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1

Los contaminantes ambientales bifenilos policlorinados (PCB) y sus efectos sobre el Sistema Nervioso y la salud  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Environmental pollution is a world-wide issue which is a matter for concern among the international community. Great industrialized cities are the most polluted and Mexico City is among them. However, pollution affects places which are far away from contaminated urban areas, thus damaging eco-systems. Environmental pollution is responsible for an alarming and increasing list of illnesses in humans, animals

Carolina Miller-Pérez; Eduardo Sánchez-Islas; Samuel Mucio-Ramírez; José Mendoza-Sotelo; Martha León-Olea

2009-01-01

2

SERVICIOS AMBIENTALES, AGUA Y ECONOMIA ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICIES, WATER AND ECONOMY Octubre 22\\/2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental services (ES) related to natural ecosystems are seriously threatened by local activities and global warming. The ES related to water and its effect on quality and quantity in watersheds that supply aqueducts and irrigation systems has great social and economic importance. For Bogotá-Colombia the ES of páramos and cloudy forest in the Chingaza basin represents US$18.2 million per year.

Juan Pablo Ruiz Soto

3

Toward socially inspired social neuroscience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social neuroscience, often viewed as studying the neural foundations of social cognition, has roots in multiple disciplines. This paper argues that it needs a firmer base in social psychology. First, we outline some major opportunities from social psychology—the power of social context and social motives in shaping human behavior. Second, as the social cognition field moves away from studying only

Alexander Todorov; Lasana T. Harris; Susan T. Fiske

2006-01-01

4

Socialization: Insights from Social Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Socialization is the process by which individuals are assisted to become members of their social groups. Findings from social cognition and cross-cultural psychology offer two major insights into the socialization process. First, basic social cognitive principles imply that the immediate environ- ment functions as a socialization agent by activating and inhibiting knowledge structures and thereby shaping cognition and behavior. Second,

Selin Kesebir; David H. Uttal; Wendi Gardner

2010-01-01

5

Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unpacking social work's low self-image and even lower social prestige reveals multiple layers of assumptions both within and outside the discipline that coalesce to construct a profession at odds with itself. Social work colludes with social forces which devalue its work while it presents a series of signs that reinforce the negative stereo-types associated with its practices. Social work projects

Gregory D. Gross

2007-01-01

6

FUNCIONAMIENTO Y COMUNICACIÓN FAMILIAR Y CONSUMO DE SUSTANCIAS EN LA ADOLESCENCIA: EL ROL MEDIADOR DEL APOYO SOCIAL1  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESUMEN En el presente estudio se analiza el apoyo social como un recurso protector para el ajuste de los adolescentes. Concretamente, se estudian tanto los efectos directos como los mediadores del apoyo social entre las características de funcionamiento y comunicación familiar y el consumo de sustancias de los adolescentes. Con este objetivo, 431 chicos y chicas de 15 a 17

Teresa Isabel Jiménez; Gonzalo Musitu; Sergio Murgui

2006-01-01

7

Social Indicators and Social Forecasting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The paper identifies major types of social indicators and explains how they can be used in social forecasting. Social indicators are defined as statistical measures relating to major areas of social concern and/or individual well being. Examples of social indicators are projections, forecasts, outlook statements, time-series statistics, and…

Johnston, Denis F.

8

Social Epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social epidemiology has been defined as the branch of epidemiology that studies the social distribution and social determinants\\u000a of health (Berkman and Kawachi 2000). As all aspects of human life are inextricably bound within the context of social relations,\\u000a every conceivable epidemiological exposure is related to social factors. In this broad sense, all epidemiology is social epidemiology\\u000a (Kaufman and Cooper

Tarani Chandola; Michael Marmot

9

Social Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Earlier this year, CASE formed a social media task force to explore what educational institutions are trying to achieve with social media presence and learn about social media engagements at member institutions. CASE, in partnership with mStoner and Slover Linett Strategies, in June launched a benchmarking survey on social media in advancement by…

Slover-Linett, Cheryl; Stoner, Michael

2010-01-01

10

Social Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Earlier this year, CASE formed a social media task force to explore what educational institutions are trying to achieve with social media presence and learn about social media engagements at member institutions. CASE, in partnership with mStoner and Slover Linett Strategies, in June launched a benchmarking survey on social media in advancement by…

Slover-Linett, Cheryl; Stoner, Michael

2010-01-01

11

Social media and social reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Media provide an exciting and novel view into social phenomena. The vast amounts of data that can be gathered from the Internet coupled with massively parallel supercomputers such as the Cray XMT open new vistas for research. Conclusions drawn from such analysis must recognize that social media are distinct from the underlying social reality. Rigorous validation is essential. This

William N. Reynolds; Marta S. Weber; Robert M. Farber; Courtney D. Corley; Andrew J. Cowell; Michelle L. Gregory

2010-01-01

12

Social Phobia  

MedlinePLUS

... that it prevents them from speaking up or socializing most of the time, it's probably more than ... A shy child who watches this learns that socializing is uncomfortable, distressing, and something to avoid. Life ...

13

Social Welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although it is commonly agreed that social welfare ideas and philosophies emanate from many faith traditions, the complex\\u000a link between religion and social welfare merits careful examination. Prowelfare values only set the overall social expectations;\\u000a they do not create formal social welfare programs. Helping the needy can range from a one-time help for a known neighbor to\\u000a the establishment of

Ram A. Cnaan; Charlene C. McGrew

14

Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)  

MedlinePLUS

... phobia, everyday interactions cause irrational anxiety, fear, self-consciousness and embarrassment. Social anxiety disorder is a chronic ... other health conditions can increase feelings of self-consciousness and may trigger social anxiety disorder in some ...

15

Social Mobility and Social Participation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines data related to social mobility and social participation of Americans. Topics include educational and occupational mobility; voting; volunteer work; charitable giving; community participation; views on religion; and anomie. For journal availability, see SO 506 144. (Author/DB)|

Sewell, William H.

1978-01-01

16

Social capital and social economics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The “discovery” of social capital in the early 1990s led to an upsurge of research into the economic impact of social cohesion\\u000a and governmental effectiveness. This paper outlines key developments in the social capital literature over the past 13 years.\\u000a It then examines theory and evidence of the links between social cohesion, quality of governance, economic performance and\\u000a human welfare.

Paul Killerby; Joe Wallis

2002-01-01

17

Social facilitation with social robots?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regarding the future usage of social robots in workplace scenarios, we addressed the question of potential mere robotic presence effects on human performance. Applying the experimental social facilitation paradigm in social robotics, we compared task performance of 106 participants on easy and complex cognitive and motoric tasks across three presence groups (alone vs. human present vs. robot present). Results revealed

Nina Riether; Frank Hegel; Britta Wrede; Gernot Horstmann

2012-01-01

18

What's social about social learning?  

PubMed

Research on social learning in animals has revealed a rich variety of cases where animals--from caddis fly larvae to chimpanzees--acquire biologically important information by observing the actions of others. A great deal is known about the adaptive functions of social learning, but very little about the cognitive mechanisms that make it possible. Even in the case of imitation, a type of social learning studied in both comparative psychology and cognitive science, there has been minimal contact between the two disciplines. Social learning has been isolated from cognitive science by two longstanding assumptions: that it depends on a set of special-purpose modules--cognitive adaptations for social living; and that these learning mechanisms are largely distinct from the processes mediating human social cognition. Recent research challenges these assumptions by showing that social learning covaries with asocial learning; occurs in solitary animals; and exhibits the same features in diverse species, including humans. Drawing on this evidence, I argue that social and asocial learning depend on the same basic learning mechanisms; these are adapted for the detection of predictive relationships in all natural domains; and they are associative mechanisms--processes that encode information for long-term storage by forging excitatory and inhibitory links between event representations. Thus, human and nonhuman social learning are continuous, and social learning is adaptively specialized--it becomes distinctively "social"--only when input mechanisms (perceptual, attentional, and motivational processes) are phylogenetically or ontogenetically tuned to other agents. PMID:21895355

Heyes, Cecilia

2011-09-05

19

Social Administration, Social Policy and Socialism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper develops from the marxist critique of social policy under capitalism a speculative picture of socialist social policy. It draws its ideas from:(a) socialist theory of the state, human nature, family life, and the relationship between need and resources(b) 'socialist' countries such as Russia and Cuba(c) struggles about welfare policies under capitalism.It attempts to answer a number of questions

Bob Deacon

1981-01-01

20

Social isolation  

PubMed Central

Social species, by definition, form organizations that extend beyond the individual. These structures evolved hand in hand with behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms to support them because the consequent social behaviors helped these organisms survive, reproduce, and care for offspring sufficiently long that they too reproduced. Social isolation represents a lens through which to investigate these behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms. Evidence from human and nonhuman animal studies indicates that isolation heightens sensitivity to social threats (predator evasion) and motivates the renewal of social connections. The effects of perceived isolation in humans share much in common with the effects of experimental manipulations of isolation in nonhuman social species: increased tonic sympathetic tonus and HPA activation, and decreased inflammatory control, immunity, sleep salubrity, and expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid responses. Together, these effects contribute to higher rates of morbidity and mortality in older adults.

Cacioppo, John T.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Norman, Greg J.; Berntson, Gary G.

2011-01-01

21

Social Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

A society is characterized by the common attitudes and behavior of its members. Such behavior reflects purposive decision making by individuals, given the environment they live in. Thus, as technology changes, so might social norms. There were big changes in social norms during the 20th century, especially in sexual mores. In 1900 only six percent of unwed females engaged in

Jeremy Greenwood; Nezih Guner

2008-01-01

22

Social Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Society is characterized by the common attitudes and behaviour of its members. Such behaviour reflects purposive decision making by individuals, given the environment they live in. Thus, as technology changes, so might social norms. There were big changes in social norms during the 20th Century, especially in sexual mores. In 1900 only six percent of unwed females engaged in premarital

Jeremy Greenwoodyand Nezih Gunerz; Nezih Guner

1964-01-01

23

Social Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Society is characterized by the common attitudes and behaviour of its members. Such behaviour reflects purposive decision making by individuals, given the environment they live in. Thus, as technology changes, so might social norms. There were big changes in social norms during the 20th Century, especially in sexual mores. In 1900 only six percent of unwed females engaged in premarital

Jeremy Greenwood; Nezih Guner

2007-01-01

24

Social Revolution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

MySpace and Facebook may have been pioneers in the world of social software, but nowadays, colleges and universities across the country are embracing better and more targeted forms of technology, to enable their campus users to interact. Today, the world of social software includes traditional venues and formats: (1) blogs; (2) wikis; and (3)…

Villano, Matt

2007-01-01

25

Social Psychology (Program Description)  

NSF Publications Database

... and Cognitive Sciences Social Psychology Description The Social Psychology Program at NSF ... emotion, social comparison and social influence, and the psychophysiological and neurophysiological ...

26

Social indicators.  

PubMed

The notions of social indicators and social accounting, expressed by analogy with the national economic accounts, generated excitement in the 1960's, and the interest continues to grow if we may judge from governmental activity and the publication of programmatic and research papers. But the concepts which focused much of the early enthusiasm gave exaggerated promise of policy applications and provided an unproductive basis for research. The essential theoretical prerequisites for developing a system of social accounts-defining the variables and the interrelationships among them-are missing. It is now realized that evaluation research, particularly experimentation, must be relied on for evaluation of government programs. Through the development and analysis of descriptive time series and the modeling of social processes, we will be able to describe the state of the society and its dynamics and thus improve immensely our ability to state problems in a productive fashion, obtain clues as to promising lines of endeavor, and ask good questions. But these activities cannot measure program effectiveness. Finally, we must be skeptical about definitions of the social indicators enterprise which confine it to social engineering efforts. The issue is not whether social indicators are useful for policy but, rather, how this usefulness comes about. The interest in social indicators has stimulated a revival of interest in quantitative, comparative, social analysis (60), in the analysis of social change, in conceptual and measurement work on such topics as prejudice, crime, and learning, and in the development of models of social processes. The fruit of these efforts will be more directly a contribution to the policy-maker's cognition than to his decisions. Decision emerges from a mosaic of inputs, including valuational and political, as well as technical components. The work we have described deals with only one type of input; it is a contribution to the intellectual mapping process which is essential if decisionmakers are to know what it is that has changed, and how the change has come about. The character of the scientific contribution will, of course, vary with the subject. Models of a few social processes, such as those pertaining to social mobility and population dynamics, are in varying degrees of development and application. But for many other areas, the appropriate question is not "How does it work?" but "How has it changed?" And for still others, the question is "What is it?" The work of the Berkeley sociologists on the measurement of prejudice illustrates very well the interaction between measurement and conceptual development that is required to answer the question "What is it?" In the present state of work on this topic, the appropriate hypotheses are not so much concerned with the relationships of the phenomenon to others in a causal system, as they are with the nature of the phenomenon itself. What is being tested is a set of propositions that certain ways of thinking about social reality are productive, that a phenomenon as conceptualized is "there" in the reality being measured, and that the investigators have found a set of measures which tell us something we need to know about changes in the society. It is apparent that many different types of work go on under the rubric of social indicators. What is important is that the field be seen as an arena for long-term development, as an effort of social scientists to push forward developments in concepts and in methodology that promise payoffs to both science and public policy.Such a view is reflected in the funding commitments of the National Science Foundation, which supports many of the research projects reported above. What we may expect of this work was aptly stated by Duncan (61): The value of improved measures of social change ... is not that they necessarily resolve theoretical issues concerning social dynamics or settle pragmatic issues,of social policy, but that they may permit those issues to be argued more produ

Sheldon, E B; Parke, R

1975-05-16

27

[Social psychiatry as a social science].  

PubMed

Social Psychiatry mostly is perceived as social epidemiology. But other branches of sociology and social psychology have influenced its history as well, e.g. family sociology and the sociology of institutions. Recently, research in family milieu and social environment has gained some importance. It is demonstrated how research in social psychiatry follows developments in other social sciences. PMID:2447640

Finzen, A

1987-01-01

28

Social Explorer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the name "Social Explorer" may conjure up images for some of a new and powerful social networking site, this site is actually a splendid way to learn more about your friends and neighbors. Created by a team of demographers and GIS experts at Queens College in New York, the Social Explorer website offers access to dozens of different interactive data maps including time series maps that chart the ethnic transitions that have occurred throughout New York and Los Angeles over the past decades. Before delving into the maps any further, first-time visitors may want to go to the "Getting Started" section, where they can read a brief introductory essay about these data maps and their basic objectives. Finally, visitors can also use the site to generate their own specialized maps and reports.

29

Social Engineering hits Social Commerce  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Looking at social commerce, a bunch of bewildering phenomena attracts the attention of social psychologists. The way customers participate today shows attitudes and ethical behavior which cannot be explained from the inherent conditions of Web 2.0 environments alone. Fraud often succeeds, when you do not expect it, and honesty can be found under circumstances that do not support honesty at all. The current situation seems to result from customers assigning experience and ethics from real world business to virtual business environments. But there are indications that this situation may change. Social commerce could suffer as soon as customers would use its inherent weaknesses to their own advantage. The following article outlines first approaches to research into this topic.

Degenhardt, Werner; Wiele, Johannes

30

Social Intelligence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the concept of social intelligence (SI), including its history and contexts in which it may be valid; assesses SI from the perspectives of information management, information policy, and information economics; reviews tools and techniques associated with SI, including networks, hypermedia, and connectionism; and considers education and…

Cronin, Blaise; Davenport, Elisabeth

1993-01-01

31

Socials Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eric Sheninger, the principal at New Milford High School in Bergen County, NJ, is well-known in ed tech circles as an evangelist for the use of web 2.0 tools in K-12 education. New Milford has made collaboration a pillar of its educational platform, and Sheninger believes that social media helps students learn how to collaborate. In fact, he…

Raths, David

2013-01-01

32

Social lending  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prosper, the largest online social lending marketplace with nearly a million members and $178 million in funded loans, uses an auction amongst lenders to finance each loan. In each auction, the borrower specifies D, the amount he wants to borrow, and a maximum acceptable interest rate R. Lenders specify the amounts ai they want to lend, and bid on the

Ning Chen; Arpita Ghosh; Nicolas S. Lambert

2009-01-01

33

Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The product of a Special Studies Institute, this teacher developed resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents social study concepts and activities relative to education in the urban out-of-doors. Focus is on the study of man (past, present, and future) interacting with his environment. Listed below are activity examples: (1)…

Bieber, Edward

34

Social discounting.  

PubMed

The amount of money a person was willing to forgo in order to give 75 dollars to another person decreased as a hyperbolic function of the perceived social distance between them. Similar hyperbolic functions have previously been shown to describe both time and probability discounting. PMID:16623683

Jones, Bryan; Rachlin, Howard

2006-04-01

35

Social Cities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humans are social animals: relationships are critical to our wellbeing. Indeed, a lack of face-to-face contact can put our health at risk. This report looks at ways to make cities better places to live by increasing our opportunities to connect with other people. It examines how the design and functioning of a city – from transport networks to the availability

Jane-Frances Kelly; Peter Breadon; Caitrin Davis; Amelie Hunter; Peter Mares; Daniel Mullerworth; Tom Quinn; Ben Weidmann

2012-01-01

36

HABILIDADES SOCIALES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Últimamente se han puesto de moda trabajos, tratados y estudios sobre el concepto de “habilidad social” pero, ¿ cómo podemos definir este concepto? La verdad es que definiciones sobre el término hay muchas, pero todas ellas tienen un denominador común: son un conjunto de comportamientos eficaces para\\/en las relaciones interpersonales”

Carmen Grimaldi Herrera

2009-01-01

37

On the Social Study of Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School research should be more social in nature, i.e., contextualized, interactive/dynamic, and sensitive to participant conceptions. To explore the possibilities and limitations of the social study of social studies, a conception of social research is delineated, using recent social studies classroom research as illustration. Research utilization…

Cornbleth, Catherine

1982-01-01

38

Modeling Socialness in Dynamic Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Socialness refers to the ability to elicit social in- teraction and social links among people. It is a concept often associated with individuals. Although there are tangible benefits in socialness, there is little research in its modeling. In this paper, we study socialness as a property that can be associated with items, beyond its traditional association with people. We aim

Tuan-Anh Hoang; Ee-Peng Lim; Palakorn Achananuparp; Jing Jiang; Loo-Nin Teow

2011-01-01

39

Habilidades sociales y apoyo social en esquizofrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Skill and Social Support in Schizophrenia. Although both constructs of Social Skill and Social Support are known for their significance in the field of schizophrenia, the relationship between the two has hardly been explored. The available research is generally limited to the structural dimension of Social Support and it tends to be based on small, heterogenous samples. This study

Rosa Jiménez García-Bóveda; Antonio J. Vázquez Morejón; Raquel Vázquez Morejón Jiménez

2007-01-01

40

Social medicine and social policy.  

PubMed Central

Social medicine as a term has achieved acceptance in medical education and medical practice, although there is still some question as to its acceptance in reality. The term had its origin in the vigorous nineteenth-century efforts at both medical and social reform, combining the two in a recognition of the intimate connection between social factors and the causation of disease. Henry Ernest Sigerist, a Swiss physician and noted scholar of medical history, formulated the broadest concept in the 1930s, attracting students and a latent American reform movement toward the idea of restructuring medical education as one part of social reform, and indicating ways of restructuring medical practice as another element in improving medical care at the same time. In addition to promulgating the doctrine, he established the policy of examining and describing systems of medical education and medical care in other parts of the world, not only to assist in improving medical care in countries with well-organized systems, but to assist countries with poor resources and lesser organizational capability in meeting the goals of social medicine. Doubt as to the durability of the concept has been expressed, insofar as the recommended improvements have lagged behind the expression, and because so many changes have taken place in the nature of medical practice, medical discoveries, and advances in technology. A closer examination of Sigerist's writings on the subject and evaluation of the circumstances around present-day problems would seem to indicate that the flaw is not in the doctrine, but in the lack of social application.

Silver, G. A.

1984-01-01

41

Social Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Taken as a whole, Social Watch as an international network of citizens' groups concerned with the "fulfillment of internationally agreed commitments on poverty eradication and equality." These citizens' groups are also responsible for submitting national reports, promoting dialogue about these development priorities, and developing an inclusive strategy in order to bring other groups into the fold. For persons with an interest in these matters, this site will prove quite indispensable. Along the top of their homepage, visitors can view country reports, learn about development indicators through interactive maps, and also read up on the progress towards these goals. Visitors should also take a look at their annual reports, which provide both an executive summary and detailed regional reports on such matters as gender equity and poverty eradication efforts. The site also contains links to other relevant organizations and conferences, including the World Summit for Social Development and the World Conference on Women.

42

Social Geography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The open-access journal "Social Geography" is primarily concerned with "the interrelation of society, practice and space and its implications for every day-life, social and environmental policy or economic practice." The journal was started in 2005, and visitors with an interest in human geography or sociology will appreciate their offerings. Users can start by reading through the "General Information" section, then looking over their submission guidelines. After that, visitors will want to click on over to the "Online Library SG" area, where they can read final papers and also search all of the submitted papers by title and author. Additionally, visitors can sign up to receive email alerts and RSS feeds.

2008-01-24

43

Social Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1995, Social Watch was first established to provide a global platform for non-governmental organizations to monitor and promote the effective implementation of the commitments made by national governments during the United Nations World Summit on Social Development. Since that time, the group's work has continued in the areas of monitoring poverty eradication and gender equality and users with interests in these areas will appreciate both the organization's annual report (available from the homepage) and its country-by-country reports. One very well-developed interactive graphic feature is the development indicator section of the site. Here, visitors can view representations of such indicators as female adult literacy, deforestation, and fertility across the globe, along with discrete data from each country. Additionally, many of the materials offered here are available in Spanish as well.

44

Social neuroendocrinology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we provide a critical review of research concerned with social\\/environmental mechanisms that modulate human\\u000a neuroendocrine function. We survey research in four behavioral systems that have been shaped through evolution: competition,\\u000a partnering, sex, and pregnancy\\/parenting. Generally, behavioral neuroendocrine research examines how hormones affect behavior.\\u000a Instead, we focus on approaches that emphasize the effects of behavioral states on hormones

Sari M. van Anders; Neil V. Watson

2006-01-01

45

Socializing Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The traditional way to study thinking in humans is to investigate cognitive processes in single individuals. The positions\\u000a laid out in this chapter, by contrast, regard social interaction as the default context within which cognition occurs. The\\u000a chapter introduces and discusses the theoretical background as well as relevant empirical findings of three approaches that\\u000a aim at exploring how cognition emerges

Anne Böckler; Günther Knoblich; Natalie Sebanz

2010-01-01

46

Study of Physician Socialization.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The socialization of medical students is examined, with the professional socialization process defined as a combination of technical training and social character formation. Much of the literature on medical education is not concerned with socialization. ...

1978-01-01

47

Socialization in Work Organizations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a review of the literature on organizational socialization. The report discusses the content of socialization, including both what is learned during socialization, and the outcomes of organizational socialization. The process of socializati...

C. D. Fisher J. A. Weekley

1982-01-01

48

Efectos de la irradiación iónica en hielos de moléculas carbonadas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

En Astrofísica podemos encontrar numerosos contextos en los cuales se observan moléculas en estado sólido que, en condiciones estándar de presión y temperatura, se encontrarían como gases o líquidos. Dichas moléculas se denominan hielos y han sido observadas en nubes densas del medio interestelar, en envolturas circumestelares, en satélites del Sistema Solar, en cometas, etc. Los hielos pueden ser alterados en su composición química debido a diversos factores como por ejemplo variaciones de temperatura o aportes energéticos por parte de la irradiación, ya sea tanto de fotones ultravioleta como de iones. Dependiendo del escenario astrofísico que analicemos, unos factores cobran más importancia que otros. Los experimentos de laboratorio muestran el efecto que produce sobre la composición de los hielos la irradiación iónica, en particular sobre los que contenían alguna molécula con átomos de carbono. Dicha composición se analiza con espectroscopía IR en el rango de 2 a ˜ 25? m. La aplicabilidad de los resultados de los experimentos es distinta dependiendo de la composición química inicial de los hielos, del tipo de ion utilizado y de la dosis total de irradiación. Existen efectos generales de la irradiación sobre la materia en los experimentos de relevancia astrofísica como son: - la formación de nuevas moléculas, que pueden incluir o no el ion incidente; - la progresiva pérdida de hidrógeno (carbonización) cuando irradiamos muestras que originalmente contienen una determinada relación carbono/hidrógeno; - la variación de la temperatura de sublimación que presentan algunos hielos. Esto puede suceder tanto en hielos que estaban presentes antes de la irradiación como en hielos formados por ésta. Se presentará el papel del ion en la formación de nuevas moléculas a partir de las que originalmente se encontraban en el hielo. Al penetrar en él, el ion provoca distintos procesos como rotura de enlaces y excitaciones electrónicas. En la mayor parte de los casos las especies producidas por la rotura del enlace, se recombinan volviendo a formar la molécula original. Sin embargo un pequeño porcentaje es capaz de formar nuevas moléculas. Si el ion queda implantado en el hielo y es reactivo (H+, C+,ldots) podría formar parte de una molécula nueva que incorpora un átomo que inicialmente no se encontraba presente en el hielo. También se presentará un contraejemplo para demostrar que no es posible asegurar que siempre que implantemos un ion reactivo, éste formará parte de nuevas moléculas en la mezcla. También se presentará la formación de nuevas moléculas a partir de la irradiación de hielos de metano, que llevan a la formación de otros compuestos como acetileno, eteno, etano,... en los cuales la relación C/H ha variado. Además de estos compuestos se forma también un residuo carbonoso (refractario) que es estable a temperatura ambiente y cuya composición química no es bien conocida. Por último, el aumento de la temperatura de sublimación es también una consecuencia de la irradiación, aunque la magnitud del aumento depende de la mezcla original y de la irradiación sufrida. Existen moléculas que llegan a variar su temperatura de sublimación en decenas de grados. Para el caso de moléculas carbonadas se forman especies por irradiación que son estables a temperatura ambiente. Con todo ello se muestra que los experimentos de laboratorio pueden ayudarnos a comprender la formación, destrucción y variación de las propiedades físicas de los hielos de interés astrofísico con la irradiación.

Satorre, M. A.

49

What is ‘social’ about social science?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a report on an Academy of Social Sciences debate held on 15 March 2006. The debate concerned the nature, character and development of the social sciences. Four leading social scientists were asked to reflect upon the nature of the social sciences in the light of various transformations in both intellectual thought and in those processes that seem to

John Urry; Robert Dingwall; Ian Gough; Paul Ormerod; Doreen Massey; John Scott; Nigel Thrift

2007-01-01

50

Social Networks and Social Influences in Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Young people are concerned with making and keeping friends, and they invest a great deal of energy in group social life to do so. This book charts the interactions of young people both in and out of school and the role of peers and friends in strengthening social attachments and in establishing social identities. It describes how social

Cotterell, John

51

Social Security and Social Welfare Indicators  

Microsoft Academic Search

The proportion of its total resources that a society devotes to social welfare is a useful general measure related to social policy. In fiscal 1976, the United States spent 21 percent of Gross National Product (GNP) for public social welfare programs, including health and education as well as social insurance (the largest segment) and assistance. Program developments, inflation, population growth,

Ida C. Merriam

1978-01-01

52

Social Indicators: The EU and Social Inclusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social indicators are an important tool for evaluating a country's level of social development and for assessing the impact of policy. Such indicators are already in use in investigating poverty and social exclusion in several European countries and have begun to play a significant role in advancing the social dimension of the European Union as a whole. The purpose of

Tony Atkinson; Bea Cantillon; Eric Marlier; Brian Nolan

2002-01-01

53

Social phobia and interpretation of social events  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been suggested that social phobia may be characterized by two interpretation biases. First, a tendency to interpret ambiguous social events in a negative fashion. Second, a tendency to interpret unambiguous but mildly negative social events in a catastrophic fashion. To assess this possibility, patients with generalized social phobia, equally anxious patients with another anxiety disorder, and non-patient controls

Lusia Stopa; David M Clark

2000-01-01

54

Social Anxiety and Withdrawal  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social anxiety, social withdrawal, and social skills are intertwined, but distinct, constructs that can mutually and independently\\u000a have a significant impact on social functioning. Comprehensive definitions and descriptions of social skills are provided\\u000a elsewhere in this volume; however, social anxiety is defined as a fear of negative evaluation by others and low self-confidence\\u000a when performing or interacting in social situations

Peter J. Norton

55

Social Development and its Relevance to Australian Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents Midgley's theory on social development to an Australian social work audience. It explores the concept and theory of social development, examines the relationship between social work and social development, and discusses the relevance of social development to social work in Australia. The paper suggests that although social work and social development may share similar broad goals, their

Mel Gray; Penny Crofts

2008-01-01

56

Habilidad social y funcionamiento social en pacientes con esquizofrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relations between Social Skill and Social Functioning were examined in a group of 100 schizophrenic patients. Social skill and Social functioning were assessed with The Simulated Social Interacction Test (SSIT) and the Social Functioning Scale (SFS) respectively. The results indicated that social skills were significantly related to social functioning of patients with schizophrenia. Two dimensions of the Social Functioning

Rosa JIMÉNEZ GARCÍA-BÓVEDA; Servicio Andaluz de Salud; Raquel VÁZQUEZ-MOREJÓN JIMÉNEZ

2004-01-01

57

Religious Education and Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article considers Religious Education (RE) from the perspective of socialization theory. After clarifying the concept of socialization, an understanding of socialization processes, requiring the simultaneous development of both a personal and a social identity, is linked with RE. The development of both a personal and a social identity calls…

Vermeer, Paul

2010-01-01

58

Religious Education and Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article considers Religious Education (RE) from the perspective of socialization theory. After clarifying the concept of socialization, an understanding of socialization processes, requiring the simultaneous development of both a personal and a social identity, is linked with RE. The development of both a personal and a social identity calls…

Vermeer, Paul

2010-01-01

59

Social connection enables dehumanization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Being socially connected has considerable benefits for oneself, but may have negative consequences for evaluations of others. In particular, being socially connected to close others satisfies the need for social connection, and creates disconnection from more distant others. We therefore predicted that feeling socially connected would increase the tendency to dehumanize more socially distant others. Four experiments support this prediction.

Adam Waytz; Nicholas Epley

60

Efectos heterogéneos del trabajo infantil en la adquisición de habilidades cognitivas  

Microsoft Academic Search

El estudio se ocupa de los efectos heterogéneos del trabajo en la formación de capital humano a través de una definición amplia de trabajo que incluye toda actividad asociada a responsabilidades no escolares. Dada la variedad de responsabilidades asumidas por niños y adolescentes peruanos, se toma en cuenta dos criterios para clasificar los diferentes tipos de trabajo: el tipo de

Carmen Ponce

2012-01-01

61

Study of Physician Socialization.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Literature on the socialization of physicians is reviewed, and a research design for the study of physicians' socialization is proposed. Three goals of the research effort are to assess past investigations into the socialization of medical students, to re...

1978-01-01

62

Socialization and Developmental Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Considers the divergent paths taken by research in cognitive development and research in social-emotional development, arguing that studies of socialization need to become more developmental. Discusses meanings of development that may affect the socialization process. (Author/CI)|

Maccoby, E. E.

1984-01-01

63

Social Projection Can Solve Social Dilemmas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence for cooperation in social dilemmas is empirically robust, socially desirable, and theoretically controversial. We review theoretical positions offering normative or descriptive accounts for cooperation and note the scarcity of critical tests among them. We then introduce a modified prisoner's dilemma to perform a critical test of the social projection hypothesis. According to this hypothesis, people cooperate inasmuch as they

Joachim I. Krueger; Theresa E. DiDonato; David Freestone

2012-01-01

64

Social Development and Multicultural Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although multicultural social work has sensitized the profession to issues of cultural diversity, it has focused largely on direct practice with ehtnic minorities in the United States. Social development, on the other hand, offers a comprehensive, international approach to the amelioration of poverty and deprivation. This article seeks to enhance awareness of social developement in the hope that closer links

James Midgley

1990-01-01

65

SOCIAL SCIENCE, SOCIAL WORK AND PHARMACY  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an effort to make pharmacy a more patient oriented health profession, pharmacy students at the University of Pittsburgh are required to take a course entitled, Social Sciences in Pharmacy. Besides drawing from the diverse social and behavioral sciences this course also includes material from the field of social work. This article describes the course and the students' reactions to

John H. Kilwein; William T. Hall; Gerald C. St. Denis

1976-01-01

66

Online social network acceptance: a social perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Building upon studies of social psychology and information system literature, this study aims to propose and empirically test a research model that incorporates interpersonal motives (sociability and status) and hedonic motive (perceived enjoyment), and the three processes of social influence: compliance, identification and internalisation, to explain one's intention to use social network (SN) web sites. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The

David C. Li

2011-01-01

67

Socialism in High School Social Studies Textbooks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article concerns textbook analysis regarding the presentation of socialism in four leading high school social studies books, one in each of the following subjects: United States history, world history, United States government, and economics. Findings indicate that students relying on these texts to gain understanding of socialism and…

Neumann, Richard

2012-01-01

68

Social media platforms for social good  

Microsoft Academic Search

The disruptive potential of social media in generating participation and networking has been readily exploited by marketers and politicians. The power of these digital networks can be used by individuals and groups for good causes, to have a positive impact on the society at large. Social media platforms are starting to be used by citizens for promoting social causes, creating

Sabrina Bresciani; Andreas Schmeil

2012-01-01

69

Social Implications of Social Science Data Archives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The recent development of large-scale collections of information relevant to the social sciences (commonly referred to as 'social science data archives') is significant for society as well as for the social sciences. It is the purpose of this paper to des...

D. K. Stewart

1967-01-01

70

Social spending: Managing the social media mix  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is incessant demand for ‘proof’ of return on investment (ROI) for social media spending, and a significant degree of uncertainty among marketers with respect to allocating effort and budget to social media. In this article, we address these issues by identifying different ways that organizations use social media, highlighting important distinctions in these approaches and describing how to frame

Bruce D. Weinberg; Ekin Pehlivan

2011-01-01

71

Socializing electronics: Secure interactions in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks help us to follow friends and family daily lives. Home devices are rich in user's information so they are appropriate platforms to deploy social network applications. This article addresses two main requirements: content must be adapted to different devices and user's privacy must be respected. To enable social network interaction in home environments and to overcome privacy problems

Daniel Díaz-Sánchez; Andrés Marín; Florina Almenárez; Alberto Cortés

2010-01-01

72

Social goals, social behavior, and social status in middle childhood.  

PubMed

This study examines motivational precursors of social status and the applicability of a dual-component model of social competence to middle childhood. Concurrent and longitudinal relationships between self-reported social goals (social development, demonstration-approach, demonstration-avoid goal orientations), teacher-rated prosocial and aggressive behavior, and peer nominations of social status (preference, popularity) were examined over the course of an academic year among 980 3rd- to 5th-grade children. Findings support dual-component expectations. Confirmatory factor analyses verified the expected 3-factor structure of social goals and 2-factor structure of social status. Structural equation modeling (SEM) found that (a) social development goals were associated with prosocial behavior and increased preference, and (b) demonstration-approach goals were associated with aggressive behavior and increased popularity. Demonstration-avoid goals were associated with a popularity decrease. SEMs were invariant across grade, gender, and ethnicity. Discussion concerns the potential risks of high social status, extensions to the dual-component model, and the generality of an achievement goal approach to child social development. PMID:22822934

Rodkin, Philip C; Ryan, Allison M; Jamison, Rhonda; Wilson, Travis

2012-07-23

73

Social Inequalities, Social Capital, and Health of Canadians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has demonstrated that social inequality affects public health. Social capital theory has shown that social exchange, social contacts, and social support are also important. We test social inequality and social capital, using the data from the National Population Health Survey, 1996-7. We find weak support for capital theory and show that effects often depend on measures of social capital

M. Reza Nakhaie; LISA K. SMYLIE; ROBERT ARNOLD

2007-01-01

74

A Social Entrepreneurship Bibliography  

Microsoft Academic Search

This bibliography is an attempt to list the most relevant material on the topic of ‘social entrepreneurship’ published within the past two decades. The Academic Search Complete and Web of Science databases were used to conduct a literature search using the keywords ‘social enterprise’, ‘social entrepreneurship’ and ‘social entrepreneur’. The literature search was limited to peer-reviewed journal articles and books

Chitvan Trivedi

2010-01-01

75

Social Work Agonistes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work should be founded on a powerful network of diverse practitioners applying the social sciences to advance social welfare today. Instead, social work education operates under the guise of identity politics, reserving its highest appointments for the politically correct and members of under-represented groups, with little concern for…

Stoesz, David

2008-01-01

76

POLITICAL SOCIAL WORK  

Microsoft Academic Search

If social work education should be political, what should be the content of a model political social work curriculum? Reflecting the increasing demand in our profession for a truly culturally diverse, empowerment-based, and social justiceoriented curriculum, the University of Houston developed in a concentration in political social work for the MSW program. This article describes this model curriculum, emphasizing the

Robert Fisher

1995-01-01

77

Signals in Social Supernets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network sites (SNSs) provide a new way to organize and navigate an egocentric social network. Are they a fad, briefly popular but ultimately useless? Or are they the harbingers of a new and more powerful social world, where the ability to maintain an immense network - a social \\

Judith Donath

2007-01-01

78

Children's Social Identities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper provides a brief overview of recent developmental research on themes related to children's social identities. Initially, consideration is given to the capacity for social categorization, following which attention is given to children's developing conceptions of social identities, their identification with social groups, and the…

Bennett, Mark

2011-01-01

79

Social Work Agonistes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social work should be founded on a powerful network of diverse practitioners applying the social sciences to advance social welfare today. Instead, social work education operates under the guise of identity politics, reserving its highest appointments for the politically correct and members of under-represented groups, with little concern for…

Stoesz, David

2008-01-01

80

What is social about social perception research?  

PubMed Central

A growing consensus in social cognitive neuroscience holds that large portions of the primate visual brain are dedicated to the processing of social information, i.e., to those aspects of stimuli that are usually encountered in social interactions such as others' facial expressions, actions, and symbols. Yet, studies of social perception have mostly employed simple pictorial representations of conspecifics. These stimuli are social only in the restricted sense that they physically resemble objects with which the observer would typically interact. In an equally important sense, however, these stimuli might be regarded as “non-social”: the observer knows that they are viewing pictures and might therefore not attribute current mental states to the stimuli or might do so in a qualitatively different way than in a real social interaction. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of such higher-order conceptualization of the stimulus for social perceptual processing. Here, we assess the similarity between the various types of stimuli used in the laboratory and object classes encountered in real social interactions. We distinguish two different levels at which experimental stimuli can match social stimuli as encountered in everyday social settings: (1) the extent to which a stimulus' physical properties resemble those typically encountered in social interactions and (2) the higher-level conceptualization of the stimulus as indicating another person's mental states. We illustrate the significance of this distinction for social perception research and report new empirical evidence further highlighting the importance of mental state attribution for perceptual processing. Finally, we discuss the potential of this approach to inform studies of clinical conditions such as autism.

Teufel, Christoph; von dem Hagen, Elisabeth; Plaisted-Grant, Kate C.; Edmonds, James J.; Ayorinde, John O.; Fletcher, Paul C.; Davis, Greg

2012-01-01

81

Situated Social Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social cognition refers to the mental representations and processes that underlie social judgments and behavior—for example, the application of stereotypes to members of social groups. Theories of social cognition have generally assumed that mental representations are abstract and stable and that they are activated and applied by relatively automatic, context-independent processes. Recent evidence is inconsistent with these expectations, however. Social-cognitive

Eliot R. Smith; Gün R. Semin

2007-01-01

82

Social Skills Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term “social skills” encompasses an array of learned behaviors that share the common goal of maintaining or increasing\\u000a reinforcement within a social context. Deficits in social skills can occur at any developmental period and are not likely\\u000a to improve spontaneously because impaired social skills impede interactions with other people. In turn, unsatisfying or disruptive\\u000a interactions exacerbate social skill deficits

Ashley J. Smith; Judith A. Jordan; Mary Fran Flood; David J. Hansen

83

Efecto de algunos agentes físicos y químicos sobre el metacéstodo de Taenia solium presente en carne adobada y chorizo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rivera-Guerrero MI, Sánchez-Rueda L, Rodríguez-Bataz E, Martínez-Villalobos AN, Martínez-Maya JJ. Efecto de algunos agentes físicos y químicos sobre el metacéstodo de Taenia solium presente en carne adobada y chorizo. Salud Publica Mex 2004;46:425-429. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http:\\/\\/www.insp.mx\\/salud\\/index.html Resumen Objetivo. Evaluar el efecto de diferentes temperaturas y tiempos, así como de algunos condimentos

Ma Isabel Rivera-Guerrero; Leticia Sánchez-Rueda

2004-01-01

84

Socialization of Social Anxiety in Adolescent Crowds  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we looked at whether social anxiety is socialized, or influenced by peers’ social anxiety, more in some peer\\u000a crowds than others. Adolescents in crowds with eye-catching appearances such as Goths and Punks (here termed Radical), were compared with three comparison groups. Using data from 796 adolescents (353 girls and 443 boys; M\\u000a \\u000a age\\u000a ?=?13.36) at three timepoints,

Nejra Van Zalk; Maarten Herman Walter Van Zalk; Margaret Kerr

85

Uncovering social spammers: social honeypots + machine learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Web-based social systems enable new community-based opportunities for participants to engage, share, and interact. This community value and related services like search and advertising are threatened by spammers, content polluters, and malware disseminators. In an effort to preserve community value and ensure longterm success, we propose and evaluate a honeypot-based approach for uncovering social spammers in online social systems. Two

Kyumin Lee; James Caverlee; Steve Webb

2010-01-01

86

Parental Socialization of Emotion  

PubMed Central

Recently, there has been a resurgence of research on emotion, including the socialization of emotion. In this article, a heuristic model of factors contributing to the socialization of emotion is presented. Then literature relevant to the socialization of children’s emotion and emotion-related behavior by parents is reviewed, including (a) parental reactions to children’s emotions, (b) socializers’ discussion of emotion, and (c) socializers’ expression of emotion. The relevant literature is not conclusive and most of the research is correlational. However, the existing body of data provides initial support for the view that parental socialization practices have effects on children’s emotional and social competence and that the socialization process is bidirectional. In particular, parental negative emotionality and negative reactions to children’s expression of emotion are associated with children’s negative emotionality and low social competence. In addition, possible moderators of effects such as level of emotional arousal are discussed.

Cumberland, Amanda; Spinrad, Tracy L.

2006-01-01

87

Role of Social Support in Organizational Socialization.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The literature on the direct and moderating effects of social support on job stress and strain were applied to the stressful experience of organizational socialization. Co-worker and supervisor support were found to have main effects on un-met expectation...

C. D. Fisher W. H. Mobley J. B. Shaw R. Woodman

1983-01-01

88

The Social Cognitions of Socially Withdrawn Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to examine the social cognitions of peer-identified socially withdrawn children. Participants included 457 children from grades four, five and six (54% females, 46% males). Children completed a selection of self- and peer-report measures including: (1) peer-rated behavioral nominations; (2) hostile intent biases and…

Wichmann, Cherami; Coplan, Robert J.; Daniels, Tina

2004-01-01

89

On the Social Study of Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper proposes that the study of schooling would benefit from more research that is social in nature. The characteristics of social research are described in terms of three dimensions--the extent to which "context" and "interaction" of phenomena are considered and the degree to which "participant conceptions" are incorporated in description…

Cornbleth, Catherine

90

Re-Socializing Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

At present, the rapid development of Online Social Networks (OSN) has strong influence on our global community'scommunication patterns. This primarily manifests in an exponentially increasing number of users of Social Network Services (SNS) such as Face book or Twitter. A fundamental problem accompanied by the utilization of OSNs is given by an insufficient guarantee of its users' informational self-determination and

M. Du?rr; Martin Werner; Marco Maier

2010-01-01

91

Privacy, Social Network Sites, and Social Relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growth of the Internet comes a growth in a ubiquitous networked society. Common Web 2.0 applications include a rapidly growing trend for social network sites. Social network sites typically converged different relationship types into one group of “friends.” However, with such vast interconnectivity, convergence of relationships, and information sharing by individual users comes an increased risk of privacy

David J. Houghton; Adam N. Joinson

2010-01-01

92

Social Browsing & Information Filtering in Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are a prominent feature of many social media sites, a new generation of Web sites that allow users to create and share content. Sites such as Digg, Flickr, and Del.icio.us allow users to designate others as \\

Kristina Lerman

2007-01-01

93

Using social media for social activism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses qualitative research methods to analyze how members of the Seattle chapter of a social activist group, Asha for Education, use social media, such as Yahoo! Groups, Microsoft distribution lists, and Facebook to coordinate their organizational activities, fundraise, and build and strengthen community.

Pausali Sen; Irini Spyridakis; Silvia Amtmann; Charlotte P. Lee

2010-01-01

94

Reputation, Social Identity and Social Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

We interpret the psychology literature on social identity and examine its implications in a population partially composed of such agents. We model a population of agents from two exogenous and well defined social groups. Agents are randomly matched to play a reduced form bargaining game. We show that this struggle for resources drives a conflict through the rational destruction of

John Smith

2007-01-01

95

Reputation, social identity and social conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

We interpret the social identity literature and examine its economic implications. We model a population of agents from two exogenous and well defined social groups. Agents are randomly matched to play a reduced form bargaining game. We show that this struggle for resources drives a conflict through the rational destruction of surplus. We assume that the population contains both unbiased

John Smith

2009-01-01

96

Reputation, social identity, and social conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

We interpret the social identity literature and examine its economic implications. We model a population of agents from two exogenous and well defined social groups. Agents are randomly matched to play a reduced form bargaining game. We show that this struggle for resources drives a conflict through the rational destruction of surplus. We assume that the population contains both unbiased

John Smith

2010-01-01

97

Social networks, mobile lives and social inequalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A central argument of much contemporary literature is that the advent of digital and mobile technologies creates new kinds of mobile lives, new socialities and new ways of relating to the self and others. In this paper I specifically examine how mobile lives unfold through social networks, facilitating the forming and reforming of connections people have with others, near and

John Urry

2012-01-01

98

Organizational Socialization to Innovativeness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study tests theoretical associations between socialization practices and outcomes in an innovative organization: LINC, the main engineering group of a computer firm. Seven pairs of socialization practices are used to classify data gathered during int...

K. A. Epstein

1983-01-01

99

Disability, Social Security  

MedlinePLUS

... Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Disability, Social Security New SSA Ruling for Polio Survivors with "Post-Polio Sequelae" Two Social Security programs provide benefits based on disability. Both ...

100

SocialFunds.com  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1998 by Jay Falk, SocialFunds.com serves "the investment needs of socially responsible investors." The site hosts a variety of educational guides on community investing and philanthropy as well as analysts' recommendations and company profiles.

101

Transmission of social attitudes.  

PubMed Central

Data gathered in Australia and England on the social attitudes of spouses and twins are largely consistent with a genetic model for family resemblance in social attitudes. There is substantial assortative mating and little evidence of vertical cultural inheritance.

Martin, N G; Eaves, L J; Heath, A C; Jardine, R; Feingold, L M; Eysenck, H J

1986-01-01

102

Kids and Socializing Online  

MedlinePLUS

... Share with Care Kids and Mobile Phones Cyberbullying Social networking sites, chat rooms, virtual worlds, and blogs are ... to Your Kids’ Profiles Use privacy settings. Many social networking sites and chat rooms have adjustable privacy settings, ...

103

Intelligent social network modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given: Web 2.0 has provided for a rapid growth of computer mediated social networks. Many notable Web 2.0 applications such as Facebook, Myspace and LinkedIn are social networks. Social relational networks are becoming an important technology in human behavioral modeling. Our goal here is to enrich the domain of social network modeling by introducing ideas from fuzzy

R. R. Yager

2009-01-01

104

Characterization of social video  

Microsoft Academic Search

The popularity of social media has grown dramatically over the World Wide Web. In this thesis, we provide an overview of the types of social media. We then analyze the video popularity distribution of well-known social video websites (YouTube, Google Video, and the AOL Truveo Video Search engine) and characterize their workload up to an eight month period. We identify

Jeffrey R Ostrowski

2008-01-01

105

Introduction to social recommendation  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the exponential growth of information generated on the World Wide Web, Social Recommendation has emerged as one of the hot research topics recently. Social Recommendation forms a specific type of information filtering technique that attempts to suggest information (blogs, news, music, travel plans, web pages, images, tags, etc.) that are likely to interest the users. Social Recommendation involves the

Irwin King; Michael R. Lyu; Hao Ma

2010-01-01

106

Intelligent social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal homepages, blogs or virtual communities have contributed to the birth of the Social Networks. The success of these platforms will continue to increase while they are able to offer tools and services to improve users' social relationships. The rapid evolution of social networks, the growing business opportunities and the possibility to apply new techniques to a relatively unexplored domain,

Miguel; Angel Moreno; Pablo Muñoz; Daniel Díaz; María Dolores Rodríguez-Moreno

2011-01-01

107

Understanding Social Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Believable social interaction is not only about agents that look right but also do the right thing. To achieve this we must consider the everyday knowledge and expectations by which users make sense of real, fictive or artificial social beings. This folk-theoretical understanding of other social beings involves several, rather independent, levels such as expectations on behaviour, expectations on primitive

Per Persson; Jarmo Laaksolahti; Peter Löonnqvist

108

Interpretation and Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

James Bohman argues in his book, New Philosophy of Social Science ,t hat it is time to reconceptualize the social sciences and conclusively abandon any illusory aspirations to a unified methodological perspective that might have lingered since Hobbes sought to borrow one from classical mechanics. In addition, Bohman suggests that reflecting on the history of the social sciences and their

Johanna Meehan

1997-01-01

109

Exploring Social Desirability Bias  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines social desirability bias in the context of ethical decision-making by accountants. It hypothesizes a negative relation between social desirability bias and ethical evaluation. It also predicts an interaction effect between religiousness and gender on social desirability bias. An experiment using five general business vignettes was carried out on 121 accountants (63 males and 58 females). The results

Janne Chung; Gary S. Monroe

2003-01-01

110

Reading social work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper offers a brief preliminary report on our attempts to apply “close reading” a technique drawn from contemporary literary criticism to social work writing. Reading turns out to be very difficult -something we have had to re-learn but reveals ideological formations deeply embedded in social work texts. Hugh England's “Social Work as Art” is taken as a working example

Sue Billington; John Paley

1990-01-01

111

Conceptualising social impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conceptual framework based on environmental function evaluation of Slootweg et al. [Impact Assess. Proj. Appraisal 19 (2001) 19–28.] is used as the basis for conceptualising social impacts. Existing lists of social impact variables, such as those of the Interorganizational Committee for Guidelines and Principles for Social Impact Assessment, are examined and found to be inadequate and contradictory. A new

Frank Vanclay

2002-01-01

112

Media as Social Institution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass media have emerged as a social institution, assuming many of the functions formerly served by traditional social institutions such as the church, school, government, and family. However, in Western countries operating on the private-ownership model (most notably the United States), media systems were never intended to serve as a social institution. Instead, the primary objective of a privately owned

Art Silverblatt

2004-01-01

113

Social Security: Equitable Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Security is a major social insurance program that is projected to undergo financial woes in the near future. As this program is so essential to securing the human infrastructure of the United States, particularly because so many elderly have become increasingly reliant on Social Security benefits, any financial doubts in the program's estimates should be dealt with quickly and

Kathryn Tippey

2009-01-01

114

Nebraska Social Studies Statutes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet lists the laws that relate to Nebraska social studies. The volume is intended for administrators, teachers, and curriculum planners to assist them to do a more thorough job of planning social studies programs. The Nebraska Social Studies Statutes are designed to be a primary tool in developing a district's curriculum, as they speak…

Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln.

115

Reconsidering Social Studies Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two views of social studies curriculum development are discussed. The technical project view assumes a linear sequence of discrete events; the social process view assumes a dynamic, interactive relationship among policy, planning, enactment, and their sociocultural context. An alternative conception that integrates technical, social, and critical…

Cornbleth, Catherine

1985-01-01

116

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social work practice content is anchored in the purposes of the social work profession and focuses on strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems in relation to their broader environments. This course focuses on the knowledge of macro approaches to human problems and its importance for generalist social workers. This course will continue to utilize the Generalist Intervention Model introduced

Mike Eichler

117

Social Media. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The growing use of social media by students and adults is impacting schools. A recent Pew study found that 73% of teens use social-networking sites to connect with others. Social media includes blogs, wikis, and podcasts as well as sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Linkedin. While such sites promote connection with others, their use has…

Williamson, Ronald

2010-01-01

118

Social Change in The \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social constructionists have been advocating for the necessity to animate and lead social change. This posture suggests that change is a panacea capable of solving social and cultural dysfunctions. Though Jean Gebser is not generally considered a semiotician, his work, The Ever-Present Origin, raises several socio-semiotic problems. Particularly, Gebser's notion of \\

Farouk Y. Seif

119

Teaching Social Studies Creatively.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the issue of creative teaching in social studies. Examines the way the creative classroom looks, how teachers can become more creative, and the importance of creative teaching in social studies. Concludes that creativity can foster students' understanding of social issues and aid in the retention of students until graduation. (RW)

Solomon, Warren

1989-01-01

120

Categories of social relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of social relationships lies at the heart of the social sciences, but our understanding of the cognitive structures that support them has received little attention. This paper develops an account of the form and content of these structures, arguing that social relationships are represented by a small number of categories, rather than by dimensions as proposed by others.

Nick Haslam

1994-01-01

121

Social Relationships and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses 3 variables that assess different aspects of social relationships—social support, social integration, and negative interaction. The author argues that all 3 are associated with health outcomes, that these variables each influence health through different mechanisms, and that associations between these variables and health are not spurious findings attributable to our personalities. This argument suggests a broader view

Sheldon Cohen

2004-01-01

122

Nanotechnology and Social Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The central claims defended in this article are the following: (a) The social and ethical challenges of nanotechnology can be fully identified only if both the characteristic features of nanotechnologies and the social contexts into which they are emerging are considered. (b) When this is done, a host of significant social context issues, or…

Sandler, Ronald

2007-01-01

123

Socialization and Drawing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After reviewing the socialization models of Berger and Luckmann, Speier, and Piaget, the author relates the drawing process to these theories as a form of social interaction, citing changes in drawing style and subject matter with gains in social maturity. She concludes with implications for art educators. (SJL)

Karzenik, Diana

1979-01-01

124

Perspectives about Social Workers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research has shown that career preferences are dependent upon the words and images that individuals associate with various occupations. The present study sought to identify differences and similarities between college students' and social workers' views toward social work. College students majoring in psychology (N=25) and social workers…

Ware, Mark E.; And Others

125

Social media analytics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social media represent a fundamental shift of how information is being produced, transferred and consumed. The present tutorial investigates techniques for social media modeling, analytics and optimization. First we present methods for collecting large scale social media data and then discuss techniques for coping with and correcting for the effects arising from missing and incomplete data. We proceed by

Jure Leskovec

2011-01-01

126

Social Policy for Cyborgs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the body has become of increasing importance throughout the social sciences, it has been neglected by the discipline of social policy. The aim of this article is to rectify that neglect. It argues that the connections which some have begun to make between social welfare and the body can be strengthened by reference to the figure of the cyborg.

TONY FITZPATRICK

1999-01-01

127

Social politics: a theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to articulate a theory which connects social stratification processes to the international problem of human trafficking for sex and labor purposes. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper develops a social politics theory to connect concepts from social stratification to the study of human trafficking. It draws on data provided by the US Department of

Laura M. Williams

2008-01-01

128

Social networking sites.  

PubMed

In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools, social networking and social bookmarking sites, virtual worlds, and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes social networking Web sites and techniques to increase their safe use. PMID:20173583

Wink, Diane M

129

Piaget's Social Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Argues that Piaget did not consider social factors to be important in his developmental theory and considers some of the practical educational implications of Piaget's social theory. Piaget's notion of the role of social factors is reviewed, and the educational implications of the cooperative context favoring operational development with…

DeVries, Rheta

1997-01-01

130

Social Action As An Objective of Social Studies Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents a rationale for making social action a major goal of elementary and secondary school social studies education. In addition, it describes social action models, suggests social action approaches appropriate for students at various grade levels, and reviews literature on social action by public school students. Social action is…

Curtis, Charles K.

131

Exploring user social behaviors in mobile social applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile social applications are popular as the proliferatin g of mo- bile devices. Understanding user social behaviors is important to improve mobile social applications and enhance its quality of ser- vice. However, there is still lack of data for real deployment mobile social application on data analysis of human interaction and social behaviors in mobile social networks. In this paper,

Konglin Zhu; Pan Hui; Xiaoming Fu; Wenzhong Li; Yang Cheny

2011-01-01

132

Organizational Socialization: A Social Learning Interpretation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Organizational socialization, the process by which an employee learns the appropriate norms and required behaviors to participate and become part of the organization, has arrived as an extremely important dimension to the study of organizational behavior....

F. Luthans P. L. Perrewe T. R. V. Davis

1982-01-01

133

Modern Social Media and Social Revolutions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The emergence of social media platforms as a means of communication and information sharing marks a fundamental change to how societies interact. This new form of media played a formative role in the organization of mass uprisings and demonstrations known...

B. L. Mayer

2011-01-01

134

Social absorption and social individuation: Dutch validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social absorption (SA) and social individuation (SI) are two dimensions that may help understand and predict the quality of\\u000a interpersonal experiences and relationships (Ickes, Hutchison, & Mashek, 2004). A Dutch translation of the SA and SI scales\\u000a was validated with a circumplex of interpersonal adjective scales, vulnerability factors to depression and attachment style\\u000a dimensions among a sample of 429 Flemish

Steve de Schutter; Rolf van Geel; Hein Lodewijkx; Peter Verboon

2009-01-01

135

Social CRM – Zielgruppenorientiertes Kundenmanagement mit Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social Media ist seit dem rasanten Wachstum sozialer Netzwerkseiten wie Facebook, Myspace oder Xing in aller Munde. Mit der\\u000a wachsenden Nutzerschaft geht eine fundamentale Änderung des Kommunikationsverhaltens einher. Konnten Unternehmen bisher auch\\u000a online Push-Marketing mittels klassischer Werbeformen wie Banner Advertising betreiben und damit die Marken- und Produktkommunikation\\u000a weitestgehend kontrollieren, sind es heute die Nutzer von Social-Media-Angeboten, die Inhalt, Ort und

Goetz Greve

136

The social anxiety spectrum.  

PubMed

Social anxiety disorder is well suited to the spectrum concept because it has trait-like qualities of early onset, chronicity, and no empirically derived threshold that demarcates normal from clinically significant trait social anxiety. Social anxiety disorder has been shown to respond to relatively specific pharmacologic and cognitive-behavioral therapies, which makes identification of other conditions that may lie on the social anxiety disorder spectrum important because of possible treatment implications. Biologic markers associated with social anxiety disorder also may be shared by similar but nonidentical traits, such as behavioral inhibition and detachment. Clarification of the trait spectrums associated with specific biologic systems offers an opportunity for improving the understanding of the origin of these conditions. Strong evidence exists that at least some forms of shyness, avoidant personality disorder, and selective mutism lie on a social anxiety disorder spectrum. For several other disorders that share a prominent focus on social comparison, significant subgroups of patients seem to have features of social anxiety disorder. These disorders include major depression (especially the atypical subtype), body dysmorphic disorder, and eating disorders. Several other disorders marked by social dysfunction or inhibition, including substance use disorders (especially alcoholism), paranoid disorder, bipolar disorder, autism, and Asperger's disorder, also may show some overlap with social anxiety disorder features (e.g., social anxiety as a cause or complication of substance abuse, social avoidance in paranoid disorder, social disinhibiton in bipolar disorder, and social communication deficits in autism and Asperger's disorder). Social anxiety disorder also is associated with other anxiety disorders in general and other phobias in particular. In respect to traits, a growing body of evidence links behavioral inhibition to the unfamiliar to a social anxiety disorder spectrum with some specificity. Biologic measures of dopamine system hypoactivity have been linked to social anxiety disorder, trait detachment, and general deficits in reward and incentive function. It remains to be clarified, however, whether this brain system function is best characterized by a social anxiety disorder spectrum or some variant that incorporates social reward deficits or social avoidance behavior. Social anxiety disorder, shyness, and behavioral inhibition all seem to have a genetic component, but more research is needed to attempt to identify a more specifically heritable temperament associated with these conditions. Finally, the emergent concept of a social anxiety spectrum needs maturation. Although the notion of a single social anxiety disorder spectrum currently has some clinical use, the authors believe that exclusive focus on the notion of a single continuum with two extremes--from social disinhibition in mania to the most severe form of social anxiety, avoidant personality disorder--is premature and limiting in respect to etiologic research. An alternative approach is to conceptualize multiple, probably overlapping spectra in this area of social psychopathology. Individual dimensions might be based on various core phenomenologic, cognitive, or biologic characteristics. A bottom-up biologic approach holds promise for identifying spectra with a common etiology that might respond to specific treatments. Taking a pluralistic view of the concept of spectrum at this stage may help accelerate our understanding of social anxiety and related disorders. PMID:12462859

Schneier, Franklin R; Blanco, Carlos; Antia, Smita X; Liebowitz, Michael R

2002-12-01

137

Designing for Social Development: Enhancing Mobile Social Software through Social Capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we discuss the problem of designing mobile social software to support social capital. This approach aims at exploiting ICT to reconcile social and economic development, essential to create a human-centered Information Society. Firstly, a literature review of social capital theory is presented. Then, mobile social software is analyzed according to three dimensions: technical, individual and social. Finally,

Giuseppe Lugano

138

Intelligent Social Network Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent development of Web 2.0 has provided an enormous increase in human interactions across all corners of the earth. One manifestation of this is the growth of computer mediated social networks. Many notable Web 2.0 applications such as Facebook, Myspace and LinkedIn are social networks. Relational networks are becoming an important technology for modeling these types of social networks

Ronald R. Yager

2009-01-01

139

Social learning strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In most studies of social learning in animals, no attempt has been made to examine the nature of the strategy adopted by animals\\u000a when they copy others. Researchers have expended considerable effort in exploring the psychological processes that underlie\\u000a social learning and amassed extensive data banks recording purported social learning in the field, but the contexts under\\u000a which animals copy

Kevin N. Laland

2004-01-01

140

Social networks: looking ahead  

Microsoft Academic Search

By now, online social networks have become an indispensable part of both online and offline lives of human beings. A large fraction of time spent online by a user is directly influence by the social networks to which he\\/she belongs. This calls for a deeper examination of social networks as large-scale dynamic objects that foster efficient person-person interaction. The goal

Ravi Kumar; Alexander Tuzhilin; Christos Faloutsos; David Jensen; Gueorgi Kossinets; Jure Leskovec; Andrew Tomkins

2008-01-01

141

Consumer Economic Socialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter addresses the concept of consumer economic socialization as it has developed in the literature. Specifically,\\u000a it covers the context in which the following have been studied: economic socialization; children and adolescents’ developmental\\u000a competencies in understanding and participating in economic and consumer processes; and major agents of economic socialization,\\u000a including culture, media, schools, peers, and families. Needs for further

Beutler Ivan; Lori Dickson

142

Social Capital and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pick any current issue of a journal such as Social Science & Medicine or the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health and one is bound to see a featured article about social capital and health. Search on Pubmed for “social capital and health”,\\u000a and one sees over 27,500 articles listed (as of December 2006). Enter the same search term in

Ichiro Kawachi; S. V. Subramanian; Daniel Kim

143

Exploring social media relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate novel techniques for exploring relationship data extracted from social media sites for actionable insights by educators, researchers, and administrators. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper demonstrates how non-programmers can use NodeXL, an open source social network analysis tool built into Excel 2007\\/2010, to collect, analyze, and visualize network data from social media

Derek L. Hansen

2011-01-01

144

The Social Network Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity\\u000a of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper\\u000a presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of\\u000a traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has

Peter Bunus

2010-01-01

145

Augmenting social media accessibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The popularity of social media is affecting society as they are changing the way communication, collaboration, inter- action, and information are produced and consumed. A part of the society (e.g., the one more technologically advanced) takes advantage of social media,whereas another part of so- ciety (e.g., old or people with different abilities) is left out from the so-called social media

Roberto Borrino; Marco Furini; Marco Roccetti

2009-01-01

146

Using social robots to study abnormal social development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social robots recognize and respond to hu- man social cues with appropriate behaviors. Social robots, and the technology used in their construction, can be unique tools in the study of abnormal social development. Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that is char- acterized by social and communicative im- pairments. Based on three years of integra- tion and immersion with a

Brian Scassellati

147

Using your friends: social mechanics in social games  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes the social mechanics in top social games. It identifies several mechanisms by which social games encourage sociality: the friend bar, gifting, visiting, challenge\\/competition, and communication. Different implementations of these components result in varying gameplay experiences. However, no mechanics were found to offer very deep or sustained social interactions between players.

Mia Consalvo

2011-01-01

148

Social work profession and social work education in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social work schools were present since the beginning of the 20th century in the world, however, in Turkey, social work education was started in 1961. The first social work school, Hacettepe University, have existed as the only one providing social work education, until 2002. With the increasing need for the social workers in the country, the new schools\\/departments have established.

Elif Gökçearslan Çifci

2009-01-01

149

Social neuroscience: The social brain, oxytocin, and health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex social behaviors allow various social organisms to create emergent organizations that extend beyond the individual. Social neuroscience is a burgeoning field that strives to understand the genetic, hormonal, and neural mechanisms responsible for these social structures and behaviors. Consequently, social neuroscience is highly interdisciplinary in nature and embraces the application of methods ranging from the molecular to the molar

Greg J. Norman; Louise C. Hawkley; Steve W. Cole; Gary G. Berntson; John T. Cacioppo

2012-01-01

150

Social neuroscience: The social brain, oxytocin, and health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex social behaviors allow various social organisms to create emergent organizations that extend beyond the individual. Social neuroscience is a burgeoning field that strives to understand the genetic, hormonal, and neural mechanisms responsible for these social structures and behaviors. Consequently, social neuroscience is highly interdisciplinary in nature and embraces the application of methods ranging from the molecular to the molar

Greg J. Norman; Louise C. Hawkley; Steve W. Cole; Gary G. Berntson; John T. Cacioppo

2011-01-01

151

Towards Automating Social Engineering Using Social Networking Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing number of people use social networking sites to foster social relationships among each other. While the advantages of the provided services are obvious, drawbacks on a users' privacy and arising implications are often neglected. In this paper we introduce a novel attack called automated social engineering which illustrates how social networking sites can be used for social engineering.

Markus Huber; Stewart Kowalski; Marcus Nohlberg; Simon Tjoa

2009-01-01

152

Task force report: Social networks as mediators of social support  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intent of this paper is to present a representative, though not exhaustive, overview of the current literature on social networks, with an emphasis on research linking social networks to psychological adaptation. This overview includes a review of social network concepts; and analysis of the multiple determinants of social networks; an analysis of the varied effects of social networks; and

Roger E. Mitchell; Edison J. Trickett

1980-01-01

153

Macrosocial determinants of social integration: Social class and area effect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theory and research on social support have paid little attention to the existence of important macrosocial variables determining level and content of social relationships. This study examines variations in social integration as a function of social class and residential area characteristics. Results for 234 subjects living in high and low risk neighbourhoods indicated that differences between higher and lower social

Enrique Gracia; Fernando García; Gonzalo Musitu

1995-01-01

154

Modeling Social Cascade in the Flickr Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate social cascades, or how information propagation through social links in the online social networks. Based on the analysis of one of the largest available datasets collected from Flickr social network in detail, we shed light on the propagation pattern and cascade characteristic of the photos over the Flickr social network, We also apply a simple conceptual model that

Bai Yu; Hong Fei

2009-01-01

155

Representing dynamic social networks in discrete event social simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the key structural components of social systems is the social network. The representation of this network structure is key to providing a valid representation of the society under study. The social science concept of homophily provides a conceptual model of how social networks are formed and evolve over time. Previous work described the results of social simulation using

Jonathan K. Alt; Stephen Lieberman

2010-01-01

156

Social Work's Legacy: Irreconcilable Differences?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Work is under attack, not the least of which comes from within its own ranks. Clinical social work appears to the hardest hit as critics question its fit with social work's historic focus on the poor and the oppressed. In addition, there continues to be ongoing controversy regarding the profession as means of social control. Clinical social work has

Anne Marie McLaughlin

2002-01-01

157

Social Withdrawal in Childhood  

PubMed Central

Socially withdrawn children frequently refrain from social activities in the presence of peers. The lack of social interaction in childhood may result from a variety of causes, including social fear and anxiety or a preference for solitude. From early childhood through to adolescence, socially withdrawn children are concurrently and predictively at risk for a wide range of negative adjustment outcomes, including socio-emotional difficulties (e.g., anxiety, low self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and internalizing problems), peer difficulties (e.g., rejection, victimization, poor friendship quality), and school difficulties (e.g., poor-quality teacher-child relationships, academic difficulties, school avoidance). The goals of the current review are to (a) provide some definitional, theoretical, and methodological clarity to the complex array of terms and constructs previously employed in the study of social withdrawal; (b) examine the predictors, correlates, and consequences of child and early-adolescent social withdrawal; and (c) present a developmental framework describing pathways to and from social withdrawal in childhood.

Rubin, Kenneth H.; Coplan, Robert J.; Bowker, Julie C.

2013-01-01

158

Sympathy and Social Order  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social order is possible only if individuals forgo the narrow pursuit of self-interest for the greater good. For over a century, social scientists have argued that sympathy mitigates self-interest and recent empirical work supports this claim. Much less is known about why actors experience sympathy in the first place, particularly in fleeting…

Irwin, Kyle; McGrimmon, Tucker; Simpson, Brent

2008-01-01

159

Social Learning Analytics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We propose that the design and implementation of effective "Social Learning Analytics (SLA)" present significant challenges and opportunities for both research and enterprise, in three important respects. The first is that the learning landscape is extraordinarily turbulent at present, in no small part due to technological drivers. Online social

Buckingham Shum, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca

2012-01-01

160

Creativity: A social approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early thinking in the modern era often regarded creativity as a somewhat asocial means of individual expression, self?realization, and self?fulfillment. However, it also is a socially influenced phenomenon that serves society. A social approach offers the opportunity of distinguishing between large and small amounts of novelty, as well as between “orthodox” and “radical” novelty. Disciplines, teachers, and students differ from

Arthur Cropley

2006-01-01

161

The Social Experiment Market  

Microsoft Academic Search

In social experiments, individuals, households, or organizations are randomly assigned to two or more policy interventions. Elsewhere, we have summarized 143 experiments completed by autumn 1996. Here, we use the information we have gathered on these experiments and findings from informal telephone interviews to investigate the social experiment market--the buyers and sellers in the market that governs the production of

David Greenberg; Mark Shroder; Matthew Onstott

1999-01-01

162

Social Media Marketing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zusammenfassung  Angesichts der wachsenden Bedeutung von Social Media Plattformen für Marketing-Aktivitäten von Unternehmen will der Beitrag\\u000a eine erste datenschutzrechtliche Orientierung für Unternehmen geben, die sich in diesem Umfeld bewegen oder bewegen wollen.\\u000a Besondere Berücksichtigung findet dabei die Social Media Plattform Facebook.

Sven Venzke

2011-01-01

163

Affective Social Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes a theoretical model for affective social competence to include the three integrated and dynamic components of sending affective messages, receiving affective messages, and experiencing affect. Places the model within the context of previous research and theory related to affective social competence and, for each component, examines how…

Halberstadt, Amy G.; Denham, Susanne A.; Dunsmore, Julie C.

2001-01-01

164

Social Work Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This reference guide contains laws, rules, and regulations of the State Education Department that govern social work practice in the State of New York. It highlights requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a social worker, and authorization of licensees for insurance reimbursement. Included are sections on:…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

165

Social Work Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This reference guide contains laws, rules, and regulations of the State Education Department that govern social work practice in the state of New York. It highlights requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a social worker, and authorization of licensees for insurance reimbursement. Included are sections on:…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

166

Explaining Social Constructivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many versions of social constructivism (SC) maintain that objects exist only after they enter communicative space. At one level an object's existence is determined through an individual's sensory perception; through communicative acts, both intra- and interpersonally, they are defined and eventually embody meaning. The social process of defining…

Keaton, Shaughan A.; Bodie, Graham D.

2011-01-01

167

Multicultural Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenges and questions directed at the political order in South Africa affected the educational arena as well. The profession of social work has been questioned as to the knowledge base, content, appropriateness and the relevancy of social work education and practice in the South African context. This paper utilizes the multicultural approach to explore cultural issues essential for an

Mandla Tshabalala

1992-01-01

168

Religion and Social Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume contains the proceedings of a conference of social scientists and ministers on "Religion and Social Change" held at the North Carolina State University (Raleigh). Five seminars were held on the topics of (1) economic progress; (2) the distribution of income, status, and power; (3) the local community decision-making process; (4)…

Gregory, Marion, Ed.

169

Reinventing Social Work Accreditation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Accreditation under the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) has contributed to the professional decline of social work. The lack of scholarship of the Board of Directors of CSWE compromises its decision making. The quality of the professional literature suffers from the weak scholarship of editors and referees. The caliber of deans and…

Stoesz, David; Karger, Howard J.

2009-01-01

170

ARE SOCIAL CLASSES DYING?  

Microsoft Academic Search

New forms of social stratification are emerging. Much of our thinking about stratification - from Marx, Weber, and others - must be recast to capture these new developments. Social class was the key theme of past stratification work. Yet class is an increasingly outmoded concept. Class stratification implies that people can be differentiated hierarchically on one or more criteria into

Terry Nichols Clark; Seymour Martin Lipset

1991-01-01

171

Reinventing Social Work Accreditation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Accreditation under the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) has contributed to the professional decline of social work. The lack of scholarship of the Board of Directors of CSWE compromises its decision making. The quality of the professional literature suffers from the weak scholarship of editors and referees. The caliber of deans and…

Stoesz, David; Karger, Howard J.

2009-01-01

172

Social Streams Blog Crawler  

Microsoft Academic Search

Weblogs, and other forms of social media, differ from traditional Web content in many ways. One of the most important differences is the highly temporal nature of the content. Applications that leverage social media content must, to be effective, have access to this data with minimal publication\\/acquisition latency. An effective Weblog crawler should satisfy the following requirements: low latency, highly

Matthew Hurst; Alexey Maykov

2009-01-01

173

A Social Capital Index  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We define an index of social capital using game-theoretical concepts. We assume that interests of individuals are presented by means of a cooperative game which take into account possible different players abilities whereas the network of relations is modeled by a graph. The social capital of each actor is then measured as the difference between his Myerson value and his Shapley value.

Gonzàlez-Aranguena, Enrique; Khmelnitskaya, Anna; Manuel, Conrado; Del Pozo, Mónica

2011-09-01

174

Justice sociale, inégalités, exclusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

[eng] Social justice, inequality, exclusion Mireille Elbaum Throughout the sixties and seventies in France, the question of ine- quality was at the very core of the social debate over the distribution of the fruits of growth. Since the beginning of the eighties, the very idea of combating inequality was however challenged and seen as inadequate, or even outmoded. New theoretical

Mireille Elbaum

1995-01-01

175

The Socialization Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper develops a conceptual framework as a guide for research analysis and the designing of experimental interventions aimed at the improvement of the socialization process of the community. Socialization agents are the parents, older and like-age peers, formal education agencies, churches, leisure time child and youth serving agencies, legal…

Lippitt, Ronald O.

176

IMPROVING THE SOCIALIZATION PROCESS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

COMPONENTS OF THE SOCIALIZATION COMMUNITY, EACH WITH A VESTED INTEREST, INCLUDE THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM, CHURCHES, LEISURE TIME AGENCIES, SOCIAL CONTROL AND PROTECTION AGENCIES, RESOCIALIZATION SERVICES, EMPLOYMENT OFFICES, POLITICAL LEADERS, PARENTS, PEERS, AND THE MASS COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA. CHANGE AGENTS MAY BE PROFESSIONAL OR NONPROFESSIONAL,…

LIPPITT, RONALD

177

Social Learning Analytics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We propose that the design and implementation of effective "Social Learning Analytics (SLA)" present significant challenges and opportunities for both research and enterprise, in three important respects. The first is that the learning landscape is extraordinarily turbulent at present, in no small part due to technological drivers. Online social

Buckingham Shum, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca

2012-01-01

178

KET Social Studies Posters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The KET Social Studies posters provide an overview of the five “big ideas” that make up Kentucky’s K-12 social studies curriculum. These posters are appropriate for classroom display for both student and teacher reference. Each poster is available in two sizes and may be printed in color or black and white.

Ket

2012-02-15

179

Social Security and Retirement  

Microsoft Academic Search

A critical question for Social Security policy is how program incentives affect retirement behavior. We use the wealth of new data available through the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) to examine the impact of Social Security incentives on male retirement. We implement forward-looking models of retirement whereby individuals consider not just the incentives to work in the next year but

Courtney C. Coile; Jonathan Gruber

2000-01-01

180

Social Security Money's Worth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes how three money's worth measures - the benefit-to-tax ratio, the internal rate of return, and the net present value - are calculated and used in analyses of social security reforms, including systems with privately managed individual accounts invested in equities. Declining returns from the U.S. social security system prove to be the inevitable result of having instituted

John Geanakoplos; Olivia S. Mitchell; Stephen P. Zeldes

1999-01-01

181

Anticipatory Consumer Socialization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Anticipatory consumer socialization is the learning of consumer roles and perceptions, which will be assumed at a later time, such as those that children acquire before they become adult consumers. A survey of 784 adolescents was conducted in a southern state to examine the anticipatory consumer socialization effects of such factors as the mass…

Moore, Roy L.; Moschis, George P.

182

Social learning of fear  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research across species highlights the critical role of the amygdala in fear conditioning. However, fear conditioning, involving direct aversive experience, is only one means by which fears can be acquired. Exploiting aversive experiences of other individuals through social fear learning is less risky. Behavioral research provides important insights into the workings of social fear learning, and the neural mechanisms are

Elizabeth A Phelps; Andreas Olsson

2007-01-01

183

The Social Integration Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Social Integration Scale (SIS) is intended to facilitate empirical research on the applicability of control theory to many types of adult crime, including "street crime," white collar crime, and physical assaults on spouses. There are five subscales: (1) belief (belief in law and social control); (2) commitment (psychological investment in…

Ross, Susan M.; Straus, Murray A.

184

Social security finances  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the government’s main functions is to protect the population against a number of social risks. Hence, replacement incomes are provided in the event of unemployment, old age or occupational disability. Income supplements are granted to compensate in part for the financial burden associated with illness or with bringing up children. These social benefits are an important facet of

B. Eugène; T. Stragier; K. Van Cauter; L. Van Meensel

2005-01-01

185

Social Work Gerontological Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a pressing need to upgrade the gerontological knowledge and skills of practicing social workers. Geriatrics and gerontology, as specialized fields of knowledge, have not been sufficiently integrated into formal academic training programs. There are major trends in the health care environment which impact on social work education, including technological advances, a shift from inpatient to outpatient and community

Barbara Berkman; Barbara Silverstone; W. June Simmons; Patricia J. Volland; Judith L. Howe

2000-01-01

186

Limits of social mobilization  

PubMed Central

The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

2013-01-01

187

Embodied Social Presence Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss and reflect on the importance of embodiment, context, and spatial proximity as they pertain to the sense of presence obtained by individuals in virtual environments. We propose Embodied Social Presence (ESP) Theory, a theoretical framework that focuses on the embodied virtual representation (i.e., the avatar) as the nexus of activity in social interaction within virtual worlds. We review

Brian E. Mennecke; Janea L. Triplett; Lesya M. Hassall; Zayira Jordan Conde

2010-01-01

188

Social health insurance financing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social health insurance model Funding access to health care through social health insurance has its origins in Germany in the nineteenth century. The earliest versions of health insur- ance developed without any significant government intervention. Industrializa- tion brought with it the emergence of large firms, and the workers in these firms started to organize themselves into trade unions. Sickness

Charles Normand; Reinhard Busse

189

Oregon Social Sciences Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

190

Visualizing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two distinct forms of display have been used to construct images of networks, one based on points and lines and the other on matrices. In most point and line displays the points represent social actors and the lines represent connections among the act ors. In matrix displays the rows and columns both represent social actors and numbers or symbols in

Linton Freeman

2000-01-01

191

Sizing Up Social Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Most people are aware of the increasing importance of social media to institutional advancement, and many colleges and universities have started investing resources in these media. The next step is to measure the impact of social media on the institution and evaluate the success of one's efforts. Every advancement leader should understand how…

Pearson, Jerold

2010-01-01

192

Building Social Media Connections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

2012-01-01

193

Social Medium Well Done  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|For tech-savvy educators looking to connect with students, social media have a powerful allure: Not only are sites such as Facebook and Twitter inherently designed for discussion and the exchange of ideas, but most students are already immersed in the technology. While these sites have their critics, social media's potential for collaboration is…

Raths, David

2012-01-01

194

Social Media Under Social Control: Regulating Social Media and the Future of Socialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process of socialization for new and future journalists will look dramatically different from the process undergone by previous generations of journalists because of economic realities and changes in the nature of news production. The rise of social media and their role in the establishment of a successful career will also affect the integration of these rising professionals into their

Susan Currie Sivek

2010-01-01

195

Social Movement in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

China's recent history is formed by all kinds of social movements. In the early twentieth century, the New Cultural Movement in China introduced the concepts of democracy, equality and liberty. Now, after nearly 90 years of China's social change, the cause of seeking for democracy and equality is still far to be fulfilled. The founding of People's Republic of China

Zhibin Lin; Lixin Zhang

196

Building Social Media Connections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

2012-01-01

197

Schooling and Social Achievement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Until the 1960s schooling in Korea was looked upon quite favorably as a means of achieving equal social and economic opportunities. In the 1970s, however, many began to raise the question of whether the expansion of educational opportunities really did reduce social inequalities. This report discusses research that analyzes available evidence…

Kim, Byong-sung; And Others

198

Cognitive and Social Values.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Criticizes Hugh Lacey's separation of cognitive values and social values in discussions of the nature of science. Claims that attempting to distinguish between cognitive and social ignores crucial complexities in the development and use of knowledge. Proposes that the proper distinction be between legitimate and illegitimate reasons in science as…

Machamer, Peter; Douglas, Heather

1999-01-01

199

Social Space: Philosophical Reflections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Our analysis of the phrase "social space" first of all concentrates on the modal or functional nature of the different aspects of reality, including the social and spatial aspects. Subsequently this leads to an analysis of the problem of modal analogies--one way in which an answer is given to the perennial philosophical problem concerning the…

Strauss, D. F. M.

2009-01-01

200

Art as Social Concern  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author describes how her eleventh- and twelfth-grade portfolio class used art as a social concern through a sketchbook and a linoleum print. Students thumbed through copies of the "New York Times" to find an article that described a modern-day social concern. Students were assigned to choose an article, summarize it, and come…

Hodge, Stephanie

2010-01-01

201

Social Policies for Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Noting that successful social policies for children are critical to our nation's future, this book discusses the status of children in America and suggests that the nation's current policies may not be serving them well. Proposals for seven new social policies are discussed that deal with the following domains affecting children from birth…

Garfinkel, Irwin, Ed.; And Others

202

Oregon Social Sciences Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

203

Explaining Social Constructivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many versions of social constructivism (SC) maintain that objects exist only after they enter communicative space. At one level an object's existence is determined through an individual's sensory perception; through communicative acts, both intra- and interpersonally, they are defined and eventually embody meaning. The social process of defining…

Keaton, Shaughan A.; Bodie, Graham D.

2011-01-01

204

Current Social Problem Novels.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This review of social problem novels for young adults opens with a brief background of the genre, then lists the dominant themes of social problem fiction and nonfiction novels that have been published in the last two years, such as alcoholism, alienation, death, growing up and self-awarness, drugs, and divorce. Other themes mentioned are…

Kenney, Donald J.

205

Stop Social Network Pitfalls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ask a group of teenagers how they spend their spare time and most will mention Facebook, YouTube, World of Warcraft, or Second Life – ‘virtual’ social networks that bring millions of people together online. The benefits of social networks have been touted but what about the pitfalls? Some teens will share everything about themselves to hundreds of online friends, most

K. Michael

2010-01-01

206

Social-Mobile Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile communications devices and applications are primarily designed to increase efficiency and productivity for professionals on the go. However, users invariably appropriate such technology to meet their social needs as well. For many people, particularly younger users, BlackBerry devices, Hiptops, and other handhelds primarily have a social function. A few small companies are beginning to exploit the growing demand for

Ian Smith

2005-01-01

207

Social Determinants of Health  

Cancer.gov

Social Determinants of Health You will need Adobe Flash Player 8 or later and JavaScript enabled to view this video. You can view the movie here Video of webinar for public health professionals introducing the concept of social determinants of health

208

Addressing Social Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

Schoebel, Susan

1991-01-01

209

Studying for social work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essential guide to study skills takes social work students through every step of their degree journey, providing them with the academic tools they will need to thrive along the way. Inventively informed by the insights and reflections of qualifying students, the book offers effective guidance that is grounded in real experience of the social work degree. It is particularly

Eileen Baldry; Mark Hughes; Linda Burnett; Ian Collinson

2011-01-01

210

Current Social Problem Novels.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review of social problem novels for young adults opens with a brief background of the genre, then lists the dominant themes of social problem fiction and nonfiction novels that have been published in the last two years, such as alcoholism, alienation, death, growing up and self-awarness, drugs, and divorce. Other themes mentioned are…

Kenney, Donald J.

211

Social Policy Report, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is comprised of the four 2001 issues of a publication providing a forum for scholarly reviews and discussion of developmental research and implications for social policies affecting children. The topics featured in each of the issues are: (1) "Youth Civic Development: Implications of Research for Social Policy and Programs"…

Sherrod, Lonnie, Ed.

2001-01-01

212

Social Support in Widowhood  

PubMed Central

Although social support is assumed to be an important factor following loss, the mechanisms by which it influences outcomes are not well understood. This study explored the nature of social support following loss using mixed methods. Widows participated in semistructured interviews 1 and 4 months after loss; a subsample completed 98 days of questionnaires between interviews. Interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method; themes included the importance of supportive groups and the meaning of support. Social support trajectories were examined using hierarchical linear modeling; perceived social control explained differences in trajectories. Additional interviews were selected by their maximally divergent plots. The findings of these analyses were integrated to contribute a more detailed description of social support in the transition to widowhood.

Scott, Stacey B.; Bergeman, C. S.; Verney, Alissa; Longenbaker, Susannah; Markey, Megan A.; Bisconti, Toni L.

2012-01-01

213

Social Dynamics of Science  

PubMed Central

The birth and decline of disciplines are critical to science and society. How do scientific disciplines emerge? No quantitative model to date allows us to validate competing theories on the different roles of endogenous processes, such as social collaborations, and exogenous events, such as scientific discoveries. Here we propose an agent-based model in which the evolution of disciplines is guided mainly by social interactions among agents representing scientists. Disciplines emerge from splitting and merging of social communities in a collaboration network. We find that this social model can account for a number of stylized facts about the relationships between disciplines, scholars, and publications. These results provide strong quantitative support for the key role of social interactions in shaping the dynamics of science. While several “science of science” theories exist, this is the first account for the emergence of disciplines that is validated on the basis of empirical data.

Sun, Xiaoling; Kaur, Jasleen; Milojevic, Stasa; Flammini, Alessandro; Menczer, Filippo

2013-01-01

214

Social Dynamics of Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The birth and decline of disciplines are critical to science and society. How do scientific disciplines emerge? No quantitative model to date allows us to validate competing theories on the different roles of endogenous processes, such as social collaborations, and exogenous events, such as scientific discoveries. Here we propose an agent-based model in which the evolution of disciplines is guided mainly by social interactions among agents representing scientists. Disciplines emerge from splitting and merging of social communities in a collaboration network. We find that this social model can account for a number of stylized facts about the relationships between disciplines, scholars, and publications. These results provide strong quantitative support for the key role of social interactions in shaping the dynamics of science. While several ``science of science'' theories exist, this is the first account for the emergence of disciplines that is validated on the basis of empirical data.

Sun, Xiaoling; Kaur, Jasleen; Milojevi?, Staša; Flammini, Alessandro; Menczer, Filippo

2013-01-01

215

Social Policy Solutions to Social Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to O'Brien et al., who examined predictors of child outcome among at-risk infants as possible eligibility criteria for early intervention programs, this paper notes that most biological risk factors in infants are not adequately predictive of developmental dysfunction. It stresses that when social problems are the cause of…

Blackman, James A.

1996-01-01

216

Professional Social Workers in Public Social Welfare.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A report is made on a survey of 181 employees of the New York City Department of Welfare (as it was then titled) who recently completed social work school under the Federally-supported scholarship program and had returned to the Department. A great majori...

L. Podell

1969-01-01

217

Fostering Social Creativity by Increasing Social Capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex design problems require more knowledge than any single person can possess, and the knowledge relevant to a problem is often distributed among all stakeholders who have different perspectives and background knowledge, thus providing the foundation for social creativity. Bringing together different points of view and trying to create a shared understanding among all stakeholders can lead to new insights,

Gerhard Fischer; Eric Scharff; Yunwen Ye

218

Leveraging social context for searching social media  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to utilize and benet from today's explosion of social media sites depends on providing tools that allow users to productively participate. In order to participate, users must be able to nd resources (both people and in- formation) that they nd valuable. Here, we argue that in order to do this eectiv ely, we should make use of a

Marc Smith; Vladimir Barash; Lise Getoor; Hady Wirawan LAUW

2008-01-01

219

Medical malpractice, social structure, and social control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The origin and handling of doctor-patient conflict can be understood with reference to the sociological aspects of professional health care. This premise is explored by applying Black's theory of social control to the empirical evidence concerning malpractice litigation in the United States. The vertical, organizational, and relational distances between the health care provider and the patient are particularly relevant for

Jeffery Mullis

1995-01-01

220

BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL FOR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: By entrepreneurial combinations of voluntary resources, project means from public and private sources, commissions on contracts and other ways of financing, the youth house Fryshuset, with a great number of social activities for primarily young people in Stockholm, Sweden, has been able to allocate resources for establishing and expanding its activities. This development would not have been possible without

Hans WESTLUND; Malin GAWELL

2012-01-01

221

Teaching Social Software with Social Software  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Ulises Mejias examines how social software--information and communications technologies that facilitate the collaboration and exchange of ideas--enables students to participate in distributed research, an approach to learning in which knowledge is collectively constructed and shared. During Fall 2005, Mejias taught a graduate seminar that…

Mejias, Ulises

2006-01-01

222

Social Issues as Social Problems: Adolescents' Perceptions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Surveyed 446 late adolescents concerning their assessment of specific social issues as problems existing in contemporary American society. Subjects overwhelmingly pointed to drug use, pollution, hunger, nuclear war, and poverty as serious to very serious problems, while ageism, and racial and sexual discrimination were regarded as substantially…

Roscoe, Bruce

1985-01-01

223

When is social marketing not social marketing?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper aims to discuss the thorny issues of industry-funded social marketing campaigns. Can the tobacco industry be trusted to educate our children about the dangers of smoking? Is a brewer the best source of health promotion? The paper argues for transparency and critical appraisal. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper looks at the issues of tobacco and alcohol in

Gerard Hastings; Kathryn Angus

2011-01-01

224

Jurors' use of social framework evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monahan and Walker (1988) delineated three uses of social science evidence within the courts: social authority, social fact, and social framework. Social authority evidence is social science evidence used in making policy or law. Social fact evidence is social science evidence that describes research undertaken expressly for the case at hand. Social framework evidence involves providing conclusions from previously conducted

Kellye Suzanne Hebert

2000-01-01

225

Social skill as a determinant of social networks and perceived social support in schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors influencing supportive social networks of people with schizophrenia are little understood. Data from 46 outpatients with schizophrenia were analysed using structural equation modelling to test plausible sets of inter-relationships between social skill, social networks, and social support. The data supported a tentative model about the causal relationships between variables. Paths showed that people with greater social skill had larger

E. M. Macdonald; H. J. Jackson; R. L. Hayes; A. J. Baglioni; C. Madden

1998-01-01

226

Tips for Socializing with Aphasia  

MedlinePLUS

... their social life. Ironically, research has shown that socializing is one of the best ways to maximize stroke recovery. Many experts contend that socializing should begin right away in the recovery process. ...

227

Analyzing Enterprise Social Media Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broadening adoption of social media applications within the enterprise offers a new and valuable data source for insight into the social structure of organizations. Social media applications generate networks when employees use features to create \\

Marc Smith; Derek L. Hansen; Eric Gleave

2009-01-01

228

Online Advertising in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networks offer opportunities to analyze user behavior and social connectivity and leverage resulting insights for effective online advertising. This chapter focuses on the role of social network information in online display advertising.

Bagherjeiran, Abraham; Bhatt, Rushi P.; Parekh, Rajesh; Chaoji, Vineet

229

On Social e-Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Web sites include social networking sites and social media sites. They make it possible for people to share user-created\\u000a contents online and to interact and stay connected with their online people networks. The social features of social Web sites,\\u000a appropriately adapted, can help turn e-learning into social e-learning and make e-learning significantly more effective. In\\u000a this paper, we develop

Won Kim; Ok-Ran Jeong

2009-01-01

230

Data Mining in Social Media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rise of online social media is providing a wealth of social network data. Data mining techniques provide researchers and practitioners the tools needed to analyze large, complex, and frequently changing social media data. This chapter introduces the basics of data mining, reviews social media, discusses how to mine social media data, and highlights some illustrative examples with an emphasis on social networking sites and blogs.

Barbier, Geoffrey; Liu, Huan

231

Social Capital and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social capital is a compound and complex construct, an umbrella term under which social cohesion, social support, social integration\\u000a and\\/or participation are often lumped together. Beyond its growing appeal to policy makers, practitioners and researchers\\u000a in public health in general and mental health in particular, social capital is now also an integral part of broad-based discussions\\u000a on social-ecological resilience, ecosystem

Astier M. Almedom; Douglas Glandon

232

Social strategies that work.  

PubMed

Although most companies have collected lots of friends and followers on social platforms such as Facebook, few have succeeded in generating profits there. That's because they merely port their digital strategies into social environments by broadcasting their commercial messages or seeking customer feedback. To succeed on social platforms, says Harvard Business School's Piskorski, businesses need to devise social strategies that are consistent with users' expectations and behavior in these venues--namely, people want to connect with other people, not with companies. The author defines successful social strategies as those that reduce costs or increase customers' willingness to pay by helping people establish or strengthen relationships through doing free work on a company's behalf. Citing successes at Zynga, eBay, American Express, and Yelp, Piskorski shows that social strategies can generate profits by helping people connect in exchange for tasks that benefit the company such as customer acquisition, marketing, and content creation. He lays out a systematic way to build a social strategy and shows how a major credit card company he advised used the method to roll out its own strategy. PMID:22111430

Piskorski, Miko?aj Jan

2011-11-01

233

Genetics and social class  

PubMed Central

Design: Using genetic epidemiological principles, five claims on the role of genes in determining social class are examined: (1) traits that run in families are usually inherited; (2) complex traits can be explained by alleles at a single gene locus; (3) complex traits are transmitted intact from one generation to the next; (4) natural selection explains social advantage. (5) Heritability estimates provide a valid estimate of the importance of genes in explaining complex human traits or behaviour. Results: (1) Traits that run in families can result from environmental exposures that differ by social class. (2) The protein encoded by any single gene has too narrow a range of biological activity to explain traits as complex as social status. (3) Because alleles at different gene loci are transmitted independently, genetic inheritance cannot explain why offspring display the same complex traits as their parents. (4) The propagation of mutations that might result in a selective advantage takes much longer than the time for which any social class has achieved or maintained dominance. (5) Heritability measures are accurate only when environment is maintained constant. This is impossible in evaluating human traits. Conclusions: The roots of social class differences do not lie in our genes. Consequently, genetics cannot be used as a justification for maintaining a ruling class, limiting procreation among the poor, or minimising social support programmes.

Holtzman, N

2002-01-01

234

Interactive brains, social minds  

PubMed Central

To reveal the neural and behavioral dynamics of social interaction, single-person studies are increasingly complemented by research designs that simultaneously assess two or more interacting individuals. In this article, we review studies on neural mechanisms and markers of social interactions that use multi-person functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological recordings. We propose a terminology for investigating social interaction dynamics, show how forward models of action regulation may serve as a framework for investigating interpersonal action coordination and discuss different methodological approaches to studying functional brain connectivity.

Lindenberger, Ulman

2011-01-01

235

Social network and addiction.  

PubMed

In recent decades, the rapid development of innovative Internet-based communication technologies created a new field of academic study among scholars. Particularly, the attention of researchers is focusing on new ways to form relationship-thought social web. Social Network sites constitute a new form of web communities, where people meet and share interests and activities. Due to exponential growth of these sites, an increasing number of scholars are beginning to study the emergent phenomena in order to identify any psychopathological risk related to use of social web, such as addiction. This article examines the recent literature about this issue. PMID:19592725

La Barbera, Daniele; La Paglia, Filippo; Valsavoia, Rosaria

2009-01-01

236

Social communication impairments: pragmatics.  

PubMed

Social communication or pragmatic impairments are characterized and illustrated as involving inappropriate or ineffective use of language and gesture in social contexts. Three clinical vignettes illustrate different pragmatic impairments and the wealth of diagnostic information that can be garnered from observation of a child's social communication behavior. Definitions of, and developmental milestones in, domains of pragmatic competence are provided. Several screening instruments are suggested for use in assessing pragmatic competence within the time-frame of a pediatric examination. Frequent comorbid psychiatric conditions are described and a sample of current neurobiologic research is briefly summarized. PMID:17543906

Russell, Robert L

2007-06-01

237

Mass Social Movements and Social Class  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper critically reviews the major class interpretations of contemporary mass movements, including the fascist movements, Polish Solidarity and Western Green (eco-pax) movements, and argues that these accounts are deficient. A paradigmatic shift from the class interpretation of movements to `post-Marxist' and `post-modernist' accounts has been occurring in movement literature. This shift follows the processes of social change and broadening

Jan Pakulski

1993-01-01

238

Program Memorandum: Social Problems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Program Memorandum covers Social Problems, the sixth of the eleven major programs in the statewide program structure. Article VIII, Sections 3 and 4, of the Hawaii State Constitution, authorizes the State government to provide public assistance for p...

1977-01-01

239

Introducing Social Innovation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the processes by which an interdisciplinary research project overcame the usual problems of antagonism among disciplines and succeeded in introducing a number of social innovations into a community. In terms of the experience five \\

James B. Taylor

1970-01-01

240

Social Psychiatry: An Overview.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Socail psychiatry, which includes the study of the impingement of social phenomena upon the genesis, manifestations, and treatment of mental and physical illness, has in recent decades become an increasingly important part of psychiatry. The epidemiology ...

R. J. Arthur

1973-01-01

241

The Social Climbing Game  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structure of societies depends, to some extent, on the incentives of the individuals they are composed of. We study a stylized model of this interplay, that suggests that the more individuals aim at climbing the social hierarchy, the more society's hierarchy gets strong. Such a dependence is sharp, in the sense that a persistent hierarchical order emerges abruptly when the preference for social status gets larger than a threshold. This phase transition has its origin in the fact that the presence of a well defined hierarchy allows agents to climb it, thus reinforcing it, whereas in a "disordered" society it is harder for agents to find out whom they should connect to in order to become more central. Interestingly, a social order emerges when agents strive harder to climb society and it results in a state of reduced social mobility, as a consequence of ergodicity breaking, where climbing is more difficult.

Bardoscia, Marco; De Luca, Giancarlo; Livan, Giacomo; Marsili, Matteo; Tessone, Claudio J.

2013-05-01

242

Social Aspects of Osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... consequences may be the least recognized. Managing social limitations is much easier when you're surrounded by ... they may be prevented by pain and activity limitations. Instead, they need to identify other ways to ...

243

On Resisting Social Influence.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Resisting social influences becomes important when such influences can be appropriately thought of as 'mind control.' When information is systematically hidden, withheld or distorted it is impossible to make unbiased decisions. Under these circumstances, ...

S. Andersen P. Zimbardo

1979-01-01

244

Genre as social action  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay proposes a conception of genre based on conventionalized social motives which are found in recurrent situation?types. The thesis is that genre must be conceived in terms of rhetorical action rather than substance or form.

Carolyn R. Miller

1984-01-01

245

Social Security in a \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Private transfer payments are modeled as outcomes of a constrained social choice pro blem facing donors. The approach is applied to a large household leve l data set for Java and hypotheses are tested concerning the performa nce of the \\

Martin Ravallion; Lorraine Dearden

1988-01-01

246

Social Security: Telephone Accessibility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The fact sheet contains information testing accessibility to the Social Security Administration (SSA) by telephone. Specifically, it measured the extent to which telephone calls to SSA's local offices and teleservice centers during a single workweek were ...

1987-01-01

247

Decentralized Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current Online social networks (OSN) are web services run on logically centralized infrastructure. Large OSN sites use content distribution networks and thus distribute some of the load by caching for performance reasons, nevertheless there is a central repository for user and application data. This centralized nature of OSNs has several drawbacks including scalability, privacy, dependence on a provider, need for being online for every transaction, and a lack of locality. There have thus been several efforts toward decentralizing OSNs while retaining the functionalities offered by centralized OSNs. A decentralized online social network (DOSN) is a distributed system for social networking with no or limited dependency on any dedicated central infrastructure. In this chapter we explore the various motivations of a decentralized approach to online social networking, discuss several concrete proposals and types of DOSN as well as challenges and opportunities associated with decentralization.

Datta, Anwitaman; Buchegger, Sonja; Vu, Le-Hung; Strufe, Thorsten; Rzadca, Krzysztof

248

Teaching with Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

This presentation addresses the benefits and challenges of teaching with social media. Examples of student work, assignments, and class projects are included from Linfield College classes and from other institutions, including disciplines other than mass communication.

Susan Currie Sivek

2012-01-01

249

Social Network Change Detection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Changes in observed social networks may signal an underlying change within an organization, and may even predict significant events or behaviors. The breakdown of a team's effectiveness, the emergence of informal leaders, or the preparation of an attack b...

I. A. McCulloh K. M. Carley

2008-01-01

250

Graphing Your Social Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students analyze their social networks using graph theory. They gather data on their own social relationships, either from Facebook interactions or the interactions they have throughout the course of a day, recording it in Microsoft Excel and using Cytoscape (a free, downloadable application) to generate social network graphs that visually illustrate the key persons (nodes) and connections between them (edges). The nodes in the Cytoscape graphs are color-coded and sized according to the importance of the node (in this activity, nodes are people in students' social networks). After the analysis, the graphs are further examined to see what can be learned from the visual representation. Students gain practice with graph theory vocabulary, including node, edge, betweeness centrality and degree on interaction, and learn about a range of engineering applications of graph theory.

Impart Ret Program

251

Cyber stalking: The social impact of social networking technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking technology provides a social, collaborative and interactive platform for Internet users. The advances in social networking technology improve the socialization among Internet users. Users become more open in expressing their thoughts and sharing information, and along the way this contributes to the rise of internet violations. One of the violation faced by the internet users is cyber stalking.

Haryani Haron; F. B. M. Yusof

2010-01-01

252

Social Signal Processing: Understanding social interactions through nonverbal behavior analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces social signal processing (SSP), the domain aimed at automatic understanding of social interactions through analysis of nonverbal behavior. The core idea of SSP is that nonverbal behavior is machine detectable evidence of social signals, the relational attitudes exchanged between interacting individuals. Social signals include (dis-)agreement, empathy, hostility, and any other attitude towards others that is expressed not

A. Vinciarelli; H. Salamin; M. Pantic

2009-01-01

253

Sociability and social interaction on social networking websites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Social websites have become a major medium for social interaction. From Facebook to MySpace to emergent sites like Twitter, social websites are increasing exponentially in user numbers and unique visits every day. How do these websites encourage sociability? What features or design practices enable users to socialize with other users? The purpose of this paper is to explore

Andrew Keenan; Ali Shiri

2009-01-01

254

Group Work and Social Justice: Designing Pedagogy for Social Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article the authors explore the gap between education and action in putting the social work core value of social justice into practice. Describing how their School of Social Work has taken up this challenge, the authors analyze how a new social action course helps bridge this gap and draw on student reflection on their experiences and assignments in

Suzanne Dudziak; Norma Jean Profitt

2012-01-01

255

Social Class, Sense of Control, and Social Explanation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lower social class is associated with diminished resources and perceived subordinate rank. On the basis of this analysis, the authors predicted that social class would be closely associated with a reduced sense of personal control and that this association would explain why lower class individuals favor contextual over dispositional explanations of social events. Across 4 studies, lower social class individuals,

Michael W. Kraus; Paul K. Piff; Dacher Keltner

2009-01-01

256

Social cognition, social skill, and the broad autism phenotype.  

PubMed

Social-cognitive deficits differentiate parents with the "broad autism phenotype" from non-broad autism phenotype parents more robustly than other neuropsychological features of autism, suggesting that this domain may be particularly informative for identifying genetic and brain processes associated with the phenotype. The current study examined whether the social-cognitive deficits associated with the broad autism phenotype extend to the general population and relate to reduced social skill. A total of 74 undergraduates completed the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire, three standardized social-cognitive tasks, and a live social interaction with an unfamiliar research assistant. Social broad autism phenotype traits were significantly associated with deficits in social cognition and reduced social skill. In addition, the relationship between social broad autism phenotype traits and social skill was partially mediated by social cognition, suggesting that the reduced interpersonal ability associated with the broad autism phenotype occurs in part because of poorer social-cognitive ability. Together, these findings indicate that the impairments in social cognition and social skill that characterize autism spectrum disorder extend in milder forms to the broad autism phenotype in the general population and suggest a framework for understanding how social broad autism phenotype traits may manifest in diminished social ability. PMID:22987889

Sasson, Noah J; Nowlin, Rachel B; Pinkham, Amy E

2012-09-17

257

AlwaySocial: Social Networking in the Real World  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking is nowadays a popular way for people to socialize and network professionally. Currently, social net- working websites provide a mostly online experience whether they are accessed from a computer or a mobile phone. This leads to a chasm between online social activities and those done in the actual world. As there is no direct way to turn an

Nir J. Peer

258

Social Privilege, Social Justice, and Group Counseling: An Inquiry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The construct of social privilege is ubiquitous within the multicultural and social justice literature. However, the group work literature has yet to integrate the construct into group theory, processes, and training. In this article, we review the group literature on multicultural and diversity issues. Also, we examine the multicultural and social justice literature for an operational definition of social privilege.

Lance C. Smith; Richard Q. Shin

2008-01-01

259

Cultural differences in perceived social norms and social anxiety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cultural considerations in social anxiety are a rarely investigated topic although it seems likely that differences between countries in social norms may relate to the extent of social anxiety. The present study investigated individuals’ personal and perceived cultural norms and their relation to social anxiety and fear of blushing. A total of 909 participants from eight countries completed vignettes describing

Nina Heinrichs; Ronald M. Rapee; Lynn A. Alden; Susan Bögels; Stefan G. Hofmann; Kyung Ja Oh; Yuji Sakano

2006-01-01

260

The Social Side of School: Why Teachers Need Social Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Teaching and learning are fundamentally social enterprises. In attempting to understand, explain, and predict social behavior, social psychologists have amassed scores of empirically grounded, fundamental principles. Yet, many such principles have yet to be applied to classrooms despite the social nature of these settings. This article…

Gehlbach, Hunter

2010-01-01

261

Social Contract and Social Integration in Adolescent Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-nine subjects from two high schools were tested during the spring of their sophomore and senior years, when their mean ages were 16 years, 1 month, and 18 years, 1 month, respectively. Composites measured social contract with: (a) independence, (b) implicit social contract, societal norms and expectations, and (c) explicit social contracts, rules. Composites and single items measured social integration

W. Scott Hilles; Lynn R. Kahle

1985-01-01

262

A Social Problems Approach to Gerontology in Social Work Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a social problems emphasis to gerontology in social work education which acknowledges the fact that the elderly are handicapped and discriminated against by social values, attitudes, and practices. The traditional integrative approach has been ineffective in educating and sensitizing students to problems and needs of the aged. The social problems emphasis is discussed as related to future

JORDAN I. KOSBERG

1976-01-01

263

Attachment, Social Competencies, Social Support, and Psychological Distress  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this survey study of 430 undergraduates, elements of the social competencies and interpersonal processes model (B. Mallinckrodt, 2000) were tested. Two social competencies were hypothesized to mediate the direct effects of 2 independent variables, attachment anxiety and avoidance, on 2 outcomes, psychological distress and perceived social support. Social self-efficacy was expected to be a significant mediator only for attachment

Brent Mallinckrodt; Meifen Wei

2005-01-01

264

SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF REDUCING FRICTIONS IN SOCIAL NETWORKING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Can we use the underlying technologies of virtual social networking in a (more) productive way? If we reduce frictions within social networks, caused by distance, inaccessibility, and other factors, can we detect social and economic effects, such as a reduction of transportation costs and a faster spread of knowledge? We want to know how a virtual social network is organised

Mark Schonewille

265

Social Network Analysis of Social Capital in Collaborative Planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social capital is an important primary outcome of collaborative planning and is deemed a precursor to arriving at successful collaborative planning outcomes such as more effective collective action and both individual and social benefits. Although commonly used definitions of social capital stress the importance of social networks, recent scholarly research tends to overlook the importance of understanding how collaborative efforts

Lynn A. Mandarano

2009-01-01

266

A social collaboration platform for enterprise social networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

The consumer-oriented technologies categorized as social media and social networking are transforming the way that people communicate and accelerating the spread of information. Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) lack the capability of finance and technology, and can not afford to establish a collaborative portal for partners. With social network service increasing rapidly and being used popularly, an enterprise social

Minbo Lil; Guangyu Chenl; Zhe Zhang; Yi Fu

2012-01-01

267

Using Social Media Data Aggregators to Do Social Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article asks if it is possible to use commercial data analysis software and digital by-product data to do critical social science. In response this article introduces social media data aggregator software to a social science audience. The article explores how this particular software can be used to do social research. It uses some specific examples in order to elaborate

David Beer

2012-01-01

268

Social support across cultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates subjective perceptions of supervisor emotional support and co-worker instrumental support among 15,606 employees located within five geographic and\\/or social regions of a multinational firm. Beehr and Glazer's (2001. A cultural perspective of social support in relation to occupational stress. In P. Perrewé, D. C. Ganster, & J. Moran (Eds.), Research in occupational stress and well-being (pp. 97–142).

Sharon Glazer

2006-01-01

269

Social Learning Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social learning theory utilizes precise descriptions of dyadic relationships and other larger system dynamics that are present\\u000a in families with adolescents. Similar to other theoretical perspectives that claim more individual psychological origins,\\u000a however, this theoretical approach is not given extensive coverage in the family theory literature. The present chapter discusses\\u000a how social learning theory focuses attention on the ways in

Stephen M. Gavazzi

270

Social Learning Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conceptual foundations of social learning theory (SLT), respondent conditioning, opérant conditioning, and observational learning, are empirically-supported approaches to understanding normative human development and the etiology of psychosocial problems. The principles of SLT are completely consistent with the currently popular eco-systems framework within social work practice. A thorough integration of SLT within the eco-systems model will substantially reduce the shortcomings

Bruce A. Thyer; Laura L. Myers

1998-01-01

271

Sniffing out social signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

In most mammals, conspecific chemical communication strategies control complex social and sexual behavior. Just a few years\\u000a ago, our concept of how the olfactory system is organized to ensure faithful transmission of social information built on the\\u000a rather simplistic assumption that two fundamentally different classes of stimuli – ‘general’ odors versus ‘pheromones’ – are exclusively detected by either of two

M. Spehr

2010-01-01

272

Quantitative social science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

General concepts for the quantitative description of the dynamics of social processes are introduced. They allow for embedding social science into the conceptual framework of synergetics. Equations of motion for the socioconfiguration are derived on the stochastic and quasideterministic level. As an application the migration of interacting human populations is treated. The solutions of the nonlinear migratory equations include limit cycles and strange attractors. The empiric evaluation of interregional migratory dynamics is exemplified in the case of Germany.

Weidlich, W.

1987-03-01

273

Socially Situated Affective Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a For a socially situated agent, the world is populated by other agents with which it interacts in the true sense of the word,\\u000a in that the action–reaction sequence typical of the physical world is replaced by mutual acting-with and acting-upon the other.\\u000a This chapter first introduces the sociological bottom line of emotion as the glue and regulatory system of social

Sabine Payr; Peter Wallis

274

Experiencing Social Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Isadora Duncan (1927\\/1996) famously said “What one has not experienced, one will never understand in print” (p. 60). Taking\\u000a my cue from Isadora, I begin this chapter by dancing around barefoot with two very basic questions: what are the issues involved\\u000a with modeling a social education philosophy around genuine communal experiences? And can communal experiences and the concepts\\u000a of social

Sabrina Marsh

275

Corporate Social Responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter examines the ideas and ideology associated with the contemporary corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement,\\u000a and discusses how new approaches to corporate social responsibility are changing the relationship between the corporate and\\u000a third sectors. Changes in this relationship raise questions in turn about shifts in attitudes, behaviors, and practices within\\u000a third sector organizations as well as in their external

Brenda Gainer

276

Self and social identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract In this chapter, we examine the self and identity by considering the different conditions under which,these are affected by the groups,to which,people belong. From a social identity perspective we argue that group commitment, on the one hand, and features of the social context, on the other hand, are crucial determinants of central identity concerns. We develop a taxonomy,of

Naomi Ellemers; Russell Spears; Bertjan Doosje

2002-01-01

277

Social Ecology of Horses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Horses (Equidae ) are believed to clearly demonstrate the links between ecology and social organization. Their social cognitive\\u000a abilities enable them to succeed in many different environments, including those provided for them by humans, or the ones\\u000a domestic horses encounter when escaping from their human care takers. Living in groups takes different shapes in equids. Their\\u000a aggregation and group cohesion

Konstanze Krueger

278

Towards Semantic Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer manipulated social networks are usually built from the explicit assertion by users that they have some relation with\\u000a other users or by the implicit evidence of such relations (e.g., co-authoring). However, since the goal of social network\\u000a analysis is to help users to take advantage of these networks, it would be convenient to take more information into account.\\u000a We

Jason J. Jung; Jérôme Euzenat

2007-01-01

279

The Social Gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis Skew selection is a multiple-selection model (not to be confused with a multi-level selection model) that explains the inherent duality of social behavior from an individualistic, self-preservation point of view. The dual behaviors of social beings are ‘greed’ and ‘sharing’. Greed produces resource stockpiles. Stockpiles buffer an individual from famine. Sharing aggregates individuals into groups. Groups buffer an individual

Deby Cassill

2005-01-01

280

Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

{Excerpt} Power no longer resides exclusively (if at all) in states, institutions, or large corporations. It is located in the networks that structure society. Social network analysis seeks to understand networks and their participants and has two main focuses: the actors and the relationships between them in a specific social context.\\u000aThe information revolution has given birth to new economies

Olivier Serrat

2009-01-01

281

Social jetlag and obesity.  

PubMed

Obesity has reached crisis proportions in industrialized societies. Many factors converge to yield increased body mass index (BMI). Among these is sleep duration. The circadian clock controls sleep timing through the process of entrainment. Chronotype describes individual differences in sleep timing, and it is determined by genetic background, age, sex, and environment (e.g., light exposure). Social jetlag quantifies the discrepancy that often arises between circadian and social clocks, which results in chronic sleep loss. The circadian clock also regulates energy homeostasis, and its disruption-as with social jetlag-may contribute to weight-related pathologies. Here, we report the results from a large-scale epidemiological study, showing that, beyond sleep duration, social jetlag is associated with increased BMI. Our results demonstrate that living "against the clock" may be a factor contributing to the epidemic of obesity. This is of key importance in pending discussions on the implementation of Daylight Saving Time and on work or school times, which all contribute to the amount of social jetlag accrued by an individual. Our data suggest that improving the correspondence between biological and social clocks will contribute to the management of obesity. PMID:22578422

Roenneberg, Till; Allebrandt, Karla V; Merrow, Martha; Vetter, Céline

2012-05-10

282

Social Self-Reappraisal Therapy for Social Phobia: Preliminary Findings  

PubMed Central

The recent psychopathology literature suggests that individuals with social phobia overestimate social standards and are deficient in setting and attaining social goals, have a negative perception of themselves as social objects and show heightened self-focused attention when confronted with social threat. They further overestimate the potential cost of a social encounter, experience their anxiety as uncontrollable and visible to others, view their social skills as inadequate, rely on safety behaviors and avoidance strategies to control their anxiety, and engage in post-event rumination. Traditional cognitive-behavior therapy does not adequately address all of these features of social phobia during treatment. We discuss here an enhanced version of cognitive-behavioral treatment for social phobia, which is specifically designed to address these factors. The results of an uncontrolled pilot study suggest that this new treatment may be more effective than traditional cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia.

Hofmann, Stefan G.; Scepkowski, Lisa A.

2009-01-01

283

Potential social interactions are important to social attention  

PubMed Central

Social attention, or how spatial attention is allocated to biologically relevant stimuli, has typically been studied using simplistic paradigms that do not provide any opportunity for social interaction. To study social attention in a complex setting that affords social interaction, we measured participants’ looking behavior as they were sitting in a waiting room, either in the presence of a confederate posing as another research participant, or in the presence of a videotape of the same confederate. Thus, the potential for social interaction existed only when the confederate was physically present. Although participants frequently looked at the videotaped confederate, they seldom turned toward or looked at the live confederate. Ratings of participants’ social skills correlated with head turns to the live, but not videotaped, confederate. Our results demonstrate the importance of studying social attention within a social context, and suggest that the mere opportunity for social interaction can alter social attention.

Laidlaw, Kaitlin E. W.; Foulsham, Tom; Kuhn, Gustav; Kingstone, Alan

2011-01-01

284

The Social Side of School: Why Teachers Need Social Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teaching and learning are fundamentally social enterprises. In attempting to understand, explain, and predict social behavior,\\u000a social psychologists have amassed scores of empirically grounded, fundamental principles. Yet, many such principles have yet\\u000a to be applied to classrooms despite the social nature of these settings. This article illustrates how infusing novel concepts\\u000a from social psychology into teachers’ repertoires holds untapped potential

Hunter Gehlbach

2010-01-01

285

Social Trust, Social Partner Time and Television Time  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social trust is an important phenomenon, but the influence of important time-based measures upon trust has not been examined.\\u000a Such measures include social contact and anti-social activity, such as television watching, which allows for the co-presence\\u000a of other people. This paper reports on associations between trust and weighted means of co-present ‘social’ time (defined\\u000a as time spent in various ‘social

Roger Patulny

2011-01-01

286

Autonomic analysis of social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern society offers us many ways to socially interact with friends, colleagues, co-workers, etc. In this scenario, our social networks are in constantly changing and interests, objectives, and other things involved in each social interaction can be affected or even remain out of reach. For each change, the social network has to be re-analyzed to show us if the interests

Ricardo Tadeu da Silva; Jano Moreira de Souza; Jonice Oliveira

2011-01-01

287

Social Competence and Early Intervention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The relationship between young children's social competence and the goals of early intervention programs is explored, focusing on the significance of peer-related social competence, the development of peer social competence skills in young handicapped children, the nature of assessment and intervention strategies, and the importance of the social

Guralnick, Michael J.

1990-01-01

288

Privacy in dynamic social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anonymization of social networks before they are published or shared has become an important research question. Recent work on anonymizing social networks has looked at privacy preserving techniques for publishing a single instance of the network. However, social networks evolve and a single instance is inadequate for analyzing the evolution of the social network or for performing any longitudinal data

Smriti Bhagat; Graham Cormode; Balachander Krishnamurthy; Divesh Srivastava

2010-01-01

289

Special education and social context  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structural elements of special education, that is the way that teaching is organized, the principles of teaching and the selected groups, are social products which must be viewed in terms of the social and political context, and of the social functions, which the special education activity plays in that particular context. Furthermore, acknowledgement of the social and political conditions

Gunnar Stangvik

1989-01-01

290

Social characters for computer games  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many current video games feature virtual worlds inhabited by autonomous 3D animated characters. These characters often fall short in their ability to participate in social interactions with each other or with people. Increasing the social capabilities of game characters could increase the potential of games as a platform for social learning. This article presents advances in the area of social

Bill Tomlinson

2005-01-01

291

Online social networks in economics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes how economists study social networks. While economists borrow from other fields like sociology or computer science, their approach of modeling of social networks is distinguished by the emphasis on the role of choices under constraints. Economists investigate how socioeconomic background and economic incentives affect the structure and composition of social networks. The characteristics of social networks are

Adalbert Mayer

2009-01-01

292

Guest Editors' Introduction: Social Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broadly stated, social computing takes a computational approach to the study and modeling of social interactions and communications. It also encompasses the development of technologies supporting these interactions. In recent years, we've seen social computing impact numerous information and communications technology (ICT) fields. It's attracted significant interest from not only researchers in the computing and social sciences but also software

Daniel Zeng; Fei-Yue Wang; Kathleen M. Carley

2007-01-01

293

Child and Nonviolent Social Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines the nature of the child and the impact of socialization experiences on his capacity to act nonviolently in a changing social order. Presents a socialization model that draws on different disciplinary frameworks and research areas (animal and human ethnology, social learning theories, altruism studies, and reviews of protest movements).…

Boulding, Elise

1974-01-01

294

Social reading and literary engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has shown that embedding a text in a socially meaningful context can help readers become more engaged with it as a piece of literary discourse. In order to determine whether a device called social reading can also facilitate literary engagement, 68 undergraduates read a short story aloud in either a social or a nonsocial condition. Social readers read

Douglas Vipond; Russell A. Hunt; Lynwood C. Wheeler

1987-01-01

295

Social Science and Institutional Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|With the growth of the social sciences, there has been increasing interest in use of their products to shed light on, and solve, some of the pressing social problems of our society. This monograph, the first in a series of studies on social change, reports on an analysis of applications of social change theory and research to programs of…

Mayer, Robert R.

296

Social Work Education and Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social work has a long history in the areas of rehabilitation and work with people with disabilities, at least as far as medical social work is concerned. During the 1960s, funding and opportunities in the area of disability and rehabilitation provided opportunities for an increased involvement of social workers. in the last two decades, however, social work has virtually relinquished

Peggy Quinn

1996-01-01

297

Social Psychology, Self, and Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author addresses himself to the need for social psychologists to reconsider the difficulties and distresses within the house of social science and to explain themselves to the public. He describes some of the sources of strain: the lack of a common language even among social psychologists; the lack of commonly defined commitments; the fact that the social psychologist, unlike

John R. Seeley

1965-01-01

298

SOCIAL NETWORKS AND STATUS ATTAINMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay traces the development of the research enterprise, known as the social resources theory, which formulated and tested a number of proposi- tions concerning the relationships between embedded resources in social networks and socioeconomic attainment. This enterprise, seen in the light of social capital, has accumulated a substantial body of research literature and supported the proposition that social capital,

Nan Lin

1999-01-01

299

A Primer on Social Neuroscience  

Microsoft Academic Search

{Excerpt} Human history is not only social history but also neurobiological history. Throughout most of the 20th century, social and biological explanations were widely viewed as incompatible. However, from the 1990s, the emergence of social neuroscience vindicates Aristotle’s pioneering deductions. The young science accepts that the brain is a single, pivotal component of an undeniably social species and that it

Olivier Serrat

2010-01-01

300

Social robots for health applications.  

PubMed

Social robots are designed to interact with people in a manner that is consistent with human social psychology. They are a particularly intriguing technology in health domains due to their ability to engage people along social and emotional dimensions. In this paper, we highlight a number of interesting opportunities for social robots in healthcare related applications. PMID:22255551

Breazeal, Cynthia

2011-01-01

301

Detecting Communities Using Social Ties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many internet-based applications such as social networking websites, online viral marketing, and recommendation network based applications, use social network analysis to improve performance in terms of user-specific information dissemination. The notion of community in a social network is a key concept in such analyses and there has been significant work recently in identifying communities within a social network. In this

Partha Basuchowdhuri; Jianhua Chen

2010-01-01

302

[Social media, children and pediatricians].  

PubMed

Using social media web sites is a common activity for children, and any site that allows social interaction (social network, games, virtual worlds...) is a social media site. Pediatricians are in a position to help families understand the benefits and the risks of these sites, and to diagnose problems in children and adolescents as cyberbullying, depression, and post traumatic disorder. PMID:22119289

Le Heuzey, M-F

2011-11-26

303

Information recycling for social creativity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social brainstorming has become a popular group creativity technique to create a large number of ideas for solving problems. The social computing, for its advance in information processing and network communication, collaborates the social intelligence and enhances the social creativity in brainstorming. However, facing the dilemma of quantity deficiency in idea pondering or quality submergence in idea deluge, cooperative participants

Yilang Wu; Takanobu Watanabe

2011-01-01

304

Semantic Networks and Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

Downes, Stephen

2005-01-01

305

Social Capital and Urban Growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social capital is often place-specific while schooling is portable, so the prospect of migration may reduce the returns to social capital and increase the returns to schooling. If social capital matters for urban success, it is possible that an area can get caught in a bad equilibrium where the prospect of out-migration reduces social capital investment and a lack of

Edward L. Glaeser; Charles Redlick

2009-01-01

306

Applied Sociology and Social Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|During the early decades of social science in the United States, the strong applied emphasis in sociology and the mutual interest of sociology and social work in social reform made these disciplines nearly indistinguishable. The dissolution in 1909 of the American Social Science Association began a period of divergence between the two disciplines…

Sherohman, James

307

Social cognition and social functioning in nonclinical paranoia.  

PubMed

Introduction. Persons with nonclinical paranoia show many of the same biases as those with clinical paranoia, suggesting that paranoia exists on a continuum. However, little is known about the various social cognitive processes found in paranoia and how these relate to social functioning and social behaviours in general. This study will examine performance on emotion perception and attributional style measures and their relationship to social functioning, social problem solving, and social skill. A key element in this study will be the incorporation of ambiguity in the perception of emotional expressions and the assignment of attributional blame, which appears to be an important, yet neglected, construct in paranoia. Methods. Twenty-six persons with high levels of nonclinical paranoia and 31 persons with low levels of paranoia completed measures of emotion perception, attributional style, social functioning, and social problem solving. Salient and subtle emotional expressions were used to examine how ambiguity impacts emotion perception in paranoia. Results. The group high in nonclinical paranoia showed reduced accuracy for subtle negative emotional expressions and showed more perceived hostility and blame for ambiguous social situations as compared to the group low in nonclinical paranoia. Also, the high nonclinical paranoia group reported less social engagement, fewer social contacts, and more problems in social perception and social skill than the group low in nonclinical paranoia. Conclusion. Social cognitive and social functioning biases are found in persons with high levels of nonclinical paranoia. Possible mechanisms of these biases and relevance for treatment approaches are discussed. PMID:23445398

Combs, Dennis R; Finn, Jacob A; Wohlfahrt, Whitney; Penn, David L; Basso, Michael R

2013-02-27

308

Animal models of social avoidance and social fear.  

PubMed

Social fear and avoidance of social situations represent the main behavioral symptoms of social anxiety disorder (SAD), a highly prevalent anxiety disorder that is poorly elucidated and has rather unsatisfactory therapeutic options. Therefore, animal models are needed to study the underlying etiology and pathophysiology of SAD and to verify the efficacy of possible novel treatment approaches. In this review, we describe and discuss the most important paradigms that have been shown to induce social avoidance and fear in rodents, including foot shock exposure, restraint stress, social isolation, social instability, social defeat, conditioned defeat, social defeat/overcrowding, chronic subordinate colony housing, chronic mild stress, maternal separation and social fear conditioning. We also describe some of the behavioral paradigms used to assess social avoidance and fear in rodents, including the social interaction test, the social preference-avoidance test, the social approach-avoidance test, the three-chambered social approach test, the partition test and the modified Y-maze test. We focus on the behavioral alterations these paradigms induce, especially on social interaction, general anxiety and depressive-like behavior given that SAD is strongly comorbid with anxiety and affective disorders. PMID:23760888

Toth, Iulia; Neumann, Inga D

2013-06-13

309

On Social e-Learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social Web sites include social networking sites and social media sites. They make it possible for people to share user-created contents online and to interact and stay connected with their online people networks. The social features of social Web sites, appropriately adapted, can help turn e-learning into social e-learning and make e-learning significantly more effective. In this paper, we develop requirements for social e-learning systems. They include incorporating the many of the social features of social Web sites, accounting for all key stakeholders and learning subjects, and curbing various types of misuses by people. We also examine the capabilities of representative social e-learning Web sites that are available today.

Kim, Won; Jeong, Ok-Ran

310

Data Mining in Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The rise of online social media is providing a wealth of social network data. Data mining techniques provide researchers and\\u000a practitioners the tools needed to analyze large, complex, and frequently changing social media data. This chapter introduces\\u000a the basics of data mining, reviews social media, discusses how to mine social media data, and highlights some illustrative\\u000a examples with an emphasis

Geoffrey Barbier; Huan Liu

2011-01-01

311

Making Social Studies Social: Engaging Students through Different Forms of Social Perspective Taking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

People are intrinsically motivated to connect to others socially. One of the most important mechanisms in fostering social relationships is social perspective taking (SPT)--the capacity to discern the thoughts and feelings of others. Thus, students in social studies classrooms might be motivated to engage with their subject either through taking…

Gehlbach, Hunter

2011-01-01

312

Culturally Relevant, Socially Just Social Work Supervision: Becoming Visible Through a Social Constructionist Lens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developing a conceptualization of the supervision relationship that can successfully encourage cultural relevancy and the pursuit of social justice is a challenge facing social workers today. We propose that a social constructionist perspective invites social work supervisors influenced by Euro-Western discourse to (1) seek understanding about differences rather than strive to achieve some preconceived notion of cultural competence, and (2)

Heather J. Hair; Kieran ODonoghue

2009-01-01

313

The Historically Black College as Social Contract, Social Capital, and Social Equalizer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) enjoy a unique social contract in the national history, acting as social agencies for society by providing equal educational opportunity and attainment for all students. This social contract brokered between the nation and African Americans is realized through social capital or distribution and…

Brown, M. Christopher, II; Davis, James Earl

2001-01-01

314

Social phobia and social appraisal in successful and unsuccessful social interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

32 generalized social phobic outpatients and 32 matched nonclinical control subjects participated in a dyadic ‘getting acquainted’ interaction with an experimental assistant who engaged in either positive or negative social behavior. The accuracy of social phobics' and control subjects' perceptions of themselves and their partners were compared in the two conditions. Relative to observers' ratings, the social phobics displayed a

Lynn E. Alden; Scott T. Wallace

1995-01-01

315

The Social Strategy Game  

PubMed Central

This paper examines social determinants of resource competition among Tsimane Amerindian women of Bolivia. We introduce a semi-anonymous experiment (the Social Strategy Game) designed to simulate resource competition among women. Information concerning dyadic social relationships and demographic data were collected to identify variables influencing resource competition intensity, as measured by the number of beads one woman took from another. Relationship variables are used to test how the affiliative or competitive aspects of dyads affect the extent of prosociality in the game. Using a mixed-modeling procedure, we find that women compete with those with whom they are quarreling over accusations of meat theft, mate competition, and rumor spreading. They also compete with members of their social network and with those who were designated as cooperative helpers or as close kin. Women take fewer beads from desired friends, neighbors, and from those viewed as enemies. We interpret favoritism toward enemies as resulting from fear of retribution. Our results suggest that social relations among women are multifaceted and often cannot be simplified by exclusive focus on genetic relatedness, physical proximity, or reciprocity. We argue that a complex understanding of cooperation and competition among women may require important contextual information concerning relationship history in addition to typical features of resource ecology.

Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Winking, Jeffrey

2010-01-01

316

Embodiment in social psychology.  

PubMed

Psychologists are increasingly interested in embodiment based on the assumption that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are grounded in bodily interaction with the environment. We examine how embodiment is used in social psychology, and we explore the ways in which embodied approaches enrich traditional theories. Although research in this area is burgeoning, much of it has been more descriptive than explanatory. We provide a critical discussion of the trajectory of embodiment research in social psychology. We contend that future researchers should engage in a phenomenon-based approach, highlight the theoretical boundary conditions and mediators involved, explore novel action-relevant outcome measures, and address the role of individual differences broadly defined. Such research will likely provide a more explanatory account of the role of embodiment in general terms as well as how it expands the knowledge base in social psychology. PMID:22777820

Meier, Brian P; Schnall, Simone; Schwarz, Norbert; Bargh, John A

2012-07-09

317

Social Science Information Gateway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located within the Institute for Learning and Research Technology at the University of Bristol, the Social Science Information Gateway (SOSIG) is an online database of high quality Internet resources that primarily deal with the vast array of social science fields and subfields. Visitors can perform a simple search, or browse through the subject headings offered on the homepage. Each one of these discrete sites has been catalogued and annotated, making it easier to find specific resources quickly. Within each field or subfield, the editors of SOSIG have also listed some of their top choices. One particularly fine feature of the site is the "Grapevine", which offers a place for people in the social sciences to find out (and publicize) information about career opportunities and upcoming events. Visitors can also post their vitas in order to facilitate such opportunities. Finally, it is worth noting that the coverage of events and the like here is particularly strong for the United Kingdom and continental Europe.

2005-11-02

318

The Social Network Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

Bunus, Peter

319

Indigenous People in a Landscape of Risk: Teaching Social Work Students About Socially Just Social Work Responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for social justice in social work practice is particularly apparent in work with indigenous populations. In spite of the social work profession's commitment to social justice, social workers have often done significant harm in their work with indigenous peoples. Social work educators are ideally positioned to close this gap between social work values and practice by teaching how

Hilary Weaver; Elaine Congress

2009-01-01

320

Indigenous People in a Landscape of Risk: Teaching Social Work Students about Socially Just Social Work Responses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need for social justice in social work practice is particularly apparent in work with indigenous populations. In spite of the social work profession's commitment to social justice, social workers have often done significant harm in their work with indigenous peoples. Social work educators are ideally positioned to close this gap between social

Weaver, Hilary; Congress, Elaine

2009-01-01

321

Social Studies School Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Beginning this month, socialstudies.com offers an Online Course for New History/ Social Studies Teachers designed to provide new teachers with icebreakers, lesson plans, background pedagogy, and activities for the classroom. Currently, IceBreakers, Introduction to Social Studies, and Lesson Planning (including over a dozen sample lessons) are online with Creative Lessons, Idea Books and Activities, and Assessment to follow. Lesson Planning also gives lists of supplementary print resources from socialstudies.com, which may be purchased online, and links to useful educational Websites.

322

Social Identity and Preferences*  

PubMed Central

Social identities prescribe behaviors for people. We identify the marginal behavioral effect of these norms on discount rates and risk aversion by measuring how laboratory subjects’ choices change when an aspect of social identity is made salient. When we make ethnic identity salient to Asian-American subjects, they make more patient choices. When we make racial identity salient to black subjects, non-immigrant blacks (but not immigrant blacks) make more patient choices. Making gender identity salient has no effect on intertemporal or risk choices.

Benjamin, Daniel J.; Choi, James J.; Strickland, A. Joshua

2009-01-01

323

Social networking and adolescents.  

PubMed

Online social networking is a 21st century innovation increasingly embraced by today's young people. It provides new opportunities for communication that expand an adolescent's world. Yet adults, often suspicious of new trends and technologies initially embraced by youth, often see these new environments as perilous places to visit. These fears have been accentuated by media hype, especially about sexual predators. How dangerous are they? Because the rush to go on these sites is a new phenomenon, research is as yet scant. This review explores current beliefs and knowledge about the dangers of social networking sites. PMID:19492691

Fuld, Gilbert L

2009-04-01

324

Cultural transmission of social essentialism  

PubMed Central

Social essentialism entails the belief that certain social categories (e.g., gender, race) mark fundamentally distinct kinds of people. Essentialist beliefs have pernicious consequences, supporting social stereotyping and contributing to prejudice. How does social essentialism develop? In the studies reported here, we tested the hypothesis that generic language facilitates the cultural transmission of social essentialism. Two studies found that hearing generic language about a novel social category diverse for race, ethnicity, age, and sex led 4-y-olds and adults to develop essentialist beliefs about that social category. A third study documented that experimentally inducing parents to hold essentialist beliefs about a novel social category led them to produce more generic language when discussing the category with their children. Thus, generic language facilitates the transmission of essentialist beliefs about social categories from parents to children.

Rhodes, Marjorie; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Tworek, Christina M.

2012-01-01

325

The Social Ecology of Adolescent Alcohol Misuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract A conceptual framework based on social ecology, social learning, and social control theories guided identification of social contexts, contextual attributes, and joint effects that contribute to development of adolescent alcohol misuse. Modeling of alcohol use, suggested by social learning theory, and indicators of the social bond, suggested by social control theory, were examined in the family, peer, school, and

Susan T. Ennett; Vangie A. Foshee; Karl E. Bauman; Andrea Hussong; Li Cai; Heathe Luz McNaughton Reyes; Robert Faris; John Hipp; Robert DuRant

2008-01-01

326

Extending the Human Life Span: Social Policy and Social Ethics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document contains some papers and discussions dealing with extension of the human life span, which emanated from a conference attended by social and biological scientists, policymakers, and social ethicists. Authors were asked to focus upon the gener...

B. L. Neugarten R. J. Havighurst

1977-01-01

327

Self Assessment for Socializing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Socializing is an integral part of human relations and auger well for the human development. Defined as "the involvement of students in identifying standards and/or criteria to apply to their work and making judgments about the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards", self assessment by its nature teaches students how to…

McDonald, Betty

2011-01-01

328

Socialization of Novice Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by new structuralism theory, this study examined the context of novice teacher socialization, identified the frequency and substance of interactions between novice teachers and their mentors and other colleagues, and reported on novices' evaluation of the support that they received. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with…

Pogodzinski, Ben

2012-01-01

329

"Socializing" Music Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While educators in other fields have made significant strides in incorporating issues of social justice in their foundations and curricula, and while a few music education theorists have labored to move everyone in this direction, music education lags behind. Hence the author's plan for this paper. First, the author reflects on the concept of…

Elliott, David J.

2007-01-01

330

Social Software in Academia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considerable buzz has appeared on the Internet over a group of new tools labeled social software. These tools can expand discussion beyond the classroom and provide new ways for students to collaborate and communicate within their class or around the world. Dickinson College has implemented two of the best-known tools, the wiki and the blog, in…

Bryant, Todd

2006-01-01

331

Language As Social Event.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A taxonomy developed for the study of the growth and development of written language from the perspective of social event was tested with a group of 68 children, aged three to six years. The subjects were presented with a wide variety of environmental print messages (road signs, toys, fast food signs, and household products) and were questioned…

Harste, Jerome C.

332

Social Change and Stratification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Korean society has changed a great deal in the wake of rapid economic development and industrialization that began in the early 1960s. This article examines social change in Korea in terms of shifts in its occupational structure and class stratification. For the past four decades, industrialization has steadily reduced the agricultural labour force and significantly expanded the urban labour force

Doo-Seung Hong

2003-01-01

333

Social Networks' XSS Worms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross Site Scripting Worms, are malicious programs that propagates through visitors of a website in attempt to infect other visitors progressively. Cross site scripting vulnerabilities are exploited in many forms; one of the common forms is using worms on popular social websites, such as MySpace and Facebook. In this paper first we suggest a general model based on our discussions.

Mohammad Reza Faghani; Hossein Saidi

2009-01-01

334

Social Network Infiltration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are websites (or software that distributes media online) where users can distribute content to either a list of friends on that site or to anyone who surfs onto their page, and where those friends can interact and discuss the content. By linking to friends online, the users' personal content (pictures, songs, favorite movies, diaries, websites, and so on)

Philip Plait

2008-01-01

335

Primer on Social Economics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An elaboration of the author's booklet entitled "First Steps Toward Economic Understanding," this primer is designed to help the reader develop a functional understanding of the economic process so that he can make wiser decisions on issues of social policy and on matters affecting his economic well-being. The document is not "economics in one…

Darcy, Robert L.

336

Literature and Social Sensitivity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Focusing on the responses of adolescents to literature "involving values based on the concept of human dignity," this study examined two groups of adolescents (60 students each) in grades 8-12. The two groups represented extremes of social sensitivity: highly sensitive and least sensitive to the feelings of others. Teachers read aloud 10 short…

Loban, Walter

337

Thomas Hodgkin: Social activist  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thomas Hodgkin's discovery of a lymphgl and disorder is merely one event in a life of unusually varied public activities in the social reform and humanitarian movements of the mid-19th century. He wrote pamphlets on medical care for the working-class poor, public health, housing, sanitation, and the relief of cold, hunger, and unemployment. Hodgkin wrote about the problems arising from

Louis Rosenfeld

2000-01-01

338

Social Programs That Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, social programs for the poor have lost the support of the American public. This book describes some of the very best programs and documents their benefits, demonstrating that we can, in fact, make substantial progress in the fight against educational failure, family dissolution, violent crime, substance abuse, unemployment, and…

Crane, Jonathan, Ed.

339

Primer on Social Economics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An elaboration of the author's booklet entitled "First Steps Toward Economic Understanding," this primer is designed to help the reader develop a functional understanding of the economic process so that he can make wiser decisions on issues of social policy and on matters affecting his economic well-being. The document is not "economics in one…

Darcy, Robert L.

340

Buddhist Social Principles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gotama Buddha has been called the world’s first psychotherapist, but he was also socially active and spent much of his teaching career on the road engaging all elements of society in dialogue and reform rather than remaining isolated in meditation. Buddhist practice is not primarily a solitary quest, and only at times did the Buddha wander lonely as a rhinoceros.

David W. Chappell

341

Evolutionary Social Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have argued that the evolutionary perspective to social psychology is not untestable, not reductionist, not a theory about rigid genetic determinism, not a justification for the status quo, and not incompatible with sociocultural or cognitive analyses. What it is, instead, is a set of ideas that have proved quite useful in generating novel hypotheses, and parsimoniously connecting findings from

Douglas Kenrick; Josh Ackerman; Susan Ledlow

342

Social Studies Journal, 2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue of the "Social Studies Journal" focuses on the worldwide conflict known in the United States as the French and Indian War (1754-1763). The volume is dedicated to examining the conflict in Pennsylvania. Western Pennsylvania became a battle-scarred landscape as the British and French, with their Native American allies, struggled for…

West, Leo R., Ed.

2003-01-01

343

Condensed Social Media Presentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a short presentation illustrating some of the different ways that libraries (specifically academic libraries) can use social media to better connect with their user base. Presented as part of a technology panel from the Kansas Library Association's 2010 Preconference.

Barry Bailey

2010-01-01

344

Innocenti Social Monitor 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Innocenti Social Monitor 2004 reviews recent socio-economic trends in the 27 countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. It examines child poverty in an integrating world from four different perspectives: Economic Growth and Child Poverty looks at children in poverty related to family income and indicates that since the late 1990s steady economic growth has

2004-01-01

345

School Social Work Worldwide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book, with sequentially arranged chapters, allow practitioners, educators, and students to follow the expansion of school social work practice around the world. Leaders in the field from 12 countries provide eye-opening perspectives and interventions, selected for their range and application. Additionally, the book looks ahead to policy and…

Huxtable, Marion, Ed.; Blyth, Eric, Ed.

346

The Effective Social Worker  

Microsoft Academic Search

Client and worker interchange is at the core of the social work effort. The practitioner, in using the self as a tool, must manifest a fundamental grasp of the treatment configuration that is empirically based, relevant, and guided by a professional code of ethics. Successful therapeutic outcomes in psychosocial treatment depend on a number of variables, such as, client and

Carolyn Hilarski; John S. Wodarski

2001-01-01

347

Addictions and social compassion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Addictions are, to a considerable extent, born of disadvantage and deprivation. That is not the whole story; there are other factors in place, some of which are in individuals as individuals. In terms of the social determinants of ill-health, addiction and poverty are highly correlated. There is also a literature that investigates whether additionally inequality is bad for our health.

GAVIN H. MOONEY

2005-01-01

348

Sociality and optimal functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article outlines an approach to optimal functioning based on an elaboration of the Sociality corollary of Kelly's (1955) personal construct psychology. Nine aspects of optimal functioning (discrimination, flexibility, creativity, responsibility, openness, commitment, courage, forgiveness, and reverence) are discussed in terms of their theoretical, empirical, and clinical implications. All of these aspects are viewed as an elaboration of empathy.

L. M. Leitner; D. T. Pfenninger

1994-01-01

349

Internet For Social Statistics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, created by the University of Bristol, is a tutorial that lets you practice your internet information skills in searching and researching statistics in the social sciences. This site has indexed other statistics resources into five main categories: official statistics, published statistics, timely statistics, datasets for secondary analysis and statistical help and teaching materials. This is a nice overview of this broad topic.

2009-01-29

350

Teaching Social Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Strategies typically used for teaching academic skills can also be used to teach disabled children to become more socially competent. They include modeling, strategic placement, correspondence training, rehearsal and practice, positive reinforcement/shaping, prompting and coaching, positive practice, and multimethod training packages. (VW)|

Carter, Jane; Sugai, George

1988-01-01

351

Issues of Social Promotion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting the difficult decision faced by educators each year regarding the placement of students who are not performing at grade level, this paper examines issues related to social promotion and retention of elementary school students and presents the findings of a questionnaire study of elementary school teachers in New York. The paper argues that…

Di Maria, Marie J.

352

Globalisation and Social Class  

Microsoft Academic Search

'Grand' theories of globalisation - those that treat globalisation as a social and cultural as well as an economic process - regularly feature claims that fundamental changes are involved in the nature of class inequalities in modern (or 'post-modern') societies, in the form of the class structure itself, and in the relationship between class and politics. The theoretical and empirical

J. H. Goldthorpe

2002-01-01

353

Motives for Social Comparison.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A set of motive statements for social comparison was elicited from one group of subjects and then rated in terms of usefulness by a second group of subjects. Analysis of these statements revealed six motives in response to two different hypothetical scenarios: self-evaluation, common bond, self-improvement, self-enhancement, altruism, and…

Helgeson, Vicki S.; Mickelson, Kristin D.

1995-01-01

354

Social Studies: Grade 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Manitoba (Canada) curriculum guide for eighth grade social studies students contains suggested teaching strategies and learning activities in four units covering: (1) life during prehistoric and early historic times; (2) ancient civilizations; (3) life in early modern Europe; and (4) life in the modern world. Each unit includes an overview,…

Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

355

The Teacher's Social Position.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a survey conducted in the Tatar Republic of the Soviet Union involving over 800 teachers, students, and parents. Reports that the study investigated opinions about teachers' social position. Indicates widespread agreement concerning the teaching profession's low prestige. Explores reasons for the profession's low prestige through an…

Ziiatdinova, Fliura Gazizovna

1990-01-01

356

Social Browsing on Flickr  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The new social media sites — blogs, wikis, del.icio.us and Flickr, among others — underscore the transformation of the Web to a participatory medium,in which users are actively creating, evaluating and distributing information. The photosharing site Flickr, for example, allows users to upload photographs, view photos created by others, comment on those photos, etc. As is common to other

Kristina Lerman; Laurie Jones

2006-01-01

357

Social Security & You.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This set of materials for high school students explains the Social Security system. It consists of five lessons and an overview lesson that may be taught separately. To support the lessons, a videotape, fact sheets, student handouts, and quizzes are included. Handouts are in large print and are suitable for use as black line masters for…

Social Security Administration (DHHS), Washington, DC.

358

Social Frameworks of Sustainability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation was given as part of Portland Community College's 2010 Summer Sustainability Institute. The presentation looks at how educators can connect career technical programs to their social contexts. The participants were asked to gather into small groups and discuss their sustainable teaching philosophies and other related issues. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

Smith, Kim

2012-04-30

359

Rationality and social behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article penetrates the relationship between social behavior and rationality. A critical analysis is made of efforts to classify some behaviors as altruistic, as they simultaneously meet criteria of rationality by not truly being self-destructive. Newcomb's paradox is one attempt to create a hybrid behavior that is both irrational and still meets some criterion of rationality. Such dubious rationality is

Jan Tullberg

2003-01-01

360

Sport and Social Organization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Sport is examined in relation to a number of basic aspects of social organization. Each of the seven sections includes a brief clarification of the key sociological concepts used for analysis, a consideration of various applications of those concepts to sport, and a review and discussion of what is known about specific aspects of sport in…

Nixon, Howard L., II

361

Social Software in Academia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Considerable buzz has appeared on the Internet over a group of new tools labeled social software. These tools can expand discussion beyond the classroom and provide new ways for students to collaborate and communicate within their class or around the world. Dickinson College has implemented two of the best-known tools, the wiki and the blog, in…

Bryant, Todd

2006-01-01

362

The Social Justice Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shines an important light on the continuing struggle of disabled people for dignity, citizenship rights, and access to the marketplace. Common threads bind the struggle for basic human rights among disenfranchised groups, offer experience and approaches to facilitate change, and move society towards social justice. The philosophy…

Loewen, Gladys; Pollard, William

2010-01-01

363

Social Network Infiltration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks are websites (or software that distributes media online) where users can distribute content to either a list of friends on that site or to anyone who surfs onto their page, and where those friends can interact and discuss the content. By linking to friends online, the users’ personal content (pictures, songs, favorite movies, diaries, websites, and so on) is dynamically distributed, and can "become viral", that is, get spread rapidly as more people see it and spread it themselves. Social networks are immensely popular around the planet, especially with younger users. The biggest social networks are Facebook and MySpace; an IYA2009 user already exists on Facebook, and one will be created for MySpace (in fact, several NASA satellites such as GLAST and Swift already have successful MySpace pages). Twitter is another network where data distribution is more limited; it is more like a mini-blog, but is very popular. IYA2009 already has a Twitter page, and will be updated more often with relevant information. In this talk I will review the existing social networks, show people how and why they are useful, and give them the tools they need to contribute meaningfully to IYA's online reach.

Plait, Philip

2008-05-01

364

Social Policy Report, 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This quarterly publication presents scholarly developmental research results pertaining to social and public policies which affect children. The first issue in the 1994 volume examines "Children's Changing Access to Resources: A Historical Perspective" (Donald Hernandez). This report focuses on changes in the American family's finances,…

Thomas, Nancy G., Ed.

1994-01-01

365

Pregnancy: A social stigma?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental evidence is presented which explores the social stimulus value of pregnancy. It was found that, for men especially, the pregnant woman elicits avoidance and staring and that these responses occur primarily because pregnancy is a novel visual stimulus. For women, avoidance seems to be tied less to the stimulus aspects of the pregnant woman than to role expectations about

Shelley E. Taylor; Ellen J. Langer

1977-01-01

366

Reggio Social Capital  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper presents the social capital as the essential element of success of the Reggio Emilia preschools known for their unique approach to the early childhood education. The collaborative effort is introduced through examples of the currently ongoing "Reggio Narrates" project of Reggio preschools, the "Dialogue with the Places" and "The…

Stejzygier, Aneta

2009-01-01

367

Health and Social Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Societies make decisions and take actions that profoundly impact the distribution of health. Why and how should collective choices be made, and policies implemented, to address health inequalities under conditions of resource scarcity? How should societies conceptualize and measure health disparities, and determine whether they've been adequately addressed? Who is responsible for various aspects of this important social problem? In

Jennifer Prah Ruger

368

Social Dynamics of Quilting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the social dynamics of quilting. It also investigates some of the contributions the study of quilting makes to leisure theory. Findings are based largely on the research done for the doctoral dissertation by King (1997) on contemporary quilting. Three primary findings were highlighted. First, quilts are a relevant topic for study because they express powerful rhetorical statements

Faye Lynn King

2001-01-01

369

Socially Intelligent Tutor Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions and personality have received quite a lot of attention the last few years in research on embodied conversational agents. Attention is also increasingly being paid to matters of social psychology and interpersonal aspects (see (3), for example, and (11), for work of our group). Given the nature of an embodied conversational agent's main activity: \\

Dirk Heylen; Anton Nijholt; Rieks Op Den Akker; Maarten Vissers; R. Aylett; D. Ballin; T. Rist

2003-01-01

370

Social Balance Experiment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the entry page for participation in the Social Balance Experiment. In this experiment, participants are asked to imagine that they are in a situation in which they have one of five feelings (love, like, neutral, dislike or hate) toward another person named Bill.

371

Favoritism Under Social Pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with the effect of nonmonetary incentives on behavior, in particular with the study of social pressure as a determinant of corruption. We offer empirical evidence that shows how professional soccer referees favor home teams in order to satisfy the crowds in the stadium. Referees have discretion over the addition of extra time at the end of

Luis Garicano; Ignacio Palacios-Huerta; Canice Prendergast

2005-01-01

372

Favoritism Under Social Pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides empirical evidence of favoritism by agents, where that favoritism is generated by social pressure. To do so, we explore the behavior of professional soccer referees. Referees have discretion over the addition of extra time at the end of a soccer game (called injury time), to compensate for lost time due to unusual stoppages. We test for systematic

Luis Garicano; Ignacio Palacios-Huerta; Canice Prendergast

2001-01-01

373

Psychology and social practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this address to the American Psychological Association, the President examines the relation of psychology to social practice, focusing primarily on the relation of psychology to education. The main point is whether the standpoint of psychological science, as a study of mechanism, is indifferent and opposed to the demands of education with its free interplay of personalities in their vital

John Dewey

1900-01-01

374

Social Policy Report, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is comprised of the four 2002 issues of a publication providing a forum for scholarly reviews and discussion of developmental research and implications for social policies affecting children. The topics featured in each of the issues are: (1) "The Effects of Welfare Reform Policies on Children" (Pamela A. Morris); (2) "At What Age…

Sherrod, Lonnie, Ed.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.

375

The social hyperlink  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online, hyperlinks connect not just related information, but people who relate to one another. In this talk I will discuss the many dimensions and uses of the social hyperlink across a variety of online communities. Sometimes it is the information that brings the people together, as they are seeking answers to questions, or seeking to answer questions. In online question

Lada A. Adamic

2009-01-01

376

Anonymizing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in technology have made it possible to collect data about individuals and the connections between them, such as email correspondence and friendships. Agencies and researchers who have col- lected such social network data often have a compelling interest in allowing others to analyze the data. However, in many cases the data describes relationships that are private (e.g., email correspondence)

Michael Hay; Gerome Miklau; David Jensen; Philipp Weis; Siddharth Srivastava

377

Social capital contested  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose in this paper is to specify certain basic ways of conceptualising social capital (SC) in order to bring out the contested character of it. The paper starts by touching on the origins of the concept. This is followed by a critical overview of the views of P. Bourdieu, J.S. Coleman, A. Portes and R. Putnam, and an attempt

Sokratis M. Koniordos

2008-01-01

378

Social Relations of Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSENCE abroad has prevented me from responding sooner and expressing, as invited, an opinion on the proposals in the article entitled ``Social Relations of Science'' printed in NATURE of April 23. Though to me they come too late and too tainted with officialdom and regimentation to appear to be much more than a wish to be in at the shouting,

Frederick Soddy

1938-01-01

379

Social Studies: Grade 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Manitoba (Canada) curriculum guide for eighth grade social studies students contains suggested teaching strategies and learning activities in four units covering: (1) life during prehistoric and early historic times; (2) ancient civilizations; (3) life in early modern Europe; and (4) life in the modern world. Each unit includes an overview,…

Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

380

Socialization of Novice Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Guided by new structuralism theory, this study examined the context of novice teacher socialization, identified the frequency and substance of interactions between novice teachers and their mentors and other colleagues, and reported on novices' evaluation of the support that they received. Data were collected through semistructured interviews…

Pogodzinski, Ben

2012-01-01

381

Globalization and social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globalization is a universal phenomenon that not only makes domestic economies restructure, but also may impact other areas of local societies. This paper studies the effect of globalization on human relations, in particular on the formation of social networks, both bonding and bridging: I postulate that globalization induces labor market and workplace dynamics that would be destructive. Data come from

Justina A. V. Fischer

2012-01-01

382

Student Services Go Social  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Like fine wines, Web 2.0 technologies get better with age. Gone are the days of the pointless chat room; this is the era of social networking juggernauts such as Facebook, MySpace, and Friendster. Services offered by these firms are helpful in facilitating connections among users in every industry and of every age. In higher education, however, a…

Villano, Matt; Gullon, Monica

2009-01-01

383

Inter and Intra Professional Social Work Differences: Social Works Challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social work historically has had two overarching domains. One domain is concerned with communities and policy development,\\u000a the other with direct practice involving individuals, groups and families. Both the macro and micro domains are infused with\\u000a concerns of social justice and advocacy. Conflict in the profession between social justice and casework began over a century\\u000a ago, with early social work

Dorothea Marie Epple

2007-01-01

384

Individualism and the social in early American social psychology.  

PubMed

In this paper an attempt is made to specify the original conception of the social dimensions of cognition, emotion and behavior-and of a distinctively social psychology-that was held by early American social psychologists, but abandoned by later generations of social psychologists committed to Floyd Allport's individualistic experimental program. Two influential forms of "individualism" in the work of Floyd Allport are distinguished and detailed. PMID:11054736

Greenwood, J D

2000-01-01

385

SOCIAL: An Integrative Framework for the Development of Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite significant advances in the field of social neuroscience, much remains to be understood regarding the development and maintenance of social skills across the life span. Few comprehensive models exist that integrate multidisciplinary perspectives and explain the multitude of factors that influence the emergence and expression of social

Beauchamp, Miriam H.; Anderson, Vicki

2010-01-01

386

Social Snapshots: Digital Forensics for Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, academia and law enforcement alike have shown a strong demand for data that is collected from online social networks. In this work, we present a novel method for harvesting such data from social networking websites. Our approach uses a hybrid system that is based on a custom add-on for social networks in combination with a web crawling component. The

Markus Huber; Martin Mulazzani; Manuel Leithner; Sebastian Schrittwieser; Gilbert Wondracek; Edgar R. Weippl

2011-01-01

387

Socialization Tactics, Proactive Behavior, and Newcomer Learning: Integrating Socialization Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of the study was to examine how socialization processes (socialization tactics and proactive behavior) jointly affect socialization content (i.e., what newcomers learn) and adjustment. Longitudinal survey data from 150 business and engineering graduates during their first 7 months of work indicate that: (1) institutionalized…

Ashforth, Blake E.; Sluss, David M.; Saks, Alan M.

2007-01-01

388

The Implications of Social Neuroscience for Social Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social disability represents a unifying feature in the diverse group of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Social neuroscience is the study of brain mechanisms supporting interpersonal interaction. In this paper, we review brain imaging studies of the social brain and highlight practical applications of these scientific insights.…

McPartland, James C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

2012-01-01

389

Is Social Security Part of the Social Safety Net?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building on the existing literature that examines the extent of redistribution in the Social Security system as a whole, this paper focuses more specifically on how Social Security affects the poor. This question is important because a Social Security program that reduces overall inequality by redistributing from high income individuals to middle income individuals may do nothing to help the

Jeffrey R. Brown; Julia Lynn Coronado; Don Fullerton

2009-01-01

390

Coupling Social Solidarity and Social Harmony in Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The various forms of social solidarity are empirically uncharted, especially in relation to social harmony. With respect to resource exchange theory, inclusive solidarity or intergroup acceptance is more conducive to social harmony than mechanical, organic, distributive, and dialogic forms of solidarity. The theoretical prediction holds in the…

Cheung, Chau-kiu; Ma, Stephen Kan

2011-01-01

391

Social software: new opportunities for challenging social inequalities in learning?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enthusiasts for new social software do not always acknowledge that belonging to e?learning communities depends upon complex and often unresolved identity issues for learners. Drawing on the author’s previous research on belonging in social learning, the paper presents a theory of identity congruence in social learning and brings to the foreground the importance of identities which arise from expressions of

Gwyneth Hughes

2009-01-01

392

Social Learning in a Social Hierarchy: An Experimental Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social learning occurs in the context of a structure of social interaction among agents. Models of the social structure typically do not include hierarchical elements, such as status differences among agents. In this paper we report the results of experiments designed to examine learning in the presence of a commonly-observed, higher-status agent. We test strategy choice by subjects in a

Catherine C. Eckel; Rick K. Wilson

393

Toward Valuation in Social Work and Social Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work and social services are known to be beneficial to society, but to date no systematic valuation of their contribution has been attempted. The aim of this article is to advance our ability to quantify both the known direct benefits and some of the positive externalities of social work. The authors make the case of why valuation is…

Cnaan, Ram A.; Kang, Chulhee

2011-01-01

394

Social class and academic guidance: A social-psychological analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Canadian research has consistently shown that, compared with high social class students, a lower proportion of low social class students have high educational expectations. This difference persists even when the level of mental ability between the 2 groups is the same. To answer the question of why so many low social class students do not have high educational expectations, a

Ramesh A. Deosaran

1978-01-01

395

Professional Socialization and Social Work Values: Who Are We Teaching?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the centrality of values to professional socialization, the social work literature lacks an extensive exploration of the readiness of students to be socialized into the profession and taught the theoretical framework and skills for ethical decision making. This study explored the relationship between age, academic class standing, and identity development. Results indicated that the Identity Achievement status occurs later

Stephanie Valutis; Deborah Rubin; Melissa Bell

2011-01-01

396

The social in medicine: Social techniques in patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article investigates the role of the social in medicine through an empirical study of social technologies in Diabetes 2 and COPD patient education in Denmark. It demonstrates how the social at the same time is the cause of disease but also functions as a solution to the problem. Furthermore it suggests that the patient groups have an ambiguous role

Anders Kruse Ljungdalh; Jane Ege Møller

2012-01-01

397

Local Social Networks and Social Resources in Two Dutch Neighbourhoods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much research in neighbour relations is inspired by two research questions. First, it is necessary to know to which degree social contacts are local and in particular whether local social contacts in disadvantaged neighbourhoods bear an instrumental disadvantage. Second, it is necessary to know whether policies aiming at mixing people from different social and ethnic backgrounds result in more diverse

Fenne M. Pinkster; Beate Völker

2009-01-01

398

A Complexity Science Model of Social Innovation in Social Enterprise  

Microsoft Academic Search

A complexity science-based model for social innovation in social enterprises is presented. The three components of the model include: (1) representing the evolution of social innovation using nonlinear dynamical systems with accompanying parameters and attractors; (2) a cusp catastrophe model of bifurcation or the emergence of a new attractor; (3) the role of emergence in complex systems utilizing recombinatory operations.

Jeffrey Goldstein; James K. Hazy; Joyce Silberstang

2010-01-01

399

Social anxiety and social norms in individualistic and collectivistic countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Social anxiety is assumed to be related to cultural norms across countries. Heinrichs et al. [2006: Behav Res Ther 44:1187–1197] compared individualistic and collectivistic countries and found higher social anxiety and more positive attitudes toward socially avoidant behaviors in collectivistic rather than in individualistic countries. However, the authors failed to include Latin American countries in the collectivistic group. Methods:

S. S. Schreier; N. Heinrichs; L. Alden; R. M. Rapee; S. G. Hofmann; J. Chen; K. Y. Oh; S. M. Bogels

2010-01-01

400

Social Software: New Opportunities for Challenging Social Inequalities in Learning?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Enthusiasts for new social software do not always acknowledge that belonging to e-learning communities depends upon complex and often unresolved identity issues for learners. Drawing on the author's previous research on belonging in social learning, the paper presents a theory of identity congruence in social learning and brings to the foreground…

Hughes, Gwyneth

2009-01-01

401

Reflexionando sobre las relaciones entre política social y estructura social  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the main debates that have developed in the SAP. S ( Social Po l i c y Analysis Se m i n a r, UAB), in order to build a theoretical framew o rk which should be able to analyse the relations between social policy and social stru c t u re. We start from some criticisms

José Adelantado Gimeno; José Antonio Noguera

1999-01-01

402

Society, Social Justice, and Social/Political Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses postwar social studies reform in England in terms of the social studies movement (1940-50), the new social studies movement (1960-70), and the political education movement (late 1970s). Argues that the movements are limited because of their inadequate understanding of the relationship between schooling and society and the nature of the…

Whitty, Geoff

1981-01-01

403

SOCIAL: An Integrative Framework for the Development of Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite significant advances in the field of social neuroscience, much remains to be understood regarding the development and maintenance of social skills across the life span. Few comprehensive models exist that integrate multidisciplinary perspectives and explain the multitude of factors that influence the emergence and expression of social

Beauchamp, Miriam H.; Anderson, Vicki

2010-01-01

404

Social enterprise resisting social accounting: reflecting on lived experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The advantages of using social accounting (SA) by social enterprises are widely evident (e.g. Social Audit Network, New Economics Foundation). The data gathered by the authors, through introductory SA workshops and training attended by 30 organisations and a single case study, are used with the purpose of demonstrating that the barriers and resistance to SA are widespread. Design\\/methodology\\/approach

Jane Gibbon; Arthur Affleck

2008-01-01

405

Social Anxiety and Adolescents' Friendships: The Role of Social Withdrawal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Research indicates social anxiety is associated with lower friendship quality, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. This 2-month longitudinal study examined social withdrawal as a mediator of the social anxiety-friendship quality link in a sample of 214 adolescents (M[subscript age] = 13.1 years, SD = 0.73) that included an…

Biggs, Bridget K.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Wu, Yelena P.

2012-01-01

406

Social Studies and the Social Order: Transmission or Transformation?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author brings a historical perspective to the perennial question, "Should social studies teachers work to transmit the status quo or to transform it?" Should they transmit or transform the social order? When one looks at the question of education for social transformation in the context of American history, three prevailing…

Stanley, William B.

2005-01-01

407

Toward Valuation in Social Work and Social Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social work and social services are known to be beneficial to society, but to date no systematic valuation of their contribution has been attempted. The aim of this article is to advance our ability to quantify both the known direct benefits and some of the positive externalities of social work. The authors make the case of why valuation is…

Cnaan, Ram A.; Kang, Chulhee

2011-01-01

408

Using Social Media to Engage Youth: Education, Social Justice, & Humanitarianism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While youth typically turn to social media for gossip, photo sharing, and friendship building, can it also be used to inspire them toward greater goals? The creators of GenerationPulse.com explore how two theories salient to adolescent social development (positive youth development and relational health) were used to shape a social media website…

Liang, Belle; Commins, Meghan; Duffy, Nicole

2010-01-01

409

Social Learning by Design: The Role of Social Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|It is no secret that learning has a social context. As library media specialists work with students nearly every day, they take for granted their pedagogical roots in social learning theory based on the premise that students need modeling and observation to learn from one another. Information gathering becomes a key activity, and social

Brooks, Laura

2009-01-01

410

Travel Socialization: A Social Theory of Travel Mode Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports research investigating the cultural determinants of children's travel. A new perspective, travel socialization theory, is presented. This states that children learn about travel modes in the same way as other aspects of culture through agents of socialization: the family, school, media, and peer groups. The role of each is discussed. A theoretical implication of travel socialization is

Hazel Baslington

2008-01-01

411

Davis Social Links: Leveraging Social Networks for Future Internet Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present a social network based network communication architecture, Davis Social Links (DSL). DSL uses the trust and relationships inherent to human so- cial networks to provide an enhanced communication ar- chitecture for future Internet designs. We begin with a con- ceptual discussion of how future network architectures can leverage social networks. Next, we describe the DSL

Lerone Banks; Prantik Bhattacharyya; Matthew Spear; Shyhtsun Felix Wu

2009-01-01

412

Social Inclusion as an Agenda for Mental Health Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following New Labour's election to office in the UK in 1997, policy initiatives have proliferated relating to mental health. Much of this policy innovation emphasises the social dimensions of mental health and distress, with an emphasis on employment and social inclusion. Paradoxically, this modernization of the mental health agenda comes at a time when mental health social work is struggling

Nick Gould

2006-01-01

413

Masculinity, Educational Achievement and Social Status: A Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study utilises a quantitative case study social network approach to explore the connection between masculinity and scholastic achievement in two secondary, all-boys schools in Australia. In both schools two social networks representing social status are explored: the "friendship" network as a measure of status that includes emotional…

Lusher, Dean

2011-01-01

414

Social Revolutionary Learning: The New Social Movements As Learning Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper argues that the new social movements are particularly privileged sites for emancipatory praxis. Old social movements are differientiated from new, and the new social movements are interpreted primarily as defenses of the threatened lifeworld and ecosystem. The specific nature of the learning challenges within particular movements is examined. The author hypothesizes that diverse movements may be crystallizing into

Michael Welton

1993-01-01

415

Social Structure and Social Cognition in Early Adolescence: Affiliative Patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the relations between perceptions of the social structure and affiliative patterns in early adolescence, subjects in three grades of a junior high school were studied in a multi-method, longitudinal research design. Interview, observational, and rating procedures were employed to obtain information about the effective social clusters within each class. After one year, the social structure of the 7th

Robert B. Cairns; Jane E. Perrin; Beverley D. Cairns

1985-01-01

416

Masculinity, educational achievement and social status: a social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study utilises a quantitative case study social network approach to explore the connection between masculinity and scholastic achievement in two secondary, all?boys schools in Australia. In both schools two social networks representing social status are explored: the friendship network as a measure of status that includes emotional investment, and the influence network as a measure of status without emotion.

Dean Lusher

2011-01-01

417

Promoting social network awareness: A social network monitoring system  

Microsoft Academic Search

To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system – the KIWI system – that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a distributed research community and the results have

Rita Cadima; Carlos Ferreira; Josep Maria Monguet; Jordi Ojeda; Joaquin Fernandez

2010-01-01

418

Social Cohesion and Embeddedness: A hierarchical conception of social groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

While questions about social cohesion lie at the core of our discipline, no clear definition of cohesion exists. We present a definition of social cohesion based on network connectivity that leads to an operationalization of social embeddedness. We define cohesiveness as the minimum number of actors who, if removed from a group, would disconnect the group. This definition generates hierarchically

James Moody; Douglas R. White

2002-01-01

419

Social Phobia and Social Anxiety as Components of Shyness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to investigate the conceptual nature of shyness by examining its relationship with social phobia and social anxiety in a non-clinical sample. The participants in the present study were 132 introductory psychology students who completed the Cheek-Buss Shyness Scale (CBSS), Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), and Liebowitz…

Carducci, Bernardo J.; Hutzel, Karen; Morrison, Erin; Weyer, Christina Y.

420

Promoting Social Network Awareness: A Social Network Monitoring System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system--the KIWI system--that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a…

Cadima, Rita; Ferreira, Carlos; Monguet, Josep; Ojeda, Jordi; Fernandez, Joaquin

2010-01-01

421

Social Reconstructionism and the Alberta Social Studies Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The six articles contained in this document review the implications for education of the ideas of the group known as the social reconstructionists. In "Social Reconstructionism: A Critical Look," Robert Koole briefly discusses the contributions of social reconstructionists to the issue of the role of schooling and their influence on educational…

Parsons, Jim, Ed.

422

Social Trust, Social Partner Time and Television Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social trust is an important phenomenon, but the influence of important time-based measures upon trust has not been examined. Such measures include social contact and anti-social activity, such as television watching, which allows for the co-presence of other people. This paper reports on associations between trust and weighted means of…

Patulny, Roger

2011-01-01

423

Social Software: Participants' Experience Using Social Networking for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking tools used in learning provides instructional design with tools for transformative change in education. This study focused on defining the meanings and essences of social networking through the lived common experiences of 7 college students. The problem of the study was a lack of learner voice in understanding the value of social

Batchelder, Cecil W.

2010-01-01

424

Bowling online: social networking and social capital within the organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within an organizational setting, social capital facilitates knowledge management processes in that it enables individuals to locate useful information, draw on resources and make contributions to the network. This paper explores the relationship between various dimensions of organizational social capital and the use of an internal social network site (SNS). We hypothesize that the use of a SNS contributes to

Charles Steinfield; Joan Moris DiMicco; Nicole B. Ellison; Cliff Lampe

2009-01-01

425

From social media to social customer relationship management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the augment of the authors, who are IBM consultants, that companies need to meld social media programs with customer relationship management (CRM). This new paradigm – Social CRM – recognizes that instead of just managing customers, the role of the business is to facilitate collaborative social experiences and dialogue that

Carolyn Heller Baird; Gautam Parasnis

2011-01-01

426

The Contemporary Social Work Record.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed 94 social organizations to describe and analyze recordkeeping. Results show records typically contain: (1) a social history; (2) worker's assessment; (3) goals; (4) service plan; (5) progress notes; and (6) summary. Records function first to facilitate service delivery. (JAC)

Kagel, Jill Doner

1983-01-01

427

National Association of Social Workers  

MedlinePLUS

... Posted: Fri, Oct 18 2013 Mental Health Program Manager Company: Rainbow Community Center Concord, CA Posted: Fri, ... Social Justice School Social Work NASW Code of Ethics Now in Spanish! Buy Copies of the Code ...

428

The Deprofessionalization of Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Four ideological currents serve to undermine professionalism in social work: activism, anti-individualism, communalism, and environmentalism. The author describes each of these currents and discusses the ways in which social work education accommodates them. (Author)|

Specht, Harry

1972-01-01

429

Social Media and the Army.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social media has had an undeniable effect on the way we live, work, and communicate throughout the world. Military leaders are recognizing the importance of social media and taking steps to incorporate change into their organizational cultures. This is pa...

C. Perry

2010-01-01

430

Change Detection in Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social network analysis (SNA) has become an important analytic tool for analyzing terrorist networks, friendly command and control structures, and a wide variety of other applications. This project proposes a new method for detecting change in social netw...

D. B. Horn I. McCulloh J. Graham K. Carley M. Webb

2008-01-01

431

The Humanities in Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Suggests that truth, beauty, and the notion of morals and ethics are the essence of knowledge. Stresses the obligation of educators to encourage the feelings in their students that generate social responsibility. Claims the humanistic issue precedes social science. (NL)|

Burns, John

1989-01-01

432

Social Service Evaluation Demonstration Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) of the State of Washington participated in the social service evaluation demonstration project (SSEDP) during fiscal years 1971-1973, in order to test the applicability of an operations research model in...

1973-01-01

433

Critical Appraisal of Social Indicators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By drawing analogies to the history of mental testing, the author concludes that the responsibility for critical evaluation and beneficial use of social indicators rests with social scientists. Future directions of critical inquiry are suggested. (Author/MH)

Sieber, Joan E.

1979-01-01

434

Opportunities in Social Science Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The opportunities for social science research change with developments in policy and social science, conservation biology,\\u000a and ecological theory; population dynamics, quantitative methods, laws and current management or governance practices; industry\\u000a operating procedures, social values, institutional change, and funding. This paper identifies opportunities for future social\\u000a science research, and economics in particular, due to developments in economic theory and the

Dale Squires

435

Social attachments in autistic children.  

PubMed

Social responses of young autistic children to separation from and reunion with their caregivers did not differ from the social responses to similar situations of young mentally retarded nonautistic children. Most autistic children directed more social behaviors to their caregivers than to strangers and increased their preferential behavior after separation. Individual differences in social responses were not associated with the level of representational skills shown by the autistic children. PMID:2464573

Sigman, M; Mundy, P

1989-01-01

436

The Social Regulation of Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present chapter offers further evidence that the social context in which cognitive functioning takes place is an integral\\u000a part of that functioning, not just the surrounding context for it. Three categories of social-psychological studies are reported.\\u000a The first category shows that relatively simple social presence and social comparison situations can have dramatic effects\\u000a on some basic responses that have

Pascal Huguet; Florence Dumas

437

Applications of Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A social network [2] is a description of the social structure between actors, mostly persons, groups or organizations. It\\u000a indicates the ways in which they are connected with each other by some relationship such as friendship, kinship, finance exchange\\u000a etc. In a nutshell, when the person uses already known\\/unknown people to create new contacts, it forms social networking.\\u000a The social

P. Santhi Thilagam

438

The Measure of Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

As society continually progresses with on-line resources, many business executives utilize social media to promote their brands conveniently and effectively. Not only do businesses strive to use social media effectively for their company, but decision-makers and consultants try to find new ways to use social media for profitable use. Companies employ social media outlets such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter

Alyssa Donigan

2012-01-01

439

Psychopathology of Adolescent Social Phobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixty-three adolescents with social phobia and 43 with no psychiatric disorders were compared across a number of clinical\\u000a variables. In addition to clinically impairing social fear, adolescents with social phobia had significantly higher levels\\u000a of loneliness, dysphoria, general emotional over-responsiveness and more internalizing behaviors than normal controls and\\u000a 57.1% of socially phobic adolescents had a second, concurrent diagnosis, 75% of

Deborah C. Beidel; Samuel M. Turner; Brennan J. Young; Robert T. Ammerman; Floyd R. Sallee; Lori Crosby

2007-01-01

440

Information Provenance in Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Information appearing in social media provides a challenge for determining the provenance of the information. However, the\\u000a same characteristics that make the social media environment challenging provide unique and untapped opportunities for solving\\u000a the information provenance problem for social media. Current approaches for tracking provenance information do not scale for\\u000a social media and consequently there is a gap in provenance

Geoffrey Barbier; Huan Liu

2011-01-01

441

Trust Maximization in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Trust is a human-related phenomenon in social networks. Trust research on social networks has gained much attention on its\\u000a usefulness, and on modeling propagations. There is little focus on finding maximum trust in social networks which is particularly\\u000a important when a social network is oriented by certain tasks. In this paper, we propose a trust maximization algorithm based\\u000a on the

Justin Zhan; Xing Fang

2011-01-01

442

Systematic Social Observation in Criminology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Systematic social observation (SSO) came to criminology at the hand of Albert J. Reiss, Jr., who, in the 1960s, encouraged\\u000a social scientists to shed some “nonsensical” views about the limits and benefits of different forms of observing social phenomena\\u000a (Reiss 1968, 1971b). Reiss objected to the notion that direct observation of social phenomena in their natural setting was\\u000a work for

Stephen D. Mastrofski; Roger B. Parks; John D. McCluskey

443

Online Social Networks: Why Do \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the proliferation of online social networks, there has been a growing interest in understanding why people come and use\\u000a this new type of communication platform. In this paper, we explore the factors that drive people to use online social networks\\u000a (e.g., Facebook). We conceptualize the use of online social networks as intentional social action and examine the relative\\u000a impact

Pui-yee Chiu; Christy M. K. Cheung; Matthew K. O. Lee

2008-01-01

444

Social Work Practitioners as Researchers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social workers are encouraged and often expected to conduct research in addition to their clinical duties. Unfortunately, few practitioners seem interested and there is usually a lack of tangible supports in most practice settings. To counter this, a support group of non-supervisory clinical social workers in a Department of veterans Affairs Medical Center met regularly with a social work educator-consultant

Geri Adler; Diane Alfs; Michael Greeman; Jill Manske; Thomas McClellan; Nancy OBrien; Jean Quam

1993-01-01

445

Cultural normality and social perception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reported are three studies testing social categorization processes and the effects of those categorizations on social perception. It is hypothesized that in social interactions, deviations from being either white or male attract attention on that dimension leading to categorization of the target on that dimension. This effect is called the white male norm hypothesis. Experiment 1, using a frequency estimation

Michael A Zarate

1990-01-01

446

Social Networks and Occupational Choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks help workers to find jobs more easily. But those jobs need not be in occupations in which workers can fully exploit their abilities. If so, then social contacts can generate mismatch between a worker's occupational comparative advantage and his actual productivity. As a result, economies that rely extensively on social networks can exhibit low labor force quality and

Samuel Bentolila; Claudio Michelacci; Javier Suarez

447

Science, Semantics, and Social Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social semiotics suggests that social and cultural formations, including the language and practice of science and the ways in which new generations and communities advance them, develop as an integral part of the evolution of social ecosystems. Some recent models of complex dynamic systems in physics, chemistry, and biology focus more on the…

Lemke, J. L.

448

STEREOTYPE CONTENT AND SOCIAL DISTANCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project examined effects of stereotype content and uniformity on social distance regarding homosexuals. Administration of an adjective checklist and social distance scale to 538 undergraduates resulted in identification of “traits” that change social distance. Those traits that positively correlated with distance at or beyond the .05 level was: “cowardly,” “sly,” “suspicious,” “shrewd,” “stupid,” “impulsive,” and “ignorant.” Traits that correlated

Gregory R. Staats

1978-01-01

449

Social Competence and Early Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the relationship between young children's social competence and the goals of early intervention programs. Social competence is seen as a central organizing construct in development, and competence with peers during the preschool years is examined in detail. Specifically, the peer-related social competence difficulties of handicapped children are discussed from a developmental perspective. The nature of assessment and

Michael J. Guralnick

1990-01-01

450

Libertarian Conflicts in Social Choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book provides a systematic and comprehensive survey and evaluation of the problems of incorporating individual and group rights and values into social procedures and judgements, and examines the solutions that have been proposed. The book begins by defending the presence of libertarian requirements in social choice. A framework for incorporating individual rights into social choice is then formally presented,

John L. Wriglesworth

451

Social Justice Language Teacher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social justice language teacher education conceptualizes language teacher education as responding to social and societal inequities that result in unequal access to educational and life opportunities. In this volume authors articulate a global view of Social Justice Language Teacher Education, with authors from 7 countries offering a theorized…

Hawkins, Margaret R.

2011-01-01

452

Comparing Conceptualizations of Social Capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social work is ideally suited to use social capital to understand societal ills and to conduct a more holistic exploration of power, privilege, and oppression that affects marginalized individuals and groups. To that end, we review how prominent theorists discuss social capital and offer guidance for community practitioners based on these conceptualizations. In opposition to purely micro-level theories of human

Jemel P. Aguilar; Soma Sen

2009-01-01

453

SOCIAL MARKETING IN PUBLIC HEALTH  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Social marketing, the use of marketing to design and implement pro- grams to promote socially beneficial behavior change, has grown in popularity and usage within the public health community. Despite this growth, many public health professionals have an incomplete,understanding,of the field. To advance,current knowl- edge, we provide a practical definition and discuss the conceptual underpinnings of social marketing.

Sonya Grier; Carol A. Bryant

2005-01-01

454

Social Television and User Interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

At first glance, the notion of social interactive television seems to be a tautology. Television watching has always been a social activity. People watch television together in their living rooms, and outside their homes they talk about last night's football match; and even call each other to recommend an interesting program. Unfortunately, until recently, research on social interactive television has

Pablo Cesar; Konstantinos Chorianopoulos; Jens F. Jensen

2008-01-01

455

Seven Rules for Social Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Seven Rules for Social Research" teaches social scientists how to get the most out of their technical skills and tools, providing a resource that fully describes the strategies and concepts no researcher or student of human behavior can do without. Glenn Firebaugh provides indispensable practical guidance for anyone doing research in the social

Firebaugh, Glenn

2008-01-01

456

Social network visualization in epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiological investigations and interventions are increasingly focusing on social networks. Two aspects of social networks are relevant in this regard: the structure of networks and the function of networks. A better understanding of the processes that determine how networks form and how they operate with respect to the spread of behavior holds promise for improving public health. Visualizing social networks

Nicholas A. Christakis; James H. Fowler

2009-01-01

457

Understanding Education for Social Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has become increasingly common for education scholars to claim a social justice orientation in their work. At the same time, education programs seem to be adding statements about the importance of social justice to their mission, and a growing number of teacher education programs are fundamentally oriented around a vision of social justice.…

Hytten, Kathy; Bettez, Silvia C.

2011-01-01

458

Social Work Ethics for Educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because teaching about values and ethics is essential in social work education, social work educators need to become knowledgeable about the 1996 NASW Code of Ethics and its application to social work practice and education. Three major new areas in the Code, confidentiality with managed care, technology, and family and group work, cultural competence, and appropriate professional relationships, are addressed.

Elaine P. Congress

2002-01-01

459

Building Indigenous Australian Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Indigenous social work guided by Indigenous Australians’ participation and experience that has, at its heart, human rights and social justice is in its infancy in Australia. The present paper continues a discussion on Indigenous Australian social work theory and practice developments being generated by those working in this field. Aspects of this “praxis” include recognition of the effects of

Sue Green; Eileen Baldry

2008-01-01

460

The Automaticity of Social Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of social life is experienced through mental processes that are not intended and about which one is fairly oblivious. These processes are automatically triggered by features of the immediate social environment, such as the group memberships of other people, the qualities of their behavior, and features of social situations (e.g., norms, one's relative power). Recent research has shown these

John A. Bargh; Erin L. Williams

2006-01-01

461

Why Social Work Needs Mapping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relative to other fields, social work has been slow to adopt geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool for research and practice. This paper argues that GIS can benefit social work by: (1) continuing and strengthening the social survey tradition; (2) providing a framework for understanding human behavior; (3) identifying community needs and…

Hillier, Amy

2007-01-01

462

Social Navigation and Seamful Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social navigation exploits social practices to help users navigate and explore system functionality. In a wireless world, people move around, meet others and experience places and situations. Those activities may be recorded up and presented to others through their wireless devices, and serve in social navigation. One design challenge is how to deal with the technical limits and 'seams' of

Matthew Chalmers; Andreas Dieberger; Kristina Höök; Åsa Rudström

2004-01-01

463

Viability of Urban Social Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the perspective of viability, we critically examine the attractiveness of urban social technologies. We discuss two inherent difficulties in design of this type of technology, namely intentional design of social activity and the need for social innovation a long side a technical innovation. Fi- nally, we touch upon the relevance of ethnographic inspired methods in the design of urban

Jens Pedersen; Anna Vallgarda

464

Social science and the Courts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social scientists have increasingly become involved in the submission of amicus curiae or “friend of the court” briefs in legal cases being decided by state and federal courts. This increase has triggered considerable debate about the use of briefs to communicate relevant social science research. This article evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of various methods of summarizing social science research

Ronald Roesch; Stephen L. Golding; Valerie P. Hans; N. Dickon Reppucci

1991-01-01

465

Mathematical Modeling of Social Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human computation is a technique that makes use of human abilities for computation to solve problems. Social games use the power of the Internet game players to solve human computation problems. In previous works, many social games were proposed and were quite successful, but no formal framework exists for designing social games in general. A formal framework is important because

Kam Tong Chan; Irwin King; Man-ching Yuen

2009-01-01

466

Social Value and Adult Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An examination of the current government policy discourse on social value and the capturing of social impact leads immediately into the centre of the fast-moving and transforming public-sector reform agenda. The thinking around social value takes an individual to the heart of contracting, localism, the relationship between the public sector and…

Lamb, Penny

2011-01-01

467

Social Identity: A Multidimensional Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study salience, importance, and multidimensional aspects of spontaneous social identities were examined. A Social Identity Survey was developed and administered to an ethnically diverse sample of American undergraduate students. Freely generated, social identities were rank ordered for importance and rated along four conceptually-derived dimensions: emotion, evaluation, importance, and stability. Results showed pattern differences among three groups of highly

Raymond T. Garza; Lawrence G. Herringer

1987-01-01

468

Social learning analytics: five approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes that Social Learning Analytics (SLA) can be usefully thought of as a subset of learning analytics approaches. SLA focuses on how learners build knowledge together in their cultural and social settings. In the context of online social learning, it takes into account both formal and informal educational environments, including networks and communities. The paper introduces the broad

Rebecca Ferguson; Simon Buckingham Shum

2012-01-01

469

The social brain in adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term 'social brain' refers to the network of brain regions that are involved in understanding others. Behaviour that is related to social cognition changes dramatically during human adolescence. This is paralleled by functional changes that occur in the social brain during this time, in particular in the medial prefrontal cortex and the superior temporal sulcus, which show altered activity

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore

2008-01-01

470

PERSONS, IDENTITIES, AND SOCIAL INTERACTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT In this paper we hope to advance the general theory of social interaction. We bring together symbolic and sign processes in the context of an elaborated identity theory that relates social situations of interaction to social systems of interaction. Situations contain persons with their histories and unique identity sets, pursuing simultaneous and sometimes conflicting definitions, goals, and agendas. Systems

Lee Freese; Peter J. Burke

471

Social Science for a Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication is a collection of social science research and statistical techniques that can help win civil rights court cases. Articles included are: (1) "A Lawyer Looks at Social Science in the Courts"; (2) "How Social Scientists and Lawyers Can Work Together"; (3) "The Nature of Statistics and Research as Used in Civil Rights Litigation";…

Loewen, James W.; And Others

1979-01-01

472

Microcredit, Social Capital, and Politics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through an exploratory approach, we studied the evolution, sustainability, and management of ten microcredit institutions located in Gossas, a small town in Senegal, Sub-Saharan Africa. Prevailing ideas about social capital, in the form of social relationships within and between microcredit institutions and financing NGOs, donors, and governments, are examined using both rational choice and Marxist social capital theories to highlight

Jainaba M. L. Kah; Dana L. Olds; Muhammadou M. O. Kah

473

Social anxiety in college students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with social phobia often hold erroneous beliefs about the extent to which others experience symptoms of social anxiety and the ways in which others evaluate people who appear to be anxious. The purpose of this study was to: (a) provide normative data on the frequency with which individuals in a nonclinical sample experience particular symptoms of social anxiety (e.g.,

Christine Purdon; Martin Antony; Sandra Monteiro; Richard P Swinson

2001-01-01

474

Social media basics for orthodontists.  

PubMed

One of the most common buzz words in today's online world is "social media." This article defines social media, explains why it is important to practicing orthodontists, and provides information about how doctors can incorporate it into their practices. Five of the most useful social media tools are described in detail, outlining the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and risks inherent in each. PMID:22464534

Jorgensen, Greg

2012-04-01

475

Social Work and Chronic Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pauline Hardiker worked as a medical secretary and community worker before going to Leicester University to read sociology (BA. Social Science, and MA. Sociology). She taught sociology and psychology for two years at Stevenage College. She has been a lecturer at the Leicester University School of Social Work since 1969, and has been engaged in research and writing on social

PAULINE HARDIKER; VICKY TOD

1982-01-01

476

Social Exclusion Decreases Prosocial Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 7 experiments, the authors manipulated social exclusion by telling people that they would end up alone later in life or that other participants had rejected them. Social exclusion caused a substantial reduction in prosocial behavior. Socially excluded people donated less money to a student fund, were unwilling to volunteer for further lab experiments, were less helpful after a mishap,

Jean M. Twenge; Roy F. Baumeister; C. Nathan DeWall; Natalie J. Ciarocco; J. Michael Bartels

2007-01-01

477

Social Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards  

Microsoft Academic Search

County-level socioeconomic and demographic data were used to construct an index of social vulnerability to environmental hazards, called the Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for the United States based on 1990 data. Copyright (c) 2003 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Susan L. Cutter; Bryan J. Boruff; W. Lynn Shirley

2003-01-01

478

Advancing Gerontological Social Work Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Chapters in this volume reflect a variety of issues related to education for gerontological social work. Chapters in section 1, "Geriatrics and Gerontology in Social Work Education," are: (1) "Social Work's Pursuit of a Common Professional Framework: Have We Reached a Milestone?" (Roberta Greene and Colleen Galambos); (2) "Basic Gerontological…

Mellor, M. Joanna, Ed.; Ivry, Joann, Ed.

479

Why Social Work Needs Mapping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Relative to other fields, social work has been slow to adopt geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool for research and practice. This paper argues that GIS can benefit social work by: (1) continuing and strengthening the social survey tradition; (2) providing a framework for understanding human behavior; (3) identifying community needs and…

Hillier, Amy

2007-01-01

480

SEXUAL SOCIALIZATION: A CONCEPTUAL REVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a critical review of the concept of sexual socialization. A reformulation of conceptions of sexual socialization identifies five components of the developmental process (development of sex-object preference; development of gender roles; development of a gender identity; acquisition of sexual skills, knowledge, and values; and development of sexual attitudes). Sexual socialization, also referred to as sexualization, is defined

GRAHAM B. SPANIER

1977-01-01

481

SOCIAL ROLES IN ELECTRONIC COMMUNITIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals' behavior in groups is constrained by several factors, including the skills, privileges and responsibilities they enjoy. We call these factors a social role, and explore using the concept of social roles as an analytical tool for studying communities in Usenet newsgroups. Our understanding of what roles are and how they function is derived from sociolinguistics, social psychology, and the

Scott A. Golder; Judith Donath

482

Critical Social Theory: A Portrait  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The term Critical Social Theory is employed in this article following the tradition of the Frankfurt School, and particularly the work of Herbert Marcuse and his interpretation of the political and social philosophy of Hegel and Marx. Discussing the contribution of G.W.F. Hegel to social theory Marcuse argued that: "Hegel's system brings to a…

Torres, Carlos A.

2012-01-01

483

Disaster symbolism and social media  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on the use of social media during disaster events has gained attention in recent years. Prior research paid attention to warnings, response activities and the dissemination of information through social media during times of crisis. This study focuses on the use of social media during crisis from different perspectives. In this paper, the implications of symbols that emerged in

Hiroko Wilensky

2012-01-01

484

Development and Socialization in Childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, we have seen important changes in the conceptuaHzation of early child devel­ opment and socialization in psychology, sociology, and anthropology. In general, these changes involve more of a focus on children's agency in the socialization process, more con­ cern for the importance of social context, and agreement that children's experiences beyond their early years in the family

WILLIAM A. CORSARO; Laura Fingerson

485

Financial Education for Social Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social workers work with people who are financially vulnerable and who frequently have little financial knowledge and connections to mainstream financial institutions. Unfortunately, social workers often lack the knowledge and skills to help families who are in precarious financial positions to improve household stability and optimize their economic futures. Despite significant advances in financial education, social workers receive little practical

Margaret Sherraden; Sharon Laux; Cassandra Kaufman

2007-01-01

486

Social exclusion and equal opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the concept of social exclusion as articulated in the three recent European Commission White Papers on economic, social and teaching and learning policy. Between them, these papers set the framework for the development of policies for the European Union from now until well into the next millenium. How is ‘social exclusion’ conceptualized? How does the concept differ

Teresa Rees

1998-01-01

487

Evolve: Analyzing Evolving Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many current social network analytic methods work by analyzing a static aggregate graph, which provides a limited view of the structure and behavior of real-world social networks. Social networks in reality are dynamic and evolve over time as people join ...

S. Macskassy

2012-01-01

488

Online Advertising in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Online social networks offer opportunities to analyze user behavior and social connectivity and leverage resulting insights\\u000a for effective online advertising. This chapter focuses on the role of social network information in online display advertising.

Abraham Bagherjeiran; Rushi P. Bhatt; Rajesh Parekh; Vineet Chaoji

2010-01-01

489

Social Studies: Issues and Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This competency based workbook in social studies education provides information on developing teaching strategies and instructional materials. Designed for undergraduate students in social studies, student teachers, and methods instructors, it serves as a source of assignments for students, a guide in testing student competencies in social studies…

Dynneson, Thomas L.

490

Socialization, Intelligence, and Cognitive Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This longitudinal study examined the multiple influences of social class and family socialization on intelligence at age 7, and on the development of cognitive competence from age 7 through age 15 in a sample of 121 urban Icelandic children and adolescents. Socialization condition was defined as sources of parental support and control strategies,…

Grundmann, M.; Teo, Thomas

491

Structural Social Work in Action  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a world of growing inequality and oppression, there is a need for a social work practice that works for social justice and societal transformation, while simultaneously addressing people's immediate needs. Structural social work is one such theory of practice, but many claim it to be idealistic and difficult to practice. This article offers an example from India that operationalizes

Purnima George; Sara Marlowe

2005-01-01

492

Social Interaction and Urban Sprawl  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various authors, most notably Putnam (2000), have argued that low-density living reduces social capital and thus social interaction, and this argument has been used to buttress criticisms of urban sprawl. If low densities in fact reduce social interaction, then an externality arises, validating Putnam’s critique. In choosing their own lot sizes, consumers would fail to consider the loss of interaction

Jan K. Brueckner; Ann G. Largey

2006-01-01

493

Social interaction and urban sprawl  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various authors, most notably Putnam [Putnam, R.D., 2000. Bowling Alone. Simon and Schuster, New York], have argued that low-density living reduces social capital and thus social interaction, and this argument has been used to buttress criticisms of urban sprawl. If low densities in fact reduce social interaction, then an externality arises, validating Putnam's critique. In choosing their own lot sizes,

Jan K. Brueckner; Ann G. Largey

2008-01-01

494

Social Work and Criminal Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

We shall begin with the principal, and complicated, conclusion: Regrettably, the social work profession has largely abandoned the criminal justice field. That is not to say that social workers are not employed in criminal justice settings. Certainly they are. Significant numbers of social workers earn their living as probation and parole officers, caseworkers in public defender offices, counselors in correctional

Frederic G. Reamer

2004-01-01

495

The need for social psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sketches, the development of the field of social psychology from the coincidental work of Tarde (1890-1900). The aim is to make others aware of how social psychology grew in spite of a numbers of inhibitory influences. Foresees a return of focus from social to general psychology. Implications for theory of psychology and society are mentioned.

John Dewey

1917-01-01

496

Games and social network structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine repeated games played among members of a society who are connected in a social network. Players can observe each others' play, but can only directly affect the payoffs of their social neighbors. We characterize the social network patterns that sustain repeated cooperative equilibrium behavior and are robust in various ways. High levels of cooperation can only be sustained

Matthew O. Jackson

2010-01-01

497

Social Support and Social Conflict as Predictors of Prenatal Depression  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To estimate how social support and social conflict relate to prenatal depressive symptoms and to generate a brief clinical tool to identify women at increased psychosocial risk. METHODS This is a prospective study following 1,047 pregnant women receiving care at two university-affiliated clinics from early pregnancy through 1 year postpartum. Structured interviews were conducted in the second trimester of pregnancy. Hierarchical and logistic regressions were used to examine potential direct and interactive effects of social support and conflict on prenatal depressive symptoms measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. RESULTS Thirty-three percent of the sample reported elevated levels of depressive symptoms predicted from sociodemographic factors, social support, and social conflict. Social support and conflict had independent effects on depressive symptoms although social conflict was a stronger predictor. There was a “dose–response,” with each increase in interpersonal risk factor resulting in consequent risk for probable depression based on symptom reports (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Scale greater than or equal to 16). A composite of one social support and three conflict items were identified to be used by clinicians to identify interpersonal risk factors for depression in pregnancy. Seventy-six percent of women with a composite score of three or more high-risk responses reported depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION Increased assessment of social support and social conflict by clinicians during pregnancy can identify women who could benefit from group or individual interventions to enhance supportive and reduce negative social interactions.

Westdahl, Claire; Milan, Stephanie; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace S.; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

2008-01-01

498

Brain reading social action  

Microsoft Academic Search

What mechanism guides the social researcher in inferring a choice of action from particular beliefs and desires of the agent\\u000a or in reconstructing the beliefs and desires that caused an action? Through the identification process, the researcher should\\u000a be able to intercept the inferential principles guiding the agent, even when those principles differ from his own. As when\\u000a dealing with

Riccardo Viale

2011-01-01

499

Personalized Socially Assistive Robotics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The start of the 21st century, with its confluence of scientific and technological sophistication, presents a unique opportunity for robotics to positively impact human quality of life. Significant and growing societal needs include the lack of personalized one-on-one care for the growing populations of elderly individuals, children with developmental disorders, and those with special life-long cognitive and social needs. Developing

Maja J Mataric; Adriana Tapus; David Feil-Seifer

500

Housework and social policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the effects of social policy regarding women’s employment and work-family conflict on the division of household labor in 33 countries. We classify policies according to Chang’s (2000) equality of access (affirmative action and absence of discriminatory policy) and substantive benefits (parental leave and childcare services). Results show that countries without prohibitions against certain types of employment for women,

Makiko Fuwa; Philip N. Cohen

2007-01-01