epigenetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies will be undertaken by international consortia to identify additional risk factors and biomarkers, and to enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of AAA. Collaboration between different research groups will be important in overcoming the challenges to develop pharmacological treatments for AAA. PMID:26308600

  5. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease. PMID:15868023

  6. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment of Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heinz; Henninger, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common cause of chronic liver disease and HFE genotyping allows decisive and non-invasive diagnosis. Molecular and clinical genetic studies have led to the identification of genes other than HFE in patients with inherited diseases associated with increased hepatic iron storage that can cause hemochromatosis, which adds complexity to a diagnostic approach to patients with suspected hemochromatosis. Despite major advances in genetics, hepatic iron quantification by non-invasive methods therefore remains the key to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Although associated with homozygosity for the C282Y polymorphism in the HFE gene in >80% of patients, hemochromatosis is a complex genetic disease with strong environmental disease modifiers. Testing for mutations in the non-HFE hemochromatosis genes transferrin receptor 2, hemojuvelin, HAMP and SLC40A1 is complex, costly and time-consuming. Demonstration of hepatic iron overload by liver biopsy or MRI is therefore required before such complex tests are carried out. The pathogenesis of chronic liver disease in hemochromatosis is mainly attributed to the redox potential of tissue iron, and only the more recent studies have focused on the toxic properties of circulating iron. Considering the fact that an increased saturation of transferrin and high iron in plasma are the hallmark of all hemochromatosis forms, an alternative view would be that toxic iron in the circulation is involved in the pathogenesis of hemochromatosis. Recent studies have shown an increased concentration of redox-active iron in plasma in patients with increased transferrin saturation. This finding supports the hypothesis that tissue iron may be the 'smoking gun' of iron-induced organ damage. Taken together, caring for patients with suspected or established hemochromatosis still remains a challenge, where understanding the genetics, biochemistry and cell biology of hemochromatosis will aid better diagnosis and treatment of affected

  7. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  8. Henipavirus pathogenesis in human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  9. Type 1 diabetes pathogenesis – Prevention???

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, C. S. Muralidhara; Srikanta, S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes is multi-faceted, including, autoimmunity, genetics and environment. Autoimmunity directed against pancreatic islet cells results in slowly progressive selective beta-cell destruction (“Primary autoimmune insulitis”), culminating over years in clinically manifested insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Circulating serum autoantibodies directed against the endocrine cells of the islets of Langerhans (Islet cell autoantibodies - ICAb) are an important hallmark of this disease. Assays for islet cell autoantibodies have facilitated the investigation and understanding of several facets in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Their applications have extended into clinical practice and have opened new avenues for early preclinical prediction and preventive prophylaxis in IDDM/type 1 DM. Recently, surprisingly, differences in insulin content between T1DM islets, as well as, ‘patchy’ or ‘lobular’ destruction of islets have been described. These unique pathobiological phenomena, suggest that beta cell destruction may not always be inexorable and inevitably complete/total, and thus raise hopes for possible therapeutic interruption of beta cell autoimmunity – destruction and cure of type 1 diabetes. “Recurrent or secondary autoimmune insulitis” refers to the rapid reappearance of islet cell autoantibodies post pancreas transplant, and selective islet beta cell destruction in the grafted pancreas [never forgetting or “anamnestic” beta cell destructive memory], in the absence of any graft pancreas rejection [monozygotic twin to twin transplantation]. The one definite environmental factor is congenital rubella, because of which a subset of children subsequently develop type 1 diabetes. The putative predisposing factors are viruses, gluten and cow's milk. The putative protective factors include gut flora, helminths, viral infections, and Vitamin D. Prevention of T1DM can include: Primary prevention strategies before

  10. GASTROINTESTINAL TSLP IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF FOOD ALLERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Food allergy is a major public health problem affecting 6-8% of children in the United States, but there is a dearth of information on pathogenesis or preventative strategies. The proposed studies aim to assess mechanisms of food allergy pathogenesis and identify potential tri...

  11. Pathogenesis of Nervous and Mental Diseases in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Ernest, Ed.

    Major pathogenic sources of mental diseases in children and a classification of these diseases are considered. Contributions include the following: pathogenesis of mental diseases in childhood by Ernest Harms, organ inferiority and psychiatric disorders by Bernard Shulman and Howard Klapman, pathogenesis of neurological disorders by George Gold,…

  12. Naegleria fowleri: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  13. Naegleria fowleri: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  14. Pathogenesis of Malaria and Clinically Similar Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A.; Alleva, Lisa M.; Mills, Alison C.; Cowden, William B.

    2004-01-01

    There is now wide acceptance of the concept that the similarity between many acute infectious diseases, be they viral, bacterial, or parasitic in origin, is caused by the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines initiated when the organism interacts with the innate immune system. This is also true of certain noninfectious states, such as the tissue injury syndromes. This review discusses the historical origins of these ideas, which began with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and spread from their origins in malaria research to other fields. As well the more established proinflammatory mediators, such as TNF, interleukin-1, and lymphotoxin, the roles of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, which are chiefly inhibitory, are discussed. The established and potential roles of two more recently recognized contributors, overactivity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and the escape of high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) protein from its normal location into the circulation, are also put in context. The pathogenesis of the disease caused by falciparum malaria is then considered in the light of what has been learned about the roles of these mediators in these other diseases, as well as in malaria itself. PMID:15258091

  15. Obesity, Cholesterol Metabolism and Breast Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Donald P.; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T.; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Chang, Ching-yi; Norris, John D.; Guyton, John R.; Nelson, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor (LXR) in macrophages and possibly other cells is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25060521

  16. ASTROCYTES: EMERGING STARS IN LEUKODYSTROPHY PATHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Aloisi, Francesca; Ambrosini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant glial cell population in the central nervous system (CNS). Once considered only passive scaffolding elements, astrocytes are now recognised as cells playing essential roles in CNS development and function. They control extracellular water and ion homeostasis, provide substrates for energy metabolism, and regulate neurogenesis, myelination and synaptic transmission. Due to these multiple activities astrocytes have been implicated in almost all brain pathologies, contributing to various aspects of disease initiation, progression and resolution. Evidence is emerging that astrocyte dysfunction can be the direct cause of neurodegeneration, as shown in Alexander’s disease where myelin degeneration is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the astrocyte-specific cytoskeleton protein glial fibrillary acidic protein. Recent studies point to a primary role for astrocytes in the pathogenesis of other genetic leukodystrophies such as megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts and vanishing white matter disease. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiological role of astrocytes focusing on their contribution to the development of the above mentioned leukodystrophies and on new perspectives for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:24340223

  17. Exploiting death: apoptotic immunity in microbial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ucker, D S

    2016-06-01

    Innate immunity typically is responsible for initial host responses against infections. Independently, nucleated cells that die normally as part of the physiological process of homeostasis in mammals (including humans) suppress immunity. Specifically, the physiological process of cell death (apoptosis) generates cells that are recognized specifically by viable cells of all types and elicit a profound transient suppression of host immunity (termed 'innate apoptotic immunity' (IAI)). IAI appears to be important normally for the maintenance of self-tolerance and for the resolution of inflammation. In addition, pathogens are able to take advantage of IAI through a variety of distinct mechanisms, to enable their proliferation within the host and enhance pathogenicity. For example, the protist pathogen Leishmania amazonensis, at its infective stage, mimics apoptotic cells by expressing apoptotic-like protein determinants on the cell surface, triggering immunosuppression directly. In contrast, the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes triggers cell death in host lymphocytes, relying on those apoptotic cells to suppress host immune control and facilitate bacterial expansion. Finally, although the inhibition of apoptotic cell death is a common attribute of many viruses which facilitates their extended replication, it is clear that adenoviruses also reprogram the non-apoptotic dead cells that arise subsequently to manifest apoptotic-like immunosuppressive properties. These three instances represent diverse strategies used by microbial pathogens to exploit IAI, focusing attention on the potency of this facet of host immune control. Further examination of these cases will be revealing both of varied mechanisms of pathogenesis and the processes involved in IAI control. PMID:26943319

  18. Nuclear receptors and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Polvani, Simone; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tempesti, Sara; Galli, Andrea

    2014-09-14

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease with a median overall survival time of 5 mo and the five years survival less than 5%, a rate essentially unchanged over the course of the years. A well defined progression model of accumulation of genetic alterations ranging from single point mutations to gross chromosomal abnormalities has been introduced to describe the origin of this disease. However, due to the its subtle nature and concurring events PDAC cure remains elusive. Nuclear receptors (NR) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily conserved ligand-regulated DNA-binding transcription factors functionally involved in important cellular functions ranging from regulation of metabolism, to growth and development. Given the nature of their ligands, NR are very tempting drug targets and their pharmacological modulation has been widely exploited for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. There are now clear evidences that both classical ligand-activated and orphan NR are involved in the pathogenesis of PDAC from its very early stages; nonetheless many aspects of their role are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight the striking connections that link peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, retinoic acid receptors, retinoid X receptor, androgen receptor, estrogen receptors and the orphan NR Nur, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II and the liver receptor homologue-1 receptor to PDAC development, connections that could lead to the identification of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:25232244

  19. Recent advances in understanding ichthyosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marukian, Nareh V; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    The ichthyoses, also known as disorders of keratinization (DOK), encompass a heterogeneous group of skin diseases linked by the common finding of abnormal barrier function, which initiates a default compensatory pathway of hyperproliferation, resulting in the characteristic clinical manifestation of localized and/or generalized scaling. Additional cutaneous findings frequently seen in ichthyoses include generalized xerosis, erythroderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, hypohydrosis, and recurrent infections. In 2009, the Ichthyosis Consensus Conference established a classification consensus for DOK based on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and mode of inheritance. This nomenclature system divides DOK into two main groups: nonsyndromic forms, with clinical findings limited to the skin, and syndromic forms, with involvement of additional organ systems. Advances in next-generation sequencing technology have allowed for more rapid and cost-effective genetic analysis, leading to the identification of novel, rare mutations that cause DOK, many of which represent phenotypic expansion. This review focuses on new findings in syndromic and nonsyndromic ichthyoses, with emphasis on novel genetic discoveries that provide insight into disease pathogenesis. PMID:27408699

  20. Causes and pathogenesis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fogo, Agnes B.

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) describes both a common lesion in progressive kidney disease, and a disease characterized by marked proteinuria and podocyte injury. The initial injuries vary widely. Monogenetic forms of FSGS are largely due to alterations in structural genes of the podocyte, many of which result in early onset of disease. Genetic risk alleles in apolipoprotein L1 are especially prevalent in African Americans, and are linked not only to adult-onset FSGS but also to progression of some other kidney diseases. The recurrence of FSGS in some transplant recipients whose end-stage renal disease was caused by FSGS points to circulating factors in disease pathogenesis, which remain incompletely understood. In addition, infection, drug use, and secondary maladaptive responses after loss of nephrons from any cause may also cause FSGS. Varying phenotypes of the sclerosis are also manifest, with varying prognosis. The so-called tip lesion has the best prognosis, whereas the collapsing type of FSGS has the worst prognosis. New insights into glomerular cell injury response and repair may pave the way for possible therapeutic strategies. PMID:25447132

  1. Pulmonary fibrosis: pathogenesis, etiology and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, MS; Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and architectural remodeling of tissues can severely disrupt lung function, often with fatal consequences. The etiology of pulmonary fibrotic diseases is varied, with an array of triggers including allergens, chemicals, radiation and environmental particles. However, the cause of one of the most common pulmonary fibrotic conditions, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is still unclear. This review examines common mechanisms of pulmonary wound-healing responses following lung injury, and highlights the pathogenesis of some of the most widespread pulmonary fibrotic diseases. A three phase model of wound repair is reviewed that includes; (1) injury; (2) inflammation; and (3) repair. In most pulmonary fibrotic conditions dysregulation at one or more of these phases has been reported. Chronic inflammation can lead to an imbalance in the production of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and disrupt cellular recruitment. These changes coupled with excessive pro-fibrotic IL-13 and/or TGFβ1 production can turn a well-controlled healing response into a pathogenic fibrotic response. Endogenous regulatory mechanisms are discussed including novel areas of therapeutic intervention. Restoring homeostasis to these dysregulated healing responses, or simply neutralizing the key pro-fibrotic mediators may prevent or slow the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19129758

  2. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Anna J.

    2015-01-01

    The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used “premature ovarian failure” which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI. PMID:26903753

  3. Preeclampsia: Updates in Pathogenesis, Definitions, and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Elizabeth; Prasanna, Devika; Brima, Wunnie; Jim, Belinda

    2016-06-01

    Preeclampsia is becoming an increasingly common diagnosis in the developed world and remains a high cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Delay in childbearing in the developed world feeds into the risk factors associated with preeclampsia, which include older maternal age, obesity, and/or vascular diseases. Inadequate prenatal care partially explains the persistent high prevalence in the developing world. In this review, we begin by presenting the most recent concepts in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Upstream triggers of the well described angiogenic pathways, such as the heme oxygenase and hydrogen sulfide pathways, as well as the roles of autoantibodies, misfolded proteins, nitric oxide, and oxidative stress will be described. We also detail updated definitions, classification schema, and treatment targets of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy put forth by obstetric and hypertensive societies throughout the world. The shift has been made to view preeclampsia as a systemic disease with widespread endothelial damage and the potential to affect future cardiovascular diseases rather than a self-limited occurrence. At the very least, we now know that preeclampsia does not end with delivery of the placenta. We conclude by summarizing the latest strategies for prevention and treatment of preeclampsia. A better understanding of this entity will help in the care of at-risk women before delivery and for decades after. PMID:27094609

  4. Radiation Enteropathy – Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Denham, James W.; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2015-01-01

    There has been only modest change in cancer incidence and mortality during the past several decades, but the number of cancer survivors has almost tripled during the same period. With an increasing cohort of cancer survivors, efforts to prevent, diagnose, and manage side effects of cancer therapy in general and, specifically those of radiation therapy have intensified. Many cancer survivors have undergone radiation therapy of tumors in the pelvis or abdomen, thus rendering the bowel at risk for injury. In fact, the current prevalence of patients with long term radiation-induced intestinal side effects exceeds that of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease combined. Significant progress toward reducing toxicity of radiation therapy has been made by the introduction of so-called dose-sculpting treatment techniques, which allow more precise delivery of the radiation beam. Moreover, new insight into the underlying pathophysiology have resulted in an improved understanding of mechanisms of radiation-induced bowel toxicity and in development of new diagnostic strategies and management opportunities. This article discusses the pathogenesis of early and delayed radiation-induced bowel toxicity, reviews current management options, and outlines priorities for future research. The gastroenterologist by adding insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms of related bowel disorders can substantially strengthen these efforts. PMID:24686268

  5. Lichen planopilaris: update on pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Baibergenova, Akerke; Donovan, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Lichen planopilaris (LPP) is considered to be a follicular variant of lichen planus. Clinical variants include classic LPP, frontal fibrosing alopecia, and the Graham-Little-Piccardi-Lassueur syndrome. The pathogenesis of LPP remains to be fully elucidated, but like other cicatricial alopecias involves the irreversible destruction of hair follicle stem cells and loss of a hair follicle's capacity to regenerate itself In the early stages of LPP, patients may have scalp pruritus, burning, tenderness, and increased hair shedding. A scalp biopsy shows a lymphocytic infiltrate involving the isthmus and infundibulum. Apoptotic cells present in the external root sheath and concentric fibrosis surrounds the hair follicle. Treatment is prescribed with the goal to alleviate patient symptoms and to halt the progression of hair loss. Treatment involves use of potent topical corticosteroids and/or intralesional corticosteroids. Options for systemic treatment include anti-inflammatory agents such as hydroxychloroquine, tetracyclines, pioglitazones, and immunosuppressive medications such as cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, or systemic corticosteroids. Hair transplantation may also be an option if the disease has been in clinical remission. The management of LPP can sometimes be challenging and additional research is needed to improve outcomes for patients. PMID:23930355

  6. The hepatitis delta virus: Replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sureau, Camille; Negro, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective virus and a satellite of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Its RNA genome is unique among animal viruses, but it shares common features with some plant viroids, including a replication mechanism that uses a host RNA polymerase. In infected cells, HDV genome replication and formation of a nucleocapsid-like ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are independent of HBV. But the RNP cannot exit, and therefore propagate, in the absence of HBV, as the latter supplies the propagation mechanism, from coating the HDV RNP with the HBV envelope proteins for cell egress to delivery of the HDV virions to the human hepatocyte target. HDV is therefore an obligate satellite of HBV; it infects humans either concomitantly with HBV or after HBV infection. HDV affects an estimated 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide, and the clinical significance of HDV infection is more severe forms of viral hepatitis--acute or chronic--, and a higher risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison to HBV monoinfection. This review covers molecular aspects of HDV replication cycle, including its interaction with the helper HBV and the pathogenesis of infection in humans. PMID:27084031

  7. Recent advances in understanding ichthyosis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marukian, Nareh V.; Choate, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    The ichthyoses, also known as disorders of keratinization (DOK), encompass a heterogeneous group of skin diseases linked by the common finding of abnormal barrier function, which initiates a default compensatory pathway of hyperproliferation, resulting in the characteristic clinical manifestation of localized and/or generalized scaling. Additional cutaneous findings frequently seen in ichthyoses include generalized xerosis, erythroderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, hypohydrosis, and recurrent infections. In 2009, the Ichthyosis Consensus Conference established a classification consensus for DOK based on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and mode of inheritance. This nomenclature system divides DOK into two main groups: nonsyndromic forms, with clinical findings limited to the skin, and syndromic forms, with involvement of additional organ systems. Advances in next-generation sequencing technology have allowed for more rapid and cost-effective genetic analysis, leading to the identification of novel, rare mutations that cause DOK, many of which represent phenotypic expansion. This review focuses on new findings in syndromic and nonsyndromic ichthyoses, with emphasis on novel genetic discoveries that provide insight into disease pathogenesis. PMID:27408699

  8. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060521

  9. Treatment and pathogenesis of acute hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Mushiyakh, Yelena; Dangaria, Harsh; Qavi, Shahbaz; Ali, Noorjahan; Pannone, John; Tompkins, David

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and various treatment modalities for acute hyperkalemia and presents a systematic approach to selecting a treatment strategy. Hyperkalemia, a life-threatening condition caused by extracellular potassium shift or decreased renal potassium excretion, usually presents with non-specific symptoms. Early recognition of moderate to severe hyperkalemia is vital in preventing fatal cardiac arrhythmias and muscle paralysis. Management of hyperkalemia includes the elimination of reversible causes (diet, medications), rapidly acting therapies that shift potassium into cells and block the cardiac membrane effects of hyperkalemia, and measures to facilitate removal of potassium from the body (saline diuresis, oral binding resins, and hemodialysis). Hyperkalemia with potassium level more than 6.5 mEq/L or EKG changes is a medical emergency and should be treated accordingly. Treatment should be started with calcium gluconate to stabilize cardiomyocyte membranes, followed by insulin injection, and b-agonists administration. Hemodialysis remains the most reliable method to remove potassium from the body and should be used in cases refractory to medical treatment. Prompt detection and proper treatment are crucial in preventing lethal outcomes. PMID:23882341

  10. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a disease of functional impairment in the cardiac muscle and its etiology includes both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Cardiomyopathy caused by the intrinsic factors is called as primary cardiomyopathy of which two major clinical phenotypes are hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Genetic approaches have revealed the disease genes for hereditary primary cardiomyopathy and functional studies have demonstrated that characteristic functional alterations induced by the disease-associated mutations are closely related to the clinical types, such that increased and decreased Ca(2+) sensitivities of muscle contraction are associated with HCM and DCM, respectively. In addition, recent studies have suggested that mutations in the Z-disc components found in HCM and DCM may result in increased and decreased stiffness of sarcomere, respectively. Moreover, functional analysis of mutations in the other components of cardiac muscle have suggested that the altered response to metabolic stresses is associated with cardiomyopathy, further indicating the heterogeneity in the etiology and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26178429

  11. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24949885

  12. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed. PMID:24212642

  13. [Etiology and pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors influencing acute respiratory failure and pathogenesis according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either the normal delivery of oxygen to tissues and release or the normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and lung contusion, acute respiratory distress syndrome, long-term mechanical ventilation of the lungs, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: the transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, the transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and the removal of carbon dioxide from blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the course of disease or cause higher mortality. It is important to determine the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute respiratory failure, estimate the main parameters and their interrelations and prescribe proper treatment. PMID:15064552

  14. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Children: Pathogenesis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder in children that is characterized by persistent fever, splenomegaly with cytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Increased levels of various cytokines and soluble interleukin-2 receptor are biological markers of HLH. HLH can be classified into two major forms: primary and secondary. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), a type of primary HLH, is an autosomal recessive disorder that typically occurs in infancy and can be classified into five different subtypes (FHL types 1–5). In Japan, >80% of patients with FHL have either PRF1 (FHL type 2) or UNC13D (FHL type 3) defects. FHL is considered to be a disorder of T-cell function because the activity of NK cells or cytotoxic T lymphocytes as target cells is usually impaired. Moreover, Epstein–Barr virus-associated HLH (EBV-HLH) is considered a major subtype of secondary HLH. Any genetic background could have an effect on the pathogenesis of secondary HLH because EBV-HLH is considered to be particularly prevalent in Asian countries. For primary HLH, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only accepted curative therapy, although cord blood transplantation with a reduced-conditioning regimen has been used with superior outcomes. For secondary HLH, including EBV-HLH, immunochemotherapy based on the HLH-2004 protocol has been used. In the near future, the entire mechanism of HLH should be clarified to establish less toxic therapies, including cell therapy and gene targeting therapy. PMID:27242976

  15. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used "premature ovarian failure" which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI. PMID:26903753

  16. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, A R; Scheld, W M

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with associated unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates despite the availability of effective bactericidal antimicrobial therapy. Through the use of experimental animal models of infection, a great deal of information has been gleaned concerning the pathogenic and pathophysiologic mechanisms operable in bacterial meningitis. Most cases of bacterial meningitis begin with host acquisition of a new organism by nasopharyngeal colonization followed by systemic invasion and development of a high-grade bacteremia. Bacterial encapsulation contributes to this bacteremia by inhibiting neutrophil phagocytosis and resisting classic complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Central nervous system invasion then occurs, although the exact site of bacterial traversal into the central nervous system is unknown. By production and/or release of virulence factors into and stimulation of formation of inflammatory cytokines within the central nervous system, meningeal pathogens increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing protein and neutrophils to move into the subarachnoid space. There is then an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, which leads to many of the pathophysiologic consequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Attenuation of this inflammatory response with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy is associated with reduced concentrations of tumor necrosis factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, with diminished cerebrospinal fluid leukocytosis, and perhaps with improvement of morbidity, as demonstrated in recent clinical trials. Further information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis should lead to the development of more innovative treatment and/or preventive strategies for this disorder. Images PMID:8472245

  17. Molecular pathogenesis of sporadic duodenal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Achille, A.; Baron, A.; Zamboni, G.; Orlandini, S.; Bogina, G.; Bassi, C.; Iacono, C.; Scarpa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Whether duodenal adenocarcinoma should be considered as a gastrointestinal or as a peripancreatic cancer is a matter of debate, as is the opportunity and type of treatment. We investigated 12 such cancers for the genetic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancies, including (a) those occurring in common-type cancers - allelic losses at chromosomes 3p, 5q, 17p and 18q, and Ki-ras and p53 alterations; and (b) those characteristic of mutator-phenotype cancers - microsatellite instability and TGF-betaRII gene mutations. We found Ki-ras and p53 mutations in five (42%) and eight cancers (67%), respectively; chromosome 3p, 5q, 17p and 18q allelic losses in two of nine (22%), six of ten (60%), six of nine (67%) and three of ten (30%) informative cancers, respectively. Finally, three cancers (25%) showed widespread microsatellite instability and two of them had a TGF-betaRII gene mutation. Our data suggest that duodenal cancers may arise from either of the two known pathogenetic molecular pathways of gastric and colorectal cancers. The majority of our cases were highly aggressive cancers with frequent chromosomal changes and p53 mutations as observed in the common-type gastrointestinal malignancies, while widespread subtle alterations characteristic of mutator-phenotype cancers occurred in a minority, which also showed a favourable long-term outcome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9514055

  18. Pathogenesis and management of alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Haber, Paul S; Warner, Ross; Seth, Devanshi; Gorrell, Mark D; McCaughan, Geoffrey W

    2003-12-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is a potentially life-threatening complication of alcoholic abuse, typically presenting with symptoms and signs of hepatitis in the presence of an alcohol use disorder. The definitive diagnosis requires liver biopsy, but this is not generally required. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but relevant factors include metabolism of alcohol to toxic products, oxidant stress, acetaldehyde adducts, the action of endotoxin on Kupffer cells, and impaired hepatic regeneration. Mild alcoholic hepatitis recovers with abstinence and the long-term prognosis is determined by the underlying disorder of alcohol use. Severe alcoholic hepatitis is recognized by a Maddrey discriminant function >32 and is associated with a short-term mortality rate of almost 50%. Primary therapy is abstinence from alcohol and supportive care. Corticosteroids have been shown to be beneficial in a subset of severely ill patients with concomitant hepatic encephalopathy, but their use remains controversial. Pentoxifylline has been shown in one study to improve short-term survival rates. Other pharmacological interventions, including colchicine, propylthiouracil, calcium channel antagonists, and insulin with glucagon infusions, have not been proven to be beneficial. Nutritional supplementation with available high-calorie, high-protein diets is beneficial, but does not improve mortality. Orthotopic liver transplantation is not indicated for patients presenting with alcoholic hepatitis who have been drinking until the time of admission, but may be considered in those who achieve stable abstinence if liver function fails to recover. PMID:14675260

  19. Fibromyalgia Pathogenesis and Treatment Options Update.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Steven; Caldwell, William; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents and summarizes up-to-date literature on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for fibromyalgia patients. First, the most recent diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, as put forth by the American College of Rheumatology will be summarized. Clinical features, including chronic widespread pain, hyperalgesia, mood disorders, anxiety, and disturbed sleep patterns will be explored in-depth. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia involves alterations in multiple ascending and descending central nervous system pathways, as well as peripheral pathways, leading to heightened pain sensitivity. Risk factors have been studied extensively, and the most recent research focuses on various genetic influences and the contributions of stress and poor sleep. Lastly, the discussion in this article focuses on treatment options for fibromyalgia; some have been mainstay options for many years. Pharmacological agents include tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as some investigational agents. The evidence behind non-pharmacologic treatments, including massage therapy, exercise, and acupuncture, are discussed. PMID:26922414

  20. [Molecular and Cellular Pathogenesis of Cherubism].

    PubMed

    Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Study of rare genetic disorder often provides fundamental insights into the pathology of common diseases. Cherubism is a rare craniofacial disorder in children characterized by the destruction of maxillary and mandibular bones due to expansile fibrous inflammatory lesions. Genetic study of cherubism families discovered that gain-of-function mutations in the signaling adaptor protein SH3BP2 are responsible for cherubism. Analysis of the mouse model revealed that cherubism is an autoinflammatory disorder that is caused by dysregulated signaling pathway mediated by toll-like receptors and spleen tyrosine kinase. Recent study of the SH3BP2-deficient mice showed that SH3BP2 plays important roles in bone resorption in mouse models of inflammatory arthritis. These results establish SH3BP2 as a key player in the osteoimmune system beyond its role in a rare inherited disorder and suggest that the signaling pathway mediated by SH3BP2 is involved in the pathogenesis of common inflammatory bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27230848

  1. Histoplasma capsulatum surmounts obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Garfoot, Andrew L; Rappleye, Chad A

    2016-02-01

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and disseminated disease, even in immunocompetent hosts. In contrast to opportunistic pathogens, which are readily controlled by phagocytic cells, H. capsulatum yeasts are able to infect macrophages, survive antimicrobial defenses, and proliferate as an intracellular pathogen. In this review, we discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that enable H. capsulatum yeasts to overcome obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis. H. capsulatum yeasts gain refuge from extracellular obstacles such as antimicrobial lung surfactant proteins by engaging the β-integrin family of phagocytic receptors to promote entry into macrophages. In addition, H. capsulatum yeasts conceal immunostimulatory β-glucans to avoid triggering signaling receptors such as the β-glucan receptor Dectin-1. H. capsulatum yeasts counteract phagocyte-produced reactive oxygen species by expression of oxidative stress defense enzymes including an extracellular superoxide dismutase and an extracellular catalase. Within the phagosome, H. capsulatum yeasts block phagosome acidification, acquire essential metals such as iron and zinc, and utilize de novo biosynthesis pathways to overcome nutritional limitations. These mechanisms explain how H. capsulatum yeasts avoid and negate macrophage defense strategies and establish a hospitable intracellular niche, making H. capsulatum a successful intracellular pathogen of macrophages. PMID:26235362

  2. Celiac disease: prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan B R

    2012-11-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either "typical" or "atypical". In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  3. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  4. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae: Emergence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lance E.; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While significant protection from pneumococcal disease has been achieved by the use of polysaccharide and polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines, capsule-independent protection has been limited by serotype replacement along with disease caused by nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp). NESp strains compose approximately 3% to 19% of asymptomatic carriage isolates and harbor multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Surface proteins unique to NESp enhance colonization and virulence despite the lack of a capsule even though the capsule has been thought to be required for pneumococcal pathogenesis. Genes for pneumococcal surface proteins replace the capsular polysaccharide (cps) locus in some NESp isolates, and these proteins aid in pneumococcal colonization and otitis media (OM). NESp strains have been isolated from patients with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal disease, but noninvasive diseases, specifically, conjunctivitis (85%) and OM (8%), are of higher prevalence. Conjunctival strains are commonly of the so-called classical NESp lineages defined by multilocus sequence types (STs) ST344 and ST448, while sporadic NESp lineages such as ST1106 are more commonly isolated from patients with other diseases. Interestingly, sporadic lineages have significantly higher rates of recombination than classical lineages. Higher rates of recombination can lead to increased acquisition of antibiotic resistance and virulence factors, increasing the risk of disease and hindering treatment. NESp strains are a significant proportion of the pneumococcal population, can cause disease, and may be increasing in prevalence in the population due to effects on the pneumococcal niche caused by pneumococcal vaccines. Current vaccines are ineffective against NESp, and further research is necessary to develop vaccines effective against both encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci. PMID:27006456

  5. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  6. Spondyloarthritis: update on pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Reveille, John D; Arnett, Frank C

    2005-06-01

    A great deal of progress has occurred in the past few years in elucidating the causes and designing new treatments for ankylosing spondylitis and other types of spondyloarthritis. In addition to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 and other major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, chromosomal regions and genes elsewhere in the genome are being implicated both in disease susceptibility and severity. The various ways HLA-B27 may function in causing spondyloarthritis now are better understood to encompass not only antigen presentation but also other mechanisms, possibly all being operative in pathogenesis (misfolding of the HLA-B27 molecule, impaired intracellular killing of bacteria, and HLA-B27 itself serving as an autoantigen). Specific enteric and sexually acquired infections can trigger reactive arthritis, though no specific microbe has been identified in other forms of spondyloarthritis. Intestinal inflammation with impairment of the gut:blood barrier may be operative in driving ankylosing spondylitis and enteropathic arthritis. A number of treatments have been tried in spondyloarthritis, including older agents such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine but also newer drugs such as pamindronate. The recent introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers in the treatment of spondyloarthritis has offered the most hope in not only relieving symptoms and signs of both peripheral arthritis and enthesitis but also spinal disease, which often has been refractory to other agents. Their high cost and considerable side effect profile, however, have necessitated the establishment of guidelines for their use in these diseases in order to target the patient in whom they are likely to have the most benefit. PMID:15922688

  7. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  8. The pathogenesis of malaria: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    With 3.3 billion people at risk of infection, malaria remains one of the world’s most significant health problems. Increasing resistance of the main causative parasite to currently available drugs has created an urgent need to elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease in order to develop new treatments. A possible clue to such an understanding is that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum selectively absorbs vitamin A from the host and appears to use it for its metabolism; serum vitamin A levels are also reduced in children with malaria. Although vitamin A is essential in low concentration for numerous biological functions, higher concentrations are cytotoxic and pro-oxidant, and potentially toxic quantities of the vitamin are stored in the liver. During their life cycle in the host the parasites remain in the liver for several days before invading the red blood cells (RBCs). The hypothesis proposed is that the parasites emerge from the liver packed with vitamin A and use retinoic acid (RA), the main biologically active metabolite of vitamin A, as a cell membrane destabilizer to invade the RBCs throughout the body. The characteristic hemolysis and anemia of malaria and other symptoms of the disease may thus be manifestations of an endogenous form of vitamin A intoxication associated with high concentrations of RA but low concentrations of retinol (ROL). Retinoic acid released from the parasites may also affect the fetus and cause preterm birth and fetal growth restriction (FGR) as a function of the membranolytic and growth inhibitory effects of these compounds, respectively. Subject to testing, the hypothesis suggests that parasite vitamin A metabolism could become a new target for the treatment and prevention of malaria. PMID:23683366

  9. Towards a new understanding of NCL pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan D; Tarczyluk, Marta A; Nelvagal, Hemanth R

    2015-10-01

    The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCLs, Batten disease) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders that have been traditionally grouped together on the basis of certain shared clinical and pathological features. However, as the number of genes that appear to cause new forms of NCL continues to grow, it is timely to reassess our understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders and what groups them together. The various NCL subtypes do indeed share features of a build-up of autofluorescent storage material, progressive neuron loss and activation of the innate immune system. The characterisation of animal models has highlighted the selective nature of neuron loss and its intimate relationship with glial activation, rather than the generalised build-up of storage material. More recent data provide evidence for the pathway-dependent nature of pathology, the contribution of glial dysfunction, and the involvement of new brain regions previously thought to be unaffected, and it is becoming apparent that pathology extends beyond the brain. These data have important implications, not just for therapy, but also for our understanding of these disorders. However, looking beneath these broadly similar pathological themes evidence emerges for marked differences in the nature and extent of these events in different forms of NCL. Indeed, given the widely different nature of the mutated gene products it is perhaps more surprising that these disorders resemble each other as much as they do. Such data raise the question whether we should rethink the collective grouping of these gene deficiencies together, or whether it would be better to consider them as separate entities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease). PMID:26026924

  10. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae: Emergence and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Lance E; Robinson, D Ashley; McDaniel, Larry S

    2016-01-01

    While significant protection from pneumococcal disease has been achieved by the use of polysaccharide and polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines, capsule-independent protection has been limited by serotype replacement along with disease caused by nonencapsulatedStreptococcus pneumoniae(NESp). NESp strains compose approximately 3% to 19% of asymptomatic carriage isolates and harbor multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Surface proteins unique to NESp enhance colonization and virulence despite the lack of a capsule even though the capsule has been thought to be required for pneumococcal pathogenesis. Genes for pneumococcal surface proteins replace the capsular polysaccharide (cps) locus in some NESp isolates, and these proteins aid in pneumococcal colonization and otitis media (OM). NESp strains have been isolated from patients with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal disease, but noninvasive diseases, specifically, conjunctivitis (85%) and OM (8%), are of higher prevalence. Conjunctival strains are commonly of the so-called classical NESp lineages defined by multilocus sequence types (STs) ST344 and ST448, while sporadic NESp lineages such as ST1106 are more commonly isolated from patients with other diseases. Interestingly, sporadic lineages have significantly higher rates of recombination than classical lineages. Higher rates of recombination can lead to increased acquisition of antibiotic resistance and virulence factors, increasing the risk of disease and hindering treatment. NESp strains are a significant proportion of the pneumococcal population, can cause disease, and may be increasing in prevalence in the population due to effects on the pneumococcal niche caused by pneumococcal vaccines. Current vaccines are ineffective against NESp, and further research is necessary to develop vaccines effective against both encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci. PMID:27006456

  11. Pathogenesis of infection in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Fang, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the application of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy and advanced technologies, infection remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Understanding the pathogenesis of surgical infection would offer new insights into the development of biomarkers to predict and stratify infection in patients, and to explore specific strategies to minimize this serious postoperative complication. Recent findings The acute nonspecific inflammatory response triggered by endogenous danger signals evoked by surgical insult is beneficial, while paradoxically associated with reduced resistance to infection. There is growing evidence indicating that primed inflammation by surgical insult exaggerates the dysregulation of the immune-inflammatory response to the invasion of pathogens postoperatively. Innate immune receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), contribute to detecting both pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, and to further amplifying inflammatory responses to infection. Current evidence shows the fascinating role of non-TLRs in the process of infection. Non-TLRs, such as membrane-associated triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family, cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors and nuclear receptor nuclear family 4 subgroup A receptors, are also crucial in triggering the immune responses and mounting an effective defense against surgical insults and the second hit of infection. Summary Understanding the pivotal role of non-TLRs in sensing exogenous and endogenous molecules, and the influence of primed systemic inflammation and depressed immune status on the defense against pathogen after surgical insult, would be helpful to fully explore the relevant sophisticated phenomena of surgical infection, and to elucidate the occurrence of heterogeneous constellations of clinical signs and symptoms among this special population

  12. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  13. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  14. Pathogenesis of Bacterial Vaginosis: Discussion of Current Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina A; Schwebke, Jane R

    2016-08-15

    In April 2015, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases hosted an experts technical consultation on bacterial vaginosis (BV), where data regarding controversies over the pathogenesis of BV were discussed. The discussion on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of BV is presented here, and several hypotheses on its pathogenesis are critiqued. Rigorous hypothesis-driven studies are needed to ultimately determine the cause of BV. This information is vital for the prevention and control of this important infection and its adverse public health consequences. PMID:27449868

  15. [Latest Advance of Study on Pathogenesis of Immune Thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Liu, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is recognized as a multifactorial cell-specific autoimmune disorder, and its pathogenesis is still not very clear. Traditional concept suggests that the platelet destruction mediated by autoantibodies is the pathophysiology mechanism of ITP, while many studies in recent years have shown that the abnormities of T lymphocyte, dendritic cell (DC), natural killer cell (NK), cytokine, programmed cell death (PCD), oxidative stress (OS), infection, pregnancy and drugs etc play an important role in the pathogenesis of ITP. Since the study of ITP has made a series of important achievements in recent years, this review focuses on the latest advance of studies on pathogenesis of ITP. PMID:27342542

  16. Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Kuhn, Michael; Berche, Patrick; Chakraborty, Trinad; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Goebel, Werner; González-Zorn, Bruno; Wehland, Jürgen; Kreft, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    , rapid intracytoplasmic multiplication, bacterially induced actin-based motility, and direct spread to neighboring cells, in which they reinitiate the cycle. In this way, listeriae disseminate in host tissues sheltered from the humoral arm of the immune system. Over the last 15 years, a number of virulence factors involved in key steps of this intracellular life cycle have been identified. This review describes in detail the molecular determinants of Listeria virulence and their mechanism of action and summarizes the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of listeriosis and the cell biology and host cell responses to Listeria infection. This article provides an updated perspective of the development of our understanding of Listeria pathogenesis from the first molecular genetic analyses of virulence mechanisms reported in 1985 until the start of the genomic era of Listeria research. PMID:11432815

  17. Pathogenesis of infection with varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Grose, C

    1996-09-01

    Because of its exanthem, the disease varicella has been known since antiquity. Even late in the 19th century, however, there remained considerable confusion between mild smallpox and chickenpox. The name varicella itself is an irregular diminutive form of variola. Yet, early in the 20th century, detailed histologic studies began to differentiate the exanthems. The investigation of the varicella vesicle by Tyzzer 90 years ago remains a classic example (see Fig. 2). Although the pathogenesis of varicella vaccine virus infection appears to mimic that of wt VZV infection, a vaccine virus-related exanthem is more common in immunized children with an underlying immunosuppressive condition, such as leukemia, than in normal children. Those immunized children who never develop a rash presumably have an abrogated infection in which the host immune response has eliminated the virus prior to a major viremic spread. There may be a correlation between the presence of an exanthem and the ability of an immunized child to spread the varicella vaccine virus. The differences in capsid structure and assembly may explain in part the attenuation of the vaccine strain. Because the majority of varicella vaccine virus particles in the nucleus have aberrant cores lacking an electron-dense center, they are never enveloped. Therefore, they do not become infectious virions. In a recent article, Grose et al applied the technique of three-dimensional (3-D) computer modeling in an attempt to reconstruct an aberrant VZV capsid with the hubcap or pinwheel core. Each 3-D model was then sliced by computer to obtain a series of two-dimensional models that represented the images commonly seen by traditional electron microscopy. The 3-D model that best represented the capsid with a pinwheel core contained particulate matter in each of the 12 vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Fig. 14). This model strongly suggested that VZV may form in the nucleus an intermediary or end-stage capsid with an aberrant

  18. Water hardness influences Flavobacterium columnare pathogenesis in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to determine aspects of water chemistry responsible for large differences in pathogenesis and mortality rates in challenges of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus with Flavobacterium columnare; challenges were conducted in water supplying the Stuttgart National Aquaculture Res...

  19. Interferon-stimulated genes: roles in viral pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schoggins, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are critical for controlling virus infections. As new antiviral ISGs continue to be identified and characterized, their roles in viral pathogenesis are also being explored in more detail. Our current understanding of how ISGs impact viral pathogenesis comes largely from studies in knockout mice, with isolated examples from human clinical data. This review outlines recent developments on the contributions of various ISGs to viral disease outcomes in vivo. PMID:24713352

  20. The pathogenesis of congenital radial head dislocation/subluxation.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Alkattan, Wael M

    2016-07-15

    The pathogenesis of congenital radial head dislocation/subluxation is unknown and has not been previously investigated. In this review, we explore the pathogenesis and define five different primary insults: collagen abnormalities, abnormal endochondral ossification of the developing growth plate, abnormalities of forearm ossification outside the growth plate, disproportionate growth of the radius and ulna, and altered HOX D expression/activity. Finally, the clinical relevance of our review is discussed. PMID:27050104

  1. Epigenetics, the holy grail in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Altorok, Nezam; Almeshal, Nawaf; Wang, Yongqing; Kahaleh, Bashar

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to present evidence that supports the central role of epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of SSc. SSc is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by immune activation, fibrosis of the skin and internal organs and obliterative vasculopathy affecting predominantly the microvessels. Remarkable progress has been made in the past few years emphasizing the importance of epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of many disorders, including SSc. Current evidence demonstrates alterations in DNA methylation, histone code modifications and changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression levels in SSc cells. Recent reports have described the differential expression of numerous regulatory miRNAs in SSc, mainly in SSc fibroblasts, a number of which are important in TGF-β pathways and downstream signalling cascades. While studies to date have revealed the significant role of epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of SSc, the causal nature of epigenetic alterations in SSc pathogenesis remains elusive. Additional longitudinal and comprehensive epigenetic studies designed to evaluate the effect of environmental epigenetic factors on disease pathogenesis are needed. PMID:24740406

  2. Junín Virus Pathogenesis and Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Ashley; Seregin, Alexey; Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga; Brasier, Allan; Peters, Clarence; Paessler, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    Junín virus, the etiological agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, causes significant morbidity and mortality. The virus is spread through the aerosolization of host rodent excreta and endemic to the humid pampas of Argentina. Recently, significant progress has been achieved with the development of new technologies (e.g. reverse genetics) that have expanded knowledge about the pathogenesis and viral replication of Junín virus. We will review the pathogenesis of Junín virus in various animal models and the role of innate and adaptive immunity during infection. We will highlight current research regarding the role of molecular biology of Junín virus in elucidating virus attenuation. We will also summarize current knowledge on Junín virus pathogenesis focusing on the recent development of vaccines and potential therapeutics. PMID:23202466

  3. MicroRNAs associated with the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingrong; Xiao, Bo; Ma, Xinting; Qu, Mingjuan; Li, Yanmin; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Zhou, Juhua

    2016-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is not only an autoimmune disease in which autoreactive immune cells against myelin damage axons and nerves in the central nervous system, but also a neurodegenerative disease, in which progressive loss of structure and function of neurons occurs. The mechanisms of MS pathogenesis have not been fully understood. It has been reported that miRNAs may play a critical role in MS pathogenesis. In this review, we have extensively discussed the alterations in the expression of miRNAs detected in patients with MS. The dysregulated miRNAs have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of MS. We suggest that such dysregulated miRNAs may potentially be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of MS, to discover new therapeutic targets for MS treatment, and to predict prognostic markers in responses to MS treatment. PMID:27235360

  4. Emmprin and KSHV: new partners in viral cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lu; Bai, Lihua; Lu, Ying; Xu, Zengguang; Reiss, Krys; Valle, Luis Del; Kaleeba, Johnan; Toole, Bryan P.; Parsons, Chris; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Emmprin (CD147; basigin) is a multifunctional glycoprotein expressed at higher levels by cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. Through direct effects within tumor cells and promotion of tumor-stroma interactions, emmprin participates in induction of tumor cell invasiveness, angiogenesis, metastasis and chemoresistance. Although its contribution to cancer progression has been widely studied, the role of emmprin in viral oncogenesis still remains largely unclear, and only a small body of available literature implicates emmprin-associated mechanisms in viral pathogenesis and tumorigenesis. We summarize these data in this review, focusing on the role of emmprin in pathogenesis associated with the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a common etiology for cancers arising in the setting of immune suppression. We also discuss future directions for mechanistic studies exploring roles for emmprin in viral cancer pathogenesis. PMID:23743354

  5. A Trojan horse mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis against nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Jianping; Yang, Dongmei; Wei, Kangbi; Niu, Xuemei; An, Zhiqiang; Bennett, Joan Wennstrom; Zou, Chenggang; Yang, Jinkui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host–pathogen interaction can provide crucial information for successfully manipulating their relationships. Because of its genetic background and practical advantages over vertebrate model systems, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans model has become an attractive host for studying microbial pathogenesis. Here we report a “Trojan horse” mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis against nematodes. We show that the bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 lures nematodes by emitting potent volatile organic compounds that are much more attractive to worms than those from ordinary dietary bacteria. Seventeen B. nematocida-attractant volatile organic compounds are identified, and seven are individually confirmed to lure nematodes. Once the bacteria enter the intestine of nematodes, they secrete two proteases with broad substrate ranges but preferentially target essential intestinal proteins, leading to nematode death. This Trojan horse pattern of bacterium–nematode interaction enriches our understanding of microbial pathogenesis. PMID:20733068

  6. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  7. Genetic events in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Chng, W J; Glebov, O; Bergsagel, P L; Kuehl, W M

    2007-12-01

    The genetics of myeloma has been increasingly elucidated in recent years. Recurrent genetic events, and also biologically distinct and clinically relevant genetic subtypes of myeloma have been defined. This has facilitated our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, some genetic abnormalities have proved to be highly reproducible prognostic factors. With the expanding therapeutic armamentarium, it is time to include genetic assessment as part of clinical evaluation of myeloma patients to guide management. In this review we examine the role of various genetic abnormalities in the molecular pathogenesis of myeloma, and the use of such abnormalities in disease classification, prognosis and clinical management. PMID:18070707

  8. Genetic events in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Chng, W. J.; Glebov, O.; Bergsagel, P.L.; Kuehl, W. M.

    2007-01-01

    The genetics of myeloma has been increasingly elucidated in recent years. Recurrent genetic events, and also biologically distinct and clinically relevant genetic subtypes of myeloma have been defined. This has facilitated our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, some genetic abnormalities have proved to be highly reproducible prognostic factors. With the expanding therapeutic armamentarium, it is time to include genetic assessment as part of clinical evaluation of myeloma patients to guide management. In this review we examine the role of various genetic abnormalities in the molecular pathogenesis of myeloma, and the use of such abnormalities in disease classification, prognosis and clinical management. PMID:18070707

  9. Pathogenesis of dengue virus diseases: missing pieces in the jigsaw.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H

    1997-10-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome remain unresolved. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection has long been thought to play a central role; however, this remains unverified. The alternative hypothesis that virus variation, virulence and dynamics may account for severe dengue disease, particularly in children, should be considered. PMID:9351178

  10. Taming the Elephant: Salmonella Biology, Pathogenesis, and Prevention▿

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; McCormick, Beth A.; Fang, Ferric C.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella infections continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality throughout the world. However, recent discoveries and new paradigms promise to lead to novel strategies to diagnose, treat, and prevent Salmonella infections. This review provides an update of the Salmonella field based on oral presentations given at the recent 3rd ASM Conference on Salmonella: Biology, Pathogenesis and Prevention. PMID:20385760

  11. Pathogenesis of MDV in the eye: neoplasia or autoimmunity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease virus induces blindness in chickens, primarily due to neoplastic lesions in the iris and keratitis. It has been hypothesized that the severity of eye lesions is related to the pathogenecity of MDV. The aim of this study was to better understand the pathogenesis of MDV in the eye an...

  12. Pathogenesis of the intravertebral vacuum of Kümmell's disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Dengwei; Yu, Weiyang; Chen, Zhenzhong; Li, Liangchen; Zhu, Kejun; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we explored the progress of the pathogenesis of Kümmell's disease intravertebral vacuum. Using different expressions of the same disease including ‘Kümmell's disease’, ‘avascular necrosis after vertebral compression fracture (VCF)’, ‘post-traumatic vertebral osteonecrosis’, ‘vertebral pseudarthrosis’, ‘intravertebral vacuum (cleft or gas)’, ‘delayed vertebral collapse’, ‘VCF nonunion’, and by conducting a search of the PubMed database, we analyzed the results to examine the pathogenesis of the intravertebral vacuum of Kümmell's disease after referring to pertinent literature on intravertebral vacuum of ischemic necrosis after VCF, and exploring the progress of pathogenesis of this disease. A number of discrepancies were identified within the pathogenesis of the intravertebral vacuum after VCF. There were statements such as avascular necrosis of the vertebral body, bone biomechanics, gas forming and other types of claims, all of which obtained clinical and biomechanical supporting evidence. Collectively, most of the researchers believe that Kümmell vertebral fracture syndrome was the comprehensive effect of multiple factors including osteoporosis, avascular necrosis of the vertebral body, and biomechanical changes following fracture. However, there are a number of discrepancies to be resolved and future studies are therefore needed.

  13. The pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The greatest segment of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies that are specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental invest...

  14. Pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis: A unifying model

    PubMed Central

    Kouroumalis, Elias; Notas, George

    2006-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease of unknown etiology leading to progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts and eventually to liver cirrhosis and failure. It is characterised by female predominance and serum auto-antibodies to mitochondrial antigens targeting the E2 components of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex. Although they are associated with disease pathogenesis, no concrete evidence has been presented so far. Epidemiological data indicate that a geographical clustering of cases and possible environmental factors are implicated in pathogenesis. A number of genetic factors play a role in determining disease susceptibility or progression, although no definitive conclusion has been reached so far. A key factor to immune pathogenesis is considered to be the breakdown of immune tolerance, either through molecular mimicry or through the so called determinant density model. In this review, the available data regarding the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis are described and discussed. A new unifying hypothesis based on early endothelin overproduction in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is presented and discussed. PMID:16688819

  15. New insights in the pathogenesis and genetics of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Andrea; Fried, Isabella

    2010-01-01

    In the last 30 years the leprosy burden has been dramatically reduced but over the last 5 years still more than 200,000 new cases were detected each year. Advances in immunology, pathogenesis, and genetics of leprosy have been reported. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of infection will ultimately improve our ability to fight against this potentially devastating infectious disease. PMID:20948855

  16. The early pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the early pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is of critical importance to ongoing and future efforts to decrease the impact of FMD in endemic regions and prevent incursions to disease-free territories. The importance of the early phase of virus-host interaction lies in two ke...

  17. Conducting influenza virus pathogenesis studies in avian species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian infection studies with influenza A are an important means of assessing host susceptibility, viral pathogenesis, host responses to infection, mechanisms of transmission and viral pathotype. Complex systems and natural settings may also be explored with carefully designed infection studies. In ...

  18. [Polonium-210 acute and chronic pathomorphology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kvacheva, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, the data on the pathology of acute and chronic polonium injuries available from the an open-access domestic and foreign literature are primarily systemized and analyzed. The historical background of the research is presented in brief. On the basis of clinical and experimental generalizations, the current concept regarding the pathogenesis of polonium intoxication has been developed. PMID:26856053

  19. Common evolutionary origin of the ilvGMEDA attenuation locus and tRNA(1Leu) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R M; Jackson, J H

    1987-06-01

    Published sequences of transcripts from ilvGMEDA leader regions of several enteric bacteria were compared with published sequences of the tRNAs from Escherichia coli. The analyses revealed homology between the ilvGMEDA leader peptide-coding region and tRNA(1Leu) in E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Klebsiella aerogenes, whereas homology was not present in Serratia marcescens and Edwardsiella tarda. PMID:3294812

  20. Pathogenesis of Acute Kidney Injury: Foundation for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) is complex, involving factors such as vasoconstriction, leukostasis, vascular congestion, cell death, and abnormal immune modulators and growth factors. Many targeted clinical therapies have failed, are inconclusive, or have yet to be tested. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of AKI, it may be naïve to expect one therapeutic intervention would have success. Some examples of detrimental processes that can be blocked in pre-clinical models to improve kidney function and survival are apoptotic cell death in tubular epithelial cells, complement-mediated immune system activation, and impairment of cellular homeostasis and metabolism. Modalities with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality in AKI include vasodilators, growth factors, anti-inflammatory agents, and cell-based therapies. Pharmacological agents that target these diverse pathways are being used clinically for other indications. Using combinatorial approaches in future clinical trials may improve our ability to prevent and treat AKI. PMID:21530035

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Tony J; Robinson, Philip C; Haroon, Nigil

    2015-09-01

    There has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. The advent of genome-wide association studies has increased the known loci associated with AS to more than 40. The endoplasmic reticulum resident aminopeptidases (ERAP) 1 and 2 were identified in this manner and are of particular interest. There appears to be a genetic as well as a functional interaction of ERAP1 and 2 with HLA-B27 based on the known functions of these molecules. Recent studies on the structure, immunological effects and the peptide-trimming properties of ERAP 1 and 2 have helped to provide insight into their pathogenic potential in AS. In this review, we explore the role of ERAP 1 and 2 in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:26070942

  2. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  3. The involvement of uric acid in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Masoura, Sophia; Makedou, Kali; Theodoridis, Theodoros; Kourtis, Anargyros; Zepiridis, Leonidas; Athanasiadis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a common disorder of human pregnancy and a major cause of worldwide pregnancy-related maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress, angiogenic imbalance, placental ischemia and an inflammatory response have been proposed to play role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Hyperuricemia is a key biochemical feature in preeclampsia with elevated levels of uric acid being diagnosed as early as the 10(th) week of gestation. Traditionally, elevated uric acid levels were considered a result of renal dysfunction known to exist in preeclampsia. The contribution of uric acid in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia is being recently further investigated. We, hereby, review the possible mechanisms by which uric acid contributes to the development of the disease and its complications both on mother and fetus. PMID:26022211

  4. Vitamin D and the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Bechtold, Matthew L; Nguyen, Douglas L

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D has traditionally been known for its role in bone metabolism, but emerging evidence has suggested a broader role for vitamin D in immune regulation. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with the pathogenesis of diverse autoimmune disorders and has similarly been implicated as a contributor to inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we discuss animal, in vitro, genetic, and epidemiologic studies that have linked vitamin D deficiency with inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis or severity. Nonetheless, we present the caveat in interpreting these studies in the context of reverse causation: Does vitamin D deficiency lead to gastrointestinal disease, or does gastrointestinal disease (with related changes in dietary choices, intestinal absorption, nutritional status, lifestyle) lead to vitamin D deficiency? PMID:27538982

  5. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Wang; Chaoshu, Tang; Hongfang, Jin; Junbao, Du

    2010-05-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H{sub 2}S and inflammatory processes. The role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerosis.

  6. Controversies in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Nelson, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The two most common HIV-associated renal diseases, HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV-immune-complex kidney disease, share the common pathologic finding of hyperplasia within the glomerulus. Podocyte injury is central to the pathogenesis of these diseases; however, the source of the proliferating glomerular epithelial cell remains a topic of debate. Parenchymal injury has been linked to direct infection of renal epithelial cells by HIV-1, although the mechanism of viral entry into this non-lymphoid compartment is unclear. Although transgenic rodent models have provided insight into viral proteins responsible for inducing renal disease, such models have important limitations. Rodent HIV-1 models, for instance, cannot replicate all aspects of immune activation, a process that could have an important role in the pathogenesis PMID:19776779

  7. HIV/AIDS epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Viviana; Ho, David D; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 pandemic is a complex mix of diverse epidemics within and between countries and regions of the world, and is undoubtedly the defining public-health crisis of our time. Research has deepened our understanding of how the virus replicates, manipulates, and hides in an infected person. Although our understanding of pathogenesis and transmission dynamics has become more nuanced and prevention options have expanded, a cure or protective vaccine remains elusive. Antiretroviral treatment has transformed AIDS from an inevitably fatal condition to a chronic, manageable disease in some settings. This transformation has yet to be realised in those parts of the world that continue to bear a disproportionate burden of new HIV-1 infections and are most a% ected by increasing morbidity and mortality. This Seminar provides an update on epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention interventions pertinent to HIV-1. PMID:16890836

  8. Microglia in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Proper synaptic pruning is essential for the development of functional neural circuits. Impairments in synaptic pruning disrupt the excitatory versus inhibitory balance (E/I balance) of synapses, which may cause neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recent studies have determined molecular mechanisms by which microglia, the brain's resident immune cells, engulf inappropriate and less active synapses. Thus, microglial dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of ASD through attenuated or excess synaptic pruning. In this review, we discuss recent animal and human studies that report an E/I imbalance and the characteristics of microglia in ASD. We will further discuss whether and how synaptic pruning by microglia is involved in the pathogenesis of ASD. PMID:26116891

  9. [Lymphangioleiomyomatosis - new concepts on pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Sobiecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic lung disease presenting with cough, dyspnea on exertion and recurrent pneumothorax. Substantial achievements have been made during the past two decades regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of this disorder. LAM, affecting almost exclusively women, is associated with inactivating tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) gene mutations in LAM cells, resulting in activation of mTOR that controls cell proliferation, growth and motility. Many parallels have been identified between LAM pathogenesis and neoplasia; inactivating mutations, the ability of LAM cells to metastasise, the induction of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, invasion of the lung. Recent reports suggest that VEGF-D levels have diagnostic utility in LAM patients. Partial response of TSC-associated tumors and decrease the rate of lung function decline in females with LAM due to inhibition of mTOR pathway with sirolimus have been demonstrated. PMID:27421126

  10. MicroRNAs in the Cholangiopathies: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pisarello, Maria Jose Lorenzo; Loarca, Lorena; Ivanics, Tommy; Morton, Leslie; LaRusso, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The cholangiopathies are a group of liver diseases resulting from different etiologies but with the cholangiocyte as the primary target. As a group, the cholangiopathies result in significant morbidity and mortality and represent one of the main indications for liver transplant in both children and adults. Contributing to this situation is the absence of a thorough understanding of their pathogenesis and a lack of adequate diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that modify gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including the cholangiopathies. Thus, in this review we provide an overview of the literature on miRNAs in the cholangiopathies and discuss future research directions. PMID:26343736

  11. Behavioral Contributions to the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Cook, Lauren; O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Page, Kathleen A.; Quinn, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral Contributions to the pathogenesis of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) include lifestyle behaviors including dietary intake, exercise, sedentariness, sleep, and stress. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence for the metabolic pathways by which the behavior is linked to T2D. Evidence for interventions which change each of the lifestyle behaviors is discussed. The article will close with a brief discussion on how new technologies may provide opportunities to better understand relationships between moment-to-moment fluctuations in behaviors and diabetes pathogenesis, as well as provide opportunities to personalize and adapt interventions to achieve successful behavior change and maintenance of that change. Especially promising are new technologies which assist in tracking lifestyle behaviors along with clinical and metabolic outcomes. PMID:24604714

  12. Molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and impact of therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Bandoh, Salome; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality and has an increasing incidence worldwide. HCC can be induced by multiple etiologies, is influenced by many risk factors, and has a complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, HCCs exhibit substantial heterogeneity, which compounds the difficulties in developing effective therapies against this highly lethal cancer. With advances in cancer biology and molecular and genetic profiling, a number of different mechanisms involved in the development and progression of HCC have been identified. Despite the advances in this area, the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma is still not completely understood. This review aims to elaborate our current understanding of the most relevant genetic alterations and molecular pathways involved in the development and progression of HCC, and anticipate the potential impact of future advances on therapeutic drug development. PMID:27239288

  13. MicroRNAs in the Cholangiopathies: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo Pisarello, Maria Jose; Loarca, Lorena; Ivanics, Tommy; Morton, Leslie; LaRusso, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The cholangiopathies are a group of liver diseases resulting from different etiologies but with the cholangiocyte as the primary target. As a group, the cholangiopathies result in significant morbidity and mortality and represent one of the main indications for liver transplant in both children and adults. Contributing to this situation is the absence of a thorough understanding of their pathogenesis and a lack of adequate diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that modify gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including the cholangiopathies. Thus, in this review we provide an overview of the literature on miRNAs in the cholangiopathies and discuss future research directions. PMID:26343736

  14. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of Lawsonia intracellularis infections.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, F A; Gebhart, C J

    2014-03-01

    Proliferative enteropathy is an infectious disease caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium, Lawsonia intracellularis, and characterized by thickening of the intestinal epithelium due to enterocyte proliferation. The disease is endemic in swine herds and has been occasionally reported in various other species. Furthermore, outbreaks among foals began to be reported on breeding farms worldwide within the past 5 years. Cell proliferation is directly associated with bacterial infection and replication in the intestinal epithelium. As a result, mild to severe diarrhea is the major clinical sign described in infected animals. The dynamics of L. intracellularis infection in vitro and in vivo have been well characterized, but little is known about the genetic basis for the pathogenesis or ecology of this organism. The present review focuses on the recent advances regarding the pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction of L. intracellularis infections. PMID:24476941

  15. Actin-associated Proteins in the Pathogenesis of Podocyte Injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang-Fang; Chen, Shan; Su, Hua; Meng, Xian-Fang; Zhang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes have a complex cellular architecture with interdigitating processes maintained by a precise organization of actin filaments. The actin-based foot processes of podocytes and the interposed slit diaphragm form the final barrier to proteinuria. The function of podocytes is largely based on the maintenance of the normal foot process structure with actin cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal dynamics play important roles during normal podocyte development, in maintenance of the healthy glomerular filtration barrier, and in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. In this review, we focused on recent findings on the mechanisms of organization and reorganization of these actin-related molecules in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury and potential therapeutics targeting the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in podocytopathies. PMID:24396279

  16. Membrane proteins of Mycoplasma bovis and their role in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adamu, James Y; Wawegama, Nadeeka K; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2013-10-01

    Mycoplasma membrane proteins influence cell shape, cell division, motility and adhesion to host cells, and are thought to be integrally involved in the pathogenesis of mycoplasmoses. Many of the membrane proteins predicted from mycoplasma genome sequences remain hypothetical, as their presence in cellular protein preparations is yet to be established experimentally. Recent genome sequences of several strains of Mycoplasma bovis have provided further insight into the potential role of the membrane proteins of this pathogen in colonisation and infection. This review highlights recent advances in knowledge about the influence of M. bovis membrane proteins on the pathogenesis of infection with this species and identifies future research directions for enhancing our understanding of the role of these proteins. PMID:23810376

  17. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  18. Intestinal Innate Immunity and the Pathogenesis of Salmonella Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Chittur V.; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2011-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella typhimurium infection is a clinical problem with significant public health impact. The availability of several experimental models of this condition has allowed detailed investigation of the cellular and molecular interactions involved in its pathogenesis. Such studies have shed light on the roles played by bacterial virulence factors and host innate immune mechanisms in the development of intestinal inflammation. PMID:17496347

  19. Molecular Pathogenesis of Sporadic Melanoma and Melanoma-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yunyi; Kumar, Suresh M.; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetics and cancer stem cell biology have shed some light on the molecular basis of melanomagenesis. In this review, we will focus on major genetic alterations in the melanoma, particularly pathways involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumor suppression. The potential role of melanoma-initiating cells during melanomagenesis and progression will also be discussed. Understanding pathogenesis of melanoma may uncover new diagnostic clues and therapeutic targets for this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:21128770

  20. SARCOPENIA: ITS ASSESSMENT, ETIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, CONSEQUENCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    ROLLAND, Y.; CZERWINSKI, S.; VAN KAN, G. ABELLAN; MORLEY, J.E.; CESARI, M.; ONDER, G.; WOO, J.; BAUMGARTNER, R.; PILLARD, F.; BOIRIE, Y.; CHUMLEA, W.M.C.; VELLAS, B.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of muscle protein mass and loss of muscle function. It occurs with increasing age, being a major component in the development of frailty. Current knowledge on its assessment, etiology, pathogenesis, consequences and future perspectives are reported in the present review. On-going and future clinical trials on sarcopenia may radically change our preventive and therapeutic approaches of mobility disability in older people. PMID:18615225

  1. Pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Helmar C; Meyer Zu Horste, Gerd; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2009-07-01

    Immune-mediated neuropathies represent a heterogeneous spectrum of peripheral nerve disorders that can be classified according to time course, predominant involvement of motor/sensory fibers, distribution of deficits and paraclinical parameters such as electrophysiology and serum antibodies. In the last few years, significant advances have been achieved in elucidating underlying pathomechanisms, which made it possible to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the latest development in pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies. PMID:21179533

  2. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  3. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M; Wang, Ping Z; Bai, Xue F

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  4. Alpha chain disease: immunoglobulin abnormalities, pathogenesis and current concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Seligmann, M.

    1975-01-01

    The laboratory findings upon which the diagnosis of alpha chain disease relies and the main results of immunochemical, structural and biosynthetic studies of the pathological immunoglobulin are reviewed briefly. The pathogenesis of the disease is discussed in view of its possibly non-malignant nature at the early stage and of its peculiar geographic distribution, suggesting the triggering role of an intestinal micro-organism. PMID:810152

  5. Pathogenesis, Management and Prevention of Atypical Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung-Hyo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the relationship between atypical femoral fractures (AFF) and use of bisphosphonates (BPs). While a significant cause-effect relationship was not established in earlier studies, more recent data shows a growing relationship between AFF and BPs use. The definition of an 'AFF' has also undergone significant changes. This review briefly summarizes the definition, pathogenesis, and management of AFF. PMID:25774358

  6. Understanding Zika virus pathogenesis: an interview with Catherine Spong.

    PubMed

    Spong, Catherine Y

    2016-01-01

    A recent outbreak of Zika virus has been linked to fetal abnormalities in pregnant women who have been infected. The scientific community is working toward understanding Zika virus pathogenesis to better manage affected women and children. In an interview with Dr. Catherine Spong, we discuss the aims and challenges of a forthcoming longitudinal study of a cohort of pregnant women in areas of current active Zika virus transmission. PMID:27268016

  7. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M.; Wang, Ping Z.; Bai, Xue F.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  8. Pathogenesis, clinical features and management of hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, R. W.; Parks, T. G.

    1997-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic skin condition involving the apocrine glandular zones. Affected patients may present with acute abscesses, but the condition often progresses to a chronic state with persistent pain, sepsis, sinus tract and fistula formation, purulent discharge and dermal scarring. Treatment of patients with severe disease can be difficult and may require complex surgical intervention. This review encompasses the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and management options for patients with hidradenitis suppurativa. Images Figure 2 PMID:9135232

  9. Semi-automated confocal imaging of fungal pathogenesis on plants: microscopic analysis of macroscopic specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contextualizing natural genetic variation in plant disease resistance in terms of pathogenesis can provide information about the function of causal genes. Cellular mechanisms associated with pathogenesis can be elucidated with confocal microscopy, but systematic phenotyping platforms—from sample pro...

  10. Influence of carp intestinal mucus molecular size and glycosylation on bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Schroers, V; Van Der Marel, M; Steinhagen, D

    2008-08-27

    The first step of the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases is the colonisation of the mucosal surface by the pathogen. Bacterial colonisation of the mucosal surface is promoted by adherence to high molecular weight mucus glycoproteins. We examined the effect of carp intestinal mucus glycoproteins on the adhesion of different bacteria. The bacteria used were 3 strains of Aeromonas hydrophila, and A. salmonicida, Edwardsiella tarda and Yersinia ruckeri. All bacteria adhered to mucus, but at varying intensities. All tested bacteria adhered best to molecules of 670 to 2000 kDa in size, less to molecules larger than 2000 kDa and weakest to molecules of 30 to 670 kDa. In general, bacteria that showed a stronger adhesion to intestinal mucus were cytotoxic to cells in vitro, and bacteria that showed a weaker adhesion to intestinal mucus did not lead to alterations of monolayers of EPC-cells. Furthermore, the involvement of glycan side chains of the glycoproteins for bacterial adhesion was analysed for one A. hydrophila strain. After cleavage of terminal sugar residues by treatment of mucus glycoproteins with different glycosidases, binding of bacteria was modulated. When mannose was cleaved off, adhesion significantly increased. Blocking of glycan receptors by incubation of bacteria with different oligosaccharides had no clear effect on bacterial binding to mucus glycoproteins. Our results suggest that bacteria interact with carbohydrate side chains of mucus glycoproteins, and that the carbohydrates of the core region are involved in bacterial binding. PMID:18924378

  11. Update of enterovirus 71 infection: epidemiology, pathogenesis and vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2014-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic human pathogen that is the causative agent of hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD), herpangina and brain stem encephalitis. Recurrent EV71 epidemics of various scales have occurred in the Asia-Pacific region. Several specific cell surface molecules serve as the receptors for EV71. Identification of the receptors is an important step to understand EV71 disease. Cytokines, lymphocytes and monocytes contribute significantly to EV71 pathogenesis. The interaction of EV71 and receptors may be associated with the cytokines immunopathogenesis. Some animal models have been established and aim to explore the pathogenesis of EV71 infections. EV71 antibodies can neutralize or enhance infection at subneutralizing levels. These results are important for EV71 vaccine and therapeutics design. Several clinical trials of human inactivated EV71 vaccine have recently been completed. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent discoveries about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of EV71 and provide insights into human vaccine development. PMID:24579906

  12. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  13. Concept of the pathogenesis and treatment of cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2012-01-01

    Gallstone disease (GD) is a chronic recurrent hepatobiliary disease, the basis for which is the impaired metabolism of cholesterol, bilirubin and bile acids, which is characterized by the formation of gallstones in the hepatic bile duct, common bile duct, or gallbladder. GD is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal diseases with a substantial burden to health care systems. GD can result in serious outcomes, such as acute gallstone pancreatitis and gallbladder cancer. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of GD are discussed in this review. The prevalence of GD varies widely by region. The prevalence of gallstone disease has increased in recent years. This is connected with a change in lifestyle: reduction of motor activity, reduction of the physical load and changes to diets. One of the important benefits of early screening for gallstone disease is that ultrasonography can detect asymptomatic cases, which results in early treatment and the prevention of serious outcomes. The pathogenesis of GD is suggested to be multifactorial and probably develops from complex interactions between many genetic and environmental factors. It suggests that corticosteroids and oral contraceptives, which contain hormones related to steroid hormones, may be regarded as a model system of cholelithiasis development in man. The achievement in the study of the physiology of bile formation and the pathogenesis of GD has allowed expanding indications for therapeutic treatment of GD. PMID:22400083

  14. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L.; Doran, John T.; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M.; Lindsay, David S.; Allen, Irving C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc−/− and Casp11−/− mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc−/− mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11−/− mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  15. Booster vaccinations: can immunologic memory outpace disease pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2009-12-01

    Almost all current vaccines work by the induction of antibodies in serum or on the mucosa to block adherence of pathogens to epithelial cells or interfere with microbial invasion of the bloodstream. However, antibody levels usually decline after vaccination to undetectable amounts if further vaccination does not occur. Persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies usually goes well beyond the time when they should have decayed to undetectable levels because of ongoing "natural" boosting or other immunologic mechanisms. The production of memory B and T cells is of clear importance, but the likelihood that a memory response will be fast enough in the absence of a protective circulating antibody level likely depends on the pace of pathogenesis of a specific organism. This concept is discussed with regard to Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis; hepatitis A and B; diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis; polio, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella; rotavirus; and human papilloma virus. With infectious diseases for which the pace of pathogenesis is less rapid, some individuals will contract infection before the memory response is fully activated and implemented. With infectious diseases for which the pace of pathogenesis is slow, immune memory should be sufficient to prevent disease. PMID:19933727

  16. Pathogenesis of Chagas disease: time to move on

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Brant, Fatima; Esper, Lisia; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. The contributions of parasite and immune system for disease pathogenesis remain unresolved and controversial. The possibility that Chagas disease was an autoimmune progression triggered by T. cruzi infection led some to question the benefit of treating chronically T. cruzi-infected persons with drugs. Furthermore, it provided the rationale for not investing in research aimed at a vaccine which might carry a risk of inducing autoimmunity or exacerbating inflammation. This viewpoint was adopted by cash-strapped health systems in the developing economies where the disease is endemic and has been repeatedly challenged by researchers and clinicians in recent years and there is now a considerable body of evidence and broad consensus that parasite persistence is requisite for pathogenesis and that antiparasitic immunity can be protective against T. cruzi pathogenesis without eliciting autoimmune pathology. Thus, treatment of chronically infected patients is likely to yield positive outcomes and efforts to understand immunity and vaccine development should be recognized as a priority area of research for Chagas disease. PMID:22201990

  17. Periodontitis-atherosclerosis syndrome: an expanded model of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, S; Madianos, P N; Champagne, C M; Southerland, J H; Paquette, D W; Williams, R C; Slade, G; Beck, J D

    1999-10-01

    The early reports of a linkage between periodontitis and atherosclerosis have garnered further support by additional data generated by several investigative teams in many different countries. The evidence continues to suggest that periodontitis may be an important risk factor or risk indicator for cardiovascular pathology for some individuals. The term periodontitis-atherosclerosis syndrome (PAS) is proposed as a new diagnostic term to describe this condition in these individuals. Current evidence, albeit preliminary in nature, which describes a cluster of clinical signs and symptoms that are associated with this condition, is presented. It is clear that this syndrome will require considerable study and refinement before a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan can be formulated. Potential mechanisms by which systemic inflammation and infectious challenge of periodontal origin may serve as a potential modifier of cardiovascular disease are discussed in the context of a detailed working model of pathogenesis. This hypothetical model embraces many cellular and molecular components of atherogenesis and thromboembolic diseases from the perspective of periodontitis pathogenesis. Many aspects of the hypothetical model remain unproved; however, it is our opinion that only through the clarification of the mechanisms of pathogenesis can we ultimately construct a knowledge framework for accurate diagnoses and successful therapies. The concept of diagnosing and treating a periodontal patient to minimize the deleterious effects of this chronic infectious and inflammatory condition on the cardiovascular system represents an unprecedented challenge to our profession. PMID:10685359

  18. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L; Doran, John T; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M; Lindsay, David S; Allen, Irving C

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc (-/-) and Casp11 (-/-) mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc (-/-) mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11 (-/-) mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  19. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  20. Novel Insights into the Pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's-associated Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Chun-Lei; Chen, Xu-Yong; Feng, Jie-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically summary the updated results about the pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's-associated enterocolitis (HAEC). Besides, we discussed the research key and direction based on these results. Data Sources: Our data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed from 1975 to 2015, with keywords “Hirschsprung enterocolitis”, “Hirschsprung's enterocolitis”, “Hirschsprung's-associated enterocolitis”, “Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis”, “HAEC”, and “EC”. Study Selection: Articles regarding the pathogenesis of HAEC were selected, and the articles mainly regarding the diagnosis, surgical approach, treatment, and follow-up were excluded. Results: Several factors, mainly including mucus barrier, intestinal microbiota, and immune function, as well as some other factors such as genetic variations and surgical reasons, have been found to be related to the pathogenesis of HAEC. Changed quantity and barrier property of mucus, different composition of microbiota, and an abnormal immune state work together or separately trigger HAEC. Conclusions: The maintenance of intestinal homeostasis is due to a well cooperation of microbiota, mucus barrier, and immune system. If any part presents abnormal, intestinal homeostasis will be broken. Meanwhile, for patients with Hirschsprung's disease or HAEC, dysfunction of these parts has been found. Thus, the happening of HAEC may be mainly attributed to the disorders of intestinal microbiota, mucus barrier, and immune system. PMID:27270548

  1. miRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Bo; Shen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were first discovered as regulatory RNAs that controlled the timing of the larval development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Since then, nearly 30,000 mature miRNA products have been found in many species, including plants, warms, flies and mammals. Currently, miRNAs are well established as endogenous small (~22 nt) noncoding RNAs, which have functions in regulating mRNA stability and translation. Owing to intensive investigations during the last decade, miRNAs were found to play essential roles in regulating many physiological and pathological processes. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by elevated autoantibodies against nuclear antigens and excessive inflammatory responses affecting multiple organs. Although efforts were taken and theories were produced to elucidate the pathogenesis of SLE, we still lack sufficient knowledge about the disease for developing effective therapies for lupus patients. Recent advances indicate that miRNAs are involved in the development of SLE, which gives us new insights into the pathogenesis of SLE and might lead to the finding of new therapeutic targets. Here, we will review recent discoveries about how miRNAs are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE and how it can promote the development of new therapy. PMID:25927578

  2. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Flatz, Lukas; Rieger, Toni; Merkler, Doron; Bergthaler, Andreas; Regen, Tommy; Schedensack, Mariann; Bestmann, Lukas; Verschoor, Admar; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Brück, Wolfgang; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Günther, Stephan; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2010-03-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF), is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I) failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development. PMID:20360949

  3. T Cell-Dependence of Lassa Fever Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bergthaler, Andreas; Regen, Tommy; Schedensack, Mariann; Bestmann, Lukas; Verschoor, Admar; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Brück, Wolfgang; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Günther, Stephan; Pinschewer, Daniel D.

    2010-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF), is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I) failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development. PMID:20360949

  4. The Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; de Los Santos, Teresa; Rodriguez, Luis L; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or to predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV) infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx) than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in contrast to

  5. The Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; de los Santos, Teresa; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or to predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV) infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx) than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in contrast to

  6. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  7. Role of FGFR2-signaling in the pathogenesis of acne

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    It is the purpose of this review to extend our understanding of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-2b-signaling network in the pathogenesis of acne. A new concept of the role of FGFR2b-signaling in dermal-epithelial interaction for skin appendage formation, pilosebaceous follicle homeostasis, comedogenesis, sebaceous gland proliferation and lipogenesis is presented. The FGFR2-gain-of-function mutations in Apert syndrome and unilateral acneiform nevus are most helpful model diseases pointing the way to androgen-dependent dermalepithelial FGFR2-signaling in acne. Androgen-mediated upregulation of FGFR2b-signaling in acne-prone skin appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. In organotypic skin cultures, keratinocyte-derived interleukin-1α stimulated fibroblasts to secrete FGF7 which stimulated FGFR2b-mediated keratinocyte proliferation. Postnatal deletion of FGFR2b in mice resulted in severe sebaceous gland atrophy. The importance of FGFR2b in sebaceous gland physiology is further supported by the mode of action of anti-acne agents which have been proposed to attenuate FGFR2b-signaling. Downregulation of FGFR2b-signaling by isotretinoin explains its therapeutic effect in acne. Downregulation of FGFR2b-signaling during the first trimester of pregnancy disturbs branched morphogenesis and explains retinoid embryotoxicity. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), the mediator of growth hormone during puberty, intracts with androgen-dependent FGFR2b-signaling and links androgen- and FGF-mediated signal transduction important in sebaceous gland homeostasis. The search for a follicular defect in the dermalepithelial regulation of growth factor-signaling in acne-prone skin appears to be a most promising approach to clarify the pathogenesis of acne. PMID:20436882

  8. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve M; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and parasite

  9. Pathogenesis and Management of Pruritus in PBC and PSC.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Andreas E; Namer, Barbara; Bolier, Ruth; Fischer, Michael J; Oude Elferink, Ronald P; Beuers, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Pruritus is a preeminent symptom in patients with chronic cholestatic liver disorders such as primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. More than two-thirds of these patients experience itching during the course of their disease. This symptom is also frequently observed in patients with other causes of cholestasis such as cholangiocarcinoma, inherited forms of cholestasis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, but may accompany almost any other liver disease. The pathogenesis of pruritus of cholestasis remains largely elusive. Increased concentrations of bile salts, histamine, serotonin, progesterone metabolites and endogenous opioids have been controversially discussed as potential pruritogens. However, for these molecules, neither a correlation with itch intensity nor a causative link could be established. The G protein-coupled receptor for bile salts, TGR5, has been shown to be expressed in dorsal root ganglia and give rise to itch in rodents, albeit upon stimuli with suprapathological concentrations of bile salts. The potent neuronal activator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its forming enzyme, autotaxin (ATX), could be identified in the serum of patients with cholestatic pruritus. ATX activity correlated with itch severity and effectiveness of several anti-pruritic therapeutic interventions in cholestatic patients. Thus, the ATX-LPA-axis may represent a key element in the pathogenesis of this agonizing symptom. Treatment options for pruritus of cholestasis remain limited to a few evidence-based and several experimental medical and interventional therapies. The current guideline-based recommendations include the anion exchange resins colestyramine, the pregnane X receptor-agonist and enzyme inducer rifampicin, the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors sertraline. Still, a considerable part of patients is unresponsive to these drugs and requires experimental approaches including phototherapy

  10. Alzheimer's pathogenesis and its link to the mitochondrion.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, C; Orsucci, D; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Siciliano, G; Bonuccelli, U; Mancuso, M

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. This neurodegenerative disorder is clinically characterized by impairment of cognitive functions and changes in behaviour and personality. The pathogenesis of AD is still unclear. Recent evidence supports some role of mitochondria dysfunction and oxidative stress in the development of the neurodegenerative process. In this review, we discuss the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, focusing on the mechanisms that lead to mitochondrial impairment, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration, a "vicious circle" that ends in dementia. PMID:25973139

  11. Microbiota and their role in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoecke, B; De Ryck, T; Stringer, A; Van de Wiele, T; Keefe, D

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis in patients undergoing cancer therapy is a significant problem. Its prevalence ranges between 20 and 100%, depending on treatment type and protocols and patient-based variables. Mucositis is self-limiting when uncomplicated by infection. Unfortunately, the incidence of developing a local or systemic infection during the course of the treatment is very high. At this stage, it is unclear which role oral microbiota play in the onset, duration, and severity of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, there is growing interest in this underexplored topic, and new studies are being undertaken to unravel their impact on the pathogenesis of mucositis. PMID:24456144

  12. RNA Viruses: RNA Roles in Pathogenesis, Coreplication and Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Sun, Binlian; Mallardo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The review intends to present and recapitulate the current knowledge on the roles and importance of regulatory RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, RNA binding proteins and enzymes processing RNAs or activated by RNAs, in cells infected by RNA viruses. The review focuses on how non-coding RNAs are involved in RNA virus replication, pathogenesis and host response, especially in retroviruses HIV, with examples of the mechanisms of action, transcriptional regulation, and promotion of increased stability of their targets or their degradation. PMID:27047253

  13. Review of Critical Issues in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Alan D; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F; Simpson, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    About a decade age, loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin molecule were first implicated in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris and, subsequently, of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases. Since then, intensive study of the role of filaggrin null mutations have led to other milestones in understanding the pathologic pathways in these diseases, including the initiation, maintenance, and promotion of the disease processes. The result has been new and emerging clinical and pharmacologic strategies for early identification of and intervention in atopic diseases. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S89-S91. PMID:27525507

  14. Revisiting old friends: Developments in understanding Histoplasma capsulatum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jon P

    2016-03-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a dimorphic pathogenic fungus and causative agent of histoplasmosis, which is a respiratory and systemic infection that is particularly severe in immunocompromised hosts and represents the fungal homolog of tuberculosis. In highly endemic regions, the majority of individuals have been infected and carry the organism in a persistent latent form that is a danger for reactivation if host defenses are suppressed. H. capsulatum has been a model organism for intracellular pathogenesis and fungal morphogenesis for decades. New genomic information and application of approaches for molecular genetic manipulation are shedding new light on virulence mechanisms. PMID:26920886

  15. Cutaneous porphyrias part I: epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, diagnosis, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Horner, Mary E; Alikhan, Ali; Tintle, Suzanne; Tortorelli, Silvia; Davis, Dawn Marie R; Hand, Jennifer L

    2013-12-01

    The porphyrias are a group of disorders characterized by defects in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Many present with skin findings including photosensitivity, bullae, hypertrichosis, and scarring. Systemic symptoms may include abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric changes, anemia, and liver disease. With advances in DNA analysis, researchers are discovering the underlying genetic causes of the porphyrias, enabling family members to be tested for genetic mutations. Here we present a comprehensive review of porphyria focusing on those with cutaneous manifestations. In Part I, we have included the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, diagnosis, and histopathology. Treatment and management options will be discussed in Part II. PMID:24261722

  16. Pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis: modeling the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Scott M; Berryhill, Taylor F; Ellenburg, James L; Jilling, Tamas; Cleveland, Dava S; Lorenz, Robin G; Martin, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. The pathophysiology is likely secondary to innate immune responses to intestinal microbiota by the premature infant's intestinal tract, leading to inflammation and injury. This review provides an updated summary of the components of the innate immune system involved in NEC pathogenesis. In addition, we evaluate the animal models that have been used to study NEC with regard to the involvement of innate immune factors and histopathological changes as compared to those seen in infants with NEC. Finally, we discuss new approaches to studying NEC, including mathematical models of intestinal injury and the use of humanized mice. PMID:25447054

  17. Infectious diseases of the nervous system: pathogenesis and worldwide impact.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Ben

    2008-11-01

    The 2008 Infectious Diseases of the Nervous System: Pathogenesis and World Impact conference was held at the Pasteur Institute of Paris, and was the first worldwide conference on neuroinfections. While viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis are being actively studied in the developed world, much less attention is paid to the often fatal nervous system infections caused by neurotropic viruses, parasites and mycobacteria that represent important health problems in tropical regions. This meeting fostered worldwide interactions between scientists and stimulated the exchange of the latest research results on these neglected neurotropic pathogens. PMID:18988120

  18. New Paradigms in the Pathogenesis of Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Coticchia, James Mark; Chen, Michael; Sachdeva, Livjot; Mutchnick, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a multifactorial disease with a significant socioeconomic impact. The pathogenesis of AOM is attributed to a variety of well-established internal and extrinsic factors. Recent evidence strongly points to bacterial biofilm formation as an important contributor to this disease entity. The nasopharynx is a likely reservoir for infection with subsequent seeding of pathogens to the middle ear via planktonic shedding. Various modalities have been used to directly detect biofilm formation in the middle ear mucosa of children with AOM. Further insights into this disease may lead to new strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:24400296

  19. Pulmonary surfactant in innate immunity and the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J S; Schlesinger, L S

    2000-01-01

    Components of the innate immune system serve to protect the host from invading pathogens prior to the generation of a directed immune response, and influence the manner in which the directed immune response develops. The pulmonary surfactant system consists of a complex array of proteins and lipids that reduce surface tension of the alveoli, and appears to play an essential role in innate immunity. Investigators have recently gained insight into the interactions between components of the surfactant system and the respiratory pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is likely that pulmonary surfactant and other innate immune determinants play significant roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:11052906

  20. Syringomyelia: current concepts in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rusbridge, Clare; Greitz, Dan; Iskandar, Bermans J

    2006-01-01

    Syringomyelia is a condition that results in fluid-containing cavities within the parenchyma of the spinal cord as a consequence of altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. This review discusses the history and the classification of the disorder, the current theories of pathogenesis, and the advanced imaging modalities used in the diagnosis. The intramedullary pulse pressure theory (a new pathophysiologic concept of syringomyelia) also is presented. In addition, the current understanding of the painful nature of this condition is discussed and the current trends in medical and surgical management are reviewed. PMID:16734077

  1. Alzheimer's Pathogenesis and Its Link to the Mitochondrion

    PubMed Central

    Simoncini, C.; Orsucci, D.; Caldarazzo Ienco, E.; Siciliano, G.; Bonuccelli, U.; Mancuso, M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. This neurodegenerative disorder is clinically characterized by impairment of cognitive functions and changes in behaviour and personality. The pathogenesis of AD is still unclear. Recent evidence supports some role of mitochondria dysfunction and oxidative stress in the development of the neurodegenerative process. In this review, we discuss the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, focusing on the mechanisms that lead to mitochondrial impairment, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration, a “vicious circle” that ends in dementia. PMID:25973139

  2. Evolutionary trajectories of primate genes involved in HIV pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Millán; Guex, Nicolas; Patin, Etienne; Martin, Olivier; Xenarios, Ioannis; Ciuffi, Angela; Quintana-Murci, Lluís; Telenti, Amalio

    2009-12-01

    The current availability of five complete genomes of different primate species allows the analysis of genetic divergence over the last 40 million years of evolution. We hypothesized that the interspecies differences observed in susceptibility to HIV-1 would be influenced by the long-range selective pressures on host genes associated with HIV-1 pathogenesis. We established a list of human genes (n = 140) proposed to be involved in HIV-1 biology and pathogenesis and a control set of 100 random genes. We retrieved the orthologous genes from the genome of humans and of four nonhuman primates (Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus abeli, Macaca mulatta, and Callithrix jacchus) and analyzed the nucleotide substitution patterns of this data set using codon-based maximum likelihood procedures. In addition, we evaluated whether the candidate genes have been targets of recent positive selection in humans by analyzing HapMap Phase 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in a region centered on each candidate gene. A total of 1,064 sequences were used for the analyses. Similar median K(A)/K(S) values were estimated for the set of genes involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis and for control genes, 0.19 and 0.15, respectively. However, genes of the innate immunity had median values of 0.37 (P value = 0.0001, compared with control genes), and genes of intrinsic cellular defense had K(A)/K(S) values around or greater than 1.0 (P value = 0.0002). Detailed assessment allowed the identification of residues under positive selection in 13 proteins: AKT1, APOBEC3G, APOBEC3H, CD4, DEFB1, GML, IL4, IL8RA, L-SIGN/CLEC4M, PTPRC/CD45, Tetherin/BST2, TLR7, and TRIM5alpha. A number of those residues are relevant for HIV-1 biology. The set of 140 genes involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis did not show a significant enrichment in signals of recent positive selection in humans (intraspecies selection). However, we identified within or near these genes 24 polymorphisms showing strong signatures of recent positive

  3. Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C During Pregnancy and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Le Campion, Armelle; Larouche, Ariane; Fauteux-Daniel, Sébastien; Soudeyns, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of HCV infection is between 1% and 8% in pregnant women and between 0.05% and 5% in children. Yet the pathogenesis of hepatitis C during pregnancy and in the neonatal period remains poorly understood. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), a leading cause of pediatric HCV infection, takes place at a rate of <10%. Factors that increase the risk of MTCT include high maternal HCV viral load and coinfection with HIV-1 but, intriguingly, not breastfeeding and mode of delivery. Pharmacological prevention of MTCT is not possible at the present time because both pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin are contraindicated for use in pregnancy and during the neonatal period. However, this may change with the recent introduction of direct acting antiviral agents. This review summarizes what is currently known about HCV infection during pregnancy and childhood. Particular emphasis is placed on how pregnancy-associated immune modulation may influence the progression of HCV disease and impact MTCT, and on the differential evolution of perinatally acquired HCV infection in children. Taken together, these developments provide insights into the pathogenesis of hepatitis C and may inform strategies to prevent the transmission of HCV from mother to child. PMID:23223189

  4. Cytokines in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, P T; Sallenave, J-M

    2003-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. The term is heterogenous and encompasses a number of distinct but often overlapping phenotypes including chronic bronchitis, small airways obstruction, emphysema and in some individuals, a systemic component. Although there have been significant advances in understanding the pathophysiology of COPD, understanding of the role of the inflammation in the pathogenesis of the condition remains in its infancy. Indeed, cytokines that are known to orchestrate the inflammatory response in asthma and other inflammatory diseases are only beginning to be reported in COPD. In this review, we highlight the potential role of cytokines in the development of mucus hypersecretion observed in chronic bronchitis and the morphological changes observed in the small airways and airspaces contributing to the development of airflow limitation and respiratory failure respectively. We report evidence that exacerbations are linked to increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and that the wasting and skeletal muscle dysfunction observed in some patients is most probably related to the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In addition transgenic and gene therapy technology has been used to explore the temporal and co-ordinated role of cytokines in the development of COPD animal models. Enhanced understanding of the events involved in the pathogenesis of COPD will lead to the development of therapy with potential to modify the observed progressive decline in lung function and impact on the development of the illness. PMID:12570672

  5. Phosphate starvation enhances the pathogenesis of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Somya; Somani, Vikas Kumar; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the factors responsible for survival and virulence of Bacillus anthracis within the host is prerequisite for the development of therapeutics against anthrax. Host provides several stresses as well as many advantages to the invading pathogen. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation within the host has been considered as one of the major contributing factors in the establishment of infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Here, we report for the first time that Pi fluctuation encountered by B. anthracis at different stages of its life cycle within the host, contributes significantly in its pathogenesis. In this study, Pi starvation was found to hasten the onset of infection cycle by promoting spore germination. After germination, it was found to impede cell growth. In addition, phosphate starved bacilli showed more antibiotic tolerance. Interestingly, phosphate starvation enhanced the pathogenicity of B. anthracis by augmenting its invasiveness in macrophages in vitro. B. anthracis grown under phosphate starvation were also found to be more efficient in establishing lethal infections in mouse model as well. Phosphate starvation increased B. anthracis virulence by promoting the secretion of primary virulence factors like protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Thus, this study affirms that besides other host mediated factors, phosphate limitation may also contribute B. anthracis for successfully establishing itself within the host. This study is a step forward in delineating its pathophysiology that might help in understanding the pathogenesis of anthrax. PMID:26143397

  6. [PANDAS: a possible model for adult OCD pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Marconi, Daniela; Limpido, Lucilla; Bersani, Iliana; Giordano, Annalisa; Bersani, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a disabling disorder. Genetic predisposing factors may have an important role in the onset of the symptoms, but is not been individualized any specific gene yet. In the last years it has been demonstrated that obsessive-compulsive disease and/or tic syndromes may be triggered by an antecedent infection especially with group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. On the basis of recent studies has been postulated that in genetically predisposed individuals, certain streptococcal antigens trigger antibodies which, through a process of molecular mimicry, cross-react with epitopes on the basal ganglia. According to such hypothesis, the acronym PANDAS has been used to describe a subset of children with abrupt onset or exacerbations of OCD or tics, or both, following streptococcal infections. Neuroimaging studies reveal increased basal ganglia volumes, and the proposed cause involves the cross-reaction of streptococcal antibodies with basal ganglia tissue. The hypothesis of a possible involvement of the immunitary system seems justified from quantitative alterations of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in the patients' serum with such syndrome. Echotomographic studies on cardiac valves have not yet demonstrated the parallels between PANDAS and Sydenham's chorea. The use of treatment strategies, such as therapeutic plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin, has been proposed to explain the autoimmune process responsible for the pathogenesis of PANDAS. Further research is still necessary in order to understand the role of streptococcal infection in the pathogenesis of PANDAS. PMID:20066816

  7. Problems concerning the prophylaxis, pathogenesis and therapy of diphtheria

    PubMed Central

    Tasman, A.; Lansberg, H. P.

    1957-01-01

    The first part of this article on the prophylaxis, pathogenesis and therapy of diphtheria is devoted to an epidemiological survey of the results achieved with active immunization against the disease. From these results it can be concluded that active immunization has been largely responsible for the decrease in the morbidity and mortality rates which has taken place in the past half-century. In the second part, the authors deal at length with problems relating to the pathogenesis and therapy of the disease, discussing such subjects as the different types of diphtheria bacteria, the significance of non-virulent strains, the action of bacteriophages, the plurality of diphtheria toxin, the use of antibacterial sera, and the importance of the “avidity” of antitoxic sera. Finally, taking into consideration the data presented in the preceding parts, the authors put forward their views as to the cause of diphtheria, the measures which should be taken to control it, and the most satisfactory form of therapy. PMID:13472439

  8. [Laboratory Medicine Learned Through Research on the Pathogenesis of Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hakuo

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory tests used in clinical practice to assess hypertension include a differential diagnosis, the assessment of complications, and detection of adverse events with medication, which cover a variety of fields of laboratory medicine. I learned laboratory medicine through basic and clinical studies on the pathogenesis of hypertension, and summarized those findings and my interpretations. Basic research using animal models points to a causal role of the central nervous system in essential hypertension; however, since clinical research is technically difficult to perform, this connection has not been confirmed in humans. Recently, renal nerve ablation in humans proved to continuously decrease the blood pressure in the presence of resistant hypertension. Furthermore, when electrical stimulation was continuously applied to the carotid baroreceptor nerve of human adults, their blood pressure lowered. These findings promoted the concept that the central nervous system may actually be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension, which is closely associated with excess sodium intake. We demonstrated that endogenous digitalis plays a key role in hypertension associated with excess sodium intake via sympathetic activation in rats. An increased sodium concentration inside the brain activates epithelial sodium channels and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the brain. Aldosterone releases ouabain from neurons in the paraventricular nucleus in the hypothalamus. Angiotensin II and aldosterone of peripheral origin reach the brain to augment sympathetic outflow. Collectively essential hypertension associated with excess sodium intake and obesity, renovascular hypertension, and primary aldosteronism and pseudoaldosteronism are all suggested to have a common cause originating from the central nervous system. PMID:26524901

  9. IL-33 signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Riether, Carsten; Schürch, Christian M.; Banz, Yara; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Stuber, Regula; Theocharides, Alexandre P.; Li, Xiaohong; Xia, Yu; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Baerlocher, Gabriela M.; Manz, Markus G.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.; Beutler, Bruce; Krebs, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are characterized by the clonal expansion of one or more myeloid cell lineage. In most cases, proliferation of the malignant clone is ascribed to defined genetic alterations. MPNs are also associated with aberrant expression and activity of multiple cytokines; however, the mechanisms by which these cytokines contribute to disease pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we reveal a non-redundant role for steady-state IL-33 in supporting dysregulated myelopoiesis in a murine model of MPN. Genetic ablation of the IL-33 signaling pathway was sufficient and necessary to restore normal hematopoiesis and abrogate MPN-like disease in animals lacking the inositol phosphatase SHIP. Stromal cell–derived IL-33 stimulated the secretion of cytokines and growth factors by myeloid and non-hematopoietic cells of the BM, resulting in myeloproliferation in SHIP-deficient animals. Additionally, in the transgenic JAK2V617F model, the onset of MPN was delayed in animals lacking IL-33 in radio-resistant cells. In human BM, we detected increased numbers of IL-33–expressing cells, specifically in biopsies from MPN patients. Exogenous IL-33 promoted cytokine production and colony formation by primary CD34+ MPN stem/progenitor cells from patients. Moreover, IL-33 improved the survival of JAK2V617F-positive cell lines. Together, these data indicate a central role for IL-33 signaling in the pathogenesis of MPNs. PMID:26011644

  10. Pathogenesis, Emerging therapeutic targets and Treatment in Sialidosis

    PubMed Central

    d’Azzo, Alessandra; Machado, Eda; Annunziata, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sialidosis is a neurosomatic, lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by mutations in the NEU1 gene, encoding the lysosomal sialidase NEU1. Deficient enzyme activity results in impaired processing/degradation of sialo-glycoproteins, and accumulation of oversialylated metabolites. Sialidosis is considered an orphan disorder for which no therapy is currently available. Areas covered The review describes the clinical forms of sialidosis and the NEU1 mutations so far identified; NEU1 requirement to complex with the protective protein/cathepsin A for stability and activation; and the pathogenic effects of NEU1 deficiency. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in animal models uncovered basic cellular pathways downstream of NEU1 and its substrates, which may be implicated in more common adult (neurodegenerative) diseases. The development of a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with galactosialidosis may prove suitable for sialidosis patients with the attenuated form of the disease. Expert opinion Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the development of therapies for orphan LSDs, like sialidosis. Given the small number of potentially eligible patients, the way to treat sialidosis would be through the coordinated effort of clinical centers, which provide diagnosis and care for these patients, and the basic research labs that work towards understanding the disease pathogenesis. PMID:26949572

  11. Molecular biology, pathogenesis and pathology of mumps virus

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Steven; Eckhaus, Michael; Rennick, Linda J; Bamford, Connor GG; Duprex, W Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mumps is caused by the mumps virus (MuV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of enveloped, non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses. Mumps is characterized by painful inflammatory symptoms, such as parotitis and orchitis. The virus is highly neurotropic, with laboratory evidence of central nervous system (CNS) infection in approximately half of cases. Symptomatic CNS infection occurs less frequently; nonetheless, prior to the introduction of routine vaccination, MuV was a leading cause of aseptic meningitis and viral encephalitis in many developed countries. Despite being one of the oldest recognized diseases, with a worldwide distribution, surprisingly little attention has been given to its study. Cases of aseptic meningitis associated with some vaccine strains and a global resurgence of cases, including in highly vaccinated populations, has renewed interest in the virus, particularly in its pathogenesis and the need for development of clinically relevant models of disease. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge on the virus, its pathogenesis and its clinical and pathological outcomes. PMID:25229387

  12. Aortic stenosis: insights on pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Carità, Patrizia; Coppola, Giuseppe; Novo, Giuseppina; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Guglielmo, Marco; Balasus, Fabio; Novo, Salvatore; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Moscarelli, Marco; Fattouch, Khalil; Corrado, Egle

    2016-09-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular heart disease in the Western populations, with an estimated overall prevalence of 3% in adults over 75 years. To understand its patho-biological processes represents a priority. In elderly patients, AS usually involves trileaflet valves and is referred to as degenerative calcific processes. Scientific evidence suggests the involvement of an active "atherosclerosis-like" pathogenesis in the initiation phase of degenerative AS. To the contrary, the progression could be driven by different forces (such as mechanical stress, genetic factors and interaction between inflammation and calcification). The improved understanding presents potentially new therapeutic targets for preventing and inhibiting the development and progression of the disease. Furthermore, in clinical practice the management of AS patients implies the evaluation of generalized atherosclerotic manifestations (i.e., in the coronary and carotid arteries) even for prognostic reasons. In counselling elderly patients, the risk stratification should address individual frailty beyond the generic risk scores. In these regard, the co-morbidities, and in particular those linked to the global atherosclerotic burden, should be carefully investigated in order to define the risk/benefit ratio for invasive treatment strategies. We present a detailed overview of insights in pathogenesis of AS with possible practical implications. PMID:27582763

  13. Arginine Metabolism in Bacterial Pathogenesis and Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L L; Botelho, Michael G; Lo, Regina C; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance to infectious diseases is a significant global concern for health care organizations; along with aging populations and increasing cancer rates, it represents a great burden for government healthcare systems. Therefore, the development of therapies against bacterial infection and cancer is an important strategy for healthcare research. Pathogenic bacteria and cancer have developed a broad range of sophisticated strategies to survive or propagate inside a host and cause infection or spread disease. Bacteria can employ their own metabolism pathways to obtain nutrients from the host cells in order to survive. Similarly, cancer cells can dysregulate normal human cell metabolic pathways so that they can grow and spread. One common feature of the adaption and disruption of metabolic pathways observed in bacterial and cancer cell growth is amino acid pathways; these have recently been targeted as a novel approach to manage bacterial infections and cancer therapy. In particular, arginine metabolism has been illustrated to be important not only for bacterial pathogenesis but also for cancer therapy. Therefore, greater insights into arginine metabolism of pathogenic bacteria and cancer cells would provide possible targets for controlling of bacterial infection and cancer treatment. This review will summarize the recent progress on the relationship of arginine metabolism with bacterial pathogenesis and cancer therapy, with a particular focus on arginase and arginine deiminase pathways of arginine catabolism. PMID:26978353

  14. Arginine Metabolism in Bacterial Pathogenesis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L. L.; Botelho, Michael G.; Lo, Regina C.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance to infectious diseases is a significant global concern for health care organizations; along with aging populations and increasing cancer rates, it represents a great burden for government healthcare systems. Therefore, the development of therapies against bacterial infection and cancer is an important strategy for healthcare research. Pathogenic bacteria and cancer have developed a broad range of sophisticated strategies to survive or propagate inside a host and cause infection or spread disease. Bacteria can employ their own metabolism pathways to obtain nutrients from the host cells in order to survive. Similarly, cancer cells can dysregulate normal human cell metabolic pathways so that they can grow and spread. One common feature of the adaption and disruption of metabolic pathways observed in bacterial and cancer cell growth is amino acid pathways; these have recently been targeted as a novel approach to manage bacterial infections and cancer therapy. In particular, arginine metabolism has been illustrated to be important not only for bacterial pathogenesis but also for cancer therapy. Therefore, greater insights into arginine metabolism of pathogenic bacteria and cancer cells would provide possible targets for controlling of bacterial infection and cancer treatment. This review will summarize the recent progress on the relationship of arginine metabolism with bacterial pathogenesis and cancer therapy, with a particular focus on arginase and arginine deiminase pathways of arginine catabolism. PMID:26978353

  15. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Keun; Shin, Jin Hee; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Eui-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons associated with the abnormal aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ALS remain unclear, however. Autophagy is a major pathway for the elimination of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore contributes to cellular homeostasis. This catabolic process begins with the formation of the double membrane-bound autophagosome that engulfs portions of the cytoplasm and subsequently fuses with a lysosome to form an autolysosome, in which lysosomal enzymes digest autophagic substrates. Defects at various stages of autophagy have been associated with pathological mutations of several ALS-linked genes including SOD1, p62, TDP-43, and optineurin, suggesting that such defects may play a causative role in the pathogenesis of this condition. In this review, we summarize the dysregulation of autophagy associated with ALS as well as potential therapeutic strategies based on modulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26264610

  16. The role of obesity in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Yolanda E; Linas, Stuart

    2009-02-01

    The rapid rise in the incidence and prevalence of obesity and the concomitant increase in the incidence and prevalence of hypertension have fueled investigation into the role of obesity in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The genetic background that predisposes obese individuals to hypertension is being elucidated, and the importance of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ in the pathogenesis of hypertension is increasingly being recognized. Visceral adipose tissue is critical in the production of pathologic cytokines that are thought to mediate obesity-induced hypertension. Changes in the types and levels of adipocytokines that result from the accumulation of aberrant adipose tissue directly leads to alterations in systemic vascular resistance, sodium retention and sympathetic nervous system activity. Key changes in adipocytokine levels seen in obesity-induced hypertension include increased leptin and adiponectin levels. Another important mechanism in obesity-induced hypertension is the generation of angiotensin II and direct stimulation of aldosterone production. The increased sympathetic nervous system activity seen in obesity-associated hypertension leads to increased renal sodium retention and increased systemic vascular resistance. Increased systemic vascular resistance can also occur directly in obese individuals through vascular fibrosis and lipid deposition. Obesity should no longer be simply considered as a marker of cardiovascular risk but should be regarded as an important and primary contributor to the pathophysiology of hypertension. PMID:19107106

  17. Pathogenesis of a Model Gammaherpesvirus in a Natural Host ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David J.; Kipar, Anja; Sample, Jeffery T.; Stewart, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) infection of laboratory mice (Mus musculus) is an established model of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis. The fact that M. musculus is not a host in the wild prompted us to reassess MHV-68 infection in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), a natural host. Here, we report significant differences in MHV-68 infection in the two species: (i) following intranasal inoculation, MHV-68 replicated in the lungs of wood mice to levels approximately 3 log units lower than in BALB/c mice; (ii) in BALB/c mice, virus replication in alveolar epithelial cells was accompanied by a diffuse, T-cell-dominated interstitial pneumonitis, whereas in wood mice it was restricted to focal granulomatous infiltrations; (iii) within wood mice, latently infected lymphocytes were abundant in inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue that was not apparent in BALB/c mice; (iv) splenic latency was established in both species, but well-delineated secondary follicles with germinal centers were present in wood mice, while only poorly delineated follicles were seen in BALB/c mice; and, perhaps as a consequence, (v) production of neutralizing antibody was significantly higher in wood mice. These differences highlight the value of this animal model in the study of MHV-68 pathogenesis. PMID:20130062

  18. Pathogenesis of a model gammaherpesvirus in a natural host.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David J; Kipar, Anja; Sample, Jeffery T; Stewart, James P

    2010-04-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) infection of laboratory mice (Mus musculus) is an established model of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis. The fact that M. musculus is not a host in the wild prompted us to reassess MHV-68 infection in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), a natural host. Here, we report significant differences in MHV-68 infection in the two species: (i) following intranasal inoculation, MHV-68 replicated in the lungs of wood mice to levels approximately 3 log units lower than in BALB/c mice; (ii) in BALB/c mice, virus replication in alveolar epithelial cells was accompanied by a diffuse, T-cell-dominated interstitial pneumonitis, whereas in wood mice it was restricted to focal granulomatous infiltrations; (iii) within wood mice, latently infected lymphocytes were abundant in inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue that was not apparent in BALB/c mice; (iv) splenic latency was established in both species, but well-delineated secondary follicles with germinal centers were present in wood mice, while only poorly delineated follicles were seen in BALB/c mice; and, perhaps as a consequence, (v) production of neutralizing antibody was significantly higher in wood mice. These differences highlight the value of this animal model in the study of MHV-68 pathogenesis. PMID:20130062

  19. Genetics and molecular pathogenesis of mitochondrial respiratory chain diseases.

    PubMed

    Hanna, M G; Nelson, I P

    1999-05-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been recognised as a cause of human disease for over 30 years. Advances in the past 10 years have led to a better understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of many of these disorders. Over 100 primary defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are now implicated in the pathogenesis of a group of disorders which are collectively known as the mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, and which most frequently involve skeletal muscle and/or the central nervous system. Although impaired oxidative phosphorylation is likely to be the final common pathway leading to the cellular dysfunction associated with such mtDNA mutations, the complex relationship between genotype and phenotype remains largely unexplained. Most of the genes which encode the respiratory chain reside in the nucleus, yet only five nuclear genes have been implicated in human respiratory chain diseases. There is evidence that respiratory chain dysfunction is present in common neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. The precise cause of this respiratory chain dysfunction and its relationship to the disease process are unclear. This review focuses upon respiratory chain disorders associated with primary defects in mtDNA. PMID:10379358

  20. [Pathogenesis of liver disease in alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Vogel, W; Braunsteiner, T; Dietze, O; Braunsteiner, H

    1990-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is one of the most common lethal hereditary disorders. Approximately 5 to 10% of the general population carry an "at risk" gene for the development of liver disease or emphysema of the lung. Patients with A1ATD associated liver disease constitute a histologically and clinically heterogeneous group. The pathogenesis of the disease still remains to be elucidated. Recent experimental evidence produced in the transgenic mouse model is in favour of the engorgement hypothesis considering the deposition of amorphous A1AT in the hepatocytes the prime event causing liver disease. This theory, however, fails to explain the clinical observation of the presence of a number of other factors known to cause chronic liver disease in A1ATD patients. The latter observation is in support of the deficiency theory, which explains the pathogenesis of emphysema of the lung, and would point to A1ATD as a predisposition to acquire chronic disease. The meaning of the increased synthesis of stress proteins in patients with liver disease is still speculative. PMID:2092568