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Sample records for eeg alpha phenotypes

  1. Magnetic Resonance Therapy Improves Clinical Phenotype and EEG Alpha Power in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Taghva, Alexander; Silvetz, Robert; Ring, Alex; Kim, Keun-young A.; Murphy, Kevin T.; Liu, Charles Y.; Jin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling and prevalent psychiatric disorder with limited effective treatment options. In addition to the clinical features of the disease, pathologic changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG), including decreased alpha power, have been reported. Objectives: To determine if magnetic brain stimulation can induce normalization of EEG abnormalities and improve clinical symptoms in PTSD in a preliminary, open-label evaluation. Materials and Methods: We reviewed prospectively-collected data on 21 veterans that were consecutively-treated for PTSD. Magnetic resonance therapy (MRT) was administered for two weeks at treatment frequencies based on frequency-domain analysis of each patient’s dominant alpha-band EEG frequencies and resting heart rate. Patients were evaluated on the PTSD checklist (PCL-M) and pre- and post-treatment EEGs before and after MRT. Results: Of the 21 patients who initiated therapy, 16 completed treatment. Clinical improvements on the PCL-M were seen in these 16 patients, with an average pre-treatment score of 54.9 and post-treatment score of 31.8 (P < 0.001). In addition, relative global EEG alpha-band (8 - 13 Hz) power increased from 32.0 to 38.5 percent (P = 0.013), and EEG delta-band (1 - 4 Hz) power decreased from 32.3 percent to 26.8 percent (P = 0.028). Conclusions: These open-label data show trends toward normalization of EEG and concomitant clinical improvement using magnetic stimulation for PTSD. PMID:26839865

  2. Low voltage alpha EEG phenotype is associated with reduced amplitudes of alpha event-related oscillations, increased cortical phase synchrony, and a low level of response to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Wills, Derek N; Phillips, Evelyn; Havstad, James

    2015-10-01

    Low voltage EEG (LVEEG) is a heritable phenotype that differs depending on ancestral heritage, yet its impact on brain networks and cognition remain relatively unexplored. In this study we assessed energy and task related phase locking of event-related oscillation (EROs), behavioral responses, measures of IQ and personality, and expected responses to alcohol in a large sample of individuals with LVEEG compared to those with higher voltage variants. Participants (n=762) were recruited from a Native American community and completed a diagnostic interview, the Quick Test, the Subjective High Assessment Scale Expectation Version (SHAS-E) and the Maudsley Personality Inventory. Clinical and spectral analyzed EEGs were collected for determination of the presence of a LVEEG variant. EROs were generated using a facial expression recognition task. Participants with LVEEG (n=451) were significantly more likely to be older, married and have higher degrees of Native American heritage but did not differ in gender, income or education. Individuals with LVEEG were also found to have decreased energy in their alpha EROs, increased phase locking between stimulus trials, and increased phase-locking between cortical brain areas. No significant differences in the cognitive tests, personality variables or alcohol dependence or anxiety diagnoses were found, however, individuals with LVEEG did report a larger number of drinks ever consumed in a 24-h period and a less intense expected response to alcohol. These data suggest that alpha power in the resting EEG is highly associated with energy and cortical connectivity measures generated by event-related stimuli, as well as potentially increased risk for alcohol use. PMID:26151497

  3. PSYCHOPHYSICS OF EEG ALPHA STATE DISCRIMINATION

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Jon A.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly all research in neurofeedback since the 1960s has focused on training voluntary control over EEG constructs. By contrast, EEG state discrimination training focuses on awareness of subjective correlates of EEG states. This study presents the first successful replication of EEG alpha state discrimination first reported by Kamiya (1962). A 150-second baseline was recorded in 106 participants. During the task, low (<30th percentile of the baseline) and high alpha events (>70th percentile) triggered a prompt. Participants indicated “high” or “low” with a keypress response and received immediate feedback. Seventy-five percent of participants achieved significant discrimination within nine sessions, with a significant learning curve effect. Performance was significantly related to physical properties of the EEG signal, including magnitude, duration, and absolute vs. relative amplitude. These results are consistent with a conceptualization of EEG state discrimination as a sensory modality, although it is also intricately related to voluntary control of these states. PMID:22800733

  4. HTR3B is associated with alcoholism with antisocial behavior and alpha EEG power—an intermediate phenotype for alcoholism and co-morbid behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ducci, Francesca; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; White, Kenneth V.; Hodgkinson, Colin; Albaugh, Bernard; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) with co-morbid antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) have been associated with serotonin (5-HT) dysfunction. 5-HT3 receptors are potentiated by ethanol and appear to modulate reward. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists may be useful in the treatment of early-onset alcoholics with co-morbid ASPD. Low-voltage alpha electroencephalogram (EEG) power, a highly heritable trait, has been associated with both AUD and ASPD. A recent whole genome linkage scan in one of our samples, Plains American Indians (PI), has shown a suggestive linkage peak for alpha power at the 5-HT3R locus. We tested whether genetic variation within the HTR3A and HTR3B genes influences vulnerability to AUD with comorbid ASPD (AUD + ASPD) and moderates alpha power. Our study included three samples: 284 criminal alcoholic Finnish Caucasians and 234 controls; two independent community-ascertained samples with resting EEG recordings: a predominantly Caucasian sample of 191 individuals (Bethesda) and 306 PI. In the Finns, an intronic HTR3B SNP rs3782025 was associated with AUD + ASPD (P = .004). In the Bethesda sample, the same allele predicted lower alpha power (P = 7.37e-5). Associations between alpha power and two other HTR3B SNPs were also observed among PI (P = .03). One haplotype in the haplotype block at the 3′ region of the gene that included rs3782025 was associated with AUD + ASPD in the Finns (P = .02) and with reduced alpha power in the Bethesda population (P = .00009). Another haplotype in this block was associated with alpha power among PI (P = .03). No associations were found for HTR3A. Genetic variation within HTR3B may influence vulnerability to develop AUD with comorbid ASPD. 5-HT3R might contribute to the imbalance between excitation and inhibition that characterize the brain of alcoholics. PMID:19185213

  5. HTR3B is associated with alcoholism with antisocial behavior and alpha EEG power--an intermediate phenotype for alcoholism and co-morbid behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ducci, Francesca; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; White, Kenneth V; Hodgkinson, Colin; Albaugh, Bernard; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2009-02-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) with co-morbid antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) have been associated with serotonin (5-HT) dysfunction. 5-HT3 receptors are potentiated by ethanol and appear to modulate reward. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists may be useful in the treatment of early-onset alcoholics with co-morbid ASPD. Low-voltage alpha electroencephalogram (EEG) power, a highly heritable trait, has been associated with both AUD and ASPD. A recent whole genome linkage scan in one of our samples, Plains American Indians (PI), has shown a suggestive linkage peak for alpha power at the 5-HT3R locus. We tested whether genetic variation within the HTR3A and HTR3B genes influences vulnerability to AUD with comorbid ASPD (AUD+ASPD) and moderates alpha power. Our study included three samples: 284 criminal alcoholic Finnish Caucasians and 234 controls; two independent community-ascertained samples with resting EEG recordings: a predominantly Caucasian sample of 191 individuals (Bethesda) and 306 PI. In the Finns, an intronic HTR3B SNP rs3782025 was associated with AUD+ASPD (P=.004). In the Bethesda sample, the same allele predicted lower alpha power (P=7.37e(-5)). Associations between alpha power and two other HTR3B SNPs were also observed among PI (P=.03). One haplotype in the haplotype block at the 3' region of the gene that included rs3782025 was associated with AUD+ASPD in the Finns (P=.02) and with reduced alpha power in the Bethesda population (P=.00009). Another haplotype in this block was associated with alpha power among PI (P=.03). No associations were found for HTR3A. Genetic variation within HTR3B may influence vulnerability to develop AUD with comorbid ASPD. 5-HT3R might contribute to the imbalance between excitation and inhibition that characterize the brain of alcoholics. PMID:19185213

  6. EEG alpha power and creative ideation.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Neuroscientific studies revealed first insights into neural mechanisms underlying creativity, but existing findings are highly variegated and often inconsistent. Despite the disappointing picture on the neuroscience of creativity drawn in recent reviews, there appears to be robust evidence that EEG alpha power is particularly sensitive to various creativity-related demands involved in creative ideation. Alpha power varies as a function of creativity-related task demands and the originality of ideas, is positively related to an individuals' creativity level, and has been observed to increase as a result of creativity interventions. Alpha increases during creative ideation could reflect more internally oriented attention that is characterized by the absence of external bottom-up stimulation and, thus, a form of top-down activity. Moreover, they could indicate the involvement of specific memory processes such as the efficient (re-)combination of unrelated semantic information. We conclude that increased alpha power during creative ideation is among the most consistent findings in neuroscientific research on creativity and discuss possible future directions to better understand the manifold brain mechanisms involved in creativity. PMID:23246442

  7. EEG alpha power and creative ideation☆

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientific studies revealed first insights into neural mechanisms underlying creativity, but existing findings are highly variegated and often inconsistent. Despite the disappointing picture on the neuroscience of creativity drawn in recent reviews, there appears to be robust evidence that EEG alpha power is particularly sensitive to various creativity-related demands involved in creative ideation. Alpha power varies as a function of creativity-related task demands and the originality of ideas, is positively related to an individuals’ creativity level, and has been observed to increase as a result of creativity interventions. Alpha increases during creative ideation could reflect more internally oriented attention that is characterized by the absence of external bottom-up stimulation and, thus, a form of top-down activity. Moreover, they could indicate the involvement of specific memory processes such as the efficient (re-)combination of unrelated semantic information. We conclude that increased alpha power during creative ideation is among the most consistent findings in neuroscientific research on creativity and discuss possible future directions to better understand the manifold brain mechanisms involved in creativity. PMID:23246442

  8. Relationship of genetically transmitted alpha EEG traits to anxiety disorders and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, M.A.; Rohrbaugh, W.; Harris, C.R.

    1995-10-09

    We tested the hypothesis that a heritable EEG trait, the low voltage alpha (LV), is associated with psychiatric disorders. Modest to moderate evidence for genetic linkage of both panic disorder and the low voltage alpha trait to the same region of chromosome 20q has recently been reported, raising the issue of whether there is a phenotypic correlation between these traits. A total of 124 subjects including 50 unrelated index subjects and 74 relatives were studied. Alpha EEG power was measured and EEG phenotypes were impressionistically classified. Subjects were psychiatrically interviewed using the SADS-L and blind-rated by RDC criteria. Alcoholics were four times more likely to be LV (including so-called borderline low voltage alpha) than were nonalcoholic, nonanxious subjects. Alcoholics with anxiety disorder are 10 times more likely to be LV. However, alcoholics without anxiety disorder were similar to nonalcoholics in alpha power. An anxiety disorder (panic disorder, phobia, or generalized anxiety) was found in 14/17 LV subjects as compared to 34/101 of the rest of the sample (P < 0.01). Support for these observations was found in the unrelated index subjects in whom no traits would be shared by familial clustering. Lower alpha power in anxiety disorders was not state-dependent, as indicated by the Spielberger Anxiety Scale. Familial covariance of alpha power was 0.25 (P < 0.01). These findings indicate there may be a shared factor underlying the transmissible low voltage alpha EEG variant and vulnerability to anxiety disorders with associated alcoholism. This factor is apparently not rare, because LV was found in approximately 10% of unrelated index subjects and 5% of subjects free of alcoholism and anxiety disorders. 43 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Where the BOLD signal goes when alpha EEG leaves.

    PubMed

    Laufs, H; Holt, John L; Elfont, Robert; Krams, Michael; Paul, Joseph S; Krakow, K; Kleinschmidt, A

    2006-07-15

    Previous studies using simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings have yielded discrepant results regarding the topography of brain activity in relation to spontaneous power fluctuations in the alpha band of the EEG during eyes-closed rest. Here, we explore several possible explanations for this discrepancy by re-analyzing in detail our previously reported data. Using single subject analyses as a starting point, we found that alpha power decreases are associated with fMRI signal increases that mostly follow two distinct patterns: either 'visual' areas in the occipital lobe or 'attentional' areas in the frontal and parietal lobe. On examination of the EEG spectra corresponding to these two fMRI patterns, we found greater relative theta power in sessions yielding the 'visual' fMRI pattern during alpha desynchronization and greater relative beta power in sessions yielding the 'attentional' fMRI pattern. The few sessions that fell into neither pattern featured the overall lowest theta and highest beta power. We conclude that the pattern of brain activation observed during spontaneous power reduction in the alpha band depends on the general level of brain activity as indexed over a broader spectral range in the EEG. Finally, we relate these findings to the concepts of 'resting state' and 'default mode' and discuss how - as for sleep - EEG-based criteria might be used for staging brain activity during wakefulness. PMID:16537111

  10. EEG alpha sensitization in individualized homeopathic treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Lewis, Daniel A; Lewis, Sabrina E; Schwartz, Gary E; Brooks, Audrey J; Scott, Anne; Baldwin, Carol M

    2004-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) patients show evidence of sensitizability in pain pathways and electroencephalographic (EEG) alterations. One proposed mechanism for the claimed effects of homeopathy, a form of complementary medicine used for FM, is time-dependent sensitization (TDS, progressive amplification) of host responses. This study examined possible sensitization-related changes in EEG relative alpha magnitude during a clinical trial of homeopathy in FM. A 4-month randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial of daily orally administered individualized homeopathy in physician-confirmed FM, with an additional 2-month optional crossover phase, included three laboratory sessions, at baseline, 3 and 6 months (N = 48, age 49.2 +/- 9.8 years, 94% women). Nineteen leads of EEG relative alpha magnitude at rest and during olfactory administration of treatment and control solutions were evaluated in each session. After 3 months, the active treatment group significantly increased, while the placebo group decreased, in global alpha-1 and alpha-2 during bottle sniffs over sessions. At 6 months, the subset of active patients who stayed on active continued to increase, while the active-switch subgroup reversed direction in alpha magnitude. Groups did not differ in resting alpha. Consistent with the TDS hypothesis, sniff alpha-1 and alpha-2 increases at 6 months versus baseline correlated with total amount of time on active remedy over all subjects (r = 0.45, p = .003), not with dose changes or clinical outcomes in the active group. The findings suggest initiation of TDS in relative EEG alpha magnitude by daily oral administration of active homeopathic medicines versus placebo, with laboratory elicitation by temporolimbic olfactory stimulation or sniffing. PMID:15370183

  11. Changes in EEG alpha power during simulated driving: a demonstration.

    PubMed

    Schier, M A

    2000-08-01

    The aim was to assess the suitability of EEG-based techniques to recording activity during a driving simulation task. To achieve this, an inexpensive driving simulator (comprising a steering wheel, pedals and gear shift) were made to function with a personal computer running 'Need for Speed' simulation software. Simulators of this type are both inexpensive and relatively realistic. The EEG was recorded from four sites on the scalp (P3, P4, F3, F4) for two laps during the driving task, and during a replay task. The driving task involved participants driving a vehicle on a simulated undulating, sealed surface circuit, without any other vehicles present. Two men were participants in this experiment. Power spectra were computed and integrated to produce values of relative alpha activity for each channel and recording epoch, a time-series of alpha activity during each recorded segment. Overall values for alpha activity indicated an increase for replay compared to driving, and also driving on lap 5 compared to driving on lap 2. The EEG changes are consistent with the notion of overall reduction of attention during the later laps and the replay task and indicate the potential of such measures for complex motor behaviour. PMID:10832002

  12. Theta and alpha EEG frequency interplay in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: evidence from EEG, MRI, and SPECT brain modifications

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Davide V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Temporo-parietal and medial temporal cortex atrophy are associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer disease (AD) as well as the reduction of regional cerebral blood perfusion in hippocampus. Moreover, the increase of EEG alpha3/alpha2 power ratio has been associated with MCI due to AD and with an increase in theta frequency power in a group of subjects with impaired cerebral perfusion in hippocampus. Methods: Seventy four adult subjects with MCI underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and high resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Among the patients, a subset of 27 subjects underwent also perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography and hippocampal atrophy evaluation. Alpha3/alpha2 power ratio as well as cortical thickness was computed for each subject. Three MCI groups were detected according to increasing tertile values of alpha3/alpha2 power ratio and difference of cortical thickness among the groups estimated. Results: Higher alpha3/alpha2 power ratio group had wider cortical thinning than other groups, mapped to the Supramarginal and Precuneus bilaterally. Subjects with higher alpha3/alpha2 frequency power ratio showed a constant trend to a lower perfusion than lower alpha3/alpha2 group. Moreover, this group correlates with both a bigger hippocampal atrophy and an increase of theta frequency power. Conclusion: Higher EEG alpha3/alpha2 power ratio was associated with temporo-parietal cortical thinning, hippocampal atrophy and reduction of regional cerebral perfusion in medial temporal cortex. In this group an increase of theta frequency power was detected inMCI subjects. The combination of higher EEG alpha3/alpha2 power ratio, cortical thickness measure and regional cerebral perfusion reveals a complex interplay between EEG cerebral rhythms, structural and functional brain modifications. PMID:25926789

  13. Intra-cortical propagation of EEG alpha oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hindriks, Rikkert; van Putten, Michel J A M; Deco, Gustavo

    2014-12-01

    The most salient feature of spontaneous human brain activity as recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) are rhythmic fluctuations around 10Hz. These alpha oscillations have been reported to propagate over the scalp with velocities in the range of 5-15m/s. Since these velocities are in the range of action potential velocities through cortico-cortical axons, it has been hypothesized that the observed scalp waves reflect cortico-cortically mediated propagation of cortical oscillations. The reported scalp velocities however, appear to be inconsistent with those estimated from local field potential recordings in dogs, which are <1m/s and agree with the propagation velocity of action potentials in intra-cortical axons. In this study, we resolve these diverging findings using a combination of EEG data-analysis and biophysical modeling. In particular, we demonstrate that the observed scalp velocities can be accounted for by slow traveling oscillations, which provides support for the claim that spatial propagation of alpha oscillations is mediated by intra-cortical axons. PMID:25168275

  14. EEG Alpha Synchronization Is Related to Top-Down Processing in Convergent and Divergent Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedek, Mathias; Bergner, Sabine; Konen, Tanja; Fink, Andreas; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    2011-01-01

    Synchronization of EEG alpha activity has been referred to as being indicative of cortical idling, but according to more recent evidence it has also been associated with active internal processing and creative thinking. The main objective of this study was to investigate to what extent EEG alpha synchronization is related to internal processing…

  15. EEG Alpha Synchronization Is Related to Top-Down Processing in Convergent and Divergent Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedek, Mathias; Bergner, Sabine; Konen, Tanja; Fink, Andreas; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    2011-01-01

    Synchronization of EEG alpha activity has been referred to as being indicative of cortical idling, but according to more recent evidence it has also been associated with active internal processing and creative thinking. The main objective of this study was to investigate to what extent EEG alpha synchronization is related to internal processing…

  16. Alpha-band EEG activity in perceptual learning

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Brett C.; Visscher, Kristina M.; Le Dantec, Christophe C.; Seitz, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    In studies of perceptual learning (PL), subjects are typically highly trained across many sessions to achieve perceptual benefits on the stimuli in those tasks. There is currently significant debate regarding what sources of brain plasticity underlie these PL-based learning improvements. Here we investigate the hypothesis that PL, among other mechanisms, leads to task automaticity, especially in the presence of the trained stimuli. To investigate this hypothesis, we trained participants for eight sessions to find an oriented target in a field of near-oriented distractors and examined alpha-band activity, which modulates with attention to visual stimuli, as a possible measure of automaticity. Alpha-band activity was acquired via electroencephalogram (EEG), before and after training, as participants performed the task with trained and untrained stimuli. Results show that participants underwent significant learning in this task (as assessed by threshold, accuracy, and reaction time improvements) and that alpha power increased during the pre-stimulus period and then underwent greater desynchronization at the time of stimulus presentation following training. However, these changes in alpha-band activity were not specific to the trained stimuli, with similar patterns of posttraining alpha power for trained and untrained stimuli. These data are consistent with the view that participants were more efficient at focusing resources at the time of stimulus presentation and are consistent with a greater automaticity of task performance. These findings have implications for PL, as transfer effects from trained to untrained stimuli may partially depend on differential effort of the individual at the time of stimulus processing. PMID:26370167

  17. BOLD correlates of EEG alpha phase-locking and the fMRI default mode network.

    PubMed

    Jann, K; Dierks, T; Boesch, C; Kottlow, M; Strik, W; Koenig, T

    2009-04-15

    Phase locking or synchronization of brain areas is a key concept of information processing in the brain. Synchronous oscillations have been observed and investigated extensively in EEG during the past decades. EEG oscillations occur over a wide frequency range. In EEG, a prominent type of oscillations is alpha-band activity, present typically when a subject is awake, but at rest with closed eyes. The spectral power of alpha rhythms has recently been investigated in simultaneous EEG/fMRI recordings, establishing a wide-range cortico-thalamic network. However, spectral power and synchronization are different measures and little is known about the correlations between BOLD effects and EEG synchronization. Interestingly, the fMRI BOLD signal also displays synchronous oscillations across different brain regions. These oscillations delineate so-called resting state networks (RSNs) that resemble the correlation patterns of simultaneous EEG/fMRI recordings. However, the nature of these BOLD oscillations and their relations to EEG activity is still poorly understood. One hypothesis is that the subunits constituting a specific RSN may be coordinated by different EEG rhythms. In this study we report on evidence for this hypothesis. The BOLD correlates of global EEG synchronization (GFS) in the alpha frequency band are located in brain areas involved in specific RSNs, e.g. the 'default mode network'. Furthermore, our results confirm the hypothesis that specific RSNs are organized by long-range synchronization at least in the alpha frequency band. Finally, we could localize specific areas where the GFS BOLD correlates and the associated RSN overlap. Thus, we claim that not only the spectral dynamics of EEG are important, but also their spatio-temporal organization. PMID:19280706

  18. Detecting alpha spindle events in EEG time series using adaptive autoregressive models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhythmic oscillatory activity is widely observed during a variety of subject behaviors and is believed to play a central role in information processing and control. A classic example of rhythmic activity is alpha spindles, which consist of short (0.5-2 s) bursts of high frequency alpha activity. Recent research has shown that alpha spindles in the parietal/occipital area are statistically related to fatigue and drowsiness. These spindles constitute sharp changes in the underlying statistical properties of the signal. Our hypothesis is that change point detection models can be used to identify the onset and duration of spindles in EEG. In this work we develop an algorithm that accurately identifies sudden bursts of narrowband oscillatory activity in EEG using techniques derived from change point analysis. Our motivating example is detection of alpha spindles in the parietal/occipital areas of the brain. Our goal is to develop an algorithm that can be applied to any type of rhythmic oscillatory activity of interest for accurate online detection. Methods In this work we propose modeling the alpha band EEG time series using discounted autoregressive (DAR) modeling. The DAR model uses a discounting rate to weigh points measured further in the past less heavily than points more recently observed. This model is used together with predictive loss scoring to identify periods of EEG data that are statistically significant. Results Our algorithm accurately captures changes in the statistical properties of the alpha frequency band. These statistical changes are highly correlated with alpha spindle occurrences and form a reliable measure for detecting alpha spindles in EEG. We achieve approximately 95% accuracy in detecting alpha spindles, with timing precision to within approximately 150?ms, for two datasets from an experiment of prolonged simulated driving, as well as in simulated EEG. Sensitivity and specificity values are above 0.9, and in many cases are above 0.95, for our analysis. Conclusion Modeling the alpha band EEG using discounted AR models provides an efficient method for detecting oscillatory alpha activity in EEG. The method is based on statistical principles and can generally be applied to detect rhythmic activity in any frequency band or brain region. PMID:24047117

  19. EEG alpha frequency correlates of burnout and depression: The role of gender.

    PubMed

    Tement, Sara; Pahor, Anja; Jaušovec, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    EEG alpha frequency band biomarkers of depression are widely explored. Due to their trait-like features, they may help distinguish between depressive and burnout symptomatology, which is often referred to as "work-related depression". The present correlational study strived to examine whether individual alpha frequency (IAF), power, and coherence in the alpha band can provide evidence for establishing burnout as a separate diagnostic entity. Resting EEG (eyes closed) was recorded in 117 individuals (42 males). In addition, the participants filled-out questionnaires of burnout and depression. Regression analyses highlighted the differential value of IAF and power in predicting burnout and depression. IAF was significantly related to depressive symptomatology, whereas power was linked mostly to burnout. Moreover, seven out of twelve interactions between EEG indicators and gender were significant. Connectivity patterns were significant for depression displaying gender-related differences. The results offer tentative support for establishing burnout as a separate clinical syndrome. PMID:26631352

  20. Music perception and imagery in EEG: alpha band effects of task and stimulus.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Rebecca S; Vlek, Rutger J; Desain, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Previous work has shown that mental imagination of sound generally elicits an increase of alpha band activity (8-12 Hz) in the electroencephalogram (EEG). In addition, alpha activity has been shown to be related to aspects of music processing. In the current study, EEG signatures were investigated for perception and imagery of two different natural musical phrases. The responses are compared between tasks and between stimuli. For all tasks and stimuli, posterior alpha band activity was seen, but differences are shown in the power of this response. As expected, imagery resulted in a significantly stronger alpha activation than perception. The comparison of the averaged responses to the stimuli also showed a difference in alpha power, although this effect is seen in different directions. These results are interpreted to indicate that both the tasks and the stimuli modulate an attentional network, which may relate to the inhibition of non-task relevant cortical areas, as well as engagement with the music. PMID:21945480

  1. Biofeedback Auditory Alpha EEG Training and Its Effect upon Anxiety and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, Marianne B.

    The major purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if electroencephalographic (EEG) auditory biofeedback training combined with Open Focus relaxation therapy would increase alpha-brain-wave production in highly anxious freshman university students who were also deficient in reading skills. The subjects for the study were 15 volunteer…

  2. Differences in EEG Alpha Activity between Gifted and Non-Identified Individuals: Insights into Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert

    1997-01-01

    This study examined differences in electroencephalography (EEG) alpha activity between gifted and nongifted Slovenian student-teachers (N=17 each). Gifted students showed greater left hemisphere activation than nongifted subjects in relaxed states, but lower activation during problem solving. The same pattern was observed in overall hemispheric…

  3. Biofeedback Auditory Alpha EEG Training and Its Effect upon Anxiety and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, Marianne B.

    The major purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if electroencephalographic (EEG) auditory biofeedback training combined with Open Focus relaxation therapy would increase alpha-brain-wave production in highly anxious freshman university students who were also deficient in reading skills. The subjects for the study were 15 volunteer…

  4. EEG

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of memory loss that cannot be explained otherwise Head injuries Infections Tumors EEG is also used to: Evaluate ... blood flow (cerebral infarction) Drug or alcohol abuse Head injury Migraines (in some cases) Seizure disorder (such as ...

  5. The time-course of EEG alpha power changes in creative ideation

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Daniela; Benedek, Mathias; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Fink, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increases in EEG alpha power during creative ideation are among the most consistent findings in the neuroscientific study of creativity, but existing studies did not focus on time-related changes of EEG alpha activity patterns during the process of creative ideation so far. Since several cognitive processes are involved in the generation of creative ideas, different EEG correlates may result as a function of time. In this study we addressed this crucial point. Forty-five participants worked on the “Alternative Uses Task” while the EEG was recorded and changes in task-related power (relative to rest) in the upper-frequency band (10–12 Hz) for three isochronous time intervals of the idea generation period were determined. Alpha power changes during idea generation followed a characteristic time course: we found a general increase of alpha power at the beginning of idea generation that was followed by a decrease and finally by a re-increase of alpha prior to responding that was most pronounced at parietal and temporal sites of the right hemisphere. Additionally, the production of more original ideas was accompanied by increasing hemispheric asymmetry (more alpha in the right than left hemisphere) with increasing duration of the idea generation period. The observed time course of brain activity may reflect the progression of different but well-known stages in the idea generation process: that is the initial retrieval of common and old ideas followed by the actual generation of novel and more creative ideas by overcoming typical responses through processes of mental simulation and imagination. PMID:24860485

  6. EEG alpha and cortical inhibition in affective attention.

    PubMed

    Uusberg, Andero; Uibo, Helen; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Allik, Jüri

    2013-07-01

    Recent progress in cognitive neuroscience suggests that alpha activity may reflect selective cortical inhibition involved in signal amplification, rather than neural idling. Unfortunately, these theoretical advances remain largely ignored in affective neuroscience. To address this limitation the present paper proposes a novel research avenue aimed at using alpha to elucidate cortical inhibitory mechanisms involved in affective processes. The proposal is illustrated by developing inhibitory accounts of affective attention and affective tuning phenomena. The emergent predictions were tested using event-related perturbations from 73 students evaluating affective and nonaffective aspects of five types of emotional images. The results revealed that upper alpha power was increased by affective content in general and aversive stimuli in particular from 350 ms at posterior and from 575 ms at central sites. The evaluation task interacted with affective content only at a liberal statistical significance level in late posterior alpha. These results are generally in line with the proposed inhibitory accounts of affective attention and tuning, although the evidence is preliminary rather than conclusive. As confirmation of functional origins of alpha in affect remains beyond the scope of a single study, this paper aims to inspire further extrapolation of the inhibitory account of alpha within affective neuroscience. PMID:23643563

  7. Spontaneous Slow Fluctuation of EEG Alpha Rhythm Reflects Activity in Deep-Brain Structures: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Kei; Hanakawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Masako; Honda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the occipital alpha rhythm on brain electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with brain activity in the cerebral neocortex and deep brain structures. To further understand the mechanisms of alpha rhythm power fluctuation, we performed simultaneous EEGs and functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings in human subjects during a resting state and explored the dynamic relationship between alpha power fluctuation and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the brain. Based on the frequency characteristics of the alpha power time series (APTS) during 20-minute EEG recordings, we divided the APTS into two components: fast fluctuation (0.04–0.167 Hz) and slow fluctuation (0–0.04 Hz). Analysis of the correlation between the MRI signal and each component revealed that the slow fluctuation component of alpha power was positively correlated with BOLD signal changes in the brain stem and the medial part of the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, while the fast fluctuation component was correlated with the lateral part of the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, but not the brain stem. In summary, these data suggest that different subcortical structures contribute to slow and fast modulations of alpha spectra on brain EEG. PMID:23824708

  8. Spontaneous Slow Fluctuation of EEG Alpha Rhythm Reflects Activity in Deep-Brain Structures: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Omata, Kei; Hanakawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Masako; Honda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the occipital alpha rhythm on brain electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with brain activity in the cerebral neocortex and deep brain structures. To further understand the mechanisms of alpha rhythm power fluctuation, we performed simultaneous EEGs and functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings in human subjects during a resting state and explored the dynamic relationship between alpha power fluctuation and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the brain. Based on the frequency characteristics of the alpha power time series (APTS) during 20-minute EEG recordings, we divided the APTS into two components: fast fluctuation (0.04-0.167 Hz) and slow fluctuation (0-0.04 Hz). Analysis of the correlation between the MRI signal and each component revealed that the slow fluctuation component of alpha power was positively correlated with BOLD signal changes in the brain stem and the medial part of the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, while the fast fluctuation component was correlated with the lateral part of the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, but not the brain stem. In summary, these data suggest that different subcortical structures contribute to slow and fast modulations of alpha spectra on brain EEG. PMID:23824708

  9. Interval analysis of interictal EEG: pathology of the alpha rhythm in focal epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Pyrzowski, Jan; Siemi?ski, Mariusz; Sarnowska, Anna; Jedrzejczak, Joanna; Nyka, Walenty M.

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary use of interictal scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in the context of focal epilepsy workup relies on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges. The high-specificity performance of this marker comes, however, at a cost of only moderate sensitivity. Zero-crossing interval analysis is an alternative to Fourier analysis for the assessment of the rhythmic component of EEG signals. We applied this method to standard EEG recordings of 78 patients divided into 4 subgroups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and nonepileptic patients with headache. Interval-analysis based markers were capable of effectively discriminating patients with epilepsy from those in control subgroups (AUC~0.8) with diagnostic sensitivity potentially exceeding that of visual analysis. The identified putative epilepsy-specific markers were sensitive to the properties of the alpha rhythm and displayed weak or non-significant dependences on the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) taken by the patients. Significant AED-related effects were concentrated in the theta interval range and an associated marker allowed for identification of patients on AED polytherapy (AUC~0.9). Interval analysis may thus, in perspective, increase the diagnostic yield of interictal scalp EEG. Our findings point to the possible existence of alpha rhythm abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. PMID:26553287

  10. Interval analysis of interictal EEG: pathology of the alpha rhythm in focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pyrzowski, Jan; Siemi?ski, Mariusz; Sarnowska, Anna; Jedrzejczak, Joanna; Nyka, Walenty M

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary use of interictal scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in the context of focal epilepsy workup relies on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges. The high-specificity performance of this marker comes, however, at a cost of only moderate sensitivity. Zero-crossing interval analysis is an alternative to Fourier analysis for the assessment of the rhythmic component of EEG signals. We applied this method to standard EEG recordings of 78 patients divided into 4 subgroups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and nonepileptic patients with headache. Interval-analysis based markers were capable of effectively discriminating patients with epilepsy from those in control subgroups (AUC~0.8) with diagnostic sensitivity potentially exceeding that of visual analysis. The identified putative epilepsy-specific markers were sensitive to the properties of the alpha rhythm and displayed weak or non-significant dependences on the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) taken by the patients. Significant AED-related effects were concentrated in the theta interval range and an associated marker allowed for identification of patients on AED polytherapy (AUC~0.9). Interval analysis may thus, in perspective, increase the diagnostic yield of interictal scalp EEG. Our findings point to the possible existence of alpha rhythm abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. PMID:26553287

  11. Interval analysis of interictal EEG: pathology of the alpha rhythm in focal epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrzowski, Jan; Siemiński, Mariusz; Sarnowska, Anna; Jedrzejczak, Joanna; Nyka, Walenty M.

    2015-11-01

    The contemporary use of interictal scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in the context of focal epilepsy workup relies on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges. The high-specificity performance of this marker comes, however, at a cost of only moderate sensitivity. Zero-crossing interval analysis is an alternative to Fourier analysis for the assessment of the rhythmic component of EEG signals. We applied this method to standard EEG recordings of 78 patients divided into 4 subgroups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and nonepileptic patients with headache. Interval-analysis based markers were capable of effectively discriminating patients with epilepsy from those in control subgroups (AUC~0.8) with diagnostic sensitivity potentially exceeding that of visual analysis. The identified putative epilepsy-specific markers were sensitive to the properties of the alpha rhythm and displayed weak or non-significant dependences on the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) taken by the patients. Significant AED-related effects were concentrated in the theta interval range and an associated marker allowed for identification of patients on AED polytherapy (AUC~0.9). Interval analysis may thus, in perspective, increase the diagnostic yield of interictal scalp EEG. Our findings point to the possible existence of alpha rhythm abnormalities in patients with epilepsy.

  12. Prefrontal EEG alpha asymmetry changes while observing disaster happening to other people: cardiac correlates and prediction of emotional impact.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Schulter, Günter; Fink, Andreas; Reiser, Eva M; Lackner, Helmut K

    2014-12-01

    Changes of EEG alpha asymmetry in terms of increased right versus left sided activity in prefrontal cortex are considered to index activation of the withdrawal/avoidance motivational system. The present study aimed to add evidence of the validity of individual differences in the EEG alpha asymmetry response and their relevance regarding the impact of emotional events. The magnitude of the EEG alpha asymmetry response while watching a film consisting of scenes of real injury and death correlated with components of transient cardiac responses to sudden horrifying events happening to persons in the film which index withdrawal/avoidance motivation and heightened attention and perceptual intake. Additionally, it predicted greater mood deterioration following the film and film-related intrusive memories and avoidance over the following week. The study provides further evidence for prefrontal EEG alpha asymmetry changes in response to relevant stimuli reflecting an individual's sensitivity to negative social-emotional cues encountered in everyday life. PMID:25224180

  13. Prestimulus EEG alpha oscillations modulate task-related fMRI BOLD responses to auditory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Walz, Jennifer M; Goldman, Robin I; Carapezza, Michael; Muraskin, Jordan; Brown, Truman R; Sajda, Paul

    2015-06-01

    EEG alpha-band activity is generally thought to represent an inhibitory state related to decreased attention and play a role in suppression of task-irrelevant stimulus processing, but a competing hypothesis suggests an active role in processing task-relevant information - one in which phase dynamics are involved. Here we used simultaneous EEG-fMRI and a whole-brain analysis to investigate the effects of prestimulus alpha activity on the event-related BOLD response during an auditory oddball task. We separately investigated the effects of the posterior alpha rhythm's power and phase on activity related to task-relevant stimulus processing and also investigated higher-level decision-related processing. We found stronger decision-related BOLD activity in areas late in the processing stream when subjects were in the high alpha power state prior to stimulus onset, but did not detect any effect in primary sensory regions. Our phase analysis revealed correlates in the bilateral thalamus, providing support for a thalamo-cortical loop in attentional modulations and suggesting that the cortical alpha rhythm acts as a cyclic modulator of task-related responses very early in the processing stream. Our results help to reconcile the competing inhibition and active-processing hypotheses for ongoing alpha oscillations and begin to tease apart the distinct roles and mechanisms underlying their power and phase. PMID:25797833

  14. EEG Alpha and Beta Activity in Normal and Deaf Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Manjula; And Others

    Electroencephalogram and task performance data were collected from three groups of young adult males: profoundly deaf Ss who signed from an early age, profoundly deaf Ss who only used oral (speech and speedreading) methods of communication, and normal hearing Ss. Alpha and Beta brain wave patterns over the Wernicke's area were compared across…

  15. Attention and the EEG Alpha Rhythm in Learning Disabled Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Peter W.

    1978-01-01

    Parieto-occipital electroencephalograms were recorded during resting baseline intervals, during an initial instruction period, and during active performance on mental arithmetic and immediate recall tasks to determine if 10 learning disabled boys (10-12 years old) would show less alpha attenuation than 11 normal controls. (Author/CL)

  16. EEG alpha blocking correlated with perception of inner light during zen meditation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Pei-Chen; Huang, Ming-Liang; Chang, Kang-Ming

    2003-01-01

    According to the experimental results and practitioners' subjective experience, we report some hypotheses that may account for meditative phenomena during the practice of Zen-Buddhism. Orthodox Zen-Buddhist practitioners, aiming to prove the most original true-self, discover and uncover the inner energy or light on the way towards their goal. Perception of the inner light can be comprehended as resonance. Uncovering the inner energy optimizes physiological and mental health. In the meditation experiment, a significant correlation was observed between perception of the inner light and electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha blockage. We further examined this phenomenon by recording the EEG from subjects during a blessing that the subjects did not know being given. During the blessing period, significant alpha blocking was observed in experimental subjects who had been practicing meditation for years in preparation for being in resonance with the inner light. This report provides a new insight into the debate that meditation benefits our health. PMID:14587885

  17. The Effect of Alpha Rhythm Sleep on EEG Activity and Individuals’ Attention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Chill; Lee, Myoung Hee; Jang, Chel; Kwon, Jung Won; Park, Joo Wan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined whether the alpha rhythm sleep alters the EEG activity and response time in the attention and concentration tasks. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 30 healthy university students, who were randomly and equally divided into two groups, the experimental and control groups. They were treated using the Happy-sleep device or a sham device, respectively. All participants had a one-week training period. Before and after training sessions, a behavioral task test was performed and EEG alpha waves were measured to confirm the effectiveness of training on cognitive function. [Results] In terms of the behavioral task test, reaction time (RT) variations in the experimental group were significantly larger than in the control group for the attention item. Changes in the EEG alpha power in the experimental group were also significantly larger than those of the control group. [Conclusions] These findings suggest that sleep induced using the Happy-sleep device modestly enhances the ability to pay attention and focus during academic learning. PMID:24409009

  18. A novel EEG for alpha brain state training, neurobiofeedback and behavior change.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Bruce; Arthur, David

    2013-08-01

    Mindfulness meditation, with the resulting alpha brain state, is gaining a strong following as an adjunct to health, so too is applying self-affirmation to stimulate behavior change through subconscious re-programming. Until recently the EEG technology needed to demonstrate this has been cumbersome and required specialist training. This paper reports a pilot study using a remote EEG headband, which through a sophisticated algorithm, provides a real-time EEG readout unencumbered by conventional artifacts. In a convenience sample of 13, the difference in brain waves was examined while the subjects were occupied in an 'attention' and an 'alpha mind state' exercise. There was a significant difference in the mean scores for theta, delta, beta and gamma brain waves. Alpha brain waves remained static suggesting an ability of the headset to discriminate a mindful state and to provide real-time, easy to interpret feedback for the facilitator and subject. The findings provide encouragement for research applications in health care activities providing neurobiofeedback to subjects involved in mindfulness behavior change activities. PMID:23890456

  19. The validity of individual frontal alpha asymmetry EEG neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Quaedflieg, C W E M; Smulders, F T Y; Meyer, T; Peeters, F; Merckelbach, H; Smeets, T

    2016-01-01

    Frontal asymmetry in alpha oscillations is assumed to be associated with psychopathology and individual differences in emotional responding. Brain-activity-based feedback is a promising tool for the modulation of cortical activity. Here, we validated a neurofeedback protocol designed to change relative frontal asymmetry based on individual alpha peak frequencies, including real-time average referencing and eye-correction. Participants (N?=?60) were randomly assigned to a right, left or placebo neurofeedback group. Results show a difference in trainability between groups, with a linear change in frontal alpha asymmetry over time for the right neurofeedback group during rest. Moreover, the asymmetry changes in the right group were frequency and location specific, even though trainability did not persist at 1 week and 1 month follow-ups. On the behavioral level, subjective stress on the second test day was reduced in the left and placebo neurofeedback groups, but not in the right neurofeedback group. We found individual differences in trainability that were dependent on training group, with participants in the right neurofeedback group being more likely to change their frontal asymmetry in the desired direction. Individual differences in trainability were also reflected in the ability to change frontal asymmetry during the feedback. PMID:26163671

  20. Dynamics of alpha control: Preparatory suppression of posterior alpha oscillations by frontal modulators revealed with combined EEG and event-related optical signal (EROS)

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Kyle E.; Beck, Diane M.; Ro, Tony; Maclin, Edward L.; Low, Kathy A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of brain processes facilitating conscious experience of external stimuli. Previously we proposed that alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillations, which fluctuate with both sustained and directed attention, represent a pulsed inhibition of ongoing sensory brain activity. Here we tested the prediction that inhibitory alpha oscillations in visual cortex are modulated by top-down signals from frontoparietal attention networks. We measured modulations in phase-coherent alpha oscillations from superficial frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices using the event-related optical signal (EROS), a measure of neuronal activity affording high spatiotemporal resolution, along with concurrently-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG), while subjects performed a visual target-detection task. The pre-target alpha oscillations measured with EEG and EROS from posterior areas were larger for subsequently undetected targets, supporting alpha's inhibitory role. Using EROS, we localized brain correlates of these awareness-related alpha oscillations measured at the scalp to the cuneus and precuneus. Crucially, EROS alpha suppression correlated with posterior EEG alpha power across subjects. Sorting the EROS data based on EEG alpha power quartiles to investigate alpha modulators revealed that suppression of posterior alpha was preceded by increased activity in regions of the dorsal attention network, and decreased activity in regions of the cingulo-opercular network. Cross-correlations revealed the temporal dynamics of activity within these preparatory networks prior to posterior alpha modulation. The novel combination of EEG and EROS afforded localization of the sources and correlates of alpha oscillations and their temporal relationships, supporting our proposal that top-down control from attention networks modulates both posterior alpha and awareness of visual stimuli. PMID:24702458

  1. Distraction affects frontal alpha rhythms related to expectancy of pain: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Del Percio, Claudio; Le Pera, Domenica; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Chen, Andrew C N; De Armas, Liala; Miliucci, Roberto; Restuccia, Domenico; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2006-07-01

    Previous electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence has shown event-related desynchronization (ERD) of alpha rhythms before predictable painful stimuli, as a possible neural concomitant of attentional preparatory processes (Babiloni, C., Brancucci, A., Babiloni, F., Capotosto, P., Carducci, F., Cincotti, F., Arendt-Nielsen, L., Chen, A.C., Rossini, P.M., 2003. Anticipatory cortical responses during the expectancy of a predictable painful stimulation. A high-resolution electroencephalography study. Eur. J. Neurosci. 18 (6) 1692-700). This study tested the hypothesis that alpha ERD before predictable painful stimuli is reduced as an effect of distraction. A visual warning stimulus preceded a laser painful stimulation, which was strictly followed by visual imperative stimuli. In the Pain (control) condition, no task was required after the imperative stimuli. In the Pain + Movement condition, subjects had to perform a movement of the right index finger. In the Pain + Cognition condition, they had to mentally perform an arithmetical task. EEG data were recorded in 10 subjects from 30 electrodes. Artifact-free recordings were spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian transformation. Alpha ERD was computed at three alpha sub-bands according to subjects' individual alpha frequency peak (i.e., about 6-8 Hz, 8-10 Hz, 10-12 Hz). Compared to the control condition, the subjects reported a significantly lower stimulus intensity perception and unpleasantness in the Pain + Movement and Pain + Cognition conditions. In addition, there was a cancellation of the alpha 3 ERD (i.e., about 10-12 Hz) in Pain + Cognition condition and even a generation of a statistically significant alpha 3 ERS in Pain + Movement condition. These effects were maximum over fronto-central midline. These results suggest that distraction during the expectancy of pain is related to a reduced neural desynchronization of fronto-central midline alpha rhythms (i.e., reduced cortical activation) towards an overt hyper-synchronization (cortical idling). PMID:16529953

  2. Brief Report: Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence During Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M; Davidson, Bridget C; Newell, Lisa C; Mundy, Peter C; Henderson, Heather A

    2016-04-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention perception and an eyes-open resting condition. Across conditions, adolescents with ASD showed reduced right hemisphere temporal-central alpha coherence compared to typically developing adolescents. Greater right temporal-central alpha coherence during joint attention was positively associated with social cognitive performance in typical development but not in ASD. These results suggest that, in addition to a resting state, EEG coherence during joint attention perception is reduced in ASD. PMID:26659813

  3. Relation of EEG alpha background to cognitive fuction, brain atrophy, and cerebral metabolism in Down's syndrome. Age-specific changes

    SciTech Connect

    Devinsky, O.; Sato, S.; Conwit, R.A.; Schapiro, M.B. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied 19 young adults (19 to 37 years old) and 9 older patients (42 to 66 years old) with Down's syndrome (DS) and a control group of 13 healthy adults (22 to 38 years old) to investigate the relation of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha background to cognitive function and cerebral metabolism. Four of the older patients with DS had a history of mental deterioration, disorientation, and memory loss and were demented. Patients and control subjects had EEGs, psychometric testing, quantitative computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18. A blinded reader classified the EEGs into two groups--those with normal alpha background or those with abnormal background. All the control subjects, the 13 young adult patients with DS, and the 5 older patients with DS had normal EEG backgrounds. In comparison with the age-matched patients with DS with normal alpha background, older patients with DS with decreased alpha background had dementia, fewer visuospatial skills, decreased attention span, larger third ventricles, and a global decrease in cerebral glucose utilization with parietal hypometabolism. In the young patients with DS, the EEG background did not correlate with psychometric or positron emission tomographic findings, but the third ventricles were significantly larger in those with abnormal EEG background. The young patients with DS, with or without normal EEG background, had positron emission tomographic findings similar to those of the control subjects. The mechanism underlying the abnormal EEG background may be the neuropathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease in older patients with DS and may be cerebral immaturity in younger patients with DS.

  4. Regarding the database for the Peniston alpha-theta EEG biofeedback protocol.

    PubMed

    Graap, K; Freides, D

    1998-12-01

    Five papers by Peniston and colleagues, which constitute the basic literature for alpha-theta EEG biofeedback treatment for alcoholism and posttraumatic stress disorder, are reviewed. As a result, we raise three questions: (a) Are the samples studied independent? (b) What was the clinical status of the participants prior to treatment? (c) What treatment did the participants actually receive? In seeking answers to these questions we aim to strengthen the database for neurofeedback with specific procedural information so that claims of efficacy can be tested and accepted or rejected on an objective basis. PMID:10457816

  5. Detecting Driver Mental Fatigue Based on EEG Alpha Power Changes during Simulated Driving

    PubMed Central

    GHARAGOZLOU, Faramarz; NASL SARAJI, Gebraeil; MAZLOUMI, Adel; NAHVI, Ali; MOTIE NASRABADI, Ali; RAHIMI FOROUSHANI, Abbas; ARAB KHERADMAND, Ali; ASHOURI, Mohammadreza; SAMAVATI, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Driver fatigue is one of the major implications in transportation safety and accounted for up to 40% of road accidents. This study aimed to analyze the EEG alpha power changes in partially sleep-deprived drivers while performing a simulated driving task. Methods: Twelve healthy male car drivers participated in an overnight study. Continuous EEG and EOG records were taken during driving on a virtual reality simulator on a monotonous road. Simultaneously, video recordings from the driver face and behavior were performed in lateral and front views and rated by two trained observers. Moreover, the subjective self-assessment of fatigue was implemented in every 10-min interval during the driving using Fatigue Visual Analog Scale (F-VAS). Power spectrum density and fast Fourier transform (FFT) were used to determine the absolute and relative alpha powers in the initial and final 10 minutes of driving. Results: The findings showed a significant increase in the absolute alpha power (P = 0.006) as well as F-VAS scores during the final section of driving (P = 0.001). Meanwhile, video ratings were consistent with subjective self-assessment of fatigue. Conclusion: The increase in alpha power in the final section of driving indicates the decrease in the level of alertness and attention and the onset of fatigue, which was consistent with F-VAS and video ratings. The study suggested that variations in alpha power could be a good indicator for driver mental fatigue, but for using as a countermeasure device needed further investigations. PMID:26811821

  6. Frontal EEG alpha activity and obsessive-compulsive behaviors in non-clinical young adults: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael; Woody, Erik Z.; Schmidt, Louis A.; Ameringen, Michael Van; Soreni, Noam; Szechtman, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the resting electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha patterns of non-clinical participants who score high on measures of negative affect, such as depression and shyness, are different from those who score low. However, we know relatively little about patterns of resting EEG alpha patterns in a non-clinical sample of individuals with high levels of obsessive-compulsive behaviors indicative of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we measured resting EEG alpha activity in frontal and parietal regions of non-clinical participants who scored high and low on the Padua-R, a measure of the severity of OCD-related behaviors. We found that participants who scored high on the Padua-R exhibited decreased overall activity in frontal regions relative to individuals who scored low on the measure. We speculate that frontal hypoactivity may be a possible marker and/or index of risk for OCD. PMID:26483733

  7. State-modulation of cortico-cortical connections underlying normal EEG alpha variants.

    PubMed

    Cantero, J L; Atienza, M; Salas, R M

    Normal electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha variants appear during relaxed wakefulness with closed eyes, drowsiness period at sleep onset, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in bursts without arousal signals. Previous results revealed that fronto-occipital and fronto-frontal alpha coherences became weaker from wakefulness to drowsiness, and finally to REM sleep. The present work was aimed at determining whether a generalized or a unidirectional deactivation of the long fronto-occipital fasciculi, previously proposed to be involved in the alpha rhythm generation, could explain the above-mentioned results. Polynomial regression analyses, applied to the change of alpha coherence with distance along the antero-posterior axis, suggested that the anterior and posterior local circuits show a similar level of activation in all brain states. Bivariate partial correlation analyses between local alpha coherences revealed that such local circuits maintain a reciprocal dependency during wakefulness, but unidirectional during drowsiness (anterior-to-posterior, A-P) and REM sleep (posterior-to-anterior, P-A). From these findings, both anterior and posterior cortical structures are suggested as being involved in the generation of the three alpha variants. If the implication of a double cortical generation source (anterior and posterior) of alpha variants is assumed, these two generators seem to maintain a mutual inter-dependency during wakefulness, whereas during the transition to human sleep, the anterior areas work quite independently of the posterior regions. Finally, the occipital structures may be the driving force for the REM-alpha bursts generation, since involvement of frontal regions demonstrated a high dependence on the posterior neural circuits in the genesis of this sleep event. PMID:11134692

  8. EEG Alpha and Gamma Modulators Mediate Motion Sickness-Related Spectral Responses.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shang-Wen; Chuang, Chun-Hsiang; Yu, Yi-Hsin; King, Jung-Tai; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2016-03-01

    Motion sickness (MS) is a common experience of travelers. To provide insights into brain dynamics associated with MS, this study recruited 19 subjects to participate in an electroencephalogram (EEG) experiment in a virtual-reality driving environment. When riding on consecutive winding roads, subjects experienced postural instability and sensory conflict between visual and vestibular stimuli. Meanwhile, subjects rated their level of MS on a six-point scale. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to separate the filtered EEG signals into maximally temporally independent components (ICs). Then, reduced logarithmic spectra of ICs of interest, using principal component analysis, were decomposed by ICA again to find spectrally fixed and temporally independent modulators (IMs). Results demonstrated that a higher degree of MS accompanied increased activation of alpha ([Formula: see text]) and gamma ([Formula: see text]) IMs across remote-independent brain processes, covering motor, parietal and occipital areas. This co-modulatory spectral change in alpha and gamma bands revealed the neurophysiological demand to regulate conflicts among multi-modal sensory systems during MS. PMID:26790485

  9. Topographic distribution of EEG alpha attractor correlation dimension values in wake and drowsy states in humans.

    PubMed

    Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Bojić, Tijana

    2015-03-01

    Organization of resting state cortical networks is of fundamental importance for the phenomenon of awareness, which is altered in the first part of hypnagogic period (Hori stages 1-4). Our aim was to investigate the change in brain topography pattern of EEG alpha attractor correlation dimension (CD) in the period of transition from Hori stage 1 to 4. EEG of ten healthy adult individuals was recorded in the wake and drowsy states, using a 14 channel average reference montage, from which 91 bipolar channels were derived and filtered in the wider alpha (6-14 Hz) range. Sixty 1s long epochs of each state and individual were subjected to CD calculation according to the Grassberger-Procaccia method. For such a collection of signals, two embedding dimensions, d={5, 10}, and 22 time delays τ=2-23 samples were explored. Optimal values were d=10 and τ=18, where both saturation and second zero crossing of the autocorrelation function occurred. Bipolar channel CD underwent a significant decrease during the transition and showed a positive linear correlation with electrode distance, stronger in the wake individuals. Topographic distribution of bipolar channels with above median CD changed from longitudinal anterior-posterior pattern (awake) to a more diagonal pattern, with localization in posterior regions (drowsiness). Our data are in line with the literature reporting functional segregation of neuronal assemblies in anterior and posterior regions during this transition. Our results should contribute to understanding of complex reorganization of the cortical part of alpha generators during the wake/drowsy transition. PMID:25462218

  10. Effects of Physical Exercise on Individual Resting State EEG Alpha Peak Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Boris; Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Przyklenk, Axel; Strüder, Heiko Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that both acute and chronic physical exercises can induce positive effects on brain function and this is associated with improvements in cognitive performance. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive processing are not well understood. This study examined the effects of an acute bout of physical exercise as well as four weeks of exercise training on the individual resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha peak frequency (iAPF), a neurophysiological marker of the individual's state of arousal and attention, in healthy young adults. The subjects completed a steady state exercise (SSE) protocol or an exhaustive exercise (EE) protocol, respectively, on two separate days. EEG activity was recorded for 2 min before exercise, immediately after exercise, and after 10 min of rest. All assessments were repeated following four weeks of exercise training to investigate whether an improvement in physical fitness modulates the resting state iAPF and/or the iAPF response to an acute bout of SSE and EE. The iAPF was significantly increased following EE (P = 0.012) but not following SSE. It is concluded that the iAPF is increased following intense exercise, indicating a higher level of arousal and preparedness for external input. PMID:25759762

  11. Effects of physical exercise on individual resting state EEG alpha peak frequency.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Boris; Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Hildebrand, Carolin; Przyklenk, Axel; Hollmann, Wildor; Strüder, Heiko Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that both acute and chronic physical exercises can induce positive effects on brain function and this is associated with improvements in cognitive performance. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive processing are not well understood. This study examined the effects of an acute bout of physical exercise as well as four weeks of exercise training on the individual resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha peak frequency (iAPF), a neurophysiological marker of the individual's state of arousal and attention, in healthy young adults. The subjects completed a steady state exercise (SSE) protocol or an exhaustive exercise (EE) protocol, respectively, on two separate days. EEG activity was recorded for 2?min before exercise, immediately after exercise, and after 10?min of rest. All assessments were repeated following four weeks of exercise training to investigate whether an improvement in physical fitness modulates the resting state iAPF and/or the iAPF response to an acute bout of SSE and EE. The iAPF was significantly increased following EE (P = 0.012) but not following SSE. It is concluded that the iAPF is increased following intense exercise, indicating a higher level of arousal and preparedness for external input. PMID:25759762

  12. Modulation of Alpha Oscillations in the Human EEG with Facial Preference

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Yang Seok; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2015-01-01

    Facial preference that results from the processing of facial information plays an important role in social interactions as well as the selection of a mate, friend, candidate, or favorite actor. However, it still remains elusive which brain regions are implicated in the neural mechanisms underlying facial preference, and how neural activities in these regions are modulated during the formation of facial preference. In the present study, we investigated the modulation of electroencephalography (EEG) oscillatory power with facial preference. For the reliable assessments of facial preference, we designed a series of passive viewing and active choice tasks. In the former task, twenty-four face stimuli were passively viewed by participants for multiple times in random order. In the latter task, the same stimuli were then evaluated by participants for their facial preference judgments. In both tasks, significant differences between the preferred and non-preferred faces groups were found in alpha band power (8–13 Hz) but not in other frequency bands. The preferred faces generated more decreases in alpha power. During the passive viewing task, significant differences in alpha power between the preferred and non-preferred face groups were observed at the left frontal regions in the early (0.15–0.4 s) period during the 1-s presentation. By contrast, during the active choice task when participants consecutively watched the first and second face for 1 s and then selected the preferred one, an alpha power difference was found for the late (0.65–0.8 s) period over the whole brain during the first face presentation and over the posterior regions during the second face presentation. These results demonstrate that the modulation of alpha activity by facial preference is a top-down process, which requires additional cognitive resources to facilitate information processing of the preferred faces that capture more visual attention than the non-preferred faces. PMID:26394328

  13. Childhood EEG frontal alpha power as a predictor of adolescent antisocial behavior: A twin heritability study

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Sharon; Ashrafulla, Syed; Tuvblad, Catherine; Joshi, Anand; Raine, Adrian; Leahy, Richard; Baker, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    High EEG frontal alpha power (FAP) is thought to represent a state of low arousal in the brain, which has been related in past research to antisocial behavior (ASB). We investigated a longitudinal sample of 900 twins in two assessments in late childhood and mid-adolescence to verify whether relationships exist between FAP and both aggressive and nonaggressive ASB. ASB was measured by the Child Behavioral Checklist, and FAP was calculated using connectivity analysis methods that used principal components analysis to derive power of the most dominant frontal activation. Significant positive predictive relationships emerged in males between childhood FAP and adolescent aggressive ASB using multilevel mixed modeling. No concurrent relationships were found. Using bivariate biometric twin modeling analysis, the relationship between childhood FAP and adolescent aggressive ASB in males was found to be entirely due to genetic factors, which were correlated r = 0.22. PMID:25456277

  14. Childhood EEG frontal alpha power as a predictor of adolescent antisocial behavior: a twin heritability study.

    PubMed

    Niv, Sharon; Ashrafulla, Syed; Tuvblad, Catherine; Joshi, Anand; Raine, Adrian; Leahy, Richard; Baker, Laura A

    2015-02-01

    High EEG frontal alpha power (FAP) is thought to represent a state of low arousal in the brain, which has been related in past research to antisocial behavior (ASB). We investigated a longitudinal sample of 900 twins in two assessments in late childhood and mid-adolescence to verify whether relationships exist between FAP and both aggressive and nonaggressive ASB. ASB was measured by the Child Behavioral Checklist, and FAP was calculated using connectivity analysis methods that used principal components analysis to derive power of the most dominant frontal activation. Significant positive predictive relationships emerged in males between childhood FAP and adolescent aggressive ASB using multilevel mixed modeling. No concurrent relationships were found. Using bivariate biometric twin modeling analysis, the relationship between childhood FAP and adolescent aggressive ASB in males was found to be entirely due to genetic factors, which were correlated r=0.22. PMID:25456277

  15. EEG upper/low alpha frequency power ratio relates to temporo-parietal brain atrophy and memory performances in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Davide V.; Paternicò, Donata; Binetti, Giuliano; Zanetti, Orazio; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Temporo-parietal cortex thinning is associated to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer disease (AD). The increase of EEG upper/low alpha power ratio has been associated with AD-converter MCI subjects. We investigated the association of alpha3/alpha2 ratio with patterns of cortical thickness in MCI. Materials and Methods: Seventy-four adult subjects with MCI underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and high resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging. Alpha3/alpha2 power ratio as well as cortical thickness was computed for each subject. Three MCI groups were detected according to increasing tertile values of upper/low alpha power ratio. Difference of cortical thickness among the groups was estimated. Pearson’s r was used to assess the topography of the correlation between cortical thinning and memory impairment. Results: High upper/low alpha power ratio group had total cortical gray matter volume reduction of 471 mm2 than low upper/low alpha power ratio group (p < 0.001). Upper/low alpha group showed a similar but less marked pattern (160 mm2) of cortical thinning when compared to middle upper/low alpha power ratio group (p < 0.001). Moreover, high upper/low alpha group had wider cortical thinning than other groups, mapped to the Supramarginal and Precuneus bilaterally. Finally, in high upper/low alpha group temporo-parietal cortical thickness was correlated to memory performance. No significant cortical thickness differences was found between middle and low alpha3/alpha2 power ratio groups. Conclusion: High EEG upper/low alpha power ratio was associated with temporo-parietal cortical thinning and memory impairment in MCI subjects. The combination of EEG upper/low alpha ratio and cortical thickness measure could be useful for identifying individuals at risk for progression to AD dementia and may be of value in clinical context. PMID:24187540

  16. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  17. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  18. Non-linear dynamics of alpha and theta rhythm: correlation dimensions and Lyapunov exponents from healthy subject's spontaneous EEG.

    PubMed

    Röschke, J; Fell, J; Mann, K

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the present paper was to analyze some non-linear dynamic properties of the resting EEG from healthy subjects under eyes closed conditions. For this purpose we digitally filtered the spontaneous EEG in the theta (3-8 Hz) and alpha frequency range (8-13 Hz) and considered these independent rhythms as signals from a deterministic system. Under certain conditions non-linear dynamic systems are able to generate deterministic chaos, which means that similar causes do not produce similar effects. This phenomenon is called sensitive dependence on initial conditions. From different lead positions (F3, F4, Cz, P3, P4, O1 and O2) we calculated the so-called correlation dimension D2, which is assumed to be an estimation of the system's complexity, and the Lyapunov exponent L, which appears to be a measure of the sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Our investigations revealed that the dimensionality of the theta- and alpha-rhythm varies within subjects across the experimental session in wide ranges. The degrees of freedom of the alpha and theta rhythms across the scalp are in the same order, indicating dynamic processes which can not be differentiated by applying the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm. The Lyapunov-exponents, indicating 'how chaotic a deterministic process is', are in general smaller for the theta than for the alpha activity. Across the scalp there is no evidence for different dynamics of the theta rhythm. The dynamics of the alpha rhythm, on the contrary, appears to be different at various lead positions. It appears justified to state that the dynamics of the frontal alpha activity is functionally different from the alpha activity recorded at other topographic locations. PMID:9203007

  19. Audio-Visual and Autogenic Relaxation Alter Amplitude of Alpha EEG Band, Causing Improvements in Mental Work Performance in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Mikicin, Miros?aw; Kowalczyk, Marek

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular audio-visual relaxation combined with Schultz's autogenic training on: (1) the results of behavioral tests that evaluate work performance during burdensome cognitive tasks (Kraepelin test), (2) changes in classical EEG alpha frequency band, neocortex (frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal), hemisphere (left, right) versus condition (only relaxation 7-12 Hz). Both experimental (EG) and age-and skill-matched control group (CG) consisted of eighteen athletes (ten males and eight females). After 7-month training EG demonstrated changes in the amplitude of mean electrical activity of the EEG alpha bend at rest and an improvement was significantly changing and an improvement in almost all components of Kraepelin test. The same examined variables in CG were unchanged following the period without the intervention. Summing up, combining audio-visual relaxation with autogenic training significantly improves athlete's ability to perform a prolonged mental effort. These changes are accompanied by greater amplitude of waves in alpha band in the state of relax. The results suggest usefulness of relaxation techniques during performance of mentally difficult sports tasks (sports based on speed and stamina, sports games, combat sports) and during relax of athletes. PMID:26016588

  20. Correlation between integrin alpha 5 expression and the malignant phenotype of transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, T.; Kimura, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Sato, S.; Tomita, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the expression of alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5 and beta 1 integrin on 36 transitional cell cancers (TCCs) in the bladder by immunohistochemistry. Only alpha 2, alpha 3 and beta 1 were detected on normal transitional cell epithelium, but four TCCs (12.5%) revealed positive staining for alpha 1, seven (19.4%) for alpha 4 and seven (20%) for alpha 5. These altered expressions of integrin alpha chain were more frequent in histologically higher stage or grade of TCC, and a correlation was found between increased alpha 5 expression and histological stage. alpha 5 was positive in 6 (35.3%) of 17 invasive TCCs whereas only 1 (5.9%) of 17 superficial TCCs. Flow cytometric analysis on bladder cancer cell lines showed that T24 and HT1376, which are undifferentiated TCC cell lines, highly expressed alpha 5 and beta 1. Also, SCaBER, which is derived from urinary bladder squamous cell cancer and which is recognised as the most malignant phenotype after metaplasia of transitional epithelium, had alpha 5 and beta 1. However, RT4, which is derived from transitional cell papilloma, showed no expression of alpha 5. Furthermore, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed the presence of mRNA of alpha 5 on T24, SCaBER and HT1376, but not on RT4. Taken together, it seems that the presence of alpha 5 integrin might be a more malignant phenotype in transitional cell carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8562338

  1. Co-inheritance of alpha- and beta-thalassaemia in mice ameliorates thalassaemic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Voon, Hsiao Phin Joanna; Wardan, Hady; Vadolas, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is an inherited disease caused by defective synthesis of the beta-globin chain of haemoglobin, leading to an imbalance in globin chains. Excess alpha-globin chains precipitate in erythroid progenitor cells resulting in cell death, ineffective erythropoiesis and severe anaemia. Decreased alpha-globin synthesis leads to milder symptoms, exemplified by individuals who co-inherit alpha-thalassaemia and beta-thalassaemia. In this study, we set out to investigate whether co-inheritance of alpha- and beta-thalassaemia in mice leads to reduced anaemia. Heterozygous murine beta-globin knockout (KO) mice (beta+/-) which display severe anaemia were mated with heterozygous alpha-globin KO mice (alpha++/--). The resulting progeny were genotyped and classed as wild-type WT (alpha++/++;beta+/+), heterozygous alpha-KO (alpha++/--;beta+/+), heterozygous beta-KO (alpha++/++;beta+/-) or double heterozygous (DH) alpha-KO/beta-KO (alpha++/--;beta+/-). Mice were bled and full blood examinations (FBE) performed. FBE results for heterozygous beta-KO mice (beta+/-) showed marked reductions in haemoglobin and haematocrit levels and significant increases in red cell distribution widths and reticulocyte counts compared to WT mice. In contrast, FBE results for DH alpha-KO/beta-KO mice showed near normal red blood cell indices. These results indicate that reduction of alpha-globin expression leads to correction of the globin chain imbalance in beta-thalassaemic mice and therefore an improved phenotype. The analysis of DH alpha-KO/beta-KO mice leads to the following conclusions: (1) co-inheritance of alpha- and beta-thalassaemia in mice improves the thalassaemic phenotype, identical to the situation in humans; (2) the heterozygous murine beta-globin KO mouse model is a suitable in vivo model to test for therapeutic knockdown of alpha-globin. PMID:17493845

  2. Sensitivity of Alpha and Beta Oscillations to Sensorimotor Characteristics of Action: An EEG Study of Action Production and Gesture Observation

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Lorna C.; Marshall, Peter J.; Shipley, Thomas F.; Beilock, Sian L.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The sensorimotor experiences we gain when performing an action have been found to influence how our own motor systems are activated when we observe others performing that same action. Here we asked whether this phenomenon applies to the observation of gesture. Would the sensorimotor experiences we gain when performing an action on an object influence activation in our own motor systems when we observe others performing a gesture for that object? Participants were given sensorimotor experience with objects that varied in weight, and then observed video clips of an actor producing gestures for those objects. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded while participants first observed either an iconic gesture (pantomiming lifting an object) or a deictic gesture (pointing to an object) for an object, and then grasped and lifted the object indicated by the gesture. We analyzed EEG during gesture observation to determine whether oscillatory activity was affected by the observer’s sensorimotor experiences with the object represented in the gesture. Seeing a gesture for an object previously experienced as light was associated with a suppression of power in alpha and beta frequency bands, particularly at posterior electrodes. A similar pattern was found when participants lifted the light object, but over more diffuse electrodes. Moreover, alpha and beta bands at right parieto-occipital electrodes were sensitive to the type of gesture observed (iconic vs. deictic). These results demonstrate that sensorimotor experience with an object affects how a gesture for that object is processed, as measured by the gesture-observer’s EEG, and suggest that different types of gestures recruit the observer’s own motor system in different ways. PMID:22910276

  3. Developmental Differences in the Relationship between Reading Comprehension and Hemispheric Alpha Patterns: An EEG Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Theresa A.; Kraft, R. Harter

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-five boys, aged 6 to 8 and 10 to 12 years, were administered EEGs while they silently read short passages. Subjects were then tested on the passages. Age differences in the relationship between hemisphere activation during silent reading and reading comprehension were discovered. (TJH)

  4. Developmental aspects of language lateralization in delta, theta, alpha and beta EEG bands.

    PubMed

    Spironelli, Chiara; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the functional role of several EEG bands across age by analyzing language hemispheric lateralization in three linguistic tasks. Twenty-eight children, 22 young adults and 20 middle-aged participants were administered the same sample of written words and normalized amplitudes of δ, ϑ, α and β bands were analyzed. Only young adults showed rightwards lateralization in δ frequency band. Task-dependent right-lateralization marked adults' ϑ and α distributions, whereas only linguistic vs. non-linguistic differences were found in children. Concerning the high-beta band, all groups showed left-lateralized linguistic effects. In adults slow rhythms represent indices of active inhibition of task-irrelevant regions, but in children they marked incomplete automated linguistic processing. The high-beta band revealed task-relevant left hemisphere linguistic activity in all groups, therefore representing the most reliable EEG marker of language hemispheric dominance in children and adults. PMID:20659528

  5. Differential interaction between iron and mutant alpha-synuclein causes distinctive Parkinsonian phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhou-Jing; Wu, Ka-Chun; Yung, Wing-Ho; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Ke, Ya

    2016-04-01

    Alpha-synuclein aggregation is the central hallmark of both sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients with different PD-causing genetic defects of alpha-synuclein usually show distinctive clinical features that are atypical to sporadic PD. Iron accumulation is invariably found in PD. Recent studies showed that mutant and wild-type alpha-synuclein may have differential interaction with iron and mutant alpha-synuclein toxicity could be preferentially exacerbated by iron. We hence hypothesized that iron overload could selectively influence mutant alpha-synuclein toxicity and disease phenotypes. To test the hypothesis, we investigated if Drosophila melanogaster over-expressing A53T, A30P, and wild-type (WT) alpha-synuclein have different responses to iron treatment. We showed that iron treatment induced similar reduction of survival rate in all flies but induced a more severe motor decline in A53T and A30P mutant alpha-synuclein expressing flies, suggesting interaction between mutant alpha-synuclein and iron. Although no significant difference in total head iron content was found among these flies, we demonstrated that iron treatment induced selective DA neuron loss in motor-related PPM3 cluster only in the flies that express A53T and A30P mutant alpha-synuclein. We provided the first in vivo evidence that iron overload could induce distinctive neuropathology and disease phenotypes in mutant but not WT alpha-synuclein expressing flies, providing insights to the cause of clinical features selectively exhibited by mutant alpha-synuclein carriers. PMID:26769358

  6. Theta- and alpha-band EEG activity in response to eye gaze cues in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christine; Stets, Manuela; Parise, Eugenio; Reid, Vincent M; Striano, Tricia; Hoehl, Stefanie

    2015-09-01

    In order to elucidate the development of how infants use eye gaze as a referential cue, we investigated theta and alpha oscillations in response to object-directed and object-averted eye gaze in infants aged 2, 4, 5, and 9months. At 2months of age, no difference between conditions was found. In 4- and 9-month-olds, alpha-band activity desynchronized more in response to faces looking at objects compared to faces looking away from objects. Theta activity in 5-month-old infants differed between conditions with more theta synchronization for object-averted eye gaze. Whereas alpha desynchronization might reflect mechanisms of early social object learning, theta is proposed to imply activity in the executive attention network. The interplay between alpha and theta activity represents developmental changes in both kinds of processes during early infancy. PMID:26095092

  7. Neural correlates underlying insight problem solving: Evidence from EEG alpha oscillations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhipeng; Li, Yadan; Hitchman, Glenn; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies on insight problem solving using Chinese logogriphs as insight problems only investigated the time- and phase-locked changes of electrocortical responses triggered by Chinese logogriphs, but did not focus on what kind of brain state facilitates individuals to solve insight problems. To investigate this, we focused on participants' alpha activities (8-12 Hz) that closely correlates with insight problem solving and defocused attention while they were solving Chinese logogriphs. Results indicated that in the time window of 800-1400 ms after the presentation of target logogriphs, alpha power over parieto-central electrodes decreased relative to the reference interval in both the successful and unsuccessful logogriphs solving conditions. However, alpha power increased at parieto-occipital electrode sites in successful conditions compared with that in unsuccessful condition. The decrease in alpha activity in both conditions may reflect the cognitive demands in solving the target logogriphs. Furthermore, difference in alpha power between the successful and unsuccessful conditions at parieto-occipital electrode sites is associated with the process of heuristic information. Alpha synchronization observed in the successful condition compared to the unsuccessful condition might reflect a state of defocused attention that facilitates insight problem solving. PMID:26048161

  8. Phenotypic classification of male pseudohermaphroditism due to steroid 5{alpha}-reductase 2 deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnecker, G.H.G; Hiort, O.; Kruse, K.; Dibbelt, L.

    1996-05-03

    Conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in genital tissue is catalysed by the enzyme 5{alpha}-reductase 2, which is encoded by the SRD5A2 gene. The potent androgen DHT is required for full masculinization of the external genitalia. Mutations of the SRD5A2 gene inhibit enzyme activity, diminish DHT formation, and hence cause masculinization defects of varying degree. The classical syndrome, formerly described as pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias, is characterized by a predominantly female phenotype at birth and significant virilization without gynecomastia at puberty. We investigated nine patients with steroid 5{alpha}-reductase 2 deficiency (SRD). T/DHT-ratios were highly increased in the classical syndrome, but variable in the less severe affected patients. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene had been characterized using PCR-SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing. A small deletion was encountered in two patients, while all other patients had single base mutations which result in amino acid substitutions. We conclude that phenotypes may vary widely in patients with SRD5A2 gene mutations spanning the whole range from completely female to normal male without distinctive clinical signs of the disease. Hence, steroid 5{alpha}-reductase deficiency should be considered not only in sex reversed patients with female or ambiguous phenotypes, but also in those with mild symptoms of undermasculinization as encountered in patients with hypospadias and/or micropenis. A classification based on the severity of the masculinization defect may be used for correlation of phenotypes with enzyme activities and genotypes, and for comparisons of phenotypes between different patients as the basis for clinical decisions to be made in patients with pseudohermaphroditism due to steroid 5{alpha}-reductase 2 deficiency. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Phenotypic spectrum of alpha-synuclein mutations: New insights from patients and cellular models.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Simona; Ginevrino, Monia; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    The identification of the p.A53T mutation in the SNCA gene encoding alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn), as causative of autosomal dominant Parkinson disease (PD) represented a fundamental milestone, which paved the way to the extremely prolific field of PD genetics. Despite being the oldest player in this field and only a rare cause of inherited PD, research on alpha-syn has remained incredibly active over nearly twenty decades, leading to identify alpha-syn aggregation as a key mechanism in PD pathogenesis. The past two years have witnessed new exciting findings, with the discovery of at least three novel pathogenic mutations (p.H50Q, p.G51D and p.A53E) causative of complex parkinsonian phenotypes, and the identification of additional patients carrying "old" SNCA mutations (p.A53T, p.A30P, p.E46K and whole gene multiplications), which has allowed to further expand their phenotypic spectrum. This review aims at providing a clinical and functional update on the most recent findings in alpha-syn genetics, at the same time discussing novel avenues of SNCA research such as those on somatic mutations and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26341711

  10. Pupil Dilation and EEG Alpha Frequency Band Power Reveal Load on Executive Functions for Link-Selection Processes during Text Reading

    PubMed Central

    Scharinger, Christian; Kammerer, Yvonne; Gerjets, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Executive working memory functions play a central role in reading comprehension. In the present research we were interested in additional load imposed on executive functions by link-selection processes during computer-based reading. For obtaining process measures, we used a methodology of concurrent electroencephalographic (EEG) and eye-tracking data recording that allowed us to compare epochs of pure text reading with epochs of hyperlink-like selection processes in an online reading situation. Furthermore, this methodology allowed us to directly compare the two physiological load-measures EEG alpha frequency band power and pupil dilation. We observed increased load on executive functions during hyperlink-like selection processes on both measures in terms of decreased alpha frequency band power and increased pupil dilation. Surprisingly however, the two measures did not correlate. Two additional experiments were conducted that excluded potential perceptual, motor, or structural confounds. In sum, EEG alpha frequency band power and pupil dilation both turned out to be sensitive measures for increased load during hyperlink-like selection processes in online text reading. PMID:26076026

  11. Amino acid substitutions in the Dictyostelium G alpha subunit G alpha 2 produce dominant negative phenotypes and inhibit the activation of adenylyl cyclase, guanylyl cyclase, and phospholipase C.

    PubMed Central

    Okaichi, K; Cubitt, A B; Pitt, G S; Firtel, R A

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the Dictyostelium G alpha subunit G alpha 2 is essential for the cAMP-activation of adenylyl cyclase and guanylyl cyclase and that g alpha 2 null mutants do not aggregate. In this manuscript, we extend the analysis of the function of G alpha 2 in regulating downstream effectors by examining the in vivo developmental and physiological phenotypes of both wild-type and g alpha 2 null cells carrying a series of mutant G alpha 2 subunits expressed from the cloned G alpha 2 promoter. Our results show that wild-type cells expressing G alpha 2 subunits carrying mutations G40V and Q208L in the highly conserved GAGESG (residues 38-43) and GGQRS (residues 206-210) domains, which are expected to reduce the intrinsic GTPase activity, are blocked in multicellular development. Analysis of down-stream effector pathways essential for mediating aggregation indicates that cAMP-mediated activation of guanylyl cyclase and phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) is almost completely inhibited and that there is a substantial reduction of cAMP-mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase. Moreover, neither mutant G alpha 2 subunit can complement g alpha 2 null mutants. Expression of G alpha 2(G43V) and G alpha 2(G207V) have little or no effect on the effector pathways and can partially complement g alpha 2 null cells. Our results suggest a model in which the dominant negative phenotypes resulting from the expression of G alpha 2(G40V) and G alpha 2(Q208L) are due to a constitutive adaptation of the effectors through a G alpha 2-mediated pathway. Analysis of PI-PLC in g alpha 2 null mutants and in cell lines expressing mutant G alpha 2 proteins also strongly suggests that G alpha 2 is the G alpha subunit that directly activates PI-PLC during aggregation. Moreover, overexpression of wild-type G alpha 2 results in the ability to precociously activate guanylyl cyclase by cAMP in vegetative cells, suggesting that G alpha 2 may be rate limiting in the developmental regulation of guanylyl cyclase activation. In agreement with previous results, the activation of adenylyl cyclase, while requiring G alpha 2 function in vivo, does not appear to be directly carried out by the G alpha 2 subunit. Our data are consistent with adenylyl cyclase being directly activated by either another G alpha subunit or by beta gamma subunits released on activation of the G protein containing G alpha 2. Images PMID:1355376

  12. Cortical alpha rhythms are correlated with body sway during quiet open-eyes standing in athletes: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Del Percio, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Bergami, Francesca; Marzano, Nicola; Fiore, Antonio; Di Ciolo, Enrico; Aschieri, Pierluigi; Lino, Andrea; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Iacoboni, Marco; Gallamini, Michele; Babiloni, Claudio; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2007-07-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG; Be-plus Eb-Neuro) and stabilogram (RGM) data were simultaneously recorded in 19 elite karate and 18 fencing athletes and in 10 non-athletes during quiet upright standing at open- and closed-eyes condition in order to investigate the correlation between cortical activity and body sway when the visual inputs are available for balance. Our working hypothesis is that, at difference of non-athletes, athletes are characterized by enhanced cortical information processing as indexed by the amplitude reduction of EEG oscillations at alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz) during open- referenced to closed-eyes condition (event-related desynchronization, ERD). Balance during quiet standing was indexed by body "sway area". Correlation between alpha ERD and event-related change of the sway area was computed by a non-parametric test (p<0.05). It was found that alpha ERD (10-12 Hz) is stronger in amplitude in the karate and fencing athletes than in the non-athletes at ventral centro-parietal electrodes of the right hemisphere (p<0.02). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant correlation in the karate athletes between right ventral centro-parietal alpha ERD and body sway area (r=0.61; p<0.008): specifically, the greater the alpha ERD, the greater the percentage reduction of the body sway area when the visual inputs were available. These results suggest that parasylvian alpha ERD of the right hemisphere may reflect the cortical information processing for the balance in elite athletes subjected to a long training for equilibrium control. PMID:17478102

  13. 'SZ like' alpha 1-antitrypsin phenotypes in PI ZZ children with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, D B; Lovegrove, J U; Mieli-Vergani, G; Mowat, A P; Hopkinson, D A

    1994-01-01

    Using high resolution isoelectric focusing, alpha 1-antitrypsin phenotypes were studied in 106 individuals of the PI ZZ genotype including 71 with liver disease, 22 with chest disease and 13 healthy subjects. The resulting Z patterns were found to be highly variable. In the majority of cases (89/106) the maximum staining intensity was either in the most basic isoform or shared equally between two basic isoforms of the Z phenotype. However, in 17 cases there was a marked intensification of the more acidic isoforms resulting in a pattern which closely resembled the SZ phenotype. This 'SZ like' pattern occurred more frequently in the liver group (16/71) than the chest group (0/22) or healthy (1/13) controls. One possible consequence of the 'SZ like' pattern is confusion with the genuine SZ phenotype leading to misclassification. If this were so, there could be an erroneous exaggeration of the actual incidence of childhood liver disease associated with PI SZ. PMID:8031012

  14. Atrophy and lower regional perfusion of temporo-parietal brain areas are correlated with impairment in memory performances and increase of EEG upper alpha power in prodromal Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Vito Davide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Temporo-parietal cortex thinning is associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The increase of the EEG upper/low alpha power ratio has been associated with MCI due to AD subjects and to the atrophy of temporo-parietal brain areas. Moreover, subjects with a higher alpha3/alpha2 frequency power ratio showed lower brain perfusion than in the low alpha3/alpha2 group. The two groups have significantly different hippocampal volumes and correlation with the theta frequency activity. Methods: 74 adult subjects with MCI underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, electroencephalogram (EEG) recording, and high resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 27 of them underwent EEG recording and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) evaluation. The alpha3/alpha2 power ratio as well as cortical thickness was computed for each subject. The difference in cortical thickness between the groups was estimated. Pearson’s r was used to assess the correlation topography between cortical thinning as well as between brain perfusion and memory impairment. Results: In the higher upper/low alpha group, memory impairment was more pronounced both in the MRI group and the SPECT MCI group. Moreover, it was correlated with greater cortical atrophy and lower perfusional rate in temporo-parietal cortex. Conclusion: High EEG upper/low alpha power ratio was associated with cortical thinning lower perfusion in temporo-parietal. Moreover, atrophy and lower perfusional rate were both significantly correlated with memory impairment in MCI subjects. The increase of EEG upper/low alpha frequency power ratio could be useful for identifying individuals at risk for progression to AD dementia and may be of value in the clinical context. PMID:26389016

  15. “I am resting but rest less well with you.” The moderating effect of anxious attachment style on alpha power during EEG resting state in a social context

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Willem J. M. I.; Pozharliev, Rumen; Van Strien, Jan W.; Belschak, Frank; Bagozzi, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    We took EEG recordings to measure task-free resting-state cortical brain activity in 35 participants under two conditions, alone (A) or together (T). We also investigated whether psychological attachment styles shape human cortical activity differently in these two settings. The results indicate that social context matters and that participants' cortical activity is moderated by the anxious, but not avoidant attachment style. We found enhanced alpha, beta and theta band activity in the T rather than the A resting-state condition, which was more pronounced in posterior brain regions. We further found a positive correlation between anxious attachment style and enhanced alpha power in the T vs. A condition over frontal and parietal scalp regions. There was no significant correlation between the absolute powers registered in the other two frequency bands and the participants' anxious attachment style. PMID:25071516

  16. Resting state glutamate predicts elevated pre-stimulus alpha during self-relatedness: A combined EEG-MRS study on "rest-self overlap".

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Nakao, Takashi; Xu, Jiameng; Qin, Pengmin; Chaves, Pedro; Heinzel, Alexander; Duncan, Niall; Lane, Timothy; Yen, Nai-Shing; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Northoff, Georg

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated neural overlap between resting state activity and self-referential processing. This "rest-self" overlap occurs especially in anterior cortical midline structures like the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC). However, the exact neurotemporal and biochemical mechanisms remain to be identified. Therefore, we conducted a combined electroencephalography (EEG)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study. EEG focused on pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) power changes to assess the degree to which those changes can predict subjects' perception (and judgment) of subsequent stimuli as high or low self-related. MRS measured resting state concentration of glutamate, focusing on PACC. High pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) alpha power significantly correlated with both perception of stimuli judged to be highly self-related and with resting state glutamate concentrations in the PACC. In sum, our results show (i) pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) alpha power and resting state glutamate concentration to mediate rest-self overlap that (ii) dispose or incline subjects to assign high degrees of self-relatedness to perceptual stimuli. PMID:26207415

  17. Studies in a phenotypic female with 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kershnar, A K; Borut, D; Kogut, M D; Biglieri, E G; Schambelan, M

    1976-09-01

    In a 19-year-old phenotypic female (46, XY) with hypertension and hypokalemia, studies confirmed 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency. Prior to diagnosis she had been considered to have testicular feminization. Increased plasma progesterone and urinary pregnanediol levels were present before treatment. Increased secretion rates of deoxycorticosterone and corticosterone and abnormally low production of cortisol and aldosterone were present. Following treatment with hydrocortisone, plasma progesterone, serum potassium, and urinary pregnanediol levels and DOC and B secretions were normal. Aldosterone secretion six months after treatment remained low. Normal blood pressure measurements were achieved during treatment with hydrocortisone and oral estrogen with the patient at rest; however, mild elevations in blood pressure (130/90 mm Hg) have been noted despite continued hydrocortisone therapy. PMID:182944

  18. Alpha1-antitrypsin phenotypes and lung function in a moderately polluted northern Ontario community.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, D N; Manfreda, J; Dorman, T; Cherniack, R M

    1978-03-18

    To determine whether persons with intermediate value alpha1-antitrypsin phenotypes living in a polluted environment manifest significant abnormalities in lung function, a study was undertaken of an age-, sex- and smoking-stratified sample of 391 persons from the town of Fort Frances, Ont., which has elevated values of total dustfall, suspended particulates and hydrogen sulfide. Indices of pulmonary function were derived from the maximum expiratory flow and the single breath expiratory flow and the single breath expiratory nitrogen washout curves. The percentage frequency of the M, MS and MZ pheontypes was 91.7, 7.3 and 0.8, respectively. There was no significant difference between the M and MS groups as indicated by the nitrogen washout curve and maximum expiratory flow curve. There was no significant difference between the three MZ subjects and the M group. In both M and MS groups smokers displayed evidence of airflow obstruction when compared with nonsmokers. It would appear that, when compared with M subjects, persons with the MS phenotype living in a moderately polluted area show no changes in indicators of pulmonary function, including tests of early airway disease, that cannot be attributed to their smoking habit. PMID:306869

  19. Regional electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha power and asymmetry in older adults: a study of short-term test–retest reliability

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Karen J.; Hashemi, Ali; Sheng, Bruce; Sekuler, Allison B.; Bennett, Patrick J.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2015-01-01

    Although regional alpha power and asymmetry measures have been widely used as indices of individual differences in emotional processing and affective style in younger populations, there have been relatively few studies that have examined these measures in older adults. Here, we examined the short-term test–retest reliability of resting regional alpha power (7.5–12.5 Hz) and asymmetry in a sample of 38 active, community-dwelling older adults (M age = 71.2, SD = 6.5 years). Resting electroencephalogram recordings were made before and after a perceptual computer task. Pearson and intra-class correlations indicated acceptable test–retest reliability for alpha power and asymmetry measures in all regions. Interestingly, alpha asymmetry appeared to be less affected by the task than was alpha power. Findings suggest that alpha asymmetry may reflect more enduring, “trait-like” characteristics, while alpha power may reflect more “state-like” processes in older adults. PMID:26441639

  20. Splicing mutation in the ATR-X gene can lead to a dysmorphic mental retardation phenotype without {alpha}-thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Villard, L.; Lossi, A.M.; Fontes, M.

    1996-03-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a gene from Xq13 that codes for a putative regulator of transcription (XNP) and has now been shown to be the gene involved in the X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia with mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome. The widespread expression and numerous domains present in the putative protein suggest that this gene could be involved in other phenotypes. The predominant expression of the gene in the developing brain, as well as its association with neuron differentiation, indicates that mutations of this gene might result in a mental retardation (MR) phenotype. In this paper we present a family with a splice junction mutation in XNP that results in the skipping of an exon and in the introduction of a stop codon in the middle of the XNP-coding sequence. Only the abnormal transcript is expressed in two first cousins presenting the classic ATR-X phenotype (with {alpha}-thalassemia and HbH inclusions). In a distant cousin presenting a similar dysmorphic MR phenotype but not having thalassemia, {approximately}30% of the XNP transcripts are normal. These data demonstrate that the mode of action of the XNP gene product on globin expression is distinct from its mode of action in brain development and facial morphogenesis and suggest that other dysmorphic mental retardation phenotypes, such as Juberg-Marsidi or some sporadic cases of Coffin-Lowry, could be due to mutations in XNP. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. EEG, ERPs and food consumption.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, L D; Polich, J

    1998-06-01

    Baseline electroencephalographic (EEG) and auditory event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were assessed in subjects before and after consuming food and under eyes open and closed recording conditions in an attempt to replicate and extend previous food--ERP effects. Subjects were assessed the morning after fasting from the previous night, before and after eating a standard lunch. Delta- band EEG spectral power decreased and theta- and early alpha-band frequency increased after food consumption. However, in contrast to previous reports, P300 amplitude was unaffected by food consumption and peak latency increased. The strength of the correlational association between background EEG activity and P300 measures decreased for the delta- and theta- bands, but increased for the early and late alpha- bands. The findings suggest that food consumption affects general arousal, rather than specific cognitive EEG or ERP factors and are discussed with respect to previous EEG-ERP findings on food intake. PMID:9700015

  2. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  3. Auditory cortical deactivation during speech production and following speech perception: an EEG investigation of the temporal dynamics of the auditory alpha rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Jenson, David; Harkrider, Ashley W.; Thornton, David; Bowers, Andrew L.; Saltuklaroglu, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration (SMI) across the dorsal stream enables online monitoring of speech. Jenson et al. (2014) used independent component analysis (ICA) and event related spectral perturbation (ERSP) analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) data to describe anterior sensorimotor (e.g., premotor cortex, PMC) activity during speech perception and production. The purpose of the current study was to identify and temporally map neural activity from posterior (i.e., auditory) regions of the dorsal stream in the same tasks. Perception tasks required “active” discrimination of syllable pairs (/ba/ and /da/) in quiet and noisy conditions. Production conditions required overt production of syllable pairs and nouns. ICA performed on concatenated raw 68 channel EEG data from all tasks identified bilateral “auditory” alpha (α) components in 15 of 29 participants localized to pSTG (left) and pMTG (right). ERSP analyses were performed to reveal fluctuations in the spectral power of the α rhythm clusters across time. Production conditions were characterized by significant α event related synchronization (ERS; pFDR < 0.05) concurrent with EMG activity from speech production, consistent with speech-induced auditory inhibition. Discrimination conditions were also characterized by α ERS following stimulus offset. Auditory α ERS in all conditions temporally aligned with PMC activity reported in Jenson et al. (2014). These findings are indicative of speech-induced suppression of auditory regions, possibly via efference copy. The presence of the same pattern following stimulus offset in discrimination conditions suggests that sensorimotor contributions following speech perception reflect covert replay, and that covert replay provides one source of the motor activity previously observed in some speech perception tasks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that inhibition of auditory regions by speech has been observed in real-time with the ICA/ERSP technique. PMID:26500519

  4. Frontoparietal EEG alpha-phase synchrony reflects differential attentional demands during word recall and oculomotor dual-tasks.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gusang; Kim, Min-Young; Lim, Sanghyun; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Suh, Minah

    2015-12-16

    To study the relationship between the varying degrees of cognitive load and long-range synchronization among neural networks, we utilized a dual-task paradigm combining concurrent word recall working memory tasks and oculomotor tasks that differentially activate the common frontoparietal (FP) network. We hypothesized that each dual-task combination would generate differential neuronal activation patterns among long-range connection during word retention period. Given that the FP alpha-phase synchronization is involved in attentional top-down processes, one would expect that the long-range synchronization pattern is affected by the degrees of dual-task demand. We measured a single-trial phase locking value in the alpha frequency (8-12?Hz) with electroencephalography in healthy participants. Single-trial phase locking value characterized the synchronization between two brain signals. Our results revealed that different amounts of FP alpha-phase synchronization were produced by different dual-task combinations, particularly during the early phase of the word retention period. These differences were dependent on the individual's working memory capacity and memory load. Our study shows that during dual-task, each oculomotor task, which is subserved by distinct neural network, generates different modulation patterns on long-range neuronal activation and FP alpha-phase synchronization seems to reflect these differential cognitive loads. PMID:26559729

  5. EEG Alpha Production Correlates of Cognitive Style Differences and Recall of Metaphor from Poetry. Technical Report No. 324.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddix, Michael D.; Dunn, Bruce R.

    Differences in metaphor recall from poetry were investigated using 10 female and 10 male college student subjects hypothesized as having either an analytic or a holistic processing style. Style was determined using bilateral alpha (8-13Hz) scores measured from the cerebral cortex. It was suggested, on the basis of bimodal theory, that holistic…

  6. COMT polymorphism modulates the resting-state EEG alpha oscillatory response to acute nicotine in male non-smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, H.; Smith, D.; de la Salle, S.; Choueiry, J.; Impey, D.; Philippe, T.; Dort, H.; Millar, A.; Daigle, M.; Albert, P. R.; Beaudoin, A.; Knott, V.

    2015-01-01

    Performance improvements in cognitive tasks requiring executive functions are evident with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, and activation of the underlying neural circuitry supporting these cognitive effects is thought to involve dopamine neurotransmission. As individual difference in response to nicotine may be related to a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that strongly influences cortical dopamine metabolism, this study examined the modulatory effects of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on the neural response to acute nicotine as measured with resting-state electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations. In a sample of 62 healthy non-smoking adult males, a single dose (6 mg) of nicotine gum administered in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was shown to affect α oscillatory activity, increasing power of upper α oscillations in frontocentral regions of Met/Met homozygotes and in parietal/occipital regions of Val/Met heterozygotes. Peak α frequency was also found to be faster with nicotine (vs. placebo) treatment in Val/Met heterozygotes, who exhibited a slower α frequency compared to Val/Val homozygotes. The data tentatively suggest that interindividual differences in brain α oscillations and their response to nicotinic agonist treatment are influenced by genetic mechanisms involving COMT. PMID:26096691

  7. Adenovirus-mediated hepatocyte nuclear factor-4{alpha} overexpression maintains liver phenotype in cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Naiki, Takafumi; Nagaki, Masahito . E-mail: mnagaki@cc.gifu-u.ac.jp; Asano, Takahiko; Kimata, Takayuki; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2005-09-23

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF-4{alpha}) is a transcription factor that controls embryonal liver development and that maintains and regulates gene expression in adult liver cells. We have previously demonstrated that transient overexpression of HNF-4{alpha} up-regulates a number of liver-specific genes in hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we extend these studies by assessing the functional role of HNF-4{alpha} in regulating cellular viability and liver-specific functions of primary rat hepatocytes. In cells transfected with an adenovirus vector carrying rat HNF-4{alpha} cDNA, induction and maintenance of liver-specific genes and functions were observed over a long-term culture, which might be associated with the prevention of a rapid loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, we demonstrated that transthyretin mRNA was up-regulated by HNF-4{alpha} in primary hepatocytes, but not in hepatoma cells. These results indicate that HNF-4{alpha} plays a role in the maintenance of morphologically and biochemically functional hepatocytes and that the difference in expression of liver-specific genes induced by HNF-4{alpha} may depend on a differentiation state of cells.

  8. Lung fibroblast alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and contractile phenotype in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H. Y.; Gharaee-Kermani, M.; Zhang, K.; Karmiol, S.; Phan, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    The emergence of the myofibroblast phenotype (characterized by alpha-smooth muscle actin expression) in wound healing and in tissues undergoing fibrosis is thought to be responsible for the increased contractility of the affected tissues. In bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, the myofibroblast is also responsible for the observed increase in collagen gene expression. To evaluate further these phenotypic changes in lung fibroblasts, contractile and other phenotypic properties of fibroblasts isolated from lungs of rats with bleomycin-induced fibrosis were compared with those of normal rats using in vitro models. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal injection on day 0, and 7 and 14 days later the animals were sacrificed and lung fibroblasts isolated. Using immunofluorescence, < 10% of fibroblasts from control animals express alpha-smooth muscle actin when cultured as a monolayer. In contrast, 19% and 21% of cells from day 7 and day 14 bleomycin-treated animals, respectively, expressed this actin and with greater intensity than in control lung cells. This increase in actin expression was associated with enhanced contractility when evaluated using a three-dimensional cell culture model consisting of fibroblast-populated collagen gels. This enhanced contractility was abolished by treatment with antibody to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), whereas exogenous TGF-beta 1 and serum-stimulated contraction of control lung fibroblasts. TGF-beta 1 gene expression was greater in cells from bleomycin-treated animals than those from control lungs. These results show that cells with the myofibroblast phenotype are more abundant in fibrotic lung, and that these cells possess greater contractile capacity in vitro at least partly by virtue of their enhanced endogenous TGF-beta 1 gene expression. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 9 PMID:8579115

  9. Lipid metabolism during aging of high-alpha-linolenate-phenotype potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Zabrouskov, Vladimir; Knowles, N Richard

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that high levels of alpha-linolenate in cell membranes of potato tubers (achieved by overexpressing fatty acid desaturases) enhances lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress, and tuber metabolic rate, effectively accelerating the physiological age of tubers. This study details the changes in lipid molecular species of microsomal and mitochondrial membranes from wild-type (WT) and high-alpha-linolenate tubers during aging. The microsomal and mitochondrial polar lipids of high-alpha-linolenate tubers were dominated by 18:3/18:3 and 16:0/18:3 molecular species. Relative to WT tubers, high-alpha-linolenate tubers had a substantially higher 16:0/18:n to 18:n/18:n molecular species ratio in mitochondria and microsomes, potentially reflecting a compensatory response to maintain membrane biophysical properties in the face of increased unsaturation. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) accounted for 53 and 37% of polar lipids, respectively, in mitochondria from younger WT and high-alpha-linolenate tubers. The relative proportions of these phospholipids (PL) did not change during aging of WT tubers. In contrast, PE increased to dominate the PL pool of mitochondria during aging of high-alpha-linolenate tubers. While aging effected an increase in mitochondrial 18:3-bearing PCs and PEs in WT tubers, the concentration of 18:3-bearing PCs fell with a concomitant increase in 18:3-bearing PEs during aging of high-alpha-linolenate tubers. These age- and high-alpha-linolenate-induced changes had no effect on the respiration rate and functional integrity of isolated mitochondria. Differential increases in the respiration rates of WT and high-alpha-linolenate tubers during aging were therefore a consequence of unsaturation-dependent alterations in the microenvironments of cells. Microsomal 18:3-bearing PCs, PEs, digalactosyldiacylglycerols (DGDG), and monogalactosyldiacylglycerols all increased in WT tubers during aging. In contrast, a selective loss of 18:3-bearing PCs and DGDGs from microsomes of high-alpha-linolenate tubers likely reflects a greater susceptibility of membranes to peroxidative catabolism during aging. Aging resulted in an increase in sterol/PL ratio in microsomes from WT tubers, due primarily to a decline in PL. In high-alpha-linolenate tubers, the increase in sterol/PL ratio during aging was due to increases in Delta 5-avenasterol and stigmasterol, indicating membrane rigidification and likely contributing to increased membrane permeability. Age-induced changes in 18:3-bearing lipids in membranes of transformed tubers are discussed relative to the development of oxidative stress and accelerated aging. PMID:12051691

  10. Interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma differentially affect pancreatic beta-cell phenotype and function.

    PubMed

    Baldeón, M E; Chun, T; Gaskins, H R

    1998-07-01

    To better clarify individual roles of interferon (IFN)-alpha and IFN-gamma in beta-cell pathology during the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus, we compared the effects of these cytokines on insulin production and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene expression in pancreatic beta-cell lines. IFN-gamma but not IFN-alpha decreased secreted and intracellular insulin concentrations in betaTC6-F7 and betaTC3 cells. Likewise, IFN-gamma but not IFN-alpha treatment of beta-cells upregulated mRNA expression of MHC class IA antigen-processing genes and surface expression of class IA molecules. Alternatively, class IA MHC expression was upregulated by IFN-gamma and IFN-alpha in the P388D1 macrophage cell line. The observation of constitutive Ifn-alpha6 mRNA expression by a differentiated beta-cell line substantiates previous indications that local expression of IFN-alpha in islets may trigger insulitis. Evidence that IFN-gamma, a product of infiltrating leukocytes, directly decreases beta-cell glucose sensitivity and increases MHC class IA cell surface expression supports the postulate that IFN-gamma magnifies the insulitic process. PMID:9688831

  11. Female phenotype in a male child due to 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Heremans, G F; Moolenaar, A J; van Gelderen, H H

    1976-09-01

    The discovery of testicles in a 3-year-old girl with XY karyotype led to a diagnosis of testicular feminization. Subsequently, however, hypokalaemia, hypertension, and severe prostration during a mild infection suggested adrenal involvement, and investigations showed a 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency. Diagnosis of testicular feminization should not be made without excluding a defect of testosterone synthesis. PMID:999330

  12. CRB2 Mutations Produce a Phenotype Resembling Congenital Nephrosis, Finnish Type, with Cerebral Ventriculomegaly and Raised Alpha-Fetoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, Anne; Kaylor, Julie; Pierce, Heather; Cahr, Michelle; DeWard, Stephanie J.; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Alsadah, Adnan; Salem, Fadi; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Mehta, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    We report five fetuses and a child from three families who shared a phenotype comprising cerebral ventriculomegaly and echogenic kidneys with histopathological findings of congenital nephrosis. The presenting features were greatly elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) or amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein (AFAFP) levels or abnormalities visualized on ultrasound scan during the second trimester of pregnancy. Exome sequencing revealed deleterious sequence variants in Crumbs, Drosophila, Homolog of, 2 (CRB2) consistent with autosomal-recessive inheritance. Two fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly and renal microcysts were compound heterozygotes for p.Asn800Lys and p.Trp759Ter, one fetus with renal microcysts was a compound heterozygote for p.Glu643Ala and p.Asn800Lys, and one child with cerebral ventriculomegaly, periventricular heterotopias, echogenic kidneys, and renal failure was homozygous for p.Arg633Trp in CRB2. Examination of the kidneys in one fetus showed tubular cysts at the corticomedullary junction and diffuse effacement of the epithelial foot processes and microvillous transformation of the renal podocytes, findings that were similar to those reported in congenital nephrotic syndrome, Finnish type, that is caused by mutations in nephrin (NPHS1). Loss of function for crb2b and nphs1 in Danio rerio were previously shown to result in loss of the slit diaphragms of the podocytes, leading to the hypothesis that nephrosis develops from an inability to develop a functional glomerular barrier. We conclude that the phenotype associated with CRB2 mutations is pleiotropic and that the condition is an important consideration in the evaluation of high MSAFP/AFAFP where a renal cause is suspected. PMID:25557780

  13. CRB2 mutations produce a phenotype resembling congenital nephrosis, Finnish type, with cerebral ventriculomegaly and raised alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne; Kaylor, Julie; Pierce, Heather; Cahr, Michelle; DeWard, Stephanie J; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Alsadah, Adnan; Salem, Fadi; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Mehta, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    We report five fetuses and a child from three families who shared a phenotype comprising cerebral ventriculomegaly and echogenic kidneys with histopathological findings of congenital nephrosis. The presenting features were greatly elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) or amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein (AFAFP) levels or abnormalities visualized on ultrasound scan during the second trimester of pregnancy. Exome sequencing revealed deleterious sequence variants in Crumbs, Drosophila, Homolog of, 2 (CRB2) consistent with autosomal-recessive inheritance. Two fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly and renal microcysts were compound heterozygotes for p.Asn800Lys and p.Trp759Ter, one fetus with renal microcysts was a compound heterozygote for p.Glu643Ala and p.Asn800Lys, and one child with cerebral ventriculomegaly, periventricular heterotopias, echogenic kidneys, and renal failure was homozygous for p.Arg633Trp in CRB2. Examination of the kidneys in one fetus showed tubular cysts at the corticomedullary junction and diffuse effacement of the epithelial foot processes and microvillous transformation of the renal podocytes, findings that were similar to those reported in congenital nephrotic syndrome, Finnish type, that is caused by mutations in nephrin (NPHS1). Loss of function for crb2b and nphs1 in Danio rerio were previously shown to result in loss of the slit diaphragms of the podocytes, leading to the hypothesis that nephrosis develops from an inability to develop a functional glomerular barrier. We conclude that the phenotype associated with CRB2 mutations is pleiotropic and that the condition is an important consideration in the evaluation of high MSAFP/AFAFP where a renal cause is suspected. PMID:25557780

  14. Intravenous administration of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in patients of PiZ and PiM phenotype. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, K.M.; Smith, R.M.; Spragg, R.G.; Tisi, G.M.

    1988-06-24

    Nine patients with moderate pulmonary emphysema, six of PiZ phenotype and three of PiM phenotype, have received a single intravenous infusion of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (human) (A1PI), in a dose of 60 mg/kg over a 30-minute period. They also received a tracer dose (300 microCi) of /sup 131/I-labeled A1PI. No active or passive immunization against hepatitis was given. No acute toxicity was observed. Compared with baseline data, significant elevations of serum A1PI (measured both antigenically and as anti-elastase activity) occurred, with a serum half-life approximating 110 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, obtained 48 hours after infusion, reflected a significant increase in A1PI concentration versus baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid values. Serial gamma camera images of the lungs confirmed persistence of enhanced lung radioactivity for several days. Urinary desmosine excretion did not change following A1PI infusion. During the period of follow-up thus far, no patient has had chronic toxicity, results of liver function tests have been stable, and there has been no development of hepatitis B antigen or antibodies to hepatitis B surface or core antigens.

  15. P2Y receptor signaling regulates phenotype and IFN-alpha secretion of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Amanda; Toy, Tracey; Rothenfusser, Simon; Robson, Neil; Vorac, Julia; Dauer, Marc; Stuplich, Moritz; Endres, Stefan; Cebon, Jonathan; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Schnurr, Max

    2008-03-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) play powerful regulatory roles in innate and adaptive immune responses and are a major source of type I interferon (IFN) following viral infection. During inflammation and mechanical stress, cells release nucleotides into the extracellular space where they act as signaling molecules via G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. We have previously reported on the regulation of myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function by nucleotides. Here, we report that human PDCs express several subtypes of P2Y receptors and mobilize intracellular calcium in response to nucleotide exposure. As a functional consequence, PDCs acquire a mature phenotype that is further enhanced in the context of CD40 ligation. Strikingly, nucleotides strongly inhibit IFN-alpha secretion induced by influenza virus or CpG-A. This effect is most pronounced for the uridine nucleotides UDP and UTP and the sugar nucleotide UDP-glucose, ligands of P2Y(6), P2Y(4), and P2Y(14), respectively. Nucleotide-induced inhibition of IFN-alpha production is blocked by suramin, a P2Y receptor antagonist. Pharmacological data point toward a role of protein kinase C in the negative regulation of type I IFN. Manipulating PDC function with P2Y receptor agonists may offer novel therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases or cancer. PMID:17993619

  16. Note on the EEG Orienting Response in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Janice Westlund

    1982-01-01

    Durations of children's alpha bursts and alpha blocking were measured by EEG with eyes closed or open in the dark and with feedback visual stimulation. Alpha durations decreased across conditions. Older children had longer no-alpha durations and showed greater responsiveness to conditions. The alpha-blocking response changes during childhood.…

  17. Identification of distinct human invariant natural killer T-cell response phenotypes to alpha-galactosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Croudace, Joanne E; Curbishley, Stuart M; Mura, Manuela; Willcox, Carrie R; Illarionov, Petr A; Besra, Gurdyal S; Adams, David H; Lammas, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background Human CD1d-restricted, invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) are a unique class of T lymphocytes that recognise glycolipid antigens such as ?-galactosylceramide (?GalCer) and upon T cell receptor (TCR) activation produce both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. iNKT cells expand when cultured in-vitro with ?GalCer and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in a CD1d-restricted manner. However, the expansion ratio of human iNKT cells varies between individuals and this has implications for attempts to manipulate this pathway therapeutically. We have studied a panel of twenty five healthy human donors to assess the variability in their in-vitro iNKT cell expansion responses to stimulation with CD1d ligands and investigated some of the factors that may influence this phenomenon. Results Although all donors had comparable numbers of circulating iNKT cells their growth rates in-vitro over 14 days in response to a range of CD1d ligands and IL-2 were highly donor-dependent. Two reproducible donor response patterns of iNKT expansion were seen which we have called 'strong' or 'poor' iNKT responders. Donor response phenotype did not correlate with age, gender, frequency of circulating iNKT, or with the CD1d ligand utilised. Addition of exogenous recombinant human interleukin 4 (IL-4) to 'poor' responder donor cultures significantly increased their iNKT proliferative capacity, but not to levels equivalent to that of 'strong' responder donors. However in 'strong' responder donors, addition of IL-4 to their cultures did not significantly alter the frequency of iNKT cells in the expanded CD3+ population. Conclusion (i) in-vitro expansion of human iNKT cells in response to CD1d ligand activation is highly donor variable, (ii) two reproducible patterns of donor iNKT expansion were observed, which could be classified into 'strong' and 'poor' responder phenotypes, (iii) donor iNKT response phenotypes did not correlate with age, gender, frequency of circulating iNKT cells, or with the CD1d ligand utilised, (iv) addition of IL-4 to 'poor' but not 'strong' responder donor cultures significantly increased their in-vitro iNKT cell expansion to ?GalCer. PMID:19055753

  18. EEG Recorded from the Ear: Characterizing the Ear-EEG Method

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Kaare B.; Kappel, Simon L.; Mandic, Danilo P.; Kidmose, Preben

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Auditory middle and late latency responses can be recorded reliably from ear-EEG.For sources close to the ear, ear-EEG has the same signal-to-noise-ratio as scalp.Ear-EEG is an excellent match for power spectrum-based analysis. A method for measuring electroencephalograms (EEG) from the outer ear, so-called ear-EEG, has recently been proposed. The method could potentially enable robust recording of EEG in natural environments. The objective of this study was to substantiate the ear-EEG method by using a larger population of subjects and several paradigms. For rigor, we considered simultaneous scalp and ear-EEG recordings with common reference. More precisely, 32 conventional scalp electrodes and 12 ear electrodes allowed a thorough comparison between conventional and ear electrodes, testing several different placements of references. The paradigms probed auditory onset response, mismatch negativity, auditory steady-state response and alpha power attenuation. By comparing event related potential (ERP) waveforms from the mismatch response paradigm, the signal measured from the ear electrodes was found to reflect the same cortical activity as that from nearby scalp electrodes. It was also found that referencing the ear-EEG electrodes to another within-ear electrode affects the time-domain recorded waveform (relative to scalp recordings), but not the timing of individual components. It was furthermore found that auditory steady-state responses and alpha-band modulation were measured reliably with the ear-EEG modality. Finally, our findings showed that the auditory mismatch response was difficult to monitor with the ear-EEG. We conclude that ear-EEG yields similar performance as conventional EEG for spectrogram-based analysis, similar timing of ERP components, and equal signal strength for sources close to the ear. Ear-EEG can reliably measure activity from regions of the cortex which are located close to the ears, especially in paradigms employing frequency-domain analyses. PMID:26635514

  19. Developing of EEG print and its preliminary technical application.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, M; Fukuzako, H; Ueyama, K; Takeuchi, K; Fukuzako, T; Nomaguchi, M

    1994-03-01

    In this report, we discuss a method called "EEG print" to represent EEG contrast mapping in time and frequency domains simultaneously. A bank of bandpass FIR (Finite Impulse Response) digital filters is used to obtain EEG prints. EEG prints were taken from four areas (F3, F4, O1 and O2) of EEG when healthy subjects were at rest with their eyes closed. The pattern of the prints was classified into four types: alpha type, beta type, alpha + beta type and complex type. It was found that EEG prints may vary from person-to-person but they usually do not vary much between the four areas for a given person. The method is further modified to obtain "differential EEG prints" to investigate whether meaningful higher frequency EEG components exist. Differentiation of EEG resulted in marked intensification of the fast waves, using 0.14 Hz as the critical point. In differential EEG print with higher order differentiation, amplification in the high frequency components increase their frequency. As a result, it is possible to observe variations in the high frequency components, which are otherwise not detectable in the usual EEG print. EEG print can be used for representing the function of the brain. Using the method for classification of EEG print patterns, described in this paper, we can clarify not only the characteristics of the normal brain but also the pathophysiology of mentally-ill patients. PMID:7933722

  20. On chronological changes in the basic EEG rhythm in persons with Down syndrome - with special reference to slowing of alpha waves.

    PubMed

    Katada, A; Hasegawa, S; Ohira, D; Kumagai, T; Harashima, T; Ozaki, H; Suzuki, H

    2000-06-01

    The authors tried to know specificity of aging in persons with Down syndrome (DS) from the aspect of electroencephalograph (EEG) frequency changes through the cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, in comparison with normal persons as well as those with mentally retardation except the Down syndrome (non-DS MR). Subjects for a cross-sectional study were 265 persons with DS, 242 with non-DS MR and 239 healthy persons, and subjects for a follow-up study were 28 persons with DS and 14 with non-DS MR, whose EEGs were recorded repeatedly once a year during 8 or 9 years. Resting EEGs from the frontal, central and occipital regions were examined through power spectrum. In the cross-sectional study, the number of subjects with DS who showed dominant component within 8 Hz band of the basic rhythm reached maximum in its appearance rate at 40-44 years of age in the occipital area, but this slowing progressed already at 30-34 years of age. While in non-DS MR, the number of subjects who showed dominant component at 8 Hz reached maximum at 45-49 years of age, and this slowing of the basic rhythm was not so clear as in DS. In the follow-up study for subjects with DS, although the lowering in EEG frequency to 8 Hz took place in various years of age individually, earlier distinct decrease of the frequency was commonly noticed. These earlier steep lowering of EEG frequency was discussed in relation to the senile signs and to the decline of brain function referring to Alzheimer disease. PMID:10838108

  1. Test-retest reliability of cognitive EEG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEvoy, L. K.; Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Task-related EEG is sensitive to changes in cognitive state produced by increased task difficulty and by transient impairment. If task-related EEG has high test-retest reliability, it could be used as part of a clinical test to assess changes in cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the EEG recorded during the performance of a working memory (WM) task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). METHODS: EEG was recorded while subjects rested quietly and while they performed the tasks. Within session (test-retest interval of approximately 1 h) and between session (test-retest interval of approximately 7 days) reliability was calculated for four EEG components: frontal midline theta at Fz, posterior theta at Pz, and slow and fast alpha at Pz. RESULTS: Task-related EEG was highly reliable within and between sessions (r0.9 for all components in WM task, and r0.8 for all components in the PVT). Resting EEG also showed high reliability, although the magnitude of the correlation was somewhat smaller than that of the task-related EEG (r0.7 for all 4 components). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that under appropriate conditions, task-related EEG has sufficient retest reliability for use in assessing clinical changes in cognitive status.

  2. Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Presenting with Atypical Cutaneous Involvement and Diagnosis of ZZ Phenotype Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Teresa; Cherry, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare condition. Specific neoplastic involvement can be primary (confined to the skin) or secondary to systemic involvement (metastatic). Cutaneous involvement by HL usually occurs late in the course and is associated with poor prognosis; however in some cases it can exhibit indolent behavior. Skin involvement with nonspecific cutaneous findings may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome. We describe a case of 46-year-old white male patient presented with rash and lymphadenopathy which led to the diagnosis of stage IVE mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma with skin involvement. His disease was refractory to multiple lines of chemotherapy including (1) AVD (doxorubicin/bleomycin/dacarbazine), (2) brentuximab, and (3) bendamustine, he later achieved complete remission with (4) GCD (gemcitabine/carboplatin/dexamethasone) salvage regimen. Bleomycin was not given secondary to poor pulmonary function tests. His treatment was complicated after AVD with multiple pneumothoraces which unmasked the diagnosis of ZZ phenotype alpha-1 antitrypsin (ATT) deficiency. Simultaneous existence of Hodgkin lymphoma and ATT is rarely reported. PMID:24955265

  3. Differential regulation of T helper phenotype development by interleukins 4 and 10 in an alpha beta T-cell-receptor transgenic system.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, C S; Heimberger, A B; Gold, J S; O'Garra, A; Murphy, K M

    1992-01-01

    To address the mechanisms controlling T helper (Th) phenotype development, we used DO10, a transgenic mouse line that expresses the alpha beta T-cell receptor from an ovalbumin-reactive T hybridoma, as a source of naive T cells that can be stimulated in vitro with ovalbumin peptide presented by defined antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We have examined the role of cytokines and APCs in the regulation of Th phenotype development. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) directs development toward the Th2 phenotype, stimulating IL-4 and silencing IL-2 and interferon gamma production in developing T cells. Splenic APCs direct development toward the Th1 phenotype when endogenous IL-10 is neutralized with anti-IL-10 antibody. The splenic APCs mediating these effects are probably macrophages or dendritic cells and not B cells, since IL-10 is incapable of affecting Th phenotype development when the B-cell hybridoma TA3 is used as the APC. These results suggest that early regulation of IL-4 and IL-10 in a developing immune response and the identity of the initiating APCs are critical in determining the Th phenotype of the developing T cells. PMID:1385868

  4. Factor IX ectopically expressed in platelets can be stored in alpha-granules and corrects the phenotype of hemophilia B mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guowei; Shi, Qizhen; Fahs, Scot A; Kuether, Erin L; Walsh, Christopher E; Montgomery, Robert R

    2010-08-26

    We developed 2bF9 transgenic mice in a hemophilia B mouse model with the expression of human factor IX (FIX) under control of the platelet-specific integrin alphaIIb promoter, to determine whether ectopically expressing FIX in megakaryocytes can enable the storage of FIX in platelet alpha-granules and corrects the murine hemophilia B phenotype. FIX was detected in the platelets and plasma of 2bF9 transgenic mice by both antigen and activity assays. Approximately 90% of total FIX in blood was stored in platelets, most of which is releasable on activation of platelets. Immunostaining demonstrated that FIX was expressed in platelets and megakaryocytes and stored in alpha-granules. All 2bF9 transgenic mice survived tail clipping, suggesting that platelet-derived FIX normalizes hemostasis in the hemophilia B mouse model. This protection can be transferred by bone marrow transplantation or platelet transfusion. However, unlike our experience with platelet FVIII, the efficacy of platelet-derived FIX was limited in the presence of anti-FIX inhibitory antibodies. These results demonstrate that releasable FIX can be expressed and stored in platelet alpha-granules and that platelet-derived FIX can correct the bleeding phenotype in hemophilia B mice. Our studies suggest that targeting FIX expression to platelets could be a new gene therapy strategy for hemophilia B. PMID:20445020

  5. [Effects of noise and music on EEG power spectrum].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Liu, X H; Li, D C; Wang, H L; Liu, Y S

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To observe the effect of noise and music on EEG power spectrum. Method. 12 healthy male pilots aged 30 +/- 0.58 years served as the subjects. Dynamic EEG from 16 regions was recorded during quiet, under noise or when listening to music using Oxford MR95 Holter recorder. Changes of EEG power spectrum of delta, theta, alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2, frequency components in 16 regions were analyzed. Result. The total alpha1 power was significantly decreased, while the total theta power was significantly increased when listening to music; It implies that the interhemispheric transmission of information in the frontotemporal areas might be involved. Conclusion. The changes of the EEG power spectrum were closely related to man's emotions; relaxation was associated with music; Individual difference exists in the influence of sound on EEG. PMID:11767781

  6. Fluctuations between sleep and wakefulness: wake-like features indicated by increased EEG alpha power during different sleep stages in nightmare disorder.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára; Ujma, Péter P; Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert

    2013-12-01

    Although a growing body of research indicates that frequent nightmares are related to impaired sleep regulation, the pathophysiology of nightmare disorder is far from being fully understood. We examined the relative spectral power values for NREM and REM sleep separately in 19 individuals with nightmare disorder and 21 healthy controls, based on polysomnographic recordings of the second nights' laboratory sleep. Nightmare subjects compared to controls exhibited increased relative high alpha (10-14.5Hz) and fronto-central increases in high delta (3-4Hz) power during REM sleep, and a trend of increased fronto-central low alpha (7.75-9Hz) power in NREM sleep. These differences were independent of the confounding effects of waking emotional distress. High REM alpha and low NREM alpha powers were strongly related in nightmare but not in control subjects. The topographical distribution and spectral components of REM alpha activity suggest that nightmare disordered subjects are characterized by wake-like electroencephalographic features during REM sleep. PMID:23831546

  7. Longitudinal study of EEG frequency maturation and power changes in children on the Russian North.

    PubMed

    Soroko, S I; Shemyakina, N V; Nagornova, Zh V; Bekshaev, S S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to reveal longitudinal changes in electroencephalogram spectral power and frequency (percentage frequency composition of EEG and alpha peak frequency) patterns in normal children from northern Russia. Fifteen children (9 girls and 6 boys) participated in the study. The resting state (eyes closed) EEGs were recorded yearly (2005-2013) from age 8 to age 16-17 for each child. EEG frequency patterns were estimated as the percentages of waves with a 1 Hz step revealed by measuring the interval durations between points crossing zero (isoline) by a curve. EEG spectral power changes were analyzed for delta (1.5-4 Hz), theta (4-7.5 Hz), alpha-1 (7.5-9.5 Hz), alpha-2 (9.5-12.5 Hz), beta-1 (12.5-18 Hz) and beta-2 (18-30 Hz) bands. According to the frequency composition of the EEG signals fast synchronous, polymorphous synchronous, polymorphous desynchronous and slow synchronous types of children EEG were revealed. These EEG types were relatively stable during adolescence. In these EEG types, the frequency patterns and spectral power dynamics with age had several common and specific features. Slow wave percentage and spectral power in the delta band remarkably decreased with age in all groups. Starting from the theta band the EEG types were characterized by different EEG spectral power changes with age. In fast synchronous EEG type, the theta and alpha-1 EEG power decreased, and the alpha-2 power increased in the occipital and parietal areas. The polymorphous synchronous type was characterized by increased both the alpha-1 and alpha-2 power with regional peculiarities. In the polymorphous desynchronous type spectral power in all bands decreased with age, and in the slow synchronous type, the alpha-1 power massively increased with age. Obtained results suggest predictive strength of the spatial-frequency patterns in EEG for its following maturation through the years. PMID:25219895

  8. Effects of 2G and 3G mobile phones on human alpha rhythms: Resting EEG in adolescents, young adults, and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Croft, R J; Leung, S; McKenzie, R J; Loughran, S P; Iskra, S; Hamblin, D L; Cooper, N R

    2010-09-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether adolescents and/or the elderly are more sensitive to mobile phone (MP)-related bioeffects than young adults, and to determine this for both 2nd generation (2G) GSM, and 3rd generation (3G) W-CDMA exposures. To test this, resting alpha activity (8-12 Hz band of the electroencephalogram) was assessed because numerous studies have now reported it to be enhanced by MP exposure. Forty-one 13-15 year olds, forty-two 19-40 year olds, and twenty 55-70 year olds were tested using a double-blind crossover design, where each participant received Sham, 2G and 3G exposures, separated by at least 4 days. Alpha activity, during exposure relative to baseline, was recorded and compared between conditions. Consistent with previous research, the young adults' alpha was greater in the 2G compared to Sham condition, however, no effect was seen in the adolescent or the elderly groups, and no effect of 3G exposures was found in any group. The results provide further support for an effect of 2G exposures on resting alpha activity in young adults, but fail to support a similar enhancement in adolescents or the elderly, or in any age group as a function of 3G exposure. PMID:20564174

  9. The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

    PubMed

    Verrusio, Walter; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Vanacore, Nicola; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions. PMID:26036835

  10. [Qualitative and quantitative EEG-findings in schizophrenia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-03-01

    The results of the qualitative but particularly the quantitative EEG-studies indicate that 1. The EEG of adult schizophrenics is characterized by an appearance of excessive fast activity along with some slow waves and the lack of alpha-activity. 2. Excessive fast activity and lack of alpha-waves have also been found in the EEGs of psychotic children and most interestingly in children whose parents (particularly the mother) are schizophrenic (high risk children). 3. Based on the studies during sleep and investigations with neuroleptics, it was established that the origin of the excess fast activity in schizophrenia cannot be the muscle potential. Particularly the excess fast activity in high risk children for schizophrenia goes against the muscle potential hypothesis. 4. The quantitative EEG changes seen in schizophrenia show similarity to those seen after hallucinogenic compounds particularly after anticholinergic hallucinogenics. 5. All neuroleptics (major tranquilizers) produce quantitative EEG alterations which are almost diametrically opposite to those seen in schizoprenia. PMID:416942

  11. EEG mapping in patients with social phobia.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gabriele; Anderer, Peter; Dantendorfer, Karl; Saletu, Bernd

    2004-09-15

    Recent studies have suggested an information-processing bias in social phobia (SP). Little is known about the electrophysiological correlates of anxiety in SP. The aim of the present study was to investigate the quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) in 25 drug-free patients with SP as compared with age- and sex-matched normal controls and to correlate anxiety and depressive symptoms with EEG data. EEG was recorded under vigilance-controlled and resting conditions. The Spielberger State and Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to assess anxiety and depression levels. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant differences between patients and controls, specifically frontopolarly and right centrally. Statistical analysis demonstrated a decrease in absolute and relative delta, theta power, alpha-adjacent slow-beta and fast beta power and an increase in absolute and relative intermediate beta power, as well as an acceleration of the total centroid and a slowing in beta centroid and its variability. Trait anxiety and depression scores correlated positively with the dominant alpha frequency and the alpha centroid, and negatively with absolute theta and slow alpha power as well as with the centroid of the delta/theta frequency band. In conclusion, EEG mapping in patients with SP revealed significant differences from normal controls suggesting a hyperarousal as a pathogenetic factor of anxiety. PMID:15465293

  12. Effects of different phenotypes of hyperlipoproteinemia and of treatment with fibric acid derivatives on the rates of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylation in humans.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, M; Concari, M; Loria, P; Abate, N; Pinetti, A; Guicciardi, M E; Carulli, N

    1995-08-01

    Little is known about the relationships between hyperlipidemia and bile acid metabolism. However, hypolipidemic treatment with fibric acid derivatives has been shown to increase biliary cholesterol secretion, presumably by reducing bile acid synthesis. To clarify such relationships, we investigated the effects of different hyperlipoproteinemic conditions and of treatment with fibric acid derivatives on the rates of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylation (the limiting step of bile acid synthesis) in humans. We studied 10 patients (aged 36 to 68 years) with lipoprotein phenotype IIa and with a clinical diagnosis of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, a condition of reduced activity of LDL receptors, and 11 patients (aged 48 to 70 years) with lipoprotein phenotype IIb or IV and clinical diagnosis of familial combined hyperlipidemia, a condition probably related to increased hepatic lipoprotein synthesis. Cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylation rates were assayed in vivo by tritium release assay after an intravenous injection of [7 alpha-3H]cholesterol. The results were compared by ANOVA to the values obtained in a group of 28 normolipidemic patients (aged 34 to 83 years), with age as the covariate. Six patients were also studied after treatment with gemfibrozil (900 to 1200 mg/d for 6 to 8 weeks) and 5 patients were studied after treatment with bezafibrate (400 mg/d for 6 to 8 weeks). Hydroxylation rates were 0.82 +/- 0.22 mmol/d in the familial hypercholesterolemia group and 1.30 +/- 0.47 mmol/d in the familial combined hyperlipidemia group (P < .05 between the two groups and between patients with familial combined hyperlipidemia and control subjects; P = NS between patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and control subjects, as determined by ANOVA).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7627697

  13. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the gamma 3, alpha 5, or beta 3 subunit of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Culiat, C T; Stubbs, L J; Montgomery, C S; Russell, L B; Rinchik, E M

    1994-01-01

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the gamma 3, alpha 5, and beta 3 subunits of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3 on a panel of p-locus deletions, we have determined that the order of genes within this cluster is centromere-p(D15S12h)-Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telom ere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors (approximately 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. We have previously suggested that deficiency of the beta 3 subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report we describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the gamma 3 transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the gamma 3 nor alpha 5 transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three (gamma 3, alpha 5, and beta 3) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A gamma-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the gamma 3 and/or alpha 5 subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the gamma 3 and/or alpha 5 subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans. Images PMID:8146195

  14. Quantitative EEG analysis in post-traumatic anosmia.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, E; Borghetti, D; Fabbrini, M; Maestri, M; Cignoni, F; Sartucci, F; Murri, L

    2006-12-11

    Many objective and quantitative methods have been developed to create a procedure or a device to prove, describe and quantify olfactory deficit and anosmia, especially after a head trauma. Electrophysiological testing throughout olfactoelectroencephalography (olfactoEEG) is based on brain activity desynchronisation, and on the subsequent disappearance of alpha activity on the posterior regions after an olfactory stimulus. Yet traditional evaluation of EEG can be difficult, because of little or hardly detectable alpha activity on the posterior regions ('alpha rare'). The aim of this study was to evaluate the Olfactory Stop Reaction (OSR) by means of frequency band power calculation and subsequent topographical mapping in patients with post-traumatic anosmia, who presented 'alpha rare' EEG. Twenty-five consecutive patients, affected by anosmia caused by head trauma, were submitted to an EEG recording with olfactory stimulation. After signal processing and analysis, an Olfactory Stop Reaction was detected in 17 out of 25 patients; moreover, in these patients we detected a significant decrease in alpha band power in the occipital regions and an increase in theta band power on midline frontal and central regions after olfactory stimulation. In the remaining eight patients, no significant variation in band power was observed. In conclusion, an objective evaluation of the olfactory function with this method of automatic EEG signal analysis allows the limits given by psychophysical methods and traditional EEG to be overcome and attempts to fulfil the requirements for standardization of olfactory function evalution. PMID:17113930

  15. The impact of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland: exploiting a national registry to understand a rare disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M Emmet; Pennycooke, Kevin; Carroll, Tomás P; Shum, Jonathan; Fee, Laura T; O'Connor, Catherine; Logan, P Mark; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) have mutations in the SERPINA1 gene causing genetic susceptibility to early onset lung and liver disease that may result in premature death. Environmental interactions have a significant impact in determining the disease phenotype and outcome in AATD. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of AATD in Ireland. Clinical demographics and available thoracic computerised tomography (CT) imaging were detected from 139 PiZZ individuals identified from the Irish National AATD Registry. Clinical information was collected by questionnaire. Data was analysed to assess AATD disease severity and evaluate predictors of clinical phenotype. Questionnaires were collected from 107/139 (77%) and thoracic CT evaluation was available in 72/107 (67.2%). 74% of respondents had severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (GOLD stage C or D). Cigarette smoking was the greatest predictor of impairment in FEV1 and DLCO (%predicted) and the extent of emphysema correlated most significantly with DLCO. Interestingly the rate of FEV1 decline was similar in ex-smokers when compared to never-smokers. Passive smoke exposure in childhood resulted in a greater total pack-year smoking history. Radiological evidence of bronchiectasis was a common finding and associated with increasing age. The Irish National AATD Registry facilitates clinical and basic science research of this condition in Ireland. This study illustrates the detrimental effect of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of AATD in Ireland and the benefit of immediate smoking cessation at any stage of lung disease. PMID:25938284

  16. Expression of the phenotypic abnormality of platelet-type von Willebrand disease in a recombinant glycoprotein Ib alpha fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Murata, M; Russell, S R; Ruggeri, Z M; Ware, J

    1993-01-01

    The platelet GP Ib-IX receptor supports platelet adhesion and activation by binding to vWf in the exposed subendothelial matrix. An abnormal GP Ib-IX complex exists in platelet-type or pseudo-von Willebrand disease and has a characteristic increased affinity for soluble vWf resulting in impaired hemostatic function due to the removal of larger vWf multimers from the circulation. Genetic studies within an afflicted family have demonstrated that the disease is linked to a Gly233-->Val amino acid substitution within the alpha-subunit of the oligomeric GP Ib-IX complex (Miller, J.L., D. Cunningham, V.A. Lyle, and C. L. Finch. 1991. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 88:4761-4765). To evaluate the functional consequences of this mutation, we constructed a recombinant analogue of the alpha-subunit of GP Ib containing Val233. Experiments comparing molecules with either Gly233 or Val233 revealed that the Val substitution generates a molecule with increased affinity for vWf. The recombinant fragment reproduces the functional abnormality of the GP Ib-IX complex in platelet-type von Willebrand disease, thus establishing the molecular basis of the bleeding disorder within this family. Moreover, it becomes apparent that structural elements responsible for the regulation of hemostasis through modulation of vWf affinity for platelets reside within the alpha-subunit of the GP Ib-IX complex. Images PMID:8486780

  17. [Mechanism of anesthesia: view from the EEG during anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Hagihira, Satoshi

    2011-05-01

    It is widely known that electroencephalogram (EEG) shows dramatic changes with increase of the concentration of anesthetic. It is considered that volatile anesthetics (i. e. isoflurane, sevoflurane), barbiturates, propofol show anesthetic effect by potentiating GABAA receptor. Changing patterns of EEG by these anesthetics are quite similar. In light anesthetic level, high frequency with low amplitude waves are dominant. With increase of anesthetic concentration, waves in alpha range (8-13 Hz) become dominant. In deeper levels, powers in alpha range then become smaller and theta or delta powers become dominant. With further deeper levels, EEG waveform changes into specific pattern so-called "burst and suppression", and finally it becomes flat. The author considers that prominent alpha power indicates adequate anesthetic level. However this is not always the required condition for adequate anesthesia, because alpha power never becomes larger in some patients even when the anesthetic level was judged as adequate by concentration dependent changing patterns of EEG. As EEG changes in relation to the concentration of anesthetic, it seems to be correlated with the level of consciousness. But EEG patterns during anesthesia are mainly determined by the condition of thalamic neurons, and it would merely indicate the level of hypnosis indirectly. PMID:21626859

  18. Modeling and detecting deep brain activity with MEG & EEG.

    PubMed

    Attal, Yohan; Bhattacharjee, Manik; Yelnik, Jerome; Cottereau, Benoit; Lefèvre, Julien; Okada, Yoshio; Bardinet, Eric; Chupin, Marie; Baillet, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    We introduce an anatomical and electrophysiological model of deep brain structures dedicated to magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging. So far, most imaging inverse models considered that MEG/EEG surface signals were predominantly produced by cortical, hence superficial, neural currents. Here we question whether crucial deep brain structures such as the basal ganglia and the hippocampus may also contribute to distant, scalp MEG and EEG measurements. We first design a realistic anatomical and electrophysiological model of these structures and subsequently run Monte-Carlo experiments to evaluate the respective sensitivity of the MEG and EEG to signals from deeper origins. Results indicate that MEG/EEG may indeed localize these deeper generators, which is confirmed here from experimental MEG data reporting on the modulation of alpha brain waves. PMID:18003114

  19. EEG Correlates of Self-Referential Processing

    PubMed Central

    Knyazev, Gennady G.

    2013-01-01

    Self-referential processing has been principally investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, understanding of the brain functioning is not possible without careful comparison of the evidence coming from different methodological domains. This paper aims to review electroencephalographic (EEG) studies of self-referential processing and to evaluate how they correspond, complement, or contradict the existing fMRI evidence. There are potentially two approaches to the study of EEG correlates of self-referential processing. Firstly, because simultaneous registration of EEG and fMRI has become possible, the degree of overlap between these two signals in brain regions related to self-referential processing could be determined. Second and more direct approach would be the study of EEG correlates of self-referential processing per se. In this review, I discuss studies, which employed both these approaches and show that in line with fMRI evidence, EEG correlates of self-referential processing are most frequently found in brain regions overlapping with the default network, particularly in the medial prefrontal cortex. In the time domain, the discrimination of self- and others-related information is mostly associated with the P300 ERP component, but sometimes is observed even earlier. In the frequency domain, different frequency oscillations have been shown to contribute to self-referential processing, with spontaneous self-referential mentation being mostly associated with the alpha frequency band. PMID:23761757

  20. Wavelet analysis as a tool for investigating movement-related cortical oscillations in EEG-fMRI coregistration.

    PubMed

    Storti, Silvia Francesca; Formaggio, Emanuela; Beltramello, Alberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Electroencephalography combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) identifies blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes associated with physiological and pathological EEG events. In this study we used EEG-fMRI to determine the possible correlation between topographical movement related EEG changes in brain oscillatory activity recorded from EEG electrodes over the scalp and fMRI cortical responses in motor areas during finger movement. Thirty-two channels of EEG were recorded in 12 subjects during eyes-closed condition inside a three T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner using an MR-compatible EEG recording system. Off-line MRI artifact subtraction software was applied to obtain continuous EEG data during fMRI acquisition. For EEG data analysis we used a time-frequency approach to measure time by varying the energy in a signal at a given frequency band by the convolution of the EEG signal with a wavelet family in the alpha and beta bands. The correlation between the BOLD signal associated with the EEG regressor provides that sensory motor region is a source of the EEG. We conclude that combined EEG-fMRI can be used to investigate movement-related oscillations of the human brain inside an MRI scanner and wavelet analysis adds further details on the EEG changes. The movement-related changes in the EEG signals are useful to identify the brain activation sources responsible for BOLD-signal changes. PMID:19921416

  1. Efficiency analysis of voluntary control of human's EEG spectral characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kiroy, Valery N; Aslanyan, Elena V; Lazurenko, Dmitry M; Minyaeva, Nadezhda R; Bakhtin, Oleg M

    2016-03-01

    Spectral power (SP) of EEG alpha and beta-2 frequencies in different cortical areas has been used for neurofeedback training to control a graphic interface in different scenarios. The results show that frequency range and brain cortical areas are associated with high or low efficiency of voluntary control. Overall, EEG phenomena observed in the course of training are largely general changes involving extensive brain areas and frequency bands. Finally, we have demonstrated EEG patterns that dynamically switch with a specific feature in different tasks within one training, after a relatively short period of training. PMID:26912214

  2. Seizures and EEG features in 74 patients with genetic-dysmorphic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Alfei, Enrico; Raviglione, Federico; Franceschetti, Silvana; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Milani, Donatella; Selicorni, Angelo; Riva, Daria; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Binelli, Simona

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common findings in chromosome aberrations. Types of seizures and severity may significantly vary both between different conditions and within the same aberration. Hitherto specific seizures and EEG patterns are identified for only few syndromes. We studied 74 patients with defined genetic-dysmorphic syndromes with and without epilepsy in order to assess clinical and electroencephalographic features, to compare our observation with already described electro-clinical phenotypes, and to identify putative electroencephalographic and/or seizure characteristics useful to address the diagnosis. In our population, 10 patients had chromosomal disorders, 19 microdeletion or microduplication syndromes, and 32 monogenic syndromes. In the remaining 13, syndrome diagnosis was assessed on clinical grounds. Our study confirmed the high incidence of epilepsy in genetic-dysmorphic syndromes. Moreover, febrile seizures and neonatal seizures had a higher incidence compared to general population. In addition, more than one third of epileptic patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. EEG study revealed poor background organization in 42 patients, an excess of diffuse rhythmic activities in beta, alpha or theta frequency bands in 34, and epileptiform patterns in 36. EEG was completely normal only in 20 patients. No specific electro-clinical pattern was identified, except for inv-dup15, Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Nevertheless some specific conditions are described in detail, because of notable differences from what previously reported. Regarding the diagnostic role of EEG, we found that--even without any epileptiform pattern--the generation of excessive rhythmic activities in different frequency bandwidths might support the diagnosis of a genetic syndrome. PMID:25257908

  3. Response of hepatitis C virus to long-term passage in the presence of alpha interferon: multiple mutations and a common phenotype.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Beach, Nathan M; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles; Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie

    2013-07-01

    Cell culture-produced hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been subjected to up to 100 serial passages in human hepatoma cells in the absence or presence of different doses of alpha interferon (IFN-?). Virus survival, genetic changes, fitness levels, and phenotypic traits have been examined. While high initial IFN-? doses (increasing from 1 to 4 IU/ml) did not allow HCV survival beyond passage 40, a gradual exposure (from 0.25 to 10 IU/ml) allowed the virus to survive for at least 100 passages. The virus passaged in the presence of IFN-? acquired IFN-? resistance as evidenced by enhanced progeny production and viral protein expression in an IFN-? environment. A partial IFN-? resistance was also noted in populations passaged in the absence of IFN-?. All lineages acquired adaptative mutations, and multiple, nonsynonymous mutations scattered throughout the genome were present in IFN-?-selected populations. Comparison of consensus sequences indicates a dominance of synonymous versus nonsynonymous substitutions. IFN-?-resistant populations displayed decreased sensitivity to a combination of IFN-? and ribavirin. A phenotypic trait common to all assayed viral populations is the ability to increase shutoff host cell protein synthesis, accentuated in infections with IFN-?-selected populations carried out in the presence of IFN-?. The trait was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase R (PKR) and eIF2?, although other contributing factors are likely. The results suggest that multiple, independent mutational pathways can confer IFN-? resistance to HCV and might explain why no unified picture has been obtained regarding IFN-? resistance in vivo. PMID:23637397

  4. Novel active comb-shaped dry electrode for EEG measurement in hairy site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Wu, Chung-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important biopotential, and has been widely applied in clinical applications. The conventional EEG electrode with conductive gels is usually used for measuring EEG. However, the use of conductive gel also encounters with the issue of drying and hardening. Recently, many dry EEG electrodes based on different conductive materials and techniques were proposed to solve the previous issue. However, measuring EEG in the hairy site is still a difficult challenge. In this study, a novel active comb-shaped dry electrode was proposed to measure EEG in hairy site. Different form other comb-shaped or spike-shaped dry electrodes, it can provide more excellent performance of avoiding the signal attenuation, phase distortion, and the reduction of common mode rejection ratio. Even under walking motion, it can effectively acquire EEG in hairy site. Finally, the experiments for alpha rhythm and steady-state visually evoked potential were also tested to validate the proposed electrode. PMID:25137719

  5. Pharmaco-EEG profiles of antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Saletu, B.; Grünberger, J.; Rajna, P.

    1983-01-01

    1 Antidepressant drugs produce significant changes in human brain function as reflected in the quantitatively analysed EEG. Two main types of pharmaco-EEG profiles may be differentiated: a thymeretic (desipramine-like) profile characterised mainly by an alpha increase suggesting activating properties and a thymoleptic (imipramine- or amitriptyline-like) profile showing a concomitant increase of slow and fast activities and a decrease in alpha activity indicating also sedative qualities. A small number of compounds exhibit still different profiles. 2 Aside from determining the type of EEG changes, the pharmaco-EEG method seems to be of value in determining time and dose efficacy relations at the target organ, the human brain. Moreover, the relationships between pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics may be determined. 3 Fluvoxamine, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitor from the new class of 2-aminoethyloximethers of aralkylketones, produced a typical thymoleptic pharmaco-EEG profile after oral doses of 75 mg in a double-blind placebo-controlled study involving 10 healthy volunteers. Fluvoxamine (75 mg) induced less augmentation of slow activity than 75 mg imipramine, indicating less sedative properties of fluvoxamine than imipramine. 4 After 75 mg fluvoxamine psychometric tests demonstrated a tendency towards an improvement in attention, concentration, psychomotor activity, after-effect and mood and a significant increase in critical flicker fusion frequency as compared with placebo. Comparison with the reference drug, 75 mg imipramine, revealed a significant superiority of fluvoxamine regarding concentration, psychomotor activity, tapping, reaction time, mood and affectivity. 5 Side-effects (mostly tiredness) were seen in five out of 10 subjects after 75 mg fluvoxamine and in eight out of 10 subjects after 75 mg imipramine. There were no clinically relevant changes in pulse, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. PMID:6407499

  6. Identifying periods of drowsy driving using EEG.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy; Johnson, Robin; Milavetz, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Drowsy driving is a significant contributor to death and injury crashes on our nation's highways. Predictive neurophysiologic/physiologic solutions to reduce these incidences have been proposed and developed. EEG based metrics were found to be promising in initial studies, but remain controversial in their efficacy, primarily due to failures to develop replication studies within the simulation settings used for development, and real-world validation. This analysis sought to address these short comings by assessing the utility of the B-Alert algorithms, in a replication study of driving and drowsiness. Data were collected on the National Advanced Driving Simulator from 72 volunteer drivers exposed to three types of roadways at three times of day representing different levels of drowsiness. EEG metrics, collected using the B-Alert X10 Wireless Headset were evaluated to determine their utility in future predictive studies. The replication of the B-Alert algorithms was a secondary focus for this analysis, resulting in highly variable start times within each time of day segment, leading to EEG data being confounded by the diurnal variations that occur in the basal EEG signal. Regardless of this limitation, the analysis revealed promising outcomes. The EEG based algorithms for sleep onset, drowsiness, as well as fatigue related power spectral bandwidths (i.e. lateral central, and parietal alpha) varied with time of day of the drives. Interestingly, EEG metrics of cognitive workload were also sensative to the terrain of the drives. The replicaiton of the B-Alert algorithms were a secondary focuse in the study design, Taken together, these data indicate great potential of carefully designed studies to utilize neurophysiologic metrics to identify time of day and task and road conditions that may be at greatest risk during fatigued/drowsy periods. PMID:24406950

  7. Identifying Periods of Drowsy Driving Using EEG

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Timothy; Johnson, Robin; Milavetz, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Drowsy driving is a significant contributor to death and injury crashes on our nation’s highways. Predictive neurophysiologic/physiologic solutions to reduce these incidences have been proposed and developed. EEG based metrics were found to be promising in initial studies, but remain controversial in their efficacy, primarily due to failures to develop replication studies within the simulation settings used for development, and real-world validation. This analysis sought to address these short comings by assessing the utility of the B-Alert algorithms, in a replication study of driving and drowsiness. Data were collected on the National Advanced Driving Simulator from 72 volunteer drivers exposed to three types of roadways at three times of day representing different levels of drowsiness. EEG metrics, collected using the B-Alert X10 Wireless Headset were evaluated to determine their utility in future predictive studies. The replication of the B-Alert algorithms was a secondary focus for this analysis, resulting in highly variable start times within each time of day segment, leading to EEG data being confounded by the diurnal variations that occur in the basal EEG signal. Regardless of this limitation, the analysis revealed promising outcomes. The EEG based algorithms for sleep onset, drowsiness, as well as fatigue related power spectral bandwidths (i.e. lateral central, and parietal alpha) varied with time of day of the drives. Interestingly, EEG metrics of cognitive workload were also sensative to the terrain of the drives. The replicaiton of the B-Alert algorithms were a secondary focuse in the study design, Taken together, these data indicate great potential of carefully designed studies to utilize neurophysiologic metrics to identify time of day and task and road conditions that may be at greatest risk during fatigued/drowsy periods. PMID:24406950

  8. Sleep EEG Fingerprints Reveal Accelerated Thalamocortical Oscillatory Dynamics in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodizs, Robert; Gombos, Ferenc; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Sleep EEG alterations are emerging features of several developmental disabilities, but detailed quantitative EEG data on the sleep phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome (WS, 7q11.23 microdeletion) is still lacking. Based on laboratory (Study I) and home sleep records (Study II) here we report WS-related features of the patterns of…

  9. Sleep EEG Fingerprints Reveal Accelerated Thalamocortical Oscillatory Dynamics in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodizs, Robert; Gombos, Ferenc; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Sleep EEG alterations are emerging features of several developmental disabilities, but detailed quantitative EEG data on the sleep phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome (WS, 7q11.23 microdeletion) is still lacking. Based on laboratory (Study I) and home sleep records (Study II) here we report WS-related features of the patterns of…

  10. EEG and FMRI coregistration to investigate the cortical oscillatory activities during finger movement.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Avesani, Mirko; Cerini, Roberto; Milanese, Franco; Gasparini, Anna; Acler, Michele; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2008-12-01

    Electroencephalography combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) may be used to identify blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes associated with physiological and pathological EEG event. In this study we used EEG-fMRI to determine the possible correlation between topographical movement-related EEG changes in brain oscillatory activity recorded from EEG electrodes over the scalp and fMRI-BOLD cortical responses in motor areas during finger movement. Thirty-two channels of EEG were recorded in 9 subjects during eyes-open condition inside a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner using a MR-compatible EEG recording system. Off-line MRI artifact subtraction software was applied to obtain continuous EEG data during fMRI acquisition. For EEG data analysis we used the event-related-synchronization/desynchronization (ERS/ERD) approach to investigate where movement-related decreases in alpha and beta power are located. For image statistical analysis we used a general linear model (GLM) approach. There was a significant correlation between the positive-negative ratio of BOLD signal peaks and ERD values in the electrodes over the region of activation. We conclude that combined EEG-fMRI may be used to investigate movement-related oscillations of the human brain inside an MRI scanner and the movement-related changes in the EMG or EEG signals are useful to identify the brain activation sources responsible for BOLD-signal changes. PMID:18648924

  11. EEG correlates of social interaction at distance

    PubMed Central

    Giroldini, William; Pederzoli, Luciano; Bilucaglia, Marco; Caini, Patrizio; Ferrini, Alessandro; Melloni, Simone; Prati, Elena; Tressoldi, Patrizio

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated EEG correlates of social interaction at distance between twenty-five pairs of participants who were not connected by any traditional channels of communication. Each session involved the application of 128 stimulations separated by intervals of random duration ranging from 4 to 6 seconds. One of the pair received a one-second stimulation from a light signal produced by an arrangement of red LEDs, and a simultaneous 500 Hz sinusoidal audio signal of the same length. The other member of the pair sat in an isolated sound-proof room, such that any sensory interaction between the pair was impossible. An analysis of the Event-Related Potentials associated with sensory stimulation using traditional averaging methods showed a distinct peak at approximately 300 ms, but only in the EEG activity of subjects who were directly stimulated. However, when a new algorithm was applied to the EEG activity based on the correlation between signals from all active electrodes, a weak but robust response was also detected in the EEG activity of the passive member of the pair, particularly within 9 – 10 Hz in the Alpha range. Using the Bootstrap method and the Monte Carlo emulation, this signal was found to be statistically significant. PMID:26966513

  12. EEG in the neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Lamblin, M D; de Villepin-Touzery, A

    2015-03-01

    The execution and interpretation of neonatal EEG adheres to strict and specific criteria related to this very early age. In preterm newborns, the dedicated healthcare staff needs to respect EEG indications and chronology of EEG recordings in order to diagnose and manage various pathologies, and use EEG in addition to cerebral imaging. EEG analysis focuses on a global vision of the recording according to the neonate's state of alertness and various age-related patterns. Monitoring of continuous conventional EEG and simplified EEG signal processing can help screen for seizures and monitor the effect of antiepileptic treatment, as well as appreciating changes in EEG background activity, for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. EEG reports should be highly explanatory to meet the expectations of the physician's clinical request. PMID:25678127

  13. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  14. Telemetered EEG in schizophrenia: spectral analysis during abnormal behaviour episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, J R; Livermore, A

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to detect electroencephalographic (EEG) changes associated with characteristic clinical signs and symptoms of schizophrenia, power spectra were derived from scalp EEGs of schizophrenic patients recorded by telemetry during free behaviour on their psychiatric wards. Power spectra from EEG epochs coincident with psychomotor blocking, stereotyped automatism or hallucinations were compared with spectra derived during periods of relatively normal behaviour, during performance of specific tasks and spectra from control subjects. Ramp spectra, characterised by a smooth decline in power from lowest to highest frequencies, previously found in conjunction with subcortical spike activity of epilepsy were not found in any control subject, but appeared in spectra from schizophrenic patients during catatonic episodes, hallucinatory periods and visual checking. Schizophrenic patients also had more slow activity and less alpha activity in their EEGs than normal control subjects. Images PMID:7086451

  15. EEG correlates of emotions in dream narratives from typical young adults and individuals with autistic spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Daoust, Anne-Marie; Lusignan, Félix-Antoine; Braun, Claude M J; Mottron, Laurent; Godbout, Roger

    2008-03-01

    The relationship between emotional dream content and Alpha and Beta REM sleep EEG activity was investigated in typical individuals and in Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Dream narratives of persons with ASD contained fewer emotional elements. In both groups, emotions correlated positively with slow Alpha (8.0-10.0 Hz) spectral power over parieto-occipital and left central regions, as well as with a right occipital EEG asymmetry. Slow Alpha activity in ASD individuals was lower over midline and parasagittal areas and higher over lateral areas compared to controls. Both groups displayed a right-biased slow Alpha activity for midparietal and occipital (significantly higher in control) sites. Results indicate that Alpha EEG activity may represent a neurophysiological substrate associated with emotional dream content. Distinctive Alpha EEG patterns and asymmetries suggest that dream generation implies different brain connectivity in ASD. PMID:18047484

  16. A mimetic-based frequency domain technique for automatic generation of EEG reports.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, N; Dutt, D N; Satyam, S

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a novel mimetic technique of using frequency domain approach and digital filters for automatic generation of EEG reports. Digitized EEG data files, transported on a cartridge, have been used for the analysis. The signals are filtered for alpha, beta, theta, and delta bands with digital bandpass filters of fourth-order, cascaded, Butterworth, infinite impulse response (IIR) type. The maximum amplitude, mean frequency, continuity index and degree of asymmetry have been computed for a given EEG frequency band. Finally, searches for the presence of artifacts (eye movement or muscle artifacts) in the EEG records have been made. PMID:8467635

  17. EEG patterns in persons exposed to ionizing radiation as a result of the Chernobyl accident: part 1: conventional EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Loganovsky, K N; Yuryev, K L

    2001-01-01

    Prospective conventional EEG study was carried out 3-5 and 10-13 years after the Chernobyl accident (1986) in patients who had acute radiation sickness and in emergency workers in 1986 ("liquidators"). Control groups comprised healthy volunteers; veterans of the Afghanistan war with posttraumatic stress disorder; veterans with mild traumatic brain injury; and patients with dyscirculatory encephalopathy. In 3-5 years after irradiation, there were irritated EEG changes with paroxysmal activity shifted to the left frontotemporal region (cortical-limbic overactivation) that were transformed 10-13 years after irradiation toward a low-voltage EEG pattern with excess of fast (beta) and slow (delta) activity together with depression of alpha and theta activity (organic brain damage with inhibition of the cortical-limbic system). Quantitative EEG is likely to be very informative for investigation of dose-effect relationships. PMID:11748314

  18. Combined testing for CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA) mutations and promoter methylation in acute myeloid leukemia demonstrates shared phenotypic features.

    PubMed

    Szankasi, Philippe; Ho, Albert K; Bahler, David W; Efimova, Olga; Kelley, Todd W

    2011-02-01

    Loss of function mutations in CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) have been identified in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and bi-allelic (double) CEBPA mutations are associated with improved prognosis in cases of cytogenetically normal-AML. In a subset of AML patients lacking CEBPA mutations, core promotor methylation of CEBPA has been described and is associated with a gene expression profile similar to the mutated cases including the expression of T cell associated genes such as CD7. However, the overall incidence and pattern of CEBPA mutations and core promoter methylation has not been thoroughly explored in a larger subset of AML with expression of CD7. Here we describe a simple and clinically deployable CEBPA promoter methylation test and the results of combined testing for CEBPA mutations and promoter methylation in 102 cases of AML, including 43 CD7+ cases. Overall, there were 5 methylated cases, 6 cases with double mutations, and 3 cases with single mutations. Significantly, 10 of 43 CD7+ cases (23%) had either methylated or double-mutated CEBPA. The CD7+ subset included all 5 methylated cases and 5 of the 6 cases with double mutations. All 3 cases with single mutations were CD7-. No case exhibited both hypermethylation and mutations. We find that promoter methylation accounts for half of those CD7+ cases with CEBPA dysregulating abnormalities. Furthermore, methylated cases and those with bi-allelic CEBPA mutations have similar phenotypic features including expression of CD7 and lack of co-incident NPM1 mutations. Our study suggests that methylation testing may be as important as mutation testing for identifying AML cases with CEBPA dysregulation and may be indicated in the routine prognostic workup of AML. PMID:20970189

  19. Invasive EEG explorations.

    PubMed

    Taussig, D; Montavont, A; Isnard, J

    2015-03-01

    The Wada test was adapted from the procedure described by Wada in 1964. It still has a role in the prognostic evaluation of memory disorders after mesial temporal lobectomy. The test consists of injecting a short-acting anesthetic into one hemisphere, under continuous EEG monitoring and during carotid catheterization, to verify the function of contralateral structures. Intracranial EEG recordings deliver signals with few artifacts, and which are quite specific of the zone explored. Three types of electrodes are in common use: (a) foramen ovale (FO) electrodes: electrodes can be inserted directly, without any stereotactic procedure, to provide easy and comparative EEG recordings of the lower and middle portions of the temporal lobe close to the hippocampus. These allow validation of the temporal lobe origin of seizures using FO electrodes recording coupled with scalp EEG; (b): subdural strip or grip electrodes. This relatively aggressive technique carries infectious and hemorrhagic risks and does not allow the exploration of deep cortical structures. However, it permits precise functional cortical mapping via electrical stimulation because of dense and regular positioning of electrodes over the cortical convexity; (c) stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography [SEEG]). Electrodes are individually planned and inserted within the brain parenchyma through small burr holes. This technique is less aggressive than subdural grid exploration. However it offers relatively limited spatial sampling that may be less well adapted to precise functional evaluation. It allows recording from deep cortical structures and can be argued to be the gold standard of presurgical EEG exploration. PMID:25703438

  20. Signal Quality Assessment Model for Wearable EEG Sensor on Prediction of Mental Stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Qinglin; Hu, Bo; Majoe, Dennis; Zheng, Fang; Moore, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) plays an important role in E-healthcare systems, especially in the mental healthcare area, where constant and unobtrusive monitoring is desirable. In the context of OPTIMI project, a novel, low cost, and light weight wearable EEG sensor has been designed and produced. In order to improve the performance and reliability of EEG sensors in real-life settings, we propose a method to evaluate the quality of EEG signals, based on which users can easily adjust the connection between electrodes and their skin. Our method helps to filter invalid EEG data from personal trials in both domestic and office settings. We then apply an algorithm based on Discrete Wavelet Transformation (DWT) and Adaptive Noise Cancellation (ANC) which has been designed to remove ocular artifacts (OA) from the EEG signal. DWT is applied to obtain a reconstructed OA signal as a reference while ANC, based on recursive least squares, is used to remove the OA from the original EEG data. The newly produced sensors were tested and deployed within the OPTIMI framework for chronic stress detection. EEG nonlinear dynamics features and frontal asymmetry of theta, alpha, and beta bands have been selected as biological indicators for chronic stress, showing relative greater right anterior EEG data activity in stressful individuals. Evaluation results demonstrate that our EEG sensor and data processing algorithms have successfully addressed the requirements and challenges of a portable system for patient monitoring, as envisioned by the EU OPTIMI project. PMID:25935041

  1. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, or {beta}{sub 3} subunit of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Culia, C.T.; Stubbs, L.J.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M.

    1994-03-29

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3} subunits of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telomere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors ({approximately} 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. The authors have previously suggested that deficiency of the {beta}{sub 3} subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report they describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the {gamma}{sub 3} transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the {gamma}{sub 3} nor {alpha}{sub 5} transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three ({gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3}) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A {gamma}-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans.

  2. EEG activity during the performance of complex mental problems.

    PubMed

    Jausovec, N; Jausovec, K

    2000-04-01

    This study investigated differences in cognitive processes related to problem complexity. It was assumed that these differences would be reflected in respondents' EEG activity--spectral power and coherence. A second issue of the study was to compare differences between the lower (alpha(1) = 7.9-10.0 Hz), and upper alpha band (alpha(2) = 10.1-12.9 Hz). In the first experiment two well-defined problems with two levels of complexity were used. Only minor differences in EEG power and coherence measures related to problem complexity were observed. In the second experiment divergent production problems resembling tasks on creativity tests were compared with dialectic problems calling for creative solutions. Differences in EEG power measures were mainly related to the form of problem presentation (figural/verbal). In contrast, coherence was related to the level of creativity needed to solve a problem. Noticeable increased intra- and interhemispheric cooperation between mainly the far distant brain regions was observed in the EEG activity of respondents while solving the dialectic problems. These results are explained by the more intense involvement of the long cortico-cortical fiber system in creative thinking. Differences between the lower and upper alpha band were significant for the power and coherence measures. In Experiment 2, fewer differences were observed in power measures in the upper alpha band than in the lower alpha band. A reverse pattern was observed for the coherence measures. These results hint to a functional independence of the two alpha bands, however, they do not allow to draw firm conclusions about their functional meanings. The study showed that it is unlikely that individuals solve well- and ill-defined problems by employing similar cognitive strategies. PMID:10700625

  3. Flexible electroencephalogram (EEG) headband

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Headband incorporates sensors which are embedded in sponges and are exposed only on surface that touches skin. Electrode sponge system is continually fed electrolyte through forced feed vacuum system. Headband may be used for EEG testing in hospitals, clinical laboratories, rest homes, and law enforcement agencies.

  4. Electroencephalogram (EEG) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the brain. This procedure tracks and records brain wave patterns. Small metal discs with thin wires (electrodes) are placed on the scalp, and then send signals to a computer to record the results. Normal electrical activity in the brain makes a recognizable pattern. Through an EEG, doctors ...

  5. EEG changes during forced alternate nostril breathing.

    PubMed

    Stancák, A; Kuna, M

    1994-10-01

    The effects of 10 min forced alternate nostril breathing (FANB) on EEG topography were studied in 18 trained subjects. One type of FANB consisted in left nostril inspiration and right nostril expiration and the other type in right nostril inspiration and left nostril expiration. Mean power in the beta bands and partially in the alpha band increased during FANB irrespective of the type of nostril breathing. In addition, hemisphere asymmetry in the beta 1 band decreased in the second half of FANB suggesting that FANB has a balancing effect on the functional activity of the left and right hemisphere. PMID:7876041

  6. Association of EEG, MRI, and regional blood flow biomarkers is predictive of prodromal Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Davide Vito

    2015-01-01

    Background Thinning in the temporoparietal cortex, hippocampal atrophy, and a lower regional blood perfusion is connected with prodromal stage of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Of note, an increase of electroencephalography (EEG) upper/low alpha frequency power ratio has also been associated with these major landmarks of prodromal AD. Methods Clinical and neuropsychological assessment, EEG recording, and high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging were done in 74 grown up subjects with mild cognitive impairment. This information was gathered and has been assessed 3 years postliminary. EEG recording and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography assessment was done in 27 subjects. Alpha3/alpha2 frequency power ratio, including cortical thickness, was figured for every subject. Contrasts in cortical thickness among the groups were assessed. Pearson’s r relationship coefficient was utilized to evaluate the quality of the relationship between cortical thinning, brain perfusion, and EEG markers. Results The higher alpha3/alpha2 frequency power ratio group corresponded with more prominent cortical decay and a lower perfusional rate in the temporoparietal cortex. In a subsequent meetup after 3 years, these patients had AD. Conclusion High EEG upper/low alpha power ratio was connected with cortical diminishing and lower perfusion in the temporoparietal brain area. The increase in EEG upper/low alpha frequency power ratio could be helpful in recognizing people in danger of conversion to AD dementia and this may be quality information in connection with clinical assessment. PMID:26604762

  7. How to use: amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG).

    PubMed

    Shah, Nidhi Agrawal; Wusthoff, Courtney Jane

    2015-04-01

    Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) is a method for continuous monitoring of brain activity that is increasingly used in the neonatal intensive care unit. In its simplest form, aEEG is a processed single-channel electroencephalogram that is filtered and time-compressed. Current evidence demonstrates that aEEG is useful to monitor cerebral background activity, diagnose and treat seizures and predict neurodevelopmental outcomes for preterm and term infants. This review aims to explain the fundamentals behind aEEG and its clinical applications. PMID:25035312

  8. Functional phenotype of phosphoinositide 3-kinase p85alpha-null platelets characterized by an impaired response to GP VI stimulation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naohide; Nakajima, Hideaki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Oda, Atsushi; Matsubara, Yumiko; Moroi, Masaaki; Terauchi, Yasuo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Suzuki, Harumi; Koyasu, Shigeo; Ikeda, Yasuo; Handa, Makoto

    2003-07-15

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), a family of lipid kinases comprising 3 classes with multiple isoforms, have been shown to participate in different phases of platelet signaling. To investigate the roles that enzymes play in platelet function in vivo and determine which isoforms are important for particular signaling events, we analyzed platelet function of gene knockout mice deficient in the p85alpha regulatory subunit of heterodimeric class IA PI3K. The kinase activity of p85alpha-/- platelets was only 5% of the activity of platelets from wild-type littermates. Platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin, U46619, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), or botrocetin was not defective in p85alpha-/- mice, compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, aggregation induced by collagen and collagen-related peptide (CRP) was partially but readily impaired in p85alpha-/- mice. Both P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding in response to CRP were also decreased to a similar extent in p85alpha-/- platelets. Platelets from p85alpha-/- mice appeared to spread poorly over a CRP-coated surface with intact filopodial protrusions. Significant attenuation of CRP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in known PI3K effectors such as Btk, Tec, PKB/Akt, and phospholipase Cgamma2 were observed with p85alpha-/- platelets, whereas no alteration was noted in upstream molecules of Syk, LAT, and SLP-76. Considered as a whole, these results provide the first genetic evidence that PI3K p85alpha plays a significant role in platelet function, almost exclusively in the glycoprotein (GP) VI/Fc receptor gamma chain complex-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:12649157

  9. The Default Mode Network and EEG Regional Spectral Power: A Simultaneous fMRI-EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Cornelius J.; Hitz, Konrad; Boers, Frank; Kawohl, Wolfram; Shah, N. Jon

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) frequencies have been linked to specific functions as an “electrophysiological signature” of a function. A combination of oscillatory rhythms has also been described for specific functions, with or without predominance of one specific frequency-band. In a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study at 3 T we studied the relationship between the default mode network (DMN) and the power of EEG frequency bands. As a methodological approach, we applied Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components (MELODIC) and dual regression analysis for fMRI resting state data. EEG power for the alpha, beta, delta and theta-bands were extracted from the structures forming the DMN in a region-of-interest approach by applying Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA). A strong link between the spontaneous BOLD response of the left parahippocampal gyrus and the delta-band extracted from the anterior cingulate cortex was found. A positive correlation between the beta-1 frequency power extracted from the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the spontaneous BOLD response of the right supplementary motor cortex was also established. The beta-2 frequency power extracted from the PCC and the precuneus showed a positive correlation with the BOLD response of the right frontal cortex. Our results support the notion of beta-band activity governing the “status quo” in cognitive and motor setup. The highly significant correlation found between the delta power within the DMN and the parahippocampal gyrus is in line with the association of delta frequencies with memory processes. We assumed “ongoing activity” during “resting state” in bringing events from the past to the mind, in which the parahippocampal gyrus is a relevant structure. Our data demonstrate that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations within the DMN are associated with different EEG-bands and strengthen the conclusion that this network is characterized by a specific electrophysiological signature created by combination of different brain rhythms subserving different putative functions. PMID:24505434

  10. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  11. Electroencephalograph (EEG) study of brain bistable illusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2015-05-01

    Bistable illusion reflects two different kinds of interpretations for a single image, which is currently known as a competition between two groups of antagonism of neurons. Recent research indicates that these two groups of antagonism of neurons express different comprehension, while one group is emitting a pulse, the other group will be restrained. On the other hand, when this inhibition mechanism becomes weaker, the other antagonism neurons group will take over the interpretation. Since attention plays key roles controlling cognition, is highly interesting to find the location and frequency band used by brain (with either top-down or bottom-up control) to reach deterministic visual perceptions. In our study, we used a 16-channel EEG system to record brain signals from subjects while conducting bistable illusion testing. An extra channel of the EEG system was used for temporal marking. The moment when subjects reach a perception switch, they click the channel and mark the time. The recorded data were presented in form of brain electrical activity map (BEAM) with different frequency bands for analysis. It was found that the visual cortex in the on the right side between parietal and occipital areas was controlling the switching of perception. In the periods with stable perception, we can constantly observe all the delta, theta, alpha and beta waves. While the period perception is switching, almost all theta, alpha, and beta waves were suppressed by delta waves. This result suggests that delta wave may control the processing of perception switching.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of microEEG: a miniature, wireless EEG device.

    PubMed

    Grant, Arthur C; Abdel-Baki, Samah G; Omurtag, Ahmet; Sinert, Richard; Chari, Geetha; Malhotra, Schweta; Weedon, Jeremy; Fenton, Andre A; Zehtabchi, Shahriar

    2014-05-01

    Measuring the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of an EEG device is unconventional and complicated by imperfect interrater reliability. We sought to compare the DA of a miniature, wireless, battery-powered EEG device ("microEEG") to a reference EEG machine in emergency department (ED) patients with altered mental status (AMS). Two hundred twenty-five ED patients with AMS underwent 3 EEGs. Two EEGs, EEG1 (Nicolet Monitor, "reference") and EEG2 (microEEG) were recorded simultaneously with EEG cup electrodes using a signal splitter. The remaining study, EEG3, was recorded with microEEG using an electrode cap immediately before or after EEG1/EEG2. The official EEG1 interpretation was considered the gold standard (EEG1-GS). EEG1, 2, and 3 were de-identified and blindly interpreted by two independent readers. A generalized mixed linear model was used to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of these interpretations relative to EEG1-GS and to compute a diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). Seventy-nine percent of EEG1-GS were abnormal. Neither the DOR nor the κf representing interrater reliabilities differed significantly between EEG1, EEG2, and EEG3. The mean setup time was 27 min for EEG1/EEG2 and 12 min for EEG3. The mean electrode impedance of EEG3 recordings was 12.6 kΩ (SD: 31.9 kΩ). The diagnostic accuracy of microEEG was comparable to that of the reference system and was not reduced when the EEG electrodes had high and unbalanced impedances. A common practice with many scientific instruments, measurement of EEG device DA provides an independent and quantitative assessment of device performance. PMID:24727466

  13. Concurrent EEG/fMRI analysis by multiway Partial Least Squares.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montes, Eduardo; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A; Miwakeichi, Fumikazu; Goldman, Robin I; Cohen, Mark S

    2004-07-01

    Data may now be recorded concurrently from EEG and functional MRI, using the Simultaneous Imaging for Tomographic Electrophysiology (SITE) method. As yet, there is no established means to integrate the analysis of the combined data set. Recognizing that the hemodynamically convolved time-varying EEG spectrum, S, is intrinsically multidimensional in space, frequency, and time motivated us to use multiway Partial Least-Squares (N-PLS) analysis to decompose EEG (independent variable) and fMRI (dependent variable) data uniquely as a sum of "atoms". Each EEG atom is the outer product of spatial, spectral, and temporal signatures and each fMRI atom the product of spatial and temporal signatures. The decomposition was constrained to maximize the covariance between corresponding temporal signatures of the EEG and fMRI. On all data sets, three components whose spectral peaks were in the theta, alpha, and gamma bands appeared; only the alpha atom had a significant temporal correlation with the fMRI signal. The spatial distribution of the alpha-band atom included parieto-occipital cortex, thalamus, and insula, and corresponded closely to that reported by Goldman et al. [NeuroReport 13(18) (2002) 2487] using a more conventional analysis. The source reconstruction from EEG spatial signature showed only the parieto-occipital sources. We interpret these results to indicate that some electrical sources may be intrinsically invisible to scalp EEG, yet may be revealed through conjoint analysis of EEG and fMRI data. These results may also expose brain regions that participate in the control of brain rhythms but may not themselves be generators. As of yet, no single neuroimaging method offers the optimal combination of spatial and temporal resolution; fusing fMRI and EEG meaningfully extends the spatio-temporal resolution and sensitivity of each method. PMID:15219575

  14. EEG biofeedback improves attentional bias in high trait anxiety individuals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emotion-related attentional bias is implicated in the aetiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback can obviously improve the anxiety disorders and reduce stress level, and can also enhance attention performance in healthy subjects. The present study examined the effects and mechanisms of EEG biofeedback training on the attentional bias of high trait anxiety (HTA) individuals toward negative stimuli. Results Event-related potentials were recorded while HTA (n=24) and nonanxious (n=21) individuals performed the color-word emotional Stroop task. During the emotional Stroop task, HTA participants showed longer reaction times and P300 latencies induced by negative words, compared to nonanxious participants. The EEG biofeedback significantly decreased the trait anxiety inventory score and reaction time in naming the color of negative words in the HTA group. P300 latencies evoked by negative stimuli in the EEG biofeedback group were significantly reduced after the alpha training, while no significant changes were observed in the sham biofeedback group after the intervention. Conclusion The prolonged P300 latency is associated with attentional bias to negative stimuli in the HTA group. EEG biofeedback training demonstrated a significant improvement of negative emotional attentional bias in HTA individuals, which may be due to the normalization of P300 latency. PMID:24099141

  15. Brain Oscillations in Sport: Toward EEG Biomarkers of Performance

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Guy; Petit, Géraldine; Cheron, Julian; Leroy, Axelle; Cebolla, Anita; Cevallos, Carlos; Petieau, Mathieu; Hoellinger, Thomas; Zarka, David; Clarinval, Anne-Marie; Dan, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Brain dynamics is at the basis of top performance accomplishment in sports. The search for neural biomarkers of performance remains a challenge in movement science and sport psychology. The non-invasive nature of high-density electroencephalography (EEG) recording has made it a most promising avenue for providing quantitative feedback to practitioners and coaches. Here, we review the current relevance of the main types of EEG oscillations in order to trace a perspective for future practical applications of EEG and event-related potentials (ERP) in sport. In this context, the hypotheses of unified brain rhythms and continuity between wake and sleep states should provide a functional template for EEG biomarkers in sport. The oscillations in the thalamo-cortical and hippocampal circuitry including the physiology of the place cells and the grid cells provide a frame of reference for the analysis of delta, theta, beta, alpha (incl.mu), and gamma oscillations recorded in the space field of human performance. Based on recent neuronal models facilitating the distinction between the different dynamic regimes (selective gating and binding) in these different oscillations we suggest an integrated approach articulating together the classical biomechanical factors (3D movements and EMG) and the high-density EEG and ERP signals to allow finer mathematical analysis to optimize sport performance, such as microstates, coherency/directionality analysis and neural generators. PMID:26955362

  16. Brain Oscillations in Sport: Toward EEG Biomarkers of Performance.

    PubMed

    Cheron, Guy; Petit, Géraldine; Cheron, Julian; Leroy, Axelle; Cebolla, Anita; Cevallos, Carlos; Petieau, Mathieu; Hoellinger, Thomas; Zarka, David; Clarinval, Anne-Marie; Dan, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Brain dynamics is at the basis of top performance accomplishment in sports. The search for neural biomarkers of performance remains a challenge in movement science and sport psychology. The non-invasive nature of high-density electroencephalography (EEG) recording has made it a most promising avenue for providing quantitative feedback to practitioners and coaches. Here, we review the current relevance of the main types of EEG oscillations in order to trace a perspective for future practical applications of EEG and event-related potentials (ERP) in sport. In this context, the hypotheses of unified brain rhythms and continuity between wake and sleep states should provide a functional template for EEG biomarkers in sport. The oscillations in the thalamo-cortical and hippocampal circuitry including the physiology of the place cells and the grid cells provide a frame of reference for the analysis of delta, theta, beta, alpha (incl.mu), and gamma oscillations recorded in the space field of human performance. Based on recent neuronal models facilitating the distinction between the different dynamic regimes (selective gating and binding) in these different oscillations we suggest an integrated approach articulating together the classical biomechanical factors (3D movements and EMG) and the high-density EEG and ERP signals to allow finer mathematical analysis to optimize sport performance, such as microstates, coherency/directionality analysis and neural generators. PMID:26955362

  17. Spectral EEG Features of a Short Psycho-physiological Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Krakovská, Anna; Špajdel, Marián

    2014-08-01

    Short-lasting psycho-physiological relaxation was investigated through an analysis of its bipolar electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics. In 8 subjects, 6-channel EEG data of 3-minute duration were recorded during 88 relaxation sessions. Time course of spectral EEG features was examined. Alpha powers were decreasing during resting conditions of 3-minute sessions in lying position with eyes closed. This was followed by a decrease of total power in centro-parietal cortex regions and an increase of beta power in fronto-central areas. Represented by EEG coherences the interhemispheric communication between the parieto-occipital regions was enhanced within a frequency range of 2-10 Hz. In order to discern between higher and lower levels of relaxation distinguished according to self-rated satisfaction, EEG features were assessed and discriminating parameters were identified. Successful relaxation was determined mainly by the presence of decreased delta-1 power across the cortex. Potential applications for these findings include the clinical, pharmacological, and stress management fields.

  18. EEG of Chronic Marijuana Users during Abstinence: Relationship to Years of Marijuana Use, Cerebral Blood Flow and Thyroid Function

    PubMed Central

    Herning, Ronald I.; Better, Warren; Cadet, Jean L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Marijuana abuse is associated with neurological changes including increases in frontal EEG alpha during abstinence. Research is needed to assess to what extent these EEG patterns are indicative of cerebral perfusion deficits. Methods We recorded the resting eyes closed EEG of 75 abstinent marijuana users and 33 control subjects. Fifty-six marijuana users used marijuana for less than eight years and 19 used for eight years or more. The EEG evaluation occurred within 72 hours of admission to an inpatient unit. Fifty-nine marijuana users remained abstinent for a month and were tested twice. Supplemental psychological and physiological data were also collected. Results Log alpha2 and beta2 power at posterior sites were significantly lower for the marijuana abusers that used eight years or more than the other marijuana abusers and the control subjects. These EEG changes continued for the month of abstinence. The marijuana users who used marijuana for more than eight years, also, had lower heart rates and thyroid function (T4) compared to the other marijuana users and the control subjects. Conclusions Chronic marijuana use was also associated with reduced EEG power in alpha and beta bands at posterior sites. These reductions in EEG power appear to be related to cerebral perfusion deficits and/or thyroid function in marijuana abusers. Significance Our results suggest EEG, cerebral blood flow velocity, cardiovascular and thyroid function alterations in marijuana abuser with an extended period of use. These alterations reflect under arousal in these systems. PMID:18065267

  19. Simultaneous MEG and intracranial EEG recordings during attentive reading.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sarang S; Baillet, Sylvain; Adam, Claude; Ducorps, Antoine; Schwartz, Denis; Jerbi, Karim; Bertrand, Olivier; Garnero, Line; Martinerie, Jacques; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2009-05-01

    The relationship between neural oscillations recorded at various spatial scales remains poorly understood partly due to an overall dearth of studies utilizing simultaneous measurements. In an effort to study quantitative markers of attention during reading, we performed simultaneous magnetoencephalography (MEG) and intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings in four epileptic patients. Patients were asked to attend to a specific color when presented with an intermixed series of red words and green words, with words of a given color forming a cohesive story. We analyzed alpha, beta, and gamma band oscillatory responses to the word presentation and compared the strength and spatial organization of those responses in both electrophysiological recordings. Time-frequency analysis of iEEG revealed a network of clear attention-modulated high gamma band (50-150 Hz) power increases and alpha/beta (9-25 Hz) suppressions in response to the words. In addition to analyses at the sensor level, MEG time-frequency analysis was performed at the source level using a sliding window beamformer technique. Strong alpha/beta suppressions were observed in MEG reconstructions, in tandem with iEEG effects. While the MEG counterpart of high gamma band enhancement was difficult to interpret at the sensor level in two patients, MEG time-frequency source reconstruction revealed additional activation patterns in accordance with iEEG results. Importantly, iEEG allowed us to confirm that several sources of gamma band modulation observed with MEG were indeed of cortical origin rather than EMG muscular or ocular artifact. PMID:19349241

  20. EEG activity in Carmelite nuns during a mystical experience.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Mario; Paquette, Vincent

    2008-10-17

    Mystical experiences relate to a fundamental dimension of human existence. These experiences, which are characterized by a sense of union with God, are commonly reported across all cultures. To date, no electroencephalography (EEG) study has been conducted to identify the neuroelectrical correlates of such experiences. The main objective of this study was to measure EEG spectral power and coherence in 14 Carmelite nuns during a mystical experience. EEG activity was recorded from 19 scalp locations during a resting state, a control condition and a mystical condition. In the mystical condition compared to control condition, electrode sites showed greater theta power at F3, C3, P3, Fz, Cz and Pz, and greater gamma1 power was detected at T4 and P4. Higher delta/beta ratio, theta/alpha ratio and theta/beta ratio were found for several electrode sites. In addition, FP1-C3 pair of electrodes displayed greater coherence for theta band while F4-P4, F4-T6, F8-T6 and C4-P4 pairs of electrodes showed greater coherence for alpha band. These results indicate that mystical experiences are mediated by marked changes in EEG power and coherence. These changes implicate several cortical areas of the brain in both hemispheres. PMID:18721862

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of microEEG: A Miniature, Wireless EEG Device

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Arthur C.; Abdel-Baki, Samah G.; Omurtag, Ahmet; Sinert, Richard; Chari, Geetha; Malhotra, Schweta; Weedon, Jeremy; Fenton, Andre A.; Zehtabchi, Shahriar

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of an EEG device is unconventional and complicated by imperfect interrater reliability. We sought to compare the DA of a miniature, wireless, battery-powered EEG device (“microEEG”) to a reference EEG machine in emergency department (ED) patients with altered mental status (AMS). 225 ED patients with AMS underwent 3 EEGs. EEG1 (Nicolet Monitor, “reference”) and EEG2 (microEEG) were recorded simultaneously with EEG cup electrodes using a signal splitter. EEG3 was recorded with microEEG using an electrode cap, immediately before or after EEG1/EEG2. The official EEG1 interpretation was considered the gold standard (EEG1-GS). EEG1, 2 and 3 were de-identified and blindly interpreted by two independent readers. A generalized mixed linear model was used to estimate the sensitivity & specificity of these interpretations relative to EEG1-GS, and to compute a diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). 79% of EEG1-GS were abnormal. Neither the DOR nor ?f representing interrater reliabilities differed significantly between EEG1, EEG2, and EEG3. Mean setup time was 27 minutes for EEG1/EEG2 and 12 minutes for EEG3. Mean electrode impedance of EEG3 recordings was 12.6 k? (SD 31.9 k?). DA of microEEG was comparable to that of the reference system and was not reduced when the EEG electrodes had high and unbalanced impedances. A common practice with many scientific instruments, measurement of EEG device DA provides an independent and quantitative assessment of device performance. PMID:24727466

  2. Exon-intron structure of the human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}4 subunit (CHRNA4)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlein, O.; Weiland, S.; Stoodt, J.; Propping, P.

    1996-03-01

    The human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}4 subunit gene (CHRNA4) is located in the candidate region for three different phenotypes: benign familial neonatal convulsions, autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, and low-voltage EEG. Recently, a missense mutation in transmembrane domain 2 of CHRNA4 was found to be associated with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in one extended pedigree. We have determined the genomic organization of CHRNA4, which consists of six exons distributed over approximately 17 kb of genomic DNA. The nucleotide sequence obtained from the genomic regions adjacent to the exon boundaries enabled us to develop a set of primer pairs for PCR amplification of the complete coding region. The sequence analysis provides the basis for a comprehensive mutation screening of CHRNA4 in the above-mentioned phenotypes and possibly in other types of idopathic epilepsies. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The spatiospectral characterization of brain networks: fusing concurrent EEG spectra and fMRI maps

    PubMed Central

    Bridwell, David A.; Wu, Lei; Eichele, Tom; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2013-01-01

    Different imaging modalities capture different aspects of brain activity. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) reveals intrinsic networks whose BOLD signals have periods from 100s (0.01 Hz) to about 10s (0.1 Hz). Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, in contrast, commonly reflect cortical electrical fluctuations with periods up to 20 ms (50 Hz) or above. We examined the correspondence between intrinsic fMRI and EEG network activity at rest in order to characterize brain networks both spatially (with fMRI) and spectrally (with EEG). Brain networks were separately identified within the concurrently recorded fMRI and EEG at the aggregate group level with group independent component analysis and the association between spatial fMRI and frequency by spatial EEG sources was examined by deconvolving their component time courses. The two modalities are considered linked if the estimated impulse response function (IRF) is significantly non-zero at biologically plausible delays. We found that negative associations were primarily present within two of five alpha components, which highlights the importance of considering multiple alpha sources in EEG-fMRI. Positive associations were primarily present within the lower (e.g. delta and theta) and higher (e.g. upper beta and lower gamma) spectral regions, sometimes within the same fMRI components. Collectively, the results demonstrate a promising approach to characterize brain networks spatially and spectrally, and reveal that positive and negative associations appear within partially distinct regions of the EEG spectrum. PMID:23266744

  4. EEG sources in a group of patients with major depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina; González-Olvera, Jorge J; Miranda, Edgar; Harmony, Thalía; Reyes, Ernesto; Almeida, Luis; Galán, Lídice; Díaz, Daniela; Ramírez, Lizeth; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Aubert, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    EEG sources were assessed in a group of patients with major moderate-severe depressive disorder (MDD) as classified by trained clinicians according to DSM-IV criteria. Frequency Domain Variable Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (FD-VARETA) was used to calculate EEG sources. The Z-values indicated that EEG sources were abnormal (increase in current density) in all patients, with most demonstrating abnormal EEG sources in both hemispheres but with maximal inverse solution located primarily in the right. Twenty-nine patients had a predominant topography of the abnormal EEG maximal inverse solution in the frontal lobes. The remaining seven patients had a bilateral abnormal increase in current density in the superior parietal lobe. The EEG maximal abnormal inverse solution frequency was observed in both hemispheres such that the increases in current density were prevalent in alpha and theta bands. The results suggest that any of the two hemispheres could be affected by MDD, but abnormal EEG sources can be found more frequently in the right one, with the maximal abnormal inverse solution at the alpha and theta bands in frontal and parietal cortices. PMID:18755226

  5. EEG Studies with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.; Miller, Daniel C.; deBeus, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Describes how electroencephalogram (EEG) data are collected and how brain function is measured. Discusses studies on the effects of music experiences with adult subjects and studies focusing on the effects of music training on EEG activity of children and adolescents. Considers the implications of the studies and the future directions of this…

  6. EEG Studies with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.; Miller, Daniel C.; deBeus, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Describes how electroencephalogram (EEG) data are collected and how brain function is measured. Discusses studies on the effects of music experiences with adult subjects and studies focusing on the effects of music training on EEG activity of children and adolescents. Considers the implications of the studies and the future directions of this…

  7. EEG Topographic Mapping of Visual and Kinesthetic Imagery in Swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, V E; Dikman, Z; Bird, E I; Williams, J M; Harmison, R; Shaw-Thornton, L; Schwartz, G E

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated differences in QEEG measures between kinesthetic and visual imagery of a 100-m swim in 36 elite competitive swimmers. Background information and post-trial checks controlled for the modality of imagery, swimming skill level, preferred imagery style, intensity of image and task equality. Measures of EEG relative magnitude in theta, low (7-9 Hz) and high alpha (8-10 Hz), and low and high beta were taken from 19 scalp sites during baseline, visual, and kinesthetic imagery. QEEG magnitudes in the low alpha band during the visual and kinesthetic conditions were attenuated from baseline in low band alpha but no changes were seen in any other bands. Swimmers produced more low alpha EEG magnitude during visual versus kinesthetic imagery. This was interpreted as the swimmers having a greater efficiency at producing visual imagery. Participants who reported a strong intensity versus a weaker feeling of the image (kinesthetic) had less low alpha magnitude, i.e., there was use of more cortical resources, but not for the visual condition. These data suggest that low band (7-9 Hz) alpha distinguishes imagery modalities from baseline, visual imagery requires less cortical resources than kinesthetic imagery, and that intense feelings of swimming requires more brain activity than less intense feelings. PMID:26420001

  8. Quantitative EEG of Rapid-Eye-Movement Sleep: A Marker of Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Brayet, Pauline; Petit, Dominique; Frauscher, Birgit; Gagnon, Jean-François; Gosselin, Nadia; Gagnon, Katia; Rouleau, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system, which is impaired in early Alzheimer's disease, is more crucial for the activation of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) than it is for wakefulness. Quantitative EEG from REM sleep might thus provide an earlier and more accurate marker of the development of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects than that from wakefulness. To assess the superiority of the REM sleep EEG as a screening tool for preclinical Alzheimer's disease, 22 subjects with amnestic MCI (a-MCI; 63.9 ± 7.7 years), 10 subjects with nonamnestic MCI (na-MCI; 64.1 ± 4.5 years) and 32 controls (63.7 ± 6.6 years) participated in the study. Spectral analyses of the waking EEG and REM sleep EEG were performed and the [(delta + theta)/(alpha + beta)] ratio was used to assess between-group differences in EEG slowing. The a-MCI subgroup showed EEG slowing in frontal lateral regions compared to both na-MCI and control groups. This EEG slowing was present in wakefulness (compared to controls) but was much more prominent in REM sleep. Moreover, the comparison between amnestic and nonamnestic subjects was found significant only for the REM sleep EEG. There was no difference in EEG power ratio between na-MCI and controls for any of the 7 cortical regions studied. These findings demonstrate the superiority of the REM sleep EEG in the discrimination between a-MCI and both na-MCI and control subjects. PMID:26323578

  9. Altered resting-state EEG source functional connectivity in schizophrenia: the effect of illness duration.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Daverio, Andrea; Ferrentino, Fabiola; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Ciabattini, Fabio; Monaco, Leonardo; Lisi, Giulia; Barone, Ylenia; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Niolu, Cinzia; Seri, Stefano; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis of schizophrenia as a disconnection syndrome, studies of resting-state EEG Source Functional Connectivity (EEG-SFC) in people affected by schizophrenia are sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate resting-state EEG-SFC in 77 stable, medicated patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) compared to 78 healthy volunteers (HV). In order to study the effect of illness duration, SCZ were divided in those with a short duration of disease (SDD; n = 25) and those with a long duration of disease (LDD; n = 52). Resting-state EEG recordings in eyes closed condition were analyzed and lagged phase synchronization (LPS) indices were calculated for each ROI pair in the source-space EEG data. In delta and theta bands, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC than HV; a higher theta band connectivity in frontal regions was observed in LDD compared with SDD. In the alpha band, SCZ showed lower frontal EEG-SFC compared with HV whereas no differences were found between LDD and SDD. In the beta1 band, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC compared with HVs and in the beta2 band, LDD presented lower frontal and parieto-temporal EEG-SFC compared with HV. In the gamma band, SDD had greater connectivity values compared with LDD and HV. This study suggests that resting state brain network connectivity is abnormally organized in schizophrenia, with different patterns for the different EEG frequency components and that EEG can be a powerful tool to further elucidate the complexity of such disordered connectivity. PMID:25999835

  10. Altered resting-state EEG source functional connectivity in schizophrenia: the effect of illness duration

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Daverio, Andrea; Ferrentino, Fabiola; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Ciabattini, Fabio; Monaco, Leonardo; Lisi, Giulia; Barone, Ylenia; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Niolu, Cinzia; Seri, Stefano; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis of schizophrenia as a disconnection syndrome, studies of resting-state EEG Source Functional Connectivity (EEG-SFC) in people affected by schizophrenia are sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate resting-state EEG-SFC in 77 stable, medicated patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) compared to 78 healthy volunteers (HV). In order to study the effect of illness duration, SCZ were divided in those with a short duration of disease (SDD; n = 25) and those with a long duration of disease (LDD; n = 52). Resting-state EEG recordings in eyes closed condition were analyzed and lagged phase synchronization (LPS) indices were calculated for each ROI pair in the source-space EEG data. In delta and theta bands, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC than HV; a higher theta band connectivity in frontal regions was observed in LDD compared with SDD. In the alpha band, SCZ showed lower frontal EEG-SFC compared with HV whereas no differences were found between LDD and SDD. In the beta1 band, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC compared with HVs and in the beta2 band, LDD presented lower frontal and parieto-temporal EEG-SFC compared with HV. In the gamma band, SDD had greater connectivity values compared with LDD and HV. This study suggests that resting state brain network connectivity is abnormally organized in schizophrenia, with different patterns for the different EEG frequency components and that EEG can be a powerful tool to further elucidate the complexity of such disordered connectivity. PMID:25999835

  11. Cross-correlation of EEG frequency bands and heart rate variability for sleep apnoea classification.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Haslaile; Maddage, Namunu C; Cosic, Irena; Cvetkovic, Dean

    2010-12-01

    Sleep apnoea is a sleep breathing disorder which causes changes in cardiac and neuronal activity and discontinuities in sleep pattern when observed via electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG). Using both statistical analysis and Gaussian discriminative modelling approaches, this paper presents a pilot study of assessing the cross-correlation between EEG frequency bands and heart rate variability (HRV) in normal and sleep apnoea clinical patients. For the study we used EEG (delta, theta, alpha, sigma and beta) and HRV (LF(nu), HF(nu) and LF/HF) features from the spectral analysis. The statistical analysis in different sleep stages highlighted that in sleep apnoea patients, the EEG delta, sigma and beta bands exhibited a strong correlation with HRV features. Then the correlation between EEG frequency bands and HRV features were examined for sleep apnoea classification using univariate and multivariate Gaussian models (UGs and MGs). The MG outperformed the UG in the classification. When EEG and HRV features were combined and modelled with MG, we achieved 64% correct classification accuracy, which is 2 or 8% improvement with respect to using only EEG or ECG features. When delta and acceleration coefficients of the EEG features were incorporated, then the overall accuracy improved to 71%. PMID:21046273

  12. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  13. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I.; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C.; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha 1 (8–10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5–13 Hz), beta 1 (13–20 Hz), beta 2 (20–30 Hz), and gamma (30–40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  14. Dry EEG Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Gordo, M. A.; Sanchez-Morillo, D.; Valle, F. Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) emerged in the second decade of the 20th century as a technique for recording the neurophysiological response. Since then, there has been little variation in the physical principles that sustain the signal acquisition probes, otherwise called electrodes. Currently, new advances in technology have brought new unexpected fields of applications apart from the clinical, for which new aspects such as usability and gel-free operation are first order priorities. Thanks to new advances in materials and integrated electronic systems technologies, a new generation of dry electrodes has been developed to fulfill the need. In this manuscript, we review current approaches to develop dry EEG electrodes for clinical and other applications, including information about measurement methods and evaluation reports. We conclude that, although a broad and non-homogeneous diversity of approaches has been evaluated without a consensus in procedures and methodology, their performances are not far from those obtained with wet electrodes, which are considered the gold standard, thus enabling the former to be a useful tool in a variety of novel applications. PMID:25046013

  15. A capacitive, biocompatible and adhesive electrode for long-term and cap-free monitoring of EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Hun; Byeon, Hang Jin; Choi, Yoon Young; Park, Kwang Suk; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring broadens EEG applications to various areas, but it requires cap-free recording of EEG signals. Our objective here is to develop a capacitive, small-sized, adhesive and biocompatible electrode for the cap-free and long-term EEG monitoring. Approach. We have developed an electrode made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and adhesive PDMS for EEG monitoring. This electrode can be attached to a hairy scalp and be completely hidden by the hair. We tested its electrical and mechanical (adhesive) properties by measuring voltage gain to frequency and adhesive force using 30 repeat cycles of the attachment and detachment test. Electrode performance on EEG was evaluated by alpha rhythm detection and measuring steady state visually evoked potential and N100 auditory evoked potential. Main results. We observed the successful recording of alpha rhythm and evoked signals to diverse stimuli with high signal quality. The biocompatibility of the electrode was verified and a survey found that the electrode was comfortable and convenient to wear. Significance. These results indicate that the proposed EEG electrode is suitable and convenient for long term EEG monitoring.

  16. Modulation of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on resting-state EEG power

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Ortiz, Silvia; Pérez-Luque, Elva; Gutiérrez-Muñoz, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism impacts cortical dopamine (DA) levels and may influence cortical electrical activity in the human brain. This study investigated whether COMT genotype influences resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) power in the frontal, parietal and midline regions in healthy volunteers. EEG recordings were conducted in the resting-state in 13 postmenopausal healthy woman carriers of the Val/Val genotype and 11 with the Met/Met genotype. The resting EEG spectral absolute power in the frontal (F3, F4, F7, F8, FC3 and FC4), parietal (CP3, CP4, P3 and P4) and midline (Fz, FCz, Cz, CPz, Pz and Oz) was analyzed during the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. The frequency bands considered were the delta, theta, alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2. EEG data of the Val/Val and Met/Met genotypes, brain regions and conditions were analyzed using a general linear model analysis. In the individuals with the Met/Met genotype, delta activity was increased in the eyes-closed condition, theta activity was increased in the eyes-closed and in the eyes-open conditions, and alpha1 band, alpha2 band and beta1band activity was increased in the eyes-closed condition. A significant interaction between COMT genotypes and spectral bands was observed. Met homozygote individuals exhibited more delta, theta and beta1 activity than individuals with the Val/Val genotype. No significant interaction between COMT genotypes and the resting-state EEG regional power and conditions were observed for the three brain regions studied. Our findings indicate that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism does not directly impact resting-state EEG regional power, but instead suggest that COMT genotype can modulate resting-state EEG spectral power in postmenopausal healthy women. PMID:25883560

  17. Ballistocardiogram Artifact Removal with a Reference Layer and Standard EEG Cap

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingfei; Huang, Xiaoshan; Glover, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    Background In simultaneous EEG-fMRI, the EEG recordings are severely contaminated by ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifacts, which are caused by cardiac pulsations. To reconstruct and remove the BCG artifacts, one promising method is to measure the artifacts in the absence of EEG signal by placing a group of electrodes (BCG electrodes) on a conductive layer (reference layer) insulated from the scalp. However, current BCG reference layer (BRL) methods either use a customized EEG cap composed of electrode pairs, or need to construct the custom reference layer through additional model-building experiments for each EEG-fMRI experiment. These requirements have limited the versatility and efficiency of BRL. The aim of this study is to propose a more practical and efficient BRL method and compare its performance with the most popular BCG removal method, the optimal basis sets (OBS) algorithm. New Method By designing the reference layer as a permanent and reusable cap, the new BRL method is able to be used with a standard EEG cap, and no extra experiments and preparations are needed to use the BRL in an EEG-fMRI experiment. Results The BRL method effectively removed the BCG artifacts from both oscillatory and evoked potential scalp recordings and recovered the EEG signal. Comparison with Existing Method Compared to the OBS, this new BRL method improved the contrast-to-noise ratios of the alpha-wave, visual, and auditory evoked potential signals by 101%, 76%, and 75% respectively, employing 160 BCG electrodes. Using only 20 BCG electrodes, the BRL improved the EEG signal by 74%/26%/41% respectively. Conclusion The proposed method can substantially improve the EEG signal quality compared with traditional methods. PMID:24960423

  18. EEG maturation: viability through adolescence.

    PubMed

    Scraggs, Terri L

    2012-06-01

    As our brain matures, the EEG patterns change in a predictable manner These cortical developments create age-specific waveforms that help decipher the normal maturation of the EEG. The majority of these changes take place during the neonatal period when waveform alterations occur week to week from discontinuous bursts to a more continuous background. From the neonatal period to infancy, background patterns of sleep and awake begin to show the continuity seen in older children and adults. With further maturation, the neonatal patterns of awake and sleep develop into the posterior dominant rhythm and distinguishable sleep structures of childhood. While pediatric patterns mirror the mature waveforms of adult EEG, their morphology and reactive response differentiates them. The goal of this article is to illustrate the normal maturation and development of the EEG using the age-specific waveforms and patterns seen in neonates, infants, children, and adolescence. PMID:22808752

  19. Envelope responses in single-trial EEG indicate attended speaker in a ‘cocktail party’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Cort; Srinivasan, Ramesh; D'Zmura, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Recent studies have shown that auditory cortex better encodes the envelope of attended speech than that of unattended speech during multi-speaker (‘cocktail party’) situations. We investigated whether these differences were sufficiently robust within single-trial electroencephalographic (EEG) data to accurately determine where subjects attended. Additionally, we compared this measure to other established EEG markers of attention. Approach. High-resolution EEG was recorded while subjects engaged in a two-speaker ‘cocktail party’ task. Cortical responses to speech envelopes were extracted by cross-correlating the envelopes with each EEG channel. We also measured steady-state responses (elicited via high-frequency amplitude modulation of the speech) and alpha-band power, both of which have been sensitive to attention in previous studies. Using linear classifiers, we then examined how well each of these features could be used to predict the subjects’ side of attention at various epoch lengths. Main results. We found that the attended speaker could be determined reliably from the envelope responses calculated from short periods of EEG, with accuracy improving as a function of sample length. Furthermore, envelope responses were far better indicators of attention than changes in either alpha power or steady-state responses. Significance. These results suggest that envelope-related signals recorded in EEG data can be used to form robust auditory BCI’s that do not require artificial manipulation (e.g., amplitude modulation) of stimuli to function.

  20. A 6.4MB duplication of the alpha-synuclein locus causing fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism - phenotype-genotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Eleanna; Kiely, Aoife P; Proukakis, Christos; Giffin, Nicola; Love, Seth; Hehir, Jason; Rantell, Khadija; Pandraud, Amelie; Hernandez, Dena G; Nacheva, Elizabeth; Pittman, Alan M; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Revesz, Tamas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall; Hardy, John; Holton, Janice L; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Importance SNCA locus duplications are associated with variable clinical features and reduced penetrance but the reasons underlying this variability are unknown. Objective 1) To report a novel family carrying a heterozygous 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus with an atypical clinical presentation strongly reminiscent of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and late-onset pallidopyramidal syndromes. 2) To study phenotype-genotype correlations in SNCA locus duplications. Design, Setting, Participants and Data sources We report the clinical and neuropathologic features of a family carrying a 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus. To identify candidate disease modifiers, we undertake a genetic analysis in the family and conduct statistical analysis on previously published cases carrying SNCA locus duplication using regression modelling with robust standard errors to account for clustering at the family level. Main outcome measures To assess whether length of the SNCA locus duplication influences disease penetrance and severity, and whether extra-duplication factors have a disease-modifying role. Results We identified a large 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus in this family. Neuropathological analysis showed extensive ?-synuclein pathology with minimal phospho-tau pathology. Genetic analysis showed an increased burden of PD-related risk factors and the disease-predisposing H1/H1 MAPT haplotype. Statistical analysis of previously published cases suggested that there is a trend towards increasing disease severity and disease penetrance with increasing duplication size. The corresponding odds ratios (95% CI) from the univariate analyses were 1.17 (0.81 to 1.68) and 1.34 (0.78 to 2.31) respectively. Gender was significantly associated with both disease risk and severity; males compared to females had increased disease risk and severity and the corresponding odds ratios (95% CI) from the univariate analyses were 8.36 (1.97 to 35.42) and 5.55 (1.39 to 22.22) respectively. Conclusions and relevance These findings further expand the phenotypic spectrum of SNCA locus duplications. Increased dosage of genes located within the duplicated region probably cannot increase disease risk and disease severity without the contribution of additional risk factors. Identification of disease modifiers accounting for the substantial phenotypic heterogeneity of patients with SNCA locus duplications could provide insight into molecular events involved in ?-synuclein aggregation. PMID:25003242

  1. Relation between psychometric tests and quantitative topographic EEG in pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Schober, F; Dimpfel, W

    1992-11-01

    Both, psychometric tests and quantitative pharmaco-EEG are accepted as necessary tools in different fields of pharmacology. But using these methods separately, none is able to forward informations about the behavioral performance and the central nervous demand simultaneously. The solution of this problem is a complex psychophysiological set-up. Till today such complex measurement set-ups are a rarity. The main reason is the impossibility of EEG recordings during psychometric tests without different artefacts. In the present paper we demonstrate by using our own CATEEM-System in connection with the IBIS-Psychometry-system the possibility to get artefact free EEG recordings during psychometric test conditions. The different mental loads at different tests are producing a graduated increase in the delta and theta frequency range of the EEG of the fronto-temporal region and the occipital region of the cortex. During the tests a decrease of alpha-activity is seen generally. These effects can be described quantitatively as the topographical distribution of frequency changes. The present data are in line with the knowledge about the functional and anatomical structure of the human brain. PMID:1490768

  2. Analysis of postarousal EEG activity during somnambulistic episodes.

    PubMed

    Zadra, Antonio; Pilon, Mathieu; Joncas, Steve; Rompré, Sylvie; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2004-09-01

    Early studies found that electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings during somnambulistic episodes were characterized by a combination of alpha, theta, and delta frequencies, without evidence of clear wakefulness. Three postarousal EEG patterns associated with slow-wave sleep (SWS) arousals were recently identified in adults with sleepwalking and sleep terrors. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the distribution of these postarousal EEG patterns in 10 somnambulistic patients (three males, seven females, mean age: 25.1, SD: 4.1) evaluated at baseline and following 38 h of sleep deprivation. A total of 44 behavioral arousals were recorded in the laboratory; seven episodes at baseline (five from SWS, two from stage 2 sleep) and 37 episodes during recovery sleep (30 from SWS, seven from stage 2 sleep). There was no significant difference in the distribution of postarousal EEG patterns identified during baseline and recovery sleep. One pattern, comprised of diffuse rhythmic and synchronous delta activity, was preferentially associated with relatively simple behavioral episodes but did not occur during episodes from stage 2 sleep. Overall, delta activity was detected in 48% of the behavioral episodes from SWS and in 22% of those from stage 2. There was no evidence of complete awakening during any of the episodes. The results support the view of somnambulism as a disorder of arousal and suggest that sleepwalkers' atypical arousal reactions can manifest themselves in stage 2 sleep in addition to SWS. PMID:15339264

  3. Relative power and coherence of EEG series are related to amnestic mild cognitive impairment in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Zhijie; Li, Qiuli; Wang, Lei; Lu, Chengbiao; Yin, Shimin; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes is a risk factor for dementia and mild cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate whether some features of resting-state EEG (rsEEG) could be applied as a biomarker to distinguish the subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) from normal cognitive function in type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this study, 28 patients with type 2 diabetes (16 aMCI patients and 12 controls) were investigated. Recording of the rsEEG series and neuropsychological assessments were performed. The rsEEG signal was first decomposed into delta, theta, alpha, beta, gamma frequency bands. The relative power of each given band/sum of power and the coherence of waves from different brain areas were calculated. The extracted features from rsEEG and neuropsychological assessments were analyzed as well. Results: The main findings of this study were that: (1) compared with the control group, the ratios of power in theta band [P(theta)] vs. power in alpha band [P(alpha)] [P(theta)/P(alpha)] in the frontal region and left temporal region were significantly higher for aMCI, and (2) for aMCI, the alpha coherences in posterior, fronto-right temporal, fronto-posterior, right temporo-posterior were decreased; the theta coherences in left central-right central (LC-RC) and left posterior-right posterior (LP-RP) regions were also decreased; but the delta coherences in left temporal-right temporal (LT-RT) region were increased. Conclusion: The proposed indexes from rsEEG recordings could be employed to track cognitive function of diabetic patients and also to help in the diagnosis of those who develop aMCI. PMID:24550827

  4. [Effect of Leishmania mexicana, RANTES and TNF alpha on splenic dendritic cells of newborn and adult BALB/c mice: phenotypic characteristics and migratory properties].

    PubMed

    Verzura, Julie; Ponce, Loida; Pernía, Mónica; Mendoza, Francisco; Tovar, Robert; de Orta, Sioly; Corado, José

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential in the development and regulation of the immune response (IR). The inherent potential of DCs to induce a specific immune response in the neonatal period is controversial. It has been suggested that the specific IR in neonates depends on the quantitative relation of DC/T lymphocytes, as well as on the neonatal or adult age at which the interaction antigen/DC/T lymphocytes occurs. This suggests that this contact has an influence on the phenotypic and/or biological properties of DCs, which modifies its behavior. Therefore, the effects of Leishmania mexicana (L. mexicana) and of TNFalpha and RANTES cytokines on immunophenotypical characteristics were evaluated on spleen DCs, from neonate and adult BALB/c mice, by using flow cytometry and in vitro migratory properties with a Boyden Chamber. In basal conditions, neonate and adult DCs express the same molecules (CD40, CD86, MHCII and CD54). When the DCs interact with the antigen L. mexicana, the expression of these molecules are similar in adults and in neonates, with the exception of CD40 whose intensity of expression was raised (P < 0.05) in both groups. The rate of migration of the DCs in a culture medium conditioned of L. mexicana, RANTES and TNFalpha was higher in adults than in newborn mice. These observations suggest that neonatal and adult mice DCs have similar phenotypic characteristics. Under the effect of the same stimulus they respond differently; suggesting that other factors are involved in the higher susceptibility that newborns have to infections. PMID:23248968

  5. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual ?-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type ?-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual ?-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  6. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Caldeira-Gomes, António; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-02-01

    Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue - GLA p.(Arg118Cys) -, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands' close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease. The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for "rare" condition. PMID:25468652

  7. CNT/PDMS-based canal-typed ear electrodes for inconspicuous EEG recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joong Hoon; Lee, Seung Min; Byeon, Hang Jin; Hong, Joung Sook; Park, Kwang Suk; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Current electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems typically require cumbersome electrodes that must be pasted on a scalp, making a private recording of an EEG in a public place difficult. We have developed a small, user friendly, biocompatible electrode with a good appearance for inconspicuous EEG monitoring. Approach. We fabricated carbon nanotube polydimethylsiloxane (CNT/PDMS)-based canal-type ear electrodes (CEE) for EEG recording. These electrodes have an additional function, triggering sound stimulation like earphones and recording EEG simultaneously for auditory brain-computer interface (BCI). The electrode performance was evaluated by a standard EEG measurement paradigm, including the detection of alpha rhythms and measurements of N100 auditory evoked potential (AEP), steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) and auditory steady-state response (ASSR). Furthermore, the bio- and skin-compatibility of CNT/PDMS were tested. Main results. All feasibility studies were successfully recorded with the fabricated electrodes, and the biocompatibility of CNT/PDMS was also proved. Significance. These electrodes could be used to monitor EEG clinically, in ubiquitous health care and in brain-computer interfaces.

  8. Optimizing microsurgical skills with EEG neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Ros, Tomas; Moseley, Merrick J; Bloom, Philip A; Benjamin, Larry; Parkinson, Lesley A; Gruzelier, John H

    2009-01-01

    Background By enabling individuals to self-regulate their brainwave activity in the field of optimal performance in healthy individuals, neurofeedback has been found to improve cognitive and artistic performance. Here we assessed whether two distinct EEG neurofeedback protocols could develop surgical skill, given the important role this skill plays in medicine. Results National Health Service trainee ophthalmic microsurgeons (N = 20) were randomly assigned to either Sensory Motor Rhythm-Theta (SMR) or Alpha-Theta (AT) groups, a randomized subset of which were also part of a wait-list 'no-treatment' control group (N = 8). Neurofeedback groups received eight 30-minute sessions of EEG training. Pre-post assessment included a skills lab surgical procedure with timed measures and expert ratings from video-recordings by consultant surgeons, together with state/trait anxiety self-reports. SMR training demonstrated advantages absent in the control group, with improvements in surgical skill according to 1) the expert ratings: overall technique (d = 0.6, p < 0.03) and suture task (d = 0.9, p < 0.02) (judges' intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.85); and 2) with overall time on task (d = 0.5, p = 0.02), while everyday anxiety (trait) decreased (d = 0.5, p < 0.02). Importantly the decrease in surgical task time was strongly associated with SMR EEG training changes (p < 0.01), especially with continued reduction of theta (4–7 Hz) power. AT training produced marginal improvements in technique and overall performance time, which were accompanied by a standard error indicative of large individual differences. Notwithstanding, successful within session elevation of the theta-alpha ratio correlated positively with improvements in overall technique (r = 0.64, p = 0.047). Conclusion SMR-Theta neurofeedback training provided significant improvement in surgical technique whilst considerably reducing time on task by 26%. There was also evidence that AT training marginally reduced total surgery time, despite suboptimal training efficacies. Overall, the data set provides encouraging evidence of optimised learning of a complex medical specialty via neurofeedback training. PMID:19630948

  9. Study on EEG power and coherence in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory task.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zheng-yan

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) power and coherence at rest and during a working memory task of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thirty-five patients (17 males, 18 females; 52-71 years old) and 34 sex- and age-matched controls (17 males, 17 females; 51-63 years old) were recruited in the present study. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) of 35 patients with MCI and 34 normal controls revealed that the scores of MCI patients did not differ significantly from those of normal controls (P>0.05). Then, EEGs at rest and during working memory task with three levels of working memory load were recorded. The EEG power was computed over 10 channels: right and left frontal (F3, F4), central (C3, C4), parietal (P3, P4), temporal (T5, T6) and occipital (O1, O2); inter-hemispheric coherences were computed from five electrode pairs of F3-F4, C3-C4, P3-P4, T5-T6 and O1-O2 for delta (1.0-3.5 Hz), theta (4.0-7.5 Hz), alpha-1 (8.0-10.0 Hz), alpha-2 (10.5 -13.0 Hz), beta-1 (13.5-18.0 Hz) and beta-2 (18.5-30.0 Hz) frequency bands. All values of the EEG power of MCI patients were found to be higher than those of normal controls at rest and during working memory tasks. Furthermore, the values of EEG power in the theta, alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta-1 bands of patients with MCI were significantly high (P<0.05) in comparison with those of normal controls. Correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between the EEG powers and MMSE scores. In addition, during working memory tasks, the EEG coherences in all bands were significantly higher in the MCI group in comparison with those in the control group (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in EEG coherences between two groups at rest. These findings comprise evidence that MCI patients have higher EEG power at rest, and higher EEG power and coherence during working conditions. It suggests that MCI may be associated with compensatory processes at rest and during working memory tasks. Moreover, failure of normal cortical connections may be exist in MCI patients. PMID:16358382

  10. Monitoring task loading with multivariate EEG measures during complex forms of human-computer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.; Brown, H.; Karnik, A.; Du, R.

    2001-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were made while 16 participants performed versions of a personal-computer-based flight simulation task of low, moderate, or high difficulty. As task difficulty increased, frontal midline theta EEG activity increased and alpha band activity decreased. A participant-specific function that combined multiple EEG features to create a single load index was derived from a sample of each participant's data and then applied to new test data from that participant. Index values were computed for every 4 s of task data. Across participants, mean task load index values increased systematically with increasing task difficulty and differed significantly between the different task versions. Actual or potential applications of this research include the use of multivariate EEG-based methods to monitor task loading during naturalistic computer-based work.

  11. Bristle-sensors—low-cost flexible passive dry EEG electrodes for neurofeedback and BCI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozea, Cristian; Voinescu, Catalin D.; Fazli, Siamac

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new, low-cost dry electrode for EEG that is made of flexible metal-coated polymer bristles. We examine various standard EEG paradigms, such as capturing occipital alpha rhythms, testing for event-related potentials in an auditory oddball paradigm and performing a sensory motor rhythm-based event-related (de-) synchronization paradigm to validate the performance of the novel electrodes in terms of signal quality. Our findings suggest that the dry electrodes that we developed result in high-quality EEG recordings and are thus suitable for a wide range of EEG studies and BCI applications. Furthermore, due to the flexibility of the novel electrodes, greater comfort is achieved in some subjects, this being essential for long-term use.

  12. Analysis of oscillatory patterns in the human sleep EEG using a novel detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, E; Achermann, P

    2005-12-01

    The different brain states during sleep are characterized by the occurrence of distinct oscillatory patterns such as spindles or delta waves. Using a new algorithm to detect oscillatory events in the electroencephalogram (EEG), we studied their properties and changes throughout the night. The present approach was based on the idea that the EEG may be described as a superposition of stochastically driven harmonic oscillators with damping and frequency varying in time. This idea was implemented by fitting autoregressive models to the EEG data. Oscillatory events were detected, whenever the damping of one or more frequencies was below a predefined threshold. Sleep EEG data of eight healthy young males were analyzed (four nights per subject). Oscillatory events occurred mainly in three frequency ranges, which correspond roughly to the classically defined delta (0-4.5 Hz), alpha (8-11.5 Hz) and sigma (11.5-16 Hz) bands. Their incidence showed small intra- but large inter-individual differences, in particular with respect to alpha events. The incidence and frequency of the events was characteristic for sleep stages and non-rapid eye movement (REM)-REM sleep cycles. The mean event frequency of delta and sigma (spindle) events decreased with the deepening of sleep. It was higher in the second half of the night compared with the first one for delta, alpha and sigma oscillations. The algorithm provides a general framework to detect and characterize oscillatory patterns in the EEG and similar signals. PMID:16364134

  13. Multisensory integration of dynamic emotional faces and voices: method for simultaneous EEG-fMRI measurements.

    PubMed

    Schelenz, Patrick D; Klasen, Martin; Reese, Barbara; Regenbogen, Christina; Wolf, Dhana; Kato, Yutaka; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Combined EEG-fMRI analysis correlates time courses from single electrodes or independent EEG components with the hemodynamic response. Implementing information from only one electrode, however, may miss relevant information from complex electrophysiological networks. Component based analysis, in turn, depends on a priori knowledge of the signal topography. Complex designs such as studies on multisensory integration of emotions investigate subtle differences in distributed networks based on only a few trials per condition. Thus, they require a sensitive and comprehensive approach which does not rely on a-priori knowledge about the underlying neural processes. In this pilot study, feasibility and sensitivity of source localization-driven analysis for EEG-fMRI was tested using a multisensory integration paradigm. Dynamic audiovisual stimuli consisting of emotional talking faces and pseudowords with emotional prosody were rated in a delayed response task. The trials comprised affectively congruent and incongruent displays. In addition to event-locked EEG and fMRI analyses, induced oscillatory EEG responses at estimated cortical sources and in specific temporo-spectral windows were correlated with the corresponding BOLD responses. EEG analysis showed high data quality with less than 10% trial rejection. In an early time window, alpha oscillations were suppressed in bilateral occipital cortices and fMRI analysis confirmed high data quality with reliable activation in auditory, visual and frontal areas to the presentation of multisensory stimuli. In line with previous studies, we obtained reliable correlation patterns for event locked occipital alpha suppression and BOLD signal time course. Our results suggest a valid methodological approach to investigate complex stimuli using the present source localization driven method for EEG-fMRI. This novel procedure may help to investigate combined EEG-fMRI data from novel complex paradigms with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:24294195

  14. Multisensory integration of dynamic emotional faces and voices: method for simultaneous EEG-fMRI measurements

    PubMed Central

    Schelenz, Patrick D.; Klasen, Martin; Reese, Barbara; Regenbogen, Christina; Wolf, Dhana; Kato, Yutaka; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Combined EEG-fMRI analysis correlates time courses from single electrodes or independent EEG components with the hemodynamic response. Implementing information from only one electrode, however, may miss relevant information from complex electrophysiological networks. Component based analysis, in turn, depends on a priori knowledge of the signal topography. Complex designs such as studies on multisensory integration of emotions investigate subtle differences in distributed networks based on only a few trials per condition. Thus, they require a sensitive and comprehensive approach which does not rely on a-priori knowledge about the underlying neural processes. In this pilot study, feasibility and sensitivity of source localization-driven analysis for EEG-fMRI was tested using a multisensory integration paradigm. Dynamic audiovisual stimuli consisting of emotional talking faces and pseudowords with emotional prosody were rated in a delayed response task. The trials comprised affectively congruent and incongruent displays. In addition to event-locked EEG and fMRI analyses, induced oscillatory EEG responses at estimated cortical sources and in specific temporo-spectral windows were correlated with the corresponding BOLD responses. EEG analysis showed high data quality with less than 10% trial rejection. In an early time window, alpha oscillations were suppressed in bilateral occipital cortices and fMRI analysis confirmed high data quality with reliable activation in auditory, visual and frontal areas to the presentation of multisensory stimuli. In line with previous studies, we obtained reliable correlation patterns for event locked occipital alpha suppression and BOLD signal time course. Our results suggest a valid methodological approach to investigate complex stimuli using the present source localization driven method for EEG-fMRI. This novel procedure may help to investigate combined EEG-fMRI data from novel complex paradigms with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:24294195

  15. Developmental aspects of normal EEG.

    PubMed

    Plouin, Perrine; Kaminska, Anna; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Soufflet, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In pediatrics recording of EEG can range from premature infants aged just 25 weeks of gestation to young adults. Recording EEG in pediatrics ranges from 25 weeks of gestation premature in the incubator to young adults. Hence, recording conditions need to be adapted to very different situations, not only of age but also of environment, asepsis, and behavior.This requires that recording conditions be adapted to very different situations, not only of age but also of environment, asepsis and behavior. The two major determinants of EEG features are the level of vigilance and age. Standard examination includes spontaneous sleep until the age of 5 years, and hyperventilation and intermittent light stimulation in older children. Hyperventilation may modify the tracing in a physiological way until adolescence. One of the major characteristics of a child's EEG recording is its course over time that parallels rapid brain maturation. EEG changes are particularly rapid in early age and they involve both temporal and spatial organization. In premature babies modifications appear by two 2 weeks, in infancy by 1 month and in childhood by 1 year, before reaching the adult patterns at an age varying between 8 and 12 years of age. Apart from being aware of the normal EEG patterns according to thein children of different ages, it is important to recognize unusual patterns that are not linked to a pathological situation. Most important are the interpretation and the conclusion of the EEG tracing and any conclusions reached, for which and a precise knowledge besides clinical information is mandatory for this purpose is essential. PMID:23622152

  16. Acquired somatic ATRX mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome associated with alpha thalassemia (ATMDS) convey a more severe hematologic phenotype than germline ATRX mutations.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P; Higgs, Douglas R; Fisher, Chris A; Gibbons, Richard J

    2004-03-15

    Acquired somatic mutations in ATRX, an X-linked gene encoding a chromatin-associated protein, were recently identified in 4 patients with the rare subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with thalassemia (ATMDS). Here we describe a series of novel point mutations in ATRX detected in archival DNA samples from marrow and/or blood of patients with ATMDS by use of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), a technique sensitive to low-level mosaicism. Two of the new mutations result in changes in amino acids altered in previously described pedigrees with germ line ATRX mutations (ATR-X syndrome), but the hematologic abnormalities were much more severe in the patients with ATMDS than in the corresponding constitutional cases. In one ATMDS case where DNA samples from several time points were available, the proportion of ATRX-mutant subclones correlated with changes in the amount of hemoglobin H. This study strengthens the link between acquired, somatic ATRX mutations and ATMDS, illustrates how molecular defects associated with MDS and other hematologic malignancies masked by somatic mosaicism may be detected by DHPLC, and shows that additional factors increase the severity of the hematologic phenotype of ATRX mutations in ATMDS. PMID:14592816

  17. Topographic quantitative EEG sequelae of chronic marihuana use: a replication using medically and psychiatrically screened normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Struve, F A; Straumanis, J J; Patrick, G; Leavitt, J; Manno, J E; Manno, B R

    1999-10-01

    In two previous studies it was reported that chronic marihuana (THC) use was associated with unique quantitative EEG features which were present in the non-intoxicated state. THC users, as contrasted with controls, had significant elevations of Absolute Power, Relative Power, and Coherence of alpha activity over the bilateral frontal cortex. Furthermore, a quantitative EEG discriminant function analyses permitted a 95% correct user versus non-user classification. However, because all of the THC users and 58% of the non-user controls were psychiatric inpatients, diagnostic and medication effects, if any, were uncontrolled. In the present study the same quantitative EEG methods were used to study daily THC users and non-user controls who underwent a rigorous screening process to insure that they were medically and psychiatrically healthy. The results of previous studies were replicated and an additional EEG correlate of chronic THC exposure (reduced alpha frequency) was identified. PMID:10529019

  18. [Age-Related Features of EEG Coherence in Children and Adolescents Living in the European North of Russia].

    PubMed

    Soroko, S I; Nagornova, Zh V; Rozhkov, V P; Shemyakina, N V

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents data on the formation of spatial synchronization of brain potentials in 91 children aged 7-18 years living in European North of Russia. We estimated coherence values for 19 derivations (pair 171) in five EEG frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta). We described age-related changes, gender differences and topical specific features of the formation of coherence in the left and right hemispheres, and in inter- and intrahemispheric synchronization. We carried out computer assessment of the differences in EEG coherence between three age groups of children in order to determine criteria for identification of children with retarded formation of spatial organization of local EEG processes. Age-related changes in the structure of EEG patterns observed in the study reflect the processes of morphofunctional brain development in children and adolescents at different stages of postnatal ontogenesis under severe conditions of northern climate. PMID:26601411

  19. Low-cost EEG-based sleep detection.

    PubMed

    Van Hal, Bryan; Rhodes, Samhita; Dunne, Bruce; Bossemeyer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A real-time stage 1 sleep detection system using a low-cost single dry-sensor EEG headset is described. This device issues an auditory warning at the onset of stage 1 sleep using the "NeuroSky Mindset," an inexpensive commercial entertainment-based headset. The EEG signal is filtered into low/high alpha and low/high beta frequency bands which are analyzed to indicate the onset of sleep. Preliminary results indicate an 81% effective rate of detecting sleep with all failures being false positives of sleep onset. This device was able to predict and respond to the onset of drowsiness preceding stage 1 sleep allowing for earlier warnings with the result of fewer sleep-related accidents. PMID:25571009

  20. Motion-related artefacts in EEG predict neuronally plausible patterns of activation in fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marije; White, Thomas P; Mullinger, Karen J; Liddle, Elizabeth B; Gowland, Penny A; Francis, Susan T; Bowtell, Richard; Liddle, Peter F

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous acquisition and subsequent analysis of EEG and fMRI data is challenging owing to increased noise levels in the EEG data. A common method to integrate data from these two modalities is to use aspects of the EEG data, such as the amplitudes of event-related potentials (ERP) or oscillatory EEG activity, to predict fluctuations in the fMRI data. However, this relies on the acquisition of high quality datasets to ensure that only the correlates of neuronal activity are being studied. In this study, we investigate the effects of head-motion-related artefacts in the EEG signal on the predicted T2*-weighted signal variation. We apply our analyses to two independent datasets: 1) four participants were asked to move their feet in the scanner to generate small head movements, and 2) four participants performed an episodic memory task. We created T2*-weighted signal predictors from indicators of abrupt head motion using derivatives of the realignment parameters, from visually detected artefacts in the EEG as well as from three EEG frequency bands (theta, alpha and beta). In both datasets, we found little correlation between the T2*-weighted signal and EEG predictors that were not convolved with the canonical haemodynamic response function (cHRF). However, all convolved EEG predictors strongly correlated with the T2*-weighted signal variation in various regions including the bilateral superior temporal cortex, supplementary motor area, medial parietal cortex and cerebellum. The finding that movement onset spikes in the EEG predict T2*-weighted signal intensity only when the time course of movements is convolved with the cHRF, suggests that the correlated signal might reflect a BOLD response to neural activity associated with head movement. Furthermore, the observation that broad-spectral EEG spikes tend to occur at the same time as abrupt head movements, together with the finding that abrupt movements and EEG spikes show similar correlations with the T2*-weighted signal, indicates that the EEG spikes are produced by abrupt movement and that continuous regressors of EEG oscillations contain motion-related noise even after stringent correction of the EEG data. If not properly removed, these artefacts complicate the use of EEG data as a predictor of T2*-weighted signal variation. PMID:21763774

  1. [General Features of the Formation of EEG Wave Structure in Children and Adolescents Living in Northern European Russia].

    PubMed

    Soroko, S I; Bekshaev, S S; Rozhkov, V P; Nagornova, Zh V; Shemyakina, N V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of the analysis of EEG wave structure formation in children and adolescents aged 7-18 years living under severe conditions of the North. The approaches developed in discrete mathematics (the graph theory, the theory of network flows) were used to assess the time-frequency transformations of EEG patterns. We evaluated conditional probabilities of reciprocal transitions between the components of six frequency bands of E EG (delta, theta, alpha-1, alpha-2, beta-1, beta-2). We described age- and sex-related features as well as regional specificities of the EEG wave structure. We defined the age periods of reorganization of diffuse EEG activities into the main EEG rhythms; the role of distinct rhythms in the maintenance of the EEG wave structure and its dynamic rearrangements was also discussed. The age-related changes of the structure of EEG patterns form some general picture of the morphofunctional development of brain in children and adolescents at different stages of postnatal ontogenesis under severe climate and socio-economic conditions of the North. PMID:26485790

  2. Plastic modulation of PTSD resting-state networks by EEG neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Kluetsch, Rosemarie C.; Ros, Tomas; Théberge, Jean; Frewen, Paul A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Schmahl, Christian; Jetly, Rakesh; Lanius, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback training has been shown to produce plastic modulations in salience network and default mode network functional connectivity in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of neurofeedback training aimed at the voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (8–12 Hz) amplitude would be related to differences in EEG network oscillations, functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity, and subjective measures of state anxiety and arousal in a group of individuals with PTSD. Method 21 individuals with PTSD related to childhood abuse underwent 30 minutes of EEG neurofeedback training preceded and followed by a resting-state fMRI scan. Results Alpha desynchronizing neurofeedback was associated with decreased alpha amplitude during training, followed by a significant increase (‘rebound’) in resting-state alpha synchronization. This rebound was linked to increased calmness, greater salience network connectivity with the right insula, and enhanced default mode network connectivity with bilateral posterior cingulate, right middle frontal gyrus, and left medial prefrontal cortex. Conclusion Our study represents a first step in elucidating the potential neurobehavioral mechanisms mediating the effects of neurofeedback treatment on regulatory systems in PTSD. Moreover, it documents for the first time a spontaneous EEG ‘rebound’ after neurofeedback, pointing to homeostatic/compensatory mechanisms operating in the brain. PMID:24266644

  3. Neural Activations during Visual Sequence Learning Leave a Trace in Post-Training Spontaneous EEG

    PubMed Central

    Moisello, Clara; Meziane, Hadj Boumediene; Kelly, Simon; Perfetti, Bernardo; Kvint, Svetlana; Voutsinas, Nicholas; Blanco, Daniella; Quartarone, Angelo; Tononi, Giulio; Ghilardi, Maria Felice

    2013-01-01

    Recent EEG studies have shown that implicit learning involving specific cortical circuits results in an enduring local trace manifested as local changes in spectral power. Here we used a well characterized visual sequence learning task and high density-(hd-)EEG recording to determine whether also declarative learning leaves a post-task, local change in the resting state oscillatory activity in the areas involved in the learning process. Thus, we recorded hd-EEG in normal subjects before, during and after the acquisition of the order of a fixed spatial target sequence (VSEQ) and during the presentation of targets in random order (VRAN). We first determined the temporal evolution of spectral changes during VSEQ and compared it to VRAN. We found significant differences in the alpha and theta bands in three main scalp regions, a right occipito-parietal (ROP), an anterior-frontal (AFr), and a right frontal (RFr) area. The changes in frontal theta power during VSEQ were positively correlated with the learning rate. Further, post-learning EEG recordings during resting state revealed a significant increase in alpha power in ROP relative to a pre-learning baseline. We conclude that declarative learning is associated with alpha and theta changes in frontal and posterior regions that occur during the task, and with an increase of alpha power in the occipito-parietal region after the task. These post-task changes may represent a trace of learning and a hallmark of use-dependent plasticity. PMID:23799058

  4. [Changes in the Spectral Characteristics of EEG during Neurofeedback Training].

    PubMed

    Kiroy, V N; Lazurenko, D M; Shepelev, I E; Minyaeva, N R; Aslanyan, E V; Bakhtin, O M; Shaposhnikov, D G; Vladimirskiy, B M

    2015-01-01

    We used the ratio of spectral characteristics of the EEG alpha and beta frequencies recorded in 10 apparently healthy subjects (university students) to control a computer cursor in the graphic interface in three scenarios with the use of neurofeedback. Our results showed that the scenario which uses the power of alpha- and beta-2-frequencies provided the highest accuracy and the best speed control. The parameters of beta-1-frequency were found to be less effective since an increase or a decrease of their power could result from an increase or a decrease of the power of alpha- and beta-2-frequencies. However, the subjects got the skill of cursor control with efficiency of 81%, gradually growing during learning, after a relatively short period of time (5 trainings per 2 weeks). PMID:26237948

  5. Two-step chromatographic purification of human plasma alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein: its application to the purification of rare phenotype samples of the protein and their study by chromatography on immobilized metal chelate affinity adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Herve, F; Millot, M C; Eap, C B; Duche, J C; Tillement, J P

    1996-03-29

    Alpha1-Acid glycoprotein (AAG) or orosomucoid was purified to homogeneity from human plasma by a separate two-step method using chromatography on immobilized Cibacron Blue F3G-A to cross-linked agarose and chromatography on hydroxyapatite. The conditions for the pre-purification of AAG by chromatography on immobilized Cibacron Blue F3G-A were first optimized using different buffer systems with different pH values. The overall yield of the combined techniques was 80% and ca. 12 mg of AAG were purified from an initial total amount of ca. 15 mg in a ca. 40 ml sample of human plasma. This method was applied to the purification of AAG samples corresponding to the three main phenotypes of the protein (FI*S/A, F1/A and S/A), from individual human plasma previously phenotyped for AAG. A study by isoelectric focusing with carrier ampholytes showed that the microheterogeneity of the purified F1*S/A, F1/A and S/A AAG samples was similar to that of AAG in the corresponding plasma, thus suggesting that no apparent desialylation of the glycoprotein occurred during the purification steps. This method was also applied to the purification of AAG samples corresponding to rare phenotypes of the protein (F1/A*AD, S/A*X0 and F1/A*C1) and the interactions of these variants with immobilized copper(II) ions were then studied at pH 7, by chromatography on an iminodiacetate Sepharose-Cu(II) gel. It was found that the different variants encoded by the first of the two genes coding for AAG in humans (i.e. the F1 and S variants) interacted non-specifically with the immobilized ligand, whereas those encoded by the second gene of AAG (i.e. the A, AD, X0 and C1 variants) strongly bound to immobilized Cu(II) ions. These results suggested that chromatography on an immobilized affinity Cu(II) adsorbent could be helpful to distinguish between the respective products of the two highly polymorphic genes which code for human AAG. PMID:8861652

  6. Application of independent component analysis for the data mining of simultaneous Eeg-fMRI: preliminary experience on sleep onset.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Sungsuk; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Park, Hyunwook; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional MRI (fMRI) signals is potentially advantageous because of the superior resolution that is achieved in both the temporal and spatial domains, respectively. However, ballistocardiographic artifacts along with ocular artifacts are a major obstacle for the detection of the EEG signatures of interest. Since the sources corresponding to these artifacts are independent from those producing the EEG signatures, we applied the Infomax-based independent component analysis (ICA) technique to separate the EEG signatures from the artifacts. The isolated EEG signatures were further utilized to model the canonical hemodynamic response functions (HRFs). Subsequently, the brain areas from which these EEG signatures originated were identified as locales of activation patterns from the analysis of fMRI data. Upon the identification and subsequent evaluation of brain areas generating interictal epileptic discharge (IED) spikes from an epileptic subject, the presented method was successfully applied to detect the theta and alpha rhythms that are sleep onset-related EEG signatures along with the subsequent neural circuitries from a sleep-deprived volunteer. These results suggest that the ICA technique may be useful for the preprocessing of simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions, especially when a reference paradigm is unavailable. PMID:19922343

  7. Discrete Scale Invariance of Human Large EEG Voltage Deflections is More Prominent in Waking than Sleep Stage 2

    PubMed Central

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically viewed through the lens of spectral analysis. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that the underlying neuronal dynamics are characterized by scale-free avalanches. These results suggest that techniques from statistical physics may be used to analyze EEG signals. We utilized a publicly available database of fourteen subjects with waking and sleep stage 2 EEG tracings per subject, and observe that power-law dynamics of critical-state neuronal avalanches are not sufficient to fully describe essential features of EEG signals. We hypothesized that this could reflect the phenomenon of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in EEG large voltage deflections (LVDs) as being more prominent in waking consciousness. We isolated LVDs, and analyzed logarithmically transformed LVD size probability density functions (PDF) to assess for DSI. We find evidence of increased DSI in waking, as opposed to sleep stage 2 consciousness. We also show that the signatures of DSI are specific for EEG LVDs, and not a general feature of fractal simulations with similar statistical properties to EEG. Removing only LVDs from waking EEG produces a reduction in power in the alpha and beta frequency bands. These findings may represent a new insight into the understanding of the cortical dynamics underlying consciousness. PMID:26696860

  8. Discrete Scale Invariance of Human Large EEG Voltage Deflections is More Prominent in Waking than Sleep Stage 2.

    PubMed

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically viewed through the lens of spectral analysis. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that the underlying neuronal dynamics are characterized by scale-free avalanches. These results suggest that techniques from statistical physics may be used to analyze EEG signals. We utilized a publicly available database of fourteen subjects with waking and sleep stage 2 EEG tracings per subject, and observe that power-law dynamics of critical-state neuronal avalanches are not sufficient to fully describe essential features of EEG signals. We hypothesized that this could reflect the phenomenon of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in EEG large voltage deflections (LVDs) as being more prominent in waking consciousness. We isolated LVDs, and analyzed logarithmically transformed LVD size probability density functions (PDF) to assess for DSI. We find evidence of increased DSI in waking, as opposed to sleep stage 2 consciousness. We also show that the signatures of DSI are specific for EEG LVDs, and not a general feature of fractal simulations with similar statistical properties to EEG. Removing only LVDs from waking EEG produces a reduction in power in the alpha and beta frequency bands. These findings may represent a new insight into the understanding of the cortical dynamics underlying consciousness. PMID:26696860

  9. Application of Independent Component Analysis for the Data Mining of Simultaneous EEG-fMRI: Preliminary Experience on Sleep Onset

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Sungsuk; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Park, Hyunwook; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2010-01-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional MRI (fMRI) signals is potentially advantageous because of the superior resolution that is achieved in both the temporal and spatial domains, respectively. However, ballistocardiographic artifacts along with the ocular artifacts are a major obstacle for the detection of the EEG signatures of interest. Since the sources corresponding to these artifacts are independent from those producing the EEG signatures, we applied the Infomax-based independent component analysis (ICA) technique to separate the EEG signatures from the artifacts. The isolated EEG signatures were further utilized to model the canonical hemodynamic response functions (HRFs). Subsequently, the brain areas from which these EEG signatures originated were identified as locales of activation patterns from the analysis of fMRI data. Upon the identification and subsequent evaluation of brain areas generating interictal epileptic discharge (IED) spikes from an epileptic subject, the presented method was successfully applied to detect the theta- and alpha-rhythms that are sleep onset related EEG signatures along with the subsequent neural circuitries from a sleep deprived volunteer. These results suggest that the ICA technique may be useful for the preprocessing of simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions, especially when a reference paradigm is unavailable. PMID:19922343

  10. Spontaneous EEG correlates of intellectual functioning in talented and handicapped adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D G; Hunt, D; Randhawa, B S

    1982-06-01

    EEG correlates of intellectual functioning were investigated in 35 academically talented and 20 academically handicapped adolescents. EEG data from Ertl's Brainwave Analyzer were factor-analyzed and factor scores entered into regression equations predicting four primary mental abilities, verbal, numerical, reasoning, spatial, and two sequential tests of educational progress, reading and mathematics. Analysis indicated that (1) frequency ratio, with relatively greater left-hemisphere activity was the most important EEG variable related to mental functioning in the talented group; (2) while EEG period and alpha ratio were the two most important EEG variables related to intellectual functioning in the mentally handicapped group; (3) hemispheric symmetry was of some importance for both groups, with greater symmetry being associated with superior performance. Contrary to Ertl's neural efficiency theory, (1) neural information transfer rate was significantly positively (not negatively as predicted) related to intellectual performance (for the handicapped group only), and (2) alpha was significantly related to intellectual functioning (for the handicapped group only). Further research is needed to extend and confirm the above findings dealing with persons scoring in the normal IQ range and during mentally active as well as resting conditions. PMID:7099883

  11. The EEG as an index of neuromodulator balance in memory and mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Vakalopoulos, Costa

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong correlation between signature EEG frequency patterns and the relative levels of distinct neuromodulators. These associations become particularly evident during the sleep-wake cycle. The monoamine-acetylcholine balance hypothesis is a theory of neurophysiological markers of the EEG and a detailed description of the findings that support this proposal are presented in this paper. According to this model alpha rhythm reflects the relative predominance of cholinergic muscarinic signals and delta rhythm that of monoaminergic receptor effects. Both high voltage synchronized rhythms are likely mediated by inhibitory Gαi/o-mediated transduction of inhibitory interneurons. Cognitively, alpha and delta EEG measures are proposed to indicate automatic and flexible strategies, respectively. Sleep is associated with marked changes in relative neuromodulator levels corresponding to EEG markers of distinct stages. Sleep studies on memory consolidation present some of the strongest evidence yet for the respective roles of monoaminergic and cholinergic projections in declarative and non-declarative memory processes, a key theoretical premise for understanding the data. Affective dysregulation is reflected in altered EEG patterns during sleep. PMID:24782698

  12. Salivary testosterone and EEG spectra of 9- to 11-year-old male children.

    PubMed

    Poblano, Adrian; Rothenberg, Stephen J; Fonseca, Maria Eugenia; Cruz, Maria Luisa; Flores, Teodoro; Zarco, Irma

    2003-01-01

    Although most investigators agree that there are electroencephalogram (EEG) changes with chronological age around puberty, no one has remarked on why this is so. As the increase in testosterone at the end of prepubertal childhood is a biomarker for the on-set of a period of accelerated growth and development, we searched for an association between testosterone level and the spectral power and topography of EEG. We tested 60 children between 9- and 11-years-old, each demonstrating normal neurological examination and Wechsler intelligence scale over 90. Salivary testosterone was measured using immunoenzymatic chemiluminescent assay. Children were divided into 3 groups according to measured testosterone level. EEG was processed with a Fast Fourier Transform; average of relative power spectral analyses were calculated and data divided into delta, theta, alpha, and beta bands. The principal finding was the highly significant interaction between EEG band and testosterone group, F(6, 171) = 4.54, Huynh-Feldt epsilon = 0.853, p =.001. Delta relative power decreased significantly and Alpha relative power increased significantly in the 2 groups with higher salivary testosterone concentration when compared to the lowest testosterone group. This work suggests that increased testosterone in prepubertal children can predict some of the same EEG changes that are usually associated with increased chronological age. PMID:12740191

  13. The EEG as an index of neuromodulator balance in memory and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Vakalopoulos, Costa

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong correlation between signature EEG frequency patterns and the relative levels of distinct neuromodulators. These associations become particularly evident during the sleep-wake cycle. The monoamine-acetylcholine balance hypothesis is a theory of neurophysiological markers of the EEG and a detailed description of the findings that support this proposal are presented in this paper. According to this model alpha rhythm reflects the relative predominance of cholinergic muscarinic signals and delta rhythm that of monoaminergic receptor effects. Both high voltage synchronized rhythms are likely mediated by inhibitory Gαi/o-mediated transduction of inhibitory interneurons. Cognitively, alpha and delta EEG measures are proposed to indicate automatic and flexible strategies, respectively. Sleep is associated with marked changes in relative neuromodulator levels corresponding to EEG markers of distinct stages. Sleep studies on memory consolidation present some of the strongest evidence yet for the respective roles of monoaminergic and cholinergic projections in declarative and non-declarative memory processes, a key theoretical premise for understanding the data. Affective dysregulation is reflected in altered EEG patterns during sleep. PMID:24782698

  14. Detection of EEG-resting state independent networks by eLORETA-ICA method.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yasunori; Ishii, Ryouhei; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Canuet, Leonides; Ikeda, Shunichiro; Hata, Masahiro; Imajo, Kaoru; Matsuzaki, Haruyasu; Musha, Toshimitsu; Asada, Takashi; Iwase, Masao; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that functional networks can be extracted even from resting state data, the so called "Resting State independent Networks" (RS-independent-Ns) by applying independent component analysis (ICA). However, compared to fMRI, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have much higher temporal resolution and provide a direct estimation of cortical activity. To date, MEG studies have applied ICA for separate frequency bands only, disregarding cross-frequency couplings. In this study, we aimed to detect EEG-RS-independent-Ns and their interactions in all frequency bands. We applied exact low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography-ICA (eLORETA-ICA) to resting-state EEG data in 80 healthy subjects using five frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma band) and found five RS-independent-Ns in alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands. Next, taking into account previous neuroimaging findings, five RS-independent-Ns were identified: (1) the visual network in alpha frequency band, (2) dual-process of visual perception network, characterized by a negative correlation between the right ventral visual pathway (VVP) in alpha and beta frequency bands and left posterior dorsal visual pathway (DVP) in alpha frequency band, (3) self-referential processing network, characterized by a negative correlation between the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in beta frequency band and right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) in alpha frequency band, (4) dual-process of memory perception network, functionally related to a negative correlation between the left VVP and the precuneus in alpha frequency band; and (5) sensorimotor network in beta and gamma frequency bands. We selected eLORETA-ICA which has many advantages over the other network visualization methods and overall findings indicate that eLORETA-ICA with EEG data can identify five RS-independent-Ns in their intrinsic frequency bands, and correct correlations within RS-independent-Ns. PMID:25713521

  15. Detection of EEG-resting state independent networks by eLORETA-ICA method

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yasunori; Ishii, Ryouhei; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D.; Canuet, Leonides; Ikeda, Shunichiro; Hata, Masahiro; Imajo, Kaoru; Matsuzaki, Haruyasu; Musha, Toshimitsu; Asada, Takashi; Iwase, Masao; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that functional networks can be extracted even from resting state data, the so called “Resting State independent Networks” (RS-independent-Ns) by applying independent component analysis (ICA). However, compared to fMRI, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have much higher temporal resolution and provide a direct estimation of cortical activity. To date, MEG studies have applied ICA for separate frequency bands only, disregarding cross-frequency couplings. In this study, we aimed to detect EEG-RS-independent-Ns and their interactions in all frequency bands. We applied exact low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography-ICA (eLORETA-ICA) to resting-state EEG data in 80 healthy subjects using five frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma band) and found five RS-independent-Ns in alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands. Next, taking into account previous neuroimaging findings, five RS-independent-Ns were identified: (1) the visual network in alpha frequency band, (2) dual-process of visual perception network, characterized by a negative correlation between the right ventral visual pathway (VVP) in alpha and beta frequency bands and left posterior dorsal visual pathway (DVP) in alpha frequency band, (3) self-referential processing network, characterized by a negative correlation between the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in beta frequency band and right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) in alpha frequency band, (4) dual-process of memory perception network, functionally related to a negative correlation between the left VVP and the precuneus in alpha frequency band; and (5) sensorimotor network in beta and gamma frequency bands. We selected eLORETA-ICA which has many advantages over the other network visualization methods and overall findings indicate that eLORETA-ICA with EEG data can identify five RS-independent-Ns in their intrinsic frequency bands, and correct correlations within RS-independent-Ns. PMID:25713521

  16. Rhythmic activity in EEG and sleep in rats with absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sitnikova, Evgenia; Hramov, Alexander E; Grubov, Vadim; Koronovsky, Alexey A

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that absence epilepsy is accompanied by disturbances of rhythmic activity in EEG during sleep. Sleep-wake architecture and time-frequency parameters of EEG were analyzed during drowsiness and sleep in WAG/Rij rats with genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy. The incidence of seizures varied in a group of 10 rats, in which 5 individuals did not develop epileptic discharges in their EEG (asymptomatic rats). In contrast to asymptomatic, symptomatic subjects (1) displayed less percentage of wakefulness EEG pattern and more non-REM sleep, (2) showed higher beta and less delta EEG power in frontal cortex during non-REM sleep. Mid-frequency oscillations, such as sleep spindles and 5-9Hz oscillations, were detected in EEG automatically and underwent time-frequency analysis by means of skeletons of wavelet surfaces. Some mid-frequency oscillations showed "complex" frequency structure, consisting of the dominant and subdominant components. "Complex" sleep spindles more frequently appeared in asymptomatic rats than in symptomatic, whereas the dominant frequency of these spindles in symptomatic rats was higher than in asymptomatic (12.7 vs 11.9Hz). In general, low-frequency components were readily integrated in sleep spindles in asymptomatic WAG/Rij rats, and decrease in number of "complex" sleep spindles may be associated with epileptic phenotype. PMID:26608255

  17. EEG changes and serum anticholinergic activity measured in patients with delirium in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Plaschke, K; Hill, H; Engelhardt, R; Thomas, C; von Haken, R; Scholz, M; Kopitz, J; Bardenheuer, H J; Weisbrod, M; Weigand, M A

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) is a reliable indicator of delirium in the ICU, and whether there is a significant correlation between SAA and quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) data in delirious patients. In a prospective cohort study, we assessed ICU patients diagnosed with delirium (n = 37). EEG measurements and blood analysis including SAA were performed 48 h following ICU admission. The presence of delirium was evaluated using the Confusion Assessment Method for critically ill patients in ICU (CAM-ICU). The SAA level was measured using a competitive radioreceptor binding assay for muscarinergic receptors and quantitative EEG was measured using the CATEEM system. We found that, under comparable conditions, patients in the delirium group showed a higher relative EEG theta power and a reduced alpha power (n = 17) than did the non-delirious patients (n = 20). No difference in measured SAA levels were seen; therefore, there was no correlation between SAA and EEG measurements in delirious patients. We conclude that, in contrast to the EEG, the SAA level cannot be proposed as a tool for diagnosing delirium in ICU patients. PMID:17991256

  18. Can arousing feedback rectify lapses in driving? Prediction from EEG power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Chuang, Chun-Hsiang; Ko, Li-Wei; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Objective. This study explores the neurophysiological changes, measured using an electroencephalogram (EEG), in response to an arousing warning signal delivered to drowsy drivers, and predicts the efficacy of the feedback based on changes in the EEG. Approach. Eleven healthy subjects participated in sustained-attention driving experiments. The driving task required participants to maintain their cruising position and compensate for randomly induced lane deviations using the steering wheel, while their EEG and driving performance were continuously monitored. The arousing warning signal was delivered to participants who experienced momentary behavioral lapses, failing to respond rapidly to lane-departure events (specifically the reaction time exceeded three times the alert reaction time). Main results. The results of our previous studies revealed that arousing feedback immediately reversed deteriorating driving performance, which was accompanied by concurrent EEG theta- and alpha-power suppression in the bilateral occipital areas. This study further proposes a feedback efficacy assessment system to accurately estimate the efficacy of arousing warning signals delivered to drowsy participants by monitoring the changes in their EEG power spectra immediately thereafter. The classification accuracy was up 77.8% for determining the need for triggering additional warning signals. Significance. The findings of this study, in conjunction with previous studies on EEG correlates of behavioral lapses, might lead to a practical closed-loop system to predict, monitor and rectify behavioral lapses of human operators in attention-critical settings.

  19. Use of EEG to track visual attention in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Robert Alan

    This thesis investigates the use of EEG to track the spatial locus of covert, visual attention. Three experiments are described that were to detect the position of visual attention as it was deployed towards targets as they appeared. The first experiment uses flickering fields placed in the periphery of the visual field to induce SSVEPs, to be used to track the position of attention which varies horizontally between them. The flickers failed to produce significant SSVEP activity. However attention locus could still able to be tracked by endogenous lateralizations of 12Hz and 18Hz activity. A second experiment was then designed to track attention locus as it varied either horizontally or vertically using only endogenous EEG activity in the alpha (10Hz), low-beta (18Hz), high-beta (24Hz) and gamma (36Hz) bands. Tracking proved successful in all but a small number of subjects. Horizontally varying attention was associated with lateralizations of the alpha band and low-beta band, while vertically varying attention was associated with varying alpha band and low-beta band activity in the occipito-parietal junction over the central sulcus. A third experiment was then performed to track attention locus as it varied in two dimensions. Using a combination of the features found to be informative in the second experiment, tracking proved successful in up to nine bins of two-dimensional visual space. Tracking in either the horizontal or vertical dimension was also successful when attention varied in two dimensions. The success of this method shows that EEG can be used to passively detect the spatial position of attention, at varying degrees of position, as a person attends to objects they see.

  20. The effects of Dalmane /flurazepam hydrochloride/ on human EEG characteristics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Carrie, J. R. G.; Borda, R. P.; Kellaway, P.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of the changes in the waking EEGs of six healthy male subjects who received 30 mg daily oral doses of flurazepam hydrochloride for two weeks. A placebo was then substituted for flurazepam for another two weeks. An increase in beta activity with a maximum in fronto-central leads was observed during the test period. A small increase in the mean wavelength of the alpha and theta activities in the central-occipital derivations was also apparent in the subjects during the period.

  1. Subtractive Fuzzy Classifier Based Driver Distraction Levels Classification Using EEG

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Mousa Kadhim; Murugappan, Murugappan; Ahmad, Badlishah

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] In earlier studies of driver distraction, researchers classified distraction into two levels (not distracted, and distracted). This study classified four levels of distraction (neutral, low, medium, high). [Subjects and Methods] Fifty Asian subjects (n=50, 43 males, 7 females), age range 20–35 years, who were free from any disease, participated in this study. Wireless EEG signals were recorded by 14 electrodes during four types of distraction stimuli (Global Position Systems (GPS), music player, short message service (SMS), and mental tasks). We derived the amplitude spectrum of three different frequency bands, theta, alpha, and beta of EEG. Then, based on fusion of discrete wavelet packet transforms and fast fourier transform yield, we extracted two features (power spectral density, spectral centroid frequency) of different wavelets (db4, db8, sym8, and coif5). Mean ± SD was calculated and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed. A fuzzy inference system classifier was applied to different wavelets using the two extracted features. [Results] The results indicate that the two features of sym8 posses highly significant discrimination across the four levels of distraction, and the best average accuracy achieved by the subtractive fuzzy classifier was 79.21% using the power spectral density feature extracted using the sym8 wavelet. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that EEG signals can be used to monitor distraction level intensity in order to alert drivers to high levels of distraction. PMID:24259914

  2. Resting State EEG Hemispheric Power Asymmetry in Children with Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Papagiannopoulou, Eleni A; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder estimated to affect between 4 and 7% of the population. It is often referred to as a learning disability and is characterized by deficits in the linguistic system. To better understand the neural underpinnings of dyslexia, we examined the electroencephalography (EEG) power spectra between pre-adolescents with dyslexia and neurotypical control children during eyes closed state. We reported the differences in spontaneous oscillatory activity of each major EEG band (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) adopting a global as well as in a region-by-region and hemispheric approach to elucidate whether there are changes in asymmetry in children with dyslexia compared to controls. We also examined the relationship between EEG power spectra and clinical variables. The findings of our study confirm the presence of an atypical linguistic network, evident in children with dyslexia. This abnormal network hallmarked by a dominance of theta activity suggests that these abnormalities are present prior to these children learning to read, thus implicating delayed maturation and abnormal hypoarousal mechanisms. PMID:26942169

  3. Resting State EEG Hemispheric Power Asymmetry in Children with Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannopoulou, Eleni A.; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder estimated to affect between 4 and 7% of the population. It is often referred to as a learning disability and is characterized by deficits in the linguistic system. To better understand the neural underpinnings of dyslexia, we examined the electroencephalography (EEG) power spectra between pre-adolescents with dyslexia and neurotypical control children during eyes closed state. We reported the differences in spontaneous oscillatory activity of each major EEG band (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) adopting a global as well as in a region-by-region and hemispheric approach to elucidate whether there are changes in asymmetry in children with dyslexia compared to controls. We also examined the relationship between EEG power spectra and clinical variables. The findings of our study confirm the presence of an atypical linguistic network, evident in children with dyslexia. This abnormal network hallmarked by a dominance of theta activity suggests that these abnormalities are present prior to these children learning to read, thus implicating delayed maturation and abnormal hypoarousal mechanisms. PMID:26942169

  4. [Study of zopiclone with quantitative EEG analysis and topography].

    PubMed

    Yamadera, H; Kato, M; Tsukahara, Y; Okuma, T

    1995-08-01

    Zopiclone is a cyclopyrrolone derivative which possesses hypnotic activity. This drug is known to increase the slow sleep stage compared to benzodiazepines in polysomnography. The subjects were 10 right-handed healthy male volunteers aged 21-23 years. Double-blind crossover trials with placebo control were conducted in a random sequence at intervals of 1 week. Zopiclone 7.5 mg and placebo were administered as single oral doses. Three-minute vigilance controlled EEGs at before and at 1, 3, and 5 h after drug administration, and the response times were recorded. One minute out of the 3-minute EEGs was analyzed with FFT and the power spectrum was obtained. Then the absolute amplitude power (microV) was calculated. These results were subjected to Student's t-test (double difference) and displayed with topographic maps (t statistic significance probability mapping). Zopiclone prolonged the latency of the response time, and increased the amount of delta absolute amplitude power over the right central region, beta 1 absolute amplitude power over the left central region and beta 2 absolute amplitude power over the right central area along with decreased alpha absolute amplitude power over the occipital region and theta power over the left frontal pole area after 1 h, when the peak pharmacological effect was expected. The EEG profiles of zopiclone were different from that of diazepam reported previously concerning the increase in delta activity. PMID:7584730

  5. EEG-microstate dependent emergence of perceptual awareness

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Juliane; Díaz Hernàndez, Laura; Ro, Tony; Michel, Christoph M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether the differences in perceptual awareness for stimuli at the threshold of awareness can arise from different global brain states before stimulus onset indexed by the EEG microstate. We used a metacontrast backward masking paradigm in which subjects had to discriminate between two weak stimuli and obtained measures of accuracy and awareness while their EEG was recorded from 256 channels. Comparing targets that were correctly identified with and without awareness allowed us to contrast differences in awareness while keeping performance constant for identical physical stimuli. Two distinct pre-stimulus scalp potential fields (microstate maps) dissociated correct identification with and without awareness, and their estimated intracranial generators were stronger in primary visual cortex before correct identification without awareness. This difference in activity cannot be explained by differences in alpha power or phase which were less reliably linked with differential pre-stimulus activation of primary visual cortex. Our results shed a new light on the function of pre-stimulus activity in early visual cortex in visual awareness and emphasize the importance of trial-by-trials analysis of the spatial configuration of the scalp potential field identified with multichannel EEG. PMID:24860450

  6. Effects of Manual Lymph Drainage of the Neck on EEG in Subjects with Psychological Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jung-Myo; Kim, Sung-Joong

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effect of manual lymph drainage (MLD) of the neck on electroencephalography (EEG) in subjects with psychological stress. [Methods] Twenty-six subjects were randomly allocated to receive one 15-min session of either MLD or resting on a bed (control). [Results] Analysis of EEG in the MLD group showed a significant increase in relaxation, manifested as an increase in average absolute and relative delta and alpha activity. [Conclusion] It is suggested that MLD provides acute neural effects that increase relaxation in subjects with psychological stress. PMID:24567691

  7. EEG-MEG Integration Enhances the Characterization of Functional and Effective Connectivity in the Resting State Network

    PubMed Central

    Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Stephani, Ulrich; Deuschl, Günther; Freitag, Christine M.; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    At the sensor level many aspects, such as spectral power, functional and effective connectivity as well as relative-power-ratio ratio (RPR) and spatial resolution have been comprehensively investigated through both electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). Despite this, differences between both modalities have not yet been systematically studied by direct comparison. It remains an open question as to whether the integration of EEG and MEG data would improve the information obtained from the above mentioned parameters. Here, EEG (64-channel system) and MEG (275 sensor system) were recorded simultaneously in conditions with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) in 29 healthy adults. Spectral power, functional and effective connectivity, RPR, and spatial resolution were analyzed at five different frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma). Networks of functional and effective connectivity were described using a spatial filter approach called the dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) followed by the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC). Absolute mean power at the sensor level was significantly higher in EEG than in MEG data in both EO and EC conditions. At the source level, there was a trend towards a better performance of the combined EEG+MEG analysis compared with separate EEG or MEG analyses for the source mean power, functional correlation, effective connectivity for both EO and EC. The network of coherent sources and the spatial resolution were similar for both the EEG and MEG data if they were analyzed separately. Results indicate that the combined approach has several advantages over the separate analyses of both EEG and MEG. Moreover, by a direct comparison of EEG and MEG, EEG was characterized by significantly higher values in all measured parameters in both sensor and source level. All the above conclusions are specific to the resting state task and the specific analysis used in this study to have general conclusion multi-center studies would be helpful. PMID:26509448

  8. EEG-MEG Integration Enhances the Characterization of Functional and Effective Connectivity in the Resting State Network.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Moliadze, Vera; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Stephani, Ulrich; Deuschl, Günther; Freitag, Christine M; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    At the sensor level many aspects, such as spectral power, functional and effective connectivity as well as relative-power-ratio ratio (RPR) and spatial resolution have been comprehensively investigated through both electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). Despite this, differences between both modalities have not yet been systematically studied by direct comparison. It remains an open question as to whether the integration of EEG and MEG data would improve the information obtained from the above mentioned parameters. Here, EEG (64-channel system) and MEG (275 sensor system) were recorded simultaneously in conditions with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) in 29 healthy adults. Spectral power, functional and effective connectivity, RPR, and spatial resolution were analyzed at five different frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma). Networks of functional and effective connectivity were described using a spatial filter approach called the dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) followed by the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC). Absolute mean power at the sensor level was significantly higher in EEG than in MEG data in both EO and EC conditions. At the source level, there was a trend towards a better performance of the combined EEG+MEG analysis compared with separate EEG or MEG analyses for the source mean power, functional correlation, effective connectivity for both EO and EC. The network of coherent sources and the spatial resolution were similar for both the EEG and MEG data if they were analyzed separately. Results indicate that the combined approach has several advantages over the separate analyses of both EEG and MEG. Moreover, by a direct comparison of EEG and MEG, EEG was characterized by significantly higher values in all measured parameters in both sensor and source level. All the above conclusions are specific to the resting state task and the specific analysis used in this study to have general conclusion multi-center studies would be helpful. PMID:26509448

  9. Residual brain dysfunction observed one year post-mild traumatic brain injury: Combined EEG and balance study

    PubMed Central

    Slobounov, Semyon; Sebastianelli, Wayne; Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is still considerable debate and controversy about whether EEG can be used as a robust clinical tool for assessment of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Nonhomogeneous subject populations, inaccurate assessment of severity of brain injury, time since injury when EEG testing was performed, the lack of EEG research conducted serially and in conjunction with other behavioral measures as injury evolves over time may contribute to the existing controversies. In this study, we implemented a concussion assessment protocol combining a series of EEG and balance measures throughout one year post-injury to document the efficacy of EEG and balance measures as relate to differential recovery of patients suffering from MTBI. Methods Three hundred and eighty subjects at risk for MTBI were initially recruited for baseline testing. Forty nine from this initial subjects pool subsequently suffered a single episode of concussive blow and were tested on day 7, 15, 30 days, 6 months and 12 months post-injury. EEGs were recorded while sitting, standing on the force plate and then on a foam base of support with eyes open/closed conditions. EEG alpha power (8–12 Hz) and its percent suppression from sitting to standing postures were computed. The center of pressure (COP) measures were obtained from the force platform and analyzed for eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Results Percent alpha power suppression from sitting to standing postural conditions significantly increased in MTBI subjects shortly after the injury (p < 0.01). Percent alpha power suppression significantly correlated with increased area of COP during standing posture with eye closed (r2 = 0.53, p < 0.01). The magnitude of alpha power suppression predicted the rate of recovery of this measure in sub-acute and chronic phases of injury (r2 = 0.609, p < 0.01). Finally, 85% of MTBI subjects who showed more than 20% of alpha power suppression in the acute phase of injury did not return to pre-injury status up to 12 months post-injury. Conclusions The efficacy of serially implemented EEG measures in conjunction with balance assessment over the course of MTBI evolution to document residual cerebral dysfunction was demonstrated. Specifically, alteration of EEG alpha power dynamics in conjunction with balance data in the acute phase of injury with respect to baseline measures may predict the rate of recovery from a single concussive blow. Significance Neurophysiological measures are excellent tools to assess the status and prognosis of patients with MTBI. PMID:22361265

  10. Effects of nootropics on the EEG in conscious rats and their modification by glutamatergic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vorobyov, Vasily; Kaptsov, Vladimir; Kovalev, Georgy; Sengpiel, Frank

    2011-05-30

    To study the effects of acute and repeated injections of nootropics and to learn how glutamate receptors might be involved in their mediation, the frequency spectra of cortical and hippocampal electroencephalogram (EEG) were analyzed in non-narcotized rats subcutaneously injected repeatedly with Piracetam (400mg/kg) or its analogue, Noopept (0.2mg/kg), after intracerebroventricular infusions of saline (5 ?l) or the antagonists of NMDA and quisqualate/AMPA receptors: CPP (0.1 nmol) and GDEE (1 ?mol), respectively. Piracetam increased alpha/beta1 EEG activity in the left frontal cortex, and alpha activity in both the right cortex and hippocampus, with a 10-min latency and 40-min duration. Noopept increased alpha/beta1 activity, with 30-min latency and 40-min duration in all brain areas. CPP pretreatment eliminated Piracetam EEG effects; reduced Noopept effects in the cortex and completely suppressed them in the hippocampus. After four injections of Piracetam, EEG effects were very small in the cortex, and completely lacking in the hippocampus, while GDEE pretreatment partially recovered them. The effect of Noopept in the alpha/beta1 ranges was replaced by increased beta2 activity after the eighth injection, while no effects were observed after the ninth one. GDEE pretreatment restored the effect of Noopept in the beta2 frequency range. These results demonstrate similarities in EEG effects and their mediatory mechanisms for Piracetam and its much more effective analogue, Noopept. Activation of NMDA receptors is involved in the effects of a single injection of the nootropics, whereas activation of quisqualate/AMPA receptors is associated with the decrease in their efficacy after repeated use. PMID:21414388

  11. Sleep misperception, EEG characteristics and autonomic nervous system activity in primary insomnia: a retrospective study on polysomnographic data.

    PubMed

    Maes, J; Verbraecken, J; Willemen, M; De Volder, I; van Gastel, A; Michiels, N; Verbeek, I; Vandekerckhove, M; Wuyts, J; Haex, B; Willemen, T; Exadaktylos, V; Bulckaert, A; Cluydts, R

    2014-03-01

    Misperception of Sleep Onset Latency, often found in Primary Insomnia, has been cited to be influenced by hyperarousal, reflected in EEG- and ECG-related indices. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the association between Central Nervous System (i.e. EEG) and Autonomic Nervous System activity in the Sleep Onset Period and the first NREM sleep cycle in Primary Insomnia (n=17) and healthy controls (n=11). Furthermore, the study examined the influence of elevated EEG and Autonomic Nervous System activity on Stage2 sleep-protective mechanisms (K-complexes and sleep spindles). Confirming previous findings, the Primary Insomnia-group overestimated Sleep Onset Latency and this overestimation was correlated with elevated EEG activity. A higher amount of beta EEG activity during the Sleep Onset Period was correlated with the appearance of K-complexes immediately followed by a sleep spindle in the Primary Insomnia-group. This can be interpreted as an extra attempt to protect sleep continuity or as a failure of the sleep-protective role of the K-complex by fast EEG frequencies following within one second. The strong association found between K-alpha (K-complex within one second followed by 8-12 Hz EEG activity) in Stage2 sleep and a lower parasympathetic Autonomic Nervous System dominance (less high frequency HR) in Slow-wave sleep, further assumes a state of hyperarousal continuing through sleep in Primary Insomnia. PMID:24177246

  12. EEG changes with aging in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ono, Y

    1993-03-01

    The EEGs of 40 subjects with Down syndrome (DS) aged 15 to 54 were investigated and compared with those of 42 mentally retarded subjects without DS (MR) and 47 healthy volunteers. The frequencies of the occipital alpha rhythms decreased with age in the DS subjects, and were significantly slower than the MR subjects over 35 years old. The slowing of alpha rhythm in the older DS subjects accompanied an increase of slow activity of 6-8 Hz, but did not relate to the deterioration of activities of daily life (ADL) as estimated by the GBS score. Twenty-one subjects with DS were examined by a CT scan as well, and showed no age-related morphometric changes. PMID:8411794

  13. Multimodal EEG Recordings, Psychometrics and Behavioural Analysis.

    PubMed

    Boeijinga, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution measurements of neuronal activity are preferably combined. In an overview on how this approach can take shape, multimodal electroencephalography (EEG) is treated in 2 main parts: by experiments without a task and in the experimentally cued working brain. It concentrates first on the alpha rhythm properties and next on data-driven search for patterns such as the default mode network. The high-resolution volumic distributions of neuronal metabolic indices result in distributed cortical regions and possibly relate to numerous nuclei, observable in a non-invasive manner in the central nervous system of humans. The second part deals with paradigms in which nowadays assessment of target-related networks can align level-dependent blood oxygenation, electrical responses and behaviour, taking the temporal resolution advantages of event-related potentials. Evidence-based electrical propagation in serial tasks during performance is now to a large extent attributed to interconnected pathways, particularly chronometry-dependent ones, throughout a chain including a dorsal stream, next ventral cortical areas taking the flow of information towards inferior temporal domains. The influence of aging is documented, and results of the first multimodal studies in neuropharmacology are consistent. Finally a scope on implementation of advanced clinical applications and personalized marker strategies in neuropsychiatry is indicated. PMID:26901154

  14. Use of EEG to Diagnose ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Agatha; Loo, Sandra K.

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) has, historically, played a focal role in the assessment of neural function in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We review here the most recent developments in the utility of EEG in the diagnosis of ADHD, with emphasis on the most commonly used and emerging EEG metrics and their reliability in diagnostic classification. Considering the clinical heterogeneity of ADHD and the complexity of information available from the EEG signals, we suggest that considerable benefits are to be gained from multivariate analyses and a focus towards understanding of the neural generators of EEG. We conclude that while EEG cannot currently be used as a diagnostic tool, vast developments in analytical and technological tools in its domain anticipate future progress in its utility in the clinical setting. PMID:25234074

  15. Improvements in quantitative EEG following consumption of a natural citicoline-enhanced beverage.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Steven E

    2012-06-01

    The present study examined the impact of a taurine-free drink enhanced with citicoline and other natural ingredients on electrophysiological markers of mental alertness. Ten healthy adult participants enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study and were randomized to receive either placebo or the citicoline supplement on the first visit. Measures of electrical brain activity using electroencephalogram (EEG) were collected 30 min after consuming the beverage. Seven days after the initial assessment participants completed the alternative condition (placebo or citicoline beverage). Compared to placebo, significant improvements were found in frontal alpha EEG and N100 event related potentials (ERP) associated with the citicoline-enhanced supplement. These preliminary findings suggest that a novel brain drink containing compounds known to increase choline in the brain significantly improved attention as measured by ERP and EEG. These findings suggest that a viable and alternative brain supplement without potential compounds such as taurine may augment attentional mechanisms in healthy individuals. PMID:22578105

  16. EEG Evolution in Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kossoff, Eric H.; Bachur, Cathy; Quain, Angela M.; Ewen, Joshua B.; Comi, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The EEG in Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) was theorized over 50 years ago as changing over time from normality to focal asymmetry to lastly epileptiform. We sought to validate these findings in a larger cohort today. Children with confirmed SWS and routine EEG at our center were evaluated retrospectively. An EEG score (0–3) was created and linked to patient current age, overall neurologic function, and seizure frequency. Eighty-one EEGs from 44 patients with SWS (mean age 2.0 years (range: 0.2 – 37.9 years) were evaluated and assigned an EEG score. The mean age for patients with an EEG score of 0–1 (normal or focal slowing) was 3.2 years (SEM 0.6), whereas those with an EEG score of 2–3 (focal sharp waves or frequent spike-wave bursts) was 8.7 years (SEM 1.7) (p=0.006). There was no correlation between the EEG score and either the SWS overall neuroscore or seizure subscore (measuring frequency). The EEG in patients with SWS does appear to evolve over time, becoming more abnormal with more frequent epileptiform activity, as suspected in smaller studies decades ago. This progressive change, however, did not correlate with the child’s neurologic function or seizure frequency. PMID:24560844

  17. [Topographic-quantitative EEG-analysis of the paradoxical arousal reaction. EEG changes during urologic surgery using isoflurane/ N2O anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Bischoff, P; Kochs, E; Droese, D; Meyer-Moldenhauer, W H; Schulte am Esch, J

    1993-03-01

    Increases in slow-wave (delta) activity in the EEG may reflect increased depth of anaesthesia provided that hypoxia, haemodynamic instability and drug overdose have been excluded. In contrast, similar intraoperative EEG responses have been described as paradoxical arousal reactions. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of surgical stimulation on spatial EEG changes during anaesthesia with 0.6% isoflurane/66% nitrous oxide. METHODS. The present study investigated changes in EEG power and frequencies in 20 patients (mean age 36 +/- 8 years; ASA I or II) scheduled for elective urological surgery during steady-state anaesthesia with 0.6% isoflurane and 66% nitrous oxide. The following variables were measured: heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), end-tidal isoflurane (PetISO) and carbon dioxide concentrations (PetCO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2%) and body temperature (degree C). Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: group 1 (n = 10; without surgery) and group 2 (n = 10; with surgical procedure). The EEG was recorded over 20 min. The first 5 min were taken as baseline. In group 2 surgical stimulation (skin incision with subsequent surgical preparation) was started 1-2 min after recording of baseline values. Topographical distribution of EEG output was recorded from 17 electrodes (international 10-20 system), digitized and stored on disk (CATEEM) after establishment of steady-state anaesthesia (PetISO: 0.6%; PetCO2: 35-37 mmHg). Data are given as medium (microV2/Hz) and relative changes (%) +/- SD with respect to baseline. Statistical significance was tested for F4 versus C4 for the delta- and alpha-1-frequency bands using Wilcoxon's test (P < 0.05). RESULTS. In group 1 (without surgical stimulation) all parameters did not change over time. EEG slowing with an increase in power (> 100%) was noted in 8 patients of group 2 (n = 10; during surgical stimulation). By visual inspection of the original EEG tracings paradoxical arousal patterns were seen in these patients. In group 2, delta output changed from 69.6 microV2/Hz (baseline) to 147.4 microV2/Hz at frontal leads (F4) 5-6 min after the start of surgery. Only minimal changes were observed for theta activity. At the same time, in most cases fast wave activity (alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1 and beta 2) was decreased by more than 50% at identical cortical areas. Increases in MAP were noted continuously after start of surgery up to a maximum of 19.8% from baseline, which became significant at the 16-min level. Heart rate did not change over time. DISCUSSION. Our data demonstrate that EEG slowing may be induced by surgical stimulation during steady-state anaesthesia with 0.6% isoflurane/66% nitrous oxide in oxygen. These findings are consistent with previous reports indicating the occurrence of slow wave patterns following sensory stimulation in comatose patients. Since these events occur predominantly at frontal areas they may not be detected with single-channel parietal recordings. Our data suggest that topographical EEG monitoring may useful for assessing painful events during surgery. Using EEG monoparameters like spectral edge frequency or median the occurrence of paradoxical arousal reactions may be falsely interpreted as an increased depth of anaesthesia. PMID:8480900

  18. Theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation is associated with increased EEG synchronization in the stimulated relative to unstimulated cerebral hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Kaspar; Nyffeler, Thomas; Wiest, Roland; Hauf, Martinus; Mathis, Johannes; Hess, Ch W; Müri, René

    2008-05-01

    Theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) may induce behavioural changes that outlast the stimulation period. The neurophysiological basis of these behavioural changes are currently under investigation. Given the evidence that cortical information processing relies on transient synchronization and desynchronization of neuronal assemblies, we set out to test whether TBS is associated with changes of neuronal synchronization as assessed by surface EEG. In four healthy subjects one TBS train of 600 pulses (200 bursts, each burst consisting of 3 pulses at 30 Hz, repeated at intervals of 100 ms) was applied over the right frontal eye field and EEG synchronization was assessed in a time-resolved manner over 60 min by using a non-overlapping moving window. For each time step the linear cross-correlation matrix for six EEG channels of the right and for the six homotopic EEG channels of the left hemisphere were computed and their largest eigenvalues used to assess changes of synchronization. Synchronization was computed for broadband EEG and for the delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands. In all subjects EEG synchronization of the stimulated hemisphere was significantly and persistently increased relative to EEG synchronization of the unstimulated hemisphere. This effect occurred immediately after TBS for the theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands and 10-20 min after TBS for broadband and delta frequency band EEG. Our results demonstrate that TBS is associated with increased neuronal synchronization of the cerebral hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulation site relative to the unstimulated hemisphere. We speculate that enhanced synchronization interferes with cortical information processing and thus may be a neurophysiological correlate of the impaired behavioural performance detected previously. PMID:18355959

  19. Resting State EEG in Children With Learning Disabilities: An Independent Component Analysis Approach.

    PubMed

    Jäncke, Lutz; Alahmadi, Nsreen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the neurophysiological underpinnings of learning disabilities (LD) in children are examined using resting state EEG. We were particularly interested in the neurophysiological differences between children with learning disabilities not otherwise specified (LD-NOS), learning disabilities with verbal disabilities (LD-Verbal), and healthy control (HC) children. We applied 2 different approaches to examine the differences between the different groups. First, we calculated theta/beta and theta/alpha ratios in order to quantify the relationship between slow and fast EEG oscillations. Second, we used a recently developed method for analyzing spectral EEG, namely the group independent component analysis (gICA) model. Using these measures, we identified substantial differences between LD and HC children and between LD-NOS and LD-Verbal children in terms of their spectral EEG profiles. We obtained the following findings: (a) theta/beta and theta/alpha ratios were substantially larger in LD than in HC children, with no difference between LD-NOS and LD-Verbal children; (b) there was substantial slowing of EEG oscillations, especially for gICs located in frontal scalp positions, with LD-NOS children demonstrating the strongest slowing; (c) the estimated intracortical sources of these gICs were mostly located in brain areas involved in the control of executive functions, attention, planning, and language; and (d) the LD-Verbal children demonstrated substantial differences in EEG oscillations compared with LD-NOS children, and these differences were localized in language-related brain areas. The general pattern of atypical neurophysiological activation found in LD children suggests that they suffer from neurophysiological dysfunction in brain areas involved with the control of attention, executive functions, planning, and language functions. LD-Verbal children also demonstrate atypical activation, especially in language-related brain areas. These atypical neurophysiological activation patterns might provide a helpful guide for rehabilitation strategies to treat the deficiencies in these children with LD. PMID:26545819

  20. Indicators of sleepiness in an ambulatory EEG study of night driving.

    PubMed

    Papadelis, Christos; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Koufogiannis, D; Bekiaris, E; Maglaveras, Nikos

    2006-01-01

    Driver sleepiness due to sleep deprivation is a causative factor in 1% to 3% of all motor vehicle crashes. In recent studies, the importance of developing driver fatigue countermeasure devices has been stressed, in order to help prevent driving accidents and errors. Although numerous physiological indicators are available to describe an individual's level of alertness, the EEG signal has been shown to be one of the most predictive and reliable, since it is a direct measure of brain activity. In the present study, multichannel EEG data that were collected from 20 sleep-deprived subjects during real environmental conditions of driving are presented for the first time. EEG data's annotation made by two independent Medical Doctors revealed an increase of slowing activity and an acute increase of the alpha waves 5-10 seconds before driving events. From the EEG data that were collected, the Relative Band Ratio (RBR) of the EEG frequency bands, the Shannon Entropy, and the Kullback-Leibler (KL) Entropy were estimated for each one second segment. The mean values of these measurements were estimated for 5 minutes periods. Analysis revealed a significant increase of alpha waves relevant band ratios (RBR), a decrease of gamma waves RBR, and a significant decrease of KL entropy when the first and the last 5-min periods were compared. A rapid decrease of both Shannon and K-L entropies was observed just before the driving events. Conclusively, EEG can assess effectively the brain activity alterations that occur a few seconds before sleeping/drowsiness events in driving, and its quantitative measurements can be used as potential sleepiness indicators for future development of driver fatigue countermeasure devices. PMID:17946748

  1. Age effects on EEG correlates of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Nuno S; Ferreira, Daniela; Reis, Joana; Jacinto, Luís R; Fernandes, Luís; Pinho, Francisco; Festa, Joana; Pereira, Mariana; Afonso, Nuno; Santos, Nadine C; Cerqueira, João J; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Body and brain undergo several changes with aging. One of the domains in which these changes are more remarkable relates with cognitive performance. In the present work, electroencephalogram (EEG) markers (power spectral density and spectral coherence) of age-related cognitive decline were sought whilst the subjects performed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Considering the expected age-related cognitive deficits, WCST was applied to young, mid-age and elderly participants, and the theta and alpha frequency bands were analyzed. From the results herein presented, higher theta and alpha power were found to be associated with a good performance in the WCST of younger subjects. Additionally, higher theta and alpha coherence were also associated with good performance and were shown to decline with age and a decrease in alpha peak frequency seems to be associated with aging. Additionally, inter-hemispheric long-range coherences and parietal theta power were identified as age-independent EEG correlates of cognitive performance. In summary, these data reveals age-dependent as well as age-independent EEG correlates of cognitive performance that contribute to the understanding of brain aging and related cognitive deficits. PMID:26216431

  2. Quantitative EEG is an objective, sensitive, and reliable indicator of transient anesthetic effects during Wada tests.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Assassi, Nadege J; Bazil, Carl W; Hamberger, Marla J; Hirsch, Lawrence J

    2015-04-01

    The intracarotid amobarbital or Wada procedure is a component of the presurgical evaluation for refractory epilepsy, during which monitoring the onset and offset of transient anesthetic effects is critical. In this study, the authors characterized changes of 8 quantitative measures during 26 Wada tests, which included alpha, beta, theta, and delta powers, alpha/delta power ratio, beta/delta power ratio, median amplitude-integrated EEG, and 90% spectral edge frequency (SEF90), and correlated them with contralateral hemiplegia. The authors found that on the side of injection, delta and theta powers, alpha/delta power ratio, beta/delta power ratio, and SEF90 peaked within 1 minute after injection of 70 to 150 mg amobarbital or 4 to 7 mg methohexital. When contralateral arm strength returned to 3/5, delta power and amplitude-integrated EEG decayed on average 24% and 19%, respectively, for amobarbital, similar to that of methohexital (27% and 18%). Because delta power resolution most closely mirrored that of the hemiplegia and amplitude-integrated EEG had the highest signal/noise ratio, these quantitative values appear to be the best measures for decay of anesthetic effects. Increase in alpha power persisted longest, and therefore may be the best measure of late residual anesthetic effects. PMID:25580802

  3. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C.; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S.; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Design: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA) Measurement and Results: Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P < 0.0001) and fast ratio = (alpha+beta)/(delta+theta) (P < 0.0001) across the 2 days of CPAP withdrawal. The A/D ratio significantly correlated with the driving simulator response time (P = 0.015), steering variation (P = 0.002), and PVT reaction time (P = 0.006). In contrast, individual EEG band power of alpha, beta, theta, and delta did not correlate with any neurocognitive performance. Conclusions: Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. Citation: Wang D, Bai XX, Williams SC, Hua SC, Kim JW, Marshall NS, D'Rozario A, Grunstein RR. Modafinil increases awake EEG activation and improves performance in obstructive sleep apnea during continuous positive airway pressure withdrawal. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1297–1303. PMID:26158894

  4. Estimation of the propagation direction and spectral properties of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia using Directed Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Kaminski, Maciej; Marciniak, Radoslaw; Byrczek, Tomasz; Stasiowski, Michal; Jalowiecki, Przemyslaw; Sobieszek, Aleksander; Zmyslowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate spectral properties and propagation of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia between individual EEG recording channels. The intensities of activity flows were calculated for delta, theta, alpha and beta waves using the Directed Transfer Function integration procedure. It was found that delta waves played the dominant role in the EEG signal propagation during anesthesia and it was suggested that theta and alpha waves propagation could be related to the processes participating in the wakefulness control. Data obtained with DTF method were compared with data received from the analysis of cerebral blood flow with the use of PET in other laboratory. This study showed that analysis of the EEG signal propagation is useful for better understanding and thus safer induction of anaesthesia procedure.

  5. Non-stationarity of EEG during wakefulness and anaesthesia: advantages of EEG permutation entropy monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Matthias; Kochs, Eberhard F; Schneider, Gerhard; Jordan, Denis

    2014-12-01

    Monitors evaluating the electroencephalogram (EEG) to determine depth of anaesthesia use spectral analysis approaches for analysis windows up to 61.5 s as well as additional smoothing algorithms. Stationary EEG is required to reliably apply the index algorithms. Because of rapid physiological changes, artefacts, etc., the EEG may not always fulfil this requirement. EEG analysis using permutation entropy (PeEn) may overcome this issue, since PeEn can also be applied to practically nonstationary EEG. One objective was to determine the duration of EEG sequences that can be considered stationary at different anaesthetic levels. The second, more important objective was to test the reliability of PeEn to reflect the anaesthetic levels for short EEG segments. EEG was recorded from 15 volunteers undergoing sevoflurane and propofol anaesthesia at different anaesthetic levels and for each group 10 data sets were included. EEG stationarity was evaluated for EEG sample lengths from 4 to 116 s for each level. PeEn was calculated for these sequences using different parameter settings and analysis windows from 2 to 60 s. During wakefulness EEG can only be considered stationary for sequences up to 12 s. With increasing anaesthetic level the probability and duration of stationary EEG increases. PeEn is able to reliably separate consciousness from unconsciousness for EEG segments as short as 2 s. Especially during wakefulness a conflict between stationary EEG sequence durations and methods used for monitoring may exist. PeEn does not require stationarity and functions for EEG sequences as short as 2 s. These promising results seem to support the application of non-linear parameters, such as PeEn, to depth of anaesthesia monitoring. PMID:24442330

  6. EEG and ocular correlates of circadian melatonin phase and human performance decrements during sleep loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Khalsa, S. B.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the associations between slow eye movements (SEMs), eye blink rate, waking electroencephalogram (EEG) power density, neurobehavioral performance, and the circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin in a cohort of 10 healthy men during up to 32 h of sustained wakefulness. The time course of neurobehavioral performance was characterized by fairly stable levels throughout the first 16 h of wakefulness followed by deterioration during the phase of melatonin secretion. This deterioration was closely associated with an increase in SEMs. Frontal low-frequency EEG activity (1-7 Hz) exhibited a prominent increase with time awake and little circadian modulation. EEG alpha activity exhibited circadian modulation. The dynamics of SEMs and EEG activity were phase locked to changes in neurobehavioral performance and lagged the plasma melatonin rhythm. The data indicate that frontal areas of the brain are more susceptible to sleep loss than occipital areas. Frontal EEG activity and ocular parameters may be used to monitor and predict changes in neurobehavioral performance associated with sleep loss and circadian misalignment.

  7. Characterizing Alzheimer’s Disease Severity via Resting-Awake EEG Amplitude Modulation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Francisco J.; Falk, Tiago H.; Kanda, Paulo A. M.; Anghinah, Renato

    2013-01-01

    Changes in electroencephalography (EEG) amplitude modulations have recently been linked with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Existing tools available to perform such analysis (e.g., detrended fluctuation analysis), however, provide limited gains in discriminability power over traditional spectral based EEG analysis. In this paper, we explore the use of an innovative EEG amplitude modulation analysis technique based on spectro-temporal signal processing. More specifically, full-band EEG signals are first decomposed into the five well-known frequency bands and the envelopes are then extracted via a Hilbert transform. Each of the five envelopes are further decomposed into four so-called modulation bands, which were chosen to coincide with the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Experiments on a resting-awake EEG dataset collected from 76 participants (27 healthy controls, 27 diagnosed with mild-AD, and 22 with moderate-AD) showed significant differences in amplitude modulations between the three groups. Most notably, i) delta modulation of the beta frequency band disappeared with an increase in disease severity (from mild to moderate AD), ii) delta modulation of the theta band appeared with an increase in severity, and iii) delta modulation of the beta frequency band showed to be a reliable discriminant feature between healthy controls and mild-AD patients. Taken together, it is hoped that the developed tool can be used to assist clinicians not only with early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, but also to monitor its progression. PMID:24015222

  8. Modeling the contribution of lamina 5 neuronal and network dynamics to low frequency EEG phenomena.

    PubMed

    Karameh, Fadi N; Dahleh, Munther A; Brown, Emery N; Massaquoi, Steve G

    2006-10-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is an important clinical and research tool in neurophysiology. With the advent of recording techniques, new evidence is emerging on the neuronal populations and wiring in the neocortex. A main challenge is to relate the EEG generation mechanisms to the underlying circuitry of the neocortex. In this paper, we look at the principal intrinsic properties of neocortical cells in layer 5 and their network behavior in simplified simulation models to explain the emergence of several important EEG phenomena such as the alpha rhythms, slow-wave sleep oscillations, and a form of cortical seizure. The models also predict the ability of layer 5 cells to produce a resonance-like neuronal recruitment known as the augmenting response. While previous models point to deeper brain structures, such as the thalamus, as the origin of many EEG rhythms (spindles), the current model suggests that the cortical circuitry itself has intrinsic oscillatory dynamics which could account for a wide variety of EEG phenomena. PMID:16897093

  9. What type of EEG (or EEG-video) does your patient need?

    PubMed

    Benbadis, Selim R

    2015-05-01

    For many years, EEG has been synonymous with 'routine' EEG, a short recording without video. With digital technology, there are now many ways to perform EEG recordings. Variable attributes of EEG recordings include: inpatient versus outpatient, prolonged versus short, with video versus without, and with provocation/activation versus without. Each method has advantages and disadvantages, and, in particular, inpatient versus outpatient studies have major cost differences. In some situations EEG-video monitoring can be performed in the ambulatory/home rather than the inpatient setting. PMID:25804449

  10. Measurement of neural signals from inexpensive, wireless and dry EEG systems.

    PubMed

    Grummett, T S; Leibbrandt, R E; Lewis, T W; DeLosAngeles, D; Powers, D M W; Willoughby, J O; Pope, K J; Fitzgibbon, S P

    2015-07-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is challenged by high cost, immobility of equipment and the use of inconvenient conductive gels. We compared EEG recordings obtained from three systems that are inexpensive, wireless, and/or dry (no gel), against recordings made with a traditional, research-grade EEG system, in order to investigate the ability of these 'non-traditional' systems to produce recordings of comparable quality to a research-grade system. The systems compared were: Emotiv EPOC (inexpensive and wireless), B-Alert (wireless), g.Sahara (dry) and g.HIamp (research-grade). We compared the ability of the systems to demonstrate five well-studied neural phenomena: (1) enhanced alpha activity with eyes closed versus open; (2) visual steady-state response (VSSR); (3) mismatch negativity; (4) P300; and (5) event-related desynchronization/synchronization. All systems measured significant alpha augmentation with eye closure, and were able to measure VSSRs (although these were smaller with g.Sahara). The B-Alert and g.Sahara were able to measure the three time-locked phenomena equivalently to the g.HIamp. The Emotiv EPOC did not have suitably located electrodes for two of the tasks and synchronization considerations meant that data from the time-locked tasks were not assessed. The results show that inexpensive, wireless, or dry systems may be suitable for experimental studies using EEG, depending on the research paradigm, and within the constraints imposed by their limited electrode placement and number. PMID:26020164

  11. EEG Changes Due to Experimentally Induced 3G Mobile Phone Radiation.

    PubMed

    Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 15-minute placement of a 3G dialing mobile phone causes direct changes in EEG activity compared to the placement of a sham phone. Furthermore, it was investigated whether placement of the mobile phone on the ear or the heart would result in different outcomes. Thirty-one healthy females participated. All subjects were measured twice: on one of the two days the mobile phone was attached to the ear, the other day to the chest. In this single-blind, cross-over design, assessments in the sham phone condition were conducted directly preceding and following the mobile phone exposure. During each assessment, EEG activity and radiofrequency radiation were recorded jointly. Delta, theta, alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma activity was computed. The association between radiation exposure and the EEG was tested using multilevel random regression analyses with radiation as predictor of main interest. Significant radiation effects were found for the alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma bands. When analyzed separately, ear location of the phone was associated with significant results, while chest placement was not. The results support the notion that EEG alterations are associated with mobile phone usage and that the effect is dependent on site of placement. Further studies are required to demonstrate the physiological relevance of these findings. PMID:26053854

  12. EEG Changes Due to Experimentally Induced 3G Mobile Phone Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 15-minute placement of a 3G dialing mobile phone causes direct changes in EEG activity compared to the placement of a sham phone. Furthermore, it was investigated whether placement of the mobile phone on the ear or the heart would result in different outcomes. Thirty-one healthy females participated. All subjects were measured twice: on one of the two days the mobile phone was attached to the ear, the other day to the chest. In this single-blind, cross-over design, assessments in the sham phone condition were conducted directly preceding and following the mobile phone exposure. During each assessment, EEG activity and radiofrequency radiation were recorded jointly. Delta, theta, alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma activity was computed. The association between radiation exposure and the EEG was tested using multilevel random regression analyses with radiation as predictor of main interest. Significant radiation effects were found for the alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma bands. When analyzed separately, ear location of the phone was associated with significant results, while chest placement was not. The results support the notion that EEG alterations are associated with mobile phone usage and that the effect is dependent on site of placement. Further studies are required to demonstrate the physiological relevance of these findings. PMID:26053854

  13. Neural Correlates of Action Observation and Execution in 14-Month-Old Infants: An Event-Related EEG Desynchronization Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Peter J.; Young, Thomas; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing interest in neurobiological methods for investigating the shared representation of action perception and production in early development. We explored the extent and regional specificity of EEG desynchronization in the infant alpha frequency range (6-9 Hz) during action observation and execution in 14-month-old infants.…

  14. Differences in Cognitive Processes between Gifted, Intelligent, Creative, and Average Individuals While Solving Complex Problems: An EEG Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert

    2000-01-01

    Studied differences in cognitive processes related to creativity and intelligence using EEG coherence and power measures in the lower and upper alpha bands. Results of 2 experiments involving 49 and 48 right-handed student teachers suggest that creativity and intelligence are different abilities that also differ in the neurological activity…

  15. Notched delta, phenotype, and Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Korff, Christian M; Kelley, Kent R; Nordli, Douglas R

    2005-08-01

    The notched delta pattern is one of the characteristic EEG features found in Angelman syndrome patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the notched delta pattern as a detection tool for Angelman syndrome patients by analyzing its frequency in a tertiary care pediatric center, its specificity for Angelman syndrome, and the age at which it was observed. The authors performed a retrospective review of the video-EEG recordings of all the patients who had either the notched delta pattern or a phenotype consistent with Angelman syndrome. The notched delta was observed in 1.1% of all the EEGs performed. Its specificity for Angelman syndrome was evaluated at 38%. The youngest age at which it was noted was 14 months. The results indicate that the notched delta pattern is relatively rare, but more frequent than expected, and is easily recognizable. The pattern was observed not only in Angelman syndrome patients, but also in children with a spectrum of conditions wider than reported. It is a powerful detection tool for Angelman syndrome when correlated to a suggestive phenotype, and the association of these features should raise suspicion for Angelman syndrome in both infants and adults. PMID:16093895

  16. Analysis of EEG Related Saccadic Eye Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funase, Arao; Kuno, Yoshiaki; Okuma, Shigeru; Yagi, Tohru

    Our final goal is to establish the model for saccadic eye movement that connects the saccade and the electroencephalogram(EEG). As the first step toward this goal, we recorded and analyzed the saccade-related EEG. In the study recorded in this paper, we tried detecting a certain EEG that is peculiar to the eye movement. In these experiments, each subject was instructed to point their eyes toward visual targets (LEDs) or the direction of the sound sources (buzzers). In the control cases, the EEG was recorded in the case of no eye movemens. As results, in the visual experiments, we found that the potential of EEG changed sharply on the occipital lobe just before eye movement. Furthermore, in the case of the auditory experiments, similar results were observed. In the case of the visual experiments and auditory experiments without eye movement, we could not observed the EEG changed sharply. Moreover, when the subject moved his/her eyes toward a right-side target, a change in EEG potential was found on the right occipital lobe. On the contrary, when the subject moved his/her eyes toward a left-side target, a sharp change in EEG potential was found on the left occipital lobe.

  17. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation efficiency compared with MDFA. Conclusion: Each entropy index has its advantages and disadvantages in estimating DoA. Overall, it is suggested that the RPE index was a superior measure. Investigating the advantages and disadvantages of these entropy indices could help improve current clinical indices for monitoring DoA. PMID:25741277

  18. Canonical bicoherence analysis of dynamic EEG data.

    PubMed

    He, Huixia; Thomson, David J

    2010-08-01

    Bicoherence has been used in quantifying quadratic phase coupling (QPC) in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. However, for high-dimensional EEG signals, the calculations of traditional auto- and cross-bicoherences of signals from multiple electrodes are computationally very expensive. This has been compounded by the recognition of the non-stationary character of EEG signals. This paper introduces a new approach, the time-varying canonical bicoherence (CBC) by short-time weighted Fourier transforms, for analyzing QPC nonlinearities of dynamic EEG signals. This new method shows both computational efficiency and simple interpretation of estimated canonical bicoherences. The canonical bicoherence analysis of EEG records, during a human visual stimulus-driven cognitive process, put into evidence of quadratic phase couplings of Beta waves and Delta waves in the frontal regions. PMID:19629667

  19. Phenotyping Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    James, Paula; Coller, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Although recorded evidence of phenotyping bleeding disorders extends back two millennia, standardization of phenotyping has only begun in the past half century. This was spurred by the need for greater precision in diagnosing disorders in order to select proper laboratory tests and treatment, and the realization that the bleeding history provides prognostic information about the future risk of bleeding with surgery or invasive procedures. Recent findings New bleeding assessment tools (BATs) have been developed to: 1. evaluate the relative bleeding risks associated with new anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, 2. assess the efficacy of new thrombopoiesis stimulating agents in preventing hemorrhage in patients with immune thrombocytopenia, and 3. assess complex gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. New web-based systems allow many researchers to collaborate by sharing the same electronic phenotyping infrastructure. Major issues of validation remain, but at present, the data indicate that the new BATs have relatively high negative predictive value for excluding a significant bleeding disorder, but disappointingly low positive predictive values. Summary New instruments to phenotype bleeding have been developed to address a number of different important clinical and research goals. The improved standardization and opportunities for collaborative studies hold promise for maximizing diagnostic, prognostic, and scientific information. PMID:22759628

  20. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI at ultra-high field: artifact prevention and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Jorge, João; Grouiller, Frédéric; Ipek, Özlem; Stoermer, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Figueiredo, Patrícia; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Gruetter, Rolf

    2015-01-15

    The simultaneous recording of scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can provide unique insights into the dynamics of human brain function, and the increased functional sensitivity offered by ultra-high field fMRI opens exciting perspectives for the future of this multimodal approach. However, simultaneous recordings are susceptible to various types of artifacts, many of which scale with magnetic field strength and can seriously compromise both EEG and fMRI data quality in recordings above 3T. The aim of the present study was to implement and characterize an optimized setup for simultaneous EEG-fMRI in humans at 7 T. The effects of EEG cable length and geometry for signal transmission between the cap and amplifiers were assessed in a phantom model, with specific attention to noise contributions from the MR scanner coldheads. Cable shortening (down to 12 cm from cap to amplifiers) and bundling effectively reduced environment noise by up to 84% in average power and 91% in inter-channel power variability. Subject safety was assessed and confirmed via numerical simulations of RF power distribution and temperature measurements on a phantom model, building on the limited existing literature at ultra-high field. MRI data degradation effects due to the EEG system were characterized via B0 and B1(+) field mapping on a human volunteer, demonstrating important, although not prohibitive, B1 disruption effects. With the optimized setup, simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions were performed on 5 healthy volunteers undergoing two visual paradigms: an eyes-open/eyes-closed task, and a visual evoked potential (VEP) paradigm using reversing-checkerboard stimulation. EEG data exhibited clear occipital alpha modulation and average VEPs, respectively, with concomitant BOLD signal changes. On a single-trial level, alpha power variations could be observed with relative confidence on all trials; VEP detection was more limited, although statistically significant responses could be detected in more than 50% of trials for every subject. Overall, we conclude that the proposed setup is well suited for simultaneous EEG-fMRI at 7 T. PMID:25449743

  1. EEG Spectral Features Discriminate between Alzheimer’s and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Emanuel; Allen, Elena A.; Aurlien, Harald; Nordby, Helge; Eichele, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) present with similar clinical symptoms of cognitive decline, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms differ. To determine whether clinical electroencephalography (EEG) can provide information relevant to discriminate between these diagnoses, we used quantitative EEG analysis to compare the spectra between non-medicated patients with AD (n = 77) and VaD (n = 77) and healthy elderly normal controls (NC) (n = 77). We use curve-fitting with a combination of a power loss and Gaussian function to model the averaged resting-state spectra of each EEG channel extracting six parameters. We assessed the performance of our model and tested the extracted parameters for group differentiation. We performed regression analysis in a multivariate analysis of covariance with group, age, gender, and number of epochs as predictors and further explored the topographical group differences with pair-wise contrasts. Significant topographical differences between the groups were found in several of the extracted features. Both AD and VaD groups showed increased delta power when compared to NC, whereas the AD patients showed a decrease in alpha power for occipital and temporal regions when compared with NC. The VaD patients had higher alpha power than NC and AD. The AD and VaD groups showed slowing of the alpha rhythm. Variability of the alpha frequency was wider for both AD and VaD groups. There was a general decrease in beta power for both AD and VaD. The proposed model is useful to parameterize spectra, which allowed extracting relevant clinical EEG key features that move toward simple and interpretable diagnostic criteria. PMID:25762978

  2. Subclinical rhythmic EEG discharge of adults: SREDA in two children.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, L; Gregory, P B; Hewitt, I K; Gubbay, S S; Parry, T S

    2001-04-01

    Subclinical rhythmic electroencephalogram (EEG) discharge is an uncommon rhythmic EEG pattern that has been reported to occur in adults. It is thought to be a nonspecific finding with little clinical significance. This article reports this EEG pattern in two children and suggests it be called subclinical rhythmic EEG discharge of adults and children. PMID:11377110

  3. Resting state EEG oscillatory power differences in ADHD college students and their peers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among the most robust neural abnormalities differentiating individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) from typically developing controls are elevated levels of slow oscillatory activity (e.g., theta) and reduced fast oscillatory activity (e.g., alpha and beta) during resting-state electroencephalography (EEG). However, studies of resting state EEG in adults with ADHD are scarce and yield inconsistent findings. Methods EEG profiles, recorded during a resting-state with eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions, were compared for college students with ADHD (n?=?18) and a nonclinical comparison group (n?=?17). Results The ADHD group showed decreased power for fast frequencies, especially alpha. This group also showed increased power in the slow frequency bands, however, these effects were strongest using relative power computations. Furthermore, the theta/beta ratio measure was reliably higher for the ADHD group. All effects were more pronounced for the eyes-closed compared to the eyes-open condition. Measures of intra-individual variability suggested that brains of the ADHD group were less variable than those of controls. Conclusions The findings of this pilot study reveal that college students with ADHD show a distinct neural pattern during resting state, suggesting that oscillatory power, especially alpha, is a useful index for reflecting differences in neural communication of ADHD in early adulthood. PMID:23249444

  4. Serum anticholinergic activity and cerebral cholinergic dysfunction: An EEG study in frail elderly with and without delirium

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Christine; Hestermann, Ute; Kopitz, Juergen; Plaschke, Konstanze; Oster, Peter; Driessen, Martin; Mundt, Christoph; Weisbrod, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Background Delirium increases morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs especially in the elderly. Serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) is a suggested biomarker for anticholinergic burden and delirium risk, but the association with cerebral cholinergic function remains unclear. To clarify this relationship, we prospectively assessed the correlation of SAA with quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) power, delirium occurrence, functional and cognitive measures in a cross-sectional sample of acutely hospitalized elderly (> 80 y) with high dementia and delirium prevalence. Methods 61 consecutively admitted patients over 80 years underwent an extensive clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. SAA was determined by using radio receptor assay as developed by Tune, and standard as well as quantitative EEGs were obtained. Results 15 patients had dementia with additional delirium (DD) according to expert consensus using DSM-IV criteria, 31 suffered from dementia without delirium (D), 15 were cognitively unimpaired (CU). SAA was clearly detectable in all patients but one (mean 10.9 ± 7.1 pmol/ml), but was not associated with expert-panel approved delirium diagnosis or cognitive functions. Delirium-associated EEG abnormalities included occipital slowing, peak power and alpha decrease, delta and theta power increase and slow wave ratio increase during active delirious states. EEG measures correlated significantly with cognitive performance and delirium severity, but not with SAA levels. Conclusion In elderly with acute disease, EEG parameters reliable indicate delirium, but SAA does not seem to reflect cerebral cholinergic function as measured by EEG and is not related to delirium diagnosis. PMID:18793418

  5. Enhanced connectivity between visual cortex and other regions of the brain in autism: a REM sleep EEG coherence study.

    PubMed

    Léveillé, Cathy; Barbeau, Elise B; Bolduc, Christianne; Limoges, Elyse; Berthiaume, Claude; Chevrier, Elyse; Mottron, Laurent; Godbout, Roger

    2010-10-01

    Functional interregional neural coupling was measured as EEG coherence during REM sleep, a state of endogenous cortical activation, in 9 adult autistic individuals (21.1±4.0 years) and 13 typically developed controls (21.5±4.3 years) monitored for two consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Spectral analysis was performed on 60 s of artefact-free EEG samples distributed equally throughout the first four REM sleep periods of the second night. EEG coherence was calculated for six frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, sigma, beta, and total spectrum) using a 22-electrode montage. The magnitude of coherence function was computed for intra- and interhemispheric pairs of recording sites. Results were compared by Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Each time the autistic group showed a greater EEG coherence than the controls; it involved intrahemispheric communication among the left visual cortex (O1) and other regions either close to or distant from the occipital cortex. In contrast, lower coherence values involved frontal electrodes in the right hemisphere. No significant differences between groups were found for interhemispheric EEG coherence. These results show that the analysis of EEG coherence during REM sleep can disclose patterns of cortical connectivity that can be reduced or increased in adults with autism compared to typically developed individuals, depending of the cortical areas studied. Superior coherence involving visual perceptual areas in autism is consistent with an enhanced role of perception in autistic brain organization. PMID:20717953

  6. Neural network model of cortical EEG response to olfactory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, George L.; Van Toller, Steve

    1995-04-01

    We describe three experiments attempting to model differences in cortical EEG following stimulation with different odors. The data used in these experiments was obtained in previous studies, described briefly here. Subjects sit in an environmentally stabilized low odor cubicle. Twenty-eight electrodes are placed on the scalp and connect the subject to a neurosciences brain imager, which digitizes cortical EEG response. In a given trial, a specific odor is introduced, and the response recorded. In the first experiment, alpha wave data from a subset of ten electrodes and a single subject was used. In the original experiment, the subject was presented with a number of odors and the resulting brain electrical activity was resolved into 16 time slices (5 preceding presentation, 4 during presentation and 7 following presentation). Only data from frames 6, 7 and 8 (during presentation) was used here. A model was constructed to discriminate morning from afternoon responses. The network used measurements from 10 electrodes as input, and backpropagation was used for training. During training, the network was presented with responses to just one odor. Generalization was demonstrated for five other odors. The weights in the network have been analyzed and indicate a role for a specific group of electrode sites in this discrimination. The second experiment involved constructing a network to discriminate cortical EEG responses to two odors. In the original experiment from which we drew our data, fourteen subjects were presented with each odor once. Data from only the frame at first presentation of the odor were used here. Data from three subjects (chosen pseudo-randomly) was selected for use in the generalization phase and dropped from the training set. Output targets were constructed that took account of subjective ratings of `pleasantness.' A feed-forward network with twenty-eight input units was trained using data from the eleven remaining subjects, using conjugate gradient descent.

  7. EEG correlates of spatial orientation in the human retrosplenial complex.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-T; Chiu, T-C; Gramann, K

    2015-10-15

    Studies on spatial navigation reliably demonstrate that the retrosplenial complex (RSC) plays a pivotal role for allocentric spatial information processing by transforming egocentric and allocentric spatial information into the respective other spatial reference frame (SRF). While more and more imaging studies investigate the role of the RSC in spatial tasks, high temporal resolution measures such as electroencephalography (EEG) are missing. To investigate the function of the RSC in spatial navigation with high temporal resolution we used EEG to analyze spectral perturbations during navigation based on allocentric and egocentric SRF. Participants performed a path integration task in a clearly structured virtual environment providing allothetic information. Continuous EEG recordings were decomposed by independent component analysis (ICA) with subsequent source reconstruction of independent time source series using equivalent dipole modeling. Time-frequency transformation was used to investigate reference frame-specific orientation processes during navigation as compared to a control condition with identical visual input but no orientation task. Our results demonstrate that navigation based on an egocentric reference frame recruited a network including the parietal, motor, and occipital cortices with dominant perturbations in the alpha band and theta modulation in frontal cortex. Allocentric navigation was accompanied by performance-related desynchronization of the 8-13 Hz frequency band and synchronization in the 12-14 Hz band in the RSC. The results support the claim that the retrosplenial complex is central to translating egocentric spatial information into allocentric reference frames. Modulations in different frequencies with different time courses in the RSC further provide first evidence of two distinct neural processes reflecting translation of spatial information based on distinct reference frames and the computation of heading changes. PMID:26163801

  8. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  9. Carbon-wire loop based artifact correction outperforms post-processing EEG/fMRI corrections-A validation of a real-time simultaneous EEG/fMRI correction method.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Johan N; Pampel, André; Van Someren, Eus J W; Ramautar, Jennifer R; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; Gomez-Herrero, German; Lepsien, Jöran; Hellrung, Lydia; Hinrichs, Hermann; Möller, Harald E; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-15

    Simultaneous EEG-fMRI combines two powerful neuroimaging techniques, but the EEG signal suffers from severe artifacts in the MRI environment that are difficult to remove. These are the MR scanning artifact and the blood-pulsation artifact - strategies to remove them are a topic of ongoing research. Additionally large, unsystematic artifacts are produced across the full frequency spectrum by the magnet's helium pump (and ventilator) systems which are notoriously hard to remove. As a consequence, experimenters routinely deactivate the helium pump during simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions which potentially risks damaging the MRI system and necessitates more frequent and expensive helium refills. We present a novel correction method addressing both helium pump and ballisto-cardiac (BCG) artifacts, consisting of carbon-wire loops (CWL) as additional sensors to accurately track unpredictable artifacts related to subtle movements in the scanner, and an EEGLAB plugin to perform artifact correction. We compare signal-to-noise metrics of EEG data, corrected with CWL and three conventional correction methods, for helium pump off and on measurements. Because the CWL setup records signals in real-time, it fits requirements of applications where immediate correction is necessary, such as neuro-feedback applications or stimulation time-locked to specific sleep oscillations. The comparison metrics in this paper relate to: (1) the EEG signal itself, (2) the "eyes open vs. eyes closed" effect, and (3) an assessment of how the artifact corrections impacts the ability to perform meaningful correlations between EEG alpha power and the BOLD signal. Results show that the CWL correction corrects for He pump artifact and also produces EEG data more comparable to EEG obtained outside the magnet than conventional post-processing methods. PMID:26505301

  10. Scalp EEG does not predict hemispherectomy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Hansel M.; Park, Yong D.; Holland, Katherine; Horn, Paul S.; Byars, Anna W.; Mangano, Francesco T.; Smith, Joseph R.; Lee, Mark R.; Lee, Ki-Hyeong

    2012-01-01

    Background Functional hemispherectomy is effective in carefully selected patients, resulting in a reduction of seizure burden up to complete resolution, improvement of intellectual development, and developmental benefit despite possible additional neurological deficit. Despite apparent hemispheric pathology on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or other imaging tests, scalp electroencephalography (EEG) could be suggestive of bilateral ictal onset or even ictal onset contralateral to the dominant imaging abnormality. We aimed to investigate the role of scalp EEG lateralization pre-operatively in predicting outcome. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 54 patients who underwent hemispherectomy between 1991 and 2009 at Medical College of Georgia (1991–2006) and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (2006–2009) and had at least one year post-operative follow-up. All preoperative EEGs were reviewed, and classified as either lateralizing or nonlateralizing, for both ictal and interictal EEG recordings. Results Of 54 patients, 42 (78%) became seizure free. Twenty-four (44%) of 54 had a nonlateralizing ictal or interictal EEG. Further analysis was based on etiology of epilepsy, including malformation of cortical development (MCD), Rasmussen syndrome (RS), and stroke (CVA). EEG nonlateralization did not predict poor outcome in any of the etiology groups evaluated. Conclusion Scalp EEG abnormalities in contralateral or bilateral hemispheres do not, in isolation, predict a poor outcome from hemispherectomy. Results of other non-invasive and invasive evaluations should be used to determine candidacy. PMID:21813300

  11. Combining EEG and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mullinger, Karen; Bowtell, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The combination of electroencephalography (EEG) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) forms a powerful tool for the investigation of brain function, but concurrent implementation of EEG and fMRI poses many technical challenges. Here, the motivation for combining EEG and fMRI is explored and methods underlying the combination are described. After a brief introduction to the two different techniques, the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data recording are detailed, followed by a description of the artefacts encountered when performing EEG and fMRI measurements simultaneously, and the methods which have been developed to eliminate these artefacts. Important safety considerations and potential pitfalls associated with simultaneous recording are also described. The ways in which EEG and fMRI data analysis can be integrated are then described along with examples of key work which illustrate the power of combined EEG/fMRI measurements. The chapter concludes with a brief discussion of future directions for combined EEG/fMRI research. PMID:21279609

  12. Early EEG Improvement after Ketogenic Diet Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Gallagher, Paul R.; Shellhaas, Renée A.; Clancy, Robert R.; Bergqvist, A.G. Christina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study examines electroencephalographic (EEG) changes in children with medication resistant epilepsy treated with the ketogenic diet (KD). Methods Routine EEGs were obtained prior to KD initiation, then one month and three months later. Changes in EEG background slowing and frequency of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) were evaluated using power spectrum analysis and manual determination of spike index. KD responders were compared to non-responders to determine if baseline or early EEG characteristics predicted treatment response (>50% seizure reduction) at three months. Results Thirty-seven patients were evaluated. No differences in baseline EEG features were found between responder groups. Frequency of IEDs declined in 65% of patients as early as one month, by a median of 13.6% (IQR 2-33). Those with a ten percent or greater improvement in IED frequency at one month were greater than six times more likely to be KD responders (OR 6.5 95% CI 0.85 to 75. p=0.03). Qualitative and quantitative measures of EEG background slowing improved in the whole cohort, but did not predict responder status. Conclusion Baseline predictors of KD response remain elusive. Most patients experienced a reduction in IEDs and improvement in EEG background slowing after KD initiation. Reduction of IEDs at one month strongly predicted KD responder status at three months. PMID:21345653

  13. Circadian variation of EEG power spectra in NREM and REM sleep in humans: dissociation from body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    In humans, EEG power spectra in REM and NREM sleep, as well as characteristics of sleep spindles such as their duration, amplitude, frequency and incidence, vary with circadian phase. Recently it has been hypothesized that circadian variations in EEG spectra in humans are caused by variations in brain or body temperature and may not represent phenomena relevant to sleep regulatory processes. To test this directly, a further analysis of EEG power spectra - collected in a forced desynchrony protocol in which sleep episodes were scheduled to a 28-h period while the rhythms of body temperature and plasma melatonin were oscillating at their near 24-h period - was carried out. EEG power spectra were computed for NREM and REM sleep occurring between 90-120 and 270-300 degrees of the circadian melatonin rhythm, i.e. just after the clearance of melatonin from plasma in the 'morning' and just after the 'evening' increase in melatonin secretion. Average body temperatures during scheduled sleep at these two circadian phases were identical (36.72 degrees C). Despite identical body temperatures, the power spectra in NREM sleep were very different at these two circadian phases. EEG activity in the low frequency spindle range was significantly and markedly enhanced after the evening increase in plasma melatonin as compared to the morning phase. For REM sleep, significant differences in power spectra during these two circadian phases, in particular in the alpha range, were also observed. The results confirm that EEG power spectra in NREM and REM sleep vary with circadian phase, suggesting that the direct contribution of temperature to the circadian variation in EEG power spectra is absent or only minor, and are at variance with the hypothesis that circadian variations in EEG power spectra are caused by variations in temperature.

  14. Enabling computer decisions based on EEG input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, Benjamin J.; Keller, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Multilayer neural networks were successfully trained to classify segments of 12-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) data into one of five classes corresponding to five cognitive tasks performed by a subject. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to segregate obvious artifact EEG components from other sources, and a frequency-band representation was used to represent the sources computed by ICA. Examples of results include an 85% accuracy rate on differentiation between two tasks, using a segment of EEG only 0.05 s long and a 95% accuracy rate using a 0.5-s-long segment.

  15. Quantified EEG in different G situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Metz, K.; Quadens, O.; De Graeve, M.

    The electrical activity of the brain (EEG) has been recorded during parabolic flights in trained astronauts and non trained volunteers as well. The Fast Fourier analysis of the EEG activity evidenced more asymmetry between the two brain hemispheres in the subjects who suffered from motion sickness than in the others. However, such a FFT classification does not lead to a discrimination between deterministic and stochastic events. Therefore, a first attempt was made to calculate the dimensionality of "chaotic attractors" in the EEG patterns as a function of the different g-epochs of one parabola. Very preliminary results are given here.

  16. Alpha Asymmetry in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabard-Durnam, Laurel; Tierney, Adrienne L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging focus of research on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) targets the identification of early-developing ASD endophenotypes using infant siblings of affected children. One potential neural endophenotype is resting frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha asymmetry, a metric of hemispheric organization. Here, we examined the development of…

  17. Alpha Asymmetry in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabard-Durnam, Laurel; Tierney, Adrienne L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging focus of research on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) targets the identification of early-developing ASD endophenotypes using infant siblings of affected children. One potential neural endophenotype is resting frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha asymmetry, a metric of hemispheric organization. Here, we examined the development of…

  18. Radiofrequency signal affects alpha band in resting electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Rania; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Hugueville, Laurent; Ducorps, Antoine; Lemaréchal, Jean-Didier; Thuróczy, György; de Seze, René; Selmaoui, Brahim

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human resting EEG with a control of some parameters that are known to affect alpha band, such as electrode impedance, salivary cortisol, and caffeine. Eyes-open and eyes-closed resting EEG data were recorded in 26 healthy young subjects under two conditions: sham exposure and real exposure in double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover design. Spectral power of EEG rhythms was calculated for the alpha band (8-12 Hz). Saliva samples were collected before and after the study. Salivary cortisol and caffeine were assessed by ELISA and HPLC, respectively. The electrode impedance was recorded at the beginning of each run. Compared with the sham session, the exposure session showed a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) decrease of the alpha band spectral power during closed-eyes condition. This effect persisted in the postexposure session (P < 0.0001). No significant changes were detected in electrode impedance, salivary cortisol, and caffeine in the sham session compared with the exposure one. These results suggest that GSM-EMFs of a mobile phone affect the alpha band within spectral power of resting human EEG. PMID:25695646

  19. Discriminant analysis and equivalent source localization of the EEG related to cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Lind, J C; Flor-Henry, P; Koles, Z J

    1999-01-01

    Discriminant analysis and EEG source localization methods were employed to compare groups of normal subjects during different cognitive conditions using 43-channel EEG recordings in the alpha (8-13 Hz) frequency band. Recordings were obtained from 69 dextral females during 2 passive conditions, Eyes-Open and Eyes-Closed, and 2 active conditions, Word-Finding and Dot-Localization. The cross-spectral matrix between all of the electrode sites was used to characterize the EEGs obtained during each condition. The subjects were partitioned into training and test sets and quadratic discriminant functions were constructed from the training sets to classify the EEGs. The discriminant functions successfully classified both the training and test sets at rates approaching 80%. The classification was repeated using only the diagonal (power spectral) elements of the cross-spectral matrices in the discriminant functions and this approach was successful in discriminating between the EEGs from the passive cognitive conditions but failed to discriminate between the EEGs from the active conditions. Source localization using a modified MUSIC algorithm indicated that the centers of brain electrical activity that distinguished the Eyes-Closed condition from the Eyes-Open condition were located in the medial occipital and right frontal regions. Centers of electrical activity that distinguished the Word-Finding condition from the Dot-Localization condition were located in the right medial posterior and left temporal regions. Validation of the locations of the centers of activity was accomplished by repeating the classification procedures using the spatial patterns generated on the scalp by dipole current sources placed at these locations. PMID:10449258

  20. Optimal set of EEG features for emotional state classification and trajectory visualization in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Palaniappan, R

    2014-12-01

    In addition to classic motor signs and symptoms, individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by emotional deficits. Ongoing brain activity can be recorded by electroencephalograph (EEG) to discover the links between emotional states and brain activity. This study utilized machine-learning algorithms to categorize emotional states in PD patients compared with healthy controls (HC) using EEG. Twenty non-demented PD patients and 20 healthy age-, gender-, and education level-matched controls viewed happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust emotional stimuli while fourteen-channel EEG was being recorded. Multimodal stimulus (combination of audio and visual) was used to evoke the emotions. To classify the EEG-based emotional states and visualize the changes of emotional states over time, this paper compares four kinds of EEG features for emotional state classification and proposes an approach to track the trajectory of emotion changes with manifold learning. From the experimental results using our EEG data set, we found that (a) bispectrum feature is superior to other three kinds of features, namely power spectrum, wavelet packet and nonlinear dynamical analysis; (b) higher frequency bands (alpha, beta and gamma) play a more important role in emotion activities than lower frequency bands (delta and theta) in both groups and; (c) the trajectory of emotion changes can be visualized by reducing subject-independent features with manifold learning. This provides a promising way of implementing visualization of patient's emotional state in real time and leads to a practical system for noninvasive assessment of the emotional impairments associated with neurological disorders. PMID:25109433

  1. Separation of circadian and wake duration-dependent modulation of EEG activation during wakefulness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    The separate contribution of circadian rhythmicity and elapsed time awake on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during wakefulness was assessed. Seven men lived in an environmental scheduling facility for 4 weeks and completed fourteen 42.85-h 'days', each consisting of an extended (28.57-h) wake episode and a 14.28-h sleep opportunity. The circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin desynchronized from the 42.85-h day. This allowed quantification of the separate contribution of circadian phase and elapsed time awake to variation in EEG power spectra (1-32 Hz). EEG activity during standardized behavioral conditions was markedly affected by both circadian phase and elapsed time awake in an EEG frequency- and derivation-specific manner. The nadir of the circadian rhythm in alpha (8-12 Hz) activity in both fronto-central and occipito-parietal derivations occurred during the biological night, close to the crest of the melatonin rhythm. The nadir of the circadian rhythm of theta (4.5-8 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity in the fronto-central derivation was located close to the onset of melatonin secretion, i.e. during the wake maintenance zone. As time awake progressed, delta frequency (1-4.5 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity rose monotonically in frontal derivations. The interaction between the circadian and wake-dependent increase in frontal delta was such that the intrusion of delta was minimal when sustained wakefulness coincided with the biological day, but pronounced during the biological night. Our data imply that the circadian pacemaker facilitates frontal EEG activation during the wake maintenance zone, by generating an arousal signal that prevents the intrusion of low-frequency EEG components, the propensity for which increases progressively during wakefulness.

  2. Making the case for mobile cognition: EEG and sports performance.

    PubMed

    Park, Joanne L; Fairweather, Malcolm M; Donaldson, David I

    2015-05-01

    In the high stakes world of International sport even the smallest change in performance can make the difference between success and failure, leading sports professionals to become increasingly interested in the potential benefits of neuroimaging. Here we describe evidence from EEG studies that either identify neural signals associated with expertise in sport, or employ neurofeedback to improve performance. Evidence for the validity of neurofeedback as a technique for enhancing sports performance remains limited. By contrast, progress in characterizing the neural correlates of sporting behavior is clear: frequency domain studies link expert performance to changes in alpha rhythms, whilst time-domain studies link expertise in response evaluation and motor output with modulations of P300 effects and readiness potentials. Despite early promise, however, findings have had relatively little impact for sports professionals, at least in part because there has been a mismatch between lab tasks and real sporting activity. After selectively reviewing existing findings and outlining limitations, we highlight developments in mobile EEG technology that offer new opportunities for sports neuroscience. PMID:25735956

  3. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Prolonged Ambulatory Versus Routine EEG.

    PubMed

    Keezer, Mark R; Simard-Tremblay, Elisabeth; Veilleux, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged ambulatory electroencephalography (paEEG) is increasingly used in clinical practice but its diagnostic accuracy relative to that of routine EEG (rEEG) remains uncertain. We examined a consecutive sample of 72 individuals who had undergone 32-channel paEEG immediately after an rEEG, creating perfectly matched EEG samples. Each recording was prospectively assessed for epileptiform discharges (ED) and nonepileptiform abnormalities. The median paEEG duration was 22.5 hours (interquartile range: 22.0-23.0). The sensitivity of paEEG was 2.23 times greater than that of rEEG [sensitivity ratio: 2.23 (95% CI = 1.49-3.34)] if a positive test was limited to the presence of epileptiform discharges. This benefit of paEEG versus rEEG was no longer evident if the definition of a positive test included nonepileptiform abnormalities (sensitivity ratio 1.26; 95% CI = 1.02-1.55). The specificity of the 2 tests was not evidently different (specificity ratio 0.67; 95% CI = 0.17-2.67). Twenty-six percent of paEEG recorded epileptic seizures while none of the rEEG did (absolute difference 26.0% (95% CI = 11.8-40.2). Our findings quantify the benefit of 32-channel paEEG, relative to rEEG, and support its role in the diagnosis and characterization of epilepsy. PMID:26376916

  4. Improving N1 classification by grouping EEG trials with phases of pre-stimulus EEG oscillations.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Liang, Zhang; Jiacai, Zhang; Changming, Wang; Li, Yao; Xia, Wu; Xiaojuan, Guo

    2015-04-01

    A reactive brain-computer interface using electroencephalography (EEG) relies on the classification of evoked ERP responses. As the trial-to-trial variation is evitable in EEG signals, it is a challenge to capture the consistent classification features distribution. Clustering EEG trials with similar features and utilizing a specific classifier adjusted to each cluster can improve EEG classification. In this paper, instead of measuring the similarity of ERP features, the brain states during image stimuli presentation that evoked N1 responses were used to group EEG trials. The correlation between momentary phases of pre-stimulus EEG oscillations and N1 amplitudes was analyzed. The results demonstrated that the phases of time-frequency points about 5.3 Hz and 0.3 s before the stimulus onset have significant effect on the ERP classification accuracy. Our findings revealed that N1 components in ERP fluctuated with momentary phases of EEG. We also further studied the influence of pre-stimulus momentary phases on classification of N1 features. Results showed that linear classifiers demonstrated outstanding classification performance when training and testing trials have close momentary phases. Therefore, this gave us a new direction to improve EEG classification by grouping EEG trials with similar pre-stimulus phases and using each to train unit classifiers respectively. PMID:25852778

  5. Automatic seizure detection: going from sEEG to iEEG.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Jonas; Remvig, Line S; Madsen, Rasmus E; Conradsen, Isa; Kjaer, Troels W; Thomsen, Carsten E; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2010-01-01

    Several different algorithms have been proposed for automatic detection of epileptic seizure based on both scalp and intracranial electroencephalography (sEEG and iEEG). Which modality that renders the best result is hard to assess though. From 16 patients with focal epilepsy, at least 24 hours of ictal and non-ictal iEEG were obtained. Characteristics of the seizures are represented by use of wavelet transformation (WT) features and classified by a support vector machine. When implementing a method used for sEEG on iEEG data, a great improvement in performance was obtained when the high frequency containing lower levels in the WT were included in the analysis. We were able to obtain a sensitivity of 96.4% and a false detection rate (FDR) of 0.20/h. In general, when implementing an automatic seizure detection algorithm made for sEEG on iEEG, great improvement can be obtained if a frequency band widening of the feature extraction is performed. This means that algorithms for sEEG should not be discarded for use on iEEG - they should be properly adjusted as exemplified in this paper. PMID:21095958

  6. Brain Networks Responsible for Sense of Agency: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Miseon; Nahab, Fatta B.; Park, Jihye; Kim, Do-Won; Kakareka, John; Miletta, Nathanial; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-agency (SA) is a person’s feeling that his action was generated by himself. The neural substrates of SA have been investigated in many neuroimaging studies, but the functional connectivity of identified regions has rarely been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate the neural network related to SA. Methods SA of hand movements was modulated with virtual reality. We examined the cortical network relating to SA modulation with electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum and phase coherence of alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands in 16 right-handed, healthy volunteers. Results In the alpha band, significant relative power changes and phase coherence of alpha band were associated with SA modulation. The relative power decrease over the central, bilateral parietal, and right temporal regions (C4, Pz, P3, P4, T6) became larger as participants more effectively controlled the virtual hand movements. The phase coherence of the alpha band within frontal areas (F7-FP2, F7-Fz) was directly related to changes in SA. The functional connectivity was lower as the participants felt that they could control their virtual hand. In the other frequency bands, significant phase coherences were observed in the frontal (or central) to parietal, temporal, and occipital regions during SA modulation (Fz-O1, F3-O1, Cz-O1, C3-T4L in beta band; FP1-T6, FP1-O2, F7-T4L, F8-Cz in gamma band). Conclusions Our study suggests that alpha band activity may be the main neural oscillation of SA, which suggests that the neural network within the anterior frontal area may be important in the generation of SA. PMID:26270552

  7. Multidimensional Directed Phase Analysis for Basic Rhythm of EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Osamu; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Yoichi

    In this paper, multidimensional directed phase analysis is proposed as a means of causality analysis for multiple time series, is proposed. The multidimensional directed phase is a phase with causality, which is associated with multidimensional directed coherence. Using multidimensional directed phase analysis, direction and time of a signal flow among multidimensional time series can be estimated. In two simulations, artificial time series have been analyzed by the new method to confirm its characteristics. In first simulation, accuracy of estimation of signal flow time has been investigated. Second, a complex signal flow pattern has been analyzed. Next, the multidimensional directed phase analysis and the multidimensional directed coherence analysis have been applied to EEG data of normal volunteer. As a result, we have got information differ from common learning which is the difference between the phase of a frontal alpha waves and an occipital is ?.

  8. Simultaneous MEG and EEG source analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizenga, H. M.; van Zuijen, T. L.; Heslenfeld, D. J.; Molenaar, P. C. M.

    2001-07-01

    A method is described to derive source and conductivity estimates in a simultaneous MEG and EEG source analysis. In addition the covariance matrix of the estimates is derived. Simulation studies with a concentric spheres model and a more realistic boundary element model indicate that this method has several advantages, even if only a few EEG sensors are added to a MEG configuration. First, a simultaneous analysis profits from the `preferred' location directions of MEG and EEG. Second, deep sources can be estimated quite accurately, which is an advantage compared to MEG. Third, superficial sources profit from accurate MEG location and from accurate EEG moment. Fourth, the radial source component can be estimated, which is an advantage compared to MEG. Fifth, the conductivities can be estimated. It is shown that conductivity estimation gives a substantial increase in precision, even if the conductivities are not identified appropriately. An illustrative analysis of empirical data supports these findings.

  9. Correlation between intra- and extracranial background EEG.

    PubMed

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels W; Madsen, Rasmus E; Remvig, Line S; Thomsen, Carsten E; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2012-01-01

    Scalp EEG is the most widely used modality to record the electrical signals of the brain. It is well known that the volume conduction of these brain waves through the brain, cerebrospinal fluid, skull and scalp reduces the spatial resolution and the signal amplitude. So far the volume conduction has primarily been investigated by realistic head models or interictal spike analysis. We have set up a novel and more realistic experiment that made it possible to compare the information in the intra- and extracranial EEG. We found that intracranial EEG channels contained correlated patterns when placed less than 30 mm apart, that intra- and extracranial channels were partly correlated when placed less than 40 mm apart, and that extracranial channels probably were correlated over larger distances. The underlying cortical area that influences the extracranial EEG is found to be up to 45 cm(2). This area is larger than previously reported. PMID:23367100

  10. Connectivity Measures in EEG Microstructural Sleep Elements.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Koupparis, Andreas M; Kokkinos, Vasileios; Koutroumanidis, Michalis; Kostopoulos, George K

    2016-01-01

    During Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep (NREM) the brain is relatively disconnected from the environment, while connectedness between brain areas is also decreased. Evidence indicates, that these dynamic connectivity changes are delivered by microstructural elements of sleep: short periods of environmental stimuli evaluation followed by sleep promoting procedures. The connectivity patterns of the latter, among other aspects of sleep microstructure, are still to be fully elucidated. We suggest here a methodology for the assessment and investigation of the connectivity patterns of EEG microstructural elements, such as sleep spindles. The methodology combines techniques in the preprocessing, estimation, error assessing and visualization of results levels in order to allow the detailed examination of the connectivity aspects (levels and directionality of information flow) over frequency and time with notable resolution, while dealing with the volume conduction and EEG reference assessment. The high temporal and frequency resolution of the methodology will allow the association between the microelements and the dynamically forming networks that characterize them, and consequently possibly reveal aspects of the EEG microstructure. The proposed methodology is initially tested on artificially generated signals for proof of concept and subsequently applied to real EEG recordings via a custom built MATLAB-based tool developed for such studies. Preliminary results from 843 fast sleep spindles recorded in whole night sleep of 5 healthy volunteers indicate a prevailing pattern of interactions between centroparietal and frontal regions. We demonstrate hereby, an opening to our knowledge attempt to estimate the scalp EEG connectivity that characterizes fast sleep spindles via an "EEG-element connectivity" methodology we propose. The application of the latter, via a computational tool we developed suggests it is able to investigate the connectivity patterns related to the occurrence of EEG microstructural elements. Network characterization of specified physiological or pathological EEG microstructural elements can potentially be of great importance in the understanding, identification, and prediction of health and disease. PMID:26924980

  11. Connectivity Measures in EEG Microstructural Sleep Elements

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Koupparis, Andreas M.; Kokkinos, Vasileios; Koutroumanidis, Michalis; Kostopoulos, George K.

    2016-01-01

    During Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep (NREM) the brain is relatively disconnected from the environment, while connectedness between brain areas is also decreased. Evidence indicates, that these dynamic connectivity changes are delivered by microstructural elements of sleep: short periods of environmental stimuli evaluation followed by sleep promoting procedures. The connectivity patterns of the latter, among other aspects of sleep microstructure, are still to be fully elucidated. We suggest here a methodology for the assessment and investigation of the connectivity patterns of EEG microstructural elements, such as sleep spindles. The methodology combines techniques in the preprocessing, estimation, error assessing and visualization of results levels in order to allow the detailed examination of the connectivity aspects (levels and directionality of information flow) over frequency and time with notable resolution, while dealing with the volume conduction and EEG reference assessment. The high temporal and frequency resolution of the methodology will allow the association between the microelements and the dynamically forming networks that characterize them, and consequently possibly reveal aspects of the EEG microstructure. The proposed methodology is initially tested on artificially generated signals for proof of concept and subsequently applied to real EEG recordings via a custom built MATLAB-based tool developed for such studies. Preliminary results from 843 fast sleep spindles recorded in whole night sleep of 5 healthy volunteers indicate a prevailing pattern of interactions between centroparietal and frontal regions. We demonstrate hereby, an opening to our knowledge attempt to estimate the scalp EEG connectivity that characterizes fast sleep spindles via an “EEG-element connectivity” methodology we propose. The application of the latter, via a computational tool we developed suggests it is able to investigate the connectivity patterns related to the occurrence of EEG microstructural elements. Network characterization of specified physiological or pathological EEG microstructural elements can potentially be of great importance in the understanding, identification, and prediction of health and disease. PMID:26924980

  12. Short-Term EEG Spectral Pattern as a Single Event in EEG Phenomenology

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Al. A; Fingelkurts, An. A

    2010-01-01

    Spectral decomposition, to this day, still remains the main analytical paradigm for the analysis of EEG oscillations. However, conventional spectral analysis assesses the mean characteristics of the EEG power spectra averaged out over extended periods of time and/or broad frequency bands, thus resulting in a “static” picture which cannot reflect adequately the underlying neurodynamic. A relatively new promising area in the study of EEG is based on reducing the signal to elementary short-term spectra of various types in accordance with the number of types of EEG stationary segments instead of using averaged power spectrum for the whole EEG. It is suggested that the various perceptual and cognitive operations associated with a mental or behavioural condition constitute a single distinguishable neurophysiological state with a distinct and reliable spectral pattern. In this case, one type of short-term spectral pattern may be considered as a single event in EEG phenomenology. To support this assumption the following issues are considered in detail: (a) the relations between local EEG short-term spectral pattern of particular type and the actual state of the neurons in underlying network and a volume conduction; (b) relationship between morphology of EEG short-term spectral pattern and the state of the underlying neurodynamical system i.e. neuronal assembly; (c) relation of different spectral pattern components to a distinct physiological mechanism; (d) relation of different spectral pattern components to different functional significance; (e) developmental changes of spectral pattern components; (f) heredity of the variance in the individual spectral pattern and its components; (g) intra-individual stability of the sets of EEG short-term spectral patterns and their percent ratio; (h) discrete dynamics of EEG short-term spectral patterns. Functional relevance (consistency) of EEG short-term spectral patterns in accordance with the changes of brain functional state, cognitive task and with different neuropsychopathologies is demonstrated. PMID:21379390

  13. Sensitivity distributions of EEG and MEG measurements.

    PubMed

    Malmivuo, J; Suihko, V; Eskola, H

    1997-03-01

    It is generally believed that because the skull has low conductivity to electric current but is transparent to magnetic fields, the measurement sensitivity of the magnetoencephalography (MEG) in the brain region should be more concentrated than that of the electroencephalography (EEG). It is also believed that the information recorded by these techniques is very different. If this were indeed the case, it might be possible to justify the cost of MEG instrumentation which is at least 25 times higher than that of EEG instrumentation. The localization of measurement sensitivity using these techniques was evaluated quantitatively in an inhomogeneous spherical head model using a new concept called half-sensitivity volume (HSV). It is shown that the planar gradiometer has a far smaller HSV than the axial gradiometer. However, using the EEG it is possible to achieve even smaller HSV's than with whole-head planar gradiometer MEG devices. The micro-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) MEG device does have HSV's comparable to those of the EEG. The sensitivity distribution of planar gradiometers, however, closely resembles that of dipolar EEG leads and, therefore, the MEG and EEG record the electric activity of the brain in a very similar way. PMID:9216133

  14. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus and Creutzfeldt–Jakob-like EEG changes in a case of lithium toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old lady with bipolar affective disorder on lithium who was brought to our emergency center in a comatose state. Neurologically, the patient was comatose and had generalized hypotonia and hyporeflexia. Lithium toxicity was considered. Laboratory examinations revealed leukocytosis, normal blood sugar, blood level of lithium was 4.7 mEq/L and she had renal dysfunction. Cerebrospinal fluid examination and cranial computerized tomography were unremarkable. Blood lithium level was 4.7 mEq/L. Hemodialysis was initiated. However, in spite of dialysis and decreasing lithium levels, the patient remained unconscious. A possibility of nonconvulsive status epilepticus was considered; hence, EEG was advised. The EEG demonstrated bihemispheric slowing (4- to 5-Hz theta range) with bilateral periodic triphasic waves of 1- to 2-Hz frequency, similar to the EEG changes seen in Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. She was started on lorazepam. Her sensorium improved gradually, which correlated with the decline in blood lithium levels. A normal background alpha rhythm on EEG was ensured prior to discharge. At discharge, clinically, she had recovered completely, with no apparent neurological deficit or cognitive impairment. This case highlights the importance of therapeutic drug-level monitoring of lithium, especially where toxicity is suspected, and the important role electroencephalography plays in diagnosing NCSE and its management. PMID:25667908

  15. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus and Creutzfeldt-Jakob-like EEG changes in a case of lithium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, B K

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old lady with bipolar affective disorder on lithium who was brought to our emergency center in a comatose state. Neurologically, the patient was comatose and had generalized hypotonia and hyporeflexia. Lithium toxicity was considered. Laboratory examinations revealed leukocytosis, normal blood sugar, blood level of lithium was 4.7 mEq/L and she had renal dysfunction. Cerebrospinal fluid examination and cranial computerized tomography were unremarkable. Blood lithium level was 4.7 mEq/L. Hemodialysis was initiated. However, in spite of dialysis and decreasing lithium levels, the patient remained unconscious. A possibility of nonconvulsive status epilepticus was considered; hence, EEG was advised. The EEG demonstrated bihemispheric slowing (4- to 5-Hz theta range) with bilateral periodic triphasic waves of 1- to 2-Hz frequency, similar to the EEG changes seen in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. She was started on lorazepam. Her sensorium improved gradually, which correlated with the decline in blood lithium levels. A normal background alpha rhythm on EEG was ensured prior to discharge. At discharge, clinically, she had recovered completely, with no apparent neurological deficit or cognitive impairment. This case highlights the importance of therapeutic drug-level monitoring of lithium, especially where toxicity is suspected, and the important role electroencephalography plays in diagnosing NCSE and its management. PMID:25667908

  16. Relationship between speed and EEG activity during imagined and executed hand movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Han; Perdoni, Christopher; He, Bin

    2010-04-01

    The relationship between primary motor cortex and movement kinematics has been shown in nonhuman primate studies of hand reaching or drawing tasks. Studies have demonstrated that the neural activities accompanying or immediately preceding the movement encode the direction, speed and other information. Here we investigated the relationship between the kinematics of imagined and actual hand movement, i.e. the clenching speed, and the EEG activity in ten human subjects. Study participants were asked to perform and imagine clenching of the left hand and right hand at various speeds. The EEG activity in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (18-28 Hz) frequency bands were found to be linearly correlated with the speed of imagery clenching. Similar parametric modulation was also found during the execution of hand movements. A single equation relating the EEG activity to the speed and the hand (left versus right) was developed. This equation, which contained a linear independent combination of the two parameters, described the time-varying neural activity during the tasks. Based on the model, a regression approach was developed to decode the two parameters from the multiple-channel EEG signals. We demonstrated the continuous decoding of dynamic hand and speed information of the imagined clenching. In particular, the time-varying clenching speed was reconstructed in a bell-shaped profile. Our findings suggest an application to providing continuous and complex control of noninvasive brain-computer interface for movement-impaired paralytics.

  17. Assessment of mental fatigue during car driving by using high resolution EEG activity and neurophysiologic indices.

    PubMed

    Borghini, G; Vecchiato, G; Toppi, J; Astolfi, L; Maglione, A; Isabella, R; Caltagirone, C; Kong, W; Wei, D; Zhou, Z; Polidori, L; Vitiello, S; Babiloni, F

    2012-01-01

    Driving tasks are vulnerable to the effects of sleep deprivation and mental fatigue, diminishing driver's ability to respond effectively to unusual or emergent situations. Physiological and brain activity analysis could help to understand how to provide useful feedback and alert signals to the drivers for avoiding car accidents. In this study we analyze the insurgence of mental fatigue or drowsiness during car driving in a simulated environment by using high resolution EEG techniques as well as neurophysiologic variables such as heart rate (HR) and eye blinks rate (EBR). Results suggest that it is possible to introduce a EEG-based cerebral workload index that it is sensitive to the mental efforts of the driver during drive tasks of different levels of difficulty. Workload index was based on the estimation of increase of EEG power spectra in the theta band over prefrontal areas and the simultaneous decrease of EEG power spectra over parietal areas in alpha band during difficult drive conditions. Such index could be used in a future to assess on-line the mental state of the driver during the drive task. PMID:23367404

  18. EEG spectral analysis of attention in ADHD: implications for neurofeedback training?

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Hartmut; Busch, Katrin; Studer, Petra; Erbe, Karlheinz; Moll, Gunther H.; Kratz, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), an increased theta/beta ratio in the resting EEG typically serves as a rationale to conduct theta/beta neurofeedback (NF) training. However, this finding is increasingly challenged. As NF may rather target an active than a passive state, we studied the EEG in a condition that requires attention. Methods: In children with ADHD of the DSM-IV combined type (ADHD-C; N = 15) and of the predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-I; N = 9) and in typically developing children (N = 19), EEG spectral analysis was conducted for segments during the attention network test (ANT) without processing of stimuli and overt behavior. Frontal (F3, Fz, F4), central (C3, Cz, C4) and parietal (P3, Pz, P4) electrodes were included in the statistical analysis. To investigate if EEG spectral parameters are related to performance measures, correlation coefficients were calculated. Results: Particularly in the ADHD-C group, higher theta and alpha activity was found with the most prominent effect in the upper-theta/lower-alpha (5.5–10.5 Hz) range. In the ADHD-I group, a significantly higher theta/beta ratio was observed at single electrodes (F3, Fz) and a tendency for a higher theta/beta ratio when considering all electrodes (large effect size). Higher 5.5–10.5 Hz activity was associated with higher reaction time variability with the effect most prominent in the ADHD-C group. A higher theta/beta ratio was associated with higher reaction times, particularly in the ADHD-I group. Conclusions: (1) In an attention demanding period, children with ADHD are characterized by an underactivated state in the EEG with subtype-specific differences. (2) The functional relevance of related EEG parameters is indicated by associations with performance (reaction time) measures. (3) Findings provide a rationale for applying NF protocols targeting theta (and alpha) activity and the theta/beta ratio in subgroups of children with ADHD. PMID:25191248

  19. Correlation between amygdala BOLD activity and frontal EEG asymmetry during real-time fMRI neurofeedback training in patients with depression

    PubMed Central

    Zotev, Vadim; Yuan, Han; Misaki, Masaya; Phillips, Raquel; Young, Kymberly D.; Feldner, Matthew T.; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Real-time fMRI neurofeedback (rtfMRI-nf) is an emerging approach for studies and novel treatments of major depressive disorder (MDD). EEG performed simultaneously with an rtfMRI-nf procedure allows an independent evaluation of rtfMRI-nf brain modulation effects. Frontal EEG asymmetry in the alpha band is a widely used measure of emotion and motivation that shows profound changes in depression. However, it has never been directly related to simultaneously acquired fMRI data. We report the first study investigating electrophysiological correlates of the rtfMRI-nf procedure, by combining the rtfMRI-nf with simultaneous and passive EEG recordings. In this pilot study, MDD patients in the experimental group (n = 13) learned to upregulate BOLD activity of the left amygdala using an rtfMRI-nf during a happy emotion induction task. MDD patients in the control group (n = 11) were provided with a sham rtfMRI-nf. Correlations between frontal EEG asymmetry in the upper alpha band and BOLD activity across the brain were examined. Average individual changes in frontal EEG asymmetry during the rtfMRI-nf task for the experimental group showed a significant positive correlation with the MDD patients' depression severity ratings, consistent with an inverse correlation between the depression severity and frontal EEG asymmetry at rest. The average asymmetry changes also significantly correlated with the amygdala BOLD laterality. Temporal correlations between frontal EEG asymmetry and BOLD activity were significantly enhanced, during the rtfMRI-nf task, for the amygdala and many regions associated with emotion regulation. Our findings demonstrate an important link between amygdala BOLD activity and frontal EEG asymmetry during emotion regulation. Our EEG asymmetry results indicate that the rtfMRI-nf training targeting the amygdala is beneficial to MDD patients. They further suggest that EEG-nf based on frontal EEG asymmetry in the alpha band would be compatible with the amygdala-based rtfMRI-nf. Combination of the two could enhance emotion regulation training and benefit MDD patients. PMID:26958462

  20. Correlation between amygdala BOLD activity and frontal EEG asymmetry during real-time fMRI neurofeedback training in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Zotev, Vadim; Yuan, Han; Misaki, Masaya; Phillips, Raquel; Young, Kymberly D; Feldner, Matthew T; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Real-time fMRI neurofeedback (rtfMRI-nf) is an emerging approach for studies and novel treatments of major depressive disorder (MDD). EEG performed simultaneously with an rtfMRI-nf procedure allows an independent evaluation of rtfMRI-nf brain modulation effects. Frontal EEG asymmetry in the alpha band is a widely used measure of emotion and motivation that shows profound changes in depression. However, it has never been directly related to simultaneously acquired fMRI data. We report the first study investigating electrophysiological correlates of the rtfMRI-nf procedure, by combining the rtfMRI-nf with simultaneous and passive EEG recordings. In this pilot study, MDD patients in the experimental group (n = 13) learned to upregulate BOLD activity of the left amygdala using an rtfMRI-nf during a happy emotion induction task. MDD patients in the control group (n = 11) were provided with a sham rtfMRI-nf. Correlations between frontal EEG asymmetry in the upper alpha band and BOLD activity across the brain were examined. Average individual changes in frontal EEG asymmetry during the rtfMRI-nf task for the experimental group showed a significant positive correlation with the MDD patients' depression severity ratings, consistent with an inverse correlation between the depression severity and frontal EEG asymmetry at rest. The average asymmetry changes also significantly correlated with the amygdala BOLD laterality. Temporal correlations between frontal EEG asymmetry and BOLD activity were significantly enhanced, during the rtfMRI-nf task, for the amygdala and many regions associated with emotion regulation. Our findings demonstrate an important link between amygdala BOLD activity and frontal EEG asymmetry during emotion regulation. Our EEG asymmetry results indicate that the rtfMRI-nf training targeting the amygdala is beneficial to MDD patients. They further suggest that EEG-nf based on frontal EEG asymmetry in the alpha band would be compatible with the amygdala-based rtfMRI-nf. Combination of the two could enhance emotion regulation training and benefit MDD patients. PMID:26958462

  1. The dark side of the alpha rhythm: fMRI evidence for induced alpha modulation during complete darkness.

    PubMed

    Ben-Simon, Eti; Podlipsky, Ilana; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Gruberger, Michal; Cvetkovic, Dean; Intrator, Nathan; Hendler, Talma

    2013-03-01

    The unique role of the EEG alpha rhythm in different states of cortical activity is still debated. The main theories regarding alpha function posit either sensory processing or attention allocation as the main processes governing its modulation. Closing and opening eyes, a well-known manipulation of the alpha rhythm, could be regarded as attention allocation from inward to outward focus though during light is also accompanied by visual change. To disentangle the effects of attention allocation and sensory visual input on alpha modulation, 14 healthy subjects were asked to open and close their eyes during conditions of light and of complete darkness while simultaneous recordings of EEG and fMRI were acquired. Thus, during complete darkness the eyes-open condition is not related to visual input but only to attention allocation, allowing direct examination of its role in alpha modulation. A data-driven ridge regression classifier was applied to the EEG data in order to ascertain the contribution of the alpha rhythm to eyes-open/eyes-closed inference in both lighting conditions. Classifier results revealed significant alpha contribution during both light and dark conditions, suggesting that alpha rhythm modulation is closely linked to the change in the direction of attention regardless of the presence of visual sensory input. Furthermore, fMRI activation maps derived from an alpha modulation time-course during the complete darkness condition exhibited a right frontal cortical network associated with attention allocation. These findings support the importance of top-down processes such as attention allocation to alpha rhythm modulation, possibly as a prerequisite to its known bottom-up processing of sensory input. PMID:23216771

  2. EEG biofeedback as a treatment for substance use disorders: review, rating of efficacy, and recommendations for further research.

    PubMed

    Sokhadze, Tato M; Cannon, Rex L; Trudeau, David L

    2008-03-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback has been employed in substance use disorder (SUD) over the last three decades. The SUD is a complex series of disorders with frequent comorbidities and EEG abnormalities of several types. EEG biofeedback has been employed in conjunction with other therapies and may be useful in enhancing certain outcomes of therapy. Based on published clinical studies and employing efficacy criteria adapted by the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research, alpha theta training-either alone for alcoholism or in combination with beta training for stimulant and mixed substance abuse and combined with residential treatment programs, is probably efficacious. Considerations of further research design taking these factors into account are discussed and descriptions of contemporary research are given. PMID:18214670

  3. EEG Biofeedback as a Treatment for Substance Use Disorders: Review, Rating of Efficacy, and Recommendations for Further Research

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Rex L.; Trudeau, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback has been employed in substance use disorder (SUD) over the last three decades. The SUD is a complex series of disorders with frequent comorbidities and EEG abnormalities of several types. EEG biofeedback has been employed in conjunction with other therapies and may be useful in enhancing certain outcomes of therapy. Based on published clinical studies and employing efficacy criteria adapted by the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research, alpha theta training—either alone for alcoholism or in combination with beta training for stimulant and mixed substance abuse and combined with residential treatment programs, is probably efficacious. Considerations of further research design taking these factors into account are discussed and descriptions of contemporary research are given. PMID:18214670

  4. EEG power spectrum changes due to listening to pleasant music and their relation to relaxation effects.

    PubMed

    Kabuto, M; Kageyama, T; Nitta, H

    1993-10-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectrum changes induced by pleasant music (2-min. fractions of 6 samples of music [famous classical and commercially available "alpha music" at 10-sec. intervals]) were investigated in relation to changes in 16 kinds of psychosomatic feelings. Subjects were 42 healthy young people aged 18-25 yrs. Two major components, "pleasant & relaxed" and "calm", were extracted through principal component analysis of the feeling changes, both of which were related to the "relaxation effects" of the music. These component scores were not related to the changes of EEG powers in the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency components in 6 regions (frontal, parietal and occipital regions of the left and right hemispheres), when examined separately. However, the change of the total delta power for all the regions was significantly associated with both the "pleasant & relaxed" and "calm" component scores. The association between the total theta power change and "calm" score was found to be insignificant if the type-A personality variable was added to their regression model. On the other hand, the alpha-peak frequency was inversely related to the decrease of the "calm" score in the left occipital region (LO). The reduction of the alpha-peak power in the LO was also significant, and was associated not with the alpha-peak frequency changes but inversely with the "calm" score, although these alpha-component changes were not shown to be modified by the personality. Thus, the present study suggests, as a preliminary finding, that the "relaxation effects" of pleasant music can be associated with the EEG power spectrum component changes, especially with the change in the total theta power and possibly with that in the alpha power in the occipital, and the frequency shift of the peak in the alpha-range. Some of the associations were also shown to vary for the type-A personality, suggesting a clue to relating the personality to a differential stress-related psychosomatic trait, although the physiological significance of the changes in the low-frequency component range as well as those in the alpha-frequency component, which are obtained through FFT, should be further clarified. PMID:8254987

  5. Distribution entropy analysis of epileptic EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Peng Li; Chang Yan; Karmakar, Chandan; Changchun Liu

    2015-08-01

    It is an open-ended challenge to accurately detect the epileptic seizures through electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Recently published studies have made elaborate attempts to distinguish between the normal and epileptic EEG signals by advanced nonlinear entropy methods, such as the approximate entropy, sample entropy, fuzzy entropy, and permutation entropy, etc. Most recently, a novel distribution entropy (DistEn) has been reported to have superior performance compared with the conventional entropy methods for especially short length data. We thus aimed, in the present study, to show the potential of DistEn in the analysis of epileptic EEG signals. The publicly-accessible Bonn database which consisted of normal, interictal, and ictal EEG signals was used in this study. Three different measurement protocols were set for better understanding the performance of DistEn, which are: i) calculate the DistEn of a specific EEG signal using the full recording; ii) calculate the DistEn by averaging the results for all its possible non-overlapped 5 second segments; and iii) calculate it by averaging the DistEn values for all the possible non-overlapped segments of 1 second length, respectively. Results for all three protocols indicated a statistically significantly increased DistEn for the ictal class compared with both the normal and interictal classes. Besides, the results obtained under the third protocol, which only used very short segments (1 s) of EEG recordings showed a significantly (p <; 0.05) increased DistEn for the interictal class in compassion with the normal class, whereas both analyses using relatively long EEG signals failed in tracking this difference between them, which may be due to a nonstationarity effect on entropy algorithm. The capability of discriminating between the normal and interictal EEG signals is of great clinical relevance since it may provide helpful tools for the detection of a seizure onset. Therefore, our study suggests that the DistEn analysis of EEG signals is very promising for clinical and even portable EEG monitoring. PMID:26737213

  6. Asynchronous detection of kinesthetic attention during mobilization of lower limbs using EEG measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melinscak, Filip; Montesano, Luis; Minguez, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Attention is known to modulate the plasticity of the motor cortex, and plasticity is crucial for recovery in motor rehabilitation. This study addresses the possibility of using an EEG-based brain–computer interface (BCI) to detect kinesthetic attention to movement. Approach. A novel experiment emulating physical rehabilitation was designed to study kinesthetic attention. The protocol involved continuous mobilization of lower limbs during which participants reported levels of attention to movement—from focused kinesthetic attention to mind wandering. For this protocol an asynchronous BCI detector of kinesthetic attention and deliberate mind wandering was designed. Main results. EEG analysis showed significant differences in theta, alpha, and beta bands, related to the attentional state. These changes were further pinpointed to bands relative to the frequency of the individual alpha peak. The accuracy of the designed BCI ranged between 60.8% and 68.4% (significantly above chance level), depending on the used analysis window length, i.e. acceptable detection delay. Significance. This study shows it is possible to use self-reporting to study attention-related changes in EEG during continuous mobilization. Such a protocol is used to develop an asynchronous BCI detector of kinesthetic attention, with potential applications to motor rehabilitation.

  7. Chronic exercise alters EEG power spectra in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Sarbadhikari, S N; Dey, S; Ray, A K

    1996-01-01

    The EEG from frontal cortex, EMG and EOG were recorded from rats exposed to only exercise (Treadmill), only stress, exercise + stress and neither (control). In comparison with the control group, the percent of Delta activity in the awake was significantly increased in the depressed group and significantly decreased in the exercised groups, while for Beta-2, the reverse occurred; Theta increased and Beta-2 decreased in the NREM sleep state of the depressed group and the opposite happened for the exercised groups. Delta and Alpha-2 activity significantly increased in the depressed group, and they were significantly decreased in the exercised groups whereas the Beta-2 activity showed contrary changes in the REM sleep state. These findings indicate that exercise has the opposite effect from what stress has on qEEG and concomitant physical exercise reduces the effects of stress. Behavioral tests were done by Open Field (OF) and High Plus Maze (HPM). Slow EEG activity (Delta, Theta, Alpha) was significantly positively correlated with immobilization in the OF and defecation in both OF and HPM and negatively with the food intake, transfer latency in HPM; rearing, grooming and total ambulation in OF Whereas, fast activity (Beta-2) was significantly negatively correlated with immobilization in OF and defecation in OF and HPM, while positively with ambulation in the central squares of OF and time spent at the central cross and number of times arms crossed in the HPM. PMID:8864771

  8. Ordinal patterns in epileptic brains: Analysis of intracranial EEG and simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, C.; Abela, E.; Hauf, M.; Wiest, R.; Schindler, K.

    2013-06-01

    Epileptic seizures are associated with high behavioral stereotypy of the patients. In the EEG of epilepsy patients characteristic signal patterns can be found during and between seizures. Here we use ordinal patterns to analyze EEGs of epilepsy patients and quantify the degree of signal determinism. Besides relative signal redundancy and the fraction of forbidden patterns we introduce the fraction of under-represented patterns as a new measure. Using the logistic map, parameter scans are performed to explore the sensitivity of the measures to signal determinism. Thereafter, application is made to two types of EEGs recorded in two epilepsy patients. Intracranial EEG shows pronounced determinism peaks during seizures. Finally, we demonstrate that ordinal patterns may be useful for improving analysis of non-invasive simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

  9. Study on Brain Dynamics by Non Linear Analysis of Music Induced EEG Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Archi; Sanyal, Shankha; Patranabis, Anirban; Banerjee, Kaushik; Guhathakurta, Tarit; Sengupta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Dipak; Ghose, Partha

    2016-02-01

    Music has been proven to be a valuable tool for the understanding of human cognition, human emotion, and their underlying brain mechanisms. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of Hindustani music on brain activity during normal relaxing conditions using electroencephalography (EEG). Ten male healthy subjects without special musical education participated in the study. EEG signals were acquired at the frontal (F3/F4) lobes of the brain while listening to music at three experimental conditions (rest, with music and without music). Frequency analysis was done for the alpha, theta and gamma brain rhythms. The finding shows that arousal based activities were enhanced while listening to Hindustani music of contrasting emotions (romantic/sorrow) for all the subjects in case of alpha frequency bands while no significant changes were observed in gamma and theta frequency ranges. It has been observed that when the music stimulus is removed, arousal activities as evident from alpha brain rhythms remain for some time, showing residual arousal. This is analogous to the conventional 'Hysteresis' loop where the system retains some 'memory' of the former state. This is corroborated in the non linear analysis (Detrended Fluctuation Analysis) of the alpha rhythms as manifested in values of fractal dimension. After an input of music conveying contrast emotions, withdrawal of music shows more retention as evidenced by the values of fractal dimension.

  10. Time course of EEG oscillations during repeated listening of a well-known aria

    PubMed Central

    Jäncke, Lutz; Kühnis, Jürg; Rogenmoser, Lars; Elmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    While previous studies have analyzed mean neurophysiological responses to musical stimuli, the current study aimed to identify specific time courses of electroencephalography (EEG) oscillations, which are associated with dynamic changes in the acoustic features of the musical stimulus. In addition, we were interested in whether these time courses change during a repeated presentation of the same musical piece. A total of 16 subjects repeatedly listened to the well-known aria “Nessun dorma,” sung by Paul Potts, while continuous 128-channel EEG and heart rate, as well as electrodermal responses, were recorded. The time courses for the EEG oscillations were calculated using a time resolution of 1 second for several frequency bands, on the basis of individual alpha-peak frequencies (theta, low alpha-1, low alpha-2, upper alpha, and beta). For all frequency bands, we identified a more or less continuous increase in power relative to a baseline period, indicating strong event-related synchronization (ERS) during music listening. The ERS time courses, however, did not correlate strongly with the time courses of the acoustic features of the aria. In addition, we did not observe changes in EEG oscillations after repeated presentation of the same musical piece. Aside from this distinctive feature, we identified a remarkable variability in EEG oscillations, both within and between the repeated presentations of the aria. We interpret the continuous increase in ERS observed in all frequency bands during music listening as an indicator of a particular neurophysiological and psychological state evoked by music listening. We suggest that this state is characterized by increased internal attention (accompanied by reduced external attention), increased inhibition of brain networks not involved in the generation of this internal state, the maintenance of a particular level of general alertness, and a type of brain state that can be described as “mind wandering.” The overall state can be categorized as a psychological process that may be seen as a “drawing in” to the musical piece. However, this state is not stable and varies considerably throughout the music listening session and across subjects. Most important, however, is the finding that the neurophysiological activations occurring during music listening are dynamic and not stationary. PMID:26257624

  11. Time course of EEG oscillations during repeated listening of a well-known aria.

    PubMed

    Jäncke, Lutz; Kühnis, Jürg; Rogenmoser, Lars; Elmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    While previous studies have analyzed mean neurophysiological responses to musical stimuli, the current study aimed to identify specific time courses of electroencephalography (EEG) oscillations, which are associated with dynamic changes in the acoustic features of the musical stimulus. In addition, we were interested in whether these time courses change during a repeated presentation of the same musical piece. A total of 16 subjects repeatedly listened to the well-known aria "Nessun dorma," sung by Paul Potts, while continuous 128-channel EEG and heart rate, as well as electrodermal responses, were recorded. The time courses for the EEG oscillations were calculated using a time resolution of 1 second for several frequency bands, on the basis of individual alpha-peak frequencies (theta, low alpha-1, low alpha-2, upper alpha, and beta). For all frequency bands, we identified a more or less continuous increase in power relative to a baseline period, indicating strong event-related synchronization (ERS) during music listening. The ERS time courses, however, did not correlate strongly with the time courses of the acoustic features of the aria. In addition, we did not observe changes in EEG oscillations after repeated presentation of the same musical piece. Aside from this distinctive feature, we identified a remarkable variability in EEG oscillations, both within and between the repeated presentations of the aria. We interpret the continuous increase in ERS observed in all frequency bands during music listening as an indicator of a particular neurophysiological and psychological state evoked by music listening. We suggest that this state is characterized by increased internal attention (accompanied by reduced external attention), increased inhibition of brain networks not involved in the generation of this internal state, the maintenance of a particular level of general alertness, and a type of brain state that can be described as "mind wandering." The overall state can be categorized as a psychological process that may be seen as a "drawing in" to the musical piece. However, this state is not stable and varies considerably throughout the music listening session and across subjects. Most important, however, is the finding that the neurophysiological activations occurring during music listening are dynamic and not stationary. PMID:26257624

  12. Chronic activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha with fenofibrate prevents alterations in cardiac metabolic phenotype without changing the onset of decompensation in pacing-induced heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe heart failure (HF) is characterized by profound alterations in cardiac metabolic phenotype, with down-regulation of the free fatty acid (FFA) oxidative pathway and marked increase in glucose oxidation. We tested whether fenofibrate, a pharmacological agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activat...

  13. Insights on the neural basis of motor plasticity induced by theta burst stimulation from TMS-EEG

    PubMed Central

    VERNET, Marine; BASHIR, Shahid; YOO, Woo-Kyoung; PEREZ, Jennifer M.; NAJIB, Umer; PASCUAL-LEONE, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a useful tool to induce and measure plasticity in the human brain. However, the cortical effects are generally indirectly evaluated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) reflective of modulation of cortico-spinal excitability. In this study, we aim to provide direct measures of cortical plasticity by combining TMS with electroencephalography (EEG). Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) was applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) of young healthy adults; and we measured modulation of (i) motor evoked-potentials (MEPs), (ii) TMS-induced EEG evoked potentials (TEPs), (iii) TMS-induced EEG synchronization and (iv) eyes-closed resting EEG. Our results show the expected cTBS-induced decrease in MEPs size, which we found to be paralleled by a modulation of a combination of TEPs. Furthermore, we found that cTBS increased the power in the theta band of eyes-closed resting EEG, whereas it decreased single-pulse TMS-induced power in the theta and alpha bands. In addition, cTBS decreased the power in the beta band of eyes-closed resting EEG, whereas it increased single-pulse TMS-induced power in the beta band. We suggest that cTBS acts by modulating the phase alignment between already active oscillators; it synchronizes low frequency (theta and/or alpha) oscillators and desynchronizes high frequency (beta) oscillators. These results provide novel insights into the cortical effects of cTBS and could be useful for exploring cTBS-induced plasticity outside of the motor cortex. PMID:23190020

  14. Insights on the neural basis of motor plasticity induced by theta burst stimulation from TMS-EEG.

    PubMed

    Vernet, Marine; Bashir, Shahid; Yoo, Woo-Kyoung; Perez, Jennifer M; Najib, Umer; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a useful tool to induce and measure plasticity in the human brain. However, the cortical effects are generally indirectly evaluated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) reflective of modulation of cortico-spinal excitability. In this study, we aim to provide direct measures of cortical plasticity by combining TMS with electroencephalography (EEG). Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) was applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) of young healthy adults, and we measured modulation of (i) MEPs, (ii) TMS-induced EEG evoked potentials (TEPs), (iii) TMS-induced EEG synchronization and (iv) eyes-closed resting EEG. Our results show the expected cTBS-induced decrease in MEP size, which we found to be paralleled by a modulation of a combination of TEPs. Furthermore, we found that cTBS increased the power in the theta band of eyes-closed resting EEG, whereas it decreased single-pulse TMS-induced power in the theta and alpha bands. In addition, cTBS decreased the power in the beta band of eyes-closed resting EEG, whereas it increased single-pulse TMS-induced power in the beta band. We suggest that cTBS acts by modulating the phase alignment between already active oscillators; it synchronizes low-frequency (theta and/or alpha) oscillators and desynchronizes high-frequency (beta) oscillators. These results provide novel insight into the cortical effects of cTBS and could be useful for exploring cTBS-induced plasticity outside of the motor cortex. PMID:23190020

  15. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  16. Intelligent sensing of EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Khalid J.; Collins, Leslie E.; Fitzpatrick, Dennis; Hendricks, Shelton; Hay, D. Robert; Suen, Ching Y.

    1990-11-01

    Although physician observation is usually the most sensitive method for diagnosing and monitoring a patient''s medical condition human observation cannot be conducted continuously and consistently. It can be helpful therefore to employ specialized automated techniques for the continuous reliable and noninvasive monitoring of those parameters useful for the enhancement of physicians'' diagnostic capabilities. Signal processing systems are among the most powerful of those techniques currently available for noninvasively examining the internal structure of living biological systems. Nonetheless the capability of these systems can be substantially enhanced if supplemented with automated classification and interpretation precedures. An intelligent EEG signal sensing and interpretation system using typical signal processing techniques supplemented with heuristics and identification techniques has been designed. The system is comprised of five major components namely: the fact gathering system the knowledge/rule base the knowledge organization/learning phase the inference engine and the expert/user interface. The fact gathering system collects raw waveforms preprocesses these for noise elimination and extracts the pertinent information from the waveforms. The knowledge/rule base is an information and knowledge bank wherein the appropriate knowledge parameters useful for the decision making process are stored. The knowledge organization/learning phase structures the knowledge In the order determined by the association among pattern classes and trains the Inference engine. The structure of the inference engine is based on a hierarchical pattern classifier which categorizes the unknown signals using a layered decision making strategy

  17. Bilateral EEG differentiation of stimuli.

    PubMed

    Osborne, K; Gale, A

    1976-09-01

    The EEG of both right and left hemispheres was monitored while subjects were presented with words, music, arithmetical problems and abstract pictures, (15 trials of each treatment, 9 sec per trial). The left side of the brain was most activated during presentation of words and arithmetic, whilst the right side of the brain was most activated during presentation of music. In addition, the right side was more activated during exposure to arithmetic than to words. The pictures were not differentiated by either side of the brain and it is possible that they had the effect of deactivating or relaxing subjects, since they yielded high abundance values compared with other stimuli. This study confirms earlier findings showing significant between-hemisphere ratios for arithmetic and words. In addition, however, the within-hemisphere analyses show that music affects the right hemisphere (without inducing between-hemisphere changes) and that arithmetic also activates the right hemisphere if compared with the non-activating effects of words. PMID:963141

  18. Spectral analysis of EEG responses.

    PubMed

    Jervis, B W; Coelho, M; Morgan, G W

    1989-05-01

    The techniques used and the results obtained in a spectral analysis of two specific responses in the human electroencephalogram are presented in this paper. The purposes are to show how the techniques may be applied to the necessarily short lengths of EEG data and to illustrate these techniques and the useful results obtained by relevant examples. The necessary data-processing procedures and precautions for transforming from the time to frequency domain are presented in a tutorial fashion. The importance of augmenting zeros, choice of the most appropriate data window and pretransformation of the data to avoid the combined effects of energy loss and low frequency content biasing caused by windowing is explained. The pros and cons of the tapered-cosine (Tukey) and Kaiser-Bessel windows are illustrated. The usefulness of applying certain statistical tests, which are based on a physical model of the responses, to the harmonic components of the responses is demonstrated. Thus a comparison is made between the features of auditory evoked responses and of the contingent negative variation, and the usefulness of predictive statistical diagnosis in differentiating between subject groups is illustrated by application to normal subjects and Huntington's chorea patients. PMID:2532279

  19. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Thalassemia Physicians often mistake alpha thalassemia trait for iron deficiency anemia and incorrectly prescribe iron supplements that have ... αα −− Physicians often mistake alpha thalassemia trait for iron deficiency anemia and incorrectly prescribe iron supplements that have ...

  20. "Neural efficiency" of athletes' brain for upright standing: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Del Percio, Claudio; Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Iacoboni, Marco; Infarinato, Francesco; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Lizio, Roberta; Aschieri, Pierluigi; Fiore, Antonio; Toràn, Giancarlo; Gallamini, Michele; Baratto, Marta; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-05-29

    "Neural efficiency" hypothesis posits that neural activity is reduced in experts. Here we tested the hypothesis that compared with non-athletes, elite athletes are characterized by a reduction of cortical activation during an engaging upright standing. EEG (56 channels; Be-plus Eb-Neuro and stabilogram (RGM) data were simultaneously recorded in 10 elite karate, 10 elite fencing athletes, and 12 non-athletes during a simple bipodalic (standard Romberg) and a more engaging monopodalic upright standing. Balance was indexed by body "sway area". The EEG data were spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian estimation. Cortical activity was indexed by task-related power decrease (TRPD) of EEG alpha power (8-12Hz) during monopodalic referenced to bipodalic condition. The body "sway area" was larger during the monopodalic than bipodalic upright standing in all groups. Low-frequency alpha TRPD (about 8-10Hz) was lower in amplitude in the karate and fencing athletes than in the non-athletes at left central, right central, middle parietal, and right parietal areas (p<0.01). Similarly, the amplitude of high-frequency alpha TRPD (10-12Hz) was lower in the karate and fencing athletes than in the non-athletes at right frontal, left central, right central, and middle parietal areas (p<0.03). These results suggest that during monopodalic referenced to less engaging bipodalic condition, the power decrease (i.e. the desynchronization) of cortical activity at alpha rhythms is largely reduced in elite athletes than in non-athletes, in line with the "neural efficiency" hypothesis. The present study extends our understanding of the physiological mechanisms at the basis of the "neural efficiency" for engaging upright standing in elite athletes. PMID:19429191

  1. [Gender differences in EEG coherence changes during figural creative thinking: the efficacy coupling].

    PubMed

    Vol'f, N V; Tarasova, I V; Razumnikova, O M

    2009-01-01

    The study was aimed to explore the features of interaction between cortical areas during figural creative task performance in high- and low-creative men and women. We divided the participants into two groups with high and low creativity by the median of originality score. EEG was recorded at rest and during task performance (Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking "Incomplete figures"). The EEG coherence was computed in six frequency bands from theta1 to beta2. We analyzed the total values of coherence for each of 16 sites, calculated separately for intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connections. In the theta2, alphal, and alpha2 bands, coherence values decreased in task performance as compared to baseline in subjects with lower originality scores, whereas in subjects with higher scores, they increased in the theta2 and alpha1 bands. The decrease in the alpha2 band in the higher-creativity group was significantly lower in comparison with the decrease in the lower-score group. In the alpha2 band, the interaction of gender, creativity, laterality, and electrode position factors was also found during analysis of task-induced coherence changes. Further examination of the interaction showed the similarity of EEG coherence patterns in men and women with opposite creative abilities and higher values of task-induced coherence changes in the anterior regions of the left hemisphere and posterior regions of the right hemisphere in high-creative in comparison with low-creative men. The findings are discussed in terms of different cognitive strategies used by men and women that may have the same results in creative problem solving. PMID:19795805

  2. [Quantitative EEG analysis of the effects of carbocromen, pentetrazole, beta-methyldigoxin, and strophantin-K in normal human volunteers (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Maxion, H; Klein, G; Wolf, B; Zöllner, U

    1977-09-01

    With EEG-interval analysis we studied the influence on C.N.S. of some drugs normally used for cardiovascular diseases: carbochromen, pentetrazole, beta-methyldigoxin and Strophantin-K. All investigated drugs induced activation of alpha-waves, especially in frontal areas with primary small alpha-activity. Dominant alpha-frequency was accelerated. These results confirm the direct and stimulating effects of these drugs on C.N.S. in therapeutic doses. Alpha-acceleration may not only indicate psychostimulation but also indicate epileptogenic effects. All these drugs may provoke epileptic seizures in toxic doses. PMID:616928

  3. [Compressive-spectral analysis of EEG in patients with panic attacks in the context of different psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Tuter, N V; Gnezditski?, V V

    2008-01-01

    Panic disorders (PD) which develop in the context of different psychiatric diseases (neurotic, personality disorder and schizotypal disorders) have their own clinical and neurophysiological features. The results of compressive-spectral analysis of EEG (CSA EEG) in patients with panic attack were different depending on the specifics of initial psychiatric status. EEG parameters in patients differed from those in controls. The common feature for all PD patients was the lower spectral density of theta-, alpha- and beta-bands as well as total spectral density without any alterations of region distribution. The decrease of electrical activity of activation systems was found in the groups with neurotic and schizotypal disorders and that of inhibition systems - in the group with schizotypal disorders. The EEG results did not suggest any depression of activation systems in patients with specific personality disorders. The data obtained with CSA EEG mirror the integrative brain activity which determinad of the appearance of PA as well as of nosology of psychiatre disease. PMID:18427541

  4. Effect of immobilization on the EEG of the baboon. Comparison with telemetry results from unrestricted animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bert, J.; Collomb, H.

    1980-01-01

    The EEG of the baboon was studied under two very different sets of conditions: 37 were totally immobolized while 12 were studied in their free movements with 4 channel telemetry. For the immobilzed, 3 stages were described: (1) activation, record desynchronized; (2) rest with 13-15 cm/sec rhythm, like the human alpha rhythm stage but with eyes open or closed; (3)relaxation with a decrease in 13-15 rhythm and the appearance of 5-7 cm/sec theta waves, eyelids closed, animal apparently sleeping. For the free animals the rest stage appeared when the animal's attention was not directed anywhere and there was no relaxation stage. It is concluded that the EEG pattern of the immobilized animal that was described as the "relaxation" stage really represents a special functional state which one must distinguish clearly from the physiological stages of sleep.

  5. Hemispheric specialization of language: an EEG study of bilingual Hopi indian children.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L; TenHouten, W; Kaplan, C D; Gardiner, M

    1977-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were obtained from electrode placements over the left and right frontal and parietal lobes of the brain in sixteen Hopi Indian children listening to tape recorded children's stories in the Hopi and English languages. Spectral analysis of the EEG data revealed that, for the parietal leads, alpha desynchronization was relatively greater over the right hemisphere for listening to Hopi than for listening to English, which indicates a greater right hemisphere participation in the processing of the Hopi speech. The results of the experiment are directionally consistent with our hypothesis, and imply that linguistic relativity may exist on a neurolinguistic level, such that languages can differ in the relative degree to which they serve as instruments of thought in a propositional, left hemisphere mode, or in an appositional, right hemisphere mode. PMID:617618

  6. Waking EEG spectral power and coherence differences between high and low hypnotizable subjects.

    PubMed

    Kirenskaya, Anna V; Novototsky-Vlasov, Vladimir Y; Zvonikov, Vyacheslav M

    2011-01-01

    EEG spectral power and coherence were analyzed under waking baseline condition in 19 high (HH) and 12 low (LH) hypnotizable subjects. In HH subjects, the theta1 and theta2 spectral power was higher than in LH. The major new finding of this study is that coherence between distributed brain regions was sharply elevated in HH subjects within the theta and alpha frequency bands. In contrast, spectral power and coherence of beta2 and gamma1 bands were higher in LH subjects as compared to HH subjects. However, the long distance coherence between frontal and posterior areas within beta-gamma frequency ranges was higher in HH subjects. It might be supposed that HH subjects are engaged in imaginal mental activity whereas LH ones are mainly engaged in linguistic activity. The neurophysiological basis of the obtained EEG differences is discussed. PMID:21867379

  7. Manual Lymph Drainage Attenuates Frontal EEG Asymmetry in Subjects with Psychological Stress: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jung-Myo; Kim, Sung-Joong

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the effect of manual lymph drainage (MLD) of the neck on frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry in subjects with psychological stress. [Subjects] Thirteen subjects with psychological stress participated in the study. [Methods] Subjects received MLD of the neck for 15 min. [Results] Analysis of the frontal asymmetry index showed that the energy shift in the alpha frequency band from the left hemisphere to the right hemisphere after MLD resulted in greater left-side activation (positive asymmetry values), which could be related to the positive emotional state observed particularly in the F7–F8 area. [Conclusion] These preliminary findings suggest that frontal EEG asymmetry was significantly attenuated after MLD. PMID:24764627

  8. Spatio-temporal EEG power spectral patterns during a short daytime nap.

    PubMed

    Luo, Z; Honda, K; Inoué, S

    2001-06-01

    This is an approach to investigate topographic changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral power during pre- and post-nap wakefulness as well as stages 1 (S1) and 2 (S2) NREM sleep in 12 subjects. Delta- and theta-band power significantly increased in the frontal and central regions during S1 and S2 with an increase in inter- and intra-hemispheric correlations. Beta-band power significantly increased in the frontal, central and parietal regions during S2 with an increase in interhemispheric correlation. In contrast, alpha-band power significantly decreased in the parietal-occipital regions during S1 and S2 with a decrease in interhemispheric correlation. Thus, daytime nap modulated spatio-temporal patterns of EEG power spectral patterns in wide scalp regions. PMID:11422838

  9. Effects and after-effects of chewing gum on vigilance, heart rate, EEG and mood.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew P; Jacob, Tim J C; Smith, Andrew P

    2014-06-22

    Research has shown that chewing gum improves attention, although the mechanism for this effect remains unclear. This study investigated the effects and after-effects of chewing gum on vigilance, mood, heart rate and EEG. Participants completed a vigilance task four times; at baseline, with or without chewing gum, and twice post-chewing. EEG alpha and beta power at left frontal and temporal lobes, subjective mood and heart rate were assessed. Chewing gum shortened reaction time and increased the rate of hits, although hits fell during the second post-chewing task. Chewing gum heightened heart rate, but only during chewing. Gum also increased beta power at F7 and T3 immediately post-chewing, but not following the post-chewing tasks. The findings show that chewing gum affects several different indicators of alertness. PMID:24857722

  10. [Status epilepticus: indications for emergency EEG].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    1997-11-01

    EEG is a major tool in convulsive status epilepticus. Several techniques may be used, including conventional or digitized EEG using 4, 8, 10 or 16 channels, continuous monitoring with or without simultaneous video recording, and cerebral function monitor. During the first phase, in the emergency ward, EEG may be useful in severe convulsive status epilepticus to assess further evolution and/or prognosis. However, rapid control of seizure at this phase is the primary goal, and optimization of EEG availabilities may lead to more systematic indications. After adequate control of seizures, EEG is mandatory in the following situations: i) a difficult-to-control convulsive status epilepticus, with a high risk of subsequent evolution towards subtle status epilepticus; ii) a resistant status epilepticus which needed high dose of sedatives drugs and/or curarization, to evaluate the level of anaesthesia and to watch for recurrence of epileptiform abnormalities; iii) a permanent, unexplained impairment of consciousness which followed an apparently successful treatment, to detect non convulsive status epilepticus; 4. a doubtful clinical diagnosis, to confirm pseudo-status epilepticus. PMID:9480406

  11. EEG activities during kindling in frog.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Baba, H; Mori, K; Sato, K

    1980-01-01

    The "kindling" phenomenon was investigated in relation to the EEG activities in frog, Rana nigromaculata. Repetitive electrical stimulation to the unilateral hippocampus produced the following results: (1) Prolongation in duration of after-discharges (AD) and shortening of AD intervals; (2) Appearance and enhancing of spontaneous epileptiform discharges (SEDs), which were suppressed by isolation of hippocampus; (3) Increase in power and duration of background EEG with a specific frequency (9 Hz in the nontreated group and 5 Hz in the hippocampal commissural bisected group), which coincided with the half length of the AO intervals during the steady phase; (4) Marked increase in the late components with peak latencies of 25 and 50 msec in the interhippocampal impulse responses as estimated from the bilateral background hippocampal EEG through an autoregressive model, of which the former only was suppressed by commissural section, while both were suppressed by hippocampal isolation. From the above evidences obtained in frogs, it may be inferred that the brain structures, e.g., thalamus, hypothalamus, reticular formation, etc., play an important role in kindling formation and that the alteration in background EEG generating system during kindling is closely associated with the sporadic epileptiform EEG activities. PMID:7390708

  12. Real-time EEG feedback during simultaneous EEG-fMRI identifies the cortical signature of motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Zich, Catharina; Debener, Stefan; Kranczioch, Cornelia; Bleichner, Martin G; Gutberlet, Ingmar; De Vos, Maarten

    2015-07-01

    Motor imagery (MI) combined with real-time electroencephalogram (EEG) feedback is a popular approach for steering brain-computer interfaces (BCI). MI BCI has been considered promising as add-on therapy to support motor recovery after stroke. Yet whether EEG neurofeedback indeed targets specific sensorimotor activation patterns cannot be unambiguously inferred from EEG alone. We combined MI EEG neurofeedback with concurrent and continuous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to characterize the relationship between MI EEG neurofeedback and activation in cortical sensorimotor areas. EEG signals were corrected online from interfering MRI gradient and ballistocardiogram artifacts, enabling the delivery of real-time EEG feedback. Significantly enhanced task-specific brain activity during feedback compared to no feedback blocks was present in EEG and fMRI. Moreover, the contralateral MI related decrease in EEG sensorimotor rhythm amplitude correlated inversely with fMRI activation in the contralateral sensorimotor areas, whereas a lateralized fMRI pattern did not necessarily go along with a lateralized EEG pattern. Together, the findings indicate a complex relationship between MI EEG signals and sensorimotor cortical activity, whereby both are similarly modulated by EEG neurofeedback. This finding supports the potential of MI EEG neurofeedback for motor rehabilitation and helps to better understand individual differences in MI BCI performance. PMID:25887263

  13. Multi-scale order recurrence quantification analysis of EEG signals evoked by manual acupuncture in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang; Bian, Hongrui; Han, Chunxiao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Li, Huiyan

    2013-02-01

    To explore the effects of manual acupuncture (MA) on brain activities, we design an experiment that acupuncture at acupoint ST36 of right leg with four different frequencies to obtain electroencephalograph (EEG) signals. Many studies have demonstrated that the complexity of EEG can reflect the states of brain function, so we propose to adopt order recurrence quantification analysis combined with discrete wavelet transform, to analyze the dynamical characteristics of different EEG rhythms under acupuncture, further to explore the effects of MA on the complexity of brain activities from multi-scale point of view. By analyzing the complexity of five EEG rhythms, it is found that the complexity of delta rhythm during acupuncture is lower than before acupuncture, and for alpha rhythm that is higher, but for beta, theta and gamma rhythms there are no obvious changes. All of those effects are especially obvious during acupuncture with frequency of 200 times/min. Furthermore, the determinism extracted from delta, alpha and gamma rhythms can be regarded as a characteristic parameter to distinguish the state acupuncture at 200 times/min and the state before acupuncture. These results can provide a theoretical support for selecting appropriate acupuncture frequency for patients in clinical, and the proposed methods have the potential of exploring the effects of acupuncture on brain activities. PMID:24427193

  14. Integrative Frequency Power of EEG Correlates with Progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, Youquan; Chen, Jun; Lu, Yaqin; Pan, Suyue

    2016-04-01

    Clinically, predicting the progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and diagnosing dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) are difficult. This study aims to explore an integrative electroencephalography (EEG) frequency power that could be used to predict the progression of MCI in PD patients. Twenty-six PD patients, in this study, were divided into the mild cognitive impairment group (PDMCI, 17 patients) and dementia group (PDD, 9 patients) according to cognitive performance. Beta peak frequency, alpha relative power, and alpha/theta power were recorded and analyzed for the prediction. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores at initiation, in the first year, and in the second year were examined. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, Matthew correlation coefficient, and positive likelihood ratio were calculated in both the integrative EEG biomarkers and single best biomarker. Of the 17 patients with MCI for 2 years, 6 progressed to dementia. Integrative EEG biomarkers, mainly associated with beta peak frequency, can predict conversion from MCI to dementia. These biomarkers had sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 78%, compared with sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 58% of the beta peak frequency. In conclusion, the integrative EEG frequency powers were more sensitive and specific to MCI progression in PD patients. PMID:25519446

  15. Comparison of ictal and interictal EEG signals using fractal features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhou, Weidong; Yuan, Qi; Li, Xueli; Meng, Qingfang; Zhao, Xiuhe; Wang, Jiwen

    2013-12-01

    The feature analysis of epileptic EEG is very significant in diagnosis of epilepsy. This paper introduces two nonlinear features derived from fractal geometry for epileptic EEG analysis. The features of blanket dimension and fractal intercept are extracted to characterize behavior of EEG activities, and then their discriminatory power for ictal and interictal EEGs are compared by means of statistical methods. It is found that there is significant difference of the blanket dimension and fractal intercept between interictal and ictal EEGs, and the difference of the fractal intercept feature between interictal and ictal EEGs is more noticeable than the blanket dimension feature. Furthermore, these two fractal features at multi-scales are combined with support vector machine (SVM) to achieve accuracies of 97.58% for ictal and interictal EEG classification and 97.13% for normal, ictal and interictal EEG classification. PMID:24156671

  16. Hypofrontality on topographic EEG in schizophrenia. Correlations with neuropsychological and psychopathological parameters.

    PubMed

    Gattaz, W F; Mayer, S; Ziegler, P; Platz, M; Gasser, T

    1992-01-01

    Topographic EEG was performed in 17 DSM-III-R schizophrenic patients and in 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Eleven patients were first-onset (neuroleptic naive) schizophrenics. EEG band power was compared with psychopathology, neuropsychology and neurological soft signs. The EEG was recorded at 14 topographic locations monopolarly and movements of the eye and of the lid were monitored by two bipolar electro-oculogram (EOG) derivations, one vertical and one horizontal. A multivariate correction of EOG artefacts was performed based on regression analysis with respect to EOG channels. Schizophrenic patients showed higher mean and median power in most bands. These differences were marked in the delta band, in the fast alpha and beta bands, in particular at left frontal sites. Delta power at F7 was by far the best separating variable between schizophrenics and controls in a discriminant analysis. Significant positive correlations were found between the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores "Anxiety-depression" and "Activation" and power in the fast bands and negative ones between "Anergia" and the beta bands. Positive significant correlations emerged between the total score in the Negative Symptoms Rating Scale and the amount of delta power, predominantly over the temporal region. Impairment in the Luria-Nebraska neuropsychological scores "Rhythm" and "Memory" correlated highly significantly with EEG band power. No correlations were found between neurological soft signs and EEG band power. Our results are in line with the hypothesis of a hypofrontality in schizophrenia. It is unlikely that these findings are an artefact of prior psychiatric treatment, as they were also observed in first-onset, neuroleptic naive schizophrenics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504108

  17. Interictal Functional Connectivity of Human Epileptic Networks Assessed by Intracerebral EEG and BOLD Signal Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Bettus, Gaelle; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Wendling, Fabrice; Bénar, Christian G.; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Régis, Jean; Chauvel, Patrick; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Lemieux, Louis; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Guye, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to demonstrate whether spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal derived from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reflect spontaneous neuronal activity in pathological brain regions as well as in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. This is a crucial issue as coherent fluctuations of fMRI signals between remote brain areas are now widely used to define functional connectivity in physiology and in pathophysiology. We quantified functional connectivity using non-linear measures of cross-correlation between signals obtained from intracerebral EEG (iEEG) and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) in 5 patients suffering from intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Functional connectivity was quantified with both modalities in areas exhibiting different electrophysiological states (epileptic and non affected regions) during the interictal period. Functional connectivity as measured from the iEEG signal was higher in regions affected by electrical epileptiform abnormalities relative to non-affected areas, whereas an opposite pattern was found for functional connectivity measured from the BOLD signal. Significant negative correlations were found between the functional connectivities of iEEG and BOLD signal when considering all pairs of signals (theta, alpha, beta and broadband) and when considering pairs of signals in regions spared by epileptiform discharges (in broadband signal). This suggests differential effects of epileptic phenomena on electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals and/or an alteration of the neurovascular coupling secondary to pathological plasticity in TLE even in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. In addition, indices of directionality calculated from both modalities were consistent showing that the epileptogenic regions exert a significant influence onto the non epileptic areas during the interictal period. This study shows that functional connectivity measured by iEEG and BOLD signals give complementary but sometimes inconsistent information in TLE. PMID:21625517

  18. Interictal functional connectivity of human epileptic networks assessed by intracerebral EEG and BOLD signal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Bettus, Gaelle; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Wendling, Fabrice; Bénar, Christian G; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Régis, Jean; Chauvel, Patrick; Cozzone, Patrick J; Lemieux, Louis; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Guye, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to demonstrate whether spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal derived from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reflect spontaneous neuronal activity in pathological brain regions as well as in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. This is a crucial issue as coherent fluctuations of fMRI signals between remote brain areas are now widely used to define functional connectivity in physiology and in pathophysiology. We quantified functional connectivity using non-linear measures of cross-correlation between signals obtained from intracerebral EEG (iEEG) and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) in 5 patients suffering from intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Functional connectivity was quantified with both modalities in areas exhibiting different electrophysiological states (epileptic and non affected regions) during the interictal period. Functional connectivity as measured from the iEEG signal was higher in regions affected by electrical epileptiform abnormalities relative to non-affected areas, whereas an opposite pattern was found for functional connectivity measured from the BOLD signal. Significant negative correlations were found between the functional connectivities of iEEG and BOLD signal when considering all pairs of signals (theta, alpha, beta and broadband) and when considering pairs of signals in regions spared by epileptiform discharges (in broadband signal). This suggests differential effects of epileptic phenomena on electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals and/or an alteration of the neurovascular coupling secondary to pathological plasticity in TLE even in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. In addition, indices of directionality calculated from both modalities were consistent showing that the epileptogenic regions exert a significant influence onto the non epileptic areas during the interictal period. This study shows that functional connectivity measured by iEEG and BOLD signals give complementary but sometimes inconsistent information in TLE. PMID:21625517

  19. Time-varying bispectral analysis of visually evoked multi-channel EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Vinod

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical foundations of higher order spectral analysis are revisited to examine the use of time-varying bicoherence on non-stationary signals using a classical short-time Fourier approach. A methodology is developed to apply this to evoked EEG responses where a stimulus-locked time reference is available. Short-time windowed ensembles of the response at the same offset from the reference are considered as ergodic cyclostationary processes within a non-stationary random process. Bicoherence can be estimated reliably with known levels at which it is significantly different from zero and can be tracked as a function of offset from the stimulus. When this methodology is applied to multi-channel EEG, it is possible to obtain information about phase synchronization at different regions of the brain as the neural response develops. The methodology is applied to analyze evoked EEG response to flash visual stimulii to the left and right eye separately. The EEG electrode array is segmented based on bicoherence evolution with time using the mean absolute difference as a measure of dissimilarity. Segment maps confirm the importance of the occipital region in visual processing and demonstrate a link between the frontal and occipital regions during the response. Maps are constructed using bicoherence at bifrequencies that include the alpha band frequency of 8Hz as well as 4 and 20Hz. Differences are observed between responses from the left eye and the right eye, and also between subjects. The methodology shows potential as a neurological functional imaging technique that can be further developed for diagnosis and monitoring using scalp EEG which is less invasive and less expensive than magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. EEG profile of litoxetine after single and repeated administration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Patat, A; Trocherie, S; Thébault, J J; Rosenzweig, P; Dubruc, C; Bianchetti, G; Morselli, P L; Court, L A

    1994-01-01

    1. Litoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with antidepressant activity in animal models and in depressed patients. 2. This double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled study was carried out in 12 healthy young male volunteers. The aim was to assess the EEG profile of litoxetine in parallel with its pharmacokinetics after a single dose or multiple administrations for 4 days (6 doses) of two dosages (10 mg and 25 mg). Spectral analysis of four EEG leads (F4-T4, F3-T3, T4-02 and T3-01) was done up to 12 h post-dose. 3. In single or multiple doses, litoxetine induced EEG changes characterised by a dose-related increase in fast beta energies, mainly beta 2, without any changes in slow waves (delta and theta). A slight reduction in alpha activity occurred only after repeated doses. 4. EEG changes occurred after a single oral administration and lasted at least 12 h with litoxetine blood concentrations ranging from 4 to 10 ng ml-1. With repeated administrations, the pharmacodynamic steady-state was achieved as the increase in beta 2 energies was the same before and 12 h post-dose. These effects occurred with litoxetine blood concentrations ranging from 3 to 7 ng ml-1 with the 10 mg dosage and from 8 to 18 ng ml-1 with the 25 mg dosage. The EEG profile did not change after 4 days of repeated administration, indicating that tolerance did not develop. 5. Cmax and AUC showed proportionality between the administered dosages of 10 and 25 mg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8186061

  1. Estimation of eye closure degree using EEG sensors and its application in driver drowsiness detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Chung, Wan-Young

    2014-01-01

    Currently, driver drowsiness detectors using video based technology is being widely studied. Eyelid closure degree (ECD) is the main measure of the video-based methods, however, drawbacks such as brightness limitations and practical hurdles such as distraction of the drivers limits its success. This study presents a way to compute the ECD using EEG sensors instead of video-based methods. The premise is that the ECD exhibits a linear relationship with changes of the occipital EEG. A total of 30 subjects are included in this study: ten of them participated in a simple proof-of-concept experiment to verify the linear relationship between ECD and EEG, and then twenty participated in a monotonous highway driving experiment in a driving simulator environment to test the robustness of the linear relationship in real-life applications. Taking the video-based method as a reference, the Alpha power percentage from the O2 channel is found to be the best input feature for linear regression estimation of the ECD. The best overall squared correlation coefficient (SCC, denoted by r2) and mean squared error (MSE) validated by linear support vector regression model and leave one subject out method is r2 = 0.930 and MSE = 0.013. The proposed linear EEG-ECD model can achieve 87.5% and 70.0% accuracy for male and female subjects, respectively, for a driver drowsiness application, percentage eyelid closure over the pupil over time (PERCLOS). This new ECD estimation method not only addresses the video-based method drawbacks, but also makes ECD estimation more computationally efficient and easier to implement in EEG sensors in a real time way. PMID:25237899

  2. Estimation of Eye Closure Degree Using EEG Sensors and Its Application in Driver Drowsiness Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Chung, Wan-Young

    2014-01-01

    Currently, driver drowsiness detectors using video based technology is being widely studied. Eyelid closure degree (ECD) is the main measure of the video-based methods, however, drawbacks such as brightness limitations and practical hurdles such as distraction of the drivers limits its success. This study presents a way to compute the ECD using EEG sensors instead of video-based methods. The premise is that the ECD exhibits a linear relationship with changes of the occipital EEG. A total of 30 subjects are included in this study: ten of them participated in a simple proof-of-concept experiment to verify the linear relationship between ECD and EEG, and then twenty participated in a monotonous highway driving experiment in a driving simulator environment to test the robustness of the linear relationship in real-life applications. Taking the video-based method as a reference, the Alpha power percentage from the O2 channel is found to be the best input feature for linear regression estimation of the ECD. The best overall squared correlation coefficient (SCC, denoted by r2) and mean squared error (MSE) validated by linear support vector regression model and leave one subject out method is r2 = 0.930 and MSE = 0.013. The proposed linear EEG-ECD model can achieve 87.5% and 70.0% accuracy for male and female subjects, respectively, for a driver drowsiness application, percentage eyelid closure over the pupil over time (PERCLOS). This new ECD estimation method not only addresses the video-based method drawbacks, but also makes ECD estimation more computationally efficient and easier to implement in EEG sensors in a real time way. PMID:25237899

  3. Odds Ratio Product of Sleep EEG as a Continuous Measure of Sleep State

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Magdy; Ostrowski, Michele; Soiferman, Marc; Younes, Henry; Younes, Mark; Raneri, Jill; Hanly, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To develop and validate an algorithm that provides a continuous estimate of sleep depth from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Design: Retrospective analysis of polysomnograms. Setting: Research laboratory. Participants: 114 patients who underwent clinical polysomnography in sleep centers at the University of Manitoba (n = 58) and the University of Calgary (n = 56). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Power spectrum of EEG was determined in 3-second epochs and divided into delta, theta, alpha-sigma, and beta frequency bands. The range of powers in each band was divided into 10 aliquots. EEG patterns were assigned a 4-digit number that reflects the relative power in the 4 frequency ranges (10,000 possible patterns). Probability of each pattern occurring in 30-s epochs staged awake was determined, resulting in a continuous probability value from 0% to 100%. This was divided by 40 (% of epochs staged awake) producing the odds ratio product (ORP), with a range of 0–2.5. In validation testing, average ORP decreased progressively as EEG progressed from wakefulness (2.19 ± 0.29) to stage N3 (0.13 ± 0.05). ORP < 1.0 predicted sleep and ORP > 2.0 predicted wakefulness in > 95% of 30-s epochs. Epochs with intermediate ORP occurred in unstable sleep with a high arousal index (> 70/h) and were subject to much interrater scoring variability. There was an excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between ORP in current 30-s epochs and the likelihood of arousal or awakening occurring in the next 30-s epoch. Conclusions: Our results support the use of the odds ratio product (ORP) as a continuous measure of sleep depth. Citation: Younes M, Ostrowski M, Soiferman M, Younes H, Younes M, Raneri J, Hanly P. Odds ratio product of sleep EEG as a continuous measure of sleep state. SLEEP 2015;38(4):641–654. PMID:25348125

  4. Spectral modulation of frontal EEG during motor skill acquisition: a mobile EEG study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Savio W H; Chan, Rosa H M; Mak, Joseph N

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the modulation of frontal EEG dynamics with respect to progress in motor skill acquisition using a wireless EEG system with a single dry sensor. Participants were required to complete repeated trials of a computerized visual-motor task similar to mirror drawing while the EEG was collected. In each trial, task performance of the participants was summarized with a familiarity index which took into account the performance accuracy, completion rate and time. Our findings demonstrated that certain EEG power spectra decreased with an increase in motor task familiarity. In particular, frontal EEG activities in delta and theta bands of the whole trial and in gamma band in the middle of the trial are having a significant negative relationship with the overall familiarity level of the task. The findings suggest that frontal EEG spectra are significantly modulated during motor skill acquisition. Results of this study shed light on the possibility of simultaneous monitoring of brain activity during an unconstrained natural task with a single dry sensor mobile EEG in an everyday environment. PMID:24095979

  5. Exploring miniaturized EEG electrodes for brain-computer interfaces. An EEG you do not see?

    PubMed Central

    Bleichner, Martin G; Lundbeck, Micha; Selisky, Matthias; Minow, Falk; Jäger, Manuela; Emkes, Reiner; Debener, Stefan; De Vos, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) allows the study of the brain–behavior relationship in humans. Most of what we have learned with EEG was through observing the brain–behavior relationship under well-controlled laboratory conditions. However, by reducing “normal” behavior to a minimum the ecological validity of the results can be limited. Recent developments toward mobile EEG solutions allow to study the brain–behavior relationship outside the laboratory in more natural situations. Besides mobility and robustness with respect to motion, mobile EEG systems should also interfere as little as possible with the participant's behavior. For example, natural interaction with other people could be hindered when it is obvious that a participant wears an EEG cap. This study evaluates the signal quality obtained with an unobtrusive solution for EEG monitoring through the integration of miniaturized EEG ton-electrodes into both a discreet baseball cap and an individualized ear piece. We show that such mini electrodes located at scalp and ear locations can reliably record event related potentials in a P300 brain–computer–interface application. PMID:25847919

  6. [The reward impact on the performance of verbal creative tasks: behavioral and EEG effects].

    PubMed

    Vol'f, N V; Tarasova, I V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of stimulating originality verbal instruction (IN1) and monetary reward (IN2) on originality of solutions of a verbal creative task and EEG-correlates of activity, determined on the basis of biopotentials power mapping in the frequency range 4-30 Hz. Right-handed students (10 men and 10 women) took part in experiment. An increase of solutions originality under the influence of monetary reward was revealed. At the promise of monetary reward in comparison with IN1, there was a global increase of the task-related theta2 power. Common to the teta1, 2 and alpha2 bands was increase in hemispheric asymmetry of these rhythms power with higher values in the right hemisphere of the brain. These changes have been observed already in the background EEG after IN2 and testify that generalized changes in hemispheric asymmetry provide the preparatory state after the promise of monetary reward. Regional brain activity changes were associated with beta2 rhythm. Under IN2 in comparison with IN1 the task-related power decreased in all posterior electrode sites except for frontotemporal. Reward-related EEG changes were more typical for men. In men only, promised monetary reward increased theta2 asymmetry and task-induced alpha power. Our results suggest that promise of monetary reward for creative thinking can increase verbal creativity. Gender differences in the reward-related EEG power changes show that men and women differ in neurophysiologic mechanisms that underlie increase of creativity. PMID:23885557

  7. Inter-hemispheric EEG coherence analysis in Parkinson's disease: assessing brain activity during emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Palaniappan, R; Satiyan, M

    2015-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is not only characterized by its prominent motor symptoms but also associated with disturbances in cognitive and emotional functioning. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of emotion processing on inter-hemispheric electroencephalography (EEG) coherence in PD. Multimodal emotional stimuli (happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust) were presented to 20 PD patients and 30 age-, education level-, and gender-matched healthy controls (HC) while EEG was recorded. Inter-hemispheric coherence was computed from seven homologous EEG electrode pairs (AF3-AF4, F7-F8, F3-F4, FC5-FC6, T7-T8, P7-P8, and O1-O2) for delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands. In addition, subjective ratings were obtained for a representative of emotional stimuli. Interhemispherically, PD patients showed significantly lower coherence in theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands than HC during emotion processing. No significant changes were found in the delta frequency band coherence. We also found that PD patients were more impaired in recognizing negative emotions (sadness, fear, anger, and disgust) than relatively positive emotions (happiness and surprise). Behaviorally, PD patients did not show impairment in emotion recognition as measured by subjective ratings. These findings suggest that PD patients may have an impairment of inter-hemispheric functional connectivity (i.e., a decline in cortical connectivity) during emotion processing. This study may increase the awareness of EEG emotional response studies in clinical practice to uncover potential neurophysiologic abnormalities. PMID:24894699

  8. Attention and Working Memory-Related EEG Markers of Subtle Cognitive Deterioration in Healthy Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Marie-Pierre; Meziane, Hadj Boumediene; Hasler, Roland; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Toma, Simona; Ackermann, Marine; Herrmann, François; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2015-01-01

    Future treatments of Alzheimer's disease need the identification of cases at high risk at the preclinical stage of the disease before the development of irreversible structural damage. We investigated here whether subtle cognitive deterioration in a population of healthy elderly individuals could be predicted by EEG signals at baseline under cognitive activation. Continuous EEG was recorded in 97 elderly control subjects and 45 age-matched mild cognitive impairment (MCI) cases during a simple attentional and a 2-back working memory task. Upon 18-month neuropsychological follow-up, the final sample included 55 stable (sCON) and 42 deteriorated (dCON) controls. We examined the P1, N1, P3, and PNwm event-related components as well as the oscillatory activities in the theta (4-7?Hz), alpha (8-13?Hz), and beta (14-25?Hz) frequency ranges (ERD/ERS: event-related desynchronization/synchronization, and ITC: inter-trial coherence). Behavioral performance, P1, and N1 components were comparable in all groups. The P3, PNwm, and all oscillatory activity indices were altered in MCI cases compared to controls. Only three EEG indices distinguished the two control groups: alpha and beta ERD (dCON?> ?sCON) and beta ITC (dCON?< ?sCON). These findings show that subtle cognitive deterioration has no impact on EEG indices associated with perception, discrimination, and working memory processes but mostly affects attention, resulting in an enhanced recruitment of attentional resources. In addition, cognitive decline alters neural firing synchronization at high frequencies (14-25?Hz) at early stages, and possibly affects lower frequencies (4-13?Hz) only at more severe stages. PMID:26401557

  9. EEG correlates of fatigue during administration of a neuropsychological test battery

    PubMed Central

    Barwick, Fiona; Arnett, Peter; Slobounov, Semyon

    2011-01-01

    Objective Mental fatigue, a poorly understood symptom of sports-related concussion, ideally requires assessment across multiple modalities. Our study aimed to examine mental fatigue effects among ten neurologically normal, athletically active students undergoing typical concussion testing. It is our intention to ultimately address the question whether fatigue effects due to mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may become confounded with fatigue effects due to testing effort. Methods Fourteen athletically active and neurologically normal volunteers were initially recruited from Penn State University. Self-reported fatigue, neuropsychological performance, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity were measured throughout the whole testing duration. EEG measures in frequency domain (e.g., relative power of theta, alpha & beta bands) were examined over the course of neuropsychological (NP) test administration. Results Predicted fatigue effects over the course of testing included: (a) increased self-reported fatigue; (b) increased errors on the Stroop Interference Test; (c) significantly increased relative power of theta activity during the Stroop Interference Test in frontal-central and parietal regions; and (d) migration of alpha activation from the occipital to anterior (left parietal and pre-central) regions during the Stroop Interference task administered at the beginning compared with the end of testing. Conclusions Results supported predictions related to subjective fatigue and cognitive performance and offered partial support for predictions related to EEG activation patterns over the course of administering the NP testing. Significance Neurologically intact and athletically active college students demonstrate effects related to fatigue after undergoing a typical sports concussion assessment battery, including an increase in subjectively experienced fatigue, a decrease in cognitive task performance accuracy and associated modulations in EEG activity. This finding should be considered by clinical practitioners while evaluating the symptoms of concussion and making a decision regarding the return-to-sport participation. PMID:21798799

  10. Single-trial EEG power and phase dynamics associated with voluntary response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2010-04-01

    Human voluntary response inhibition has frequently been investigated using go/no-go RT tasks. Recent studies have indicated that not only the traditional averaging waveforms of EEG activities (ERPs) but also the power and phase dynamics of single-trial EEG are important in studying the neural correlates of various human cognitive functions. Therefore, here, we aimed to undertake a detailed study of the time/frequency power and phase dynamics of single-trial EEG during go/no-go RT tasks, with focus particularly on the no-go-specific power and phase dynamics, which are presumed to involve the voluntary response inhibition processes. Thus, we demonstrated no-go-specific theta band EEG power increases and intertrial phase-locking in the midline-frontal areas, which are related to no-go-specific midline-frontal negative-positive ERP waveforms (no-go N2/no-go P3). In addition, we observed no-go-specific alpha band EEG intertrial phase-locking with an adjacent dephasing phenomenon, which is mainly associated with the early part of no-go N2. The estimated time point when the no-go-specific midline-frontal dephasing phenomenon occurred corresponded to the initial part of the voluntary response inhibition process (decision to withhold). Moreover, the no-go-specific phase dynamics in the midline-frontal areas just before and around the no-go N2 peak latency, unlike the power modulations, were affected by changes in the no-go stimulus probability, suggesting the dependence of only phase dynamics on no-go stimulus probability. From these results, we conclude that the complex power and phase dynamics of the theta and alpha band EEG in the midline-frontal areas are specific to no-go trials, being the underlying bases of the no-go-specific ERP waveforms, and suggest that the phase dynamics just before and around the no-go N2 peak latency may involve, at least, the initial part of the voluntary response inhibition process (decision to withhold). PMID:19413474

  11. Top-down Modulation of Neural Activity in Anticipatory Visual Attention: Control Mechanisms Revealed by Simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuelu; Bengson, Jesse; Huang, Haiqing; Mangun, George R; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-02-01

    In covert visual attention, frontoparietal attention control areas are thought to issue signals to selectively bias sensory neurons to facilitate behaviorally relevant information and suppress distraction. We investigated the relationship between activity in attention control areas and attention-related modulation of posterior alpha activity using simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans during cued visual-spatial attention. Correlating single-trial EEG alpha power with blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity, we found that BOLD in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and left middle frontal gyrus was inversely correlated with occipital alpha power. Importantly, in IPS, inverse correlations were stronger for alpha within the hemisphere contralateral to the attended hemifield, implicating the IPS in the enhancement of task-relevant sensory areas. Positive BOLD-alpha correlations were observed in sensorimotor cortices and the default mode network, suggesting a mechanism of active suppression over task-irrelevant areas. The magnitude of cue-induced alpha lateralization was positively correlated with BOLD in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, implicating a role of executive control in attention. These results show that IPS and frontal executive areas are the main sources of biasing influences on task-relevant visual cortex, whereas task-irrelevant default mode network and sensorimotor cortex are inhibited during visual attention. PMID:25205663

  12. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power...

  14. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power...

  15. 21 CFR 882.1855 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. 882... Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system consists of transmitters, receivers, and other components used for remotely monitoring or measuring...

  16. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power...

  17. 21 CFR 882.1855 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. 882... Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system consists of transmitters, receivers, and other components used for remotely monitoring or measuring...

  18. 21 CFR 882.1855 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. 882... Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system consists of transmitters, receivers, and other components used for remotely monitoring or measuring...

  19. 21 CFR 882.1855 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. 882... Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system consists of transmitters, receivers, and other components used for remotely monitoring or measuring...

  20. 21 CFR 882.1855 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. 882... Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system consists of transmitters, receivers, and other components used for remotely monitoring or measuring...

  1. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power...

  2. Developmental Quantitative EEG Differences during Psychomotor Response to Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.; Miller, Daniel C.

    This study examined the electrophysiological differences between baseline EEG frequencies and EEG frequencies obtained during a psychomotor response to musical stimuli. Subjects were 9 children, with mean age of 5.2 years old. Electrophysiological differences between two different musical conditions were also compared. EEG was recorded during 3…

  3. Resting-State EEG Delta Power is Associated with Psychological Pain in Adults with a History of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Meerwijk, Esther L.; Ford, Judith M.; Weiss, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Psychological pain is a prominent symptom of clinical depression. We asked if frontal alpha asymmetry, frontal EEG power, and frontal fractal dimension asymmetry predicted psychological pain in adults with a history of depression. Resting-state frontal EEG (F3/F4) was recorded while participants (N=35) sat upright with their eyes closed. Frontal delta power predicted psychological pain while controlling for depressive symptoms, with participants who exhibited less power experiencing greater psychological pain. Frontal fractal dimension asymmetry, a nonlinear measure of complexity, also predicted psychological pain, such that greater left than right complexity was associated with greater psychological pain. Frontal alpha asymmetry did not contribute unique variance to any regression model of psychological pain. As resting-state delta power is associated with the brain’s default mode network, results suggest that the default mode network was less activated during high psychological pain. Findings are consistent with a state of arousal associated with psychological pain. PMID:25600291

  4. Modification of EEG functional connectivity and EEG power spectra in overweight and obese patients with food addiction: An eLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Imperatori, Claudio; Fabbricatore, Mariantonietta; Innamorati, Marco; Farina, Benedetto; Quintiliani, Maria Isabella; Lamis, Dorian A; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Contardi, Anna; Vollono, Catello; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the modifications of electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectra and EEG connectivity in overweight and obese patients with elevated food addiction (FA) symptoms. Fourteen overweight and obese patients (3 men and 11 women) with three or more FA symptoms and fourteen overweight and obese patients (3 men and 11 women) with two or less FA symptoms were included in the study. EEG was recorded during three different conditions: 1) five minutes resting state (RS), 2) five minutes resting state after a single taste of a chocolate milkshake (ML-RS), and 3) five minutes resting state after a single taste of control neutral solution (N-RS). EEG analyses were conducted by means of the exact Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (eLORETA). Significant modification was observed only in the ML-RS condition. Compared to controls, patients with three or more FA symptoms showed an increase of delta power in the right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann Area [BA] 8) and in the right precentral gyrus (BA 9), and theta power in the right insula (BA 13) and in the right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47). Furthermore, compared to controls, patients with three or more FA symptoms showed an increase of functional connectivity in fronto-parietal areas in both the theta and alpha band. The increase of functional connectivity was also positively associated with the number of FA symptoms. Taken together, our results show that FA has similar neurophysiological correlates of other forms of substance-related and addictive disorders suggesting similar psychopathological mechanisms. PMID:25332109

  5. The processing and transmission of EEG data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    Interest in sleep research was stimulated by the discovery of a number of physiological changes that occur during sleep and by the observed effects of sleep on physical and mental performance and status. The use of the relatively new methods of EEG measurement, transmission, and automatic scoring makes sleep analysis and categorization feasible. Sleep research involving the use of the EEG as a fundamental input has the potential of answering many unanswered questions involving physical and mental behavior, drug effects, circadian rhythm, and anesthesia.

  6. Fractal Dimension in Epileptic EEG Signal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthayakumar, R.

    Fractal Analysis is the well developed theory in the data analysis of non-linear time series. Especially Fractal Dimension is a powerful mathematical tool for modeling many physical and biological time signals with high complexity and irregularity. Fractal dimension is a suitable tool for analyzing the nonlinear behaviour and state of the many chaotic systems. Particularly in analysis of chaotic time series such as electroencephalograms (EEG), this feature has been used to identify and distinguish specific states of physiological function.Epilepsy is the main fatal neurological disorder in our brain, which is analyzed by the biomedical signal called Electroencephalogram (EEG). The detection of Epileptic seizures in the EEG Signals is an important tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. So we made an attempt to analyze the EEG in depth for knowing the mystery of human consciousness. EEG has more fluctuations recorded from the human brain due to the spontaneous electrical activity. Hence EEG Signals are represented as Fractal Time Series.The algorithms of fractal dimension methods have weak ability to the estimation of complexity in the irregular graphs. Divider method is widely used to obtain the fractal dimension of curves embedded into a 2-dimensional space. The major problem is choosing initial and final step length of dividers. We propose a new algorithm based on the size measure relationship (SMR) method, quantifying the dimensional behaviour of irregular rectifiable graphs with minimum time complexity. The evidence for the suitability (equality with the nature of dimension) of the algorithm is illustrated graphically.We would like to demonstrate the criterion for the selection of dividers (minimum and maximum value) in the calculation of fractal dimension of the irregular curves with minimum time complexity. For that we design a new method of computing fractal dimension (FD) of biomedical waveforms. Compared to Higuchi's algorithm, advantages of this method include greater speed and the criterion to choose the maximum and minimum values for time intervals. Comparisons with the other waveform fractal dimension algorithms are also demonstrated. In order to discriminate the Healthy and the Epileptic EEGs, an improved method of Multifractal Measure such as Generalized Fractal Dimensions (GFD) is also proposed. Finally we conclude that there are significant differences between the Healthy and Epileptic Signals in the designed method than the GFD through graphical and statistical tools. The improved multifractal measure is very efficient technique to analyze the EEG Signals and to compute the state of illness of the Epileptic patients.

  7. An approach for representing EEG activity.

    PubMed

    Gruner, P; Otto, E

    1985-09-01

    A method for the representation of EEG-parameters by means of a bidimensional plot of two signals is described. A block diagram is given for the recording of figures with phase-sensitive parameter variations, using an oscilloscope or an X-Y graphic recorder as a display. Charts for the determination of the setting parameters of a digital as well as an analog phase-shifting arrangement are submitted. The method is capable of reflecting individual properties of a single wave and typical characteristics of the epoch as well. It is felt that it may be of benefit in the immediate estimation of EEG-activity changes. PMID:4060990

  8. Memory load effect in auditory-verbal short-term memory task: EEG fractal and spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Stoki?, Miodrag; Milovanovi?, Dragan; Ljubisavljevi?, Miloš R; Nenadovi?, Vanja; ?uki?, Milena

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to quantify changes in complexity of EEG using fractal dimension (FD) alongside linear methods of spectral power, event-related spectral perturbations, coherence, and source localization of EEG generators for theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta (13-23 Hz) frequency bands due to a memory load effect in an auditory-verbal short-term memory (AVSTM) task for words. We examined 20 healthy individuals using the Sternberg's paradigm with increasing memory load (three, five, and seven words). The stimuli were four-letter words. Artifact-free 5-s EEG segments during retention period were analyzed. The most significant finding was the increase in FD with the increase in memory load in temporal regions T3 and T4, and in parietal region Pz, while decrease in FD with increase in memory load was registered in frontal midline region Fz. Results point to increase in frontal midline (Fz) theta spectral power, decrease in alpha spectral power in parietal region-Pz, and increase in beta spectral power in T3 and T4 region with increase in memory load. Decrease in theta coherence within right hemisphere due to memory load was obtained. Alpha coherence increased in posterior regions with anterior decrease. Beta coherence increased in fronto-temporal regions. Source localization delineated theta activity increase in frontal midline region, alpha decrease in superior parietal region, and beta increase in superior temporal gyrus with increase in memory load. In conclusion, FD as a nonlinear measure may serve as a sensitive index for quantifying dynamical changes in EEG signals during AVSTM tasks. PMID:26169106

  9. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  10. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  11. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  12. alpha-Thalassaemia in Tunisia: some epidemiological and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Siala, H; Ouali, F; Messaoud, T; Bibi, A; Fattoum, S

    2008-12-01

    Unlike the other haemoglobinopathies, few researches have been published concerning alpha-thalassaemia in Tunisia. The aim of the present work is to acquire further data concerning alpha-thalassaemia prevalence and molecular defects spectrum in Tunisia, by collecting and studying several kinds of samples carrying alpha-thalassaemia. The first survey conducted on 529 cord blood samples using cellulose acetate electrophoresis, have displayed the prevalence of 7.38% Hb Bart's carriers at birth. Molecular analyses were conducted by PCR and DNA sequencing on 20 families' cases from the above survey carrying the Hb Bart's at birth and on 10 Hb H diseased patients. The results showed six alpha-globin gene molecular defects and were responsible for alpha-thalassaemia: -alpha(3.7), - -(MedI), alpha(TSaudi), alpha(2)(cd23GAG->Stop), Hb Greone Hart: alpha(1)(119CCT->TCT) corresponding to 11 genotypes out of which two are responsible for Hb H disease (- -(Med)/-alpha(3.7)) and (alpha(TSaudi)alpha/alpha(TSaudi)alpha) and a newly described polymorphism: alpha+6C->G. The geographical repartition of alpha-thal carriers showed that the -alpha3.7 deletion is distributed all over the country, respectively the alpha(HphI) and alpha(TSaudi) seem to be more frequent in the central region of the northeast region. The haematological and clinical data showed a moderate phenotype with a late age of diagnosis for Hb H disease. This work had permitted, in addition to an overview on alpha-thalassaemia in the country, the optimization of protocols for alpha-thalassaemia detection in our lab, allowing further investigations concerning phenotype-genotype correlation in sickle cell disease or beta-thalassaemia. PMID:19147907

  13. Modulation of EEG functional connectivity networks in subjects undergoing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Mouhsin M; Brandon Westover, M; Oberman, Lindsay; Cash, Sydney S; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that utilizes magnetic fluxes to alter cortical activity. Continuous theta-burst repetitive TMS (cTBS) results in long-lasting decreases in indices of cortical excitability, and alterations in performance of behavioral tasks. We investigated the effects of cTBS on cortical function via functional connectivity and graph theoretical analysis of EEG data. Thirty-one channel resting-state EEG recordings were obtained before and after 40 s of cTBS stimulation to the left primary motor cortex. Functional connectivity between nodes was assessed in multiple frequency bands using lagged max-covariance, and subsequently thresholded to construct undirected graphs. After cTBS, we find widespread decreases in functional connectivity in the alpha band. There are also simultaneous increases in functional connectivity in the high-beta bands, especially amongst anterior and interhemispheric connections. The analysis of the undirected graphs reveals that interhemispheric and interregional connections are more likely to be modulated after cTBS than local connections. There is also a shift in the topology of network connectivity, with an increase in the clustering coefficient after cTBS in the beta bands, and a decrease in clustering and increase in path length in the alpha band, with the alpha-band connectivity primarily decreased near the site of stimulation. cTBS produces widespread alterations in cortical functional connectivity, with resulting shifts in cortical network topology. PMID:23471637

  14. Modulation of EEG Functional Connectivity Networks in Subjects Undergoing Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Mouhsin M.; Westover, M. Brandon; Oberman, Lindsay; Cash, Sydney S.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that utilizes magnetic fluxes to alter cortical activity. Continuous theta-burst repetitive TMS (cTBS) results in long-lasting decreases in indices of cortical excitability, and alterations in performance of behavioral tasks. We investigated the effects of cTBS on cortical function via functional connectivity and graph theoretical analysis of EEG data. Thirty-one channel resting-state EEG recordings were obtained before and after 40 s of cTBS stimulation to the left primary motor cortex. Functional connectivity between nodes was assessed in multiple frequency bands using lagged max-covariance, and subsequently thresholded to construct undirected graphs. After cTBS, we find widespread decreases in functional connectivity in the alpha band. There are also simultaneous increases in functional connectivity in the high-beta bands, especially amongst anterior and interhemispheric connections. The analysis of the undirected graphs reveals that interhemispheric and interregional connections are more likely to be modulated after cTBS than local connections. There is also a shift in the topology of network connectivity, with an increase in the clustering coefficient after cTBS in the beta bands, and a decrease in clustering and increase in path length in the alpha band, with the alpha-band connectivity primarily decreased near the site of stimulation. cTBS produces widespread alterations in cortical functional connectivity, with resulting shifts in cortical network topology. PMID:23471637

  15. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI brain signatures of auditory cue utilization

    PubMed Central

    Scharinger, Mathias; Herrmann, Björn; Nierhaus, Till; Obleser, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Optimal utilization of acoustic cues during auditory categorization is a vital skill, particularly when informative cues become occluded or degraded. Consequently, the acoustic environment requires flexible choosing and switching amongst available cues. The present study targets the brain functions underlying such changes in cue utilization. Participants performed a categorization task with immediate feedback on acoustic stimuli from two categories that varied in duration and spectral properties, while we simultaneously recorded Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) responses in fMRI and electroencephalograms (EEGs). In the first half of the experiment, categories could be best discriminated by spectral properties. Halfway through the experiment, spectral degradation rendered the stimulus duration the more informative cue. Behaviorally, degradation decreased the likelihood of utilizing spectral cues. Spectrally degrading the acoustic signal led to increased alpha power compared to nondegraded stimuli. The EEG-informed fMRI analyses revealed that alpha power correlated with BOLD changes in inferior parietal cortex and right posterior superior temporal gyrus (including planum temporale). In both areas, spectral degradation led to a weaker coupling of BOLD response to behavioral utilization of the spectral cue. These data provide converging evidence from behavioral modeling, electrophysiology, and hemodynamics that (a) increased alpha power mediates the inhibition of uninformative (here spectral) stimulus features, and that (b) the parietal attention network supports optimal cue utilization in auditory categorization. The results highlight the complex cortical processing of auditory categorization under realistic listening challenges. PMID:24926232

  16. Complex network analysis of resting state EEG in amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ke; Wang, Yinghua; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Bian, Zhijie; Wang, Lei; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Diabetes is a great risk factor for dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study investigates whether complex network-derived features in resting state EEG (rsEEG) could be applied as a biomarker to distinguish amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) from normal cognitive function in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Method: In this study, EEG was recorded in 28 patients with T2D (16 aMCI patients and 12 controls) during a no-task eyes-closed resting state. Pair-wise synchronization of rsEEG signals were assessed in six frequency bands (delta, theta, lower alpha, upper alpha, beta, and gamma) using phase lag index (PLI) and grouped into long distance (intra- and inter-hemispheric) and short distance interactions. PLI-weighted connectivity networks were also constructed, and characterized by mean clustering coefficient and path length. The correlation of these features and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores was assessed. Results: Main findings of this study were as follows: (1) In comparison with controls, patients with aMCI had a significant decrease of global mean PLI in lower alpha, upper alpha, and beta bands. Lower functional connection at short and long intra-hemispheric distance mainly appeared on the left hemisphere. (2) In the lower alpha band, clustering coefficient was significantly lower in aMCI group, and the path length significantly increased. (3) Cognitive status measured by MoCA had a significant positive correlation with cluster coefficient and negative correlation with path length in lower alpha band. Conclusions: The brain network of aMCI patients displayed a disconnection syndrome and a loss of small-world architecture. The correlation between cognitive states and network characteristics suggested that the more in deterioration of the diabetes patients' cognitive state, the less optimal the network organization become. Hence, the complex network-derived biomarkers based on EEG could be employed to track cognitive function of diabetic patients and provide a new diagnosis tool for aMCI. PMID:26578946

  17. Zazen meditation and no-task resting EEG compared with LORETA intracortical source localization.

    PubMed

    Faber, Pascal L; Lehmann, Dietrich; Gianotti, Lorena R R; Milz, Patricia; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Held, Marlene; Kochi, Kieko

    2015-02-01

    Meditation is a self-induced and willfully initiated practice that alters the state of consciousness. The meditation practice of Zazen, like many other meditation practices, aims at disregarding intrusive thoughts while controlling body posture. It is an open monitoring meditation characterized by detached moment-to-moment awareness and reduced conceptual thinking and self-reference. Which brain areas differ in electric activity during Zazen compared to task-free resting? Since scalp electroencephalography (EEG) waveforms are reference-dependent, conclusions about the localization of active brain areas are ambiguous. Computing intracerebral source models from the scalp EEG data solves this problem. In the present study, we applied source modeling using low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) to 58-channel scalp EEG data recorded from 15 experienced Zen meditators during Zazen and no-task resting. Zazen compared to no-task resting showed increased alpha-1 and alpha-2 frequency activity in an exclusively right-lateralized cluster extending from prefrontal areas including the insula to parts of the somatosensory and motor cortices and temporal areas. Zazen also showed decreased alpha and beta-2 activity in the left angular gyrus and decreased beta-1 and beta-2 activity in a large bilateral posterior cluster comprising the visual cortex, the posterior cingulate cortex and the parietal cortex. The results include parts of the default mode network and suggest enhanced automatic memory and emotion processing, reduced conceptual thinking and self-reference on a less judgmental, i.e., more detached moment-to-moment basis during Zazen compared to no-task resting. PMID:25284209

  18. Use of electroencephalography (EEG) to assess CNS changes produced by pesticides with different modes of action: effects of permethrin, deltamethrin, fipronil, imidacloprid, carbaryl, and triadimefon.

    PubMed

    Freeborn, Danielle L; McDaniel, Katherine L; Moser, Virginia C; Herr, David W

    2015-01-15

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an apical measure, capable of detecting changes in brain neuronal activity produced by internal or external stimuli. We assessed whether pesticides with different modes of action produced different changes in the EEG of adult male Long-Evans rats. The EEG was recorded using two montages (visual cortex referenced to the cerebellum and to the frontal cortex) in unrestrained rats at the time of peak behavioral effects. Pesticides included: permethrin and deltamethrin (Type I and Type II pyrethroids; 2 h), fipronil (single and repeated doses; phenylpyrazole; 6 h), imidacloprid (neonicotinoid; 2 h), carbaryl (carbamate; 0.5 h), and triadimefon (triazole; 1 h), using dosages that produced approximately an ED30 or an ED50-ED80 change in motor activity. Permethrin (43, 100 mg/kg) increased amplitudes or areas (delta, alpha, or gamma bands) in the EEG. Deltamethrin (2.5, 5.5 mg/kg) reduced the amplitudes or areas of the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands, but the changes were not dose-related. A single treatment with fipronil (25, 50 mg/kg, but not 5, 10 mg/kg) decreased gamma band area. Additional changes in the delta, theta, and gamma bands were observed when fipronil (5, 10 mg/kg) was administered for 14 days. Imidacloprid (50, 100 mg/kg) did not alter the EEG. Carbaryl (10, 50 mg/kg) decreased theta area, and decreased delta and increased beta frequency. Triadimefon (75, 150 mg/kg) produced minimal changes in the EEG. The results show that the EEG is affected differently by approximately equipotent doses of pesticides with different modes of action. PMID:25481984

  19. Roles of Adrenergic ?1 and Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptors in the Mediation of the Desynchronization Effects of Modafinil in a Mouse EEG Synchronization Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Rui; Yang, Su-Rong; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Qu, Wei-Min; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    Background Synchronized electroencephalogram (EEG) activity is observed in pathological stages of cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Modafinil, known to increase the release of catecholamines, is a potent wake-promoting agent, and has shown some abilities to desynchronize EEG,but its receptor mechanisms by which modafinil induces desynchoronization remain to be elucidated. Here we used a pharmacological EEG synchronization model to investigate the involvement of adrenergic ?1 receptors (R, ?1R) and dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs) on modafinil-induced desynchronization in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were treated with cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine and monoamine depletor reserpine to produce experimental EEG synchronization characterized by continuous large-amplitude synchronized activity, with prominent increased delta and decreased theta, alpha, and beta power density. The results showed that modafinil produced an EEG desynchronization in the model. This was characterized by a general decrease in amplitude of all the frequency bands between 0 and 20 Hz, a prominent reduction in delta power density, and an increase in theta power density. Adrenergic ?1R antagonist terazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely antagonized the EEG desynchronization effects of modafinil at 90 mg/kg. However, DA D1R and D2R blockers partially attenuated the effects of modafinil. The modafinil-induced decrease in the amplitudes of the delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves and in delta power density were completely abolished by pretreatment with a combination of the D1R antagonist SCH 23390 (30 µg/kg) and the D2R antagonist raclopride (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that modafinil-mediated desynchronization may be attributed to the activation of adrenergic ?1R, and dopaminergic D1R and D2R in a model of EEG synchronization. PMID:24116090

  20. A Physiology-Based Seizure Detection System for Multichannel EEG

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chia-Ping; Liu, Shih-Ting; Zhou, Wei-Zhi; Lin, Feng-Seng; Lam, Andy Yan-Yu; Sung, Hsiao-Ya; Chen, Wei; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Pan, Ming-Kai; Kao, Jui-Hung; Wu, Jin-Ming; Lai, Feipei

    2013-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals play a critical role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Multichannel EEGs contain more information than do single-channel EEGs. Automatic detection algorithms for spikes or seizures have traditionally been implemented on single-channel EEG, and algorithms for multichannel EEG are unavailable. Methodology This study proposes a physiology-based detection system for epileptic seizures that uses multichannel EEG signals. The proposed technique was tested on two EEG data sets acquired from 18 patients. Both unipolar and bipolar EEG signals were analyzed. We employed sample entropy (SampEn), statistical values, and concepts used in clinical neurophysiology (e.g., phase reversals and potential fields of a bipolar EEG) to extract the features. We further tested the performance of a genetic algorithm cascaded with a support vector machine and post-classification spike matching. Principal Findings We obtained 86.69% spike detection and 99.77% seizure detection for Data Set I. The detection system was further validated using the model trained by Data Set I on Data Set II. The system again showed high performance, with 91.18% detection of spikes and 99.22% seizure detection. Conclusion We report a de novo EEG classification system for seizure and spike detection on multichannel EEG that includes physiology-based knowledge to enhance the performance of this type of system. PMID:23799053

  1. Music Shifts Frontal EEG in Depressed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Martinez, Alex; Nawrocki, Thomas; Pickens, Jeffrey; Fox, Nathan A.; Schanberg, Saul

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen chronically depressed female adolescents listened to rock music for a 23-minute session. EEG was recorded and saliva samples were collected to determine the effects of the music on stress hormone cortisol levels. No differences were reported for mood state; however, cortisol levels decreased and relative right-frontal activation was…

  2. Hemispheric Relationships in Composing: An EEG Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassner, Benjamin M.

    The left hemisphere of the brain is analytic and "particularistic" in orientation--focusing on individual elements within a field and analyzing them sequentially. The right hemisphere of the brain is holistic or relational in processing, and is predisposed to see wholes simultaneously. One of the most prominant features of the EEG is the asymmetry…

  3. Music Shifts Frontal EEG in Depressed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Martinez, Alex; Nawrocki, Thomas; Pickens, Jeffrey; Fox, Nathan A.; Schanberg, Saul

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen chronically depressed female adolescents listened to rock music for a 23-minute session. EEG was recorded and saliva samples were collected to determine the effects of the music on stress hormone cortisol levels. No differences were reported for mood state; however, cortisol levels decreased and relative right-frontal activation was…

  4. Illumination influences working memory: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Pak, Hyensou; Jeong, Yeon-Hong; Kim, Eosu

    2013-09-01

    Illumination conditions appear to influence working efficacy in everyday life. In the present study, we obtained electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of working-memory load, and investigated how these waveforms are modulated by illumination conditions. We hypothesized that illumination conditions may affect cognitive performance. We designed an EEG study to monitor and record participants' EEG during the Sternberg working memory task under four different illumination conditions. Illumination conditions were generated with a factorial design of two color-temperatures (3000 and 7100 K) by two illuminance levels (150 and 700 lx). During a working memory task, we observed that high illuminance led to significantly lower frontal EEG theta activity than did low illuminance. These differences persisted despite no significant difference in task performance between illumination conditions. We found that the latency of an early event-related potential component, such as N1, was significantly modulated by the illumination condition. The fact that the illumination condition affects brain activity but not behavioral performance suggests that the lighting conditions used in the present study did not influence the performance stage of behavioral processing. Nevertheless, our findings provide objective evidence that illumination conditions modulate brain activity. Further studies are necessary to refine the optimal lighting parameters for facilitating working memory. PMID:23694704

  5. Internal ventilation system of MR scanners induces specific EEG artifact during simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Nierhaus, Till; Gundlach, Christopher; Goltz, Dominique; Thiel, Sabrina D; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno

    2013-07-01

    During simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisition, the EEG signal suffers from tremendous artifacts caused by the scanner "environment". Particularly, gradient artifacts and the ballistocardiogram have been well characterized, along with methods to eliminate them. Here, we describe another systematic artifact in the EEG signal, which is induced by the internal ventilation system of Siemens TRIO and VERIO MR scanners. A ventilation-level dependent vibration induces specific peaks in the frequency spectrum of the EEG. These frequency peaks are in the range of physiologically relevant brain rhythms (gamma frequency range), and thus interfere with their reliable acquisition. This ventilation dependent artifact was most prominent on the electrodes placed directly on the subject's head, so it is not sufficient to simply place the EEG's amplifier outside the scanner tube. Instead, the ventilator must be switched off to fully eliminate the ventilator's artificial manipulation of EEG recordings. Without the internal ventilator system being on, the temperature within the scanner tube may rise, thus requiring shorter scanning sessions or an additional external ventilation system. PMID:23435207

  6. Separation and reconstruction of BCG and EEG signals during continuous EEG and fMRI recordings.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable effort to remove it, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) remains a major artifact in electroencephalographic data (EEG) acquired inside magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, particularly in continuous (as opposed to event-related) recordings. In this study, we have developed a new Direct Recording Prior Encoding (DRPE) method to extract and separate the BCG and EEG components from contaminated signals, and have demonstrated its performance by comparing it quantitatively to the popular Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. Our modified recording configuration allows us to obtain representative bases of the BCG- and EEG-only signals. Further, we have developed an optimization-based reconstruction approach to maximally incorporate prior knowledge of the BCG/EEG subspaces, and of the signal characteristics within them. Both OBS and DRPE methods were tested with experimental data, and compared quantitatively using cross-validation. In the challenging continuous EEG studies, DRPE outperforms the OBS method by nearly sevenfold in separating the continuous BCG and EEG signals. PMID:25002836

  7. Separation and reconstruction of BCG and EEG signals during continuous EEG and fMRI recordings

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable effort to remove it, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) remains a major artifact in electroencephalographic data (EEG) acquired inside magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, particularly in continuous (as opposed to event-related) recordings. In this study, we have developed a new Direct Recording Prior Encoding (DRPE) method to extract and separate the BCG and EEG components from contaminated signals, and have demonstrated its performance by comparing it quantitatively to the popular Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. Our modified recording configuration allows us to obtain representative bases of the BCG- and EEG-only signals. Further, we have developed an optimization-based reconstruction approach to maximally incorporate prior knowledge of the BCG/EEG subspaces, and of the signal characteristics within them. Both OBS and DRPE methods were tested with experimental data, and compared quantitatively using cross-validation. In the challenging continuous EEG studies, DRPE outperforms the OBS method by nearly sevenfold in separating the continuous BCG and EEG signals. PMID:25002836

  8. EEG correlates of enhanced spatial performance following exposure to music.

    PubMed

    Rideout, B E; Laubach, C M

    1996-04-01

    Previous research has shown that exposure to classical music can influence performance on a spatial task. The present study investigated EEG correlates of this enhanced performance effect, 4 female and 4 male undergraduates completed two equivalent spatial tests, one following a control procedure and one following the presentation of Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major. EEG was recorded during a baseline and two task-performance periods. Test performance and EEG recordings were analyzed, and correlations were generated between task performance and EEG variables (average spectral power and peak frequency within 5 frequency ranges). Performance improved significantly following the presentation of the music. EEG analysis indicated 6 reliable correlations out of 40 calculated between differential EEG variables and changes in performance. Ten reliable correlations out of 120 were also found between changes in performance and nondifferential EEG variables across baseline, control, and experimental conditions. PMID:8724912

  9. Angelman syndrome: uniparental paternal disomy 15 determines mild epilepsy, but has no influence on EEG patterns.

    PubMed

    Valente, Kette D; Fridman, Cintia; Varela, Monica C; Koiffmann, Célia P; Andrade, Joaquina Q; Grossmann, Rosi M; Kok, Fernando; Marques-Dias, Maria J

    2005-12-01

    The authors describe the electroclinical phenotype of four patients with Angelman syndrome (AS) determined by its rarest genetic mechanism-uniparental disomy (UPD). The analysis of ours and published patients showed that in UPD, when epilepsy occurred, it was milder compared to patients with deletion, although a suggestive EEG was observed in most patients. We found that UPD patients do not completely fit the scenario delineated for AS, suggesting that patients determined by different mechanisms should be distinctly addressed, for a better understanding of this syndrome. PMID:16226874

  10. Classification of awake, REM, and NREM from EEG via singular spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sara Mahvash; Enshaeifar, Shirin; Ghavami, Mohammad; Sanei, Saeid

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a single-channel electroencephalography (EEG) analysis method has been proposed for automated 3-state-sleep classification to discriminate Awake, NREM (non-rapid eye movement) and REM (rapid eye movement). For this purpose, singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is applied to automatically extract four brain rhythms: delta, theta, alpha, and beta. These subbands are then used to generate the appropriate features for sleep classification using a multi class support vector machine (M-SVM). The proposed method provided 0.79 agreement between the manual and automatic scores. PMID:26737360

  11. 'Time-scribe': a universal time writer for any EEG/polygraph chart recorder.

    PubMed

    Ives, J

    1984-04-01

    An ubiquitous digital clock 'time-scribe' with a unique pen-galvanometer writer section has been described which should greatly improve the correlation of a long term EEG with any other time related event or medium. The output of the clock generates on any pen-galvanometer based chart recorder numerical and some alpha characters which are easily and immediately readable. Because of its convenience, simplicity and basic practical application it should also stimulate discussion for the unification of time write-out standards and methods. PMID:6200303

  12. Entrainment of Human Alpha Oscillations Selectively Enhances Visual Conjunction Search

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Notger G.; Vellage, Anne-Katrin; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Zaehle, Tino

    2015-01-01

    The functional role of the alpha-rhythm which dominates the human electroencephalogram (EEG) is unclear. It has been related to visual processing, attentional selection and object coherence, respectively. Here we tested the interaction of alpha oscillations of the human brain with visual search tasks that differed in their attentional demands (pre-attentive vs. attentive) and also in the necessity to establish object coherence (conjunction vs. single feature). Between pre- and post-assessment elderly subjects received 20 min/d of repetitive transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the occipital cortex adjusted to their individual alpha frequency over five consecutive days. Compared to sham the entrained alpha oscillations led to a selective, set size independent improvement in the conjunction search task performance but not in the easy or in the hard feature search task. These findings suggest that cortical alpha oscillations play a specific role in establishing object coherence through suppression of distracting objects. PMID:26606255

  13. miR-1236 down-regulates alpha-fetoprotein, thus causing PTEN accumulation, which inhibits the PI3K/Akt pathway and malignant phenotype in hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Shuang, Zeyu; Liu, Min; Li, Shengping; Tang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) is a clinical biomarker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we found that miR-1236 is down-regulated, whereas AFP is highly expressed in HCC tissues and cells. We demonstrated that miR-1236 directly targets the 3?UTR of AFP and down-regulates its expression. Also, miR-1236 inhibited and AFP stimulated proliferation, migration, invasion and vasculogenic mimicry (VM) of HCC. In agreement, AFP over-expression counteracted the inhibitory effect of miR-1236. We demonstrated that AFP promoted the ubiquitination of PTEN, thus decreasing PTEN levels, while miR-1236 inhibited the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:25714026

  14. Tackling creativity at its roots: evidence for different patterns of EEG ? activity related to convergent and divergent modes of task processing.

    PubMed

    Jauk, Emanuel; Benedek, Mathias; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2012-05-01

    The distinction between convergent and divergent cognitive processes given by Guilford (1956) had a strong influence on the empirical research on creative thinking. Neuroscientific studies typically find higher event-related synchronization in the EEG alpha rhythm for individuals engaged in creative ideation tasks compared to intelligence-related tasks. This study examined, whether these neurophysiological effects can also be found when both cognitive processing modes (convergent vs. divergent) are assessed by means of the same task employing a simple variation of instruction. A sample of 55 participants performed the alternate uses task as well as a more basic word association task while EEG was recorded. On a trial-by-trial basis, participants were either instructed to find a most common solution (convergent condition) or a most uncommon solution (divergent condition). The answers given in the divergent condition were in both tasks significantly more original than those in the convergent condition. Moreover, divergent processing was found to involve higher task-related EEG alpha power than convergent processing in both the alternate uses task and the word association task. EEG alpha synchronization can hence explicitly be associated with divergent cognitive processing rather than with general task characteristics of creative ideation tasks. Further results point to a differential involvement of frontal and parietal cortical areas by individuals of lower versus higher trait creativity. PMID:22390860

  15. Dynamical complexity in a mean-field model of human EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frascoli, Federico; Dafilis, Mathew P.; van Veen, Lennaert; Bojak, Ingo; Liley, David T. J.

    2008-12-01

    A recently proposed mean-field theory of mammalian cortex rhythmogenesis describes the salient features of electrical activity in the cerebral macrocolumn, with the use of inhibitory and excitatory neuronal populations (Liley et al 2002). This model is capable of producing a range of important human EEG (electroencephalogram) features such as the alpha rhythm, the 40 Hz activity thought to be associated with conscious awareness (Bojak & Liley 2007) and the changes in EEG spectral power associated with general anesthetic effect (Bojak & Liley 2005). From the point of view of nonlinear dynamics, the model entails a vast parameter space within which multistability, pseudoperiodic regimes, various routes to chaos, fat fractals and rich bifurcation scenarios occur for physiologically relevant parameter values (van Veen & Liley 2006). The origin and the character of this complex behaviour, and its relevance for EEG activity will be illustrated. The existence of short-lived unstable brain states will also be discussed in terms of the available theoretical and experimental results. A perspective on future analysis will conclude the presentation.

  16. Stress assessment based on EEG univariate features and functional connectivity measures.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J F; Romero, S; Ballester, M R; Antonijoan, R M; Mañanas, M A

    2015-07-01

    The biological response to stress originates in the brain but involves different biochemical and physiological effects. Many common clinical methods to assess stress are based on the presence of specific hormones and on features extracted from different signals, including electrocardiogram, blood pressure, skin temperature, or galvanic skin response. The aim of this paper was to assess stress using EEG-based variables obtained from univariate analysis and functional connectivity evaluation. Two different stressors, the Stroop test and sleep deprivation, were applied to 30 volunteers to find common EEG patterns related to stress effects. Results showed a decrease of the high alpha power (11 to 12?Hz), an increase in the high beta band (23 to 36?Hz, considered a busy brain indicator), and a decrease in the approximate entropy. Moreover, connectivity showed that the high beta coherence and the interhemispheric nonlinear couplings, measured by the cross mutual information function, increased significantly for both stressors, suggesting that useful stress indexes may be obtained from EEG-based features. PMID:26015439

  17. Non-linear analysis of EEG and HRV signals during sleep.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alejandro; Guerrero-Mora, Guillermina; Dorantes-Mendez, Guadalupe; Alba, Alfonso; Mendez, Martin O; Chouvarda, Ioanna

    2015-08-01

    The sleep phenomenon is a complex process that involves fluctuations of autonomic functions such as the blood pressure, temperature and brain function. These fluctuations change their properties through the different sleep stages with specific relations among the different systems. In order to understand the relation between the cardiovascular and central nervous system at the different sleep stages, we applied different non-linear methods to the energy of electroencephalographic signal (EEG) and the heart rate fluctuations. The EEG was divided in the Delta, Theta, Alpha and Beta frequency bands and the mean energy of these bands was computed at each heart rate interval. Thus, the non-linear relation was evaluated between the energy of the EEG bands and the heart rate fluctuations using Cross-Correlation, Cross-Sample Entropy and Recurrence Quantification Analysis in segments of 5 minutes grouped by sleep stage. The results showed that a relation exists between the changes of the energy in the Delta band and the Heart rate fluctuations. PMID:26737214

  18. Association of autonomic nervous system and EEG scalp potential during playing 2D Grand Turismo 5.

    PubMed

    Subhani, Ahmad Rauf; Likun, Xia; Saeed Malik, Aamir

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral activation and autonomic nervous system have importance in studies such as mental stress. The aim of this study is to analyze variations in EEG scalp potential which may influence autonomic activation of heart while playing video games. Ten healthy participants were recruited in this study. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) signals were measured simultaneously during playing video game and rest conditions. Sympathetic and parasympathetic innervations of heart were evaluated from heart rate variability (HRV), derived from the ECG. Scalp potential was measured by the EEG. The results showed a significant upsurge in the value theta Fz/alpha Pz (p<0.001) while playing game. The results also showed tachycardia while playing video game as compared to rest condition (p<0.005). Normalized low frequency power and ratio of low frequency/high frequency power were significantly increased while playing video game and normalized high frequency power sank during video games. Results showed synchronized activity of cerebellum and sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation of heart. PMID:23366661

  19. Correlated Components of Ongoing EEG Point to Emotionally Laden Attention – A Possible Marker of Engagement?

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Sajda, Paul; Dias, Joao; Parra, Lucas C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging suggests that cortical hemodynamic responses coincide in different subjects experiencing a common naturalistic stimulus. Here we utilize neural responses in the electroencephalogram (EEG) evoked by multiple presentations of short film clips to index brain states marked by high levels of correlation within and across subjects. We formulate a novel signal decomposition method which extracts maximally correlated signal components from multiple EEG records. The resulting components capture correlations down to a one-second time resolution, thus revealing that peak correlations of neural activity across viewings can occur in remarkable correspondence with arousing moments of the film. Moreover, a significant reduction in neural correlation occurs upon a second viewing of the film or when the narrative is disrupted by presenting its scenes scrambled in time. We also probe oscillatory brain activity during periods of heightened correlation, and observe during such times a significant increase in the theta band for a frontal component and reductions in the alpha and beta frequency bands for parietal and occipital components. Low-resolution EEG tomography of these components suggests that the correlated neural activity is consistent with sources in the cingulate and orbitofrontal cortices. Put together, these results suggest that the observed synchrony reflects attention- and emotion-modulated cortical processing which may be decoded with high temporal resolution by extracting maximally correlated components of neural activity. PMID:22623915

  20. EEG-Based Subject- and Session-independent Drowsiness Detection: An Unsupervised Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Nikhil R.; Chuang, Chien-Yao; Ko, Li-Wei; Chao, Chih-Feng; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Liang, Sheng-Fu; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring and prediction of changes in the human cognitive states, such as alertness and drowsiness, using physiological signals are very important for driver's safety. Typically, physiological studies on real-time detection of drowsiness usually use the same model for all subjects. However, the relatively large individual variability in EEG dynamics relating to loss of alertness implies that for many subjects, group statistics may not be useful to accurately predict changes in cognitive states. Researchers have attempted to build subject-dependent models based on his/her pilot data to account for individual variability. Such approaches cannot account for the cross-session variability in EEG dynamics, which may cause problems due to various reasons including electrode displacements, environmental noises, and skin-electrode impedance. Hence, we propose an unsupervised subject- and session-independent approach for detection departure from alertness in this study. Experimental results showed that the EEG power in the alpha-band (as well as in the theta-band) is highly correlated with changes in the subject's cognitive state with respect to drowsiness as reflected through his driving performance. This approach being an unsupervised and session-independent one could be used to develop a useful system for noninvasive monitoring of the cognitive state of human operators in attention-critical settings.

  1. Soft, Comfortable Polymer Dry Electrodes for High Quality ECG and EEG Recording

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Hsuan; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Vanderheyden, Luc; Carrette, Evelien; Mihajlović, Vojkan; Vanstreels, Kris; Grundlehner, Bernard; Gadeyne, Stefanie; Boon, Paul; Van Hoof, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Conventional gel electrodes are widely used for biopotential measurements, despite important drawbacks such as skin irritation, long set-up time and uncomfortable removal. Recently introduced dry electrodes with rigid metal pins overcome most of these problems; however, their rigidity causes discomfort and pain. This paper presents dry electrodes offering high user comfort, since they are fabricated from EPDM rubber containing various additives for optimum conductivity, flexibility and ease of fabrication. The electrode impedance is measured on phantoms and human skin. After optimization of the polymer composition, the skin-electrode impedance is only ∼10 times larger than that of gel electrodes. Therefore, these electrodes are directly capable of recording strong biopotential signals such as ECG while for low-amplitude signals such as EEG, the electrodes need to be coupled with an active circuit. EEG recordings using active polymer electrodes connected to a clinical EEG system show very promising results: alpha waves can be clearly observed when subjects close their eyes, and correlation and coherence analyses reveal high similarity between dry and gel electrode signals. Moreover, all subjects reported that our polymer electrodes did not cause discomfort. Hence, the polymer-based dry electrodes are promising alternatives to either rigid dry electrodes or conventional gel electrodes. PMID:25513825

  2. Alpha oscillatory correlates of motor inhibition in the aged brain

    PubMed Central

    Bönstrup, Marlene; Hagemann, Julian; Gerloff, Christian; Sauseng, Paul; Hummel, Friedhelm C.

    2015-01-01

    Exerting inhibitory control is a cognitive ability mediated by functions known to decline with age. The goal of this study is to add to the mechanistic understanding of cortical inhibition during motor control in aged brains. Based on behavioral findings of impaired inhibitory control with age we hypothesized that elderly will show a reduced or a lack of EEG alpha-power increase during tasks that require motor inhibition. Since inhibitory control over movements has been shown to rely on prior motor memory formation, we investigated cortical inhibitory processes at two points in time—early after learning and after an overnight consolidation phase and hypothesized an overnight increase of inhibitory capacities. Young and elderly participants acquired a complex finger movement sequence and in each experimental session brain activity during execution and inhibition of the sequence was recorded with multi-channel EEG. We assessed cortical processes of sustained inhibition by means of task-induced changes of alpha oscillatory power. During inhibition of the learned movement, young participants showed a significant alpha power increase at the sensorimotor cortices whereas elderly did not. Interestingly, for both groups, the overnight consolidation phase improved up-regulation of alpha power during sustained inhibition. This points to deficits in the generation and enhancement of local inhibitory mechanisms at the sensorimotor cortices in aged brains. However, the alpha power increase in both groups implies neuroplastic changes that strengthen the network of alpha power generation over time in young as well as elderly brains. PMID:26528179

  3. Experimental Placebo Analgesia Changes Resting-State Alpha Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Huneke, Nathan T. M.; Brown, Christopher A.; Burford, Edward; Watson, Alison; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J.; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K. P.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of clear understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain could explain why we currently have only a few effective treatments. Understanding how pain relief is realised during placebo analgesia could help develop improved treatments for chronic pain. Here, we tested whether experimental placebo analgesia was associated with altered resting-state cortical activity in the alpha frequency band of the electroencephalogram (EEG). Alpha oscillations have been shown to be influenced by top-down processes, which are thought to underpin the placebo response. Seventy-three healthy volunteers, split into placebo or control groups, took part in a well-established experimental placebo procedure involving treatment with a sham analgesic cream. We recorded ongoing (resting) EEG activity before, during, and after the sham treatment. We show that resting alpha activity is modified by placebo analgesia. Post-treatment, alpha activity increased significantly in the placebo group only (p < 0.001). Source analysis suggested that this alpha activity might have been generated in medial components of the pain network, including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and left insula. These changes are consistent with a cognitive state of pain expectancy, a key driver of the placebo analgesic response. The manipulation of alpha activity may therefore present an exciting avenue for the development of treatments that directly alter endogenous processes to better control pain. PMID:24147129

  4. Effets des radiofréquences sur le système nerveux central chez lʼhomme : EEG, sommeil, cognition, vascularisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Rania; Villégier, Anne-Sophie; Selmaoui, Brahim; Thuróczy, Georges; de Sèze, René

    2013-05-01

    Most of clinical studies on radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF) were directed at mobile phone-related exposures, usually at the level of the head, at their effect on some physiological functions including sleep, brain electrical activity (EEG), cognitive processes, brain vascularisation, and more generally on the cardiovascular and endocrine systems. They were frequently carried out on healthy adults. Effects on the amplitude of EEG alpha waves, mainly during sleep, look reproducible. It would however be important to define more precisely whether and how the absence of electromagnetic disturbance between RF exposure and the recording systems is checked. No consensus arises about cognitive effects. Some effects on cerebral vascularisation need complementary work.

  5. Alpha fetoprotein

    MedlinePLUS

    Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) is a protein produced by the liver and yolk sac of a developing baby during pregnancy. AFP levels go down soon after birth. It is likely that ... A test can be done to measure the amount of AFP in your blood.

  6. Screening EEG in Aircrew Selection: Clinical Aerospace Neurology Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jonathan B.; Riley, Terrence

    2001-01-01

    As clinical aerospace neurologists we do not favor using screening EEG in pilot selection on unselected and otherwise asymptomatic individuals. The role of EEG in aviation screening should be as an adjunct to diagnosis, and the decision to disqualify a pilot should never be based solely on the EEG. Although a policy of using a screening EEG in an unselected population might detect an individual with a potentially increased relative risk, it would needlessly exclude many applicants who would probably never have a seizure. A diagnostic test performed on an asymptomatic individual without clinical indications, in a population with a low prevalence of disease (seizure) may be of limited or possibly detrimental value. We feel that rather than do EEGs on all candidates, a better approach would be to perform an EEG for a specific indication, such as family history of seizure, single convulsion (seizure) , history of unexplained loss of consciousness or head injury. Routine screening EEGs in unselected aviation applications are not done without clinical indication in the U.S. Air Force, Navy, or NASA. The USAF discontinued routine screening EEGs for selection in 1978, the U.S. Navy discontinued it in 1981 , and NASA discontinued it in 1995. EEG as an aeromedical screening tool in the US Navy dates back to 1939. The US Navy routinely used EEGs to screen all aeromedical personnel from 1961 to 1981. The incidence of epileptiform activity on EEG in asymptomatic flight candidates ranges from 0.11 to 2.5%. In 3 studies of asymptomatic flight candidates with epileptiform activity on EEG followed for 2 to 15 years, 1 of 31 (3.2%), 1 of 30 (3.3%), and 0 of 14 (0%) developed a seizure, for a cumulative risk of an individual with an epileptiform EEG developing a seizure of 2.67% (2 in 75). Of 28,658 student naval aviation personnel screened 31 had spikes and/or slow waves on EEG, and only 1 later developed a seizure. Of the 28,627 who had a normal EEG, 4 later developed seizures, or .0139% (4/28627). After review of the value of the EEG as a screening tool, the US Navy now uses EEG only for certain clinical indications (head injury, unexplained loss of consciousness, family history of epilepsy, and abnormal neurological exam). Currently the US Navy does not use EEG for screening for any flight applicant without a neurologic indication. In the US Navy, an electroencephalographic pattern is determined to be epileptiform by a neurologist.

  7. Lasting modulation effects of rTMS on neural activity and connectivity as revealed by resting-state EEG.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei; Shou, Guofa; Yuan, Han; Urbano, Diamond; Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2014-07-01

    The long-lasting neuromodulatory effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are of great interest for therapeutic applications in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, due to which functional connectivity among brain regions is profoundly disturbed. Classic TMS studies selectively alter neural activity in specific brain regions and observe neural activity changes on nonperturbed areas to infer underlying connectivity and its changes. Less has been indicated in direct measures of functional connectivity and/or neural network and on how connectivity/network alterations occur. Here, we developed a novel analysis framework to directly investigate both neural activity and connectivity changes induced by rTMS from resting-state EEG (rsEEG) acquired in a group of subjects with a chronic disorder of imbalance, known as the mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS). Resting-state activity in multiple functional brain areas was identified through a data-driven blind source separation analysis on rsEEG data, and the connectivity among them was characterized using a phase synchronization measure. Our study revealed that there were significant long-lasting changes in resting-state neural activity, in theta, low alpha, and high alpha bands and neural networks in theta, low alpha, high alpha and beta bands, over broad cortical areas 4 to 5 h after the last application of rTMS in a consecutive five-day protocol. Our results of rsEEG connectivity further indicated that the changes, mainly in the alpha band, over the parietal and occipital cortices from pre- to post-TMS sessions were significantly correlated, in both magnitude and direction, to symptom changes in this group of subjects with MdDS. This connectivity measure not only suggested that rTMS can generate positive treatment effects in MdDS patients, but also revealed new potential targets for future therapeutic trials to improve treatment effects. It is promising that the new connectivity measure from rsEEG can be used to understand the variability in treatment response to rTMS in brain disorders with impaired functional connectivity and, eventually, to determine individually tailored stimulation parameters and treatment procedures in rTMS. PMID:24686227

  8. EEG-BOLD correlations during (post-)adolescent brain maturation.

    PubMed

    Lüchinger, Rafael; Michels, Lars; Martin, Ernst; Brandeis, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    The transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical stage in the human lifespan during which the brain still undergoes substantial structural and functional change. The changing frequency composition of the resting state EEG reflects maturation of brain function. This study investigated (post)adolescent brain maturation captured by two independently but simultaneously recorded neuronal signals: EEG and fMRI. Data were collected in a 20 min eyes-open/eyes-closed resting state paradigm. EEG, fMRI-BOLD signal and EEG-BOLD correlations were compared between groups of adults, age 25 (n=18), and adolescents, age 15 (n=18). A typical developmental decrease of low-frequency EEG power was observed even at this late stage of brain maturation. Frequency and condition specific EEG-fMRI correlations proved robust for multiple brain regions. However, no consistent change in the EEG-BOLD correlations was identified that would correspond to the neuronal maturation captured by the EEG. This result indicates that the EEG-BOLD correlation measures a distinct aspect of neurophysiological activity that presumably matures earlier, since it is less sensitive to late maturation than the neuronal activity captured by low-frequency EEG. PMID:21349336

  9. Interhemispheric Asymmetries and Theta Activity in the Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex as EEG Signature of HIV-Related Depression: Gender Matters.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Heidemarie; Lutz, Franz P C; McIntosh, Roger C; Dévieux, Jessy G; Ironson, Gail

    2016-04-01

    Resting EEGs of 40 people living with HIV (PLWH) on long-term antiretroviral treatment were examined for z-scored deviations from a healthy control (normative database) to examine the main and interaction effects of depression and gender. Regions of interest were frontal (alpha) and central (all bands) for interhemispheric asymmetries in quantitative EEGs and theta in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) in low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Z-scored normed deviations of depressed PLWH, compared with nondepressed, showed right-dominant interhemispheric asymmetries in all regions. However, after adjusting for multiple testing, significance remained only central for theta, alpha, and beta. Reversed (left-dominant) frontal alpha asymmetry is a potential EEG marker of depression in the HIV negative population that was not reversed in depressive PLWH; however, corresponding with extant literature, gender had an effect on the size of frontal alpha asymmetry. The LORETA analysis revealed a trending interactional effect of depression and gender on theta activity in the rACC in Brodmann area 32. We found that compared to men, women had greater right-dominant frontal alpha-asymmetry and elevated theta activity in voxels of the rACC, which may indicate less likelihood of depression and a higher likelihood of response to antidepressants. In conclusion, subtle EEG deviations, such as right-dominant central theta, alpha, and beta asymmetries and theta activity in the rACC may mark HIV-related depressive symptoms and may predict the likelihood of response to antidepressants but gender effects need to be taken into account. Although this study introduced the use of LORETA to examine the neurophysiological correlates of negative affect in PLWH, further research is needed to assess the utility of this tool in diagnostics and treatment monitoring of depression in PLWH. PMID:25568149

  10. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  11. Abnormal Parietal Brain Function in ADHD: Replication and Extension of Previous EEG Beta Asymmetry Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hale, T. Sigi; Kane, Andrea M.; Tung, Kelly L.; Kaminsky, Olivia; McGough, James J.; Hanada, Grant; Loo, Sandra K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abundant work indicates ADHD abnormal posterior brain structure and function, including abnormal structural and functional asymmetries and reduced corpus callosum size. However, this literature has attracted considerably less research interest than fronto-striatal findings. Objective: To help address this imbalance, the current study replicates and extends our previous work showing abnormal parietal brain function in ADHD adults during the Conner’s Continuous Performance Test (CPT). Method: Our previous study found that ADHD adults had increased rightward EEG beta (16–21 Hz) asymmetry in inferior parietal brain regions during the CPT (p = 0.00001), and that this metric exhibited a lack of normal correlation (i.e., observed in controls) with beta asymmetry at temporal–parietal regions. We re-tested these effects in a new ADHD sample and with both new and old samples combined. We additionally examined: (a) EEG asymmetry in multiple frequency bands, (b) unilateral effects for all asymmetry findings, and (c) the association between EEG asymmetry and a battery of cognitive tests. Results: We replicated our original findings by demonstrating abnormal rightward inferior parietal beta asymmetry in adults with ADHD during the CPT, and again this metric exhibited abnormal reduced correlation to temporal–parietal beta asymmetry. Novel analyses also demonstrated a broader pattern of rightward beta and theta asymmetry across inferior, superior, and temporal–parietal brain regions, and showed that rightward parietal asymmetry in ADHD was atypically associated with multiple cognitive tests. Conclusion: Abnormal increased rightward parietal EEG beta asymmetry is an important feature of ADHD. We speculate that this phenotype may occur with any form of impaired capacity for top-down task-directed control over sensory encoding functions, and that it may reflect associated increase of attentional shifting and compensatory sustained/selective attention. PMID:25104941

  12. Spatiotemporal analysis of prepyriform, visual, auditory, and somesthetic surface EEGs in trained rabbits.

    PubMed

    Barrie, J M; Freeman, W J; Lenhart, M D

    1996-07-01

    1. Spatial ensemble averages were computed for 64 traces of electroencephalograms (EEGs) simultaneously recorded from 8 x 8 arrays over the epidural surfaces of the prepyriform cortex (PPC) and visual, somatic, and auditory cortices. They revealed a common waveform across each array. Examination of the spatial amplitude modulation (AM) of the waveform revealed classifiable spatial pattern in short time segments. The AM patterns varied within trials after presentation of identical conditioned stimuli, and also between trials with differing stimuli. 2. PPC EEGs revealed strong correlates with the respiratory rhythm; neocortical EEGs did not. 3. Time ensemble averaging of the PPC EEG attenuated the oscillatory bursts, indicating that olfactory gamma oscillations (20-80 Hz) were not phase-locked to the times of stimulus delivery but instead to inhalations. Time ensemble averages of neocortical recordings across trials revealed average evoked potentials starting 30-50 ms after the arrival of the stimulus. 4. Average temporal fast Fourier transform (FFT) power spectral densities (PSDs) from pre- and poststimulus PPC EEG segments revealed a peak of gamma activity in olfactory bursts. 5. The logarithm of the average temporal FFT PSDs from pre- and poststimulus neocortical EEG segments, when plotted against log frequency, revealed 1/f-type spectra in both pre- and poststimulus segments for negative/aversive conditioned stimuli (CS-) and positive/rewarding conditioned stimuli (CS+). The alpha'- and beta'-coefficients from the regression of Eq. 2 onto the average PSDs were significantly different between pre- and poststimulus segments, owing to the evoked potentials, but not between CS- and CS+ stimulus segments. 6. Spatiotemporal patterns were invariant over all frequency bins in the 1/f domain (20-100 Hz). Spatiotemporal patterns in the 2- to 20-Hz domain progressively differed from the invariant patterns with decreasing frequency. 7. In the spatial frequency domain, the logarithm of the average spatial FFT power spectra from pre- and poststimulus neocortical EEG segments, when plotted against the log spatial frequency, fell monotonically from the maximum at the lowest spatial frequency, downwardly curving to a linear 1/f spectral domain. This curve in the 1/f spectral domain extended from 0.133 to 0.880 cycles/mm in the PPC and from 0.095 to 0.624 cycles/mm in the neocortices. 8. Methods of FFT and principal component analysis (PCA) EEG decomposition were used to extract the broad-spectrum waveform common to all 64 EEGs from an array. AM patterns for the FFT and PCA components were derived by regression. They were shown by cross-correlation to yield spatial patterns that were equivalent to each other and to AM patterns from calculation of the 64 root-mean-square amplitudes of the segments. 9. Each spatial AM pattern was expressed by a 1 x 64 column vector and a point in 64-space. Similar patterns formed clusters, and dissimilar patterns gave multiple clusters. A statistical test was devised to evaluate dissimilarity by a Euclidean distance metric in 64-space. 10. Significant spatial pattern classification of CS- versus CS+ trials (below the 1% confidence limit for 20 of each) was found in discrete temporal segments of poststimulus data after digital temporal and spatial filter optimization. 11. Varying the analysis window duration from 10 to 500 ms yielded a window length of 120 ms as optimal for pattern classification. A 120-ms window was subsequently stepped across each record in overlapping intervals of 20 ms. Windows in which episodic, significant CS+/CS- differences occurred lasted 50-200 ms and were separated by 100-200 ms in the poststimulus period. 12. Neocortical spatial patterns changed under reinforcement contingency reversal, showing a lack of invariance in respect to stimuli and a dependence on context and learning, as previously found for the olfactory bulb and PPC. PMID:8836241

  13. Familial clustering and DRD4 effects on EEG Measures in multiplex families with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Sandra K.; Hale, T. Sigi; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; Shrestha, Anshu; McGough, James J.; McCracken, James T.; Nelson, Stanley; Smalley, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The current study tests encephalogram (EEG) measures as a potential endophenotype for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) by examining sibling and parent-offspring similarity, familial clustering with the disorder, and association with the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) candidate gene. Method The sample consists of 531 participants (191 parents and 340 children) from 132 multiplex families with ADHD who participated in a larger genetics study. All members of the families underwent extensive assessment including semi-structured diagnostic interviews and EEG recording. Results Strong sibling similarity and parent-offspring correlations in EEG power emerged, suggesting high trait heritability. Among children, increased theta power was observed among children with ADHD when compared to unaffected children and there were no differences according to ADHD subtype. Within the parent sample, ADHD diagnostic status and ADHD subtype group differences emerged in the theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. DRD4 effects for both parents and children were apparent in the beta frequency band and for children only in the theta frequency band. Conclusions This study suggests that EEG measures are a promising avenue of study in the search for putative endophenotypes for ADHD and that variability at the DRD4 gene may contribute to this endophenotype. PMID:20410729

  14. Heartbeat-related EEG amplitude and phase modulations from wakefulness to deep sleep: Interactions with sleep spindles and slow oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lechinger, Julia; Heib, Dominik Philip Johannes; Gruber, Walter; Schabus, Manuel; Klimesch, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Based on physiological models of neurovisceral integration, different studies have shown how cognitive processes modulate heart rate and how the heartbeat, on the other hand, modulates brain activity. We tried to further determine interactions between cardiac and electrical brain activity by means of EEG. We investigated how the heartbeat modulates EEG in 23 healthy controls from wakefulness to deep sleep and showed that frontocentral heartbeat evoked EEG amplitude and phase locking (as measured by intertrial phase locking), at about 300-400 ms after the R peak, decreased with increasing sleep depth with a renewed increase during REM sleep, which underpins the assumption that the heartbeat evoked positivity constitutes an active frontocortical response to the heartbeat. Additionally, we found that individual heart rate was correlated with the frequency of the EEG's spectral peak (i.e., alpha peak frequency during wakefulness). This correlation was strongest during wakefulness and declined linearly with increasing sleep depth. Furthermore, we show that the QRS complex modulates spindle phase possibly related to the correspondence between the frequency of the QRS complex and the spindle frequency of about 12-15 Hz. Finally, during deep sleep stages, a loose temporal coupling between heartbeats and slow oscillation (0.8 Hz) could be observed. These findings indicate that cardiac activity such as heart rate or individual heartbeats can modulate or be modulated by ongoing oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26268858

  15. Neuropolitics: EEG spectral maps related to a political vote based on the first impression of the candidate's face.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, G; Toppi, J; Cincotti, F; Astolfi, L; De Vico Fallani, F; Aloise, F; Mattia, D; Bocale, S; Vernucci, F; Babiloni, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to investigate the EEG activity elicited by a fast observation of face of real politicians during a simulated political election. Politician's face are taken from real local election performed in Italy in the 2004 and 2008. We recorded the EEG activity of eight healthy subjects while they are asked to give a judgment on dominance, trustworthiness traits and a preference of vote on faces shown. Statistical differences of spectral EEG scalp activity have been mapped onto a realistic head model. For each experimental condition, we employed the t-test to compare the PSD values and adopted the False Discovery Rate correction for multiple comparisons. The scalp statistical maps revealed a desynchronization in the alpha band related to the politicians who lost the simulated elections and have been judged less trustworthy. Although these results might be congruent with the recent literature, the present is the first EEG study about and there is the need to extend the paradigm and the analysis on a larger number of subjects to validate these results. PMID:21095981

  16. EEG phase synchronization during hypnosis induction.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, G; Nasrabadi, A M

    2012-05-01

    Hypnosis is a mental state or set of attitudes usually induced by a procedure known as hypnotic induction. In order to provide the basic physiological conditions for potentially successful hypnosis treatment of medical and psychological problems, the determination of a subject's hypnotizability level is important. Currently, the hypnotizability level is determined using different standard subjective tests. To avoid the different drawbacks of these subjective clinical tests, a practical objective method based on the correlation between electroencephalograph (EEG) phase synchronization and hypnosis susceptibility levels is presented in this study. This method can be used by clinicians instead of the traditional subjective methods to classify hypnotizability level. Thirty-two subjects with different hypnosis susceptibility levels contributed to this research. Using statistical analyses, it was concluded that, in highly hypnotizable people, the EEG phase synchronization between different paired channels, located on the frontal lobe, is significantly different from that in subjects with medium or low hypnotizability. PMID:22439789

  17. Cross coherence independent component analysis in resting and action states EEG discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almurshedi, A.; Ismail, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    Cross Coherence time frequency transform and independent component analysis (ICA) method were used to analyse the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in resting and action states during open and close eyes conditions. From the topographical scalp distributions of delta, theta, alpha, and beta power spectrum can clearly discriminate between the signal when the eyes were open or closed, but it was difficult to distinguish between resting and action states when the eyes were closed. In open eyes condition, the frontal area (Fp1, Fp2) was activated (higher power) in delta and theta bands whilst occipital (O1, O2) and partial (P3, P4, Pz) area of brain was activated alpha band in closed eyes condition. The cross coherence method of time frequency analysis is capable of discrimination between rest and action brain signals in closed eyes condition.

  18. Perceiving objects by their function: An EEG study on feature saliency and prehensile affordances.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Dimitrios; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2015-09-01

    We examined the feature saliency and prehensile/motor affordance effects that are visually elicited by a graspable object's most salient features and graspable part, respectively. EEG was recorded from participants who attended a photo of an object, and responded to a left- or right-pointing arrow, which was overlaid on the object 1000 ms after object onset. Analysis of response times demonstrated the presence of a feature saliency effect. Lateralization of posterior alpha suppression showed that attention was initially directed to the object's (most salient) functional end. Pre-movement frontocentral beta suppression and the modulation of the P3 component showed that a response compatible to the functional end was activated before arrow onset. Moreover, lateralization of pre-movement posterior and central alpha suppression indicated a behaviorally masked affordance effect. This suggests that the two effects may occur independently, but without specific attention orienting instructions, the feature saliency effect dominates a potential prehensile affordance effect. PMID:26247331

  19. Building mouse phenotype ontologies.

    PubMed

    Gkoutos, G V; Green, E C J; Mallon, A M; Hancock, J M; Davidson, D

    2004-01-01

    The structured description of mutant phenotypes presents a major conceptual and practical problem. A general model for generating mouse phenotype ontologies that involves combing a variety of different ontologies to better link and describe phenotypes is presented. This model is based on the Phenotype and Trait Ontology schema proposal and incorporates practical limitations and designing solutions in an attempt to model a testbed for the first phenotype ontology constructed in this manner, namely the mouse behavior phenotype ontology. We propose the application of such a model could provide curators with a powerful mechanism of annotation, mining and knowledge representation as well as achieving some level of free text disassociation. PMID:14992502

  20. Spectral characteristics of sleep EEG in chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Merica, H; Blois, R; Gaillard, J M

    1998-05-01

    To determine whether the spectral characteristics of the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) of insomniacs differ from that of healthy subjects, we compared in each of the first four non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) episodes: (a) the time courses of absolute power, averaged over the subjects in each group, for the delta, theta, alpha, sigma and beta frequency bands; (b) the relationship between these time courses; and (c) the overnight trend of integrated power in each frequency band. The results show that NREM power, for all frequencies below the beta range, has slower rise rates and reaches lower levels in the insomniac group, whereas beta power is significantly increased. In REM, insomniacs show lower levels in the delta and theta bands, whereas power in the faster frequency bands is significantly increased. Thus, the pathophysiology of insomnia is characterized not only by the generally acknowledged slow wave deficiency, but also by an excessive hyperarousal of the central nervous system throughout the night, affecting both REM and NREM sleep. This hyperarousal is interpreted in terms of the neuronal group theory of sleep which provides a possible explanation for the discrepancies observed between subjective impressions and objective measures of sleep. Also, it is suggested that the progressive hyperpolarization of the thalamocortical neurons as sleep deepens is slower in the patient population and that this may explain the observed slow wave deficiency. The homeostatic control of slow wave activity, on the other hand, would appear to be intact in the patient population. PMID:9751153

  1. Memories of attachment hamper EEG cortical connectivity in dissociative patients.

    PubMed

    Farina, Benedetto; Speranza, Anna Maria; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Trentini, Cristina; Vergano, Carola Maggiora; Liotti, Giovanni; Brunetti, Riccardo; Testani, Elisa; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated cortical connectivity modifications by electroencephalography (EEG) lagged coherence analysis, in subjects with dissociative disorders and in controls, after retrieval of attachment memories. We asked thirteen patients with dissociative disorders and thirteen age- and sex-matched healthy controls to retrieve personal attachment-related autobiographical memories through adult attachment interviews (AAI). EEG was recorded in the closed eyes resting state before and after the AAI. EEG lagged coherence before and after AAI was compared in all subjects. In the control group, memories of attachment promoted a widespread increase in EEG connectivity, in particular in the high-frequency EEG bands. Compared to controls, dissociative patients did not show an increase in EEG connectivity after the AAI. Conclusions: These results shed light on the neurophysiology of the disintegrative effect of retrieval of traumatic attachment memories in dissociative patients. PMID:24121863

  2. EEG source analysis using space mapping techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevecoeur, G.; Hallez, H.; van Hese, P.; D'Asseler, Y.; Dupre, L.; van de Walle, R.

    2008-06-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) measures potential differences, generated by electrical activity in brain tissue, between scalp electrodes. The EEG potentials can be calculated by the quasi-static Poisson equation in a certain head model. It is well known that the electrical dipole (source) which best fits the measured EEG potentials is obtained by an inverse problem. The dipole parameters are obtained by finding the global minimum of the relative residual energy (RRE). For the first time, the space mapping technique (SM technique) is used for minimizing the RRE. The SM technique aims at aligning two different simulation models: a fine model, accurate but CPU-time expensive, and a coarse model, computationally fast but less accurate than the fine one. The coarse model is a semi-analytical model, the so-called three-shell concentric sphere model. The fine model numerically solves the Poisson equation in a realistic head model. If we use the aggressive space mapping (ASM) algorithm, the errors on the dipole location are too large. The hybrid aggressive space mapping (HASM) on the other hand has better convergence properties, yielding a reduction in dipole location errors. The computational effort of HASM is greater than ASM but smaller than using direct optimization techniques.

  3. A Discriminative Approach to EEG Seizure Detection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley N.; Sow, Daby; Biem, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are abnormal sudden discharges in the brain with signatures represented in electroencephalograms (EEG). The efficacy of the application of speech processing techniques to discriminate between seizure and non-seizure states in EEGs is reported. The approach accounts for the challenges of unbalanced datasets (seizure and non-seizure), while also showing a system capable of real-time seizure detection. The Minimum Classification Error (MCE) algorithm, which is a discriminative learning algorithm with wide-use in speech processing, is applied and compared with conventional classification techniques that have already been applied to the discrimination between seizure and non-seizure states in the literature. The system is evaluated on 22 pediatric patients multi-channel EEG recordings. Experimental results show that the application of speech processing techniques and MCE compare favorably with conventional classification techniques in terms of classification performance, while requiring less computational overhead. The results strongly suggests the possibility of deploying the designed system at the bedside. PMID:22195192

  4. Noisy Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation Modulates the Amplitude of EEG Synchrony Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Diana J.; Yogendrakumar, Vignan; Chiang, Joyce; Ty, Edna; Wang, Z. Jane; McKeown, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation has been associated with numerous cognitive and behavioural effects, such as enhancement of visual memory in healthy individuals, improvement of visual deficits in stroke patients, as well as possibly improvement of motor function in Parkinson’s disease; yet, the mechanism of action is unclear. Since Parkinson’s and other neuropsychiatric diseases are characterized by maladaptive dynamics of brain rhythms, we investigated whether noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation was associated with measurable changes in EEG oscillatory rhythms within theta (4–7.5 Hz), low alpha (8–10 Hz), high alpha (10.5–12 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz) and gamma (31–50 Hz) bands. We recorded the EEG while simultaneously delivering noisy bilateral, bipolar stimulation at varying intensities of imperceptible currents – at 10, 26, 42, 58, 74 and 90% of sensory threshold – to ten neurologically healthy subjects. Using standard spectral analysis, we investigated the transient aftereffects of noisy stimulation on rhythms. Subsequently, using robust artifact rejection techniques and the Least Absolute Shrinkage Selection Operator regression and cross-validation, we assessed the combinations of channels and power spectral features within each EEG frequency band that were linearly related with stimulus intensity. We show that noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation predominantly leads to a mild suppression of gamma power in lateral regions immediately after stimulation, followed by delayed increase in beta and gamma power in frontal regions approximately 20–25 s after stimulation ceased. Ongoing changes in the power of each oscillatory band throughout frontal, central/parietal, occipital and bilateral electrodes predicted the intensity of galvanic vestibular stimulation in a stimulus-dependent manner, demonstrating linear effects of stimulation on brain rhythms. We propose that modulation of neural oscillations is a potential mechanism for the previously-described cognitive and motor effects of vestibular stimulation, and noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation may provide an additional non-invasive means for neuromodulation of functional brain networks. PMID:23874865

  5. Exploring EEG signals in a Brain-Computer Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrycki, Pawe?; Mulawka, Jan

    2014-11-01

    This article shows the basic methods of electroencephalography EEG signal exploration. It contains information about data acquisition and different methods in which brain-computer interfaces can be made. The main focus of the paper is to find a way to determine the best set of parameters to detect movement of a hand in EEG signal. In the introduction there is also short introduction to EEG as well as fundamentals of support vector machine.

  6. Automatic detection of epileptic events in scalp EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Susana I.; D'Attellis, Carlos E.; Sirne, Ricardo O.

    2000-12-01

    In this work we present a technique base don wavelet analysis for EEGs processing of epileptic patients explored with scalp electrodes. Our aim is to provide a contribution to the automatic treatment of EEGs in the following areas of clinical applications: detection of transients, data reduction in long-term records and tracking of crisis propagation. We show the results obtained with the prosed method applied to several EEGs records.

  7. Independent component analysis of EEG dipole source localization in resting and action state of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almurshedi, Ahmed; Ismail, Abd Khamim

    2015-04-01

    EEG source localization was studied in order to determine the location of the brain sources that are responsible for the measured potentials at the scalp electrodes using EEGLAB with Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm. Neuron source locations are responsible in generating current dipoles in different states of brain through the measured potentials. The current dipole sources localization are measured by fitting an equivalent current dipole model using a non-linear optimization technique with the implementation of standardized boundary element head model. To fit dipole models to ICA components in an EEGLAB dataset, ICA decomposition is performed and appropriate components to be fitted are selected. The topographical scalp distributions of delta, theta, alpha, and beta power spectrum and cross coherence of EEG signals are observed. In close eyes condition it shows that during resting and action states of brain, alpha band was activated from occipital (O1, O2) and partial (P3, P4) area. Therefore, parieto-occipital area of brain are active in both resting and action state of brain. However cross coherence tells that there is more coherence between right and left hemisphere in action state of brain than that in the resting state. The preliminary result indicates that these potentials arise from the same generators in the brain.

  8. Neuronal Correlates of Maladaptive Coping: An EEG-Study in Tinnitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Sven; Joos, Kathleen; Langguth, Berthold; To, Wing Ting; De Ridder, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Here we aimed to investigate the neuronal correlates of different coping styles in patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Adaptive and maladaptive coping styles were determined in 85 tinnitus patients. Based on resting state EEG recordings, coping related differences in brain activity and connectivity were found. Maladaptive coping behavior was related to increases in subjective tinnitus loudness and distress, higher tinnitus severity and higher depression scores. EEG recordings demonstrated increased alpha activity over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) as well as increased connectivity in the default (i.e. resting state) network in tinnitus patients with a maladaptive coping style. Correlation analysis revealed that the changes in the DLPFC correlate primarily with maladaptive coping behavior, whereas the changes in the sgACC correlate with tinnitus severity and depression. Our findings are in line with previous research in the field of depression that during resting state a alpha band hyperconnectivity exists within the default network for patients who use a maladaptive coping style, with the sgACC as the dysfunctional node and that the strength of the connectivity is related to focusing on negative mood and catastrophizing about the consequences of tinnitus. PMID:24558383

  9. Using Single-trial EEG to Predict and Analyze Subsequent Memory

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Eunho; Herzmann, Grit; Curran, Tim; de Sa, Virginia R.

    2013-01-01

    We show that it is possible to successfully predict subsequent memory performance based on single-trial EEG activity before and during item presentation in the study phase. Two-class classification was conducted to predict subsequently remembered vs. forgotten trials based on subjects’ responses in the recognition phase. The overall accuracy across 18 subjects was 59.6 % by combining pre- and during-stimulus information. The single-trial classification analysis provides a dimensionality reduction method to project the high-dimensional EEG data onto a discriminative space. These projections revealed novel findings in the pre- and during-stimulus period related to levels of encoding. It was observed that the pre-stimulus information (specifically oscillatory activity between 25–35Hz) ?300 to 0 ms before stimulus presentation and during-stimulus alpha (7–12 Hz) information between 1000–1400 ms after stimulus onset distinguished between recollection and familiarity while the during-stimulus alpha information and temporal information between 400–800 ms after stimulus onset mapped these two states to similar values. PMID:24064073

  10. Neuronal correlates of maladaptive coping: an EEG-study in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sven; Joos, Kathleen; Langguth, Berthold; To, Wing Ting; De Ridder, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Here we aimed to investigate the neuronal correlates of different coping styles in patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Adaptive and maladaptive coping styles were determined in 85 tinnitus patients. Based on resting state EEG recordings, coping related differences in brain activity and connectivity were found. Maladaptive coping behavior was related to increases in subjective tinnitus loudness and distress, higher tinnitus severity and higher depression scores. EEG recordings demonstrated increased alpha activity over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) as well as increased connectivity in the default (i.e. resting state) network in tinnitus patients with a maladaptive coping style. Correlation analysis revealed that the changes in the DLPFC correlate primarily with maladaptive coping behavior, whereas the changes in the sgACC correlate with tinnitus severity and depression. Our findings are in line with previous research in the field of depression that during resting state a alpha band hyperconnectivity exists within the default network for patients who use a maladaptive coping style, with the sgACC as the dysfunctional node and that the strength of the connectivity is related to focusing on negative mood and catastrophizing about the consequences of tinnitus. PMID:24558383

  11. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  12. A robust algorithm for removing artifacts in EEG recorded during FMRI/EEG study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Hsu; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2012-04-01

    The main purpose of this study was to propose a robust algorithm for removing artifacts from the electroencephalographic (EEG) data collected during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The core idea of the proposed method was to remove the main gradient artifacts by the maximum cross-correlation method and to remove the residual artifacts by the rolling-ball algorithm and lowpass filtering. The results showed that the proposed algorithm had a better performance and was robust in the sense that its performance was maintained when the sampling rate of EEG data was decreased from 10KHz to 200Hz. PMID:22277595

  13. Amplitude-Integrated EEG and Range-EEG Modulation Associated with Pneumatic Orocutaneous Stimulation in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Steven M; Jegatheesan, Priya; Weiss, Sunshine; Govindaswami, Balaji; Wang, Jingyan; Lee, Jaehoon; Oder, Austin; Song, Dongli

    2013-01-01

    Background Controlled somatosensory stimulation strategies have demonstrated merit in developing oral feeding skills in premature infants who lack a functional suck, however, the effects of orosensory entrainment stimulation on electrocortical dynamics is unknown. Objective To determine the effects of servo-controlled pneumatic orocutaneous stimulation presented during gavage feedings on the modulation of aEEG and rEEG activity. Methods Two-channel EEG recordings were collected during 180 sessions that included orocutaneous stimulation and non-stimulation epochs among 22 preterm infants (mean gestational age = 28.56 weeks) who were randomized to treatment and control ‘sham’ conditions. The study was initiated at around 32 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA). The raw EEG was transformed into amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) margins, and range-EEG (rEEG) amplitude bands measured at 1-minute intervals and subjected to a mixed models statistical analysis. Results Multiple significant effects were observed in the processed EEG during and immediately following 3-minute periods of orocutaneous stimulation, including modulation of the upper and lower margins of the aEEG, and a reorganization of rEEG with an apparent shift from amplitude bands D and E to band C throughout the 23-minute recording period that followed the first stimulus block when compared to the sham condition. Cortical asymmetry also was apparent in both EEG measures. Conclusions Orocutaneous stimulation represents a salient trigeminal input which has both short- and long-term effects in modulating electrocortical activity, and thus, is hypothesized to represent a form of neural adaptation or plasticity that may benefit the preterm infant during this critical period of brain maturation. PMID:24310443

  14. Folate receptor {alpha} regulates cell proliferation in mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Congjun; Evans, Chheng-Orn; Stevens, Victoria L.; Owens, Timothy R.; Oyesiku, Nelson M.

    2009-11-01

    We have previously found that the mRNA and protein levels of the folate receptor alpha (FR{alpha}) are uniquely over-expressed in clinically human nonfunctional (NF) pituitary adenomas, but the mechanistic role of FR{alpha} has not fully been determined. We investigated the effect of FR{alpha} over-expression in the mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cell line as a model for NF pituitary adenomas. We found that the expression and function of FR{alpha} were strongly up-regulated, by Western blotting and folic acid binding assay. Furthermore, we found a higher cell growth rate, an enhanced percentage of cells in S-phase by BrdU assay, and a higher PCNA staining. These observations indicate that over-expression of FR{alpha} promotes cell proliferation. These effects were abrogated in the same {alpha}T3-1 cells when transfected with a mutant FR{alpha} cDNA that confers a dominant-negative phenotype by inhibiting folic acid binding. Finally, by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that mRNA expression of NOTCH3 was up-regulated in FR{alpha} over-expressing cells. In summary, our data suggests that FR{alpha} regulates pituitary tumor cell proliferation and mechanistically may involve the NOTCH pathway. Potentially, this finding could be exploited to develop new, innovative molecular targeted treatment for human NF pituitary adenomas.

  15. Tracking variations in the alpha activity in an electroencephalogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, K. S.

    1971-01-01

    The problem of tracking Alpha voltage variations in an electroencephalogram is discussed. This problem is important in encephalographic studies of sleep and effects of different stimuli on the brain. Very often the Alpha voltage is tracked by passing the EEG signal through a bandpass filter centered at the Alpha frequency, which hopefully will filter out unwanted noise from the Alpha activity. Some alternative digital techniques are suggested and their performance is compared with the standard technique. These digital techniques can be used in an environment where an electroencephalograph is interfaced with a small digital computer via an A/D convertor. They have the advantage that statistical statements about their variability can sometimes be made so that the effect sought can be assessed correctly in the presence of random fluctuations.

  16. An introduction to statistical concepts for the analysis of EEG data and the planning of pharmaco-EEG trials.

    PubMed

    Schlattmann, P

    2002-01-01

    The use of descriptive statistics and graphics for electroencephalogram (EEG) data after initial data reduction and the application of hypothesis tests to EEG data are described. In planning pharmaco-EEG trials, some notion of statistical power and variability of effect size is necessary as they are used to calculate sample size in parallel-group clinical trials. The need for sensitivity analysis during the study planning phase is demonstrated as well. Because EEG data are highly dimensional data, an outline of methods for reducing dimensionality is provided. These concepts are demonstrated using data from patients with Alzheimer's disease and from healthy controls. PMID:12575482

  17. On the analysis of EEG power, frequency and asymmetry in Parkinson’s disease during emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective While Parkinson’s disease (PD) has traditionally been described as a movement disorder, there is growing evidence of disruption in emotion information processing associated with the disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are specific electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics that discriminate PD patients and normal controls during emotion information processing. Method EEG recordings from 14 scalp sites were collected from 20 PD patients and 30 age-matched normal controls. Multimodal (audio-visual) stimuli were presented to evoke specific targeted emotional states such as happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise and disgust. Absolute and relative power, frequency and asymmetry measures derived from spectrally analyzed EEGs were subjected to repeated ANOVA measures for group comparisons as well as to discriminate function analysis to examine their utility as classification indices. In addition, subjective ratings were obtained for the used emotional stimuli. Results Behaviorally, PD patients showed no impairments in emotion recognition as measured by subjective ratings. Compared with normal controls, PD patients evidenced smaller overall relative delta, theta, alpha and beta power, and at bilateral anterior regions smaller absolute theta, alpha, and beta power and higher mean total spectrum frequency across different emotional states. Inter-hemispheric theta, alpha, and beta power asymmetry index differences were noted, with controls exhibiting greater right than left hemisphere activation. Whereas intra-hemispheric alpha power asymmetry reduction was exhibited in patients bilaterally at all regions. Discriminant analysis correctly classified 95.0% of the patients and controls during emotional stimuli. Conclusion These distributed spectral powers in different frequency bands might provide meaningful information about emotional processing in PD patients. PMID:24716619

  18. Atypical sleep architecture and the autism phenotype.

    PubMed

    Limoges, Elyse; Mottron, Laurent; Bolduc, Christianne; Berthiaume, Claude; Godbout, Roger

    2005-05-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that people with autism frequently experience sleep disorders and exhibit atypical sleep architecture. In order to establish whether sleep disorders truly belong to the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) phenotype, we conducted a subjective and objective study of sleep in a group of high-functioning adults with ASD but without sleep complaints, psychiatric disorders or neurological comorbidity. We compared the subjective data of 27 ASD participants with those of 78 healthy controls matched for chronological age and gender. Subjective measures of sleep in the clinical group were compatible with insomnia and/or a tolerable phase advance of the sleep-wake cycle. Subjective data were confirmed by objective laboratory sleep recordings in a subset of 16 patients and 16 controls. Persons with autism presented with a longer sleep latency (P < 0.04), more frequent nocturnal awakenings (P < 0.03), lower sleep efficiency (P < 0.03), increased duration of stage 1 sleep (P < 0.02), decreased non-REM sleep (stages 2 + 3 + 4, P < 0.04) and slow-wave sleep (stages 3 + 4, P < 0.05), fewer stage 2 EEG sleep spindles (P < 0.004), and a lower number of rapid eye movements during REM sleep (P < 0.006) than did control participants. On clinical scales, the scores of persons with ASD on the Beck Depression Inventory were similar to those of persons without, but their trait anxiety scores on the Spielberger Anxiety Scale were higher (P < 0.02). The state anxiety scores of the Spielberger scale and cortisol levels were the same in the two groups. Objective total sleep time correlated negatively with the Social (-0.52, P < 0.05) and Communication (-0.54, P < 0.02) scales of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised. The sleep of clinical subgroups (10 with high-functioning autism, six with Asperger syndrome) did not differ, except for the presence of fewer EEG sleep spindles in the Asperger syndrome subgroup (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these findings indicate that atypicalities of sleep constitute a salient feature of the adult ASD phenotype and this should be further investigated in younger patients. Moreover, the results are consistent with an atypical organization of neural networks subserving the macro- and microstructure of sleep in ASD. We are furthering this research with quantified analysis of sleep EEG. PMID:15705609

  19. Standardized Computer-based Organized Reporting of EEG: SCORE

    PubMed Central

    Beniczky, Sándor; Aurlien, Harald; Brøgger, Jan C; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Martins-da-Silva, António; Trinka, Eugen; Visser, Gerhard; Rubboli, Guido; Hjalgrim, Helle; Stefan, Hermann; Rosén, Ingmar; Zarubova, Jana; Dobesberger, Judith; Alving, Jørgen; Andersen, Kjeld V; Fabricius, Martin; Atkins, Mary D; Neufeld, Miri; Plouin, Perrine; Marusic, Petr; Pressler, Ronit; Mameniskiene, Ruta; Hopfengärtner, Rüdiger; Emde Boas, Walter; Wolf, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The electroencephalography (EEG) signal has a high complexity, and the process of extracting clinically relevant features is achieved by visual analysis of the recordings. The interobserver agreement in EEG interpretation is only moderate. This is partly due to the method of reporting the findings in free-text format. The purpose of our endeavor was to create a computer-based system for EEG assessment and reporting, where the physicians would construct the reports by choosing from predefined elements for each relevant EEG feature, as well as the clinical phenomena (for video-EEG recordings). A working group of EEG experts took part in consensus workshops in Dianalund, Denmark, in 2010 and 2011. The faculty was approved by the Commission on European Affairs of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). The working group produced a consensus proposal that went through a pan-European review process, organized by the European Chapter of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. The Standardised Computer-based Organised Reporting of EEG (SCORE) software was constructed based on the terms and features of the consensus statement and it was tested in the clinical practice. The main elements of SCORE are the following: personal data of the patient, referral data, recording conditions, modulators, background activity, drowsiness and sleep, interictal findings, “episodes” (clinical or subclinical events), physiologic patterns, patterns of uncertain significance, artifacts, polygraphic channels, and diagnostic significance. The following specific aspects of the neonatal EEGs are scored: alertness, temporal organization, and spatial organization. For each EEG finding, relevant features are scored using predefined terms. Definitions are provided for all EEG terms and features. SCORE can potentially improve the quality of EEG assessment and reporting; it will help incorporate the results of computer-assisted analysis into the report, it will make possible the build-up of a multinational database, and it will help in training young neurophysiologists. PMID:23506075

  20. Quantitative EEG and Current Source Density Analysis of Combined Antiepileptic Drugs and Dopaminergic Agents in Genetic Epilepsy: Two Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Emory, Hamlin; Wells, Christopher; Mizrahi, Neptune

    2015-07-01

    Two adolescent females with absence epilepsy were classified, one as attention deficit and the other as bipolar disorder. Physical and cognitive exams identified hypotension, bradycardia, and cognitive dysfunction. Their initial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were considered slightly slow, but within normal limits. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) data included relative theta excess and low alpha mean frequencies. A combined treatment of antiepileptic drugs with a catecholamine agonist/reuptake inhibitor was sequentially used. Both patients' physical and cognitive functions improved and they have remained seizure free. The clinical outcomes were correlated with statistically significant changes in QEEG measures toward normal Z-scores in both anterior and posterior regions. In addition, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) Z-scored source correlation analyses of the initial and treated QEEG data showed normalized patterns, supporting a neuroanatomic resolution. This study presents preliminary evidence for a neurophysiologic approach to patients with absence epilepsy and comorbid disorders and may provide a method for further research. PMID:25326290

  1. Phenotypic plasticity in nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Viney, Mark; Diaz, Anaid

    2012-01-01

    Model systems, including C. elegans, have been successfully studied to understand the genetic control of development. A genotype’s phenotype determines its evolutionary fitness in natural environments, which are typically harsh, heterogeneous and dynamic. Phenotypic plasticity, the process by which one genome can produce different phenotypes in response to the environment, allows genotypes to better match their phenotype to their environment. Phenotypic plasticity is rife among nematodes, seen both as differences among life-cycles stages, perhaps best exemplified by parasitic nematodes, as well as developmental choices, such as shown by the C. elegans dauer/non-dauer developmental choice. Understanding the genetic basis of phenotypically plastic traits will probably explain the function of many genes whose function still remains unclear. Understanding the adaptive benefits of phenotypically plastic traits requires that we understand how plasticity differs among genotypes, and the effects of this in diverse, different environments. PMID:24058831

  2. The EEG and fMRI signatures of neural integration: An investigation of meaningful gestures and corresponding speech.

    PubMed

    He, Yifei; Gebhardt, Helge; Steines, Miriam; Sammer, Gebhard; Kircher, Tilo; Nagels, Arne; Straube, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    One of the key features of human interpersonal communication is our ability to integrate information communicated by speech and accompanying gestures. However, it is still not fully understood how this essential combinatory process is represented in the human brain. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have unanimously attested the relevance of activation in the posterior superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus (pSTS/MTG), while electroencephalography (EEG) studies have shown oscillatory activity in specific frequency bands to be associated with multisensory integration. In the current study, we used fMRI and EEG to separately investigate the anatomical and oscillatory neural signature of integrating intrinsically meaningful gestures (IMG; e.g. "Thumbs-up gesture") and corresponding speech (e.g., "The actor did a good job"). In both the fMRI (n =2 0) and EEG (n = 20) study, participants were presented with videos of an actor either: performing IMG in the context of a German sentence (GG), IMG in the context of a Russian (as a foreign language) sentence (GR), or speaking an isolated German sentence without gesture (SG). The results of the fMRI experiment confirmed that gesture-speech processing of IMG activates the posterior MTG (GG>GR?GG>SG). In the EEG experiment we found that the identical integration process (GG>GR?GG>SG) is related to a centrally-distributed alpha (7-13 Hz) power decrease within 700-1400 ms post-onset of the critical word. These new findings suggest that BOLD response increase in the pMTG and alpha power decrease represent the neural correlates of integrating intrinsically meaningful gestures with their corresponding speech. PMID:25900470

  3. Classification of EEG abnormalities in partial epilepsy with simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, C; Vaudano, A E; Thornton, R C; Chaudhary, U J; Vulliemoz, S; Laufs, H; Rodionov, R; Carmichael, D W; Lhatoo, S D; Guye, M; Quian Quiroga, R; Lemieux, L

    2014-10-01

    Scalp EEG recordings and the classification of interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) in patients with epilepsy provide valuable information about the epileptogenic network, particularly by defining the boundaries of the "irritative zone" (IZ), and hence are helpful during pre-surgical evaluation of patients with severe refractory epilepsies. The current detection and classification of epileptiform signals essentially rely on expert observers. This is a very time-consuming procedure, which also leads to inter-observer variability. Here, we propose a novel approach to automatically classify epileptic activity and show how this method provides critical and reliable information related to the IZ localization beyond the one provided by previous approaches. We applied Wave_clus, an automatic spike sorting algorithm, for the classification of IED visually identified from pre-surgical simultaneous Electroencephalogram-functional Magnetic Resonance Imagining (EEG-fMRI) recordings in 8 patients affected by refractory partial epilepsy candidate for surgery. For each patient, two fMRI analyses were performed: one based on the visual classification and one based on the algorithmic sorting. This novel approach successfully identified a total of 29 IED classes (compared to 26 for visual identification). The general concordance between methods was good, providing a full match of EEG patterns in 2 cases, additional EEG information in 2 other cases and, in general, covering EEG patterns of the same areas as expert classification in 7 of the 8 cases. Most notably, evaluation of the method with EEG-fMRI data analysis showed hemodynamic maps related to the majority of IED classes representing improved performance than the visual IED classification-based analysis (72% versus 50%). Furthermore, the IED-related BOLD changes revealed by using the algorithm were localized within the presumed IZ for a larger number of IED classes (9) in a greater number of patients than the expert classification (7 and 5, respectively). In contrast, in only one case presented the new algorithm resulted in fewer classes and activation areas. We propose that the use of automated spike sorting algorithms to classify IED provides an efficient tool for mapping IED-related fMRI changes and increases the EEG-fMRI clinical value for the pre-surgical assessment of patients with severe epilepsy. PMID:24830841

  4. EEG and implanted sources in the brain.

    PubMed

    van Burik, M; Peters, M

    1999-12-01

    Localisation procedures are based on models of the EEG that are relatively simple. The models are based on assumptions and choices of parameters that can be mistaken. Thus, it is crucial to validate the localisation procedures used in EEG. One of the options is to use the data obtained with electrodes that are implanted within the brain of an epileptic patient as part of the pre-surgical evaluation. When one of two neighbouring electrodes is used as a current source and the other as a current sink this can be regarded as a current dipole. The current injected has to be below the threshold for activation of cells. The position of this dipole can be deduced from magnetic resonance or X-ray images. The current dipole gives rise to a potential distribution at the scalp that can be measured by EEG. The measurements can be compared with the potential distribution that is calculated in a forward computation. Another method is to use the measured potential at the scalp to localize the source and to compare the result with the actual position of the dipole. In this paper the measured potential distributions at the scalp due to implanted dipoles were used to evaluate different volume conductor models. Since intracerebral and subdural electrodes were introduced through trephine holes over the fronto-central areas, and the diameter of the holes was rather large, approximately 23 mm, special effort was put into modelling the skull. Two important assumptions could be validated in this study: the electric currents within the head are Ohmic and a dipole can be used to model the induced electric activity of pairs of contacts on subdural electrodes or intra cerebral electrodes. PMID:10916164

  5. Using EEG to Study Cognitive Development: Issues and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Martha Ann; Cuevas, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Developmental research is enhanced by use of multiple methodologies for examining psychological processes. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an efficient and relatively inexpensive method for the study of developmental changes in brain-behavior relations. In this review, we highlight some of the challenges for using EEG in cognitive development…

  6. The results of computer-assisted ambulatory 16-channel EEG.

    PubMed

    Morris, G L; Galezowska, J; Leroy, R; North, R

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the results of 16-channel computer-assisted outpatient long-term EEG monitoring (CO-LTM) and to compare those results to previously published reports using 4- and 8-channel ambulatory cassette-based continuous recordings. Patients were referred to a community-based outpatient EEG service for further diagnostic evaluation using this 16-channel bipolar recording system. 344 patients were recorded for an average of 1.4 days. EEG was reviewed for the presence of patient identified events, computer identified interictal and ictal abnormalities, and periodic time samples. A push-button recording that signified a clinical event was obtained in 166 patients (48.3%); 41 (11.9%) of these recordings included a seizure and 125 (36.3%) showed no EEG changes during the habitual event. An EEG abnormality was identified by the computer in an additional 90 recordings (26.2%), for an overall clinical usefulness of 74.4%. Among the 191 patients referred with previously normal routine EEGs, a total of 129 (67.5%) of these recordings were useful. 48 (25.1%) of these tracings were abnormal and an additional 81 push-button events (42.4%) showing no changes from background EEG were recorded. In conclusion, computer-assisted outpatient EEG monitoring provides good success rates for clinically useful information. PMID:7522152

  7. Effects of Fipronil on the EEG of Long Evans Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have reported that the non-stimulus driven EEG is differentially altered by deltamethrin or permethrin (Lyke and Herr, Toxicologist, 114(S-1):265, 2010). In the current study, we examined the ability to detect changes in EEG activity produced by fipronil, a phenylpyrazole pest...

  8. Usefulness of video-EEG in the paediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Striano, Pasquale; Parisi, Pasquale; Lubrano, Riccardo; Mahmood, Fahad; Pavone, Piero; Vitaliti, Giovanna

    2014-07-01

    Over the past two decades the EEG has technically improved from the use of analog to digital machines and more recently to video-EEG systems. Despite these advances, recording a technically acceptable EEG in an electrically hostile environment such as the emergency department (ED) remains a challenge, particularly with infants or young children. In 1996, a meeting of French experts established a set of guidelines for performing an EEG in the ED based on a review of the available literature. The authors highlighted the most suitable indications for an emergency EEG including clinical suspicion of cerebral death, convulsive and myoclonic status epilepticus, focal or generalized relapsing convulsive seizures as well as follow-up of known convulsive patients. They further recommended emergency EEG in the presence of doubt regarding the epileptic nature of the presentation as well as during the initiation or modification of sedation following brain injury. Subsequently, proposals for expanding the use of EEG in emergency patients have been advocated including trauma, vascular and anoxic-ischemic injury due to cardiorespiratory arrest, postinfective encephalopathy and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The aim of this review is to show the diagnostic importance of video-EEG, as well as highlighting the predictive prognostic factors for positive and negative outcomes, when utilized in the pediatric ED for seizures as well as other neurological presentations. PMID:24917085

  9. EEG Markers for Attention Deficit Disorder: Pharmacological and Neurofeedback Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterman, M. Barry

    2000-01-01

    Examined contribution of EEG findings in the classification and treatment of attention deficit and related behavioral problems in children. Found that quantitative EEG methods disclosed patterns of abnormality in children with ADD, suggested improved guidelines for pharmacological treatment, and introduced neurofeedback, a behavioral treatment for…

  10. Assessing cortical network properties using TMS-EEG.

    PubMed

    Rogasch, Nigel C; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2013-07-01

    The past decade has seen significant developments in the concurrent use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to directly assess cortical network properties such as excitability and connectivity in humans. New hardware solutions, improved EEG amplifier technology, and advanced data processing techniques have allowed substantial reduction of the TMS-induced artifact, which had previously rendered concurrent TMS-EEG impossible. Various physiological artifacts resulting from TMS have also been identified, and methods are being developed to either minimize or remove these sources of artifact. With these developments, TMS-EEG has unlocked regions of the cortex to researchers that were previously inaccessible to TMS. By recording the TMS-evoked response directly from the cortex, TMS-EEG provides information on the excitability, effective connectivity, and oscillatory tuning of a given cortical area, removing the need to infer such measurements from indirect measures. In the following review, we investigate the different online and offline methods for reducing artifacts in TMS-EEG recordings and the physiological information contained within the TMS-evoked cortical response. We then address the use of TMS-EEG to assess different cortical mechanisms such as cortical inhibition and neural plasticity, before briefly reviewing studies that have utilized TMS-EEG to explore cortical network properties at rest and during different functional brain states. PMID:22378543

  11. EEG Markers for Attention Deficit Disorder: Pharmacological and Neurofeedback Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterman, M. Barry

    2000-01-01

    Examined contribution of EEG findings in the classification and treatment of attention deficit and related behavioral problems in children. Found that quantitative EEG methods disclosed patterns of abnormality in children with ADD, suggested improved guidelines for pharmacological treatment, and introduced neurofeedback, a behavioral treatment for…

  12. EEG Patterns Related to Cognitive Tasks of Varying Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Denise A.; And Others

    A study was conducted that attempted to show changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns (identified using topographic EEG mapping) when children were required to perform the relatively simple task of button pressing during an eyes-open baseline session of low cognitive demand and a complex reaction time (RT) task of high cognitive demand.…

  13. Using EEG to Study Cognitive Development: Issues and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Martha Ann; Cuevas, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Developmental research is enhanced by use of multiple methodologies for examining psychological processes. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an efficient and relatively inexpensive method for the study of developmental changes in brain-behavior relations. In this review, we highlight some of the challenges for using EEG in cognitive development…

  14. An empirical EEG analysis in brain death diagnosis for adults

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianting; Cao, Yang; Zhang, Yue; Gu, Fanji; Zhu, Guoxian; Hong, Zhen; Wang, Bin; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is often used in the confirmatory test for brain death diagnosis in clinical practice. Because EEG recording and monitoring is relatively safe for the patients in deep coma, it is believed to be valuable for either reducing the risk of brain death diagnosis (while comparing other tests such as the apnea) or preventing mistaken diagnosis. The objective of this paper is to study several statistical methods for quantitative EEG analysis in order to help bedside or ambulatory monitoring or diagnosis. We apply signal processing and quantitative statistical analysis for the EEG recordings of 32 adult patients. For EEG signal processing, independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to separate the independent source components, followed by Fourier and time-frequency analysis. For quantitative EEG analysis, we apply several statistical complexity measures to the EEG signals and evaluate the differences between two groups of patients: the subjects in deep coma, and the subjects who were categorized as brain death. We report statistically significant differences of quantitative statistics with real-life EEG recordings in such a clinical study, and we also present interpretation and discussions on the preliminary experimental results. PMID:19003489

  15. Single-trial EEG analysis using similarity measure.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Yen

    2015-12-17

    Single-trial electroencephalogram (EEG) data are analyzed with similarity measure. Time-frequency representation is constructed from EEG signals. It is then weighted with t-statistics. Finally, the test data are discriminated with similarity measure. Compared with non-weighted version, the experimental results indicate that the proposed method obtains better results in classification accuracy. PMID:26684888

  16. Pulse artifact detection in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording based on EEG map topography.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Giannina R; Pittau, Francesca; Michel, Christoph M; Vulliemoz, Serge; Grouiller, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    One of the major artifact corrupting electroencephalogram (EEG) acquired during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the pulse artifact (PA). It is mainly due to the motion of the head and attached electrodes and wires in the magnetic field occurring after each heartbeat. In this study we propose a novel method to improve PA detection by considering the strong gradient and inversed polarity between left and right EEG electrodes. We acquired high-density EEG-fMRI (256 electrodes) with simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) at 3 T. PA was estimated as the voltage difference between right and left signals from the electrodes showing the strongest artifact (facial and temporal). Peaks were detected on this estimated signal and compared to the peaks in the ECG recording. We analyzed data from eleven healthy subjects, two epileptic patients and four healthy subjects with an insulating layer between electrodes and scalp. The accuracy of the two methods was assessed with three criteria: (i) standard deviation, (ii) kurtosis and (iii) confinement into the physiological range of the inter-peak intervals. We also checked whether the new method has an influence on the identification of epileptic spikes. Results show that estimated PA improved artifact detection in 15/17 cases, when compared to the ECG method. Moreover, epileptic spike identification was not altered by the correction. The proposed method improves the detection of pulse-related artifacts, particularly crucial when the ECG is of poor quality or cannot be recorded. It will contribute to enhance the quality of the EEG increasing the reliability of EEG-informed fMRI analysis. PMID:25307731

  17. Resting state cortical EEG rhythms in Alzheimer's disease: toward EEG markers for clinical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Fallani, Fabrizio De Vico; Blinowska, Katarzyna; Verrienti, Giulio; Frisoni, Giovanni; Rossini, Paolo M

    2013-01-01

    The human brain contains an intricate network of about 100 billion neurons. Aging of the brain is characterized by a combination of synaptic pruning, loss of cortico-cortical connections, and neuronal apoptosis that provoke an age-dependent decline of cognitive functions. Neural/synaptic redundancy and plastic remodeling of brain networking, also secondary to mental and physical training, promote maintenance of brain activity and cognitive status in healthy elderly subjects for everyday life. However, age is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) that impact on cognition. Growing evidence supports the idea that AD targets specific and functionally connected neuronal networks and that oscillatory electromagnetic brain activity might be a hallmark of the disease. In this line, digital electroencephalography (EEG) allows noninvasive analysis of cortical neuronal synchronization, as revealed by resting state brain rhythms. This review provides an overview of the studies on resting state eyes-closed EEG rhythms recorded in amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD subjects. Several studies support the idea that spectral markers of these EEG rhythms, such as power density, spectral coherence, and other quantitative features, differ among normal elderly, MCI, and AD subjects, at least at group level. Regarding the classification of these subjects at individual level, the most previous studies showed a moderate accuracy (70-80%) in the classification of EEG markers relative to normal and AD subjects. In conclusion, resting state EEG makers are promising for large-scale, low-cost, fully noninvasive screening of elderly subjects at risk of AD. PMID:24053043

  18. Classification of spontaneous EEG signals in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; de Tommaso, M.; Lucente, M.

    2007-08-01

    We set up a classification system able to detect patients affected by migraine without aura, through the analysis of their spontaneous EEG patterns. First, the signals are characterized by means of wavelet-based features, than a supervised neural network is used to classify the multichannel data. For the feature extraction, scale-dependent and scale-independent methods are considered with a variety of wavelet functions. Both the approaches provide very high and almost comparable classification performances. A complete separation of the two groups is obtained when the data are plotted in the plane spanned by two suitable neural outputs.

  19. The effects of catechol-O-methyl-transferase polymorphism Val158Met on functional connectivity in healthy young females: a resting EEG study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tien-Wen; Yu, Younger W-Y; Hong, Chen-Jee; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Wu, Hung-Chi; Chen, Tai-Jui

    2011-03-01

    The catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) gene has been linked to a wide spectrum of human phenotypes, including cognition, affective response, pain sensitivity, anxiety and psychosis. This study examined the modulatory effects of COMT Val158Met on neural interactions, indicated by connectivity strengths. Blood samples and resting state eyes-closed EEG signals were collected in 254 healthy young females. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism was decoded into 3 groups: Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met. The values of mutual information of 20 frontal-related channel pairs across delta, theta, alpha and beta frequencies were analyzed based on the time-frequency mutual information method. Our one-way ANOVA analyses revealed that the significant connection-frequency pairs were relatively left lateralized (P<0.01) and included F7-T3 and F7-C3 at delta frequency, and F3-F4, F7-T3, F7-C3, F7-P3, F3-C3, F3-F7 and F4-F8 at theta frequency. The F-test at F7-T3 and F7-C3 theta surpassed the statistical threshold of P<0.003 (after Bonferroni correction). For all the above connection-frequency pairs, there was a dose-dependent trend in the connectivity strengths of the alleles as follows: Val/Val>Val/Met>Met/Met. Our analyses complemented previous literature regarding neural modulation by the COMT Val158Met polymorphism. The implication to the pathogenesis in schizophrenia was also discussed. Further studies are needed to clarify whether there is gender difference on this gene-brain interaction. PMID:21195697

  20. Multi-channel EEG signal feature extraction and pattern recognition on horizontal mental imagination task of 1-D cursor movement for brain computer interface.

    PubMed

    Serdar Bascil, M; Tesneli, Ahmet Y; Temurtas, Feyzullah

    2015-06-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs), based on multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) signal processing convert brain signal activities to machine control commands. It provides new communication way with a computer by extracting electroencephalographic activity. This paper, deals with feature extraction and classification of horizontal mental task pattern on 1-D cursor movement from EEG signals. The hemispherical power changes are computed and compared on alpha & beta frequencies and horizontal cursor control extracted with only mental imagination of cursor movements. In the first stage, features are extracted with the well-known average signal power or power difference (alpha and beta) method. Principal component analysis is used for reducing feature dimensions. All features are classified and the mental task patterns are recognized by three neural network classifiers which learning vector quantization, multilayer neural network and probabilistic neural network due to obtaining acceptable good results and using successfully in pattern recognition via k-fold cross validation technique. PMID:25982878

  1. Uses and abuses of the EEG in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fowle, A J; Binnie, C D

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to indicate clinical situations in epilepsy in which the EEG provides useful information and those in which it is unhelpful and should be avoided. We performed an overview of the formal evidence available through Medline, Cochrane, and the Internet, as well as a traditional review based on the questions commonly asked of the authors department in a London teaching hospital. We found that there is insufficient high-quality evidence to informed decisions regarding EEG utility. The EEG has many uses in epilepsy but, without attention to detail in the referral, may be abused. Good liaison between the referrer and the EEG department is essential to make proper use of the EEG. PMID:11001331

  2. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Depression Using EEG Signals.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Sudarshan, Vidya K; Adeli, Hojjat; Santhosh, Jayasree; Koh, Joel E W; Adeli, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The complex, nonlinear and non-stationary electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are very tedious to interpret visually and highly difficult to extract the significant features from them. The linear and nonlinear methods are effective in identifying the changes in EEG signals for the detection of depression. Linear methods do not exhibit the complex dynamical variations in the EEG signals. Hence, chaos theory and nonlinear dynamic methods are widely used in extracting the EEG signal features for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of depression. Hence, this article presents the recent efforts on CAD of depression using EEG signals with a focus on using nonlinear methods. Such a CAD system is simple to use and may be used by the clinicians as a tool to confirm their diagnosis. It should be of a particular value to enable the early detection of depression. PMID:25997732

  3. ACNS Critical Care EEG Terminology: Value, Limitations, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of the EEG in the critically ill remains a clinical challenge. Because continuous EEG monitoring plays an increasing role in patients' care, it is important that research efforts investigate the clinical significance of periodic and rhythmic discharges and of background abnormalities. The 2012 American Clinical Neurophysiology Society critical care EEG terminology was designed to provide a comprehensive and objective vocabulary for that purpose. The interrater reliability of most of the proposed terms has been established, confirming that they represent a solid basis for research. Studies using the terminology have already started to define the clinical and prognostic values of several known or newly described EEG patterns. Yet, as the field of critical care EEG evolves, improvements will be required to further enhance the clarity of the terminology and incorporate new findings from ongoing research. PMID:26629754

  4. Analysis of epileptic EEG signals in children by symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Luca; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Melia, Umberto; Clariá, Francisco; Voss, Andreas; Caminal, Pere

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders among children. The study of surface EEG signals in patients with epilepsy by techniques based on symbolic dynamics can provide new insights into the epileptogenic process and may have considerable utility in the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. The goal of this work was to find patterns from a methodology based on symbolic dynamics to characterize seizures on surface EEG in pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy. A total of 76 seizures were analyzed by their pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal phases. An analytic signal envelope algorithm was applied to each EEG segment and its performance was evaluated. Several variables were defined from the distribution of words constructed on the EEG transformed into symbols. The results showed strong evidences of detectable non-linear changes in the EEG dynamics from pre-ictal to ictal phase and from ictal to post-ictal phase, with an accuracy higher than 70%. PMID:24110699

  5. Using Bayesian Model Selection to Characterize Neonatal Eeg Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Timothy J.

    2009-12-01

    The brains of premature infants must undergo significant maturation outside of the womb and are thus particularly susceptible to injury. Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings are an important diagnostic tool in determining if a newborn's brain is functioning normally or if injury has occurred. However, interpreting the recordings is difficult and requires the skills of a trained electroencephelographer. Because these EEG specialists are rare, an automated interpretation of newborn EEG recordings would increase access to an important diagnostic tool for physicians. To automate this procedure, we employ Bayesian probability theory to compute the posterior probability for the EEG features of interest and use the results in a program designed to mimic EEG specialists. Specifically, we will be identifying waveforms of varying frequency and amplitude, as well as periods of flat recordings where brain activity is minimal.

  6. Dynamic causal modelling of EEG and fMRI to characterize network architectures in a simple motor task.

    PubMed

    Bönstrup, Marlene; Schulz, Robert; Feldheim, Jan; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Gerloff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) has extended the understanding of brain network dynamics in a variety of functional systems. In the motor system, DCM studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or on magneto-/electroencephalography (M/EEG) have demonstrated movement-related causal information flow from secondary to primary motor areas and have provided evidence for nonlinear cross-frequency interactions among motor areas. The present study sought to investigate to what extent fMRI- and EEG-based DCM might provide complementary and synergistic insights into neuronal network dynamics. Both modalities share principal similarities in the formulation of the DCM. Thus, we hypothesized that DCM based on induced EEG responses (DCM-IR) and on fMRI would reveal congruent task-dependent network dynamics. Brain electrical (63-channel surface EEG) and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signals were recorded in separate sessions from 14 healthy participants performing simple isometric right and left hand grips. DCM-IR and DCM-fMRI were used to estimate coupling parameters modulated by right and left hand grips within a core motor network of six regions comprising bilateral primary motor cortex (M1), ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and supplementary motor area (SMA). We found that DCM-fMRI and DCM-IR similarly revealed significant grip-related increases in facilitatory coupling between SMA and M1 contralateral to the active hand. A grip-dependent interhemispheric reciprocal inhibition between M1 bilaterally was only revealed by DCM-fMRI but not by DCM-IR. Frequency-resolved coupling analysis showed that the information flow from contralateral SMA to M1 was predominantly a linear alpha-to-alpha (9-13Hz) interaction. We also detected some cross-frequency coupling from SMA to contralateral M1, i.e., between lower beta (14-21Hz) at the SMA and higher beta (22-30Hz) at M1 during right hand grip and between alpha (9-13Hz) at SMA and lower beta (14-21Hz) at M1 during left hand grip. In conclusion, the strategy of informing EEG source-space configurations with fMRI-derived coordinates, cross-validating basic connectivity maps and analysing frequency coding allows for deeper insight into the motor network architecture of the human brain. The present results provide evidence for the robustness of non-invasively measured causal information flow from secondary motor areas such as SMA towards M1 and further contribute to the validation of the methodological approach of multimodal DCM to explore human network dynamics. PMID:26334836

  7. Time perception at different EEG-vigilance levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human time perception is influenced by various factors such as attention and drowsiness. Nevertheless, the impact of cerebral vigilance fluctuations on temporal perception has not been sufficiently explored. We assumed that the state of vigilance ascertained by electroencephalography (EEG) during the perception of a given auditory rhythm would influence its reproduction. Thus, we hypothesised that the re-tapping interval length and the accuracy of reproduction performance would vary depending on the state of vigilance determined by EEG. Methods 12 female and 9 male subjects ranging from 21 to 38 years (M = 25.52, SD = 3.75) participated in a test paradigm comprising a) a resting EEG for the determination of vigilance while an auditory rhythm was presented, b) a short activity of the proband to be sure of sufficient alertness, and c) a tapping task to reproduce the presented rhythm. Vigilance states of three consecutive 1-sec-EEG-segments of the resting EEG before the reproduction phase were classified using the Vigilance Algorithm Leipzig (VIGALL). Results and discussion Reproduction accuracy was more precise after high EEG-vigilance stages. Thus, the subjects’ mean deviation from the given rhythm was lower (t(17) = ?2.733, p < 0.05) after high vigilance stage A (MW = 0.046, SD = 0.049) than after low vigilance stage B (MW = 0.065, SD = 0.067). The re-tapping-length was significantly shorter (t(17) = ?2.190, p < 0.05) for reproduction phases following high EEG-vigilance stage A compared to the lower EEG-vigilance stage B. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis of a varying time perception and of speed alterations of the internal clock after different states of EEG-vigilance, which were automatically classified by VIGALL. Thus, alterations of cognitive processing may be assessable by specific EEG-patterns. PMID:22998925

  8. Advanced Analysis of Pharmaco-EEG Data in Humans.

    PubMed

    Jobert, Marc; Wilson, Frederick J

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaco-electroencephalography (EEG) is a non-invasive method used to assess the effects of pharmacological compounds on the central nervous system by processing the EEG signals which directly reveal the spontaneous synchronised postsynaptic neuronal activity of the cortex with high temporal resolution. The International Pharmaco-Encephalography Society (IPEG) has recently published guidelines, which were produced by a global panel of EEG experts, with the goal to increase the standardisation of pharmaco-EEG studies in human subjects and facilitate the comparability of data across laboratories, thus enabling data-pooling and meta-analyses. The recommended standard experimental procedure is to measure EEG activity under vigilance-controlled and resting conditions. The IPEG guidelines thoroughly present the technical details and therefore constitute a robust reference. The complementary aim of the present paper is to focus on practical aspects, pitfalls and precautions to be considered when processing pharmaco-EEG data by covering the following topics: (1) investigate the stability and reliability of 5-min EEG recordings under both vigilance-controlled and resting conditions; (2) assess the spontaneous time-dependent changes in spectral activity over time, and (3) apply the data-processing strategies suggested in the pharmaco-EEG guidelines and designed to optimally capture drug effects. For this purpose, the EEG data from a randomised, double-blind, crossover trial aimed at comparing the effect of diazepam (10 mg) and placebo in 16 healthy male volunteers is used to illustrate the discussion of the processing techniques and difficulties commonly faced when analysing pharmaco-EEG data. PMID:26900936

  9. Lateralized modulation of posterior alpha oscillations in children.

    PubMed

    Vollebregt, Madelon A; Zumer, Johanna M; Ter Huurne, Niels; Castricum, Jesminne; Buitelaar, Jan K; Jensen, Ole

    2015-12-01

    The evidence for a functionally inhibitory role of alpha oscillations is growing stronger, mostly derived from studies in healthy adults investigating spatial attention. It remains unexplored if the modulation of alpha band oscillations plays a similar functional role in typically developing children. The aim of this study was to characterize alpha modulations in children in relation to attentional performance. To this end, the posterior alpha activity (8-12Hz) in children between 7 and 10years old was measured using EEG while they performed a visuospatial covert attention task. We found that the alpha activity decreased in the hemisphere contralateral to the attended hemifield, whereas it relatively increased in the other hemisphere. In addition, we found that the degree of lateralized alpha modulation predicted performance on the attention task by negatively predicting the response time on invalid trials. Of note, children who were behaviorally less influenced by spatial cueing also were children with a clear lateralized alpha modulation pattern, with a significantly stronger alpha lateralization in the left hemisphere than children who were influenced more by spatial cueing. In addition, a bias to the right visual field such as that commonly observed in children, was significantly smaller or absent in the children influenced least by spatial cueing. Among all children, the magnitude of this visual field bias was positively related to the ability to modulate alpha activity. In conclusion, we have shown that the pattern of alpha oscillations modulated by attention is already present in 7-10year old typically developing children. Although a similar pattern is observed in adults, the consequences for behavior are different. The fact that alpha modulation is already present at this age opens up the possibility of using hemispheric alpha lateralization as a tool to study the physiological basis of attention deficits in clinical disorders such as ADHD. PMID:26119021

  10. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  11. EEG microstates during resting represent personality differences.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Felix; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L; Milz, Patricia; Gianotti, Lorena R R

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the spontaneous brain electric activity of 13 skeptics and 16 believers in paranormal phenomena; they were university students assessed with a self-report scale about paranormal beliefs. 33-channel EEG recordings during no-task resting were processed as sequences of momentary potential distribution maps. Based on the maps at peak times of Global Field Power, the sequences were parsed into segments of quasi-stable potential distribution, the 'microstates'. The microstates were clustered into four classes of map topographies (A-D). Analysis of the microstate parameters time coverage, occurrence frequency and duration as well as the temporal sequence (syntax) of the microstate classes revealed significant differences: Believers had a higher coverage and occurrence of class B, tended to decreased coverage and occurrence of class C, and showed a predominant sequence of microstate concatenations from A to C to B to A that was reversed in skeptics (A to B to C to A). Microstates of different topographies, putative "atoms of thought", are hypothesized to represent different types of information processing.The study demonstrates that personality differences can be detected in resting EEG microstate parameters and microstate syntax. Microstate analysis yielded no conclusive evidence for the hypothesized relation between paranormal belief and schizophrenia. PMID:21644026

  12. Estimating human response to taste using EEG.

    PubMed

    Park, C; Looney, D; Mandic, D P

    2011-01-01

    In order to implement affective computing, there have been several studies to elicit human emotion using audio and video stimuli or by recalling previous events. Taste-elicited emotion has also been investigated using food to induce different levels of pleasure. This is monitored using a range of methods, from questionnaire feedback to electrophysiological responses of autonomic nervous system (ANS) and central nervous system (CNS). In this work, we establish that emotions elicited by taste can be monitored using electroencephalogram (EEG), and, for rigour, compare the response to a taste stimulus against the response to the recall of the same taste. The character of emotions were assessed using a subjective measurement, the hedonic score, which describes the pleasant or unpleasant moods of subjects in response to each taste. The classification performance of EEG responses shows excellent separability between the different emotions induced by different tastes. In addition, it is shown that emotion elicited by taste recall is stronger than the stimulus-elicited emotion. PMID:22255786

  13. Analysing specificity of a bipolar EEG measurement.

    PubMed

    Vaisanen, Juho; Ryynanen, Outi; Hyttinen, Jari; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    2006-01-01

    The objective in bioelectric measurements such as ECG and EEG is to register the signal arising from sources in the region of interest. It is also desired that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a measurement is high. The sensitivity of an ideal measurement should focus on and be greater on the target areas in comparison to other areas of the volume conductor. Previously the half-sensitivity volume (HSV) has been applied to describe how focused the measurement is. In this paper we introduce a concept of the half-sensitivity ratio (HSR) which describes how well the sensitivity is concentrated in HSV compared to other source regions i.e. how specific the measurement is to the sources in HSV. Further we may have different region of interests (ROI) to which the measurements are wanted to be specific. Then the concept is called region of interest sensitivity ratio (ROISR). We present here an application of the HSR in analysing sensitivity distributions of bioelectric measurements. We studied the effects of interelectrode distance and the scalp/skull/brain resistivity ratio on the HSR of a bipolar EEG measurement with a three-layer spherical head model. The results indicate that when the focus of interest is on cortical activity more specified and concentrated sensitivity distributions are achieved with smaller interelectrode distances. Further a preliminary measurement with visual evoked potentials provides evidence of the relationship between HSR and SNR of a measurement. PMID:17945619