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1

Antimicrobial activity of sphingosines.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity of stratum corneum lipids was examined by screening in vitro various representative phospholipids and sphingolipids. Of mixed galacto-cerebrosides; phosphatidic acid; phosphatidic acid-monomethylester-dioleoyl; phosphatidylethanolamine; phosphatidylethanolamine-beta-oleoyl-gamma-palmitoyl; phosphatidylcholine; D-sphingosine; D,L-sphinganine; 4-D-hydroxysphinganine; oleoyl-sphingosine; N,N-dimethylsphingosine; and stearylamine, only the sphingosines and, to a lesser extent, stearylamine were clearly and profoundly effective against Staphylococcus aureus (4-log reduction at 6.25 micrograms/ml [20 microM]; 2-log reduction at 0.78 mu/ml [2.5 microM]). The sphingosines were similarly active against Streptococcus pyogenes, Micrococcus luteus, Propionibacterium acnes, Brevibacterium epidermidis, and Candida albicans, moderately active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ineffective against Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens. Both erythro- and threo-isomers were effective. Optimal inhibition was at 60 min incubation at 37 degrees C and at pH 6.5. Antimicrobial activity, which was Ca++ dependent, was confirmed in vivo by topical application and microbial challenge. Because free sphingosines are available in the stratum corneum and other epidermal layers, these lipids may contribute to the cutaneous antimicrobial barrier. PMID:1545135

Bibel, D J; Aly, R; Shinefield, H R

1992-03-01

2

Effects of Dimerization on the Structure and Biological Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide Ctx-Ha  

PubMed Central

It is well known that cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are potential microbicidal agents for the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance. However, the physicochemical properties of each peptide need to be optimized for clinical use. To evaluate the effects of dimerization on the structure and biological activity of the antimicrobial peptide Ctx-Ha, we have synthesized the monomeric and three dimeric (Lys-branched) forms of the Ctx-Ha peptide by solid-phase peptide synthesis using a combination of 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) and t-butoxycarbonyl (Boc) chemical approaches. The antimicrobial activity assay showed that dimerization decreases the ability of the peptide to inhibit growth of bacteria or fungi; however, the dimeric analogs displayed a higher level of bactericidal activity. In addition, a dramatic increase (50 times) in hemolytic activity was achieved with these analogs. Permeabilization studies showed that the rate of carboxyfluorescein release was higher for the dimeric peptides than for the monomeric peptide, especially in vesicles that contained sphingomyelin. Despite different biological activities, the secondary structure and pore diameter were not significantly altered by dimerization. In contrast to the case for other dimeric cAMPs, we have shown that dimerization selectively decreases the antimicrobial activity of this peptide and increases the hemolytic activity. The results also show that the interaction between dimeric peptides and the cell wall could be responsible for the decrease of the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. PMID:22391524

Lorenzón, E. N.; Cespedes, G. F.; Vicente, E. F.; Nogueira, L. G.; Bauab, T. M.; Castro, M. S.

2012-01-01

3

Antimicrobial activity of isopteropodine.  

PubMed

Bioassay-directed fractionation for the determination of antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa, has led to the isolation of isopteropodine (0.3%), a known Uncaria pentacyclic oxindol alkaloid that exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria. PMID:16042336

García, Rubén; Cayunao, Cesia; Bocic, Ronny; Backhouse, Nadine; Delporte, Carle; Zaldivar, Mercedes; Erazo, Silvia

2005-01-01

4

Medium chain fatty acid ethyl esters - activation of antimicrobial effects by Malassezia enzymes.  

PubMed

Free medium and short chain fatty acids are known to have broad antimicrobial activity. However, their practical use in topical therapy is limited by their intensive smell and acidity. Surprisingly, a nearly identical antimicrobial effect was found with the ethyl ester derivatives of these fatty acids, but only against Malassezia (M.) yeast, not against Candida spp. Obviously, these esters are hydrolysed by M. enzymes, thus generating a selective activation of antimicrobial activity especially in areas well populated with these yeast ('targeting'). Octanoic acid ethyl ester (CAS 106-32-1) was found to be most suitable. In an agar dilution test, the minimal inhibitory concentrations against M. globosa, M. pachydermatis and M. sympodialis, respectively, ranged between ~5 and 10 mmol l(-1) after 10 days of incubation. The effect started immediately and was not delayed by other lipid sources applied simultaneously. Based on these data, fatty acid monoesters may represent a new therapeutic concept in M.-associated diseases. PMID:25676074

Mayser, Peter

2015-04-01

5

Evaluation of antimicrobial activity and bronchodialator effect of a polyherbal drug-Shrishadi  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate antimicrobial and bronchodialator effect of hydroalcholic extract of polyherbal drug Shirishadi containing Shirisha (Albezzia lebbeck), Nagarmotha (Cyprus rotandus) & Kantakari (Solanum xanthocarpum). Methods Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and MIC, MBC, MFC were calculated by micro dilution method. Hydroalcholic extract of this preparation was investigated for its phytochemical analysis, phenol and flavonoid were determined by spectrophotometric method and in vivo bronchodilator effect was analysed by convulsion time. Results The phytochemical tests revealed presence of alkaloids, anthraquinones, carbohydrates, flavonoids, saponins and tannins. The antimicrobial result showed the MIC of 6.25 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and 12.5 mg/mL for Escherichia coli and 12.5 mg/mL against remaining bacteria tested, with strong antifungal activity. The maximum inhibition zone is found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC 16 mg/mL. Drug showed significant bronchodilator effect with 27.86% & 36.13% increase in preconvulsion time of guinea pigs pretreated with 100 & 200 mg/kg body weight of extract. Conclusions The study reveals that the extracts possess antibacterial activity and antifungal activity in a dose dependent manner. This antimicrobial property may be due to presence of several saponins, further studies are highly needed for the drug development. PMID:23569869

Kajaria, Divya Kumari; Gangwar, Mayank; Kumar, Dharmendra; Kumar Sharma, Amit; Tilak, Ragini; Nath, Gopal; Tripathi, Yamini Bhusan; Tripathi, JS; Tiwari, SK

2012-01-01

6

Heat treatment effects on the antimicrobial activity of macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in milk.  

PubMed

Antibiotic residues in milk can cause serious problems for consumers and the dairy industry. Heat treatment of milk may diminish the antimicrobial activity of these antibiotic residues. This study analyzed the effect of milk processing (60 °C for 30 min, 120 °C for 20 min, and 140 °C for 10 s) on the antimicrobial activity of milk samples fortified with three concentrations of three macrolides (erythromycin: 20, 40 and 80 ?g/liter; spiramycin: 100, 200, and 400 ?g/liter; and tylosin: 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ?g/liter) and one lincosamide (lincomycin: 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 ?g/liter). To measure the loss of antimicrobial activity, a bioassay based on the growth inhibition of Micrococcus luteus was done. The data were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model. The results indicate that treatment at 120 °C for 20 min produces inactivation percentages of 93% (erythromycin), 64% (spiramycin), 51% (tylosin), and 5% (lincomycin), while treatment at 140 °C for 10 s results in generally lower percentages (30% erythromycin, 35% spiramycin, 12% tylosin, and 5% lincomycin). The lowest loss or lowest reduction of antimicrobial activity (21% erythromycin and 13% spiramycin) was obtained by treatment at 60 °C for 30 min. PMID:21333154

Zorraquino, M A; Althaus, R L; Roca, M; Molina, M P

2011-02-01

7

Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.  

PubMed

Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnčs; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

2014-01-01

8

Effects of mono- and disaccharides on the antimicrobial activity of bovine lactoperoxidase system.  

PubMed

The effects of mono- and disaccharides on the antimicrobial activity of the lactoperoxidase (LPO) system against Salmonella Enteritidis were investigated. The results clearly reveal that most of the sugars inhibit the antimicrobial activity of the LPO system. The inhibitory potency varies depending on the structure of sugar. L-Fructose and D-allose were strongly inhibitive to the action of the LPO system, while sucrose was the weakest inhibitor. The decreased antimicrobial activity is due to the reduction of LPO catalytic activity by sugar. An inhibitory kinetic study showed the noncompetitive inhibitor. D-Allose and L-fructose yielded strikingly low K(i) values of 0.36 and 0.42 mM, respectively, while the K(i) values of the other sugars ranged from 1.37 to 3.60 mM. Since LPO activity is inhibited by the saccharides, the sugar content in food should be considered when the LPO system is applied to the preservation of food. PMID:21219776

Al-Baarri, Ahmad Nimatullah; Hayashi, Makoto; Ogawa, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Shigeru

2011-01-01

9

Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus mutans and their Antiproliferative Effects  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to evaluate the activity of essential oils (EOs) against Streptococcus mutans biofilm by chemically characterizing their fractions responsible for biological and antiproliferative activity. Twenty EO were obtained by hydrodistillation and submitted to the antimicrobial assay (minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations) against S. mutans UA159. Thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used for phytochemical analyses. EOs were selected according to predetermined criteria and fractionated using dry column; the resulting fractions were assessed by MIC and MBC, selected as active fractions, and evaluated against S. mutans biofilm. Biofilms formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Selected EOs and their selected active fractions were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against keratinocytes and seven human tumor cell lines. MIC and MBC values obtained for EO and their active fractions showed strong antimicrobial activity. Chemical analyses mainly showed the presence of terpenes. The selected active fractions inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation (P < 0.05) did not affect glycolytic pH drop and were inactive against keratinocytes, normal cell line. In conclusion, EO showed activity at low concentrations, and their selected active fractions were also effective against biofilm formed by S. mutans and human tumor cell lines. PMID:22685486

Galvăo, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Bersan, Salete Meyre Fernandes; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Góis; de Carvalho, Joăo Ernesto; Sartoratto, Adilson; Rehder, Vera Lúcia Garcia; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Teixeira Duarte, Marta Cristina; Ikegaki, Masarahu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

2012-01-01

10

Antimicrobial effect of silver particles on bacterial contamination of activated carbon fibers.  

PubMed

Even though activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters have been widely used in air cleaning for the removal of hazardous gaseous pollutants, because of their extended surface area and high adsorption capacity, bacteria may breed on the ACF filters as a result of their good biocompatibility; ACF filters can themselves become a source of bioaerosols. In this study, silver particles were coated onto an ACF filter, using an electroless deposition method and their efficacy for bioaerosol removal was tested. First, various surface analyses, including scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and X-ray diffraction were carried out to characterize the prepared ACF filters. Filtration and antimicrobial tests were then performed on the filters. The results showed that the silver-deposited ACF filters were effective for the removal of bioaerosols by inhibition of the survival of microorganisms, whereas pristine ACF filters were not. Two bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, were completely inhibited within 10 and 60 min, respectively. Electroless silver deposition did not influence the physical characteristics of ACF filters such as pressure drop and filtration efficiency. The gas adsorptive ability of the silver-deposited ACF filter, as represented by the micropore specific surface area, decreased by about 20% compared to the pristine filter because of the blockage of the ACF micropores by silver particles. Therefore, the amount of silver particles on the ACF filters needs to be optimized to avoid excessive reduction of their adsorptive characteristics and to show effective antimicrobial activity. PMID:18351101

Yoon, Ki Young; Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Park, Chul Woo; Hwang, Jungho

2008-02-15

11

Antimicrobial activity against periodontopathogenic bacteria, antioxidant and cytotoxic effects of various extracts from endemic Thermopsis turcica  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of Thermopsis turcica Kit Tan, Vural & Küçüködük against periodontopathogenic bacteria, its antioxidant activity and cytotoxic effect on various cancer cell lines. Methods In vitro antimicrobial activities of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate (EtAc), n-hexane and water extracts of Thermopsis turcica herb against periodontopathogenic bacteria, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 were tested by agar well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Antioxidant properties of the extracts were evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity and ?-carotene bleaching methods. Amounts of phenolic contents of the extracts were also analysed by using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of the extracts on androgen-insensitive prostate cancer, androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia human cancer cell lines were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Human gingival fibroblast cells were used as a control. Results Our data showed that EtAc extract had the highest antimicrobial effect on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (MIC: 1.562 mg/mL, MBC: 3.124 mg/mL) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (MIC: 0.781 mg/mL, MBC: 1.562 mg/mL). In antioxidant assays, EtAc extract exhibited also the highest radical scavenging activity [IC50=(30.0±0.3) µg/mL] and the highest inhibition [(74.35±0.30)%] against lineloic acide oxidation. The amount of phenolic content of it was also the highest [(162.5±1.2) µg/mg gallic acid]. In cytotoxic assay, only ethanol [IC50=(80.00±1.21) µg/mL] and EtAc extract [IC50=(70.0±0.9) µg/mL] were toxic on acute promyelocytic leukemia cells at 20-100 µg/mL (P<0.05). However, no toxic effect was observed on human gingival fibroblast cells. Conclusions According to our findings, owing to its antioxidant and cytotoxic potential, EtAc extract might include anticancer agents for acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:25183268

Bali, Elif Burcu; Aç?k, Leyla; Akca, Gülçin; Sarper, Meral; Elçi, Mualla P?nar; Avcu, Ferit; Vural, Mecit

2014-01-01

12

Neutralization effect of some agents on the antimicrobial activity of ammoniacal silver nitrate.  

PubMed

The effect of some agents on the antimicrobial activity of ammoniacal silver nitrate, an endodontic medicament, was tested with Streptococcus faecalis by the serial tube dilution method. Its results indicated that sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and blood had a marked inhibitory effect. However, the presence of dentin, necrotic tissue, saliva, and hydrogen sulfide gas liberated from protein decomposition showed no or little effect on the antibacterial properties of the chemical. Since antiseptics or antibiotics generally may be decomposed by necrotic tissues, these findings suggested that the use of ammoniacal silver nitrate not only may resolve the problem of recalcitrant cases in endodontic treatment but also may simplify the disinfecting procedure for root canals. PMID:415823

Lan, W H

1978-03-01

13

The effect of feed moisture and temperature on tannin content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of extruded chestnuts.  

PubMed

This study focuses on the effect of extrusion processing on tannin reduction, phenolic content, flavonoid content, antioxidant and anitimicrobial activity. Extrusion temperature (120 and 140 °C) and feed moisture (25% and 28%) were used on the tannin content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Extrusion cooking reduced tannin content up to 78%, and improved antioxidant activity from 12.89% to 21.17% in a concentration dependant manner without affecting its antimicrobial activity that varied from 250 to 500 mg. The time-kill assay confirmed the ability of extruded chestnut to reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa count below detectable limit that reduced the original inoculum by 3log10 CFU/mL. Overall, the results showed that extrusion cooking might serve as a tool for tannin reduction and could improve the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of chestnut, which might be helpful for chestnut related products in the food industry. PMID:23993601

Obiang-Obounou, Brice Wilfried; Ryu, Gi Hyung

2013-12-15

14

Comparison of the duration of antimicrobial activity of 2 different antimicrobial central venous catheters.  

PubMed

We compared the duration of antimicrobial effectiveness of 2 different antimicrobial catheters. The baseline activity of minocycline-rifampin catheters was greater than that of silver-platinum-carbon catheters against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Enterococcus faecalis. The antimicrobial activity of the minocycline-rifampin catheters against these pathogens persisted for up to 12 days, while that of the silver-platinum-carbon catheters was depleted by day 10 (P < .05). PMID:20100086

Matheos, Theofilos; Walz, J Matthias; Adams, Janice P; Johnson, Karen; Longtine, Karen; Longtine, Jaclyn; O'Neill, Melissa; Heard, Stephen O

2010-03-01

15

Antimicrobial activity of Potentilla species  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antibacterial and antifungal activities of aqueous extracts obtained from aerial parts of Potentilla species: P. anserina, P. argentea, P. erecta, P. fruticosa, P. grandiflora, P. nepalensis var.‘MissWillmott’, P. recta, P. rupestris and P. thuringiaca were investigated. The extracts showed the strongest antimicrobial activity against H. pylori (MIC=0.1÷0.5 mg\\/ml).

Micha? Tomczyk; Katarzyna Leszczy?ska; Piotr Jakoniuk

2008-01-01

16

Antimicrobial activity of Potentilla species.  

PubMed

The antibacterial and antifungal activities of aqueous extracts obtained from aerial parts of Potentilla species: P. anserina, P. argentea, P. erecta, P. fruticosa, P. grandiflora, P. nepalensis var.'Miss Willmott', P. recta, P. rupestris and P. thuringiaca were investigated. The extracts showed the strongest antimicrobial activity against H. pylori (MIC=0.1/0.5 mg/ml). PMID:18664379

Tomczyk, Micha?; Leszczy?ska, Katarzyna; Jakoniuk, Piotr

2008-12-01

17

Effects of cathode design parameters on in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of electrically-activated silver-based iontophoretic system.  

PubMed

Post-operative infection is a major risk associated with implantable devices. Prior studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of ionic silver as an alternative to antibiotic-based infection prophylaxis and treatment. The focus of this study is on an electrically activated implant system engineered for active release of antimicrobial silver ions. The objective was to evaluate the effects of the cathode design, especially the cathode material, on the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of the system. A modified Kirby-Bauer diffusion technique was used for the antimicrobial efficacy evaluations (24 h testing interval). In phase-1 of the study, a three-way ANOVA (n = 6, ? = 0.05) was performed to determine the effects of cathode material (silver, titanium, and stainless steel), cathode surface area and electrode separation distance on the efficacy of the system against Staphylococcus aureus. The results show that within the design space tested, none of these parameters had a statistically significant effect on the antimicrobiality of the system (P > 0.15). Subsequently, one-way ANOVA (n = 6, ? = 0.05) was conducted in phase-2 to validate the inference regarding the non-significance of the cathode material to the system efficacy using a broader spectrum of pathogens (methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae and Aspergillus flavus) responsible for osteomyelitis. The results confirmed the lack of statistical difference between efficacies of the three cathode material configurations against all pathogens tested (P > 0.58). Overall, the results demonstrate the ability to alter the cathode material and related design parameters in order to minimize the silver usage in the system without adversely affecting its antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:25589207

Tan, Zhuo; Ganapathy, Anirudh; Orndorff, Paul E; Shirwaiker, Rohan A

2015-01-01

18

Effect of Two Cancer Chemotherapeutic Agents on the Antibacterial Activity of Three Antimicrobial Agents  

PubMed Central

Cancer chemotherapeutic agents and antibacterial antibiotics are often given concomitantly. Daunorubicin, cytosine arabinoside, and three antibiotics (gentamicin, amikacin, and ticarcillin) were tested individually and in combinations to determine their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. These cytotoxic agents are commonly employed in the therapy of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia for remission induction therapy, and these antimicrobial agents are used in infection therapy. The maximum concentrations of the two cytotoxic drugs were chosen to be twice the known peak plasma levels of commonly employed dosage schedules. Neither of the cancer chemotherapeutic agents, alone or in combination, demonstrated bactericidal activity at the levels tested. However, in the presence of these agents, the antimicrobial activity of gentamicin and amikacin, although not that of ticarcillin, was depressed for 11 of 15 K. pneumoniae strains and 8 of 15 P. aeruginosa strains, but for none of the strains of E. coli. This level of decreased activity occasionally resulted in a minimal inhibitory concentration of the tested aminoglycoside well above the standard serum levels. Daunorubicin was more likely to antagonize gentamicin than was cytosine arabinoside. PMID:103494

Moody, Marcia R.; Morris, Maureen J.; Young, Viola Mae; Moyé, Lemuel A.; Schimpff, Stephen C.; Wiernik, Peter H.

1978-01-01

19

High antimicrobial effectiveness with low hemolytic and cytotoxic activity for PEG/quaternary copolyoxetanes.  

PubMed

The alkyl chain length of quaternary ammonium/PEG copolyoxetanes has been varied to discern effects on solution antimicrobial efficacy, hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Monomers 3-((4-bromobutoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (BBOx) and 3-((2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (ME2Ox) were used to prepare precursor P[(BBOx)(ME2Ox)-50:50-4 kDa] copolyoxetane via cationic ring opening polymerization. The 1:1 copolymer composition and Mn (4 kDa) were confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. After C-Br substitution by a series of tertiary amines, ionic liquid Cx-50 copolyoxetanes were obtained, where 50 is the mole percent of quaternary repeat units and "x" is quaternary alkyl chain length (2, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 carbons). Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) studies showed Tgs between -40 and -60 °C and melting endotherms for C14-50 and C16-50. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . A systematic dependence of MIC on alkyl chain length was found. The most effective antimicrobials were in the C6-50 to C12-50 range. C8-50 had better overall performance with MICs of 4 ?g/mL, E. coli ; 2 ?g/mL, S. aureus ; and 24 ?g/mL, P. aeruginosa . At 5 × MIC, C8-50 effected >99% kill in 1 h against S. aureus , E. coli , and P. aeruginosa challenges of 10(8) cfu/mL; log reductions (1 h) were 7, 3, and 5, respectively. To provide additional insight into polycation interactions with bacterial membranes, a geometric model based on the dimensions of E. coli is described that provides an estimate of the maximum number of polycations that can chemisorb. Chain dimensions were estimated for polycation C8-50 with a molecular weight of 5 kDa. Considering the approximations for polycation chemisorption (PCC), it is surprising that a calculation based on geometric considerations gives a C8-50 concentration within a factor of 2 of the MIC, 4.0 (±1.2) ?g/mL for E. coli . Cx-50 copolyoxetane cytotoxicity was low for human red blood cells, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). Selectivities for bacterial kill over cell lysis were among the highest ever reported for polycations indicating good prospects for biocompatibility. PMID:24422429

King, Allison; Chakrabarty, Souvik; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xiaomei; Ohman, Dennis E; Wood, Lynn F; Abraham, Sheena; Rao, Raj; Wynne, Kenneth J

2014-02-10

20

Effect of gamma irradiation on the antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities of Glycyrrhiza glabra root  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of gamma irradiation as a method of decontamination for food and herbal materials is well established. In the present study, Glycyrrhiza glabra roots were irradiated at doses 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 kGy in a cobalt-60 irradiator. The irradiated and un-irradiated control samples were evaluated for phenolic contents, antimicrobial activities and DPPH scavenging properties. The result of

Khanzadi Fatima Khattak; Thomas James Simpson

2010-01-01

21

Effect of addition of 2% chlorhexidine or 10% doxycycline on antimicrobial activity of biodentine  

PubMed Central

Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the addition of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate or 10% doxycycline would enhance the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC-25923), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC-29212), Candida albicans (ATCC-90028), and Streptococcus mutans (MTCC-497). Materials and Methods: Three wells of 4 mm diameter and 4 mm depth on each plate were prepared on the agar medium with standardized suspensions of each microorganism. Biodentine powder mixed with 2% chlorhexidine (0.06 g) or 10% doxycycline (0.30 g) in its liquid or liquid alone was placed to fill each well. Plates were incubated at 37°C as required for microbial growth. A blinded, independent observer measured zones of inhibition. The data were analyzed using independent “t” test to compare the differences among the three cement preparations for different micro-organisms. Results: All Biodentine samples inhibited microbial growth. The highest mean diameters of zone of inhibition for all the micro-organisms were found around Biodentine/chlorhexidine (13.417) followed by Biodentine alone (12.236) and Biodentine/doxycycline (11.25). Conclusion: In conclusion, adding 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in liquid of Biodentine enhanced the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine against all the tested micro-organisms except Candida albicans, while addition of 10% doxycycline decreased the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine. The differences were significant statistically (P < 0.05). PMID:24944453

Nikhil, Vineeta; Madan, Molly; Agarwal, Charu; Suri, Navleen

2014-01-01

22

Effect of inoculum size and medium on activity of seven antimicrobial agents against Bacteroides fragilis strains.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial activity of cefoxitin, cefotetan, cefotaxime, ceftizoxime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and clindamycin against four inocula of Bacteroides fragilis strains was determined on three different media. The inoculum sizes were 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), and 10(7) colony forming units (CFU) per spot. On all three media, substantial effects of inoculum size on minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of cefotaxime and ceftizoxime were found: the doubled dilution differences in MICs between inocula of 10(7) and 10(4) CFU/spot were 2.2, 2.3, and 2.1 micrograms/ml of cefotaxime and 1.8, 4.4, and 4.0 micrograms/ml of ceftizoxime on Brucella base-laked blood agar, Wilkins-Chalgren agar, and a brain-heart infusion medium, respectively. An inoculum difference found on all three media with ceftazidime may also be of practical significance. There was evidence of larger differences between inocula on the Wilkins-Chalgren agar and brain-heart infusion than on the Brucella agar. PMID:2611824

Wexler, H M; Reeves, D; Finegold, S M

1989-01-01

23

Antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens and immunomodulatory effects and toxicity of geopropolis produced by the stingless bee Melipona fasciculata Smith  

PubMed Central

Background Native bees of the tribe Meliponini produce a distinct kind of propolis called geopropolis. Although many pharmacological activities of propolis have already been demonstrated, little is known about geopropolis, particularly regarding its antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens. The present study aimed at investigating the antimicrobial activity of M. fasciculata geopropolis against oral pathogens, its effects on S. mutans biofilms, and the chemical contents of the extracts. A gel prepared with a geopropolis extract was also analyzed for its activity on S. mutans and its immunotoxicological potential. Methods Antimicrobial activities of three hydroalcoholic extracts (HAEs) of geopropolis, and hexane and chloroform fractions of one extract, were evaluated using the agar diffusion method and the broth dilution technique. Ethanol (70%, v/v) and chlorhexidine (0.12%, w/w) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Total phenol and flavonoid concentrations were assayed by spectrophotometry. Immunotoxicity was evaluated in mice by topical application in the oral cavity followed by quantification of biochemical and immunological parameters, and macro-microscopic analysis of animal organs. Results Two extracts, HAE-2 and HAE-3, showed inhibition zones ranging from 9 to 13 mm in diameter for S. mutans and C. albicans, but presented no activity against L. acidophilus. The MBCs for HAE-2 and HAE-3 against S. mutans were 6.25 mg/mL and 12.5 mg/mL, respectively. HAE-2 was fractionated, and its chloroform fraction had an MBC of 14.57 mg/mL. HAE-2 also exhibited bactericidal effects on S. mutans biofilms after 3 h of treatment. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in total phenol and flavonoid concentrations were observed among the samples. Signs toxic effects were not observed after application of the geopropolis-based gel, but an increase in the production of IL-4 and IL-10, anti-inflammatory cytokines, was detected. Conclusions In summary, geopropolis produced by M. fasciculata can exert antimicrobial action against S. mutans and C. albicans, with significant inhibitory activity against S. mutans biofilms. The extract with the highest flavonoid concentration, HAE-2, presented the highest antimicrobial activity. In addition, a geopropolis-based gel is not toxic in an animal model and displays anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:22053900

2011-01-01

24

Antimicrobial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Dairy Products and Gut: Effect on Pathogens  

PubMed Central

The food industry seeks alternatives to satisfy consumer demands of safe foods with a long shelf-life able to maintain the nutritional and organoleptic quality. The application of antimicrobial compounds-producing protective cultures may provide an additional parameter of processing in order to improve the safety and ensure food quality, keeping or enhancing its sensorial characteristics. In addition, strong evidences suggest that certain probiotic strains can confer resistance against infection with enteric pathogens. Several mechanisms have been proposed to support this phenomenon, including antimicrobial compounds secreted by the probiotics, competitive exclusion, or stimulation of the immune system. Recent research has increasingly demonstrated the role of antimicrobial compounds as protective mechanism against intestinal pathogens and therefore certain strains could have an effect on both the food and the gut. In this aspect, the effects of the combination of different strains keep unknown. The development of multistrain probiotic dairy products with good technological properties and with improved characteristics to those shown by the individual strains, able to act not only as protective cultures in foods, but also as probiotics able to exert a protective action against infections, has gained increased interest.

Rodríguez, Eva; Landete, José María

2015-01-01

25

Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

2015-01-01

26

Antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

2015-03-01

27

[Antimicrobial activity exerted by sodium dichloroisocyanurate].  

PubMed

Sodium dichloroisocyanurate is a chlorinated cleaner. It was used for swimming pool sanitation and for the sterilisation of linen. Not recently ago sodium dichloroisocyanurate has substituted hypochlorite for the sterilisation of infant feeding bottles and teats. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate is soluble in water; this condition causes the hydrolysis of sodium dichloroisocyanurate in hypochlorous acid, that is the active agent, isocyanurate and isocyanurate chlorine. These compounds form a chlorine protein that carry out microbicidal activity. In a toxicology study has been shown that no severe changes in the normal metabolic function occurred, furthermore sodium dichloroisocyanurate has not shown teratogenic effects at the concentration of 200 mg/kg. The antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate was evaluated against Gram negative bacteria such as E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium and against some fungi. This study illustrates a rapid antimicrobial activity using concentrations. Our study concentrated on the antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate in some experimental conditions. We tested 66 strains of fungi, 28 Gram positive bacteria and 29 Gram negative bacteria. We also evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate against protozoa such as Trichomonas vaginalis. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated in cultural conditions and non cultural conditions; in these experiments we observed similar action in both the commercial product and pure substance. In cultural conditions sodium dichloroisocyanurate shows a good activity against fungi and bacteria, moreover it can be observed that the serum didn't interfere with its activity. In a non cultural condition the Candida was killed rapidly by the sodium dichloroisocyanurate but this activity is influenced by the growth phase of the yeast. Against mycelial form such as Penicillium and Aspergillus the sodium dichloroisocyanurate needs a longer contact time than yeast form for its activity. It is interesting to note that well known bacteria, that are resistant to the common antimicrobial agents, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were inhibited by sodium dichloroisocyanurate in a rapid bactericidal action. Our data demonstrates that no significant adverse influence on the activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate was shown by pH and by temperature even if in some experimental conditions increased activity was noticed at pH = 6.6. The sodium dichloroisocyanurate has demonstrated good activity against Trichomonas vaginalis. This fact extends the broad-spectrum activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate to the protozoa. In conclusion, sodium dichloroisocyanurate has demonstrated a good activity against all tested strains, furthermore its activity did not decrease in the presence of 1% of organic substance (serum etc.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2484478

D'Auria, F D; Simonetti, G; Strippoli, V

1989-01-01

28

Antimicrobial Activities of Fidaxomicin  

PubMed Central

Fidaxomicin is bactericidal against Clostridium difficile. The combined results of 8 in vitro studies of 1323 C. difficile isolates showed the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range of fidaxomicin to be ?0.001–1 ?g/mL, with a maximum MIC for inhibition of 90% of organisms (MIC90) of 0.5 ?g/mL. Isolates from 2 phase III clinical trials demonstrated that fidaxomicin MICs of baseline isolates did not predict clinical cure, failure, or recurrence of C. difficile infections. No resistance to fidaxomicin developed during treatment in either study, although a single strain recovered from a cured patient had an elevated MIC of 16 µg/mL at the time of recurrence. For 135 strains, OP-1118, a major metabolite, had an MIC for inhibition of 50% of organisms of 4 ?g/mL and an MIC90 of 8 ?g/mL. Changes in inoculum size (102–105 colony-forming units/spot) or cation concentrations of calcium or magnesium appeared to have no effect on fidaxomicin MICs. Fidaxomicin has little or no activity against gram-negative aerobes and anaerobes or yeast. PMID:22752863

Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Babakhani, Farah; Citron, Diane M.

2012-01-01

29

Effect of water-aging on the antimicrobial activities of an ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin  

PubMed Central

Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS), an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) functionalized with polymerizable methacrylate groups and an antimicrobial agent with a long lipophilic alkyl chain quaternary ammonium group, was synthesized through a silane-based sol–gel route. By dissolving QAMS in methyl methacrylate monomer, this ORMOSIL molecule was incorporated into an auto-polymerizing, powder/liquid orthodontic acrylic resin system, yielding QAMS-containing poly (methyl methacrylate). The QAMS-containing acrylic resin showed a predominant contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 35668) and Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) on the acrylic surface. The antimicrobial activities of QAMS-containing acrylic resin were maintained after a 3 month water-aging period. Bromophenol blue assay showed minimal leaching of quaternary ammonium species when an appropriate amount of QAMS (<4 wt.%) was incorporated into the acrylic resin. The results suggest that QAMS is predominantly co-polymerized with the poly(methyl methacrylate) network, and only a minuscule amount of free QAMS molecules is present within the polymer network after water-aging. Acrylic resin with persistent antimicrobial activities represents a promising method for preventing bacteria- and fungus-induced stomatitis, an infectious disease commonly associated with the wearing of removable orthodontic appliances. PMID:23485857

Gong, Shi-qiang; Epasinghe, D. Jeevanie; Zhou, Bin; Niu, Li-na; Kimmerling, Kirk A.; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mao, Jing; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

2013-01-01

30

Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, antimicrobial activity and photodynamic effects of some thiabendazole complexes.  

PubMed

An interesting series of metal complexes of thiabendazole (tbz) is synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses and spectroscopic studies. The crystal structure of the hydrogen bonded one dimensional Co(II) complex, namely [Co(tbz)(2)(NO(3))(H(2)O)](NO(3)) is solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in monoclinic space group P2(1)/a with unit cell parameters, a=14.366(2), b=11.459(4), c=15.942(3) A, beta=113.78(3) degrees and z=4. The unit cell packing reveals an extensive hydrogen bonding involving a water molecule, nitrate ligands and the protonated nitrogen atoms of the tbz ligands, resulting in a one dimensional hydrogen bonding pattern. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes against selected bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) and yeast (Aspergillus flavues) is estimated. The relationship between the enzymatic production of ROS and antimicrobial activity of the complexes is examined, and a good correlation between two factors is found. Photodynamic quantum yields of singlet oxygen production (RNO bleaching assay) and rate of superoxide generation (SOD inhibitable ferricytochrome c reduction assay and EPR spin trapping experiments using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide as spin trap) by the metal complexes have been studied. PMID:14729312

Mothilal, K K; Karunakaran, Chandran; Rajendran, Ayyapan; Murugesan, Ramachandran

2004-02-01

31

?-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure  

PubMed Central

Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammations are among some of the most prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt ?-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the ?-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, ?-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules. PMID:24756162

Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

2014-01-01

32

Magnesium Based Materials and their Antimicrobial Activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The overall goals of this body of work were to characterize the antimicrobial properties of magnesium (Mg) metal and nano-magnesium oxide (nMgO) in vitro, to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Mg metal, and to incorporate MgO nanoparticles into a polymeric implant coating and evaluate its in vitro antimicrobial properties. In the course of this work it was found that Mg metal, Mg-mesh, and nMgO have in vitro antimicrobial properties that are similar to a bactericidal antibiotic. For Mg metal, the mechanism of this activity appears to be related to an increase in pH (i.e. a more alkaline environment) and not an increase in Mg2+. Given that Mg-mesh is a Mg metal powder, the assumption is that it has the same mechanism of activity as Mg metal. The mechanism of activity for nMgO remains to be elucidated and may be related to a combination of interaction of the nanoparticles with the bacteria and the alkaline pH. It was further demonstrated that supernatants from suspensions of Mg-mesh and nMgO had the same antimicrobial effect as was noted when the particles were used. The supernatant from Mg-mesh and nMgO was also noted to prevent biofilm formation for two Staphylococcus strains. Finally, poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) composites of Mg-mesh (PCL+Mg-mesh) and nMgO (PCL+nMgO) were produced. Coatings applied to screws inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in thin disc format inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in addition to the E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Pure Mg metal was noted to have some cytotoxic effect on murine fibroblast and osteoblast cell lines, although this effect needs to be characterized further. To address the need for an in vivo model for evaluating implant associated infections, a new closed fracture osteomyelitis model in the femur of the rat was developed. Magnesium, a readily available and inexpensive metal was shown to have antimicrobial properties that appear to be related to its corrosion products and that nMgO has similar effects. Incorporation of nMgO into a PCL composite was easily achieved and revealed similar, although not identical antimicrobial results. This work has provided a strong foundation and methodology for further evaluation of Mg based materials and their antimicrobial properties.

Robinson, Duane Allan

33

Antimicrobial activity of Gymnema sylvestre leaf extract  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ethanolic extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Bacillus pumilis, B. subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and inactivity against Proteus vulgaris and Escherichiacoli.

R. K. Satdive; P. Abhilash; Devanand P. Fulzele

2003-01-01

34

Antimicrobial activity of preparation Bioaron C.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity of sirupus Bioaron C, a preparation, whose main ingredient is an extract from the leaves of Aloe arborescens, was tested against different microorganisms isolated from patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The experiments were performed on 40 strains: 20 strains of anaerobic bacteria, 13 strains of aerobic bacteria and 7 strains of yeast-like fungi from the genus Candida and on 18 reference strains (ATCC). The antimicrobial activity of Bioaron C (MBC and MFC) was determined at undiluted concentration. Bioaron C proved to be very effective against the microorganisms causing infections. At the concentration recommended by the producer, the preparation showed biocidal activity (MBC, MFC) against the strains of the pathogenic microorganisms, which cause respiratory infections most frequently, including, among others, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Parvimonas micra, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus anginosus, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, already after 15 min. The MIC of Bioaron C against most of the tested microorganisms was 5 to 100 times lower than the usually applied concentration. The great antimicrobial activity means that the preparation may be used in the prevention and treatment of infections of the upper respiratory tract. Bioaron C may be an alternative or complement to classical therapy, especially in children. PMID:25362808

Gawron-Gzella, Anne; Michalak, Anna; K?dzia, Anna

2014-01-01

35

Investigation on the effect of RF air plasma and neem leaf extract treatment on the surface modification and antimicrobial activity of cotton fabric  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A thorough investigation on the antimicrobial activity of RF air plasma and azadirachtin (neem leaf extract) treated cotton fabric has been dealt with in this paper. The cotton fabric was given a RF air plasma treatment to improve its hydrophilicity. The process parameters such as electrode gap, time of exposure and RF power have been varied to study their effect in improving the hydrophilicity of the cotton fabric and they were optimized based on the static immersion test results. The neem leaf extract (azadirachtin) was applied on fabric samples to impart antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial efficacy of the samples have been analysed and compared with the efficacy of the cotton fabric treated with the antimicrobial finish alone. The investigation reveals that the RF air plasma has modified the surface of the fabric, which in turn increased the antimicrobial activity of the fabric when treated with azadirachtin. The surface modification due to RF air plasma treatment has been analysed by comparing the FTIR spectra of the untreated and plasma treated samples. The molecular interaction between the fabric, azadirachtin and citric acid which was used as a cross linking agent to increase the durability of the antimicrobial finish has also been analysed using FTIR spectra.

Vaideki, K.; Jayakumar, S.; Rajendran, R.; Thilagavathi, G.

2008-02-01

36

A novel beta-defensin antimicrobial peptide in Atlantic cod with stimulatory effect on phagocytic activity.  

PubMed

A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1-5, 2-4 and 3-6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an ?/? fold with one ? helix and ?1?2?3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4-0.8 µM and 25-50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F; Karlsen, Bĺrd Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M O

2013-01-01

37

A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity  

PubMed Central

A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an ?/? fold with one ? helix and ?1?2?3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bĺrd Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

2013-01-01

38

Antimicrobial Activity against Intraosteoblastic Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

Although Staphylococcus aureus persistence in osteoblasts, partly as small-colony variants (SCVs), can contribute to bone and joint infection (BJI) relapses, the intracellular activity of antimicrobials is not currently considered in the choice of treatment strategies for BJI. Here, antistaphylococcal antimicrobials were evaluated for their intraosteoblastic activity and their impact on the intracellular emergence of SCVs in an ex vivo osteoblast infection model. Osteoblastic MG63 cells were infected for 2 h with HG001 S. aureus. After killing the remaining extracellular bacteria with lysostaphin, infected cells were incubated for 24 h with antimicrobials at the intraosseous concentrations reached with standard therapeutic doses. Intracellular bacteria and SCVs were then quantified by plating cell lysates. A bactericidal effect was observed with fosfomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, oxacillin, rifampin, ofloxacin, and clindamycin, with reductions in the intracellular inocula of -2.5, -3.1, -3.9, -4.2, -4.9, -4.9, and -5.2 log10 CFU/100,000 cells, respectively (P < 10(-4)). Conversely, a bacteriostatic effect was observed with ceftaroline and teicoplanin, whereas vancomycin and daptomycin had no significant impact on intracellular bacterial growth. Ofloxacin, daptomycin, and vancomycin significantly limited intracellular SCV emergence. Overall, ofloxacin was the only molecule to combine an excellent intracellular activity while limiting the emergence of SCVs. These data provide a basis for refining the choice of antibiotics to prioritise in the management of BJI, justifying the combination of a fluoroquinolone for its intracellular activity with an anti-biofilm molecule, such as rifampin. PMID:25605365

Valour, Florent; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Riffard, Natacha; Tasse, Jason; Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Chidiac, Christian; Vandenesch, François; Ferry, Tristan; Laurent, Frédéric

2015-04-01

39

Antimicrobial activity of flowers from Anthemis cotula.  

PubMed

The flavonoid containing total extract of Anthemis cotula flowers, tested at the concentration of 200 microg/ml, showed interesting antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive microorganisms. PMID:11077183

Quarenghi, M V; Tereschuk, M L; Baigori, M D; Abdala, L R

2000-12-01

40

Antimicrobial activity of flowers from Anthemis cotula  

Microsoft Academic Search

The flavonoid containing total extract of Anthemis cotula flowers, tested at the concentration of 200 ?g\\/ml, showed interesting antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive microorganisms.

M. V Quarenghi; M. L Tereschuk; M. D Baigori; L. R Abdala

2000-01-01

41

Antimicrobial activity of borate-buffered solutions.  

PubMed Central

A minimal salts medium adjusted to physiological pH and osmolality was buffered with either 0.3% phosphate or 1.2% borate and evaluated for antimicrobial activity. The borate-buffered medium, either with or without a carbon source, exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against 15 Pseudomonas strains, 12 strains of enteric bacteria, and 7 strains of staphylococci. The borate-buffered system appears suitable for use as a generic vehicle for ophthalmic pharmaceutical agents. PMID:3729341

Houlsby, R D; Ghajar, M; Chavez, G O

1986-01-01

42

Chemical composition, cytotoxicity effect and antimicrobial activity of Ceratonia siliqua essential oil with preservative effects against Listeria inoculated in minced beef meat.  

PubMed

The present study describes the phytochemical profile and the protective effects of Ceratonia siliqua pods essential oil (CsEO), a food and medicinal plant widely distributed in Tunisia. Twenty five different components were identified in the CsEO. Among them, the major detected components were: Nonadecane, Heneicosane , Naphthalene, 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid dibutylester, Heptadecane, Hexadecanoic acid, Octadecanoic acid, 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, Phenyl ethyl tiglate, Eicosene, Farnesol 3, Camphor, Nerolidol and n-Eicosane. The antimicrobial activity of CsEO was evaluated against a panel of 13 bacteria and 8 fungal strains using agar diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Results have shown that CsEO exhibited moderate to strong antimicrobial activity against the tested species. In addition, the inhibitory effect of this CsEO was evaluated in vivo against a foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes, experimentally inoculated in minced beef meat (2×10(2) CFU/g of meat) amended with different concentrations of the CsEO and stored at 7 °C for 10 days. The antibacterial activity of CsEO in minced beef meat was clearly evident and its presence led to a strong inhibitory effect against the pathogens at 7 °C. On the other hand, the cytotoxic effects of the essential oil against two tumoral human cell lines HeLa and MCF-7 were examined by MTT assay. The CsEO showed an inhibition of both cell lines with significantly stronger activity against HeLa cells. The IC(50) values were 210 and 800 ?g/ml for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Overall, results presented here suggest that the EO of C. siliqua possesses antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties, and is therefore a potential source of active ingredients for food and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:21601302

Hsouna, Anis Ben; Trigui, Mohamed; Mansour, Riadh Ben; Jarraya, Raoudha Mezghani; Damak, Mohamed; Jaoua, Samir

2011-07-15

43

Anion effects on anti-microbial activity of poly[1-vinyl-3-(2-sulfoethyl imidazolium betaine)].  

PubMed

Recent investigations in the anti-microbial properties of the functional polymers are predominantly focused on the structure of the cationic moieties. In the present study, we investigated that the nature of the anion present in polysulfobetaines affects activity against certain microorganisms and their anti-microbial properties have been rationalized in terms of the structure-activity relationship. Vinyl imidazolium-based polysulfobetaines were prepared by the quaternization of poly(N-vinyl imidazole) with sodium salt of 2-bromo ethanesulfonic acid. The bromide counter anion of the resulting polymer was exchanged with different anions to generate a series of polymers. These were characterized by FTIR, DSC, XRD, SEM, elemental analysis (C, H, N and S) and viscosity measurements. The anti-microbial activity studies were carried against three fungi (Aspergillus niger, Byssochlamys fulva and Mucor circenelliods) and two bacteria (Bacillus coagulans BTS-3 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa BTS-2). The nature of the anion affects the structure of polysulfobetaine by realignment of polymer chains. The anion-dependent anti-microbial properties of polysulfobetaines result from the interaction of the microbes at the polymer interface. PMID:20060120

Garg, Godawari; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S; Gupta, Reena; Ahn, J-H

2010-04-01

44

Development of elastin-like recombinamer films with antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

In the present work we explored the ABP-CM4 peptide properties from Bombyx mori for the creation of biopolymers with broad antimicrobial activity. An antimicrobial recombinant protein-based polymer (rPBP) was designed by cloning the DNA sequence coding for ABP-CM4 in frame with the N-terminus of the elastin-like recombinamer consisting of 200 repetitions of the pentamer VPAVG, here named A200. The new rPBP, named CM4-A200, was purified via a simplified nonchromatographic method, making use of the thermoresponsive behavior of the A200 polymer. ABP-CM4 peptide was also purified through the incorporation of a formic acid cleavage site between the peptide and the A200 sequence. In soluble state the antimicrobial activity of both CM4-A200 polymer and ABP-CM4 peptide was poorly effective. However, when the CM4-A200 polymer was processed into free-standing films high antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi was observed. The antimicrobial activity of CM4-A200 was dependent on the physical contact of cells with the film surface. Furthermore, CM4-A200 films did not reveal a cytotoxic effect against both normal human skin fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. Finally, we have developed an optimized ex vivo assay with pig skin demonstrating the antimicrobial properties of the CM4-A200 cast films for skin applications. PMID:25580615

da Costa, André; Machado, Raul; Ribeiro, Artur; Collins, Tony; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Gomes, Andreia C; Casal, Margarida

2015-02-01

45

A novel chimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

Beta-lactamase-mediated bacterial drug resistance exacerbates the prognosis of infectious diseases, which are sometimes treated with co-administration of beta-lactam type antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors. Antimicrobial peptides are promising broad-spectrum alternatives to conventional antibiotics in this era of evolving bacterial resistance. Peptides based on the Ala46-Tyr51 beta-hairpin loop of beta-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) have been previously shown to inhibit beta-lactamase. Here, our goal was to modify this peptide for improved beta-lactamase inhibition and cellular uptake. Motivated by the cell-penetrating pVEC sequence, which includes a hydrophobic stretch at its N-terminus, our approach involved the addition of LLIIL residues to the inhibitory peptide N-terminus to facilitate uptake. Activity measurements of the peptide based on the 45-53 loop of BLIP for enhanced inhibition verified that the peptide was a competitive beta-lactamase inhibitor with a Ki value of 58??M. Incubation of beta-lactam-resistant cells with peptide decreased the number of viable cells, while it had no effect on beta-lactamase-free cells, indicating that this peptide had antimicrobial activity via beta-lactamase inhibition. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which this peptide moves across the membrane, steered molecular dynamics simulations were carried out. We propose that addition of hydrophobic residues to the N-terminus of the peptide affords a promising strategy in the design of novel antimicrobial peptides not only against beta-lactamase but also for other intracellular targets. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25597294

Alaybeyoglu, Begum; Sariyar Akbulut, Berna; Ozkirimli, Elif

2015-04-01

46

Synergistic effect and antibiofilm activity between the antimicrobial peptide coprisin and conventional antibiotics against opportunistic bacteria.  

PubMed

Coprisin is a 43-mer defensin-like peptide from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus. In this study, we tested its minimum inhibitory concentration and performed combination assays to confirm the antibacterial susceptibility of coprisin and synergistic effects with antibiotics. The synergistic effects were evaluated by testing the effects of coprisin in combination with ampicillin, vancomycin, and chloramphenicol. The results showed that coprisin possessed antibacterial properties and had synergistic activities with the antibiotics. To understand the synergistic mechanism(s), we conducted hydroxyl radical assays. Coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics generated hydroxyl radicals, which are highly reactive oxygen forms and the major property of bactericidal agents. Furthermore, the antibiofilm effect of coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics was investigated. Biofilm formation is the source of many relentless and chronic bacterial infections. The results indicated that coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics also had antibiofilm activity. Therefore, we conclude that coprisin has the potential to be used as a combinatorial therapeutic agent for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. PMID:23053486

Hwang, In-sok; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Hwang, Ji Hong; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Yangmee; Lee, Dong Gun

2013-01-01

47

Antimicrobial activity of some Indian mosses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts of 15 Indian mosses. The antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts was investigated against five G(+) and six G(?) bacterial strains. Antimycotic activity was assayed against 8 fungi. Sphagnum junghuhnianum, Barbula javanica, Barbula arcuata, Brachythecium populeum, Brachythecium rutabulum, Mnium marginatum and Entodon cf rubicundus were found to be

Meenakshi Singh; A. K. S. Rawat; R. Govindarajan

2007-01-01

48

Antimicrobial activity of different Finnish monofloral honeys against human pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

The antimicrobial activity and phenolic compounds of five Finnish honey products against important human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus were analyzed. Microbroth dilution method and HPLC-DAD were used in antimicrobial testing and phenolic compound determination, respectively. Significant antimicrobial activity (p?antimicrobial activity of Finnish monofloral honeys against streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria. To our knowledge this is also the first report on the antimicrobial effect of honey against S. pneumoniae. PMID:23278378

Huttunen, Sanna; Riihinen, Kaisu; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

2013-01-01

49

Antimicrobial activity of different Finnish monofloral honeys against human pathogenic bacteria.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity and phenolic compounds of five Finnish honey products against important human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus were analyzed. Microbroth dilution method and HPLC-DAD were used in antimicrobial testing and phenolic compound determination, respectively. Significant antimicrobial activity (p < 0.01) against all the tested pathogens was found from willow herb (Epilobium angustifolium), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) honeys. This is the first report on antimicrobial activity of Finnish monofloral honeys against streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria. To our knowledge this is also the first report on the antimicrobial effect of honey against S. pneumoniae. PMID:23278378

Huttunen, Sanna; Riihinen, Kaisu; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

2013-09-01

50

Medicinal plants and antimicrobial activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present paper, we analyze the past, present and future of medicinal plants, both as potential antimicrobial crude drugs as well as a source for natural compounds that act as new anti-infection agents. In the past few decades, the search for new anti-infection agents has occupied many research groups in the field of ethnopharmacology. When we reviewed the number

J. L. Ríos; M. C. Recio

2005-01-01

51

Antimicrobial activity of microencapsulated lemongrass essential oil and the effect of experimental parameters on microcapsules size and morphology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lemongrass (Cymbopogom citratus) essential oil, known due to its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, was microencapsulated by simple coacervation. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA, 78,000 Da and 88 mol% degree of hydrolysis) crosslinked with glutaraldehyde was used as wall-forming polymer. The influence of stirring rate and oil volume fraction on the microcapsule size distribution were evaluated. Sodium dodecil sulphate (SDS) and Poly(vinyl pirrolidone) were tested in

Fernanda V. Leimann; Odinei H. Gonçalves; Ricardo A. F. Machado; Ariovaldo Bolzan

2009-01-01

52

Synergistic antimicrobial activities of natural essential oils with chitosan films.  

PubMed

The synergistic antimicrobial activities of three natural essential oils (i.e., clove bud oil, cinnamon oil, and star anise oil) with chitosan films were investigated. Cinnamon oil had the best antimicrobial activity among three oils against Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Aspergillus oryzae , and Penicillium digitatum . The chitosan solution exhibited good inhibitory effects on the above bacteria except the fungi, whereas chitosan film had no remarkable antimicrobial activity. The cinnamon oil-chitosan film exhibited a synergetic effect by enhancing the antimicrobial activities of the oil, which might be related to the constant release of the oil. The cinnamon oil-chitosan film had also better antimicrobial activity than the clove bud oil-chitosan film. The results also showed that the compatibility of cinnamon oil with chitosan in film formation was better than that of the clove bud oil with chitosan. However, the incorporated oils modified the mechanical strengths, water vapor transmission rate, moisture content, and solubility of the chitosan film. Furthermore, chemical reaction took place between cinnamon oil and chitosan, whereas phase separation occurred between clove bud oil and chitosan. PMID:22034912

Wang, Lina; Liu, Fei; Jiang, Yanfeng; Chai, Zhi; Li, Pinglan; Cheng, Yongqiang; Jing, Hao; Leng, Xiaojing

2011-12-14

53

Multidrug pump inhibitors uncover remarkable activity of plant antimicrobials.  

PubMed

Plant antimicrobials are not used as systemic antibiotics at present. The main reason for this is their low level of activity, especially against gram-negative bacteria. The reported MIC is often in the range of 100 to 1,000 micro g/ml, orders of magnitude higher than those of common broad-spectrum antibiotics from bacteria or fungi. Major plant pathogens belong to the gram-negative bacteria, which makes the low level of activity of plant antimicrobials against this group of microorganisms puzzling. Gram-negative bacteria have an effective permeability barrier, comprised of the outer membrane, which restricts the penetration of amphipathic compounds, and multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs), which extrude toxins across this barrier. It is possible that the apparent ineffectiveness of plant antimicrobials is largely due to the permeability barrier. We tested this hypothesis in the present study by applying a combination of MDR mutants and MDR inhibitors. A panel of plant antimicrobials was tested by using a set of bacteria representing the main groups of plant pathogens. The human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were also tested. The results show that the activities of the majority of plant antimicrobials were considerably greater against the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus megaterium and that disabling of the MDRs in gram-negative species leads to a striking increase in antimicrobial activity. Thus, the activity of rhein, the principal antimicrobial from rhubarb, was potentiated 100- to 2,000-fold (depending on the bacterial species) by disabling the MDRs. Comparable potentiation of activity was observed with plumbagin, resveratrol, gossypol, coumestrol, and berberine. Direct measurement of the uptake of berberine, a model plant antimicrobial, confirmed that disabling of the MDRs strongly increases the level of penetration of berberine into the cells of gram-negative bacteria. These results suggest that plants might have developed means of delivering their antimicrobials into bacterial cells. These findings also suggest that plant antimicrobials might be developed into effective, broad-spectrum antibiotics in combination with inhibitors of MDRs. PMID:12234835

Tegos, George; Stermitz, Frank R; Lomovskaya, Olga; Lewis, Kim

2002-10-01

54

Multidrug Pump Inhibitors Uncover Remarkable Activity of Plant Antimicrobials  

PubMed Central

Plant antimicrobials are not used as systemic antibiotics at present. The main reason for this is their low level of activity, especially against gram-negative bacteria. The reported MIC is often in the range of 100 to 1,000 ?g/ml, orders of magnitude higher than those of common broad-spectrum antibiotics from bacteria or fungi. Major plant pathogens belong to the gram-negative bacteria, which makes the low level of activity of plant antimicrobials against this group of microorganisms puzzling. Gram-negative bacteria have an effective permeability barrier, comprised of the outer membrane, which restricts the penetration of amphipathic compounds, and multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs), which extrude toxins across this barrier. It is possible that the apparent ineffectiveness of plant antimicrobials is largely due to the permeability barrier. We tested this hypothesis in the present study by applying a combination of MDR mutants and MDR inhibitors. A panel of plant antimicrobials was tested by using a set of bacteria representing the main groups of plant pathogens. The human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were also tested. The results show that the activities of the majority of plant antimicrobials were considerably greater against the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus megaterium and that disabling of the MDRs in gram-negative species leads to a striking increase in antimicrobial activity. Thus, the activity of rhein, the principal antimicrobial from rhubarb, was potentiated 100- to 2,000-fold (depending on the bacterial species) by disabling the MDRs. Comparable potentiation of activity was observed with plumbagin, resveratrol, gossypol, coumestrol, and berberine. Direct measurement of the uptake of berberine, a model plant antimicrobial, confirmed that disabling of the MDRs strongly increases the level of penetration of berberine into the cells of gram-negative bacteria. These results suggest that plants might have developed means of delivering their antimicrobials into bacterial cells. These findings also suggest that plant antimicrobials might be developed into effective, broad-spectrum antibiotics in combination with inhibitors of MDRs. PMID:12234835

Tegos, George; Stermitz, Frank R.; Lomovskaya, Olga; Lewis, Kim

2002-01-01

55

Antimicrobial Activity of Root Bark of Salacia reticulata.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial activity of chloroform and methanolic extracts of Salacia reticulata were tested against gram positive, gram negative and fungus strains using zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentrations. It was observed that both extracts have inhibitory effect towards all microorganisms used in the test. Chloroform extract was more effective than methanolic extract. PMID:22557181

Choudhary, G P; Vijay Kanth, M S

2005-07-01

56

Effect of antimicrobial peptides on ATPase activity and proton pumping in plasma membrane vesicles obtained from mycobacteria.  

PubMed

The potential usefulness of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as antimycobacterial compounds has not been extensively explored. Although a myriad of studies on AMPs from different sources have been done, some of its mechanisms of action are still unknown. Maganins are of particular interest since they do not lyse non-dividing mammalian cells. In this work, AMPs with well-recognized activity against bacteria were synthesized, characterized, purified and their antimycobacterial activity and influence on ATPase activity in mycobacterial plasma membrane vesicles were assessed. Using bioinformatics tools, a magainin-I analog peptide (MIAP) with improved antimicrobial activity was designed. The influence of MIAP on proton (H(+)) pumping mediated by F(1)F(0)-ATPase in plasma membrane vesicles obtained from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was evaluated. We observed that the antimycobacterial activity of AMPs was low and variable. However, the activity of the designed peptide MIAP against M. tuberculosis was 2-fold higher in comparison to magainin-I. The basal ATPase activity of mycobacterial plasma membrane vesicles decreased approximately 24-30% in the presence of AMPs. On the other hand, the MIAP peptide completely abolished the F(1)F(0)-ATPase activity involved in H(+) pumping across M. tuberculosis plasma membranes vesicles at levels similar to the specific inhibitor N,N' dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. These finding suggest that AMPs can inhibit the H(+) pumping F(1)F(0)-ATPase of mycobacterial plasma membrane that potentially interferes the internal pH and viability of mycobacteria. PMID:22569076

Santos, Paola; Gordillo, Aldemar; Osses, Luis; Salazar, Luz-Mary; Soto, Carlos-Yesid

2012-07-01

57

Antimicrobial Activity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants Against Enterococcus  

E-print Network

Antimicrobial Activity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants Against Enterococcus faecalis By Daniel setting against the antibiotic-resistant pathogen, Enterococcus faecalis. This was accomplished by first. #12;Antimicrobial Activity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants Against Enterococcus faecalis Introduction

Firestone, Jeremy

58

Phytotoxic and antimicrobial activities of catechin derivatives.  

PubMed

(+/-)-Catechin is a potent phytotoxin, with the phytotoxicity due entirely to the (-)-catechin enantiomer. (+)-Catechin, but not the (-)-enantiomer, has antibacterial and antifungal activities. Tetramethoxy, pentaacetoxy, and cyclic derivatives of (+/-)-catechin retained phytotoxicity. The results indicate that antioxidant properties of catechins are not a determining factor for phytotoxicity. A similar conclusion was reached for the antimicrobial properties. Centaurea maculosa (spotted knapweed) exudes (+/-)-catechin from its roots, but the flavanol is not re-absorbed and hence the weed is not affected. The much less polar tetramethoxy derivative may, however, be absorbed and hence be able to cause toxicity. Because of the combination of phytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity, (+/-)-catechin could be a useful natural herbicide and antimicrobial. PMID:14995101

Veluri, Ravikanth; Weir, Tiffany L; Bais, Harsh Pal; Stermitz, Frank R; Vivanco, Jorge M

2004-03-10

59

Antimicrobial activity of some Indian mosses.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts of 15 Indian mosses. The antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts was investigated against five G(+) and six G(-) bacterial strains. Antimycotic activity was assayed against 8 fungi. Sphagnum junghuhnianum, Barbula javanica, Barbula arcuata, Brachythecium populeum, Brachythecium rutabulum, Mnium marginatum and Entodon cf rubicundus were found to be most active against all the organisms. PMID:17161558

Singh, Meenakshi; Rawat, A K S; Govindarajan, R

2007-02-01

60

Poisson Parameters of Antimicrobial Activity: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Approach  

PubMed Central

A contingency of observed antimicrobial activities measured for several compounds vs. a series of bacteria was analyzed. A factor analysis revealed the existence of a certain probability distribution function of the antimicrobial activity. A quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis for the overall antimicrobial ability was conducted using the population statistics associated with identified probability distribution function. The antimicrobial activity proved to follow the Poisson distribution if just one factor varies (such as chemical compound or bacteria). The Poisson parameter estimating antimicrobial effect, giving both mean and variance of the antimicrobial activity, was used to develop structure-activity models describing the effect of compounds on bacteria and fungi species. Two approaches were employed to obtain the models, and for every approach, a model was selected, further investigated and found to be statistically significant. The best predictive model for antimicrobial effect on bacteria and fungi species was identified using graphical representation of observed vs. calculated values as well as several predictive power parameters. PMID:22606039

Sestra?, Radu E.; Jäntschi, Lorentz; Bolboac?, Sorana D.

2012-01-01

61

Nitric oxide produced in Peyer's patches exhibits antiapoptotic activity contributing to an antimicrobial effect in murine salmonellosis.  

PubMed

Salmonella species normally infect hosts via the oral-fecal route. We previously reported that NO had potent host defense functions in murine salmonellosis, not only via a direct antibacterial effect but also because it was cytoprotective for infected host cells. Here, we used an oral route to infect iNOS-deficient mice infected with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium to further investigate the cytoprotective role of NO in preventing damage caused by Salmonella organisms in PP. Oral bacterial challenge (2 x 10(5) CFU, or >100 LD(50)) produced a more severe infection and greater lethality in iNOS-deficient mice than in iNOS-competent mice. We used specific antibodies to S. enterica Typhimurium, neutrophils, iNOS, nitrotyrosine, and dendritic cells (CD11c-positive) in histochemical and immunohistochemical studies to examine infected PP tissues. S. enterica Typhimurium colonization in PP from iNOS-deficient mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type mice. Histochemical assays showed extensive cellular damage in PP. We then examined PP tissues for apoptosis by means of in situ TUNEL analysis and by measuring caspase-3 specific activity in tissue homogenates. Increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells and severe granulomatous inflammation with increased infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages were observed during infection in iNOS-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. iNOS-deficient mice had increased numbers of dendritic cells and significantly higher caspase-3-specific activity in PP. These data confirm that NO exerts its protective function not only through direct antibacterial action, but also by preventing apoptosis and thereby contributing to antimicrobial defense during salmonellosis. PMID:18426394

Alam, Mohammad S; Zaki, Mohammad H; Sawa, Tomohiro; Islam, Sabrina; Ahmed, Khandaker A; Fujii, Shigemoto; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Akaike, Takaaki

2008-04-01

62

Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite in endodontics.  

PubMed

One of the major objectives in endodontic therapy is to disinfect the entire root canal system. This goal may be achieved using mechanical instrumenation and chemical irrigation in conjunrction with medication of the root canal between treatment sessions. Microorganisms and their by-products are considered to be the major cause of pulpal and periradicular patholic. In order to reduce or eliminate bacteria and popular tissue remnants, the use of various irrigation solution during treatment have been suggested. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCI), the most common irrigant, is an excellent nonspecific proteolytic and antimicrobial agent. The purpose of this paper is to review the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite. PMID:24494267

Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan

2013-01-01

63

Antimicrobial activity of resin acid derivatives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wide potential of resin acids as bioactive agents gave rise to a growing effort in the search for new applications of the natural forms and their derivatives. In some of these compounds, the antimicrobial activity is associated to the presence in the molecules of functional groups such as the hydroxyl, aldehyde, and ketone or to their cis or trans

Sonia Savluchinske-Feio; Maria Joăo Marcelo Curto; Bárbara Gigante; J. Carlos Roseiro

2006-01-01

64

Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Pycnocycla spinosa Extracts  

PubMed Central

Background: Pycnocycla spinosa (P. spinosa) a member of the Umbelliferae family is traditionally used for treatment of different ailments. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the total phenolic and flavonoid content of P. spinosa extracts (methanol, ethanol and aqueous) and their antioxidant and antimicrobial effects. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of different extracts of P. spinosa was evaluated using micro broth dilution. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were measured. Their antioxidant effect was evaluated using DPPH assay and ?-carotene linoleic acid test. Results: P. spinosa ethanol extract with higher-level phenolic and flavonoid contents showed the highest antioxidant and antimicrobial effects, in comparison with the other extracts. Bacillus sp. and Streptococcus sp. showed higher sensitivity to P. spinosa ethanol extract. Conclusions: P. spinosa ethanol extract can be used as a mouthwash for treatment of the oral infections. More clinical and toxicological studies are required for providing its efficacy. PMID:25237641

Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Kazempour, Nastaran

2014-01-01

65

Antimicrobial activity of millingtonia hortensis leaf extract.  

PubMed

Polar extracts of the leaves of Millingtonia hortensis showed good antimicrobial activity. Twenty different bacterial strains and two yeast cultures were used. The aqueous alcohol extract showed good activity against all microbes tested, particularly Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium , both Gram-negative bacteria, with MIC values of 6.25 µg/ml. The activity is compared with known antibiotics such as gentamycin and nystatin. PMID:21214454

Jetty, A; Iyengar, D S

2000-01-01

66

Antimicrobial activity of alcohols from Musca domestica.  

PubMed

Information on the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of cuticular alcohols on growth and virulence of insecticidal fungi is unavailable. Therefore, we set out to describe the content of cuticular and internal alcohols in the body of housefly larvae, pupae, males and females. The total cuticular alcohols in larvae, males and females of Musca domestica were detected in comparable amounts (4.59, 3.95 and 4.03 ?g g(-1) insect body, respectively), but occurred in smaller quantities in pupae (2.16 ?g g(-1)). The major free alcohol in M. domestica larvae was C(12:0) (70.4%). Internal alcohols of M. domestica larvae were not found. Among cuticular pupae alcohols, C(12:0) (31.0%) was the most abundant. In the internal lipids of pupae, only five alcohols were identified in trace amounts. The most abundant alcohol in males was C(24:0) (57.5%). The percentage content of cuticular C(24:0) in males and females (57.5 and 36.5%, respectively) was significantly higher than that of cuticular lipids in larvae and pupae (0.9 and 5.6%, respectively). Only two alcohols were present in the internal lipids of males in trace amounts (C(18:0) and C(20:0)). The most abundant cuticular alcohols in females were C(24:0) (36.5%) and C(12:0) (26.8%); only two alcohols (C(18:0) and C(20:0)) were detected in comparable amounts in internal lipids (3.61±0.32 and 5.01±0.42 ?g g(-1), respectively). For isolated alcohols, antimicrobial activity against 10 reference strains of bacteria and fungi was determined. Individual alcohols showed approximately equal activity against fungal strains. C(14:0) was effective against gram-positive bacteria, whereas gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all tested alcohols. Mixtures of alcohols found in cuticular lipids of larvae, pupae, males and females of M. domestica generally presented higher antimicrobial activity than individual alcohols. In contrast, crude extracts containing both cuticular and internal lipids showed no antifungal activity against the entomopathogenic fungus Conidiobolus coronatus, which efficiently kills adult house flies. PMID:22693023

Go??biowski, Marek; Dawgul, Ma?gorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Bogu?, Mieczys?awa I; Wieloch, Wioletta; W?óka, Emilia; Paszkiewicz, Monika; Przybysz, El?bieta; Stepnowski, Piotr

2012-10-01

67

Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Activities of PR-39 Derived Peptides  

PubMed Central

The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal) amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-? production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:24755622

Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Agustiandari, Herfita; van Dijk, Albert; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Johanna L. M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

2014-01-01

68

Novel ?-MSH Peptide Analogues with Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity  

PubMed Central

Previous investigations indicate that ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?-MSH) and certain synthetic analogues of it exert antimicrobial effects against bacteria and yeasts. However, these molecules have weak activity in standard microbiology conditions and this hampers a realistic clinical use. The aim in the present study was to identify novel peptides with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in growth medium. To this purpose, the Gly10 residue in the [DNal(2?)-7, Phe-12]-MSH(6–13) sequence was replaced with conventional and unconventional amino acids with different degrees of conformational rigidity. Two derivatives in which Gly10 was replaced by the residues Aic and Cha, respectively, had substantial activity against Candida strains, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. krusei and against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Conformational analysis indicated that the helical structure along residues 8–13 is a key factor in antimicrobial activity. Synthetic analogues of ?-MSH can be valuable agents to treat infections in humans. The structural preferences associated with antimicrobial activity identified in this research can help further development of synthetic melanocortins with enhanced biological activity. PMID:23626703

Auriemma, Luigia; Limatola, Antonio; Di Maro, Salvatore; Merlino, Francesco; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Luca, Vincenzo; Di Grazia, Antonio; Gatti, Stefano; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Novellino, Ettore; Catania, Anna

2013-01-01

69

Molybdenum doped titanium dioxide photocatalytic coatings for use as hygienic surfaces: the effect of soiling on antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) surfaces doped with molybdenum (Mo) were investigated to determine if their photocatalytic ability could enhance process hygiene in the brewery industry. Doping TiO2 with Mo showed a 5-log reduction in bacterial counts within 4 to 24?h and a 1-log reduction in yeast numbers within 72?h. The presence of a dilute brewery soil on the surface did not interfere with antimicrobial activity. The TiO2-Mo surface was also active in the dark, showing a 5-log reduction in bacteria within 4 to 24?h and a 1-log reduction in yeast numbers within 72?h, suggesting it could have a novel dual function, being antimicrobial and photocatalytic. The study suggests the TiO2-Mo coating could act as a secondary barrier in helping prevent the build-up of microbial contamination on surfaces within the brewery industry, in particular in between cleaning/disinfection regimes during long production runs. PMID:25184432

Fisher, L; Ostovapour, S; Kelly, P; Whitehead, K A; Cooke, K; Storgĺrds, E; Verran, J

2014-09-01

70

Antimicrobial silver: An unprecedented anion effect  

PubMed Central

Silver is an indispensable metal but its use has to be minimised for sustainable growth. Much of the silver lost during use is unrecoverable; an example being its use as an antimicrobial agent, a property known since ages. While developing methods to create an affordable drinking water purifier especially for the developing world, we discovered that 50 parts per billion (ppb) of Ag+ released continuously from silver nanoparticles confined in nanoscale cages is enough to cause antimicrobial activity in conditions of normal water. Here we show that the antibacterial and antiviral activities of Ag+ can be enhanced ~1,000 fold, selectively, in presence of carbonate ions whose concentration was maintained below the drinking water norms. The protective layers of the organisms were affected during the carbonate-assisted antimicrobial activity. It is estimated that ~1,300 tons of silver can be saved annually using this new way to enhance its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25418185

Swathy, J. R.; Sankar, M. Udhaya; Chaudhary, Amrita; Aigal, Sahaja; Anshup; Pradeep, T.

2014-01-01

71

Antimicrobial silver: An unprecedented anion effect  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silver is an indispensable metal but its use has to be minimised for sustainable growth. Much of the silver lost during use is unrecoverable; an example being its use as an antimicrobial agent, a property known since ages. While developing methods to create an affordable drinking water purifier especially for the developing world, we discovered that 50 parts per billion (ppb) of Ag+ released continuously from silver nanoparticles confined in nanoscale cages is enough to cause antimicrobial activity in conditions of normal water. Here we show that the antibacterial and antiviral activities of Ag+ can be enhanced ~1,000 fold, selectively, in presence of carbonate ions whose concentration was maintained below the drinking water norms. The protective layers of the organisms were affected during the carbonate-assisted antimicrobial activity. It is estimated that ~1,300 tons of silver can be saved annually using this new way to enhance its antimicrobial activity.

Swathy, J. R.; Sankar, M. Udhaya; Chaudhary, Amrita; Aigal, Sahaja; Anshup; Pradeep, T.

2014-11-01

72

Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species  

PubMed Central

The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

Mitrovi?, Tatjana; Stamenkovi?, Slaviša; Cvetkovi?, Vladimir; Toši?, Svetlana; Stankovi?, Milan; Radojevi?, Ivana; Stefanovi?, Olgica; ?omi?, Ljiljana; ?a?i?, Dragana; ?ur?i?, Milena; Markovi?, Snežana

2011-01-01

73

Antimicrobial activity of metronidazole in anaerobic bacteria.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity of metronidazole was investigated in anaerobic bacteria by use of time-viability studies. This antimicrobial agent has a rapid onset of bactericidal activity under proper reducing conditions. The bactericidal rates were not affected by inoculum size or nutritional requirements, nor by inhibition of growth and protein synthesis by chloramphenicol. Using supernatant fractions of actively growing cultures of susceptible organisms, we observed a disappearance of metronidazole and a loss of biological activity, but there was no significant change in preparations from resistant bacteria. The decrease in drug concentration with susceptible cells occurred during the time that its bactericidal action was being exerted. Extracts from susceptible organisms rapidly reduced the concentration of metronidazole, confirming previous observations which suggest that the drug acts as a terminal electron acceptor. Radioisotope experiments with [14C]metronidazole revealed that the compound was taken up by both resistant and susceptible bacteria, although there was a difference in rate and extent of accumulation. These studies demonstrate that metronidazole's antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria is bactericidal and independent of growth rate, and that it involves the uptake and metabolism of the compound. PMID:233729

Tally, F P; Goldin, B R; Sullivan, N; Johnston, J; Gorbach, S L

1978-03-01

74

Antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of herb extracts.  

PubMed

The present study provides a comprehensive data on the antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of extracts from six medicinal plants--blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) leaves, chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) leaves, hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves, lady's mantle (Alchemilla glabra) aerial parts, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) aerial parts and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves. In order to analyze the antioxidant activity of the herbs, several methods (ORAC, TRAP, HORAC and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) were used. Blackberry leaves and meadowsweet extracts revealed the highest antioxidant activities via all methods. All extracts studied blocked almost completely the opsonized zymosan particle-activated ROS production by neutrophils from human whole blood. On the other hand, the effect of extracts on phorbol myristate acetate-activated ROS production was much milder and even nonsignificant in the case of chokeberry leaves. This latter result suggests that extracts (apart from their antioxidative activity) interfere with the signaling cascade of phagocyte activation upstream of the protein kinase C activation. The antimicrobial activity of the investigated extracts against 11 human pathogens was investigated using three different methods. Meadowsweet and blackberry leaves extracts had the highest antimicrobial effect and the lowest minimal inhibiting concentrations (MICs) against the microorganisms tested. PMID:24945135

Denev, Petko; Kratchanova, Maria; Ciz, Milan; Lojek, Antonin; Vasicek, Ondrej; Blazheva, Denitsa; Nedelcheva, Plamena; Vojtek, Libor; Hyrsl, Pavel

2014-01-01

75

Antimicrobial activity of some Indian medicinal plants.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial potential of seventy-seven extracts from twenty-four plants was screened against eight bacteria and four pathogenic fungi, using microbroth dilution assay. Lowest concentration of the extract, which inhibits any visual microbial growth after treatment with p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet, was considered to be minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Water extracts of Acacia nilotica, Justicia zelanica, Lantana camara and Saraca asoca exhibited good activity against all the bacteria tested and the MIC was recorded in range of 9.375-37.5 microg/ml and 75.0-300.0 microg/ml against the bacterial and fungal pathogens, respectively. The other extracts of Phyllanthus urinaria, Thevetia nerifolia, Jatropha gossypifolia Saraca asoca, Tamarindus indica, Aegle marmelos, Acacia nilotica, Chlorophytum borivilianum, Mangifera indica, Woodfordia fruticosa and Phyllanthus emblica showed antimicrobial activity in a range of 75-1200 microg/ml. PMID:20161895

Dabur, Rajesh; Gupta, Amita; Mandal, T K; Singh, Desh Deepak; Bajpai, Vivek; Gurav, A M; Lavekar, G S

2007-01-01

76

Antimicrobial activity of aroma chemicals and essential oils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Determination of the minimum inhibitory concen-trations (MIC) of 212 common soap fragrance raw materials demonstrated that\\u000a the paper disc-petri plate technique does not reflect the relative anti-microbial activity of these materials. Commonly used\\u000a soap bacteriostats were shown to be 100 to 1000 times more effective than the most active fragrance materials. Of 521 fragrance\\u000a materials initially screened by the petri

J. A. Morris; A. Khettry; E. W. Seitz

1979-01-01

77

Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Thymus capitata Essential Oil with Its Preservative Effect against Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated in Minced Beef Meat  

PubMed Central

The chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and the preservative effect of Thymus capitata essential oil against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in minced beef meat were evaluated. The essential oil extracted was chemically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nineteen components were identified, of which carvacrol represented (88.89%) of the oil. The antioxidant activity was assessed in vitro by using both the DPPH and the ABTS assays. The findings showed that the essential oil exhibited high antioxidant activity, which was comparable to the reference standards (BHT and ascorbic acid) with IC50 values of 44.16 and 0.463 ?g/mL determined by the free-radical scavenging DPPH and ABTS assays, respectively. Furthermore, the essential oil was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity using disc agar diffusion and microdilution methods. The results demonstrated that the zone of inhibition varied from moderate to strong (15–80?mm) and the minimum inhibition concentration values ranged from 0.32 to 20?mg/mL. In addition, essential oil evaluated in vivo against Listeria monocytogenes showed clear and strong inhibitory effect. The application of 0.25 or 1% (v/w) essential oil of T. capitata to minced beef significantly reduced the L. monocytogenes population when compared to those of control samples (P-value??<0.01). PMID:24719640

El Abed, Nariman; Kaabi, Belhassen; Smaali, Mohamed Issam; Chabbouh, Meriem; Habibi, Kamel; Mejri, Mondher; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Ben Hadj Ahmed, Sami

2014-01-01

78

Antimicrobial stewardship activities: a survey of Queensland hospitals.  

PubMed

Objective In 2011, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) recommended that all hospitals in Australia must have an Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) program by 2013. Nevertheless, little is known about current AMS activities. This study aimed to determine the AMS activities currently undertaken, and to identify gaps, barriers to implementation and opportunities for improvement in Queensland hospitals. Methods The AMS activities of 26 facilities from 15 hospital and health services in Queensland were surveyed during June 2012 to address strategies for effective AMS: implementing clinical guidelines, formulary restriction, reviewing antimicrobial prescribing, auditing antimicrobial use and selective reporting of susceptibility results. Results The response rate was 62%. Nineteen percent had an AMS team (a dedicated multidisciplinary team consisting of a medically trained staff member and a pharmacist). All facilities had access to an electronic version of Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic, with a further 50% developing local guidelines for antimicrobials. One-third of facilities had additional restrictions. Eighty-eight percent had advice for restricted antimicrobials from in-house infectious disease physicians or clinical microbiologists. Antimicrobials were monitored with feedback given to prescribers at point of care by 76% of facilities. Deficiencies reported as barriers to establishing AMS programs included: pharmacy resources, financial support by hospital management, and training and education in antimicrobial use. Conclusions Several areas for improvement were identified: reviewing antimicrobial prescribing with feedback to the prescriber, auditing, and training and education in antimicrobial use. There also appears to be a lack of resources to support AMS programs in some facilities. What is known about the topic? The ACSQHC has recommended that all hospitals implement an AMS program by 2013 as a requirement of Standard 3 (Preventing and Controlling Healthcare-Associated Infections) of the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards. The intent of AMS is to ensure appropriate prescribing of antimicrobials as part of the broader systems within a health service organisation to prevent and manage healthcare-associated infections, and improve patient safety and quality of care. This criterion also aligns closely with Standard 4: Medication Safety. Despite this recommendation, little is known about what AMS activities are undertaken in these facilities and what additional resources would be required in order to meet these national standards. What does the paper add? This is the first survey that has been conducted of public hospital and health services in Queensland, a large decentralised state in Australia. This paper describes what AMS activities are currently being undertaken, identifies practice gaps, barriers to implementation and opportunities for improvement in Queensland hospitals. What are the implications for practitioners? Several areas for improvement such as reviewing antimicrobial prescribing with feedback to the prescriber, auditing, and training and education in antimicrobial use have been identified. In addition, there appears to be a lack of resources to support AMS programs in some facilities. PMID:25376911

Avent, Minyon L; Hall, Lisa; Davis, Louise; Allen, Michelle; Roberts, Jason A; Unwin, Sean; McIntosh, Kylie A; Thursky, Karin; Buising, Kirsty; Paterson, David L

2014-11-01

79

Antimicrobial activity and biofilm formation inhibition of green tea polyphenols on human teeth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial effects and biofilm formation inhibition of tea polyphenols (TPP) extracted from Korean green tea (Camellia sinensis L) were evaluated against 12 oral microorganisms. Effective antimicrobial activity against all microorganisms tested, including\\u000a Lactobacillus spp. (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum), Streptococcus spp. (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus salivarius), Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter

Yun-Seok Cho; Jay Jooyoung Oh; Kye-Heon Oh

2010-01-01

80

Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of native Rosa sp. from British Columbia, Canada.  

PubMed

Indigenous traditional knowledge and western science have revealed the potential for significant nutritional and therapeutic benefits among natural antioxidants. We investigated antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of rose hip extracts (Rosa nutkana, Rosa pisocarpa and Rosa woodsii) from wild British Columbia populations using liposome oxidation and disc diffusion assays. All extracts exhibited strong antioxidant activity. R. nutkana pericarp extracts contained high phenolic concentrations and showed greater antioxidant and antimicrobial activity than seed extracts. R. woodsii seed extracts had a higher phenolic concentration and greater antioxidant activity than pericarp extracts. Antioxidant activity was correlated with antimicrobial activity, and both extracts showed antimicrobial activity against yeast and Gram-positive bacteria. Our study is the first to demonstrate the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of wild British Columbia roses. The effectiveness of selected species compared with standards demonstrates the significance of this natural resource to the continued health of human populations, and the need for conservation practices. PMID:17514536

Yi, Ocksook; Jovel, Eduardo M; Towers, G H Neil; Wahbe, Tanya R; Cho, Dongwuk

2007-05-01

81

Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus against microbial flora of cervicovaginal infections  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the probiotic nature of Lactobacillus in preventing cervical pathogens by studying the effectiveness of antimicrobial activity against vaginal pathogens. Methods Lactobacilli were isolated from healthy vaginal swabs on selective media and different pathogenic bacteria were isolated by using different selective media. The Lactobacillus strains were tested for the production of hydrogen peroxide and antimicrobial compounds along with probiotic properties. Results Of the 10 isolated Lactobacillus strains, strain 1, 3 and 6 are high hydrogen peroxide producers and the rest were low producers. Results of pH and amines tests indicated that pH increased with fishy odour in the vaginal fluids of cervicovaginal infection patients when compared with vaginal fluids of healthy persons. The isolates were found to be facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-capsule forming and catalase-negative bacilli. The results of antimicrobial activity of compounds indicated that 280 and 140 µg/mL was the minimum concentration to inhibit the growth of both pathogens and test organisms respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrated that Lactobacillus producing antimicrobial compounds inhibits the growth of cervical pathogens, revealing that the hypothesis of preventing vaginal infection by administering probiotic organisms has a great appeal to patients, which colonize the vagina to help, restore and maintain healthy vagina.

Dasari, Subramanyam; Shouri, Raju Naidu Devanaboyaina; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

2014-01-01

82

The Effect of Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Herbal Remedy PADMA 28 on Immunological Angiogenesis and Granulocytes Activity in Mice  

PubMed Central

PADMA 28 is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, angioprotecting, and wound healing properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of this remedy on immunological angiogenesis and granulocytes metabolic activity in Balb/c mice. Mice were fed daily, for seven days, with 5.8?mg of PADMA (calculated from recommended human daily dose) or 0.085?mg (dose in the range of active doses of other herbal extracts studied by us previously). Results. Highly significant increase of newly formed blood vessels number in ex vivo cutaneous lymphocyte-induced angiogenesis test (LIA) after grafting of Balb/c splenocytes from both dosage groups to F1 hybrids (Balb/c × C3H); increase of blood lymphocytes and granulocytes number only in mice fed with lower dose of remedy; and significant suppression of metabolic activity (chemiluminescence test) of blood granulocytes in mice fed with higher dose of PADMA. Conclusion. PADMA 28 behaves as a good stimulator of physiological angiogenesis, but for this purpose it should be used in substantially lower doses than recommended by producers for avoiding the deterioration of granulocyte function. PMID:23864768

Radomska-Le?niewska, Dorota M.; Skopi?ski, Piotr; Zdanowski, Robert; Lewicki, S?awomir; Kocik, Janusz; Skopi?ska-Ró?ewska, Ewa; Stankiewicz, Wanda

2013-01-01

83

Antimicrobial Activity of Nanoemulsion on Cariogenic Planktonic and Biofilm Organisms  

PubMed Central

Introduction Nanoemulsions (NE) are a unique class of disinfectants produced by mixing a water immiscible liquid phase into an aqueous phase under high shear forces. NE have antimicrobial properties and are also effective anti-biofilm agents. Materials and Methods The effectiveness of nanoemulsion and its components was determined against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei by live/dead staining. In vitro antimicrobial effectiveness of nanoemulsion against planktonic Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, Actinomyces viscosus, Candida albicans and mixed culture was determined by a serial dilution technique to obtain minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC). In addition, efficacy was investigated by kinetics of killing, adherence and biofilm assays. Results Compared to its components, nanoemulsion showed notable antimicrobial activity against biofilm organisms, up to 83.0% kill within 1 min. NE dilutions ranging from 243 to 19683 were effective against planktonic S. mutans, L. casei, A. viscosus, C. albicans and mixed culture of these four strains as shown through MIC/MBC assays. NE showed antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells at high dilutions, confirmed by time kill studies. The level of adhesion on glass surface was reduced by 94.2 to 99.5 % in nanoemulsion treated groups (p < 0.001). 4-day-old S. mutans, L. casei, A. viscosus, C. albicans and mixed cultures biofilms treated with NE showed reductions of bacterial counts with decreasing dilutions (p < 0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that nanoemulsion has effective anti-cariogenic activity against cariogenic microorganisms and may be a useful medication in the prevention of caries. PMID:21807359

Amaechi, Bennett T.; Rawls, H Ralph; Valerie, A Lee

2011-01-01

84

Antimicrobial Properties and Membrane-Active Mechanism of a Potential ?-Helical Antimicrobial Derived from Cathelicidin PMAP-36  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which present in the non-specific immune system of organism, are amongst the most promising candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials. The modification of naturally occurring AMPs based on their residue composition and distribution is a simple and effective strategy for optimization of known AMPs. In this study, a series of truncated and residue-substituted derivatives of antimicrobial peptide PMAP-36 were designed and synthesized. The 24-residue truncated peptide, GI24, displayed antimicrobial activity comparable to the mother peptide PMAP-36 with MICs ranging from 1 to 4 µM, which is lower than the MICs of bee venom melittin. Although GI24 displayed high antimicrobial activity, its hemolytic activity was much lower than melittin, suggesting that GI24 have optimal cell selectivity. In addition, the crucial site of GI24 was identified through single site-mutation. An amino acid with high hydrophobicity at position 23 played an important role in guaranteeing the high antimicrobial activity of GI24. Then, lipid vesicles and whole bacteria were employed to investigate the membrane-active mechanisms. Membrane-simulating experiments showed that GI24 interacted strongly with negatively charged phospholipids and weakly with zwitterionic phospholipids, which corresponded well with the data of its biological activities. Membrane permeabilization and flow cytometry provide the evidence that GI24 killed microbial cells by permeabilizing the cell membrane and damaging membrane integrity. GI24 resulted in greater cell morphological changes and visible pores on cell membrane as determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Taken together, the peptide GI24 may provide a promising antimicrobial agent for therapeutic applications against the frequently-encountered bacteria. PMID:24466055

Lv, Yinfeng; Wang, Jiajun; Gao, He; Wang, Zeyun; Dong, Na; Ma, Qingquan; Shan, Anshan

2014-01-01

85

Antimicrobial properties and membrane-active mechanism of a potential ?-helical antimicrobial derived from cathelicidin PMAP-36.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which present in the non-specific immune system of organism, are amongst the most promising candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials. The modification of naturally occurring AMPs based on their residue composition and distribution is a simple and effective strategy for optimization of known AMPs. In this study, a series of truncated and residue-substituted derivatives of antimicrobial peptide PMAP-36 were designed and synthesized. The 24-residue truncated peptide, GI24, displayed antimicrobial activity comparable to the mother peptide PMAP-36 with MICs ranging from 1 to 4 µM, which is lower than the MICs of bee venom melittin. Although GI24 displayed high antimicrobial activity, its hemolytic activity was much lower than melittin, suggesting that GI24 have optimal cell selectivity. In addition, the crucial site of GI24 was identified through single site-mutation. An amino acid with high hydrophobicity at position 23 played an important role in guaranteeing the high antimicrobial activity of GI24. Then, lipid vesicles and whole bacteria were employed to investigate the membrane-active mechanisms. Membrane-simulating experiments showed that GI24 interacted strongly with negatively charged phospholipids and weakly with zwitterionic phospholipids, which corresponded well with the data of its biological activities. Membrane permeabilization and flow cytometry provide the evidence that GI24 killed microbial cells by permeabilizing the cell membrane and damaging membrane integrity. GI24 resulted in greater cell morphological changes and visible pores on cell membrane as determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Taken together, the peptide GI24 may provide a promising antimicrobial agent for therapeutic applications against the frequently-encountered bacteria. PMID:24466055

Lv, Yinfeng; Wang, Jiajun; Gao, He; Wang, Zeyun; Dong, Na; Ma, Qingquan; Shan, Anshan

2014-01-01

86

Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Swietenia macrophylla leaf extracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of methanol, dichloromethane and n-hexane extracts of S. macrophylla leaves were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts was tested against four species of bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a fungus, Candida albicans. The methanol and the dichloromethane extracts were found to be active against the Gram- positive bacteria

Seok-Keik Tan; Hasnah Osman; Keng-Chong Wong; Peng-Lim Boey; Padzilah Ibrahim

87

Antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from Swietenia macrophylla leaves.  

PubMed

The endophytic fungi isolated from leaves of Swietenia macrophylla of different ages were examined for antimicrobial activity. The agar plug diffusion assay was used for primary screening, followed by the disc diffusion method. A total of 461 filamentous endophytic fungi were isolated and cultured to examine their antimicrobial properties. In the primary screen, 315 isolates (68.3%) exhibited activity against at least one of the test pathogenic microorganisms. The percentage of isolates exhibiting antimicrobial activity increased with leaf age. Endophytic fungal assemblages, as well as those isolates exhibiting antimicrobial properties appeared to increase with leaf age. The main antimicrobial compounds were produced extracellularly by the endophytic fungi. The results suggest that healthy leaves at older stages of growth can be a potential source for the isolation of endophytic fungi with antimicrobial properties. PMID:24689302

Ibrahim, Darah; Lee, Chong Chai; Sheh-Hong, Lim

2014-02-01

88

Impact of interspecific interactions on antimicrobial activity among soil bacteria  

PubMed Central

Certain bacterial species produce antimicrobial compounds only in the presence of a competing species. However, little is known on the frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antibiotic compound production in natural communities of soil bacteria. Here we developed a high-throughput method to screen for the production of antimicrobial activity by monocultures and pair-wise combinations of 146 phylogenetically different bacteria isolated from similar soil habitats. Growth responses of two human pathogenic model organisms, Escherichia coli WA321 and Staphylococcus aureus 533R4, were used to monitor antimicrobial activity. From all isolates, 33% showed antimicrobial activity only in monoculture and 42% showed activity only when tested in interactions. More bacterial isolates were active against S. aureus than against E. coli. The frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was 6% (154 interactions out of 2798) indicating that only a limited set of species combinations showed such activity. The screening revealed also interaction-mediated suppression of antimicrobial activity for 22% of all combinations tested. Whereas all patterns of antimicrobial activity (non-induced production, induced production and suppression) were seen for various bacterial classes, interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was more frequent for combinations of Flavobacteria and alpha- Proteobacteria. The results of our study give a first indication on the frequency of interference competitive interactions in natural soil bacterial communities which may forms a basis for selection of bacterial groups that are promising for the discovery of novel, cryptic antibiotics. PMID:25389421

Tyc, Olaf; van den Berg, Marlies; Gerards, Saskia; van Veen, Johannes A.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

2014-01-01

89

Quaternized Chitosan as an Antimicrobial Agent: Antimicrobial Activity, Mechanism of Action and Biomedical Applications in Orthopedics  

PubMed Central

Chitosan (CS) is a linear polysaccharide with good biodegradability, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, which makes it potentially useful for biomedical applications, including an antimicrobial agent either alone or blended with other polymers. However, the poor solubility of CS in most solvents at neutral or high pH substantially limits its use. Quaternary ammonium CS, which was prepared by introducing a quaternary ammonium group on a dissociative hydroxyl group or amino group of the CS, exhibited improved water solubility and stronger antibacterial activity relative to CS over an entire range of pH values; thus, this quaternary modification increases the potential biomedical applications of CS in the field of anti-infection. This review discusses the current findings on the antimicrobial properties of quaternized CS synthesized using different methods and the mechanisms of its antimicrobial actions. The potential antimicrobial applications in the orthopedic field and perspectives regarding future studies in this field are also considered. PMID:23325051

Tan, Honglue; Ma, Rui; Lin, Chucheng; Liu, Ziwei; Tang, Tingting

2013-01-01

90

Synergistic Antimicrobial Activities of Folic Acid Antagonists and Nucleoside Analogs?  

PubMed Central

The antimicrobial activities of folic acid antagonists are supposed to be antagonized by elevated extracellular thymidine concentrations in damaged host tissues. Therefore, this study was aimed at screening for nucleoside analogs that impair bacterial thymidine utilization and analyzing the combined antimicrobial activities of nucleoside analogs and folic acid antagonists in the presence of thymidine. Our screening results revealed that different nucleoside analogs, in particular halogenated derivatives of 2?-deoxyuridine, substantially impaired the bacterial utilization of extracellular thymidine in Staphylococcus aureus. Time-kill methods showed that 5-iodo-2?-deoxyuridine enhanced the extent of killing of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) at 24 h against S. aureus in the presence of thymidine (200 ?g/liter). While SXT (40 mg/liter) alone did not kill bacteria in the presence of thymidine, its combination with the nucleoside analog at a concentration of 8 ?mol/liter showed a bactericidal effect. Moreover, 5-iodo-2?-deoxyuridine combined with SXT in the presence of thymidine showed a broad spectrum of activity against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that the in vitro antimicrobial activity of SXT in the presence of thymidine can be significantly improved by combination with a nucleoside analog. PMID:20028816

Zander, Johannes; Besier, Silke; Ackermann, Hanns; Wichelhaus, Thomas A.

2010-01-01

91

Antityrosinase and antimicrobial activities from Thai medicinal plants.  

PubMed

Various dermatological disorders and microbial skin infection can cause hyperpigmentation. Therefore, screenings for whitening and antimicrobial agents from Thai medicinal plants have been of research interest. Seventy-seven ethanol plant extracts were investigated for antityrosinase activity, eleven samples showed the tyrosinase inhibition more than 50 % were further preliminary screening for antimicrobial activity by agar disc diffusion and broth micro-dilution methods. Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr. (Moraceae) root extract, which showed the potential of tyrosinase inhibition with 90.57 ± 2.93 % and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Trichophyton mentagophytes with inhibition zone as 9.10 ± 0.00, 10.67 ± 0.09, 15.25 ± 0.05 and 6.60 ± 0.17 mm, respectively was selected for phytochemical investigation. Three pure compounds were isolated as artocarpin, cudraflavone C and artocarpanone. And artocarpanone exhibited anti-tyrosinase effect; artocarpin and cudraflavone C also showed the potential of antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis and P. acnes with MIC at 2, 4 and 2 ?g/ml, respectively and MBC at 32 ?g/ml for these bacteria. So, these pure compounds are interesting for further study in order to provide possibilities of new whitening and antibacterial development. This will be the first report of phytochemical investigation of A. integer root. PMID:23835832

Dej-Adisai, Sukanya; Meechai, Imron; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn; Kummee, Sopa

2014-04-01

92

Antimicrobial activity of resin acid derivatives.  

PubMed

The wide potential of resin acids as bioactive agents gave rise to a growing effort in the search for new applications of the natural forms and their derivatives. In some of these compounds, the antimicrobial activity is associated to the presence in the molecules of functional groups such as the hydroxyl, aldehyde, and ketone or to their cis or trans configurations. The resin acid family covers a spectrum of antimicrobial activities against several microorganisms, from bacteria to fungi, in which the mode of action was studied by electron microscopy. The morphological alterations are consistent with an unspecific mode of action causing inhibition of the fungal growth or damaging the fungal cells in parallel with a mechanism of resistance based on the retention of the compound by the lipid accumulation. The sterol composition of phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Lophodermium seditiosum treated with methyl cis-7-oxo-deisopropyldehydroabietate revealed the presence of ergosterol (M+ 396) and dihydroergosterol (M+ 398) in both cultures showing that this compound did not interfere with the ergosterol metabolic pathway of both fungi. PMID:16896605

Savluchinske-Feio, Sonia; Curto, Maria Joăo Marcelo; Gigante, Bárbara; Roseiro, J Carlos

2006-09-01

93

The antimicrobial activity of liposomal lauric acids against Propionibacterium acnes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a

Darren Yang; Dissaya Pornpattananangkul; Teruaki Nakatsuji; Michael Chan; Dennis Carson; Chun-Ming Huang; Liangfang Zhang

2009-01-01

94

Antimicrobial activity of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Euphorbia hirta and Asystasia gangeticum.  

PubMed

The ethanolic extracts of the dry fruits of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, aerial parts of Euphorbia hirta and flowers of Asystasia gangeticum were tested for antimicrobial activity. The three plants exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, particularly against Escherichia coli (enteropathogen), Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:16730921

Sudhakar, M; Rao, Ch V; Rao, P M; Raju, D B; Venkateswarlu, Y

2006-07-01

95

Antimicrobial activity of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Euphorbia hirta and Asystasia gangeticum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ethanolic extracts of the dry fruits of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, aerial parts of Euphorbia hirta and flowers of Asystasia gangeticum were tested for antimicrobial activity. The three plants exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, particularly against Escherichia coli (enteropathogen), Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

M. Sudhakar; Ch. V. Rao; P. M. Rao; D. B. Raju; Y. Venkateswarlu

2006-01-01

96

Aedesin: structure and antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant bacterial strains.  

PubMed

Multidrug resistance, which is acquired by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, causes infections that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in many clinical settings around the world. Because of the rapidly increasing incidence of pathogens that have become resistant to all or nearly all available antibiotics, there is a need for a new generation of antimicrobials with a broad therapeutic range for specific applications against infections. Aedesin is a cecropin-like anti-microbial peptide that was recently isolated from dengue virus-infected salivary glands of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. In the present study, we have refined the analysis of its structural characteristics and have determined its antimicrobial effects against a large panel of multidrug resistant bacterial strains, directly isolated from infected patients. Based the results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis, Aedesin has a helix-bend-helix structure typical for a member of the family of ?-helix anti-microbial peptides. Aedesin efficiently killed Gram-negative bacterial strains that display the most worrisome resistance mechanisms encountered in the clinic, including resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, 4th generation fluoroquinolones, folate inhibitors and monobactams. In contrast, Gram-positive strains were insensitive to the lytic effects of the peptide. The anti-bacterial activity of Aedesin was found to be salt-resistant, indicating that it is active under physiological conditions encountered in body fluids characterized by ionic salt concentrations. In conclusion, because of its strong lytic activity against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains displaying all types of clinically relevant resistance mechanisms known today, Aedesin might be an interesting candidate for the development of alternative treatment for infections caused by these types of bacteria. PMID:25162372

Godreuil, Sylvain; Leban, Nadia; Padilla, André; Hamel, Rodolphe; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Chauffour, Aurélie; Vittecoq, Marion; Hoh, François; Thomas, Frédéric; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Lionne, Corinne; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

2014-01-01

97

Aedesin: Structure and Antimicrobial Activity against Multidrug Resistant Bacterial Strains  

PubMed Central

Multidrug resistance, which is acquired by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, causes infections that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in many clinical settings around the world. Because of the rapidly increasing incidence of pathogens that have become resistant to all or nearly all available antibiotics, there is a need for a new generation of antimicrobials with a broad therapeutic range for specific applications against infections. Aedesin is a cecropin-like anti-microbial peptide that was recently isolated from dengue virus-infected salivary glands of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. In the present study, we have refined the analysis of its structural characteristics and have determined its antimicrobial effects against a large panel of multidrug resistant bacterial strains, directly isolated from infected patients. Based the results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis, Aedesin has a helix-bend-helix structure typical for a member of the family of ?-helix anti-microbial peptides. Aedesin efficiently killed Gram-negative bacterial strains that display the most worrisome resistance mechanisms encountered in the clinic, including resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, 4th generation fluoroquinolones, folate inhibitors and monobactams. In contrast, Gram-positive strains were insensitive to the lytic effects of the peptide. The anti-bacterial activity of Aedesin was found to be salt-resistant, indicating that it is active under physiological conditions encountered in body fluids characterized by ionic salt concentrations. In conclusion, because of its strong lytic activity against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains displaying all types of clinically relevant resistance mechanisms known today, Aedesin might be an interesting candidate for the development of alternative treatment for infections caused by these types of bacteria. PMID:25162372

Padilla, André; Hamel, Rodolphe; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Chauffour, Aurélie; Vittecoq, Marion; Hoh, François; Thomas, Frédéric; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Lionne, Corinne; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

2014-01-01

98

Prediction of Antimicrobial Activity of Synthetic Peptides by a Decision Tree Model  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial resistance is a persistent problem in the public health sphere. However, recent attempts to find effective substitutes to combat infections have been directed at identifying natural antimicrobial peptides in order to circumvent resistance to commercial antibiotics. This study describes the development of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial activity, created in silico by site-directed mutation modeling using wild-type peptides as scaffolds for these mutations. Fragments of antimicrobial peptides were used for modeling with molecular modeling computational tools. To analyze these peptides, a decision tree model, which indicated the action range of peptides on the types of microorganisms on which they can exercise biological activity, was created. The decision tree model was processed using physicochemistry properties from known antimicrobial peptides available at the Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD). The two most promising peptides were synthesized, and antimicrobial assays showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Colossomin C and colossomin D were the most inhibitory peptides at 5 ?g/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The methods described in this work and the results obtained are useful for the identification and development of new compounds with antimicrobial activity through the use of computational tools. PMID:23455341

Lira, Felipe; Perez, Pedro S.; Baranauskas, José A.

2013-01-01

99

Structural basis for antimicrobial activity of lasiocepsin.  

PubMed

Lasiocepsin is a unique 27-residue antimicrobial peptide, isolated from Lasioglossum laticeps (wild bee) venom, with substantial antibacterial and antifungal activity. It adopts a well-defined structure consisting of two ?-helices linked by a structured loop. Its basic residues form two distinct positively charged regions on the surface whereas aliphatic side chains contribute to solvent-accessible hydrophobic areas, thus emphasising the amphipathic character of the molecule. Lasiocepsin structurally belongs to the ShK family and shows a strong preference for anionic phospholipids; this is further augmented by increasing concentrations of cardiolipin, such as those found at the poles of bacterial cells. The membrane-permeabilising activity of the peptide is not limited to outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. The peptide interacts with phospholipids initially through its N terminus, and its degree of penetration is strongly dependent on the presence of cardiolipin. PMID:24339323

Monincová, Lenka; Bud?šínský, Milos; ?ujová, Sabina; ?e?ovský, Václav; Veverka, Václav

2014-01-24

100

Antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin isolated from Serratia marcescens UFPEDA 398.  

PubMed

Prodigiosin is an alkaloid and natural red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens. Prodigiosin has antimicrobial, antimalarial and antitumor properties and induces apoptosis in T and B lymphocytes. These properties have piqued the interest of researchers in the fields of medicine, pharmaceutics and different industries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin against pathogenic micro-organisms. The red pigments produced by S. marcescens exhibited absorption at 534 nm, Rf of 0.59 and molecular weight of 323 m/z. Antimicrobial activity was tested against oxacillin-resistant Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Acinetobacter sp. and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. The standard antibiotics employed were ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin and oxacillin. The disc-diffusion tests demonstrated significant inhibition zones for S. aureus (35 ± 0.6), E. faecalis (22 ± 1.0) and S. pyogenes (14 ± 0.6). However, prodigiosin showed resistance to E. coli, P. aeruginosa and acinetobacter, where no significant formation of inhibitory halos were observed. We determined the inhibitory minimum concentrations and bactericidal for 20 strains of oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA). The pattern was the antibiotic oxacillin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations observed ranged from 1, 2 and 4.0 ?g/mL, respectively, while the minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged from 2, 4, 8 and 16 ?g/mL. The S. marcescens prodigiosin produced by showed bactericidal and bacteriostatic effect showing promising antimicrobial activity and suggesting future studies regarding its applicability in antibiotics therapies directed ORSA. PMID:25549906

Lapenda, J C; Silva, P A; Vicalvi, M C; Sena, K X F R; Nascimento, S C

2015-02-01

101

Effects of Allspice, Cinnamon, and Clove Bud Essential Oils in Edible Apple Films on Physical Properties and Antimicrobial Activities  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The results of the present study show that allspice, cinnamon and clove bud essential oils can be used to prepare apple-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by both direct contact and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films. Application of the a...

102

Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants  

PubMed Central

Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

2015-01-01

103

Antimicrobial Properties of Light-activated Polyurethane Containing Indocyanine Green  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to produce novel antimicrobial polymers containing the light-activated antimicrobial agent indocyanine green (ICG). The novel materials were prepared by swelling polyurethane in acetone containing water and ICG, followed by solvent evaporation. The uptake of ICG was dependent upon the ratio of acetone to water. Only at a ratio of 99 parts acetone to 1

Stefano Perni; Jonathan Pratten; Michael Wilson; Clara Piccirillo; Ivan P. Parkin; Polina Prokopovich

2011-01-01

104

Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role during innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we ex...

105

In vitro antimicrobial activity of Medilox® super-oxidized water  

PubMed Central

Aim Super-oxidized water is one of the broad spectrum disinfectants, which was introduced recently. There are many researches to find reliable chemicals which are effective, inexpensive, easy to obtain and use, and effective for disinfection of microorganisms leading hospital infections. Antimicrobial activity of super-oxidized water is promising. The aim of this study was to investigate the in-vitro antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Medilox® super-oxidized water that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as high level disinfectant. Material and methods In this study, super-oxidized water obtained from Medilox® [Soosan E & C, Korea] device, which had been already installed in our hospital, was used. Antimicrobial activities of different concentrations of super-oxidized water (1/1, 1/2, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20, 1/50, 1/100) at different exposure times (1, 2, 5, 10, 30 min) against six ATCC strains, eight antibiotic resistant bacteria, yeasts and molds were evaluated using qualitative suspension test. Dey-Engley Neutralizing Broth [Sigma-Aldrich, USA] was used as neutralizing agent. Results Medilox® was found to be effective against all standard strains (Acinetobacter baumannii 19606, Escherichia coli 25922, Enterococcus faecalis 29212, Klebsiella pneumoniae 254988, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27853, Staphylococcus aureus 29213), all clinical isolates (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Myroides spp.), and all yeastsat 1/1 dilution in ??1 minute. It was found to be effective on Aspergillus flavus at 1/1 dilution in ??2 minutes and on certain molds in ??5 minutes. Conclusion Medilox® super-oxidized water is a broad spectrum, on-site producible disinfectant, which is effective on bacteria and fungi and can be used for the control of nosocomial infection. PMID:25023905

2014-01-01

106

Antimicrobial activity of some Hypericum species.  

PubMed

The crude methanolic extracts of six species of Hypericum [H. caprifoliatum Cham. & Schlecht., H. carinatum Griseb., H. connatum Lam., H. ternum A. St. Hil., H. myrianthum Cham. & Schlecht. and H. polyanthemum Klotzsch ex Reichardt] growing in southern Brazil were analyzed for antimicrobial activity against several microorganisms (bacteria and fungi). The most active plant was H. caprifoliatum, which showed activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Only H. polyanthemum and H. ternum extracts were active against Bacillus subtilis. None of the crude methanolic extracts showed activity against S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extracts from these species were evaluated chemically and tannin, flavonoid and phenolic acids were the prominent compounds. The plants contained quercitrin, hyperoside (except H. connatum) and, less frequently, isoquercitrin and chlorogenic acid. In contrast to H. perforatum, which has high concentrations of rutin, these species do not produce this flavonoid or it appears as traces. The tannin concentration varied between 5.1 and 16.7% in H. myrianthum and H. ternum, respectively. PMID:13678236

Dall'Agnol, R; Ferraz, A; Bernardi, A P; Albring, D; Nör, C; Sarmento, L; Lamb, L; Hass, M; von Poser, G; Schapoval, E E S

2003-01-01

107

Antimicrobial activity of saponin fractions of the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre and Eclipta prostrata  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial activity of saponin fractions from the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre and Eclipta prostrata was evaluated against pathogenic bacteria and fungi in an in vitro condition. A series of concentrations of crude and pure\\u000a saponin fractions were tested for antimicrobial activity by zone of inhibition method. The pure saponin fractions were found\\u000a to be more effective against tested bacterial pathogens

Venkatesan Gopiesh khanna; Krishnan Kannabiran

2008-01-01

108

Synergistic Antimicrobial Activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.  

PubMed

Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates." We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens. PMID:25719410

Farooqui, Amber; Khan, Adnan; Borghetto, Ilaria; Kazmi, Shahana U; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

2015-01-01

109

Oxygen limitation favors the production of protein with antimicrobial activity in Pseudoalteromonas sp  

PubMed Central

This study examined the effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on the production of biomass and metabolites with antimicrobial activity of Pseudoalteromonas sp cultured at 0, 150, 250, or 450 revolutions per minute (rev. min-1). Dissolved oxygen (D.O) was monitored during the fermentation process, biomass was quantified by dry weight, and antimicrobial activity was assessed using the disk diffusion method. The bacterium Pseudoalteromonas reached similar concentration of biomass under all experimental agitation conditions, whereas antimicrobial activity was detected at 0 and 150 rev. min-1 registering 0% and 12% of D.O respectively corresponding to microaerophilic conditions. Antibiotic activity was severely diminished when D.O was above 20% of saturation; this corresponded to 250 or 450 rev. min-1. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 80 kilodaltons (kDa) with antimicrobial activity. Pseudoalteromonas is capable of growing under oxic and microaerophilic conditions but the metabolites with antimicrobial activity are induced under microaerophilic conditions. The current opinion is that Pseudoalteromonas are aerobic organisms; we provide additional information on the amount of dissolved oxygen during the fermentation process and its effect on antimicrobial activity. PMID:24031945

López, Ruth; Monteón, Víctor; Chan, Ernesto; Montejo, Rubí; Chan, Manuel

2012-01-01

110

Oxygen limitation favors the production of protein with antimicrobial activity in Pseudoalteromonas sp.  

PubMed

This study examined the effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on the production of biomass and metabolites with antimicrobial activity of Pseudoalteromonas sp cultured at 0, 150, 250, or 450 revolutions per minute (rev. min(-1)). Dissolved oxygen (D.O) was monitored during the fermentation process, biomass was quantified by dry weight, and antimicrobial activity was assessed using the disk diffusion method. The bacterium Pseudoalteromonas reached similar concentration of biomass under all experimental agitation conditions, whereas antimicrobial activity was detected at 0 and 150 rev. min(-1) registering 0% and 12% of D.O respectively corresponding to microaerophilic conditions. Antibiotic activity was severely diminished when D.O was above 20% of saturation; this corresponded to 250 or 450 rev. min(-1). SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 80 kilodaltons (kDa) with antimicrobial activity. Pseudoalteromonas is capable of growing under oxic and microaerophilic conditions but the metabolites with antimicrobial activity are induced under microaerophilic conditions. The current opinion is that Pseudoalteromonas are aerobic organisms; we provide additional information on the amount of dissolved oxygen during the fermentation process and its effect on antimicrobial activity. PMID:24031945

López, Ruth; Monteón, Víctor; Chan, Ernesto; Montejo, Rubí; Chan, Manuel

2012-07-01

111

Antimicrobial effect of silver-impregnated cellulose: potential for antimicrobial therapy  

PubMed Central

Background Silver has long been known to have antimicrobial activity. To incorporate this property into multiple applications, a silver-impregnated cellulose (SIC) with low cytotoxicity to human cells was developed. SIC differs from other silver treatment methods in that the leaching of silver particles is non-existent and the release of ionic silver is highly controlled. Results Candida albicans, Micrococcus luteu, Pseudomonas putida, and Escherichia coli were used for antimicrobial testing. No microbial cells were able to grow in the presence of SIC at concentrations above 0.0035 Ag w/v %. Even at a concentration of 0.00035 Ag w/v %, P. putida and M. luteu failed to grow, and C. albicans and E. coli exhibited diminished growth. To determine the cytotoxic effect of silver on human cells, five different concentrations of SIC were tested on human fibroblasts. In SIC concentrations of 0.035 Ag w/v % and below, no cytotoxicity was observed. Conclusion The optimal concentration of SIC for a broad range of anti-microbial activity and low or negligible cytotoxicity was 0.0035 Ag w/v %. Although the highly controlled releasing characteristics of SIC would prove a substantial improvement over current technologies, further investigation for genotoxicity and other biocompatibility test will be required. PMID:19961601

2009-01-01

112

Antimicrobial activities of three species of family mimosaceae.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activities of crude methanolic extract of leaves of Acacia nilotica L., Albizia lebbeck L. and Mimosa himalayana Gamble belonging to family mimosaceae were investigated in this research work. Antibacterial activity was studied by agar well diffusion method against one gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and three gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia. Crude extract of all plants showed best activity against gram-negative bacterial strains while minor inhibition zones were found against gram positive bacterial strains. Antifungal activity of crude plant extract was screened by agar tube dilution method against Aspergillus nigar and Aspergillus flavus. These results showed that these plants extracts have potential against bacterias, while against fungi their activity is not much effective. PMID:22186331

Mahmood, Adeel; Mahmood, Aqeel; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem

2012-01-01

113

Antimicrobial activity of copper and silver nanofilms on nosocomial bacterial species.  

PubMed

Contaminated surfaces are possible vehicles in infection transmission. It is known that both Copper (Cu) and Silver (Ag) efficiently inactivate microbes by direct contact. Aiming at using these metals for benefitting from their antimicrobial effect, but to avoid subsequent toxic effects, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of nanometric thin Silver and Copper films covering less expensive materials. Using a modified version of the Japan Industrial Standard JIS Z 2801:2000, we demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of the surfaces covered with metal ions nanofilms on microorganisms possibly involved in nosocomial infections and on Bacillus anthracis, bacteria with possible implication in bioterrorist attacks. Copper covered surfaces proved to have better antimicrobial activity than Silver surfaces. Silver covered surfaces showed better activity on Gram negative bacteria than on Gram positive cocci. Going deeper with studies on antimicrobial effects using new methods with better direct and/or functional discriminatory capacity is needed in order to provide additional information on the mechanisms of Silver and Copper nanofilms antimicrobial activity. PMID:21462835

Codi??, Irina; Caplan, Dana Magdalena; Dr?gulescu, Elena-Carmina; Lixandru, Brîndu?a-Elena; Coldea, Ileana Lumini?a; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Surdu-Bob, Cristina; B?dulescu, Marius

2010-01-01

114

Comparative Study of Surface-Active Properties and Antimicrobial Activities of Disaccharide Monoesters  

PubMed Central

The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sugar or fatty acid in sugar ester compounds on the surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of these compounds. Disaccharides of medium-chain fatty acid monoesters were synthesized through transesterifications by immobilized lipase (Lipozyme TLIM) to yield nine monoesters for subsequent study. Their antimicrobial activities were investigated using three pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Candida albicans. Their surface-active properties including air–water surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and foaming and emulsion power and stability were also studied. The results showed that all of the tested monoesters were more effective against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) than against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacterium). The results demonstrated that the carbon chain length was the most important factor influencing the surface properties, whereas degree of esterification and hydrophilic groups showed little effect. PMID:25531369

Zhang, Xi; Song, Fei; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Wei, Wei; Feng, Fengqin

2014-01-01

115

Size-Dependent Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Palladium Nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0±0.1 nm, 2.5±0.2 nm and 3.1±0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions (2.5×10?4, 10?5, 10?6, 10?7, 10?8, and 10?9 M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ?10?5 M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

Adams, Clara P.; Walker, Katherine A.; Obare, Sherine O.; Docherty, Kathryn M.

2014-01-01

116

Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Coleus amboinicus Lour Exhibited Antimicrobial Activity  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Coleus amboinicus is a medicinal plant traditionally used to treat various diseases such as throat infection, cough and fever, diarrhea, nasal congestion and digestive problems. The plant was explored for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents. Methods: Screening for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents was conducted using agar plug method and antimicrobial activity of promising ethyl acetate extracts was determined by disc diffusion assay. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) - bioautography was performed to localize the bioactive components within the extract. TLC visualization detection reagents were used to preliminary analyze phytochemical groups of the bioactive compounds. Results: Three endophytic fungi were obtained, two of them showed promising potential. Agar diffusion method showed that endophytic fungi CAL-2 exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis, S. aureus and S. thypi, whilst CAS-1 inhibited the growth of B. subtilis. TLC bioautography of ethyl acetate extract of CAL-2 revealed at least three bands exhibited antimicrobial activity and at least two bands showed inhibition of B. subtilis growth. Preliminary analysis of the crude extracts suggests that bioactive compounds within CAL-2 extract are terpenoids, phenolics and phenyl propanoid compounds whilst the antimicrobial agents within CAS-1 extract are terpenoids, propylpropanoids, alkaloids or heterocyclic nitrogen compounds. Conclusion: These data suggest the potential of endophytic fungi of C. amboinicus as source for antimicrobial agents. PMID:25671195

Astuti, Puji; Sudarsono, Sudarsono; Nisak, Khoirun; Nugroho, Giri Wisnu

2014-01-01

117

Synergistic Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides and Antibiotics against Clostridium difficile  

PubMed Central

Accelerating rates of health care-associated infections caused by Clostridium difficile, with increasing recurrence and rising antibiotic resistance rates, have become a serious problem in recent years. This study was conducted to explore whether a combination of antibiotics with human antimicrobial peptides may lead to an increase in antibacterial activity. The in vitro activities of the antimicrobial peptides HBD1 to HBD3, HNP1, HD5, and LL-37 and the antibiotics tigecycline, moxifloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem alone or in combination against 10 toxinogenic and 10 nontoxinogenic C. difficile strains were investigated. Bacterial viability was determined by flow cytometry and toxin production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). When combined at subinhibitory concentrations, antimicrobial peptides and antibiotics generally led to an additive killing effect against toxinogenic and nontoxinogenic C. difficile strains. However, LL-37 and HBD3 acted in synergism with all the antibiotics that were tested. Electron microscopy revealed membrane perturbation in bacterial cell walls by HBD3. In 3 out of 10 toxinogenic strains, HBD3, LL-37, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem administration led to an increased toxin release which was not neutralized by the addition of HNP1. Antimicrobial peptides increase the bacterial killing of antibiotics against C. difficile regardless of the antibiotics' mode of action. Membrane perturbation in or pore formation on the bacterial cell wall may enhance the uptake of antibiotics and increase their antibacterial effect. Therefore, a combination of antibiotics with antimicrobial peptides may represent a promising novel approach to the treatment of C. difficile infections. PMID:25022581

Nuding, Sabine; Frasch, Tina; Schaller, Martin; Stange, Eduard F.

2014-01-01

118

Effectiveness of antimicrobial food packaging materials.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial additives have been used successfully for many years as direct food additives. The literature provides evidence that some of these additives may be effective as indirect food additives incorporated into food packaging materials. Antimicrobial food packaging is directed toward the reduction of surface contamination of processed, prepared foods such as sliced meats and Frankfurter sausages (hot dogs). The use of such packaging materials is not meant to be a substitute for good sanitation practices, but it should enhance the safety of food as an additional hurdle for the growth of pathogenic and/or spoilage microorganisms. Studies have focused on establishing methods for coating low-density polyethylene film or barrier films with methyl cellulose as a carrier for nisin. These films have significantly reduced the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in solutions and in vacuum packaged hot dogs. Other research has focused on the use of chitosan to inhibit L. monocytogenes and chlorine dioxide sachets for the reduction of Salmonella on modified atmosphere-packaged fresh chicken breasts. Overall, antimicrobial packaging shows promise as an effective method for the inhibition of certain bacteria in foods, but barriers to their commercial implementation continue to exist. PMID:16227182

Cooksey, K

2005-10-01

119

Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species  

PubMed Central

Background Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Methods Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. Results The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 ?g/mL), ABTS (2763.48 ?mol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 ?mol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for the first time. The results of antimicrobial activities showed P. fruticosa exhibited the strongest inhibition aganist Gram-positive bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans with MIC values of 0.78–6.25 mg/mL. P. parvifolia possessed antibacterial and antifungal activities against all the microorganisms tested, with EC50 and MIC values of 20.52–47.02 mg/mL and 0.78–50 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusions These results indicated that leaf extracts from three Potentilla species could become useful supplement for pharmaceutical products as a new antioxidant and antimicrobial agents. PMID:24252124

2013-01-01

120

Antimicrobial activity of metals: mechanisms, molecular targets and applications.  

PubMed

Metals have been used as antimicrobial agents since antiquity, but throughout most of history their modes of action have remained unclear. Recent studies indicate that different metals cause discrete and distinct types of injuries to microbial cells as a result of oxidative stress, protein dysfunction or membrane damage. Here, we describe the chemical and toxicological principles that underlie the antimicrobial activity of metals and discuss the preferences of metal atoms for specific microbial targets. Interdisciplinary research is advancing not only our understanding of metal toxicity but also the design of metal-based compounds for use as antimicrobial agents and alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:23669886

Lemire, Joseph A; Harrison, Joe J; Turner, Raymond J

2013-06-01

121

Investigation of the antimicrobial activity and biocompatibility of magnesium alloy coated with HA and antimicrobial peptide.  

PubMed

Implant-associated infection is one of the biggest problems in orthopedic surgery. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well-known components of the innate immunity and less susceptible to the development of pathogen resistance compared to conventional antibiotics. Magnesium alloys as potential biodegradable bone implants have been received much attention in biomaterials field. This study investigated the deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings and loading of AMPs on the magnesium alloy surface by a biomimetic method. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results presented that a microporous and plate-like CaP coating was processed on the magnesium alloy surface. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis showed the main component of coating was hydroxyapatite (HA). Degradation assay in vitro showed that the HA coating deposited onto the magnesium alloy was corroded more slowly than the bare one. The amount of AMP loaded in the HA coating was 11.16±1.99 ?g/cm2. The AMP loaded onto HA coatings had slow release for 7 days. The AMP-loaded coating showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Its bacterial inhibition rate exceeded 50% after 4 days and the antibacterial effect was sustained for 7 days. The coated magnesium alloys loaded with AMP could improve rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMMSCs) proliferation. Furthermore, it could also promote alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rBMMSCs. Both radiographic evaluation and histopathology analysis demonstrated that implantation of the coated magnesium alloy into the rabbit femoral condyle had promoted bone repair and showed anti-inflammatory effect. The results showed that the AMP loaded onto HA coatings on the magnesium alloy surface could be considered an ideal orthopedic implant against S. aureus infection. PMID:25631264

Tian, Jinhuan; Shen, Si; Zhou, Changren; Dang, Xiangli; Jiao, Yanpeng; Li, Lihua; Ding, Shan; Li, Hong

2015-02-01

122

Diverse antimicrobial activity from Enterococcus faecium NRRL B-30746 bacteriocin  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Antibiotic therapy to resolve bacterial disease has been compromised by the increased prevalence and magnitude of bacterial antibiotic resistance. In our efforts to identify new effective antimicrobials, bacteria isolated from poultry intestinal contents were screened for bacteriocin synthesis again...

123

Antimicrobial properties of light-activated polyurethane containing indocyanine green.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to produce novel antimicrobial polymers containing the light-activated antimicrobial agent indocyanine green (ICG). The novel materials were prepared by swelling polyurethane in acetone containing water and ICG, followed by solvent evaporation. The uptake of ICG was dependent upon the ratio of acetone to water. Only at a ratio of 99 parts acetone to 1 part water was there any substantial colouration of the samples. When exposed to laser light from the near infrared spectrum (808 nm), polyurethane-containing ICG exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria; a 2 log?? reduction was achieved against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis after 15 min exposure, corresponding to an energy dose of 31.83 J delivered at an energy density of 31.83 J/cm˛. Under the same conditions, Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) appeared to be less susceptible, the viable count being reduced by 0.5 log??. Some of the physical properties of the resulting material were also investigated and it was found that the elasticity (Young's modulus) was reduced by approximately 60%. Furthermore, when the ICG-containing polymer was stretched, the breaking point occurred when the elongation was 6.7 times the initial value, while ICG-free polyurethane samples did not break following a 7-fold elongation. The contact angles for water droplets revealed that the ICG-containing polymer was more hydrophobic than untreated polyurethane. The results of this study show that ICG can be embedded in polyurethane to produce materials which when irradiated with near-infrared light can exert a bactericidal effect particularly against MRSA and S. epidermidis. Such materials may be useful for preparing intravenous catheters, which are often colonized by such organisms. PMID:20008087

Perni, Stefano; Pratten, Jonathan; Wilson, Michael; Piccirillo, Clara; Parkin, Ivan P; Prokopovich, Polina

2011-01-01

124

Fungi treated with small chemicals exhibit increased antimicrobial activity against facultative bacterial and yeast pathogens.  

PubMed

For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown "cryptic" secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3-4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances. PMID:25121102

Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Gorfer, Markus; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

2014-01-01

125

Fungi Treated with Small Chemicals Exhibit Increased Antimicrobial Activity against Facultative Bacterial and Yeast Pathogens  

PubMed Central

For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown “cryptic” secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3–4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances. PMID:25121102

Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph

2014-01-01

126

Antimicrobial effects of quaternary phosphonium salt intercalated clay minerals on Escherichia coli and Staphylococci aureus.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to determine the antimicrobial properties and influence factors of four clay minerals intercalated by quaternary phosphonium salt (tetradecyl tributyl phosphonium bromide, TDTB) on antimicrobial effects. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococci aureus (S. aureus) were chosen for Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) tests to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of organ-clay minerals. The properties of organ-clay minerals were analyzed by FTIR, XRD, TEM, Z-Average and Zeta potential, and the releasing amount of TDTB into the broth was measured by ICP. The results showed that montmorillonites-TDTB inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus, and the MICs were 200 ± 20 and 80 ± 15 mg/L, respectively. The amount of TDTB released into the broth was 3.42 ± 0.71%. According to the properties of organ-clay mineral, it was indicated that the antimicrobial activities of organ-clay mineral were the synergic effect of the releasing amount of TDTB, Zeta potential, particle size and distribution. The organ-clay mineral with the larger releasing amount of TDTB, the higher Zeta potential, the same particle size with bacterial size and the narrower size distribution exhibited better antimicrobial activity. The present study demonstrated the properties of organ-clay minerals effected their antimicrobial activities, provided theoretically guidance to promote the antimicrobial activity of clay minerals. PMID:21536418

Wu, Ting; Xie, A-Gui; Tan, Shao-Zao; Cai, Xiang

2011-08-01

127

Activity of the De Novo Engineered Antimicrobial Peptide WLBU2 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Human Serum and Whole Blood: Implications for Systemic Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cationic amphipathic peptides have been extensively investigated as a potential source of new antimicrobials that can complement current antibiotic regimens in the face of emerging drug-resistant bacteria. However, the suppression of antimicrobial activity under certain biologically relevant conditions (e.g., serum and physio- logical salt concentrations) has hampered efforts to develop safe and effective antimicrobial peptides for clinical use. We have

Berthony Deslouches; Kazi Islam; Jodi K. Craigo; Shruti M. Paranjape; Ronald C. Montelaro; Timothy A. Mietzner

2005-01-01

128

Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens.  

PubMed

Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa was tested in vitro to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on selected microbial strains. The tested strains were oral clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus spp., Candida albicans, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The tested concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa ranged from 0.25-5% in Müeller-Hinton agar. Three percent Uncaria tomentosa inhibited 8% of Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 52% of S. mutans and 96% of Staphylococcus spp. The tested concentrations did not present inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It could be concluded that micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa presented antimicrobial activity on Enterobacteriaceae, S. mutans and Staphylococcus spp. isolates. PMID:17426895

Ccahuana-Vasquez, Renzo Alberto; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

2007-01-01

129

Antimicrobial activity of some macrophytes from Lake Manzalah (Egypt).  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activities of aqueous and organic solvents (chloroform, ethanol and methanol) extracts of four plants Ceratophyllum demersum L., Eichhornia crassipes, Potamogeton crispus and Potamogeton pectinatus were tested in vitro against seventeen different microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Nine of these identified organisms were obtained from different sources, Bacillus subtilis 1020, Bacillus cereus 1080, Staphylococcus aureus, Erwinia carotovora NCPPB 312, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium italicum. The other eight organisms were isolated from Manzalah lake water and identified using API 20E strip system (BioMereux). One hundred pathogenic bacterial isolates representing eight genera were identified to species level. These organisms are Escherichia coli (20%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (14%), Salmonella colerasuis (13%), Shigella sp. (11%), Serratia liquefaciens (10%), Proteus vulgaris (9%) and Brenneria nigrifluens (7%). The extracts of all tested plants demonstrated antimicrobial activity against the used organisms. The efficiency of the extracts varied with, solvent used in the extraction as well as plant species and the part of plant used. The aqueous extract appeared to be the highly effective extract against all tested organisms especially Fusarium oxysporum causing inhibition zone 48 +/- 0.01 mm, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 59 +/- 0.02 mm and Salmonella cholerasuis 55 +/- 0.01 mm when using P. crispus, P. pectinatus and C. demersum, respectively. Ethanol extracts of C. demersum, P. crispus and E. crassipes root showed antimicrobial activities against all tested organisms except Aspergillus niger. At the same time the extract of P. pectinatus had no effect also on Fusarium oxysporum and the extract of E. crassipes leaves have no effect on Penicillium italicum. On using chloroform extracts Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum showed resistance. Comparing the effect of different plants extracts C. demersum appeared to be the most effective followed by P. pectinatus. Furthermore, the extracts of E. crassipes leaves being more effective than that, of its roots. Elemental analysis were also takes place in water and plant samples and the results revealed the presence of Mn and Pb in higher concentration in P. pectinatus (Mn 603 +/- 4.243 ppm and Pb 44 +/- 2.828 ppm), at the same time the highest values of Fe 1680 +/- 2.2 ppm, Zn 31.5 +/- 2.1 ppm and Cu 26.5 +/- 2.1 ppm were recorded for C. demersum. Comparing the two parts of E. crassipes (leaves and roots), the roots have the highest values of all studied metals. PMID:19205264

Fareed, M F; Haroon, A M; Rabeh, S A

2008-11-01

130

An endogenous ribonuclease inhibitor regulates the antimicrobial activity of ribonuclease 7 in the human urinary tract  

PubMed Central

Recent studies stress the importance of antimicrobial peptides in protecting the urinary tract from infection. Previously, we have shown that ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is a potent antimicrobial peptide that has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against uropathogenic bacteria. The urothelium of the lower urinary tract and intercalated cells of the kidney produce RNase 7 but regulation of its antimicrobial activity has not been well defined. Here we characterize the expression of an endogenous inhibitor, ribonuclease inhibitor (RI), in the urinary tract and evaluate its effect on RNase 7’s antimicrobial activity. Using RNA isolated from non-infected human bladder and kidney tissue, quantitative real-time PCR showed that RNH1, the gene encoding RI, is constitutively expressed throughout the urinary tract. With pyelonephritis, RNH1 expression and RI peptide production significantly decrease. Immunostaining localized RI production to the umbrella cells of the bladder and intercalated cells of the renal collecting tubule. In vitro assays showed that RI bound to RNase 7 and suppressed its antimicrobial activity by blocking its ability to bind the cell wall of uropathogenic bacteria. Thus, these results demonstrate a new immunomodulatory role for RI and identified a unique regulatory pathway that may affect how RNase 7 maintains urinary tract sterility. PMID:24107847

Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Eichler, Tad; Wang, Huanyu; Kline, Jennifer; Justice, Sheryl S.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Hains, David S.

2013-01-01

131

Antimicrobial activity of ibuprofen: New perspectives on an "Old" non-antibiotic drug.  

PubMed

Pharmaceutical industry has been encountering antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotics during suitability tests carried out prior to routine pharmacopoeial microbiological purity analysis of finished dosage forms. These properties are usually ignored or perceived as a nuisance during pharmaceutical analysis. The aim of this study was: (i) to compare the available data to our method suitability test results carried out on products containing ibuprofen, i.e. to demonstrate that method suitability can be a valuable tool in identifying new antimicrobials, (ii) to demonstrate the antimicrobial activity of ibuprofen and ibuprofen lysine. Microbiological purity method suitability testing was carried out according to European Pharmacopoeia (EP), chapters 2.6.12. and 2.6.13. Antimicrobial activity of ibuprofen and ibuprofen lysine was demonstrated by a disk diffusion method, a modification of the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing method (EUCAST), against test microorganisms recommended in the EP. It was confirmed that ibuprofen may be responsible for the broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity of the tested products, and that method suitability tests according to the EP can indeed be exploited by the scientific community in setting guidelines towards future research of new antimicrobials. In the disk diffusion assay, inhibition zones were obtained with more than 62.5?g and 250?g for Staphylococcus aureus, 125?g and 250?g for Bacillus subtilis, 31.3?g and 125?g for Candidaalbicans, 31.3?g and 62.5?g for Aspergillusbrasiliensis, of ibuprofen/disk, and ibuprofen lysine/disk, respectively. For Escherichiacoli, Pseudomonasaeruginosa and Salmonellatyphimurium inhibition zones were not obtained. Antimicrobial activity of ibuprofen is considered merely as a side effect, and it is not mentioned in the patient information leaflets of ibuprofen drugs. As such, for the patient, it could represent an advantage, but, it could also introduce additional risks during usage. Further microbiological, pharmacological and clinical trials are of great importance. PMID:25708941

Obad, Jelena; Šuškovi?, Jagoda; Kos, Blaženka

2015-04-25

132

Structure-Activity Relationship of Benzophenanthridine Alkaloids from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Having Antimicrobial Activity  

PubMed Central

Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae) is a plant alkaloid that grows in South America and has been used in Brazilian traditional medicine for the treatment of different health problems. The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the steam bark crude methanol extract, fractions, and pure alkaloids of Z. rhoifolium. Its stem bark extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, ranging from 12.5 to 100 µg/mL using bioautography method, and from 125 to 500 µg/mL in the microdilution bioassay. From the dichloromethane basic fraction, three furoquinoline alkaloids (1–3), and nine benzophenanthridine alkaloids (4–12) were isolated and the antimicrobial activity of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids is discussed in terms of structure-activity relationships. The alkaloid with the widest spectrum of activity was chelerythrine (10), followed by avicine (12) and dihydrochelerythrine (4). The minimal inhibitory concentrations of chelerythrine, of 1.50 µg/mL for all bacteria tested, and between 3.12 and 6.25 µg/mL for the yeast tested, show this compound to be a more powerful antimicrobial agent when compared with the other active alkaloids isolated from Z. rhoifolium. To verify the potential importance of the methylenedioxy group (ring A) of these alkaloids, chelerythrine was selected to represent the remainder of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids isolated in this work and was subjected to a demethylation reaction giving derivative 14. Compared to chelerythrine, the derivative (14) was less active against the tested bacteria and fungi. Kinetic measurements of the bacteriolytic activities of chelerythrine against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) were determined by optical density based on real time assay, suggesting that its mechanism of action is not bacteriolytic. The present study did not detect hemolytic effects of chelerythrine on erythrocytes and found a protective effect considering the decrease in TBARS and AOPP (advanced oxidized protein products) levels when compared to the control group. PMID:24824737

Tavares, Luciana de C.; Zanon, Graciane; Weber, Andréia D.; Neto, Alexandre T.; Mostardeiro, Clarice P.; Da Cruz, Ivana B. M.; Oliveira, Raul M.; Ilha, Vinicius; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

2014-01-01

133

Influence of montmorillonite on antimicrobial activity of tetracycline and ciprofloxacin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antibiotics are used not only to fight infections and inhibit bacterial growth, but also as growth promotants in farm livestock. Farm runoff and other farm-linked waste have led to increased antibiotic levels present in the environment, the impact of which is not completely understood. Soil, more specifically clays, that the antibiotic contacts may alter its effectiveness against bacteria. In this study a swelling clay mineral montmorillonite was preloaded with antibiotics tetracycline and ciprofloxacin at varying concentrations and bioassays were conducted to examine whether the antibiotics still inhibited bacterial growth in the presence of montmorillonite. Escherichia coli was incubated with montmorillonite or antibiotic-adsorbed montmorillonite, and then the number of viable bacteria per mL was determined. The antimicrobial activity of tetracycline was affected in the presence of montmorillonite, as the growth of non-resistant bacteria was still found even when extremely high TC doses were used. Conversely, in the presence of montmorillonite, ciprofloxacin did inhibit E. coli bacterial growth at high concentrations. These results suggest that the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents in clayey soils depends on the amount of antibiotic substance present, and on the interactions between the antibiotic and the clays in the soil, as well.

Lv, Guocheng; Pearce, Cody W.; Gleason, Andrea; Liao, Libing; MacWilliams, Maria P.; Li, Zhaohui

2013-11-01

134

Copper(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine and o-phenanthroline: Theoretical studies, in vitro antimicrobial activity and alkaline phosphatase inhibitory effect  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calculations based on density functional methods are carried out for two Cu(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine (cnge) and o-phenanthroline (o-phen): [Cu(o-phen)2(cnge)](NO3)2?2H2O (1) and [Cu(o-phen)(cnge)(H2O)(NO3)2] (2). The calculated geometrical parameters are in agreement with the experimental values. The results of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) topological analysis of the electron density indicate that the Cu-N(phen) bonds in complex (1) have lower electron density, suggesting that those bonds are stronger in complex (2). Moreover, the ionic character of the Cu-N bond in the complex (1) is slightly stronger than that in the complex (2) and this situation would explain the fact that only complex (2) was stable in water solution. For this reason, the antimicrobial and enzymatic assays were performed using complex (2). It is well known that the increased use of antibiotics has resulted in the development of resistant bacterial and fungal strains. In this context, the study of novel antimicrobial agents has an enormous importance and metal complexes represent an interesting alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this work is to prove the modification of some biological properties like antimicrobial activity or alkaline phosphatase inhibitory activity upon copper complexation.

Martínez Medina, Juan J.; Islas, María S.; López Tévez, Libertad L.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Okulik, Nora B.; Williams, Patricia A. M.

2014-01-01

135

Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of some lichen species  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the research is to explore the overall in vitro antioxidant activity, total phenol content, reduction power and\\u000a antimicrobial activity of the methanol extracts of the lichens Cetraria pinastri, Cladonia digitata, Cladonia fimbriata, Fulgensia fulgens, Ochrolechia parella and Parmelia crinita. The methanol extract of the Cetraria pinastri showed a strong antioxidant activity, whereas the extracts of the species

B. Rankovi?; D. Rankovic; D. Maric

2010-01-01

136

Radical scavenging, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of halophytic species Laetitia Meot-Durosa*  

E-print Network

Radical scavenging, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of halophytic species Laetitia Meot-11Jan2011 #12;scavenging activity (Ksouri et al., 2006), but no antimicrobial properties have been investigations on in vitro antibacterial, radical scavenging and antioxidant activities of the extracts

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

137

Development and evaluation of antimicrobial activated carbon fiber filters using Sophora flavescens nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters have a wide range of applications, including air purification, dehumidification, and water purification, due to their large specific surface area, high adsorption capacity and rate, and specific surface reactivity. However, when airborne microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi adhere to the carbon substrate, ACF filters can become a source of microbial contamination, and their filter efficacy declines. Antimicrobial treatments are a promising means of preventing ACF bio-contamination. In this study, we demonstrate the use of Sophora flavescens in antimicrobial nanoparticles coated onto ACF filters. The particles were prepared using an aerosol process consisting of nebulization-thermal drying and particle deposition. The extract from S. flavescens is an effective, natural antimicrobial agent that exhibits antibacterial activity against various pathogens. The efficiency of Staphylococcus epidermidis inactivation increased with the concentration of S. flavescens nanoparticles in the ACF filter coating. The gas adsorption efficiency of the coated antimicrobial ACF filters was also evaluated using toluene. The toluene-removal capacity of the ACF filters remained unchanged while the antimicrobial activity was over 90% for some nanoparticle concentrations. Our results provide a scientific basis for controlling both bioaerosol and gaseous pollutants using antimicrobial ACF filters coated with S. flavescens nanoparticles. PMID:24951887

Sim, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Hwang, Gi Byoung; Seo, SungChul; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

2014-09-15

138

Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic ?-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

2004-03-01

139

Antimicrobial activity of lipophilic avian eggshell surface extracts.  

PubMed

The avian eggshell cuticle is the waxy outermost layer of the mineralized eggshell in direct contact with the environment. In this study, lipophilic eggshell surface extracts from three domestic species were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity. Chicken and goose extracts demonstrated potent bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, while activity could not be detected for duck eggshell surface extracts. Using the chicken as a model species, evaluation of albumen, fecal material, and uropygial gland extracts eliminated these as a potential source of the observed activity. Results suggest that lipophilic components are incorporated into the egg during its formation and play a role in antimicrobial defense. This study represents the first successful extraction and evaluation of lipophilic antimicrobial components from the avian egg. PMID:20804124

Wellman-Labadie, Olivier; Lemaire, Simon; Mann, Karlheinz; Picman, Jaroslav; Hincke, Maxwell T

2010-09-22

140

Fractionation of Mastic Gum in Relation to Antimicrobial Activity  

PubMed Central

Mastic gum is a viscous light-green liquid obtained from the bark of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia. which belongs to the Anacardiaceae family. The gum has been fractionated to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the whole gum and its fractions against various strains of Helicobacter pylori. The polymeric gum fraction was separated from the essential oil and the resin (trunk exudates without essential oil) to assess and compare the anti-H. pylori activity of the polymer fraction against lower molecular weight fractions, the gum itself and masticated gum. The polymer fraction was also oxidized and assessed for antimicrobial activity.

Sharifi, Mohammad Sharif; Hazell, Stuart Loyd

2009-01-01

141

Trachyspermum ammi (L.) sprague: chemical composition of essential oil and antimicrobial activities of respective fractions.  

PubMed

Resistance to antibacterial agents has become a serious problem for global health. The current study evaluated the antimicrobial activities of essential oil and respective fractions of Trachyspermum ammi (L.) Sprague. Seeds of the essential oil were extracted and fractionated using column chromatography. All fractions were then analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of the oil and its fractions were assessed using microdilution method. Compounds ?-terpinene (48.07%), ?-cymene (33.73%), and thymol (17.41%) were determined as major constituents. The effect of fraction II was better than total essential oil, fraction I, and standard thymol. The greater effect of fraction II compared to standard thymol showed the synergistic effects of the ingredients in this fraction. As this fraction and also total oil were effective on the studied microorganism, the combination of these products with current antimicrobial agents could be considered as new antimicrobial compounds in further investigations. PMID:25305209

Moein, Mahmoodreza R; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pakshir, Keyvan; Yavari, Farnoosh; Motamedi, Marjan; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

2015-01-01

142

Antimicrobial, antibiofilm and cytotoxic activities of Hakea sericea Schrader extracts  

PubMed Central

Background: Hakea sericea Schrader is an invasive shrub in Portuguese forests. Objective: The goal of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of H. sericea extracts against several strains of microorganisms, including the ability to inhibit the formation of biofilms. Additionally the cytotoxic properties of these extracts, against human cells, were assessed. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of the methanolic extracts of H. sericea was assessed by disk diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value determination. The antibiofilm activity was determined by quantification of total biofilm biomass with crystal violet. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by hemolysis assay and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test. Results: For Gram-positive bacteria, MIC values of H. sericea methanolic extracts ranged between 0.040 and 0.625 mg/mL, whereas the fruits extract yielded the lowest MIC for several strains of microorganisms, namely, S. aureus, B. cereus, L. monocytogenes and clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Stems and fruits extract at 2.5 mg/mL effectively eradicated the biofilm of S. aureus ATCC 25923, SA 01/10 and MRSA 12/10. Regarding leaves extract, hemolysis was not observed, and in the case of stems and fruits, hemolysis was verified only for higher concentrations, suggesting its low toxicity. Fruits extract presented no toxic effect to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) cells however for concentrations of 0.017 and 0.008 mg/mL this extract was able to decrease human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7) viability in about 60%, as MTT test results had confirmed. This is a clearly demonstrator of the cytotoxicity of this extract against MCF-7 cells. PMID:24914310

Luís, Ângelo; Breitenfeld, Luiza; Ferreira, Susana; Duarte, Ana Paula; Domingues, Fernanda

2014-01-01

143

A screening for antimicrobial activities of Caribbean herbal remedies  

PubMed Central

Background The TRAMIL program aims to understand, validate and expand health practices based on the use of medicinal plants in the Caribbean, which is a “biodiversity hotspot” due to high species endemism, intense development pressure and habitat loss. The antibacterial activity was examined for thirteen plant species from several genera that were identified as a result of TRAMIL ethnopharmacological surveys or were reported in ethnobotanical accounts from Puerto Rico. The aim of this study was to validate the traditional use of these plant species for the treatment of bacterial infections, such as conjunctivitis, fever, otitis media and furuncles. Methods An agar disc diffusion assay was used to examine five bacterial strains that are associated with the reported infections, including Staphylococcus saprophyticus (ATCC 15305), S. aureus (ATCC 6341), Escherichia coli (ATCC 4157), Haemophilus influenzae (ATCC 8142), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 7700) and Proteus vulgaris (ATCC 6896), as well as the fungus Candida albicans (ATCC 752). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were determined for each of the extracts that showed inhibitory activity. Results The decoctions of Pityrogramma calomelanos, Tapeinochilus ananassae, and Syzygium jambos, as well as the juice of Gossypium barbadense, showed?>?20% growth inhibition against several bacteria relative to the positive control, which was the antibiotic Streptomycin. Extracts with the best antimicrobial activities were S. jambos that showed MIC?=?31 ?g/mL and MBC?=?1.0 mg/mL against P. vulgaris and T. ananassae that showed MIC?=?15 ?g/mL against S. aureus. Conclusion This report confirms the traditional use of P. calomelanos for the treatment of kidney infections that are associated with stones, as well as the antimicrobial and bactericidal effects of T. ananassae against P. vulgaris and S. saprophyticus and the effects of S. jambos against S. aureus and S. saprophyticus. PMID:23731467

2013-01-01

144

Effect of Selectively Introducing Arginine and D-Amino Acids on the Antimicrobial Activity and Salt Sensitivity in Analogs of Human Beta-Defensins  

PubMed Central

We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human ?-defensins HBD-1and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs. PMID:24086767

Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

2013-01-01

145

Effect of selectively introducing arginine and D-amino acids on the antimicrobial activity and salt sensitivity in analogs of human beta-defensins.  

PubMed

We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human ?-defensins HBD-1 and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca˛? and Mg˛?. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs. PMID:24086767

Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

2013-01-01

146

Screening of antimicrobial activity of Cistus ladanifer and Arbutus unedo extracts.  

PubMed

In this work, the in vitro antimicrobial activity of different crude extracts obtained from Cistus ladanifer L. and Arbutus unedo L. was investigated. The ethanol, methanol and acetone/water extracts of Cistus ladanifer and Arbutus unedo were prepared using different extraction methods and their antimicrobial activities against reference strains, including three Gram-positive, five Gram-negative and three yeasts, and against clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, were investigated. All the extracts inhibited more than one microorganism; moreover all of them presented antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria, Klebsiella pneumonia, Candida tropicalis and Helicobacter pylori. It is noteworthy that the most considerable in vitro effect was observed against Helicobacter pylori. These inhibitory effects can be considered relevant to the development of new agents for inclusion in the treatment or prevention of infections by the tested strains. PMID:22077559

Ferreira, S; Santos, J; Duarte, A; Duarte, A P; Queiroz, J A; Domingues, F C

2012-01-01

147

Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Polish herbhoneys.  

PubMed

The present study focuses on samples of Polish herbhoneys (HHs), their chemical composition and antimicrobial activity. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was used to analyse eight samples of herbal honeys and three samples of nectar honeys. Their antimicrobial activities were tested on selected Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, as well as on pathogenic fungi Candida albicans. Ether extracts of HHs showed significant differences in composition but the principal groups found in the extracts were phenolics and aliphatic hydroxy acids typical of royal jelly and unsaturated dicarboxylic acids. In spite of the differences in chemical composition, antimicrobial activity of the extracts of HHs against all the tested microorganisms except E. coli was observed. PMID:25308646

Isidorov, V A; Bagan, R; Bakier, S; Swiecicka, I

2015-03-15

148

Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

The synthesis of nanosized particles of Ag-doped hydroxyapatite with antibacterial properties is of great interest for the development of new biomedical applications. The aim of this study was the evaluation of Ca10?xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2 nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) for their antibacterial and antifungal activity. Resistance to antimicrobial agents by pathogenic bacteria has emerged in the recent years and became a major health problem. Here, we report a method for synthesizing Ag doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. A silver-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite was synthesized at 100°C in deionised water. Also, in this paper Ag:HAp-NPs are evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungal strains. The specific antimicrobial activity revealed by the qualitative assay is demonstrating that our compounds are interacting differently with the microbial targets, probably due to the differences in the microbial wall structures. PMID:23509801

Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Costescu, Adrian; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Predoi, Daniela

2013-01-01

149

Antimicrobial activity of Hedeoma drummondii against opportunistic pathogens.  

PubMed

Hedeoma drummondii is a medicinal plant with diverse properties; however, validations of its medicinal uses are scarce. To evaluate its antimicrobial properties H. drummondii, was tested against opportunistic pathogens of medical importance. Antimicrobial tests were performed by the microdilution method in order to determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for each extract. Extracts of this plant showed relevant antimicrobial activity, results revealed that the hexanic extract has stronger activity and broader spectrum compared to acetone and methanol extracts. The activity of hexanic extract may be attributed mainly to the presence of the monoterpenes pulegone and menthol. In conclusion, the hexanic extract possess relevant antibacterial properties which suggests that H. drummondii have bioactive principles; these new data provide scientific support for the use of this plant in traditional medicine, particularly for gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:21870634

Viveros-Valdez, E; Rivas-Morales, C; Oranday-Cardenas, A; Verde-Star, M J; Carranza-Rosales, P

2011-02-15

150

Chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of essential oils from organically cultivated fennel cultivars.  

PubMed

Essential oils of the fruits of three organically grown cultivars of Egyptian fennel (Foeniculum vulgare var. azoricum, Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce and Foeniculum vulgare var. vulgare) were examined for their chemical constituents, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the essential oils revealed the presence of 18 major monoterpenoids in all three cultivars but their percentage in each oil were greatly different. trans-Anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene were highly abundant in all of the examined oils. Antioxidant activities of the essential oils were evaluated using the DPPH radical scavenging, lipid peroxidation and metal chelating assays. Essential oils from the azoricum and dulce cultivars were more effective antioxidants than that from the vulgare cultivar. Antimicrobial activities of each oil were measured against two species of fungi, two species of Gram negative and two species of Gram positive bacteria. All three cultivars showed similar antimicrobial activity. PMID:21285921

Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Ibrahim, Abeer Y; Hendawy, Saber F; Omer, Elsayed A; Hammouda, Faiza M; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia H; Saleh, Mahmoud A

2011-01-01

151

Antimicrobial effect of garlic (Allium sativum).  

PubMed

Medicinal plants like pumpkin seed, thyme, onion, Nigella sativa, lemon balm, and stinging nettle are used extensively today. One of these plants used most intensively and widespread is garlic. In this context, fresh shape, powder state and oil of garlic have been used all around the world, especially in Far East for centuries. It is scientifically proven that garlic is effectively used in cardiovascular diseases as a regulator of blood pressure, with dropper effects on glycaemia and high blood cholesterol, against bacterial, viral, mycotic and parasitic infections. It's also known that garlic is a wonderful plant having the properties of empowering immune system, anti-tumour and antioxidant effects. In this article, the summary of properties of garlic and its use against bacterial diseases is given. This article is a short review of recent patents on antimicrobial effect of garlic. PMID:19929845

Goncagul, Gulsen; Ayaz, Erol

2010-01-01

152

Screening of some Cuban medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial activities of 23 extracts of 12 Cuban plant species reported in traditional medicine were tested. The agar diffusion method was used to assess the activity against four bacteria and one yeast: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The results, evaluated as the diameter of the inhibition zone of microbial growth, showed that nine

M. J. Martínez; J. Betancourt; N. Alonso-González; A. Jauregui

1996-01-01

153

Antimicrobial activity of submerged cultures of Chilean basidiomycetes.  

PubMed

This study is part of a screening program aimed at searching for bioactive metabolites from Chilean basidiomycetes. Submerged cultivation of fungal mycelia in liquid media was evaluated for antimicrobial activity. A total of 148 strains were obtained in vitro. The extracts produced from submerged cultures were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. In the primary antimicrobial assay, approximately 60% of the extracts presented positive biological activity. The highest frequencies of active strains were from the orders Agaricales (31.0%), Polyporales (20.6%), Sterales (18.3%), Boletales (11.4%), and Cortinariales (9.1%). Antifungal activity was more pronounced than antibacterial activity. Twelve extracts that exhibited strong antimicrobial activity showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 50?µL/mL against Bacillus brevis and 25?50?µL/mL against Penicillium notatum and Paecilomyces variotii. The biological activity of some strains did not vary considerably, regardless of the substrate or collection site whereas, for others, it showed marked variations. Differences in antimicrobial activities observed in the different fungal genera suggested that the ability to produce bioactive compounds is not homogenously distributed among basidiomycetes. The information obtained from this study reveals that Chilean basidiomycetes are able to generate small and/or large variations in the normal pathway of compounds production. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate this biological and chemical wealth, which could be an unsuspected reservoir of new and potentially useful molecules. PMID:20425689

Aqueveque, Pedro; Anke, Timm; Saéz, Katia; Silva, Mario; Becerra, José

2010-10-01

154

Antimicrobial activity of crude methanolic extract from Phyllanthus niruri.  

PubMed

The antibacterial efficiency of the methanolic extract of Phyllanthus niruri Linn. was investigated against pathogenic bacteria responsible for common infections of skin, and urinary and gastrointestinal tracts. The extract demonstrated antibacterial activities against all the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested. The results obtained suggested that at higher concentrations the extract would eradicate the growth of bacterial cells. The bacterial cells, after exposure to the extract, showed complete alteration in their morphology, followed by collapse of the cells beyond repair. The study revealed that the methanolic extract of P. niruri may be an effective antibacterial agent to treat bacterial infections since the extract exhibited significant antimicrobial potency, comparable with that of the standard antibiotic chloramphenicol. PMID:23738462

Ibrahim, Darah; Hong, Lim Sheh; Kuppan, Ninthianantham

2013-04-01

155

Quaternary ammonium poly(diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) possessing antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

Quaternary ammonium (QA) methacrylate monomers and polymers were synthesized from a N-alkylation of N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEM) monomer. Linear copolymers, and for the first time reported crosslinked nanoparticles (NPs), based QA-PDEAEM were prepared by radical polymerization of the quaternized QA-DEAEM monomers with either methyl methacrylate (MMA) or a divinyl monomer. QA-PDEAEM NPs of 50-70nm were embedded in polyethylene vinyl acetate coating. QA-polymers with N-C8 and N-C18 alkyl chains and copolymers with methyl methacrylate were prepared at different molar ratios and examined for their antimicrobial effectiveness. These coatings exhibited strong antibacterial activity against four representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25686793

Farah, Shady; Aviv, Oren; Laout, Natalia; Ratner, Stanislav; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J

2015-04-01

156

Synthesis and anti-microbial activity of hydroxylammonium ionic liquids.  

PubMed

Eight hydroxylammonium-based room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been synthesized by acid-base neutralization of ethanolamines with organic acids. The ILs were characterized by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies and elemental analysis. Their anti-microbial activities were determined using the well-diffusion method. All eight ILs were toxic to Staphylococcus aureus, while 2-hydroxyethylammonium lactate and 2-hydroxy-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-methylethanaminium acetate showed high anti-microbial activity against a wide range of human pathogens. PMID:21421256

Ismail Hossain, M; El-Harbawi, Mohanad; Noaman, Yousr Abdulhadi; Bustam, Mohd Azmi B; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Affandi, Nor Azrin; Hefter, Glenn; Yin, Chun-Yang

2011-06-01

157

The Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Heterocyclic Derivatives of Totarol  

PubMed Central

The synthesis and antimicrobial activity of heterocyclic analogues of the diterpenoid totarol are described. An advanced synthetic intermediate with a ketone on the A-ring is used to attach fused heterocycles, and a carbon-to-nitrogen atom replacement is made on the B-ring by de novo synthesis. A-ring analogues with an indole attached exhibit, for the first time, enhanced antimicrobial activity relative to the parent natural product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the indole analogues do not target the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ as had been hypothesized for totarol. PMID:23119123

2012-01-01

158

Investigating the antimicrobial peptide 'window of activity' using cationic lipopeptides with hydrocarbon and fluorinated tails.  

PubMed

To probe the effect of carbon-fluorine bonds on antimicrobial peptide-membrane interactions, 24 cationic lipopeptides were created. The collection of lipopeptides was built from two different peptide sequences, KGK and KKK, with a variety of different lipids selected to probe the effectiveness of both hydrocarbon and fluorinated tails. The antimicrobial activity of each peptide was tested against a mixture of pathogenic and reference bacterial strains, with the cationic disinfectant benzalkonium chloride as a positive control. Non-specific interactions with hydrophobic proteins were assessed by repeating antimicrobial testing in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the toxicity of the lipopeptides was assessed by measuring lysis of ovine erythrocytes. Peptide sequence had a moderate effect on activity, with the most active peptide (C16-KGK) inhibiting the growth of two Staphylococcus epidermidis strains at ? 0.25 ?g/mL. Tail composition was less important than the overall hydrophobicity, with the most active fluorinated tails equivalent to moderately active hydrocarbon tails. The activity of all peptides was significantly reduced by the presence of BSA, and haemolysis was closely correlated with antimicrobial activity. PMID:22578748

Findlay, Brandon; Zhanel, George G; Schweizer, Frank

2012-07-01

159

Antimicrobial activity of the Anseriform outer eggshell and cuticle.  

PubMed

The avian eggshell is a complex, multifunctional biomineral composed of a calcium carbonate mineral phase and an organic phase of lipids and proteins. The outermost layer of the eggshell, the eggshell cuticle, is an organic layer of variable thickness composed of polysaccharides, hydroxyapatite crystals, lipids and glycoprotein. In addition to regulating gas exchanges, the eggshell cuticle may contain antimicrobial elements. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of eggshell cuticle and outer eggshell protein extracts from four Anseriform species: wood duck (Aix sponsa), hooded merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus), Canada goose (Branta canadensis) and mute swan (Cygnus olor). Cuticle and outer eggshell protein was extracted by urea or HCl treatment of eggs. C-type lysozyme, ovotransferrin and an ovocalyxin-32-like protein were detected in all extracts. Cuticle and outer eggshell protein extracts inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli D31, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis. The presence of active antimicrobial proteins within the avian cuticle and outer eggshell suggests a role in antimicrobial defense. Protein extracts from the cavity nesting hooded merganser were especially potent. The unique environmental pressures exerted on cavity-nesting species may have led to the evolution of potent antimicrobial defenses. PMID:18289902

Wellman-Labadie, Olivier; Picman, Jaroslav; Hincke, Maxwell T

2008-04-01

160

Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork. PMID:23834804

Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

2013-07-01

161

Antimicrobial effect of nylon fiber immersed with nano-silver  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of new products based on the immobilization of nanoparticles on fibers has recently received a growing interest from both the academic and industrial sectors. A wide range of nanoparticles and nano-structures can be immobilized on fibers, which brings new properties to the final product. In the present work, silver nanoparticle was immobilized on nylon fibers by immersed deposition method as an antimicrobial agent. Silver colloid was produced by chemical reduction of silver salt (silver nitrate) solution, in the presence of sodium citrate. Synthesis of silver colloid was carried out by using chemical reduction method at temperature of 95 and 100°C. The mixture was heated until color changed into pale yellow. UV-Vis spectrometry indicated formation of silver nanoparticles. UV-Vis analysis was reported that the absorption spectrum of silver nanoparticles showed a maximum between 420 and 450 nm. Characterization of silver nanoparticles was conducted using Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that silver nanoparticles forms aggregates on the surface of fiber, during deposition process. The size of aggregates varied from 19.9 +/- 4.8 nm to 49.5 +/- 12.5 nm. To evaluate the antimicrobial effects against microorganisms, we used representative microorganisms S. aureus. Silver nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity reducing bacterial growth.

Haryono, Agus; Harmami, Sri Budi; Sondari, Dewi

2010-05-01

162

Comparison of Serum Bactericidal Activity Among Three Antimicrobial Combinations  

PubMed Central

Three antimicrobial combinations, ticarcillin plus cephalothin (T+C), ticarcillin plus gentamicin (T+G), and cephalothin plus gentamicin (C+G), were administered to 105 febrile granulocytopenic cancer patients at the Baltimore Cancer Research Center as part of a multi-institutional prospective randomized antibiotic trial. The sera from 32 of these patients (T+C?10 patients, T+G?10 patients, and C+G?12 patients) obtained 1 h post-antibiotic administration were examined for bactericidal activity against 11 strains each of the most common pathogens infecting the granulocytopenic host: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. Each of the three antibiotic regimens produced a high degree of bactericidal activity in these sera against S. aureus and E. coli. P. aeruginosa was equally, although poorly, killed by sera containing ticarcillin (T+G, T+C), whereas C+G produced no measurable serocidal activity (P < 0.05). Sera with C+G killed K. pneumoniae more effectively than T+G; T+C produced the least killing effect of the three regimens against this organism (P < 0.05). The bactericidal activity of the serum from these 32 patients supplements the overall clinical results of the multi-institutional antibiotic trial and suggests that T+G is a useful initial regimen for empiric therapy of febrile episodes in granulocytopenic cancer patients. PMID:677866

Murillo, Jorge; Standiford, Harold C.; Schimpff, Stephen C.; Tatem, Beverly A.

1978-01-01

163

Phytochemical screening and in vitro antimicrobial activity of Thymus lanceolatus Desf. from Algeria  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the antimicrobial activity of an endemic Thyme, Thymus lanceolatus (T. lanceolatus), against a large number of pathogens. Methods Four solvent extracts were evaluated for antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion method and MIC determination on twenty-one strains. Results T. lanceolatus extracts showed a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, especially ethanol extract with inhibition zone diameters ranging from 14 to 32 mm, and MIC values from 0.052 to 0.500 mg/mL. Chloroform extract was more active against Gram-positive bacteria, since it has an inhibitory potency on Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis at only 31 µg/mL. While, hexane and water extracts were less effective since they were inactive against several strains. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that T. lanceolatus has a strong antimicrobial potential, which justifies its use in folk medicine for treatment of infectious diseases. Since this species is poorly investigated, further refined studies on it pure secondary metabolites are needed and very important, in the perspective to identify new antimicrobial molecules from this endemic plant.

Benbelaďd, Fethi; Khadir, Abdelmounaďm; Abdoune, Mohamed Amine; Bendahou, Mourad

2013-01-01

164

Osmoprotective polymer additives attenuate the membrane pore-forming activity of antimicrobial peptoids.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are critical components of the innate immune system and exhibit bactericidal activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria. We investigated the use of N-substituted glycine peptoid oligomers as AMP mimics with potent antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial mechanism of action varies among different AMPs, but many of these peptides can penetrate bacterial cell membranes, causing cell lysis. We previously hypothesized that amphiphilic cyclic peptoids may act through a similar pore formation mechanism against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Peptoid-induced membrane disruption is observed by scanning electron microscopy and results in a loss of membrane integrity. We demonstrate that the antimicrobial activity of the peptoids is attenuated with the addition of polyethylene glycol osmoprotectants, signifying protection from a loss of osmotic balance. This decrease in antimicrobial activity is more significant with larger osmoprotectants, indicating that peptoids form pores with initial diameters of ?2.0-3.8 nm. The initial membrane pores formed by cyclic peptoid hexamers are comparable in diameter to those formed by larger and structurally distinct AMPs. After 24 h, the membrane pores expand to >200 nm in diameter. Together, these results indicate that cyclic peptoids exhibit a mechanism of action that includes effects manifested at the cell membrane of MRSA. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 103: 227-236, 2015. PMID:25403751

Smith, Peter T; Huang, Mia L; Kirshenbaum, Kent

2015-04-01

165

Effect of Plant Age on Endophytic Bacterial Diversity of Balloon Flower ( Platycodon grandiflorum ) Root and Their Antimicrobial Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) is widely cultivated vegetable and used as a remedy for asthma in East Asia. Experiments were conducted to isolate endophytic\\u000a bacteria from 1-, 3-, and 6-year-old balloon flower roots and to analyze the enzymatic, antifungal, and anti-human pathogenic\\u000a activities of the potential endophytic biocontrol agents obtained. Total 120 bacterial colonies were isolated from the interior\\u000a of

Jong Min Kim; Myoung Geun Yun; Ji Joong Cho; Eun Jin Kim; Young Han Lee; Han Dae Yun

2010-01-01

166

Poly(ethyleneimines) in dermal applications: biocompatibility and antimicrobial effects.  

PubMed

Cationic polyamines, such as poly(ethyleneimines) (PEIs), may recommend themselves for antimicrobial applications as they can interact with microbial membranes resulting in their disruption. The purpose of the study was the assessment of biocompatibility and antibacterial activity of PEIs with different architectures (branched (b) and linear (l)) and molar masses (0.8-750 kDa). lPEI and bPEI exhibited a strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with a more pronounced effect on the Gram-positive bacteria. lPEIs further demonstrated a higher antibacterial efficacy compared to bPEIs but no significant differences between 5 and 25 kDa were observed. In accordance, antibacterial activity of bPEI did not specifically depend on molar mass. Only slightly lower minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were observed at 5 kDa (S. aureus) and 25 kDa (E. coli) in the tests. As PEIs are compelling candidates for use in antimicrobial treatment, two basic aspects have to be investigated: treatment effectiveness and safety. PEIs clearly induced molecular weight dependent cytotoxic effects in vitro. PEIs with low molecular weight (0.8 and 5 kDa) exhibited higher biocompatibility. Nonetheless, the results confirmed a low genotoxic potential of lPEI and bPEIs. In conclusion, 2.5 kDa-lPEI and 0.8 kDa-bPEI can be recommended for use as antimicrobial polymers in dermal applications due to their high biocompatibility with concomitant antibacterial efficacy. PMID:23948135

Wiegand, Cornelia; Bauer, Marius; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Fischer, Dagmar

2013-11-01

167

Antimicrobial, resistance-modifying effects, antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of Mezoneuron benthamianum Baill., Securinega virosa Roxb. &Wlld. and Microglossa pyrifolia Lam.  

PubMed

Mezoneuron benthamianum, Securinega virosa and Microglossa pyrifolia are used in folk medicine in Ghana for the treatment of dermal infections and wounds. Petroleum spirit, chloroform and ethanol extracts of the plants were tested for antimicrobial activity against a battery of organisms using the agar well diffusion technique and a serial dilution microassay. The resistance modifying activities of these extracts on standard antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus possessing efflux mechanisms of resistance have also been assessed. A 4-fold potentiation of the activity of norfloxacin was observed for ethanol and chloroform extracts of M. benthamianum and S. virosa, respectively, whilst the petroleum spirit extract resulted in a 2-fold potentiation with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in the range 8-16 microg/mL. Ethanol extracts of all three species, the petroleum spirit extract of M. benthamianum and the chloroform extracts of M. benthamianum and S. virosa, showed interesting antimicrobial activities. Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities using DPPH spectrophotometric and TBA lipid peroxidation assays were also conducted. Of the five extracts that showed antioxidant activities, the petroleum spirit and chloroform extracts of M. benthamianum rated most highly by displaying strong free radical scavenging activity with IC50 values of 15.33 and 19.72 microg/mL, respectively. Lipid peroxidation inhibition provided by the same two extracts also produced the lowest IC50 values for all the extracts tested, of 23.15 and 30.36 microg/mL. These findings therefore give some support to the ethnopharmacological use of the plants in the treatment of various skin diseases and wounds, as well as demonstrating the potential of some of the plants as sources of compounds possessing the ability to modulate bacterial multidrug resistance. PMID:16397919

Dickson, R A; Houghton, P J; Hylands, P J; Gibbons, S

2006-01-01

168

Strand Length-Dependent Antimicrobial Activity and Membrane-Active Mechanism of Arginine- and Valine-Rich ?-Hairpin-Like Antimicrobial Peptides  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial peptides with amphipathic ?-hairpin-like structures have potent antimicrobial properties and low cytotoxicity. The effect of VR or RV motifs on ?-hairpin-like antimicrobial peptides has not been investigated. In this study, a series of ?-hairpin-like peptides, Ac-C(VR)nDPG (RV)nC-NH2 (n = 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5), were synthesized, and the effect of chain length on antimicrobial activity was evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of the peptides initially increased and then decreased with chain length. Longer peptides stimulated the toxicity to mammalian cells. VR3, a 16-mer peptide with seven amino acids in the strand, displayed the highest therapeutic index and represents the optimal chain length. VR3 reduced bacterial counts in the mouse peritoneum and increased the survival rate of mice at 7 days after Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in vivo. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra demonstrated that the secondary structure of the peptides was a ?-hairpin or ?-sheet in the presence of an aqueous and membrane-mimicking environment. VR3 had the same degree of penetration into the outer and inner membranes as melittin. Experiments simulating the membrane environment showed that Trp-containing VRW3 (a VR3 analog) tends to interact preferentially with negatively charged vesicles in comparison to zwitterionic vesicles, which supports the biological activity data. Additionally, VR3 resulted in greater membrane damage than melittin as determined using a flow cytometry-based membrane integrity assay. Collectively, the data for synthetic lipid vesicles and whole bacteria demonstrated that the VR3 peptide killed bacteria via targeting the cell membrane. This assay could be an effective pathway to screen novel candidates for antibiotic development. PMID:22391533

Dong, Na; Ma, Qingquan; Lv, Yinfeng; Hu, Wanning; Gu, Yao; Li, Yuzhi

2012-01-01

169

Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) with antiviral activity against fish nodavirus.  

PubMed

Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) is classified as betanodavirus of Nodaviridae, and has caused mass mortality of numerous marine fish species at larval stage. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play an important role of innate immunity either against bacterial pathogens or viruses. Up to date, little is known if any AMP could effectively inhibit fish nodaviruses and its mechanism. In this study, the antiviral activities of three antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) against grouper NNV (GNNV) were screened in the fish cell line. Two of the three AMPs, tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5) and cyclic shrimp anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (cSALF), were able to agglutinate purified NNV particles into clump, and the clumps were further confirmed to be viral proteins by TEM and Western blot. The NNV solution, separately pre-mixed with AMP (TH 1-5 or cSALF) or deionized-distilled water for 1 h, was used to infect GF-1 cells, and the levels of capsid protein in the GNNV-AMP-infected cells at 1 h post infection were much lower than that in the GNNV-H(2)O-infected cells, indicating that only a small portion of viral particles in the GNNV-AMP mixture could successfully infected the cells. Treatment of cBB cells with TH 1-5 and cSALF did not induce Mx gene expression; however, grouper epinecidin-1 (CP643-1) could induce the expression of Mx in the pre-treated cBB cells. This study revealed three AMPs with anti-NNV activity through two different mechanisms, and shed light on the future application in aquaculture. PMID:20004246

Chia, Ta-Jui; Wu, Yu-Chi; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Chi, Shau-Chi

2010-03-01

170

Effects of antimicrobial peptide L-K6, a temporin-1CEb analog on oral pathogen growth, Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation, and anti-inflammatory activity.  

PubMed

Dental caries and periodontitis are common bacterial mouth infections. As a potentially attractive substitute for conventional antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides have been widely tested and used for controlling bacterial infections. In this study, we tested the efficacy of the peptides from the skin secretions of Rana chensinensis for killing several major cariogenic and periodontic pathogens as well as Candida albicans. L-K6, a temporin-1CEb analog, exhibited high antimicrobial activity against the tested oral pathogens and was able to inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and reduce 1-day-old S. mutans biofilms with a minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration and reducing concentration of 3.13 and 6.25 ?M, respectively. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the peptide significantly reduced cell viability within oral biofilms. Furthermore, as little as 5 ?M L-K6 significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and interleukin-1?-induced productions of interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor-? from THP-1 monocytic cells. This anti-inflammatory activity is associated with the binding of L-K6 to LPS and neutralizing LPS-induced proinflammatory responses in THP-1 cells, as well as dissociating LPS aggregates. Our results suggest that L-K6 may have potential clinical applications in treating dental caries by killing S. mutans within dental plaque and acting as anti-inflammatory agents in infected tissues. PMID:25056289

Shang, Dejing; Liang, Hao; Wei, Shi; Yan, Xin; Yang, Qingzu; Sun, Yue

2014-10-01

171

Antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of Turkish plant spices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of nine plant spices (savory, laurel, oregano, basil, cumin, seafennel, myrtle, pickling herb, and mint) were tested at three concentrations (1, 10, and 15%) and tested on various microorganisms (Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae and Aspergillus niger). The results showed

M. Özcan; Osman Erkmen

2001-01-01

172

Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity  

PubMed Central

The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), ?-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

Borug?, O; Jianu, C; Mi?c?, C; Gole?, I; Gruia, AT; Horhat, FG

2014-01-01

173

The antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria from fermented maize (kenkey) and their interactions during fermentation.  

PubMed

A total of 241 lactic acid bacteria belonging to Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus fermentum/reuteri and Lactobacillus brevis from various processing stages of maize dough fermentation were investigated. Results indicated that each processing stage has its own microenvironment with strong antimicrobial activity. About half of the Lact. plantarum and practically all of the Lact. fermentum/reuteri investigated were shown to inhibit other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, explaining the elimination of these organisms during the initial processing stages. Further, widespread microbial interactions amounting to 85% to 18% of all combinations tested were demonstrated amongst lactic acid bacteria within the various processing stages, i.e. raw material, steeping, 0 h and 48 h of fermentation, explaining the microbial succession taking place amongst lactic acid bacteria during fermentation. The antimicrobial effect was explained by the combined effect of acids, compounds sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and other compounds with antimicrobial activity with the acid production being the most important factor. The pattern of antimicrobial factors was not species-specific and the safety and storage stability of fermented maize seem to depend on a mixed population of lactic acid bacteria with different types of antimicrobial characteristics. This means that introduction of pure cultures as starters may impose a risk to the product. PMID:8567490

Olsen, A; Halm, M; Jakobsen, M

1995-11-01

174

In vitro antimicrobial activity of nanoconjugated vancomycin against drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

The mounting problem of antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus has prompted renewed efforts toward the discovery of novel antimicrobial agents. The present study was aimed to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of nanoconjugated vancomycin against vancomycin sensitive and resistant S. aureus strains. Folic acid tagged chitosan nanoparticles are used as Trojan horse to deliver vancomycin into bacterial cells. In vitro antimicrobial activity of nanoconjugated vancomycin against VSSA and VRSA strains was determined by minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, tolerance and disc agar diffusion test. Cell viability and biofilm formation was assessed as indicators of pathogenicity. To establish the possible antimicrobial mechanism of nanoconjugated vancomycin, the cell wall thickness was studied by TEM study. The result of the present study reveals that nano-sized vehicles enhance the transport of vancomycin across epithelial surfaces, and exhibits its efficient drug-action which has been understood from studies of MIC, MBC, DAD of chitosan derivative nanoparticle loaded with vancomycin. Tolerance values distinctly showed that vancomycin loaded into nano-conjugate is very effective and has strong bactericidal effect on VRSA. These findings strongly enhanced our understanding of the molecular mechanism of nanoconjugated vancomycin and provide additional rationale for application of antimicrobial therapeutic approaches for treatment of staphylococcal pathogenesis. PMID:22841851

Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

2012-10-15

175

Antimicrobial activity of kaurane diterpenes against oral pathogens.  

PubMed

Two kaurane diterpenes, ent-kaur-16(17)-en-19-oic acid (KA) and 15-beta-isovaleryloxy-ent-kaur-16(17)-en-19-oic acid (KA-Ival), isolated from Aspilia foliacea, and the methyl ester derivative of KA (KA-Me) were evaluated against oral pathogens. KA was the most active compound, with MIC values of 10 microg mL(-1) against the following microorganisms: Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Lactobacillus casei. However, KA did not show significant activity against Streptococcus salivarius and Enterococcus faecalis, with MIC values equal to 100 and 200 microg mL(-1), respectively. Our results show that KA has potential to be used as a prototype for the discovery of new effective anti-infection agents against microorganisms responsible for caries and periodontal diseases. Moreover, these results allow to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to studies on the structure-activity relationship of this type of metabolites with respect to caries and periodontal diseases. PMID:18669015

Ambrosio, Sergio R; Furtado, Niege A J C; de Oliveira, Dionéia C R; da Costa, Fernando B; Martins, Carlos H G; de Carvalho, Tatiane C; Porto, Thiago S; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S

2008-01-01

176

Steroid dimers-in vitro cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities.  

PubMed

The in vitro cytotoxic activity of previously synthesized steroid dimers with different spacer group (sulfide, trithiolane ring or phosphorotrithioate) and the substituent at C-17 position was tested for their possible effects against following human tumor cell lines: cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa), chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) and two human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-453). These compounds, applied at micromolar concentrations, exhibited cytotoxic activity of different intensity (compared with cisplatin as a control), modality and selectivity in these malignant cell lines. The best activity against all four cell cancer lines was exhibited by dimer-sulfides. All screened compounds exerted concentration-dependent cytotoxic activity against leukemia K562 cells. The compounds which exerted the most pronounced cytotoxic action exhibited notably higher cytotoxic activities against K562, HeLa and MDA-MB-453 cells in comparison to resting and PHA-stimulated PBMC, pointing to a significant selectivity in their antitumor actions. Examination of the mechanisms of cytotoxicity on leukemia K562 cells revealed pro-apoptotic action of each of the investigated compounds applied at concentrations 2IC50. The most prominent pro-apoptotic action was exhibited by dimer-sulfide of cholest-4-en-3-one. Furthermore, almost all of the tested compounds at IC50 concentrations induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest in K562 cells. Antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungal cells, and toxicity to brine shrimp Artemia salina, were evaluated. There was no antibacterial activity. The best antifungal activity was exhibited against Saccharomyces cerevisiae by dimers linked with trithiolane ring, indicating a selective activity of investigated compounds. PMID:24923733

Krsti?, Natalija M; Mati?, Ivana Z; Jurani?, Zorica D; Novakovi?, Irena T; Sladi?, Dušan M

2014-09-01

177

Chitosancellulose composite for wound dressing material. Part 2. Antimicrobial activity, blood absorption ability, and biocompatibility  

E-print Network

Chitosan­cellulose composite for wound dressing material. Part 2. Antimicrobial activity, blood wound dressings. The composites, in both air-dried and lyophilized forms, signifi- cantly inhibit be effectively used as a material in wound dressings. VC 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B

Reid, Scott A.

178

Antimicrobial activity of Amazonian oils against Paenibacillus species.  

PubMed

The Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the primary bacterial pathogen of honeybee brood and the causative agent of American foulbrood disease (AFB). One of the feasible alternative treatments being used for their control of this disease is essential oils. In this study in vitro antimicrobial activity of Andiroba and Copaíba essential oils against Paenibacillus species, including P. larvae was evaluated. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Mueller-Hinton broth by the microdilution method was assessed. Andiroba registered MIC values of 1.56-25%, while the MICs values obtained for Copaíba oil were of 1.56-12.5%. In order to determine the time-response effect of essential oils on P. larvae, this microorganism was exposed to the oils for up to 48 h. After 24 h treatment with Andiroba oil and after 48 h treatment with Copaíba oil no viable cells of P. larvae ATCC 9545 were observed. The possible toxic effect of essential oils were assessed by the spraying application method of the same concentrations of MICs. Bee mortality was evident only in treatment with Andiroba oil and the Copaíba oil shows no toxic effects after 10 days of observation. Taking together ours results showed for the first time that these oils presented a high activity against Paenibacillus species showing that Copaíba oil may be a candidate for the treatment or prevention of AFB. PMID:22200645

Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; dos Santos Alves, Camilla Filippi; Schneider, Taiane; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Aurich, Carlos; Giongo, Janice Luehring; Brandelli, Adriano; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo

2012-03-01

179

In vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic leaf extract of Psidium guajava L.  

PubMed Central

Aim: This study was designed to examine the chemical composition and in vitro antimicrobial potential of methanolic extract of Psidium guajava Linn (Myrtaceae). Materials and Methods: The inhibitory effect of methanolic extract of P. guajava was tested against three bacterial and two fungal strains by using the paper disc diffusion method. Results: The methanolic extract exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli with minimum inhibitory concentration, 0.78 ?g/ml, minimum bactericidal concentration of 50 ?g/ml, and appreciable antifungal activity with minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.5 ?g/ml. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of methanolic extract revealed the presence of antimicrobial compounds such as flavonoids, steroids, and tannins, which may contribute for the antimicrobial action of P. guajava. Conclusion: The extract was found to be bacteriostatic and fungistatic in action. PMID:21687350

Dhiman, Anju; Nanda, Arun; Ahmad, Sayeed; Narasimhan, B.

2011-01-01

180

Extraction, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Epimedium acuminatum Franch. polysaccharide.  

PubMed

Polysaccharides from Epimedium acuminatum were extracted by hot water and optimized with response surface methodology. The optimal conditions of the extraction were determined to be the ratio of water to raw material of 29.61, extraction temperature of 85.67°C and extraction time of 3.57 h. Under these optimal conditions, the yield of polysaccharide was 8.21%, which was well matched with the predictive yield (8.23%). Moreover, three purified fractions (EAP40-1, EAP60-1 and EAP80-2) were obtained for further chemical analysis, antioxidant activity analysis and antimicrobial activity analysis. EAP40-1 with molecular weight of 138,884 Da showed the best radical scavenging activity. Meanwhile, EAP60-1 with molecular weight of 114,667 Da was found to exhibit significant antihemolytic activity and antimicrobial activity. PMID:23688459

Cheng, Haoran; Feng, Shiling; Shen, Shian; Zhang, Li; Yang, Ruiwu; Zhou, Yonghong; Ding, Chunbang

2013-07-01

181

2-pyrones possessing antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities.  

PubMed

The 2-pyrone sub-unit is found in a number of natural products possessing broad spectrum biological activity. Such compounds are validated as being capable of binding to specific protein domains and able to exert a remarkable range of biological effects. In an effort to identify synthetic 2-pyrones with interesting biological effects, herein we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 4-substituted-6-methyl-2-pyrones. Synthetic routes to 4-alkyl/alkenyl/aryl/alkynyl-6-methyl-2-pyrones have been developed utilising Sonogashira, Suzuki and Negishi cross-coupling starting from readily available 4-bromo-6-methyl-2-pyrone. Specific conditions for each organometallic protocol were required for successful cross-coupling. In particular, a triethylamine/acetonitrile--base/solvent mixture was crucial to Sonogashira alkynylation of 4-bromo-6-methyl-2-pyrone, whereas thallium carbonate was a mandatory base for the Suzuki cross-coupling of trialkylboranes. The 2-pyrones demonstrate potent inhibitory activity against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Botrytis cinerea. The growth inhibitory activities of selected 2-pyrones were determined in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma and K562 human chronic myelogenous leukaemia cell lines using an in vitro cell culture system (MTT assay). These studies demonstrate that 4-phenylethynyl-, 4-tetrahydropyranylpropargyl ether- and 4-ethynyl-6-methyl-2-pyrones have excellent potential as a new class of anticancer agents. PMID:15246105

Fairlamb, Ian J S; Marrison, Lester R; Dickinson, Julia M; Lu, Feng-Ju; Schmidt, Jan Peter

2004-08-01

182

[Current animal feeds with antimicrobial activity].  

PubMed

Among the growth-promoting substances and factors contributing to fodder utilization in growing farm animals, also called nutritive, ergotropic means, the antibiotics and some synthetic chemotherapeutics have acquired special importance. To avoid the hazardous effect in humans consuming products of animal origin there should be no residual amounts of these stimulating agents in such products. That is why it has been assumed in a number of countries to use for the same purpose only nutritive means that are not applied as therapeutic agents. Such means should neither induce resistence to antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in microorganism nor should they be resorbed by the alimentary tract (or resorption should be negligible) or they are rapidly eliminated from the animal body, leaving no residual amounts. They should likewise act chiefly against gram-positive organisms, inducing no allergic reactions in the animals. Described are the following nutritive antibiotics: flavophospholipol (bambermycin, menomycin--flavomycin, producing a nutritive effect also in ruminants with a developed forestomach, and rebuilds sensitivity in antibiotic-resistant organisms belonging to Enterobacteriaceae), avoparcin (avotan--also active in ruminants with a developed forestomach), virginiamycin (staphylomycin--escalin, stafac), zincbacitracin (bacipharmin, baciferm), grisin (kormogrisin, of a road spectrum, with an antimycotic effect, raising the fertilization rate and activating phagocitosis), vitamycin-A (vitamycin--active also at retinol deficiency, lambdamycin, nosiheptide (primofax), efrotomycin. Due consideration is given to such chemotherapeutics as nitrovin (payson, paison), carbadox (mecadox, fortigro, of a broad spectrum retained for a longer period in the body of pigs), olaquindox (bio-N-celbar--of a broad spectrum, particularly with regard to gram-negative organisms, applied at present as a therapeutic and prophylactic preparation), cyadox (with a broad sprectrum). The following polyether ionophoric antibiotics are mentioned: monensine (rumensine, elancoban), lassalocide (avatek, lasotek), slinomycin(eustin, ustin, coxistac), lonomycin (emercide), harasine. Dosage rates and other data are given characterising the respective preparations. PMID:7046217

Drumev, D

1981-01-01

183

Antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity of the lichens Cladonia furcata, Lecanora atra and Lecanora muralis  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity of the acetone extracts of the lichens Cladonia furcata, Lecanora atra and Lecanora muralis. Methods Antioxidant activity was evaluated by five separate methods: free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power, determination of total phenolic compounds and determination of total flavonoid content. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method against six species of bacteria and ten species of fungi. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. Results Of the lichens tested, Lecanora atra had largest free radical scavenging activity (94.7% inhibition), which was greater than the standard antioxidants. Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. The strong relationships between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant effect of tested extracts were observed. Extract of Cladonia furcata was the most active antimicrobial agent with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.78 to 25 mg/mL. All extracts were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 8.51 to 40.22 ?g/mL. Conclusions The present study shows that tested lichen extracts demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer effects. That suggest that lichens may be used as as possible natural antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer agents to control various human, animal and plant diseases. PMID:22013953

2011-01-01

184

Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled

Bowen Li

2008-01-01

185

Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) with antiviral activity against fish nodavirus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) is classified as betanodavirus of Nodaviridae, and has caused mass mortality of numerous marine fish species at larval stage. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play an important role of innate immunity either against bacterial pathogens or viruses. Up to date, little is known if any AMP could effectively inhibit fish nodaviruses and its mechanism. In this study, the antiviral

Ta-Jui Chia; Yu-Chi Wu; Jyh-Yih Chen; Shau-Chi Chi

2010-01-01

186

Antimicrobial and antiproliferative activity of Athamanta sicula L. (Apiaceae)  

PubMed Central

Background: Athamanta sicula L., a member of Apiaceae, is an annual perennial herb and it is known in Sicilian popular medicine with the name of “spaccapietre” (rock splitters), because fresh roots infusions are indicated as diuretic and used in the treatment of diseases of the urinary tract, and to dissolve kidney stones. Materials and Methods: Acetone extracts of leaves, flowers, and stems of A. sicula L. were investigated in vitro for antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Antimicrobial activity was carried out against bacterial and fungal strains and antiproliferative activity against a group of human cancer cell lines (K-562, NCI-H460, and MCF-7). Results: All acetone extracts, apiol and myristicin, resulted inactive as antimicrobial agents at the maximum tested concentration of 200 ?g/mL, but they induced significant antiproliferative activity on the tested cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our study show that both apiol and myristicin could be tested as novel treatment in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:21472076

Stefano, Vita Di; Pitonzo, Rosa; Schillaci, Domenico

2011-01-01

187

Study of the nanomaterials and their antimicrobial activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decade, the world faced huge problems associated with the spread of antimicrobial resistant infections that are essentially untreatable such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. These infections have begun to occur in both hospital and community environments. Developing new antimicrobial surface coatings can hold a great promise to minimize and control various problems that associated with the spreading of infections and biofilms formation, these coatings can be used in medicine where medical devices associated with severe infections, in construction industry and the in food packaging industry. It has been established that single-walled CNTs exhibit a strong antimicrobial activity and can pierce bacterial cell walls. Recently, nanomaterial structures that made from pure carbon such as CNTs have been seen as promising candidates for many potential applications in Biotechnology and bioscience due to the combination of their extraordinary properties that arise from surface area, light weight, strength, flexibility, unique electrical conductivity and many more novel physical and chemical properties at nanoscale level. CNTs have been used widely in biomedical field including drug delivery, gene therapy and creating new biomedical devices with novel properties. Researchers have now made a first step to add carbon nanotubes to antimicrobial agents list. There are two types of CNTs have been used in biomedical research. The first one is a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and the second is a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT). Recent in vitro studies suggest that carbon nanotubes have antimicrobial activity and coating CNTs with nickel nanoparticle could enhance the antimicrobial activity of cabon nanotubes. In order to test this hypothesis, nickel nanoparticles were deposited on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by electrochemical deposition. The carbon nanotubes used in this study were XD-CNTs, SWNTs and Ni-coated CNTs. The structure and the morphology of Ni-coated CNTs were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The SEM results revealed that CNTs provide an excellent surface for electrochemical deposition of nanomaterials. Ni nanoparticles were homogeneously electrodeposited on the surfaces of SWNTs. Antimicrobial activity of CNTs was determined by broth dilution method using six different bacterial strains, three strains of gram negative and three strains of gram positive bacteria. The gram positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis . The gram negative bacteria include Eshericia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aerugenosa. Bactericidal rate was calculated. Based on the results Ni-coated CNTs show much stronger bactericidal property comparing to SWNTs and XD-grade CNTs.

Ramadi, Muntaha

188

Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers.  

PubMed

The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid-base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure. PMID:24656357

Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P; Lackner, Maximilian

2014-05-01

189

Evaluation of the Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea L.)  

E-print Network

Abstract: The present work evaluates the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of clary sage (CS) Salvia sclarea L. Antimicrobial, total antioxidant, DPPH radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging and metal chelating activities, reducing power, and total contents of phenolic compounds of dried herb samples extracted with chloroform and acetone were studied. The chloroform extract had stronger total antioxidant activity than the acetone extract and exhibited 93 and 68% inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation, respectively. a-Tocopherol, quercetin, butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene were used as standard antioxidants. Antimicrobial activities of both CS extracts were examined by means of disk-diffusion methods with 11 microbial species (Bacillus megaterium NRS, Proteus vulgaris FMC 1, Listeria monocytogenes BRIE 1, Bacillus cereus FMC 19, Staphylococcus aureus FÜ, Bacillus brevis FMC 3, Klebsiella pneumoniae FMC 5, Micrococcus luteus LA 2971, Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSM 50071, Escherichia coli DM and Mycobacterium smegmatis CCM 2067) and 4 fungal species (Penicillum frequentans, Fusarium equiseti, Aspergillus candidus and Byssochlamys fulves). Both CS extracts were effective in inhibiting the growth of the organisms except for Escherichia coli DM. The antifungal activity of each of the above extracts is lower than the antimicrobial activity.

Metin Tansu U?uz

190

Antimicrobial, antimalarial and antileishmanial activities of mono- and bisquaternary pyridinium compounds  

PubMed Central

Pyridinium-based oxime compounds have been utilized worldwide as antidotes following exposure to anticholinesterase agents. In the event of combined chemical and biological incident, it is of vital importance to know the ability of antidotes to provide additional protection against biological threats. This paper reports results of in vitro antimicrobial and antiprotozoal activities of a series of quaternary pyridinium oximes against a number of lower pathogenicity BSL-1 and 2 agents. In general, our compound panel had little to no antimicrobial action except for thiophene- and benzothiophene-substituted monoquaternary pyridinium compounds 21 and 24 that showed moderate antibacterial activity against Staphylococus aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus with IC50 values ranging from 12.2–17.7 µg/mL. Compounds 21 and 24 also exhibited antileishmanial activity against Leishmania donovani with IC50 values of 19 and 18 µg/mL, respectively. Another monoquaternary pyridinium compound with a bromobutyl side chain 17 showed antimalarial activity against both a chloroquine sensitive and resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 values of 3.7 and 4.0 µg/mL, respectively. None of the bisquaternary pyridinium compounds showed antimicrobial, or antiprotozoal activity. None of the compounds showed cytotoxic effects towards mammalian kidney fibroblasts. Results of this study indicate that the pyridinium compounds, some of which are already in use as antidotes, do not have significant antimicrobial and antiprotozoal activities and cannot be relied upon for additional protection in the event of combined chemical-biological incident. PMID:21040494

Bharate, Sandip B.; Thompson, Charles M.

2010-01-01

191

In-silico docking based design and synthesis of [1H,3H] imidazo[4,5-b] pyridines as lumazine synthase inhibitors for their effective antimicrobial activity  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The imidazopyridine moiety is important pharmacophore that has proven to be useful for a number of biologically relevant targets, also reported to display antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral properties. Riboflavin biosynthesis involving catalytic step of Lumazine synthase is absent in animals and human, but present in microorganism, one of marked advantage of this study. Still, this path is not exploited as antiinfective target. Here, we proposed different interactions between [1H,3H] imidazo[4,5-b] pyridine test ligands and target protein Lumazine synthase (protein Data Bank 2C92), one-step synthesis of title compounds and further evaluation of them for in vitro antimicrobial activity. Materials and Methods: Active pocket of the target protein involved in the interaction with the test ligands molecules was found using Biopredicta tools in VLifeMDS 4.3 Suite. In-silico docking suggests H-bonding, hydrophobic interaction, charge interaction, aromatic interaction, and Vanderwaal forces responsible for stabilizing enzyme-inhibitor complex. Disc diffusion assay method was used for in vitro antimicrobial screening. Results and Discussion: Investigation of possible interaction between test ligands and target lumazine synthase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggested 1i and 2f as best fit candidates showing hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic, aromatic and Vanderwaal's forces. Among all derivatives 1g, 1j, 1k, 1l, 2a, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2h, and 2j exhibited potent activities against bacteria and fungi compared to the standard Ciprofloxacin and Fluconazole, respectively. The superiority of 1H imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine compounds having R’ = Cl >No2 > NH2 at the phenyl/aliphatic moiety resident on the imidazopyridine, whereas leading 3H imidazo[4,5-b] pyridine compounds containing R/Ar = Cl > No2 > NH2> OCH3 substituents on the 2nd position of imidazole. PMID:25400412

Harer, Sunil L.; Bhatia, Manish S.

2014-01-01

192

A demonstration of the antimicrobial effectiveness of various copper surfaces  

PubMed Central

Background Bacterial contamination on touch surfaces results in increased risk of infection. In the last few decades, work has been done on the antimicrobial properties of copper and its alloys against a range of micro-organisms threatening public health in food processing, healthcare and air conditioning applications; however, an optimum copper method of surface deposition and mass structure has not been identified. Results A proof-of-concept study of the disinfection effectiveness of three copper surfaces was performed. The surfaces were produced by the deposition of copper using three methods of thermal spray, namely, plasma spray, wire arc spray and cold spray The surfaces were then inoculated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After a two hour exposure to the surfaces, the surviving MRSA were assayed and the results compared. The differences in the copper depositions produced by the three thermal spray methods were examined in order to explain the mechanism that causes the observed differences in MRSA killing efficiencies. The cold spray deposition method was significantly more effective than the other methods. It was determined that work hardening caused by the high velocity particle impacts created by the cold spray technique results in a copper microstructure that enhances ionic diffusion, and copper ions are principally responsible for antimicrobial activity. Conclusions This test showed significant microbiologic differences between coatings produced by different spray techniques and demonstrates the importance of the copper application technique. The cold spray technique shows superior anti-microbial effectiveness caused by the high impact velocity imparted to the sprayed particles which results in high dislocation density and high ionic diffusivity. PMID:23537176

2013-01-01

193

Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Activity and Toxicity Test of Pilea microphylla  

PubMed Central

A total of 9 plant extracts were tested, using two different kinds of extracting methods to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities from Pilea microphylla (Urticaceae family) and including toxicity test. Antioxidant activity were tested by using DPPH free radical scavenging, also total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents were determined. Toxicity assay carried out by using brine shrimps. Methanol extract of method I (ME I) showed the highest antioxidant activity at 69.51 ± 1.03. Chloroform extract of method I (CE I) showed the highest total phenolic contents at 72.10 ± 0.71 and chloroform extract of method II (CE II) showed the highest total flavonoid contents at 60.14 ± 0.33. The antimicrobial activity of Pilea microphylla extract was tested in vitro by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The Pilea microphylla extract showed antibacterial activity against some Gram negative and positive bacteria. The extracts did not exhibit antifungal and antiyeast activity. The hexane extract of method I (HE I) was not toxic against brine shrimp (LC50 value was 3880??g/ml). Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial and antioxidative agents in food industry. PMID:20652052

Modarresi Chahardehi, Amir; Ibrahim, Darah; Fariza Sulaiman, Shaida

2010-01-01

194

Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of some lichen species.  

PubMed

The aim of the research is to explore the overall in vitro antioxidant activity, total phenol content, reduction power and antimicrobial activity of the methanol extracts of the lichens Cetraria pinastri, Cladonia digitata, Cladonia fimbriata, Fulgensia fulgens, Ochrolechia parella and Parmelia crinita. The methanol extract of the Cetraria pinastri showed a strong antioxidant activity, whereas the extracts of the species Fulgenesi fulgens, Cladonia fimbriata and Parmelia crinita showed the moderate one and the extract of the species Ochrolechia parella and Cladonia digitata the weak one. The methanol extract of the lichen Cetraria pinastri had the biggest total phenol content (32.9 mg/g of the dry extract). A certain correlation was established between the antioxidant activity and the total phenol content for the researched lichen extracts. The work also explores the antimicrobial activity of the methanol extracts of the mentioned species of lichens against six bacterial and eleven fungi species by the disc-diffusion method and by establishing the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The methanol extracts of the lichens Cetraria pinastri and Parmelia crinita showed the strongest both antibacterial and antifungal activity against most of the tested microorganisms. These researches suggest that the lichens Cetraria prunastri can be used as new sources of the natural antioxidants and the substances with antimicrobial features. PMID:21446633

Rankovi?, B; Rankovi?, D; Mari?, D

2010-01-01

195

Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of cathelicidins and short, synthetic peptides against Francisella.  

PubMed

Francisella infects the lungs causing pneumonic tularemia. Focusing on the lung's host defense, we have examined antimicrobial peptides as part of the innate immune response to Francisella infection. Interest in antimicrobial peptides, such as the cathelicidins, has grown due their potential therapeutic applications and the increasing problem of bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Only one human cathelicidin, LL-37, has been characterized. Helical cathelicidins have also been discovered in snakes including the Chinese King Cobra, Naja atra (NA-CATH). Four synthetic 11-residue peptides (ATRA-1, -2, -1A and -1P) containing variations of a repeated motif within NA-CATH were designed. We hypothesized that these smaller synthetic peptides could have excellent antimicrobial effectiveness with shorter length (and less cost), making them strong potential candidates for development into broad-spectrum antimicrobial compounds. We tested the susceptibility of F. novicida to four ATRA peptides, LL-37, and NA-CATH. Two of the ATRA peptides had high antimicrobial activity (microM), while the two proline-containing ATRA peptides had low activity. The ATRA peptides did not show significant hemolytic activity even at high peptide concentration, indicating low cytotoxicity against host cells. NA-CATH killed Francisella bacteria more quickly than LL-37. However, LL-37 was the most effective peptide against F. novicida (EC50=50 nM). LL-37 mRNA was induced in A549 cells by Francisella infection. We recently demonstrated that F. novicida forms in vitro biofilms. LL-37 inhibited F. novicida biofilm formation at sub-antimicrobial concentrations. Understanding the properties of these peptides, and their endogenous expression in the lung could lead to potential future therapeutic interventions for this lung infection. PMID:20399752

Amer, Lilian S; Bishop, Barney M; van Hoek, Monique L

2010-05-28

196

Inducible factors with antimicrobial activity after immune challenge in the haemolymph of Red Palm Weevil (Insecta).  

PubMed

Insects are capable of innate immune responses elicited after microbial infection. In this process, the receptor-mediated recognition of foreign bodies and the subsequent activation of immunocompetent cells lead to the synthesis ex novo of a peptide pool with antimicrobial activity. We investigated the inducible immune response of a coleopteran, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, challenged with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. After immunization, we evaluated the presence of antimicrobial peptides using either biochemical analyses or microbiological techniques. The antimicrobial properties of the newly synthesized protein pool, detectable in haemolymph fractions of low molecular mass, showed strong antibacterial activity against various bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp. OX1, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus). In addition to the preliminary study of the mechanism of action of the pool of antimicrobial peptides, we also investigated its effects on bacterial cell walls by means of fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The data suggest that the main effects seem to be directed at destabilizing and damaging the bacterial wall. This study provides data that help us to understand some aspects of the inducible innate immunity in a system model that lacks anticipatory responses. However, the weevil has finely tuned its defensive strategies to counteract effectively microbial infection. PMID:25114180

Mastore, Maristella; Binda Rossetti, Simona; Giovannardi, Stefano; Scarě, Giorgio; Brivio, Maurizio F

2014-08-10

197

In-vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Some Iranian Conifers.  

PubMed

Male and female leaves and fruits of eleven different taxons of Iranian conifers (Cupressus sempervirens var. horizontalis, C. sempervirens var. sempervirens, C. sempervirens cv. Cereifeormis, Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica, J. excelsa subsp. excelsa, J. excelsa subsp. polycarpos, J. foetidissima, J. oblonga, J. sabina, Platycladus orientalis and Taxus baccata) were collected from different localities of Iran, dried and extracted with methanol. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The extracts were screened qualitatively using four different methods, the disc diffusion, hole plate, cylinder agar diffusion and agar dilution methods, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of each extract were determined by the agar dilution method. The best result was obtained by means of hole plate method in qualitative determination of antimicrobial activities of extracts and the greatest activity was found against S. aureus in all tested methods. PMID:24250573

Afsharzadeh, Maryam; Naderinasab, Mahboobe; Tayarani Najaran, Zahra; Barzin, Mohammad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad

2013-01-01

198

In-vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Some Iranian Conifers  

PubMed Central

Male and female leaves and fruits of eleven different taxons of Iranian conifers (Cupressus sempervirens var. horizontalis, C. sempervirens var. sempervirens, C. sempervirens cv. Cereifeormis, Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica, J. excelsa subsp. excelsa, J. excelsa subsp. polycarpos, J. foetidissima, J. oblonga, J. sabina, Platycladus orientalis and Taxus baccata) were collected from different localities of Iran, dried and extracted with methanol. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The extracts were screened qualitatively using four different methods, the disc diffusion, hole plate, cylinder agar diffusion and agar dilution methods, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of each extract were determined by the agar dilution method. The best result was obtained by means of hole plate method in qualitative determination of antimicrobial activities of extracts and the greatest activity was found against S. aureus in all tested methods. PMID:24250573

Afsharzadeh, Maryam; Naderinasab, Mahboobe; Tayarani Najaran, Zahra; Barzin, Mohammad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad

2013-01-01

199

Cationic Fullerenes Are Effective and Selective Antimicrobial Photosensitizers  

PubMed Central

Summary Fullerenes are soccer ball-shaped molecules composed of carbon atoms, and, when derivatized with functional groups, they become soluble and can act as photosensitizers. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combines a nontoxic photosensitizer with harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. We have compared the antimicrobial activity of six functionalized C60 compounds with one, two, or three hydrophilic or cationic groups in combination with white light against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and fungi. After a 10 min incubation, the bis- and tris-cationic fullerenes were highly active in killing all tested microbes (4–6 logs) under conditions in which mammalian cells were comparatively unharmed. These compounds performed significantly better than a widely used antimicrobial photosensitizer, toluidine blue O. The high selectivity and efficacy exhibited by these photosensitizers encourage further testing for antimicrobial applications. PMID:16242655

Tegos, George P.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Arcila-Lopez, Dennisse; Lee, Haeryeon; Wharton, Tim; Gali, Hariprasad; Hamblin, Michael R.

2011-01-01

200

Synthesis, DNA cleavage and antimicrobial activity of 4-thiazolidinones-benzothiazole conjugates.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial screening of several novel 4-thiazolidinones with benzothiazole moiety has been performed. These compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against a panel of bacterial and fungal strains. The strains were treated with these benzothiazole derivatives at varying concentrations, and MIC's were calculated. Structures of these compounds have been determined by spectroscopic studies viz., FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and elemental analysis. Significant antimicrobial activity was observed for some members of the series, and compounds viz. 3-(4-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl) phenyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)thiazolidin-4-one and 3-(4-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)phenyl)-2-(4-hydroxy phenyl)thiazolidin-4-one were found to be the most active against E.coli and C. albicans with MIC values in the range of 15.6-125 microg/ml. Preliminary study of the structure-activity relationship revealed that electron donating groups associated with thiazolidine bearing benzothiazole rings had a great effect on the antimicrobial activity of these compounds and contributes positively for the action. DNA cleavage experiments gave valuable hints with supporting evidence for describing the mechanism of action and hence showed a good correlation between their calculated MIC's and its lethality. PMID:25434101

Singh, Meenakshi; Gangwar, Mayank; Nath, Gopal; Singh, Sushil K

2014-11-01

201

Design of Embedded-Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptides with Enhanced Cell Selectivity and Anti-Biofilm Activity  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerable attention because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and their low prognostic to induce antibiotic resistance which is the most common source of failure in bacterial infection treatment along with biofilms. The method to design hybrid peptide integrating different functional domains of peptides has many advantages. In this study, we designed an embedded-hybrid peptide R-FV-I16 by replacing a functional defective sequence RR7 with the anti-biofilm sequence FV7 embedded in the middle position of peptide RI16. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid the peptide R-FV-I16 had potent antimicrobial activity over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as anti-biofilm activity. More importantly, R-FV-I16 showed lower hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Fluorescent assays demonstrated that R-FV-I16 depolarized the outer and the inner bacterial membranes, while scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy further indicated that this peptide killed bacterial cells by disrupting the cell membrane, thereby damaging membrane integrity. Results from SEM also provided evidence that R-FV-I16 inherited anti-biofilm activity from the functional peptide sequence FV7. Embedded-hybrid peptides could provide a new pattern for combining different functional domains and showing an effective avenue to screen for novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:24945359

Xu, Wei; Zhu, Xin; Tan, Tingting; Li, Weizhong; Shan, Anshan

2014-01-01

202

Design and Characterization of an Acid-Activated Antimicrobial Peptide  

PubMed Central

Dental caries is a microbial biofilm infection in which the metabolic activities of plaque bacteria result in a dramatic pH decrease and shift the demineralization/ remineralization equilibrium on the tooth surface towards demineralization. In addition to causing a net loss in tooth minerals creation of an acidic environment favors growth of acid enduring and acid generating species, which causes further reduction in the plaque pH. In this study we developed a prototype antimicrobial peptide capable of achieving high activity exclusively at low environmental pH to target bacterial species like Streptococcus mutans that produce acid and thrive under the low pH conditions detrimental for tooth integrity. The features of clavanin A, a naturally occurring peptide rich in histidine and phenylalanine residues with pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, served as a design basis for these prototype “acid-activated peptides” (AAPs). Employing the major cariogenic species S. mutans as a model system, the two AAPs characterized in this study exhibited a striking pH-dependent antimicrobial activity which correlated well with the calculated charge distribution. This type of peptide represents a potential new way to combat dental caries. PMID:19878192

Li, Lina; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Yarbrough, Daniel; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell; Shi, Wenyuan

2009-01-01

203

Pimarane-type diterpenes: antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens.  

PubMed

Seven pimarane type-diterpenes re-isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic pimarane derivatives were evaluated in vitro against the following main microorganisms responsible for dental caries: Streptococcus salivarius, S. sobrinus, S. mutans, S. mitis, S. sanguinis and Lactobacillus casei. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid (PA); ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3beta-ol; ent-15-pimarene-8beta,19-diol; ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3beta-acetoxy and the sodium salt derivative of PA were the most active compounds, displaying MIC values ranging from 2 to 8 microg mL(-1). Thus, this class of compounds seems promising as a class of new effective anticariogenic agents. Furthermore, our results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new natural compounds that could be employed in the development of oral care products. PMID:19127247

Porto, Thiago S; Rangel, Rander; Furtado, Niege A J C; de Carvalho, Tatiane C; Martins, Carlos H G; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S; Da Costa, Fernando B; Vinholis, Adriana H C; Cunha, Wilson R; Heleno, Vladimir C G; Ambrosio, Sergio R

2009-01-01

204

In vitro antimicrobial activity of Romanian medicinal plants hydroalcoholic extracts on planktonic and adhered cells.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial and antifungal potential of some Romanian medicinal plants, arnica--Arnica montana, wormwood--Artemisia absinthium and nettle--Urtica dioica. In order to perform this antimicrobial screening, we obtained the vegetal extracts and we tested them on a series of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and also against two fungal strains. The vegetal extracts showed antimicrobial activity preferentially directed against the planktonic fungal and bacterial growth, while the effect against biofilm formation and development was demonstrated only against S. aureus and C. albicans. Our in vitro assays indicate that the studied plant extracts are a significant source of natural alternatives to antimicrobial therapy, thus avoiding antibiotic therapy, the use of which has become excessive in recent years. PMID:21717806

Stanciuc, A M; Gaspar, A; Moldovan, L; Saviuc, C; Popa, M; M?ru?escu, L

2011-01-01

205

Black cumin (Nigella sativa) and its constituent (thymoquinone): a review on antimicrobial effects  

PubMed Central

Nigella sativa seeds have wide therapeutic effects and have been reported to have significant effects against many ailments such as skin diseases, jaundice, gastrointestinal problems, anorexia, conjunctivitis, dyspepsia, rheumatism, diabetes, hypertension, intrinsic hemorrhage, paralysis, amenorrhea, anorexia, asthma, cough, bronchitis, headache, fever, influenza and eczema. Thymoquinone (TQ) is one of the most active constituent and has different beneficial properties. Focus on antimicrobial effects, different extracts of N. sativa as well as TQ, have a broad antimicrobial spectrum including Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria, viruses, parasites, schistosoma and fungi. The effectiveness of N. sativa seeds and TQ is variable and depends on species of target microorganisms. The present review paper tries to describe all antimicrobial activities that have been carried out by various researchers.

Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh Fazly; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

2014-01-01

206

Antimicrobial activities of endophytic fungi isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus (Liliaceae)  

PubMed Central

Background Drug resistance in bacteria has become a global concern and the search for new antibacterial agents is urgent and ongoing. Endophytes provide an abundant reservoir of bioactive metabolites for medicinal exploitation, and an increasing number of novel compounds are being isolated from endophytic fungi. Ophiopogon japonicus, containing compounds with antibacterial activity, is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant used for eliminating phlegm, relieving coughs, latent heat in the lungs, and alleviating diabetes mellitus. We investigated the antimicrobial activities of 30 strains of O. japonicus. Methods Fungal endophytes were isolated from roots and stems of O. japonicus collected from Chongqing City, southwestern China. Mycelial extracts (MC) and fermentation broth (FB) were tested for antimicrobial activity using peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibition fluorescence assays and MTT cell proliferation assays. Results A total of 30 endophytic strains were isolated from O. japonicus; 22 from roots and eight from stems. 53.33% of the mycelial extracts (MC) and 33.33% of the fermentation broths (FB) displayed potent inhibition of PDF. 80% of MC and 33.33% of FB significantly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. 70% of MC and 36.67% of FB showed strong activities against Cryptococcus neoformans. None showed influence on Escherichia coli. Conclusion The secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi from O. japonicus are potential antimicrobial agents. PMID:23190550

2012-01-01

207

Antimicrobial activity of Curcuma zedoaria and Curcuma malabarica tubers.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity of extracts of Curcuma zedoaria and Curcuma malabarica tubers was tested against six bacterial and two fungal strains using the agar well diffusion and broth dilution methods. Petroleum ether, hexane, chloroform, acetone and ethanol extracts exhibited antibacterial as well as antifungal activity. Acetone and hexane extracts of both tubers showed comparable antimicrobial activity as indicated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values, but other extracts of Curcuma malabarica showed significantly lower activity than those of Curcuma zedoaria. The MIC values for different strains and extracts ranged from 0.01 to 0.15 mg/ml in Curcuma zedoaria and from 0.01 to 0.94 mg/ml in Curcuma malabarica. Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive) was inhibited by Curcuma malabarica but not by Curcuma zedoaria. This study is the first report of the antimicrobial properties of Curcuma malabarica. The findings also support the use of Curcuma zedoaria tubers in traditional medicine for the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections. PMID:15848035

Wilson, B; Abraham, G; Manju, V S; Mathew, M; Vimala, B; Sundaresan, S; Nambisan, B

2005-05-13

208

Design of nanoemulsion-based delivery systems of natural antimicrobials: effect of the emulsifier.  

PubMed

This work aims at investigating the effect of the nanoemulsion delivery systems on the antimicrobial activity of different essential oil components. Carvacrol, limonene and cinnamaldehyde were encapsulated in the sunflower oil droplets of nanoemulsions prepared by high pressure homogenization and stabilized by different emulsifiers: (a) lecithin, (b) pea proteins, (c) sugar ester and (d) a combination of Tween 20 and glycerol monooleate. The antimicrobial activity was measured against three different microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The measured antimicrobial activity was significantly affected by the formulation of the nanoemulsion, where the different bioactive compounds were encapsulated. In particular, the effect of the delivery systems on the antimicrobial activity was correlated to the concentration of the essential oil components in the aqueous phase in equilibrium with the nanoemulsion droplets, suggesting that the ability of the active molecules to interact with cell membranes is associated to their dissolution in the aqueous phase. These considerations can lead to a more rational design of the nanoemulsion-based delivery systems for essential oils, based on the opportune choice of the emulsifiers in dependence of the desired function of the antimicrobials within the food system. PMID:21763730

Donsě, Francesco; Annunziata, Marianna; Vincensi, Mariarosaria; Ferrari, Giovanna

2012-06-30

209

Composition and antimicrobial activity of Equisetum arvense L. essential oil.  

PubMed

The volatile constituents of the sterile stems of Equisetum arvense L. (Equisetaceae) were investigated for the first time using GC, GC/MS and (13)C-NMR. Twenty-five compounds were identified. Hexahydrofarnesyl acetone (18.34%), cis-geranyl acetone (13.74%), thymol (12.09%) and trans-phytol (10.06%) were the major constituents. A disk diffusion method was used for the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of this oil against a panel of microorganisms (bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enteritidis; fungi: Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans). The 1:10 dilution of the essential oil of Equisetum arvense L. was shown to possess a broad spectrum of a very strong antimicrobial activity against all tested strains. PMID:16397851

Radulovi?, Niko; Stojanovi?, Gordana; Pali?, Radosav

2006-01-01

210

Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-?-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.  

PubMed

The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-?-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-?-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-?-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-?-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-?-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-?-acids. PMID:25475328

Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

2015-04-01

211

Total antioxidant activity and antimicrobial potency of the essential oil and oleoresin of Zingiber officinale Roscoe  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil and oleoresin of Zingiber officinale Roscoe. Methods The antioxidant activity was evaluated based on the ability of the ginger extracts to scavenge ABTS°+ free radical. The antimicrobial activity was studied by the disc diffusion method and minimal inhibitory concentration was determined by using the agar incorporation method. Results Ginger extracts exerted significant antioxidant activity and dose-depend effect. In general, oleoresin showed higher antioxidant activity [IC50=(1.820±0.034) mg/mL] when compared to the essential oil [IC50=(110.14±8.44) mg/mL]. In terms of antimicrobial activity, ginger compounds were more effective against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, and less effective against Bacillus cereus. Aspergillus niger was least, whereas, Penicillium spp. was higher sensitive to the ginger extracts; minimal inhibitory concentrations of the oleoresin and essential oil were 2 mg/mL and 869.2 mg/mL, respectively. Moreover, the studied extracts showed an important antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Conclusions The study confirms the wide application of ginger oleoresin and essential oil in the treatment of many bacterial and fungal diseases.

Bellik, Yuva

2014-01-01

212

Antimicrobial properties of membrane-active dodecapeptides derived from MSI-78.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics known by their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes and their low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, arising as excellent candidates to fight bacterial infections. In this study we aimed at designing short 12-mer AMPs, derived from a highly effective and broad spectrum synthetic AMP, MSI-78 (22 residues), by truncating this peptide at the N- and/or C-termini while spanning its entire sequence with 1 amino acid (aa) shifts. These designed peptides were evaluated regarding antimicrobial activity against selected gram-positive Staphylococcus strains and the gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The short 12-mer peptide CEM1 (GIGKFLKKAKKF) was identified as an excellent candidate to fight P. aeruginosa infections as it displays antimicrobial activity against this strain and selectivity, with negligible toxicity to mammalian cells even at high concentrations. However, in general most of the short 12-mer peptides tested showed a reduction in antimicrobial activity, an effect that was more pronounced for gram-positive Staphylococcus strains. Interestingly, CEM1 and a highly similar peptide differing by only one aa-shift (CEM2: IGKFLKKAKKFG), showed a remarkably contrasting AMP activity. These two peptides were chosen for a more detailed study regarding their mechanism of action, using several biophysical assays and simple membrane models that mimic the mammalian and bacterial lipid composition. We confirmed the correlation between peptide helicity and antimicrobial activity and propose a mechanism of action based on the disruption of the bacterial membrane permeability barrier. PMID:25680229

Monteiro, Claudia; Fernandes, Mariana; Pinheiro, Marina; Maia, Sílvia; Seabra, Catarina L; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Costa, Fabíola; Reis, Salette; Gomes, Paula; Martins, M Cristina L

2015-05-01

213

Antimicrobial polymers: mechanism of action, factors of activity, and applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex epidemiological situation, nosocomial infections, microbial contamination, and infection risks in hospital and dental\\u000a equipment have led to an ever-growing need for prevention of microbial infection in these various areas. Macromolecular systems,\\u000a due to their properties, allow one to efficiently use them in various fields, including the creation of polymers with the\\u000a antimicrobial activity. In the past decade, the intensive

Larisa Timofeeva; Natalia Kleshcheva

2011-01-01

214

The erlanger silver catheter: In vitro results for antimicrobial activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The antimicrobial activity of a silver-impregnated polymer catheter (the Erlanger silver catheter) was demonstrated by determining\\u000a the microbial adhesion to the surface of the catheter and by measuring the rate of proliferation (viability) of microorganisms\\u000a at this site. On the surface of a catheter impregnated with silver, according to previously described methods, the bacterial\\u000a adhesion ofStaphylococcus epidermidis is reduced by

T. Bechert; M. Böswald; S. Lugauer; A. Regenfus; J. Greil; J.-P. Guggenbichler

1999-01-01

215

Multidrug Pump Inhibitors Uncover Remarkable Activity of Plant Antimicrobials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant antimicrobials are not used as systemic antibiotics at present. The main reason for this is their low level of activity, especially against gram-negative bacteria. The reported MIC is often in the range of 100 to 1,000 g\\/ml, orders of magnitude higher than those of common broad-spectrum antibiotics from bacteria or fungi. Major plant pathogens belong to the gram-negative bacteria,

George Tegos; Frank R. Stermitz; Olga Lomovskaya; Kim Lewis

2002-01-01

216

Antimicrobial Activity of Nanoemulsion in Combination with Cetylpyridinium Chloride in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii  

PubMed Central

Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a serious problematic pathogen due to the ever-increasing presence of antibiotic resistance, demonstrating a need for novel, broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapeutic options. Antimicrobial nanoemulsions are emulsified mixtures of detergent, oil, and water (droplet size, 100 to 800 nm) which have broad antimicrobial activity against bacteria, enveloped viruses, and fungi. Here, we screened the antimicrobial activities of five nanoemulsion preparations against four Acinetobacter baumannii isolates to identify the most suitable preparation for further evaluation. Among them, N5, which contains 10% (vol/vol) Triton X-100, 25% (vol/vol) soybean oil, and 1% (wt/vol) cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), showed the best efficacy against A. baumannii in both its planktonic and biofilm forms and was selected for further study. Our data demonstrate that, while the killing of planktonic forms of A. baumannii was due to the 1% CPC component of our nanoemulsions, the breakdown of biofilms was achieved via the emulsified oil and detergent fractions. Furthermore, we documented the effect of ethanol and NaCl in combination with N5 on planktonic A. baumannii. In killing curves of N5 combined with other agents (ethanol or NaCl), a synergistic effect of a ?2-log decrease in CFU/ml was observed. The antibiofilm activity of N5 was confirmed via a cell proliferation test and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of exposure to severe environmental conditions, which simulates the field conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan, were evaluated, and this exposure did not affect the overall antimicrobial activity of N5. These studies lay a solid foundation for the utilization of nanoemulsions against the antibiotic-resistant forms of A. baumannii. PMID:23669390

Hwang, Yoon Y.; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Bienek, Diane R.; Lee, Valerie; You, Tao

2013-01-01

217

Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.  

PubMed Central

The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1? , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to ?-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

2015-01-01

218

Screening antimicrobial activity of various extracts of Urtica dioica.  

PubMed

Urtica dioica or stinging nettle is traditionally used as an herbal medicine in Western Asia. The current study represents the investigation of antimicrobial activity of U. dioica from nine crude extracts that were prepared using different organic solvents, obtained from two extraction methods: the Soxhlet extractor (Method I), which included the use of four solvents with ethyl acetate and hexane, or the sequential partitions (Method II) with a five solvent system (butanol). The antibacterial and antifungal activities of crude extracts were tested against 28 bacteria, three yeast strains and seven fungal isolates by the disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. Amoxicillin was used as positive control for bacteria strains, vancomycin for Streptococcus sp., miconazole nitrate (30 microg/mL) as positive control for fungi and yeast, and pure methanol (v/v) as negative control. The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the sensitivity of the samples, whilst the broth dilution method was used for the determination of the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC). The ethyl acetate and hexane extract from extraction method I (EA I and HE I) exhibited highest inhibition against some pathogenic bacteria such as Bacillus cereus, MRSA and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A selection of extracts that showed some activity was further tested for the MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC). MIC values of Bacillus subtilis and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using butanol extract of extraction method II (BE II) were 8.33 and 16.33mg/mL, respectively; while the MIC value using ethyl acetate extract of extraction method II (EAE II) for Vibrio parahaemolyticus was 0.13mg/mL. Our study showed that 47.06% of extracts inhibited Gram-negative (8 out of 17), and 63.63% of extracts also inhibited Gram-positive bacteria (7 out of 11); besides, statistically the frequency of antimicrobial activity was 13.45% (35 out of 342) which in this among 21.71% belongs to antimicrobial activity extracts from extraction method I (33 out of 152 of crude extracts) and 6.82% from extraction method II (13 out of 190 of crude extracts). However, crude extracts from method I exhibited better antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria than the Gram-negative bacteria. The positive results on medicinal plants screening for antibacterial activity constitutes primary information for further phytochemical and pharmacological studies. Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial agents in pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:23342511

Modarresi-Chahardehi, Amir; Ibrahim, Darah; Fariza-Sulaiman, Shaida; Mousavi, Leila

2012-12-01

219

Antimicrobial activity of silver/starch/polyacrylamide nanocomposite.  

PubMed

A novel silver/starch/polyacrylamide nanocomposite hydrogel was prepared by grafting acrylamide onto starch in presence of silver nitrate by use of ammonium persulphate as an initiator and N,N-methylene-bisacrylamide as a crosslinking agent, then reducing the silver ions enclosed in the hydrogel structure to silver nanoparticles by treating the hydrogel with sodium hydroxide solution. All factors which affect the grafting/crosslinking reaction were optimized and the concentration of silver ion was changed from 0ppm to 50ppm. The produced nanocomposite hydrogel was characterized for its nanosilver content and the UV-spectra showed similar absorption spectra at wavelength 405nm for all AgNO3 concentrations but the plasmon showed increase in the intensity of the absorption peak as AgNO3 concentration incorporated to the hydrogel structure increases. The nanocomposite hydrogel was also characterized for its antimicrobial activity toward two types of bacteria and two types of fungi. The results showed that the hydrogel with 0ppm silver content has no antimicrobial activity, and that the antimicrobial activity expressed as inhibition zone increases as the silver content increases from 5ppm to 50ppm. PMID:24769214

Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

2014-07-01

220

Antimicrobial activity of new porphyrins of synthetic and natural origin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation has been successfully used against Gram (+) microorganisms, but most of the photosensitizers (PSs) on Gram (-) bacteria acts weakly. PSs are the natural or synthetic origin dyes, mainly porphyrins. We have synthesized more than 100 new cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins with different functional groups (hydroxyethyl, butyl, allyl, methallyl) and metals (cobalt, iron, copper, zinc, silver and other); from the nettle have also been purified pheophytin (a+b) and pheophytin (a) and have synthesized their Ag-and Zn-metalloporphyrins. It was found that in the dark (cytotoxic) mode, the most highly efficiency against microorganisms showed Agmetalloporphyrins of both types of porphyrins (synthetic and natural). Metalloporphyrin of natural origin Ag-pheophytin (a + b) is a strong antibacterial agent and causes 100% death as the Gram (+) microorganisms (St. aureus and MRSA) and the Gram (-) microorganisms (E.coli and Salmonella). It is established that for the destruction of Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms in photodynamic mode cationic water-soluble synthetic metalloporphyrins, especially Zn-TBut4PyP, many times more effective than pheophytins. In vivo conditions on mice established that the best therapeutic activity against various strains of the microorganism St. aureus has the synthetic metalloporphyrin Ag-TBut4PyP. It is significantly more efficient than known drug "Chlorophyllipt" (2.5-3 times) and leads the survival rate of animals up to 50-60%.

Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.; Ghazaryan, Robert K.; Paronyan, Marina H.; Ulikhanyan, Ghukas I.; Gyulkhandanyan, Aram G.; Sahakyan, Lida A.

2012-03-01

221

Antimicrobial activity of certain Indian medicinal plants used in folkloric medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty medicinal plants belonging to 26 families were studied for their antimicrobial activity. Among 50 plants tested, 72% showed antimicrobial activity. About 22 plant extracts from 15 families exhibited activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fourteen plants belonging to 11 families did not show activity against any of the bacteria tested. Only nine plant extracts showed antifungal activity. The

D. Srinivasan; Sangeetha Nathan; T. Suresh; P. Lakshmana Perumalsamy

2001-01-01

222

Antimicrobial activity of three Mexican Gnaphalium species.  

PubMed

The antibacterial activity of the hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the flowers, leaves and stems of Gnaphalium oxyphyllum var. oxyphyllum, G. liebmannii var. monticola and G. viscosum was investigated. The hexane extracts showed in all cases the higher inhibitions, G. oxyphyllum flower extract exhibiting the wider spectrum of activity. PMID:11543972

Villagómez-Ibarra, J R; Sánchez, M; Espejo, O; Zúńiga-Estrada, A; Torres-Valencia, J M; Joseph-Nathan, P

2001-08-01

223

Antimicrobial activity of three Mexican Gnaphalium species  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antibacterial activity of the hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the flowers, leaves and stems of Gnaphaliumoxyphyllum var. oxyphyllum, G. liebmannii var. monticola and G. viscosum was investigated. The hexane extracts showed in all cases the higher inhibitions, G. oxyphyllum flower extract exhibiting the wider spectrum of activity.

J. Roberto Villagómez-Ibarra; Maricruz Sánchez; Ofelia Espejo; Armida Zúńiga-Estrada; J. Mart??n Torres-Valencia; Pedro Joseph-Nathan

2001-01-01

224

Antimicrobial activity of Rubus chamaemorus leaves.  

PubMed

The antibacterial activity of Rubus chamaemorus leaf butanolic fraction of the methanol extract and ellagic acid was evaluated against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Antimycotic activity was assayed against Candida albicans. MICs and MBCs were determined by broth dilution test and by disc diffusion method. PMID:14693229

Thiem, B; Go?li?ska, O

2004-01-01

225

Antimicrobial activity of chitosan derivatives containing N-quaternized moieties in its backbone: a review.  

PubMed

Chitosan, which is derived from a deacetylation reaction of chitin, has attractive antimicrobial activity. However, chitosan applications as a biocide are only effective in acidic medium due to its low solubility in neutral and basic conditions. Also, the positive charges carried by the protonated amine groups of chitosan (in acidic conditions) that are the driving force for its solubilization are also associated with its antimicrobial activity. Therefore, chemical modifications of chitosan are required to enhance its solubility and broaden the spectrum of its applications, including as biocide. Quaternization on the nitrogen atom of chitosan is the most used route to render water-soluble chitosan-derivatives, especially at physiological pH conditions. Recent reports in the literature demonstrate that such chitosan-derivatives present excellent antimicrobial activity due to permanent positive charge on nitrogen atoms side-bonded to the polymer backbone. This review presents some relevant work regarding the use of quaternized chitosan-derivatives obtained by different synthetic paths in applications as antimicrobial agents. PMID:25402643

Martins, Alessandro F; Facchi, Suelen P; Follmann, Heveline D M; Pereira, Antonio G B; Rubira, Adley F; Muniz, Edvani C

2014-01-01

226

Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Derivatives Containing N-Quaternized Moieties in Its Backbone: A Review  

PubMed Central

Chitosan, which is derived from a deacetylation reaction of chitin, has attractive antimicrobial activity. However, chitosan applications as a biocide are only effective in acidic medium due to its low solubility in neutral and basic conditions. Also, the positive charges carried by the protonated amine groups of chitosan (in acidic conditions) that are the driving force for its solubilization are also associated with its antimicrobial activity. Therefore, chemical modifications of chitosan are required to enhance its solubility and broaden the spectrum of its applications, including as biocide. Quaternization on the nitrogen atom of chitosan is the most used route to render water-soluble chitosan-derivatives, especially at physiological pH conditions. Recent reports in the literature demonstrate that such chitosan-derivatives present excellent antimicrobial activity due to permanent positive charge on nitrogen atoms side-bonded to the polymer backbone. This review presents some relevant work regarding the use of quaternized chitosan-derivatives obtained by different synthetic paths in applications as antimicrobial agents. PMID:25402643

Martins, Alessandro F.; Facchi, Suelen P.; Follmann, Heveline D. M.; Pereira, Antonio G. B.; Rubira, Adley F.; Muniz, Edvani C.

2014-01-01

227

Microbiological and Chemical Analysis of Neem ( Azadirachta indica ) Extracts: New Data on Antimicrobial Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial effects of extracts of neem seed (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) were investigated using microbial growth inhibition assays. A laboratory-prepared neem seed extract along with\\u000a a commercially available formulated product, were characterized using HPLC, and shown to be effective against a range of bacteria\\u000a in an agar diffusion assay. The active ingredient,i.e., the unformulated seed extract of the commercial

E. Coventry; E. J. Allan

2001-01-01

228

Antimicrobial activity of peptides derived from human ß-amyloid precursor protein.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial peptides are important effector molecules of the innate immune system. Here, we describe that peptides derived from the heparin-binding disulfide-constrained loop region of human ß-amyloid precursor protein are antimicrobial. The peptides investigated were linear and cyclic forms of NWCKRGRKQCKTHPH (NWC15) as well as the cyclic form comprising the C-terminal hydrophobic amino acid extension FVIPY (NWCKRGRKQCKTHPHFVIPY; NWC20c). Compared with the benchmark antimicrobial peptide LL-37, these peptides efficiently killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, and the fungi Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Correspondingly, fluorescence and electron microscopy demonstrated that the peptides caused defects in bacterial membranes. Analogously, the peptides permeabilised negatively charged liposomes. Despite their bactericidal effect, the peptides displayed very limited hemolytic activities within the concentration range investigated and exerted very small membrane permeabilising effects on human epithelial cells. The efficiency of the peptides with respect to bacterial killing and liposome membrane leakage was in the order NWC20c?>?NWC15c?>?NWC15l, which also correlated to the adsorption density for these peptides at the model lipid membrane. Thus, whereas the cationic sequence is a minimum determinant for antimicrobial action, a constrained loop-structure as well as a hydrophobic extension further contributes to membrane permeabilising activity of this region of amyloid precursor protein. PMID:22249992

Papareddy, Praveen; Mörgelin, Matthias; Walse, Björn; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

2012-03-01

229

Chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of essential oil from Ampelopsis megalophylla.  

PubMed

Chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil of Ampelopsis megalophylla were evaluated in this research. GC-MS analysis of the essential oil revealed 42 compounds, representing 88.54% of the oil. The major compounds were borneol (10.81%), ?-pinene (6.74%) and ?-elemene (6.23%). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was evaluated against 13 micro-organisms using the disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Results demonstrated higher effects of this oil against Gram-positive bacteria than the other reference strains tested. The antioxidant effect of the essential oil was evaluated by using 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,20-azinobis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate scavenging assays. The essential oil exhibited moderate antioxidant activity. PMID:24524337

Xie, Xian-Fei; Wang, Jian-Wu; Zhang, Han-Ping; Li, Qi-Xiong; Chen, Bang-Yin

2014-01-01

230

Evaluation of Phytochemical Analysis and Antimicrobial Activity of Leaf and Fruit Extracts of Physalis Minima  

E-print Network

Abstract-- Now a day’s chemical drugs are used simultaneously for the treatment of diseases. But chemical drugs give side effects, for example stomach pain, head ache and kidney failure. So the remedies of these chemical drugs are natural plant drugs. Its have potential curative agent. Natural source are safe and without side effects. In this study mainly focus to found anti hepatic component of physalis minima. Anti hepatic activity of physalis minima leaf and unripe fruit extracts obtained by different (methanol, ethyl acetate and diethyl ether) extracts. Pyhtochemical qualitative analysis show maximum result in leaf methanol extract. Alkanoids, flavoinoids, steroids terpenoids phenol and tannin present. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated against different microbial strains (P.vulgaris, C. bacterium, K. aurogenes, S. boydii and S.flexneri). It was observed that methanol leaf extract of physalis minima shows better activity. Keywords-- Phytochemical, Physalis minima, antimicrobial. I.

Jagajothi Angamuthu; Manimekalai Ganapathy; Vasthi Kennedy Evanjelene; Nirmala Ayyavuv; Vasanthi Padamanabhan; Paramathy Velur; Namakkal Dt

231

Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Palladium(II), Cobalt(II) complexes.  

PubMed

We report the synthesis of the ligand, salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (salptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Pd(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized for the first time. The structure of the ligand and their complexes were investigated using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR, NMR and LC-MS) measurements. Salptsmh has also been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. (1)H and (13)C shielding tensors for crystal structure were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The complexes were found to have general composition [ML2]. The results of elemental analysis showed 1:2 (metal/ligand) stoichiometry for all the complex. Magnetic and spectral data indicate a square planar geometry for Pd(II) complex and a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Co(II) complexes. The ligand and its metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disk diffusion method against the selected Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Gram negative bacteria: Eschericha coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and carbonic anhydrase I (CA I) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values and it has been found that Pd(II) complex have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than salptsmh and Co(II) complex. PMID:24835932

Alyar, Saliha; Adem, ?evki

2014-10-15

232

Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Palladium(II), Cobalt(II) complexes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the synthesis of the ligand, salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (salptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Pd(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized for the first time. The structure of the ligand and their complexes were investigated using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR, NMR and LC-MS) measurements. Salptsmh has also been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The complexes were found to have general composition [ML2]. The results of elemental analysis showed 1:2 (metal/ligand) stoichiometry for all the complex. Magnetic and spectral data indicate a square planar geometry for Pd(II) complex and a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Co(II) complexes. The ligand and its metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disk diffusion method against the selected Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Gram negative bacteria: Eschericha coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and carbonic anhydrase I (CA I) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values and it has been found that Pd(II) complex have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than salptsmh and Co(II) complex.

Alyar, Saliha; Adem, ?evki

2014-10-01

233

Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some new diphenylamine derivatives.  

PubMed

In search of new leads toward potent antimicrobial agent, an array of novel derivatives of 2-hydrazinyl-N-N, diphenyl acetamide has been synthesized from the chloroacetylation reaction of diphenylamine (DPA). For this, a series of DPA derivatives were prepared by replacing chlorine with hydrazine hydrate in alcoholic medium and 2-hydrazino-N, N-diphenylacetamide was synthesized. The 2-hydrazino-N, N-diphenylacetamide was further subjected to reaction with various aromatic aldehydes in presence of glacial acetic acid in methanol. The synthesized compounds were characterized by their IR, 1HNMR spectral data and elemental analysis. The compounds were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activity by cup plate method. 2-(2-Benzylidenehydrazinyl)-N, N-diphenylacetamide (A1); 2-(2-(3-methylbenzylidene) hydrazinyl)-N, N-diphenyl-acetamide (A5) and 2-(2-(2-nitrobenzylidine) hydrazinyl)-N, N-diphenyl-acetamide compounds (A7) showed significant antimicrobial as well as antifungal activity. Diphenylamine compounds may be explored as potent antimicrobial and antifungal compounds. PMID:25709343

Kumar, Arvind; Mishra, Arun K

2015-01-01

234

Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some new diphenylamine derivatives  

PubMed Central

In search of new leads toward potent antimicrobial agent, an array of novel derivatives of 2-hydrazinyl–N-N, diphenyl acetamide has been synthesized from the chloroacetylation reaction of diphenylamine (DPA). For this, a series of DPA derivatives were prepared by replacing chlorine with hydrazine hydrate in alcoholic medium and 2-hydrazino-N, N-diphenylacetamide was synthesized. The 2-hydrazino-N, N-diphenylacetamide was further subjected to reaction with various aromatic aldehydes in presence of glacial acetic acid in methanol. The synthesized compounds were characterized by their IR, 1HNMR spectral data and elemental analysis. The compounds were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activity by cup plate method. 2-(2-Benzylidenehydrazinyl)-N, N-diphenylacetamide (A1); 2-(2-(3-methylbenzylidene) hydrazinyl)-N, N-diphenyl-acetamide (A5) and 2-(2-(2-nitrobenzylidine) hydrazinyl)-N, N-diphenyl-acetamide compounds (A7) showed significant antimicrobial as well as antifungal activity. Diphenylamine compounds may be explored as potent antimicrobial and antifungal compounds. PMID:25709343

Kumar, Arvind; Mishra, Arun K.

2015-01-01

235

Antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles impregnated wound dressing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, silver nanoparticles were synthesized by simple wet chemical reduction method. The silver nitrate was reduced by Sodium borohydride used as reducing agent and Poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as stabilizing agent. The formation of silver nanoparticles was evaluated by UV-visible spectroscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Absorption spectrum consist two plasmon peaks at 410 and 668 nm revels the formation of anisotropic nanoparticles confirmed by TEM. The formation of silver nanoparticles was also evidenced by dynamic light scattering (DLS) study. DLS showed polydisperse silver nanoparticles with hydrodynamic size 32 nm. Protecting mechanism of PVP was manifested by FT-Raman study. Silver nanoparticles were impregnated into wound dressing by sonochemical method. The Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methods were used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The antimicrobial activity of the samples has been tested against gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

Shinde, V. V.; Jadhav, P. R.; Patil, P. S.

2013-06-01

236

Immobilization Reduces the Activity of Surface-Bound Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides with No Influence upon the Activity Spectrum?  

PubMed Central

Early studies of immobilized peptides mainly focused upon the relationship between structural properties and the activity of soluble and surface-tethered sequences. The intention of this study was to analyze the influence of immobilization parameters upon the activity profile of peptides. Resin beads (TentaGel S NH2, HypoGel 400 NH2, and HypoGel 200 NH2) with polyethylene glycol spacers of different lengths were rendered antimicrobial by linkage of an amphipathic model KLAL peptide and magainin-derived MK5E. Standard solid-phase peptide synthesis, thioalkylation, and ligation strategies were used to immobilize the peptides at the C and N termini and via different side-chain positions. Depending upon the resin capacity and the coupling strategies, peptide loading ranged between 0.1 and 0.25 ?mol/mg for C-terminally and around 0.03 ?mol/mg for N-terminally and side-chain-immobilized peptides. Tethering conserved the activity spectra of the soluble peptides at reduced concentrations. The resin-bound peptides were antimicrobial toward Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis in the millimolar range compared to the results seen with micromolar concentrations of the free peptides. B. subtilis was more susceptible than E. coli. The antimicrobial activity distinctly decreased with reduction of the spacer length. Slight differences in the antimicrobial effect of KLAL and MK5E bound at different chain positions on TentaGel S NH2 suggest that the activity is less dependent upon the position of immobilization. Soluble KLAL was active toward red blood cells, whereas MK5E was nonhemolytic at up to about 400 ?M. Resin-induced hemolysis hampered the determination of the hemolytic effect of the immobilized peptides. TentaGel S NH2-bound peptides enhanced the permeability of the POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline) and mixed POPC/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (POPC/POPG) bilayers used to model the charge properties of the biological targets. The results suggest that surface immobilization of the cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptides does not influence the membrane-permeabilizing mode of action. Peptide insertion into the target membrane and likely the exchange of membrane-stabilizing bivalent cations contribute to the antimicrobial effect. In conclusion, reasonable antimicrobial activity of surface-bound peptides requires the optimization of the coupling parameters, with the length of the spacer and the amount of target-accessible peptide being the most important factors. PMID:19104020

Bagheri, Mojtaba; Beyermann, Michael; Dathe, Margitta

2009-01-01

237

Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic ?-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity). © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 102: 58-68, 2014. PMID:23982951

Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

2014-01-01

238

Novel natural food antimicrobials.  

PubMed

Naturally occurring antimicrobial compounds could be applied as food preservatives to protect food quality and extend the shelf life of foods and beverages. These compounds are naturally produced and isolated from various sources, including plants, animals and microorganisms, in which they constitute part of host defense systems. Many naturally occurring compounds, such as nisin, plant essential oils, and natamycin, have been widely studied and are reported to be effective in their potential role as antimicrobial agents against spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Although some of these natural antimicrobials are commercially available and applied in food processing, their efficacy, consumer acceptance and regulation are not well defined. This manuscript reviews natural antimicrobial compounds with reference to their applications in food when applied individually or in combination with other hurdles. It also reviews the mechanism of action of selected natural antimicrobials, factors affecting their antimicrobial activities, and future prospects for use of natural antimicrobials in the food industry. PMID:22385168

Juneja, Vijay K; Dwivedi, Hari P; Yan, Xianghe

2012-01-01

239

Study of antimicrobial effects of vancomycin loaded PLGA nanoparticles against enterococcus clinical isolates.  

PubMed

Researchers have demonstrated that antimicrobial agents in nanoparticle (NP) forms have better activities. Vancomycin (VCM), as a glycopeptide antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria, is poorly absorbed from the intestinal tract. Enterococcus is a genus of bacteria that became resistant to a wide range of antibiotics in last decades, and cause severe infections in hospitalized patients. This paper describes preparation of VCM--loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs and compares the antimicrobial effects with drug solution against clinical Enterococcus isolates. VCM-loaded PLGA NPs were fabricated by W1/O/W2 solvent evaporation method. The comparison of obtained Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values showed a significant decrease in the antimicrobial effect of VCM -loaded NPs. Results also indicated that the potency of the NPs against VCM resistant isolates of Enterococcus was less than VCM susceptible isolates. The reduced antimicrobial effect of formulated NPs in invitro condition is perhaps related to the strong electrostatic linkage between hydrophilic drug (VCM) and hydrophobic polymer (PLGA) that lead to the slow release of the antibiotic from polymeric NPs. PMID:24307271

Lotfipour, F; Abdollahi, S; Jelvehgari, M; Valizadeh, H; Hassan, M; Milani, M

2014-07-01

240

In vitro antimicrobial activity of ethanolic fractions of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta  

PubMed Central

Background Following claims that some plants have antimicrobial activities against infectious microbes, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of different solvent fractions of ethanolic extract of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta were evaluated against eight standard bacteria and clinical isolates. Methods The solvent partitioning protocol involving ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and water, was used to extract various fractions of dried pulverized Cryptolepis sanguinolenta roots. Qualitative phyto-constituents screening was performed on the ethanol extract, chloroform fraction and the water fraction. The Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method was employed to ascertain the antibiogram of the test organisms while the agar diffusion method was used to investigate the antimicrobial properties of the crude plant extracts. The microplate dilution method aided in finding the MICs while the MBCs were obtained by the method of Nester and friends. The SPSS 16.0 version was used to analyze the percentages of inhibitions and bactericidal activities. Results The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, reducing sugars, polyuronides, anthocyanosides and triterpenes. The ethanol extract inhibited 5 out of 8 (62.5%) of the standard organisms and 6 out of 8 (75%) clinical isolates. The petroleum ether fraction inhibited 4 out of 8 (50%) of the standard microbes and 1 out of 8 (12.5%) clinical isolates. It was also observed that the chloroform fraction inhibited the growth of all the organisms (100%). Average inhibition zones of 14.0?±?1.0?mm to 24.67?±?0.58?mm was seen in the ethyl acetate fraction which halted the growth of 3 (37.5%) of the standard organisms. Inhibition of 7 (87.5%) of standard strains and 6 (75%) of clinical isolates were observed in the water fraction. The chloroform fraction exhibited bactericidal activity against all the test organisms while the remaining fractions showed varying degrees of bacteriostatic activity. Conclusion The study confirmed that fractions of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta have antimicrobial activity. The chloroform fraction had the highest activity, followed by water, ethanol, petroleum ether and ethyl acetate respectively. Only the chloroform fraction exhibited bactericidal activity and further investigations are needed to ascertain its safety and prospects of drug development. PMID:22709723

2012-01-01

241

Preparation, characterization and in vitro antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains  

PubMed Central

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic microorganism with the ability to respond to a wide variety of environmental changes, exhibiting a high intrinsic resistance to a number of antimicrobial agents. This low susceptibility to antimicrobial substances is primarily due to the low permeability of its outer membrane, efflux mechanisms and the synthesis of enzymes that promote the degradation of these drugs. Cephalosporins, particularty ceftazidime and cefepime are effective against P. aeruginosa, however, its increasing resistance has limited the usage of these antibiotics. Encapsulating antimicrobial drugs into unilamellar liposomes is an approach that has been investigated in order to overcome microorganism resistance. In this study, antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and P. aeruginosa SPM-1 was compared to that of the free drugs. Liposomal characterization included diameter, encapsulation efficiency and stability. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined for free and liposomal forms of both drugs. Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) was determined at concentrations 1, 2 and 4 times MIC. Average diameter of liposomes was 131.88 nm and encapsulation efficiency for cefepime and ceftazidime were 2.29% end 5.77%, respectively. Improved stability was obtained when liposome formulations were prepared with a 50% molar ratio for cholesterol in relation to the phospholipid. MIC for liposomal antibiotics for both drugs were 50% lower than that of the free drug, demonstrating that liposomal drug delivery systems may contribute to increase the antibacterial activity of these drugs. PMID:24031917

Torres, Ieda Maria Sapateiro; Bento, Etiene Barbosa; Almeida, Larissa da Cunha; de Sá, Luisa Zaiden Carvalho Martins; Lima, Eliana Martins

2012-01-01

242

Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled particles, micron-sized copper vermiculite was prepared by jet-milling vermiculite. Meanwhile, since the exfoliated vermiculite has very unique properties, such as high porosity, specific surface area, high aspect ratio of laminates, and low density, and has been extensively utilized as a functional additives, exfoliated copper vermiculite also was synthesized and investigated. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was qualitatively evaluated by the diffusion methods (both liquid diffusion and solid diffusion) against the most common pathogenic species: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The result showed that the release velocity of copper from copper vermiculite is very slow. However, copper vermiculite clearly has excellent antibacterial efficiency to S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. The strongest antibacterial ability of copper vermiculite is its action on S. aureus. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was also quantitatively evaluated by determining the reduction rate (death rate) of E. coli versus various levels of copper vermiculite. 10 ppm of copper vermiculite in solution is sufficient to reduce the cell population of E. coli, while the untreated vermiculite had no antibacterial activity. The slow release of copper revealed that the antimicrobial effect of copper vermiculite was due to the strong interactions between copper ions and bacteria cells. Exfoliated copper vermiculite has even stronger antibacterial activity than copper vermiculite against E. coli. With 200 ppm exfoliated copper vermiculite in bacteria suspension (4.68 ppm of metal copper), the reduction of viable bacteria are 99.8% at 1 hour, and >99.9% at 2 hours. With 10 ppm exfoliated copper vermiculite in bacteria dilution (0.234 ppm of copper atoms), the reduction of viable E. coli reached 98.7% at 1 hour, and >95.6% at 2 hours. Molds have the potential to cause health problems, such as allergic reactions, irritations, and mycotoxins, and damage to buildings, historic relics, properties, etc. Since copper has better antifungal property, an initial antifungal activity of copper vermiculite was evaluated in this study. Fat-free milk was used to develop molds in the test samples by saturated samples. Incubated at 36°C for 48 hours, all of the surfaces of untreated control samples, including micron-sized vermiculite, exfoliated vermiculite, bentonite, and kaolin, have been covered by thick mold layers. However, there were no mold showed on copper vermiculite and exfoliated copper vermiculite. Even after the incubation was lasted for 10 days, copper vermiculite and exfoliated copper vermiculite did not show any mold on the surface. These results exhibited copper vermiculite has excellent antifungal activities against mold. Stability of copper ions in copper vermiculite was measured by aqueous leaching process. Copper vermiculite and exfoliated copper vermiculite were put into distilled water in a ratio of 2.0g/100ml, and then implemented leaching processes by continuously shaking (leaching) and statically storing (soaking) for desired periods of time, respectively. According to the analytic result by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP), the major metals released were copper, magnesium, iron, silicon, and aluminum. The release rate of copper depends on the environmental conditions. Under the dynamic leaching condition, all the major elements had shown linear leaching rates, and slowly increases along with the leaching time. Copper concentration in 1 hour leached solutions had suffi

Li, Bowen

243

Enhancing antibiofilm efficacy in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: effect of microbubbles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a microbubble containing photosensitizer when activated with light would enable comprehensive disinfection of bacterial biofilms in infected root dentin by antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT). Experiments were conducted in two stages. In the stage-1, microbubble containing photosensitizing formulation was tested for its photochemical properties. In the stage-2, the efficacy of microbubble containing photosensitizing formulation was tested on in vitro infected root canal model, developed with monospecies biofilm models of Enterococcus faecalis on root dentin substrate. The findings from this study showed that the microbubble containing photosensitizing formulation was overall the most effective formulation for photooxidation, generation of singlet oxygen, and in disinfecting the biofilm bacteria in the infected root canal model. This modified photosensitizing formulation will have potential advantages in eliminating bacterial biofilms from infected root dentin.

Kishen, Anil; George, Saji

2013-02-01

244

In Vitro Activity of 39 Antimicrobial Agents Against Treponema hyodysenteriae  

PubMed Central

The in vitro activities of 39 antimicrobial agents against 23 isolates of Treponema hyodysenteriae, the majority of which were field isolates, were determined by the agar dilution technique. Quinoxalines, pleuromutilin, nitroimidazoles, and nitrofuran were the most active. Their activities ranged from ?0.10 to 1.56 ?g/ml. Lincomycin, penicillins, chloramphenicol, tetracyclines, cephalosporins, three peptides (virginiamycin, thiopeptin, and bacitracin), and one aminoglycoside (gentamicin) exhibited intermediate levels of activity ranging from 0.39 to 50 ?g/ml. Four peptides (enduracidin, viomycin, bicyclomycin, and colistin), three aminoglycosides (kanamycin, streptomycin, and neomycin), polyene, and other agents, including novobiocin, vancomycin, rifampin, nalidixic acid, and p-arsanilic acid, displayed limited activities ranging from 12.5 to ?100 ?g/ml. Macrolides showed varying degrees of activity depending upon isolates. PMID:464566

Kitai, Kazuhisa; Kashiwazaki, Mamoru; Adachi, Yoshikazu; Kume, Tsuneo; Arakawa, Akira

1979-01-01

245

Antimicrobial activity of two South African honeys produced from indigenous Leucospermum cordifolium and Erica species on selected micro-organisms  

PubMed Central

Background Honey has been shown to have wound healing properties which can be ascribed to its antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity can be effective against a broad spectrum of bacterial species especially those of medical importance. It has also been shown that there is considerable variation in the antimicrobial potency of different types of honey, which is impossible to predict. With this in mind we tested the antimicrobial activity of honeys produced from plants grown in South Africa for their antibacterial properties on selected standard strains of oral micro-organisms. Methods The honeys used were produced from the blossoms of Eucalyptus cladocalyx (Bluegum) trees, an indigenous South African plant Leucospermum cordifolium (Pincushion), a mixture of wild heather shrubs, mainly Erica species (Fynbos) and a Leptospermum scoparium (Manuka) honey. Only pure honey which had not been heated was used. The honeys were tested for their antimicrobial properties with a broth dilution method. Results Although the honeys produced some inhibitory effect on the growth of the micro-organisms, no exceptionally high activity occurred in the South African honeys. The carbohydrate concentration plays a key role in the antimicrobial activity of the honeys above 25%. However, these honeys do contain other antimicrobial properties that are effective against certain bacterial species at concentrations well below the hypertonic sugar concentration. The yeast C. albicans was more resistant to the honeys than the bacteria. The species S. anginosus and S. oralis were more sensitive to the honeys than the other test bacteria. Conclusion The honeys produced from indigenous wild flowers from South Africa had no exceptionally high activity that could afford medical grade status. PMID:18627601

Basson, Nicolaas J; Grobler, Sias R

2008-01-01

246

Antimicrobial activity of different solvent extracted samples from the flowers of medicinally important Plumeria obstusa.  

PubMed

The present research work was carried out to investigate the antimicrobial (eight bacteria and one fungus) activities of different solvent (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and isobutanol) extracted samples from flowers of P. obstusa by disc diffusion method. Analysis of the data revealed that all the five extracts from flowers of P. obstusa showed different ranges of antimicrobial activities. Petroleum ether fractions showed inhibitory activities against all the nine microbial species except Klebsiella pneumonia. Ethyl acetate and isobutanol fractions showed inhibitory effects against all the tested microbial species except Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Chloroform and ethanol extracts had varying levels of inhibitions against all of the tested microorganisms. The most susceptible gram positive bacterium was Bacillus subtilis which was inhibited by all the five extracts while the most resistant gram positive bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus. Erwinia carotovora was the most susceptible gram negative bacterium while Pseudomonas aeruginosa was highly resistant among the gram negative bacteria. PMID:25553696

Ali, Nasir; Ahmad, Dawood; Bakht, Jehan

2015-01-01

247

Antimicrobial activity of polyacetylenes from Bellis perennis and their synthetic derivatives.  

PubMed

The chemical investigation of the essential oils from the aerial organs of Bellis perennis L., the common daisy, showed that polyacetylenes were one of the dominant class of compounds. The major constituents, methyl deca-4,6-diynoate and deca-4,6-diynoic acid, and their structural analogues, deca-4,6-diyne, dimethyl octa-3,5-diyne-1,8-dioate and deca-4,6-diyne-1,10-dioic acid, were synthesised and their antimicrobial activity evaluated. Only deca-4,6-diynoic acid and deca-4,6-diyne-1,10-dioic acid showed antimicrobial activity, being the two compounds mainly effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Structure-activity relationships of the tested polyacetylenes are discussed. PMID:9434600

Avato, P; Vitali, C; Mongelli, P; Tava, A

1997-12-01

248

Water Soluble Usnic Acid-Polyacrylamide Complexes with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis  

PubMed Central

Usnic acid, a potent antimicrobial and anticancer agent, poorly soluble in water, was complexed to novel antimicrobial polyacrylamides by establishment of strong acidic-base interactions. Thermal and spectroscopic analysis evidenced a molecular dispersion of the drug in the polymers and a complete drug/polymer miscibility for all the tested compositions. The polymer/drug complexes promptly dissolved in water and possessed a greater antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis than both the free drug and the polymer alone. The best results were obtained with the complex based on the lowest molecular weight polymer and containing a low drug content. Such a complex showed a larger inhibition zone of bacterial growth and a lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) with respect to usnic acid alone. This improved killing effect is presumably due to the reduced size of the complexes that allows an efficient cellular uptake of the antimicrobial complexes. The killing effect extent seems to be not significantly dependent on usnic acid content in the samples. PMID:23549269

Francolini, Iolanda; Taresco, Vincenzo; Crisante, Fernanda; Martinelli, Andrea; D’Ilario, Lucio; Piozzi, Antonella

2013-01-01

249

Antimicrobial activity of seven hypericum entities from central Italy.  

PubMed

Methanol-acetone extracts from aerial parts of seven entities of the genus Hypericum [H. perforatum L. subsp. perforatum, H. perforatum L. subsp. veronense (Schrank) Ces., H. montanum L., H. hyssopifolium Chaix, H. hirsutum L., H. hircinum L. subsp. majus (Aiton) N. Robson, H. tetrapterum Fr.] growing in the Appennino Umbro-Marchigiano (central Italy) were tested in vitro for their antimicrobial activity against two Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis), two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and the yeast Candida albicans, by the Kirby-Bauer agar diffusion method. The two H. perforatum subspecies were particularly active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, supporting the use of these plants in the traditional medicine of central Italy to treat wounds, skin and infectious diseases. However significant values of inhibition were given also by H. hirsutum against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, and by H. hyssopifolium, H. hircinum subsp. majus and H. tetrapterum against C. albicans. These results suggest that hypericin and hyperforin are the main components responsible for antimicrobial activity, but not the only ones, as other extracts, showing a low level of these compounds, possess evident activity. Isolation of pure compounds from the most active extracts is in progress. PMID:17516331

Cecchini, Cinzia; Cresci, Alberto; Coman, Maria Magdalena; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro; Lucarini, Domenico; Maggi, Filippo

2007-06-01

250

Phytochemical analysis and in vitro antimicrobial activity of two Satureja species essential oils.  

PubMed

The phytochemical GC[sol ]MS analysis and in vitro antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of the aerial parts of Satureja montana L. and Satureja cuneifolia Ten., collected in Croatia were performed. The major compound of S. montana oil was the phenolic monoterpene carvacrol (45.7%). Other important compounds were the monoterpenic hydrocarbons p-cymene (12.6%), gamma-terpinene (8.1%) and the oxygen-containing compounds carvacrol methyl ether, borneol, thymol and thymol methyl ether. The volatile oil of S. cuneifolia was characterized as beta-cubebene (8.7%), limonene (8.3%), alpha-pinene (6.9%), spathulenol and beta-caryophyllene. The antimicrobial effects of S. montana and S. cuneifolia oils were found to have a broad spectrum activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens by the broth microdilution method. These oils were active against all the test strains, with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Compared with S. cuneifolia, savory oil exhibited greater antimicrobial activity. The maximum activity of savory oil was observed against Escherichia coli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and against the yeast (Candida albicans). The essential oil of S. cuneifolia was also found to inhibit the growth of medically important pathogens such as S. aureus and E. coli. Fungicidal activity for both oils against C. albicans and S. cerevisiae was also observed. PMID:15742345

Skocibusi?, Mirjana; Bezi?, Nada

2004-12-01

251

Mode of Action of Lactoperoxidase as Related to Its Antimicrobial Activity: A Review  

PubMed Central

Lactoperoxidase is a member of the family of the mammalian heme peroxidases which have a broad spectrum of activity. Their best known effect is their antimicrobial activity that arouses much interest in in vivo and in vitro applications. In this context, the proper use of lactoperoxidase needs a good understanding of its mode of action, of the factors that favor or limit its activity, and of the features and properties of the active molecules. The first part of this review describes briefly the classification of mammalian peroxidases and their role in the human immune system and in host cell damage. The second part summarizes present knowledge on the mode of action of lactoperoxidase, with special focus on the characteristics to be taken into account for in vitro or in vivo antimicrobial use. The last part looks upon the characteristics of the active molecule produced by lactoperoxidase in the presence of thiocyanate and/or iodide with implication(s) on its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25309750

Bafort, F.; Parisi, O.; Perraudin, J.-P.; Jijakli, M. H.

2014-01-01

252

Non-anti-infective effects of antimicrobials and their clinical applications: a review.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial agents are undoubtedly one of the key advances in the history of modern medicine and infectious diseases, improving the clinical outcomes of infection owing to their inhibitory effects on microbial growth. However, many antimicrobial agents also have biological activities stemming from their interactions with host receptors and effects on host inflammatory responses and other human or bacterial cellular biological pathways. These result in clinical uses of antimicrobial drugs that are distinct from their direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal properties. We reviewed the published literature regarding non-anti-infective therapeutic properties and proposed clinical applications of selected antimicrobials, specifically, macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and ketoconazole. The clinical applications reviewed were varied, and we focused on uses that were clinically relevant (in terms of importance and burden of disease) and where published evidence exists. Such uses include chronic inflammatory pulmonary and skin disorders, chronic periodontitis, gastrointestinal dysmotility, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Most of these potential therapeutic uses are not Food and Drug Administration approved. Clinicians need to weigh the use of antimicrobial agents for their non-anti-infective benefits, considering potential adverse effects and long-term effect on microbial resistance. PMID:25440726

Sadarangani, Sapna P; Estes, Lynn L; Steckelberg, James M

2015-01-01

253

Magainins, a Class of Antimicrobial Peptides from Xenopus Skin: Isolation, Characterization of Two Active Forms, and Partial cDNA Sequence of a Precursor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A family of peptides with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity has been isolated from the skin of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. It consists of two closely related peptides that are each 23 amino acids and differ by two substitutions. These peptides are water soluble, nonhemolytic at their effective antimicrobial concentrations, and potentially amphiphilic. At low concentrations they inhibit growth of

Michael Zasloff

1987-01-01

254

Antimicrobial activity of some Salvia species essential oils from Iran.  

PubMed

The aerial parts of Salvia multicaulis, S. sclarea and S. verticillata were collected at full flowering stage. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by combination of capillary GC and GC-MS. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the essential oils were studied against eight Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumulis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and three fungi (Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger). The results of antibacterial activity tests of the essential oils according to the disc diffusion method and MIC values indicated that all the samples have moderate to high inhibitory activity against the tested bacteria except for P. aeruginosa which was totally resistant. In contrast to antibacterial activity, the oils exhibited no or slight antifungal property, in which only the oil of S. multicaulis showed weak activity against two tested yeasts, C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. PMID:17913065

Yousefzadi, Morteza; Sonboli, Ali; Karimic, Farah; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Asghari, Behvar; Zeinalia, Amineh

2007-01-01

255

Antimicrobial activity of confertifolin from Polygonum hydropiper.  

PubMed

Confertifolin (6,6,9a-trimethyl-4,5,5a,6,7,8,9,9a-octahydronaphtho[1,2-c] furan-3 (1H)-one) was isolated from the essential oil of Polygonum hydropiper L. (Polygonaceae) leaves using column chromatography. Confertifolin showed activity both in bacteria and fungi. The lowest MIC for bacteria was observed against Enterococcus faecalis (31.25 microg/mL). Significant MIC for fungi was observed against Scopulariopsis sp (7.81 microg/mL), Curvularia lunata (7.81 microg/mL), Epidermophyton floccosum (7.81 microg/mL), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (16.62 microg/mL), Trichophyton rubrum (MTCC 296) (16.62 microg/mL), Aspergillus niger (31.25 microg/mL), Botrytis cinerea (31.25 microg/mL) Magnaporthe grisea (62.5 microg/mL), Trichophyton simii (125 microg/mL) and Trichophyton rubrum (clinical isolate) (125 microg/mL). PMID:20645838

Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Indwar, Francis; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

2010-02-01

256

Pharmacological Assessment of the Medicinal Potential of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.: Antimicrobial and Toxicity Activities  

PubMed Central

Acacia mearnsii De Wild. (Fabaceae) is a medicinal plant used in the treatment of microbial infections in South Africa without scientific validation of its bioactivity and toxicity. The antimicrobial activity of the crude acetone extract was evaluated by both agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while its cytotoxicity effect was assessed with brine shrimp lethality assay. The study showed that both bacterial and fungal isolates were highly inhibited by the crude extract. The MIC values for the gram-positive bacteria (78.1–312.5) ?g/mL, gram-negative bacteria (39.1–625) ?g/mL and fungal isolates (625–5000) ?g/mL differ significantly. The bacteria were more susceptible than the fungal strains tested. The antibiosis determination showed that the extract was more (75%) bactericidal than bacteriostatic (25%) and more fungicidal (66.67%) than fungistatic (33.33%). The cytotoxic activity of the extract was observed between 31.25 ?g/mL and 500 ?g/mL and the LC50 value (112.36 ?g/mL) indicates that the extract was nontoxic in the brine shrimp lethality assay (LC50 > 100 ?g/mL). These results support the use of A. mearnsii in traditional medicine for treatment of microbial infections. The extract exhibiting significant broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and nontoxic effects has potential to yield active antimicrobial compounds. PMID:22605976

Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O.; Afolayan, Anthony J.

2012-01-01

257

Chitosan-hydroxycinnamic acid conjugates: preparation, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

In this study, the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of chitosan-caffeic acid, chitosan-ferulic acid, and chitosan-sinapic acid conjugates with different grafting ratios were investigated. The synthesized chitosan-hydroxycinnamic acid conjugates were verified by performing (1)H NMR and differential scanning calorimetry analysis. The antioxidant activities of the conjugates were increased compared to the unmodified chitosan, by 1.79-fold to 5.05-fold (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay), 2.44-fold to 4.12-fold (hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay), 1.34-fold to 3.35-fold (ABTS(+) radical scavenging assay), and also exhibited an increased reducing power. The conjugates also showed excellent lipid peroxidation inhibition abilities in a linoleic acid emulsion system. The conjugates exhibited antimicrobial activity against 15 clinical isolates, two standard methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and three standard methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains, as well as eight foodborne pathogens. Additionally, the conjugates showed no cytotoxic activity towards human Chang liver and mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. PMID:24262532

Lee, Dae-Sung; Woo, Ji-Young; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Je, Jae-Young

2014-04-01

258

New derivatives of benzimidazole and their antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

Azolium salts and neutral 2-aryl derivatives of benzimidazole, benzothiazole and benzoxazole were synthesized and compounds were identified by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and microanalytical methods. In this work the salts 1 and the neutral compounds 2 were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against standard strains: Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Candida albicans and Candida tropicals. The compounds 1f, 1g, 1l, 1m, 1n, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2e, 2f showed antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Candida albicans and Candida tropicals, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging between 50 to 200 mg/mL. Compounds 1f, 1g, 1l, lm, 2b, 2c showed the highest activity. Benzothiazolium and benzoxazolium salts were more active than 1,3-disubstituted benzimidazolium salts and neutral 2-substituted benzimidazole, benzothiazole and benzoxazole derivatives. PMID:10326736

Cetínkaya, E; Alici, B; Gök, Y; Durmaz, R; Günal, S

1999-04-01

259

Antimicrobial activity of Chinese medicine herbs against common bacteria in oral biofilm. A pilot study.  

PubMed

Twenty traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against four common oral bacteria. TCMs were tested for sensitivity against Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Aliquots of suspension of each bacterial species were inoculated onto a horse blood agar plate with TCMs soaked separately on 6mm paper disks. The plates were incubated for 48h anaerobically and the mean diameters of growth inhibition of three different areas obtained. 0.2% (w/v) chlorhexidine was used as a positive control. Broth microdilution assay was used to determine minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. Fructus armeniaca mume was effective against all four bacteria. Thirteen TCMs demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, including Cortex magnoliae officinalis, Cortex phellodendri, Flos caryophylli, Flos lonicerae japonicae, Fructus armeniaca mume, Fructus forsythiae suspensae, Herba cum radice violae yedoensitis, Herba menthae haplocalycis, Pericarpium granati, Radix et rhizoma rhei, Radix gentianae, Ramulus cinnamomi cassia and Rhizoma cimicifugae. Cortex phellodendri showed antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, while Radix et rhizoma rhei was effective against Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus sanguis. Fructus armeniaca mume had inhibitory effects against Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro. PMID:20418062

Wong, R W K; Hägg, U; Samaranayake, L; Yuen, M K Z; Seneviratne, C J; Kao, R

2010-06-01

260

Evaluation of the Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work evaluates the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of clary sage (CS) Salvia sclarea L. Antimicrobial, total antioxidant, DPPH radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging and metal chelating activities, reducing power, and total contents of phenolic compounds of dried herb samples extracted with chloroform and acetone were studied. The chloroform extract had stronger total antioxidant activity

Münir OKTAY

2004-01-01

261

Antimicrobial activity of propolis samples from two different regions of Anatolia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antimicrobial activity of two propolis samples from Kazan and Marmaris regions in Turkey were investigated by the disc diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity was tested with four different ethanolic extracts (30, 50, 70, and 96% ethanol) of each sample against seven Gram positive, four Gram negative bacteria and one fungus culture. The activity was found to be mainly due to caffeic

Murat Kartal; Sulhiye Y?ld?z; Serdar Kaya; Semra Kurucu; Gülaçt? Topçu

2003-01-01

262

Design of antimicrobially active small amphiphilic peptide dendrimers.  

PubMed

Novel polyfunctional small amphiphilic peptide dendrimers characterized by incorporation of a new core compounds - tris-amino acids or tetrakis-amino alcohols that originated from a series of basic amino acids - were efficiently synthesized. These new core elements yielded molecules with multiple branching and (+5)/(+6) charge at the 1-st dendrimer generation. Dendrimers exhibited significant antimicrobial potency against Gram(+) and Gram(-) strains involving also multiresistant reference strains (S. aureus ATCC 43300 and E. coli ATCC BAA-198). In addition, high activity against fungi from the Candida genus was detected. More charged and more hydrophobic peptide dendrimers expressed hemolytic properties. PMID:19924036

Polcyn, Piotr; Jurczak, Margarita; Rajnisz, Aleksandra; Solecka, Jolanta; Urbanczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia

2009-01-01

263

Biomaterial modification of urinary catheters with antimicrobials to give long-term broadspectrum antibiofilm activity.  

PubMed

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the commonest hospital-acquired infection, accounting for over 100,000 hospital admissions within the USA annually. Biomaterials and processes intended to reduce the risk of bacterial colonization of the catheters for long-term users have not been successful, mainly because of the need for long duration of activity in flow conditions. Here we report the results of impregnation of urinary catheters with a combination of rifampicin, sparfloxacin and triclosan. In flow experiments, the antimicrobial catheters were able to prevent colonization by common uropathogens Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli for 7 to 12weeks in vitro compared with 1-3days for other, commercially available antimicrobial catheters currently used clinically. Resistance development was minimized by careful choice of antimicrobial combinations. Drug release profiles and distribution in the polymer, and surface analysis were also carried out and the process had no deleterious effect on the mechanical performance of the catheter or its balloon. The antimicrobial catheter therefore offers for the first time a means of reducing infection and its complications in long-term urinary catheter users. PMID:25639970

Fisher, Leanne E; Hook, Andrew L; Ashraf, Waheed; Yousef, Anfal; Barrett, David A; Scurr, David J; Chen, Xinyong; Smith, Emily F; Fay, Michael; Parmenter, Christopher D J; Parkinson, Richard; Bayston, Roger

2015-03-28

264

General principles of antimicrobial therapy.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community. PMID:21282489

Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

2011-02-01

265

General Principles of Antimicrobial Therapy  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community. PMID:21282489

Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L.; Edson, Randall S.

2011-01-01

266

Effect of ozone on oral cells compared with established antimicrobials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ozone has been proposed as an alternative antiseptic agent in dentistry based on reports of its antimicrobial effects in both gaseous and aqueous forms. This study investigated whether gaseous ozone (4 · 106 l gm )3) and aqueous ozone (1.25- 20 l gm l )1) exert any cytotoxic effects on human oral epithelial (BHY) cells and gingival fibroblast (HGF-1) cells

Karin C. Huth; Franz M. Jakob; Bernd Saugel; Christian Cappello; Ekaterini Paschos; Regina Hollweck; Reinhard Hickel; Korbinian Brand

2006-01-01

267

Anthelmintic and antimicrobial activity of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Euphorbia helioscopia L.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the anthelmintic and antimicrobial efficacy of Euphorbia helioscopia crude extracts. A worm motility inhibition assay and egg hatch assay were used for in vitro study, and a faecal egg count reduction assay was used for in vivo study. The in vitro study revealed anthelmintic effects of crude methanolic extracts of E. helioscopia on live Haemonchus contortus worms as evident from their paralysis and/or death at 8 h after exposure. Different concentrations (12.5 mg?ml(-1), 25 mg?ml(-1) and 50 mg?ml(-1)) of aqueous and methanolic extracts were used against H. contortus which exhibited dose-dependent anthelmintic effects on H. contortus. Different extracts of E. helioscopia on percent inhibitory egg hatching was very low as compared to levamisole. The antimicrobial activity of extracts ranging from 100 to 500 mg?ml(-1) screened by disc diffusion method against four selected bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas multocida and Escherichia coli) and two fungal strains (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans) was also dose dependent with the extract showing more inhibitory effects against S. aureus and E. coli and a minimum inhibitory effect against A. flavus. It is concluded that the entire plant of E. helioscopia possesses significant anthelmintic and antimicrobial activity and could be a potential alternative for treating cases of helminth infections in ruminants. PMID:23065392

Lone, Bashir A; Bandh, Suhaib A; Chishti, Mohammad Zahoor; Bhat, Fayaz Ahmad; Tak, Hidayatullah; Nisa, Humeera

2013-03-01

268

In vitro antimicrobial activity of Persian shallot (Allium hirtifolium).  

PubMed

Allium hirtifolium is a Persian native plant grown in cool mountain slopes of Iran. It has been used as a spice in Iran for many years. According to the literature review, there are no considerable reports on the antimicrobial properties of this plant. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of Persian shallot hydroalcoholic extract and F1 fraction of the plant (containing amino acid derivatives and/or other cationic compounds) was investigated on some Gram positive cocci and bacilli, Gram negative bacilli, two protozoa, a yeast and a fungus. Excellent activity against Candida albicans (MIC = 64 microg/ml, MBC = 128 microg/ml), Leishmania infantum (MIC = 0.2 mg/ml on the first day of study) and Trichomonas vaginalis (MIC = 5 microg/ml in PSDE form) and a moderate activity against Bacillus spp and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (MIC = 128 microg/ml) was observed. The results showed that this plant contains some anti-trichomonas and anti-leishmania components. PMID:23210319

Soroush, Setareh; Taherikalani, Morovat; Asadollahi, Parisa; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Taran, Mojtaba; Emaneini, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Sajjad

2012-01-01

269

Biosynthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Semiconductor Nanoparticles against Oral Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Dental care is an essential phenomenon in human health. Oral pathogens can cause severe break which may show the way to serious issues in human disease like blood circulation and coronary disease. In the current study, we demonstrated the synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cadmium sulphide and zinc sulphide nanoparticles against oral pathogens. The process for the synthesis of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles is fast, novel, and ecofriendly. Formation of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles was confirmed by surface plasmon spectra using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The morphology of crystalline phase of nanoparticles was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. The average size of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles was in the range of 10?nm to 25?nm and 65?nm, respectively, and the observed morphology was spherical. The results indicated that the proteins, which contain amine groups, played a reducing and controlling responsibility during the formation of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles in the colloidal solution. The antimicrobial activity was assessed against oral pathogens such as Streptococcus sp. Staphylococcus sp. Lactobacillus sp., and Candida albicans and these results confirmed that the sulphide nanoparticles are exhibiting good bactericidal activity. PMID:24860280

Malarkodi, C.; Rajeshkumar, S.; Paulkumar, K.; Vanaja, M.; Gnanajobitha, G.; Annadurai, G.

2014-01-01

270

Antimicrobial activity of selected South African medicinal plants  

PubMed Central

Background Nearly 3,000 plant species are used as medicines in South Africa, with approximately 350 species forming the most commonly traded and used medicinal plants. In the present study, twelve South African medicinal plants were selected and tested for their antimicrobial activities against eight microbial species belonging to fungi, Mycobacteria, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods The radiometric respiratory technique using the BACTEC 460 system was used for susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for other antimicrobial assays. Results The results of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations indicated that the methanol extracts from Acacia karoo, Erythrophleum lasianthum and Salvia africana were able to prevent the growth of all the tested microorganisms. All other samples showed selective activities. MIC values below 100??g/ml were recorded with A. karoo, C. dentate, E. lasianthum, P. obligun and S. africana on at least one of the nine tested microorganisms. The best activity (MIC value of 39.06??g/ml) was noted with S. africana against E. coli, S. aureus and M. audouinii, and Knowltonia vesitoria against M. tuberculosis. Conclusion The overall results of the present work provide baseline information for the possible use of the studied South African plant extracts in the treatment of microbial infections. PMID:22704594

2012-01-01

271

Biosynthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Semiconductor Nanoparticles against Oral Pathogens.  

PubMed

Dental care is an essential phenomenon in human health. Oral pathogens can cause severe break which may show the way to serious issues in human disease like blood circulation and coronary disease. In the current study, we demonstrated the synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cadmium sulphide and zinc sulphide nanoparticles against oral pathogens. The process for the synthesis of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles is fast, novel, and ecofriendly. Formation of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles was confirmed by surface plasmon spectra using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The morphology of crystalline phase of nanoparticles was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. The average size of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles was in the range of 10?nm to 25?nm and 65?nm, respectively, and the observed morphology was spherical. The results indicated that the proteins, which contain amine groups, played a reducing and controlling responsibility during the formation of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles in the colloidal solution. The antimicrobial activity was assessed against oral pathogens such as Streptococcus sp. Staphylococcus sp. Lactobacillus sp., and Candida albicans and these results confirmed that the sulphide nanoparticles are exhibiting good bactericidal activity. PMID:24860280

Malarkodi, C; Rajeshkumar, S; Paulkumar, K; Vanaja, M; Gnanajobitha, G; Annadurai, G

2014-01-01

272

Antimicrobial activity of cationic peptides in endodontic procedures  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and biofilm inhibition activity of synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) against microbes such as Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans which are involved in endodontic infections. Materials and Methods: Agar diffusion test was done to determine the activity of peptides. The morphological changes in E. faecalis and reduction in biofilm formation after treatment with peptides were observed using scanning electron microscope. The efficacy of peptides using an ex vivo dentinal model was determined by polymerase chain reaction and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Platelet aggregation was done to determine the biocompatibility of peptides. Results: Among 11 peptides, two of the amphipathic cationic peptides were found to be highly active against E. faecalis, S. aureus, C. albicans. Efficacy results using dentinal tubule model showed significant reduction in microbial load at 400 ?m depth. The peptides were also biocompatible. Conclusion: These results suggest that synthetic AMPs have the potential to be developed as antibacterial agents against microorganisms involved in dental infections and thus could prevent the spread and persistence of endodontic infections improving treatment outcomes and teeth preservation. PMID:24966779

Winfred, Sofi Beaula; Meiyazagan, Gowri; Panda, Jiban J.; Nagendrababu, Venkateshbabu; Deivanayagam, Kandaswamy; Chauhan, Virander S.; Venkatraman, Ganesh

2014-01-01

273

Antimicrobial Activity of Artemisia absinthium Against Surgical Wounds Infected by Staphylococcus aureus in a Rat Model.  

PubMed

The wound infection is one of the frequent complications in patients undergoing surgical operations. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of surgical wounds. Artemisia absinthium has been shown to bear strong antimicrobial activity, especially against Gram-positive pathogens. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of A. absinthium against surgical wounds infected by S. aureus in a rat model. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into two equal groups of treated and control rats. A circular incision was created on the dorsal inter-scapular region of each rat. After skin wounding, rats were inoculated locally with 1 × 10(4) CFU of S. aureus at sites of skin wounds. The extract was applied topically twice a day throughout the experiment. Animals of the control group were left untreated. Results have revealed that topical application of A. absinthium extract on the infected wound sites produced significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus. PMID:24293717

Moslemi, Hamid Reza; Hoseinzadeh, Hesamoddin; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Kafshdouzan, Khatereh; Fard, Ramin Mazaheri Nezhad

2012-12-01

274

Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay  

PubMed Central

The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

2013-01-01

275

In vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of flavonoids from Panax notoginseng flowers.  

PubMed

Panax notoginseng and its flowers are both well-known traditional Chinese medicinal herbs. To date, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of flavonoids from P. notoginseng flowers (PNF) remain unclear. In this study, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of flavonoids from PNF were investigated. The crude flavonoids were purified using a column (25 cm × 1.5 cm) packed with AB-8 macroporous adsorption resin. Compared with ascorbic acid, the purified flavonoids excelled in scavenging activities on 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals at 0.2-1.0 mg/mL concentration. However, flavonoids exhibited weaker reducing power than ascorbic acid at 20-100 ?g/mL concentration. In addition, the flavonoids exhibited obvious inhibitory effects on Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These results clearly indicate that flavonoids from PNF are effective in scavenging free radicals and have the potential to be used as antioxidants and antimicrobial agents, and also provide the theoretical data for supporting the use of PNF in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. PMID:24666395

Hong, Jun; Hu, Jian-Ye; Liu, Jun-Hong; Zhou, Zheng; Zhao, An-Fang

2014-01-01

276

The in vitro antimicrobial activities of the essential oils of some Lamiaceae species from Turkey.  

PubMed

In this study, antimicrobial activities of the essential oils obtained by using the hydrodistillation method from some lamiaceous plants--Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson ssp. longifolia, M. longifolia (L.) Hudson ssp. typhoides (Briq.) Harley var. typhoides, Mentha pulegium L., Salvia fruticosa Miller, Salvia tomentosa Miller, Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi ssp. glandulosa (Req.) P.W. Ball, Nepeta cadmea Boiss., Lavandula stoechas L. ssp. stoechas, and Ziziphora tenuior L.--were determined by using the disc diffusion method. The plants used in this study were collected from different localities of Mu?la Province, Turkey. All the essential oils isolated from the plants were very effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which included multiple-antibiotic resistant strains, except Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Pseudomonas fluorescens MU 87. The essential oils of the plant species, except S. tomentosa and S. fruticosa, were very effective against Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activities varied depending on the species, subspecies, or variety. In fact, essential oils of some plants belonging to the same taxa but collected from different localities showed different levels of antimicrobial activities. PMID:19735193

Sarac, Nurdan; Ugur, Aysel

2009-08-01

277

Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis and some other medicinal plants commonly used in South-East Asia  

PubMed Central

Background Eight medicinal plants were tested for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different extraction methods were also tested for their effects on the bioactivities of the medicinal plants. Methods Eight plants, namely Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis (Laliaocao), Folium Murraya Koenigii (Jialiye), Rhizoma Arachis Hypogea (Huashenggen), Herba Houttuyniae (Yuxingcao), Epipremnum pinnatum (Pashulong), Rhizoma Typhonium Flagelliforme (Laoshuyu), Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis (Houpo) and Rhizoma Imperatae (Baimaogen) were investigated for their potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Results Extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis had the strongest activities against M. Smegmatis, C. albicans, B. subtilis and S. aureus. Boiled extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis, Folium Murraya Koenigii, Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis and Herba Houttuyniae demonstrated greater antioxidant activities than other tested medicinal plants. Conclusion Among the eight tested medicinal plants, Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis showed the highest antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different methods of extraction yield different spectra of bioactivities. PMID:19038060

Chan, Lai Wah; Cheah, Emily LC; Saw, Constance LL; Weng, Wanyu; Heng, Paul WS

2008-01-01

278

Chemical Compositions and Antimicrobial Activities of Ocimum sanctum L. Essential Oils at Different Harvest Stages  

PubMed Central

Background: Essential Oils (EOs) possess antibacterial properties and represent a natural source to treat infections and prevent food spoilage. Their chemical composition might be affected by the environmental condition and the developmental growth stages of the plant. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the variations in chemical compositions and antimicrobial activities of the EOs of Ocimum sanctum L. at different stages of harvesting. Materials and Methods: The oils constituents were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The effects of three different harvest stages of O. sanctum EOs against most common causes of food-borne were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: The analysis of the EOs indicated that eugenol was the major compound of the EOs at all developmental stages which reached its maximum level at the second stage. The results showed that the tested EOs exhibited antimicrobial activities against all of the examined pathogens at concentrations of 0.125-32 µL/mL, except Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was only inhibited by high concentrations of the floral budding and full flowering EOs. EO distilled from the second developmental growth stage (floral budding) of O. sanctum exhibited the strongest antibacterial activities against the food borne bacteria. Conclusions: Considering the wide range of antimicrobial activities of the examined EOs, they might have the potential to be used to manage infectious diseases or extend the shelf life of food products.

Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Kamyab, Amir Alam; Kazerani, Narges Khatoon; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad

2014-01-01

279

Antimicrobial activities of the bromophenols from the red alga Odonthalia corymbifera and some synthetic derivatives.  

PubMed

A series of bromophenols was obtained by isolation from red alga Odonthalia corymbifera and by reactions of bis(hydroxyphenyl)methanes with bromine. New bromophenols including 3,3',5,5'-tetrabromo-2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxydiphenylmethane (10), a regioisomer of the potent antimicrobial natural product, together with known derivatives were synthesized in high yield. All of the isolated and synthesized compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity against gram-negative, gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The preliminary structure-activity relationship, to elucidate the essential structure requirements for antimicrobial activity, has been described. Among the isolated natural products 2,2',3,3'-tetrabromo-4,4',5,5'-tetrahydroxydiphenylmethane (4) was found to be the most active derivative against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The synthetic bromophenols 3,3'-dibromo-6,6'-dihydroxydiphenylmethane (13) and 3,3',5,5'-tetrabromo-6,6'-dihydroxydiphenylmethane (14) showed potent antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Proteus vulgaris, and Salmonella typhimurium. PMID:18053715

Oh, Ki-Bong; Lee, Ji Hye; Chung, Soon-Chun; Shin, Jongheon; Shin, Hee Jae; Kim, Hye-Kyeong; Lee, Hyi-Seung

2008-01-01

280

Antimicrobial activity of metal based nanoparticles against microbes associated with diseases in aquaculture.  

PubMed

The emergence of diseases and mortalities in aquaculture and development of antibiotics resistance in aquatic microbes, has renewed a great interest towards alternative methods of prevention and control of diseases. Nanoparticles have enormous potential in controlling human and animal pathogens and have scope of application in aquaculture. The present investigation was carried out to find out suitable nanoparticles having antimicrobial effect against aquatic microbes. Different commercial as well as laboratory synthesized metal and metal oxide nanoparticles were screened for their antimicrobial activities against a wide range of bacterial and fungal agents including certain freshwater cyanobacteria. Among different nanoparticles, synthesized copper oxide (CuO), zinc oxide (ZnO), silver (Ag) and silver doped titanium dioxide (Ag-TiO2) showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity. On the contrary, nanoparticles like Zn and ZnO showed antifungal activity against fungi like Penicillium and Mucor species. Since CuO, ZnO and Ag nanoparticles showed higher antimicrobial activity, they may be explored for aquaculture use. PMID:24888333

Swain, P; Nayak, S K; Sasmal, A; Behera, T; Barik, S K; Swain, S K; Mishra, S S; Sen, A K; Das, J K; Jayasankar, P

2014-09-01

281

Essential oils and isolated compounds from Lippia alba leaves and flowers: antimicrobial activity and osteoclast apoptosis.  

PubMed

In the present study, essential oils extracted from the leaves and flowers of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E.Br. (L. alba) were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity and their effects on osteoclasts. The periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans; ATCC 43717), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum; ATCC 25586) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis); ATCC 33277) were used in antimicrobial activity assays for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), whereas Bacteroides fragilis (B. fragilis; ATCC 25285) was used as the control microorganism. Osteoclast (OC) apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL assay and Fas receptor expression was detected by immunocytochemistry. The analysis of antimicrobial activity revealed that P. gingivalis had the lowest MIC values, whereas A. actinomycetemcomitans had the highest. L. alba essential oils were found to be toxic to human cells, although the compounds, carvone, limonene and citral, were non-toxic and induced apoptosis in the OCs. This study demonstrates that L. alba has potential biotechnological application in dentistry. In fact periodontal disease has a multifactorial etiology, and the immune response to microbial challenge leads to osteoclast activation and the resorption of the alveolar bone, resulting in tooth loss. PMID:25384405

Juiz, Paulo José Lima; Lucchese, Angelica Maria; Gambari, Roberto; Piva, Roberta; Penolazzi, Letizia; Di Ciano, Martina; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Silva, Franceli; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

2015-01-01

282

Green Synthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles for Antimicrobial Activity Against Burn Wounds Contaminating Bacteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared from the plant extract of N. arbor-tristis under atmospheric conditions through green synthesis and characterized by various physicochemical techniques like UV-Visible spectroscopy, IR Spectra, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the results confirmed the synthesis of homogeneous and stable AgNPs by the plant extracts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was investigated against most common bacteria found in burn wound Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In these tests, Mueller Hinton agar plates were used with AgNPs of various concentrations, supplemented in liquid systems. P. aeruginosa was inhibited at the low concentration of AgNPs, whereas the growth-inhibitory effect on S. epidermidis was mild. These results suggest that AgNPs can be used as effective growth inhibitors of various microorganisms, making them applicable to diverse medical devices and antimicrobial control systems.

Rout, Anandini; Jena, Padan K.; Sahoo, Debasish; Parida, Umesh K.; Bindhani, Birendra K.

2014-04-01

283

Effect of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil as a natural antimicrobial agent in lipophilic formulations.  

PubMed

There has been increased interest surrounding the use of tea tree oil (TTO) as a natural antimicrobial. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of TTO and its components were investigated in vitro and in a predominantly lipid-based personal care formulation. In vitro, TTO showed minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.2% (for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pythium sulcatum), 0.4% (for Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Rhizopus stolonifer), and 0.8% (for Botrytis cinerea). TTO at 0.08%-0.8% was often as efficient as parabens. Comparison of the antimicrobial activities of TTO components showed that terpinen-4-ol and ?-terpinene were generally most effective in inhibiting microbial growth. TTO activity in a personal care product was evaluated through air and water exposure, artificial inoculation, and shelf life studies. While TTO did not increase shelf life of unopened products, it decreased microbial load in products exposed to water and air. Results from this study support that antimicrobial activity of TTO can be attributed to varying levels of its components and that low levels of TTO were effective in reducing microbial growth during the use of the product. This study showed that TTO can act as a suitable preservative system within an oil-based formulation. PMID:25515896

Mantil, Elisabeth; Daly, Grace; Avis, Tyler J

2015-01-01

284

Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine by two different tests.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial capacity of sodium hypochlorite (1% and 5%) and chlorhexidine (0.12%, 0.5% and 1%) with or without the addition of organic material (bovine serum albumin, BSA) against some bacterial samples (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum) using two activity tests (contact and diffusion agar tests). In the contact test (first model), bacterial samples were kept in contact with each irrigating solution for different time intervals: immediately (t(0)), 5 min (t(5)), 15 min (t(15)) and 30 min (t(30)). The agar diffusion test was the second model used. In half the specimens, 0.5% BSA was added to simulate organic tissue present in the root canal. Bacterial growth was evaluated for each microorganism and activity test. Each test was repeated 10 times. In the contact test, 0.12% chlorhexidine solution (CHX) did not eliminate E. faecalis at any tested time. CHX at 0.5% eliminated all strains except E. faecalis after immediate contact. All strains were eliminated by 1% CHX, 1% NaOCl and 5% NaOCl. BSA did not interfere with the antimicrobial activity of the irrigating solutions. In the agar diffusion test, all solutions exhibited zones of antimicrobial activity; however, BSA interfered with the antimicrobial activity of NaOCl and CHX. Under the condition of the contact test, the 0.12% CHX was ineffective in eliminating E. faecalis, while 0.5% CHX, 1% CHX, 1% NaOCl and 5% NaOCl showed antibacterial effectiveness against all the tested bacterial strains. The addition of an organic load interfered with the accuracy of the agar diffusion test. PMID:18352899

Sassone, Luciana M; Fidel, Rivail Antonio Sergio; Murad, Cristiana Francescutti; Fidel, Sandra Rivera; Hirata, Rafael

2008-04-01

285

Antimicrobial Activity of Terminalia catappa, Manilkara zapota and Piper betel Leaf Extract.  

PubMed

Aqueous and methanol extract of the leaves of Terminalia catappa L., Manilkara zapota L. and Piper betel L. were evaluated for antibacterial activity against 10 Gram positive, 12 Gram negative bacteria and one fungal strain, Candida tropicalis. Piperacillin and gentamicin were used as standards for antibacterial assay, while fluconazole was used as standard for antifungal assay. The three plants showed different degree of activity against the microorganisms investigated. The methanolic extract was considerably more effective than aqueous extract in inhibiting the investigated microbial strains. The most active antimicrobial plant was Piper betel. PMID:20046756

Nair, R; Chanda, Sumitra

2008-01-01

286

Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles.  

PubMed

The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity. PMID:25748589

Janaki, A Chinnammal; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S

2015-06-01

287

Antimicrobial activity and cellular toxicity of nanoparticle-polymyxin B conjugates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of conjugates of the peptide antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) to Au nanoparticles and CdTe quantum dots. Au nanoparticles fully covered with PMB are identical in antimicrobial activity to the free drug alone, whereas partially-conjugated Au particles show decreased effectiveness in proportion to the concentration of Au. CdTe-PMB conjugates are more toxic to Escherichia coli than PMB alone, resulting in a flattening of the steep PMB dose-response curve. The effect is most pronounced at low concentrations of PMB, with a greater effect on the concentration required to reduce growth by half (IC50) than on the concentration needed to inhibit all growth (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC). The Gram positive organism Staphylococcus aureus is resistant to both PMB and CdTe, showing minimal increased sensitivity when the two are conjugated. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation shows a significant reduction in photo-generated hydroxyl and superoxide radicals with CdTe-PMB as compared with bare CdTe. There is a corresponding reduction in toxicity of QD-PMB versus bare CdTe to mammalian cells, with nearly 100% survival in fibroblasts exposed to bactericidal concentrations of QD-PMB. The situation in bacteria is more complex: photoexcitation of the CdTe particles plays a small role in IC50 but has a significant effect on the MIC, suggesting that at least two different mechanisms are responsible for the antimicrobial action seen. These results show that it is possible to create antimicrobial agents using concentrations of CdTe quantum dots that do not harm mammalian cells.

Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Wong, Jody; Nadeau, Jay L.

2011-05-01

288

In vitro antimicrobial activity of extracts and isolated constituents of Rubus ulmifolius.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity on bacteria and fungi of increasing polarity extracts of Rubus ulmifolius and that of some isolated constituents, quercetin-3-O-beta-D-glucuronide; kaempferol-3-O-beta-D-glucuronide, gallic acid, ferulic acid and tiliroside was evaluated. The phenolic and tannins fractions showed an high antimicrobial activity. PMID:11801377

Panizzi, L; Caponi, C; Catalano, S; Cioni, P L; Morelli, I

2002-02-01

289

Preliminary Phytochemical Analysis and Antimicrobial Activity of Some Weeds collected from Marathwada Region  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of selected weeds such as Portulaca oleracea L. (Portulaceae), Cardiospermum helicacabum L. (Sapindaceae), Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorbiaceae), Crotalaria retusa L. (Fabaceae) and Euphorbia heterophylla L. (Euphorbiaceae) were screened for phytochemical analysis and antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activities were tested against two gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococus aureus), one gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a mould

Dhole JA; Dhole NA; Lone KD; Bodke SS; Rajarshi Shahu

2011-01-01

290

Phytochemical analysis of Gymnema sylvestre and evaluation of its antimicrobial activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gymnema sylvestre (CS 149), known to be a rich source of saponins and other valuable phytochemicals, has been analysed for antimicrobial activity. The chloroform extracts of aerial and root parts of G. sylvestre exhibited higher antimicrobial activity as compared to diethyl ether and acetone. The root extracts of chloroform have shown competitive minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values

Bhuvaneswari Chodisetti; Kiranmayee Rao; Archana Giri

2012-01-01

291

Antiproliferative, antimicrobial and apoptosis inducing effects of compounds isolated from Inula viscosa.  

PubMed

The antiproliferative and antimicrobial effects of thirteen compounds isolated from Inula viscosa (L.) were tested in this study. The antiproliferative activity was tested against three cell lines using the MTT assay. The microdilution method was used to study the antimicrobial activity against two Gram positive bacteria, two Gram negative bacteria and one fungus. The apoptotic activity was determined using a TUNEL colorimetric assay. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphological changes in treated cancer cells and bacteria. Antiproliferative activity was observed in four flavonoids (nepetin, 3,3'-di-O-methylquercetin, hispidulin, and 3-O-methylquercetin). 3,3'-di-O-Methylquercetin and 3-O-methylquercetin showed selective antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cells, with IC(50) values of 10.11 and 11.23 µg/mL, respectively. Both compounds exert their antiproliferative effect by inducing apoptosis as indicted by the presence of DNA fragmentation, nuclear condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies in treated cancer cells. The antimicrobial effect of Inula viscosa were also noticed in 3,3'-di-O-methylquercetin and 3-O-methyquercetin that inhibited Bacillus cereus at MIC of 62.5 and 125 µg/mL, respectively. Salmonella typhimurium was inhibited by both compounds at MIC of 125 µg/mL. 3,3'-di-O-Methylquercetin induced damage in bacterial cell walls and cytoplasmic membranes. Methylated quercetins isolated from Inula viscosa have improved anticancer and antimicrobial properties compared with other flavonoids and are promising as potential anticancer and antimicrobial agents. PMID:22418930

Talib, Wamidh H; Zarga, Musa H Abu; Mahasneh, Adel M

2012-01-01

292

Antiradical, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of commercial beetroot pomace.  

PubMed

The by-product of food processing is often utilized as feed, and for the preparation of dietary fiber and biofuel. However, these products are also promising sources of bioactive antioxidants and color giving compounds, which could be used as additives in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. The aim of this study was to investigate the phytochemical profile, and the antiradical, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of industrial beetroot pomace extract (BPE). The content of phenolics (45.68 mg gallic acid equivalents g(-1)), flavonoids (25.89 mg rutin equivalents g(-1)) and betalains (4.09 mg betanin g(-1); 7.32 mg vulgaxanthin I g(-1)) were determined spectrophotometrically. The antiradical activity on DPPH (EC(50)(DPPH·) = 0.0797 mg ml(-1)), hydroxyl (EC(50)(·OH) = 0.0655 mg ml(-1)) and superoxide anion (EC(50)(O2·-) = 1.0625 mg ml(-1)) radicals were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activity was determined using the agar-well diffusion method. Gram(-) bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter freundii) and Gram(+) bacteria, (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus sciuri, Bacillus cereus) showed high susceptibility, while yeasts and moulds were resistant. BPE exhibits cytotoxic properties against Ehrlich carcinoma (EAC) cells in vivo due to induction of oxidative stress. The largest decreases in EAC cell numbers were observed in the pre-treated male (approximately 53%) and female (approximately 47%) mice, and also the EAC cell viability was decreased after administration of BPE. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes, xanthine oxidase (XOD) and peroxidase (Px), were significantly different between the untreated EAC control group and all other groups that were treated with BPE. The XOD and Px activities were very low in untreated malignant cells, but increased significantly after administration of BPE. Our results show that BPE holds promise in the food industry as a source of bioactive compounds. PMID:23423147

Vuli?, Jelena J; Cebovi?, Tatjana N; Canadanovi?, Vladimir M; Cetkovi?, Gordana S; Djilas, Sonja M; Canadanovi?-Brunet, Jasna M; Veli?anski, Aleksandra S; Cvetkovi?, Dragoljub D; Tumbas, Vesna T

2013-04-30

293

Screening of plant extracts for antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance.  

PubMed

There is cumulative resistance against antibiotics of many bacteria. Therefore, the development of new antiseptics and antimicrobial agents for the treatment of skin infections is of increasing interest. We have screened six plant extracts and isolated compounds for antimicrobial effects on bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance. The following plant extracts have been tested: Gentiana lutea, Harpagophytum procumbens, Boswellia serrata (dry extracts), Usnea barbata, Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis (supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2] extracts). Additionally, the following characteristic plant substances were tested: usnic acid, carnosol, carnosic acid, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, harpagoside, boswellic acid and gentiopicroside. The extracts and compounds were tested against 29 aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and yeasts in the agar dilution test. U. barbata-extract and usnic acid were the most active compounds, especially in anaerobic bacteria. Usnea CO2-extract effectively inhibited the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains - MRSA), Propionibacterium acnes and Corynebacterium species. Growth of the dimorphic yeast Malassezia furfur was also inhibited by Usnea-extract. Besides the Usnea-extract, Rosmarinus-, Salvia-, Boswellia- and Harpagophytum-extracts proved to be effective against a panel of bacteria. It is concluded that due to their antimicrobial effects some of the plant extracts may be used for the topical treatment of skin disorders like acne vulgaris and seborrhoic eczema. PMID:17291738

Weckesser, S; Engel, K; Simon-Haarhaus, B; Wittmer, A; Pelz, K; Schempp, C M

2007-08-01

294

In vitro antimicrobial activity of phytotherapic Uncaria tomentosa against endodontic pathogens.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC (cat's claw) against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. Suspensions with 10(8) cells/ml of each microorganism were plated in triplicate on Mueller-Hinton agar. Wells in the agar were made and filled with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel, 2% cat's claw (CC) gel, 2% CHX+CC, and 1% hydroxyethylcellulose (NAT) gel. Inhibition halos were measured after 24 h at 37°C and differences were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The mean diameter of the microbial growth inhibition zones of 2% CHX+CC against the tested microbial strains ranged from 21.7 to 33.5 mm. This was the most effective substance against E. faecalis and C. albicans, followed by CHX and CC. Against S. aureus, CHX+CC, CHX, and CC showed similar antimicrobial activity (P > 0.05). The results indicate that all the investigated compounds had antimicrobial activity against microorganisms frequently found in infected root-filled teeth. PMID:20881342

Herrera, Daniel R; Tay, Lidia Y; Rezende, Eluise C; Kozlowski, Vitoldo A; Santos, Elizabete B dos

2010-09-01

295

Antimicrobial activity of whey protein based edible films incorporated with oregano, rosemary and garlic essential oils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of edible films to release antimicrobial constituents in food packaging is a form of active packaging. Antimicrobial properties of spice extracts are well known, however their application to edible films is limited. In this study, antimicrobial properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) films containing 1.0–4.0% (wt\\/vol) ratios of oregano, rosemary and garlic essential oils were tested against Escherichia

A. C. Seydim; G. Sarikus

2006-01-01

296

Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Satureja hortensis and Trachyspermum copticum essential oil  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Satureja hortensis and Trachyspermum copticum essential oils against different kinds of microorganisms in vitro. Material and Methods The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by micro broth dilution assay and the chemical composition of essential oils was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Results Thymol, p-cymene, ?-terpinene and carvacrol were the main components of S. hortensis oil while thymol, ?-terpinene, and o-cymene were the major components of T. copticum oil. Two essential oils exhibited strong antimicrobial activity but the antimicrobial activity of T. copticum oil was higher than that of S. hortensis oil. Conclusion Thymol as a main component of oils plays an important role in antimicrobial activity. PMID:22530088

Mahboubi, M; Kazempour, N

2011-01-01

297

Exploring of Antimicrobial Activity of Triphala Mashi-an Ayurvedic Formulation.  

PubMed

Triphala Mashi is an ayurvedic formulation that was prepared in our lab. Aqueous and alcoholic extracts of both Triphala and Triphala Mashi were used, to evaluate antimicrobial activity. Comparative phytochemical profile of Triphala and Triphala Mashi was done by preliminary phytochemical screening, total phenolic content and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Antimicrobial activity includes isolation of pathogens from clinical samples, its characterization, testing its multiple drug resistance against standard antibiotics and antimicrobial activity of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of both Triphala and Triphala Mashi against these organisms by using agar gel diffusion method. Triphala Mashi containing phenolic compounds, tannins exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity in relation to Triphala against all the microorganisms tested. It inhibits the dose-dependent growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, it appears that Triphala Mashi has non-specific antimicrobial activity. PMID:18317557

Biradar, Yogesh S; Jagatap, Sheetal; Khandelwal, K R; Singhania, Smita S

2008-03-01

298

Total phenolic content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of some medicinal plants.  

PubMed

Crude extracts from Inula aucherana, Fumaria officinalis, Crocus sativus, Vicum album, Tribulus terestris, Polygonatum multiflorum, Alkanna tinctoria and Taraxacum officinale were screened for their in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Total phenolic content of extracts from these plants were also determined. beta-carotene bleaching assay and Folin-Ciocalteu reagent were used to determine total antioxidant activity and total phenols of plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity was determined by using disk diffusion assay. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content varied among plants used and Viscum album and Crocus sativus had the highest antioxidant (82.23%) and total phenolic content (42.29 mgGAE/g DW), respectively. The methanol extracts from Vicum album and Alkanna tinctoria showed antimicrobial activity against 9 out of 32 microorganisms, however extract from Inula aucherana showed antimicrobial activity against 15 out of 32 microorganisms. The results provided evidence that the studied plant might indeed be potential sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial agents. PMID:19168430

Sengul, Memnune; Yildiz, Hilal; Gungor, Neva; Cetin, Bulent; Eser, Zeynep; Ercisli, Sezai

2009-01-01

299

Zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase-like activity and in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Background: Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disease, and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. Objective: We examined whether the ascorbic acid derivative zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity. SOD is an enzyme that controls reactive oxygen species production. In addition, the in vitro antimicrobial activity of zinc ascorbate against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli was tested either alone or in combination with a variety of antimicrobial agents; their fractional inhibitory concentration index was determined using checkerboard tests. Methods: The SOD-like activity was measured in comparison with other ascorbic acid derivatives (ascorbic acid, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, and sodium ascorbyl phosphate) and zinc. The antimicrobial susceptibility of twelve strains each of S. aureus and E. coli isolated from patients with dermatological infections was tested, in comparison to a type strain of S. aureus and E. coli. Results: Zinc ascorbate had significant (P < 0.001) SOD-like activity compared with other ascorbic acid derivatives and zinc. Moreover, it showed antimicrobial activity against a type strain of S. aureus and E. coli, and its concentration (0.064% and 0.128% for S. aureus and E. coli, respectively) was sufficiently lower than the normal dose (5%) of other ascorbic acid derivatives. Furthermore, combinations of zinc ascorbate with clindamycin, erythromycin, and imipenem against S. aureus (average fractional inhibitory concentration, 0.59–0.90), and with imipenem against E. coli (average fractional inhibitory concentration, 0.64) isolated from patients with dermatological infections showed an additive effect. Conclusions: Our results provide novel evidence that zinc ascorbate may be effective for acne treatment. PMID:23055762

Iinuma, Katsuhiro; Tsuboi, Isami

2012-01-01

300

Antimicrobial activities of natural antimicrobial compounds against susceptible and antibiotic-resistant pathogens in the absence and presence of food  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In an effort to improve microbial food safety, we are studying the antimicrobial activities of different classes of natural compounds including plant essential oils, apple, grape, olive, and tea extracts, bioactive components, and seashell-derived chitosans against multiple foodborne pathogens in cu...

301

Antimicrobial and inhibitory enzyme activity of N-(benzyl) and quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives on plant pathogens.  

PubMed

Chemical modification of a biopolymer chitosan by introducing quaternary ammonium moieties into the polymer backbone enhances its antimicrobial activity. In the present study, a series of quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives were synthesized and characterized by (1)H-NMR, FT-IR and UV spectroscopic techniques. The antimicrobial activity against crop-threatening bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Erwinia carotovora and fungi Botrytis cinerea, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora infestans were evaluated. The results proved that the grafting of benzyl moiety or quaternization of the derivatives onto chitosan molecule was successful in inhibiting the microbial growth. Moreover, increase water-solubility of the compounds by quaternization significantly increased the activity against bacteria and fungi. Exocellular enzymes including polygalacturonase (PGase), pectin-lyase (PLase), polyphenol oxidase (PPOase) and cellulase were also affected at 1000 mg/L. These compounds especially quaternary-based chitosan derivatives that have good inhibitory effect should be potentially used as antimicrobial agents in crop protection. PMID:25037402

Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rabea, Entsar I; Taktak, Nehad E M

2014-10-13

302

Antimicrobial activity of diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against endodontic bacteria.  

PubMed

Six pimarane-type diterpenes isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro against a panel of representative microorganisms responsible for dental root canal infections. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid, its sodium salt and ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3?-ol were the most active, displaying MIC values ranging from 1 to 10 ?g mL-1. The results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new chemicals for use as a complement to instrumental endodontic procedures. PMID:21233793

Carvalho, Tatiane C; Simăo, Marília R; Ambrósio, Sérgio R; Furtado, Niege A J C; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S; Heleno, Vladimir C G; Da Costa, Fernando B; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Souza, Maria Gorete M; Borges dos Reis, Erika; Martins, Carlos H G

2011-01-01

303

Effect of antimicrobial agents on livestock waste emissions.  

PubMed

Various antimicrobial agents were evaluated with the purpose of reducing the microbial fermentation in stored cattle waste and the resulting odor emissions. Duplicate sealed 2-L flasks with 500 ml waste slurry, with and without antimicrobial inhibitors, were used to measure the production of short-chain volatile fatty acids, lactate, and total fermentation gas over 27-30 days. A combination of chlorhexidine diacetate (2 mM), iodoacetate (2 mM), and alpha-pinene (3.8 mM) reduced gas production 80% (1000 ml to 200 ml) and total volatile fatty acid production 50% (145 mM to 72 mM). Pinene had little antimicrobial effect; rather, it served as an effective masking agent, giving the waste a less offensive odor. A combination of chlorhexidine diacetate and the deaminase inhibitor, diphenyliodonium chloride (1.3 mM) had a similar effect in reducing short-chain volatile fatty acid production (145 mM to 80 mM). It is concluded that a combination of antimicrobial agents may be useful in controlling odor emissions and conserving organic matter in livestock wastes, therefore providing a potentially more useful byproduct waste when used as plant fertilizer. PMID:10827282

Varel, V H; Miller, D N

2000-06-01

304

N-terminal amphipathic helix as a trigger of hemolytic activity in antimicrobial peptides: a case study in latarcins.  

PubMed

In silico structural analyses of sets of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are performed. Differences between hemolytic and non-hemolytic AMPs are revealed in organization of their N-terminal region. A parameter related to hydrophobicity of the N-terminal part is proposed as a measure of the peptide propensity to exhibit hemolytic and other unwanted cytotoxic activities. Based on the information acquired, a rational approach for selective removal of these properties in AMPs is suggested. A proof of concept is gained through engineering specific mutations that resulted in elimination of the hemolytic activity of AMPs (latarcins) while leaving the beneficial antimicrobial effect intact. PMID:19563807

Polyansky, Anton A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Vorontsova, Olga V; Samsonova, Olga V; Egorova, Natalya S; Krylov, Nicolay A; Feofanov, Alexei V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Efremov, Roman G

2009-07-21

305

Synthesis of 1-isopropyl-3-acyl-5-methyl-benzimidazolone derivatives and their antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

A series of N-acylated analogues of 1-isopropyl-3-acyl-5-methyl-benzimidazolone were synthesized. Bioassay results indicated that analogues 5-07 and 5-19 exhibited the most potency against Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Analogues 5-02, 5-07, 5-12, 5-15, 5-19, 5-20 and 5-25 could effectively inhibit the spore germination of Botrytis cinerea. The relationship between structure and their antimicrobial activity (SAR) has also been discussed according to aliphatic acids and aromatic acids derivatives, respectively. This implied that the N-acylated derivatives of 5-methyl-benzimidazolone might be potential antimicrobial agents. PMID:23531538

Xu, Nan; Yang, Chunnan; Gan, Xinqi; Wei, Shaopeng; Ji, Zhiqin

2013-01-01

306

The influence of the different inductivity of acetyl phenyl-thiosemicarbazone-chitosan on antimicrobial activities.  

PubMed

Ten different acetyl phenyl-thiosemicarbazone derivatives of chitosan were synthesized. Their structures were characterized by FT-IR and elemental analysis. The antimicrobial behaviors of CS and its derivatives against four species of bacteria and four crop-threatening pathogenic fungi were investigated in this paper. The results indicated that the antimicrobial activities of acetyl phenyl-thiosemicarbazone derivatives are much better than that of pure CS. The minimum value of MIC and MBC of the derivatives against Escherichia coli was 7.03 and 225 ?g mL(-1), respectively. All of the derivatives had significant inhibiting effect on the investigated fungi in the concentration of 50-500 ?g mL(-1), and the maximum inhibitory index was 93.10%. The bioactivities of the derivatives have relationship with the grafted groups with different inductivity. PMID:21310176

Zhong, Zhimei; Aotegen, Bayaer; Xu, Hui

2011-06-01

307

Structure-activity study of macropin, a novel antimicrobial peptide from the venom of solitary bee Macropis fulvipes (Hymenoptera: Melittidae).  

PubMed

A novel antimicrobial peptide, designated macropin (MAC-1) with sequence Gly-Phe-Gly-Met-Ala-Leu-Lys-Leu-Leu-Lys-Lys-Val-Leu-NH2 , was isolated from the venom of the solitary bee Macropis fulvipes. MAC-1 exhibited antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, antifungal activity, and moderate hemolytic activity against human red blood cells. A series of macropin analogs were prepared to further evaluate the effect of structural alterations on antimicrobial and hemolytic activities and stability in human serum. The antimicrobial activities of several analogs against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa were significantly increased while their toxicity against human red blood cells was decreased. The activity enhancement is related to the introduction of either l- or d-lysine in selected positions. Furthermore, all-d analog and analogs with d-amino acid residues introduced at the N-terminal part of the peptide chain exhibited better serum stability than did natural macropin. Data obtained by CD spectroscopy suggest a propensity of the peptide to adopt an amphipathic ?-helical secondary structure in the presence of trifluoroethanol or membrane-mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate. In addition, the study elucidates the structure-activity relationship for the effect of d-amino acid substitutions in MAC-1 using NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24616110

Monincová, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Slaninová, Ji?ina; Bud?šínský, Miloš; Fu?ík, Vladimír; Bednárová, Lucie; Straka, Jakub; Ce?ovský, Václav

2014-06-01

308

Biological activities of commercial bee pollens: antimicrobial, antimutagenic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.  

PubMed

Bee pollen is considered, since memorable times, a good source of nourishing substances and energy. The present study aimed to evaluate the biological activities of eight commercial bee pollens purchased from the market. The origin of sample A was not specified in the labeling; samples B, C, D and G were from Portugal and the remaining were from Spain. The sample E presented the highest value of phenolics (32.15±2.12 mg/g) and the H the lowest (18.55±095 mg/g). Sample C had the highest value of flavonoids (10.14±1.57 mg/g) and sample H the lowest (3.92±0.68 mg/g). All the samples exhibited antimicrobial activity, being Staphylococcus aureus the most sensitive and Candida glabrata the most resistant of the microorganisms studied. All the samples exhibited antimutagenic activity, even though some samples were more effective in decreasing the number of gene conversion colonies and mutant colonies. Regarding the antioxidant activity, assessed using two methods, the more effective was sample B. The anti-inflammatory activity, assessed using the hyaluronidase enzyme, was highest in samples B and D. Pearson's correlation coefficients between polyphenols, flavonoids, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity were computed. It was also performed a discriminant analysis. PMID:24262487

Pascoal, Ananias; Rodrigues, Sandra; Teixeira, Alfredo; Feás, Xesus; Estevinho, Leticia M

2014-01-01

309

Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites  

SciTech Connect

To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO{sub 2} for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO{sub 2} coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO{sub 2} particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO{sub 2} P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO{sub 2}-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

Huppmann, T., E-mail: teresa.huppmann@tum.de; Leonhardt, S., E-mail: stefan.leonhardt@mytum.de, E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Krampe, E., E-mail: stefan.leonhardt@mytum.de, E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Wintermantel, E., E-mail: wintermantel@tum.de [Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Technische Universität München (Germany); Yatsenko, S., E-mail: s.yatsenko@skz.de; Radovanovic, I., E-mail: i.radovanovic@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de; Bastian, M., E-mail: i.radovanovic@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de [SKZ- German Plastics Center, Würzburg (Germany)

2014-05-15

310

Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO2 for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO2 coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO2 particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO2 P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO2-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

Huppmann, T.; Yatsenko, S.; Leonhardt, S.; Krampe, E.; Radovanovic, I.; Bastian, M.; Wintermantel, E.

2014-05-01

311

Quantitative structure-activity relationships of antimicrobial fatty acids and derivatives against Staphylococcus aureus *  

PubMed Central

Fatty acids and derivatives (FADs) are resources for natural antimicrobials. In order to screen for additional potent antimicrobial agents, the antimicrobial activities of FADs against Staphylococcus aureus were examined using a microplate assay. Monoglycerides of fatty acids were the most potent class of fatty acids, among which monotridecanoin possessed the most potent antimicrobial activity. The conventional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were performed to establish two statistically reliable models (conventional QSAR: R 2=0.942, Q 2 LOO=0.910; CoMFA: R 2=0.979, Q 2=0.588, respectively). Improved forecasting can be achieved by the combination of these two models that provide a good insight into the structure-activity relationships of the FADs and that may be useful to design new FADs as antimicrobial agents. PMID:22302421

Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Peng, Li-juan; Dong, Xiao-wu; Wu, Di; Wu, Vivian Chi-Hua; Feng, Feng-qin

2012-01-01

312

Preliminary Screening of Endophytic Fungi from Medicinal Plants in Malaysia for Antimicrobial and Antitumor Activity  

PubMed Central

The screening of antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, yeast and fungi was carried out on isopropanol extracts prepared from 121 isolates of endophytic fungi isolated from medicinal plants in Malaysia. Sensitivity was found to vary among the microorganisms. Bacillus subtilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Alternaria sp. were susceptible to extracts from three, two and two isolates of endophytic fungi, respectively. None were found effective against Salmonella typhimurium. Sixteen endophytic fungal isolates tested were also found to exhibit antitumor activity in the yeast cell-based assay. PMID:22844221

Radu, Son; Kqueen, Cheah Yoke

2002-01-01

313

Antimicrobial Activity of Artemisinin and Precursor Derived from In Vitro Plantlets of Artemisia annua L.  

PubMed Central

Artemisia annua L., a medicinal herb, produces secondary metabolites with antimicrobial property. In Malaysia due to the tropical hot climate, A. annua could not be planted for production of artemisinin, the main bioactive compound. In this study, the leaves of three in vitro A. annua L. clones were, extracted and two bioactive compounds, artemisinin and a precursor, were isolated by thin layer chromatography. These compounds were found to be effective in inhibiting the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria but not Candida albicans. Their antimicrobial activity was similar to that of antibactericidal antibiotic streptomycin. They were found to inhibit the growth of the tested microbes at the minimum inhibition concentration of 0.09?mg/mL, and toxicity test using brine shrimp showed that even the low concentration of 0.09?mg/mL was very lethal towards the brine shrimps with 100% mortality rate. This study hence indicated that in vitro cultured plantlets of A. annua can be used as the alternative method for production of artemisinin and its precursor with antimicrobial activities. PMID:24575401

Appalasamy, Suganthi; Lo, Kiah Yann; Ch'ng, Song Jin; Nornadia, Ku; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Chan, Lai-Keng

2014-01-01

314

Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles for carboxymethylcellulose film applications in food packaging.  

PubMed

In this study, silver nanoparticles were prepared and incorporated into carboxymethylcellulose films to evaluate the antimicrobial activity for food packaging applications. The techniques carried out for material characterization were: infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis for the silver nanoparticles and films, as well as particle size distribution for the nanoparticles and water vapor permeability for the films. The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles prepared by casting method was investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of the silver nanoparticles to test Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) microorganisms was carried out by the serial dilution technique, tested in triplicate to confirm the concentration used. The results were developed using the Mcfarland scale which indicates that the presence or absence of turbidity tube demonstrates the inhibition of bacteria in relation to the substance inoculated. It was found that the silver nanoparticles inhibited the growth of the tested microorganisms. The carboxymethylcellulose film embedded with silver nanoparticles showed the best antimicrobial effect against Gram-positive (E. faecalis) and Gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria (0.1 microg cm(-3)). PMID:24758059

Siqueira, Maria C; Coelho, Gustavo F; de Moura, Márcia R; Bresolin, Joana D; Hubinger, Silviane Z; Marconcini, José M; Mattoso, Luiz H C

2014-07-01

315

Antimicrobial activity of artemisinin and precursor derived from in vitro plantlets of Artemisia annua L.  

PubMed

Artemisia annua L., a medicinal herb, produces secondary metabolites with antimicrobial property. In Malaysia due to the tropical hot climate, A. annua could not be planted for production of artemisinin, the main bioactive compound. In this study, the leaves of three in vitro A. annua L. clones were, extracted and two bioactive compounds, artemisinin and a precursor, were isolated by thin layer chromatography. These compounds were found to be effective in inhibiting the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria but not Candida albicans. Their antimicrobial activity was similar to that of antibactericidal antibiotic streptomycin. They were found to inhibit the growth of the tested microbes at the minimum inhibition concentration of 0.09?mg/mL, and toxicity test using brine shrimp showed that even the low concentration of 0.09?mg/mL was very lethal towards the brine shrimps with 100% mortality rate. This study hence indicated that in vitro cultured plantlets of A. annua can be used as the alternative method for production of artemisinin and its precursor with antimicrobial activities. PMID:24575401

Appalasamy, Suganthi; Lo, Kiah Yann; Ch'ng, Song Jin; Nornadia, Ku; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Chan, Lai-Keng

2014-01-01

316

Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

Wada, Akihiro, E-mail: a-wada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)] [Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Wong, Pooi-Fong [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)] [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hojo, Hironobu [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, Kanagawa 2591292 (Japan)] [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, Kanagawa 2591292 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shiga 5260829 (Japan)] [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shiga 5260829 (Japan); Ichinose, Akitoyo [Electron Microscopy Shop Central Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)] [Electron Microscopy Shop Central Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Llanes, Rafael [Institute Pedro Kouri, Havana (Cuba)] [Institute Pedro Kouri, Havana (Cuba); Kubo, Yoshinao [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)] [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Senba, Masachika [Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Ichinose, Yoshio [Kenya Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)] [Kenya Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)

2013-05-03

317

In vitro antimicrobial effect of the tissue conditioner containing silver nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The aim of this study was to identify in vitro antimicrobial activity of the tissue conditioner containing silver nanoparticles on microbial strains, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans. MATERIALS AND METHODS Experimental disc samples (20.0×3.0 mm) of tissue conditioner (GC Soft-Liner, GC cooperation, Tokyo, Japan) containing 0.1 - 3.0% silver nanoparticles (0%: control) were fabricated. Samples were placed on separate culture plate dish and microbial suspensions (100 µL) of tested strains were inoculated then incubated at 37?. Microbial growth was verified at 24 hrs and 72 hrs and the antimicrobial effects of samples were evaluated as a percentage of viable cells in withdrawn suspension (100 µL). Data were recorded as the mean of three colony forming unit (CFU) numerations and the borderline of the antimicrobial effect was determined at 0.1% viable cells. RESULTS A 0.1% silver nanoparticles combined to tissue conditioner displayed minimal bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans strains, a 0.5% for fungal strain. Control group did not show any microbial inhibitory effect and there were no statistical difference between 24 hrs and extended 72 hrs incubation time (P > .05). CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this in vitro study, the results suggest that the tissue conditioner containing silver nanoparticles could be an antimicrobial dental material in denture plaque control. Further mechanical stability and toxicity studies are still required. PMID:21503189

2011-01-01

318

Antimicrobial activity of allyl isothiocyanate used to coat biodegradable composite films as affected by storage and handling conditions.  

PubMed

We evaluated the effects of storage and handling conditions on the antimicrobial activity of biodegradable composite films (polylactic acid and sugar beet pulp) coated with allyl isothiocyanate (AIT). Polylactic acid and chitosan were incorporated with AIT and used to coat one side of the film. The films were subjected to different storage conditions (storage time, storage temperature, and packed or unpacked) and handling conditions (washing, abrasion, and air blowing), and the antimicrobial activity of the films against Salmonella Stanley in tryptic soy broth was determined. The films (8.16 ?l of AIT per cm(2) of surface area) significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the growth of Salmonella during 24 h of incubation at 22°C, while the populations of Salmonella in controls increased from ca. 4 to over 8 log CFU/ml, indicating a minimum inactivation of 4 log CFU/ml on films in comparison to the growth on controls. Statistical analyses indicated that storage time, storage temperature, and surface abrasion affected the antimicrobial activity of the films significantly (P < 0.05). However, the differences in microbial reduction between those conditions were less than 0.5 log cycle. The results suggest that the films' antimicrobial properties are stable under practical storage and handling conditions and that these antimicrobial films have potential applications in food packaging. PMID:23212023

Li, Weili; Liu, Linshu; Jin, Tony Z

2012-12-01

319

Antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiulcer and analgesic activities of nettle (Urtica dioica L.).  

PubMed

In this study, water extract of nettle (Urtica dioica L.) (WEN) was studied for antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiulcer and analgesic properties. The antioxidant properties of WEN were evaluated using different antioxidant tests, including reducing power, free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, and metal chelating activities. WEN had powerful antioxidant activity. The 50, 100 and 250 microg amounts of WEN showed 39, 66 and 98% inhibition on peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion, respectively, while 60 microg/ml of alpha-tocopherol, exhibited only 30% inhibition. Moreover, WEN had effective reducing power, free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, and metal chelating activities at the same concentrations. Those various antioxidant activities were compared to standard antioxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), quercetin, and alpha-tocopherol. In addition, total phenolic compounds in the WEN were determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. WEN also showed antimicrobial activity against nine microorganisms, antiulcer activity against ethanol-induced ulcerogenesis and analgesic effect on acetic acid-induced stretching. PMID:15013182

Gülçin, Ilhami; Küfrevioglu, O Irfan; Oktay, Münir; Büyükokuroglu, Mehmet Emin

2004-02-01

320

Antimicrobial activity of lemongrass oil against Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In an effort to discover new and natural antimicrobial treatments against Salmonella Newport on organic produce, we evaluated the antimicrobial effect of lemongrass essential oil on four different types of organic leafy greens inoculated with S. Newport. The effects of lemongrass treatment exposure...

321

Curcumin reduces the antimicrobial activity of ciprofloxacin against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhi  

E-print Network

Curcumin reduces the antimicrobial activity of ciprofloxacin against Salmonella Typhimurium fragmentation, SOS response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the bacterial cell. Curcumin, an active research aimed at investigating whether curcumin modulates the action of ciprofloxacin. Method: We

Srinivasan, N.

322

Antimicrobial activity of allyl isothiocyanate used to coat biodegradable composite films as affected by storage and handling conditions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We evaluated the effects of storage and handling conditions on the antimicrobial activity of biodegradable composite films (polylactic acid and sugar beet pulp) coated with allyl isothiocyanate (AIT). Polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan were incorporated with AIT and coated on one side of the film. T...

323

Structure and antimicrobial activity of phloroglucinol derivatives from Achyrocline satureioides.  

PubMed

The new prenylated phloroglucinol ?-pyrones 1-3 and the new dibenzofuran 4, together with the known 23-methyl-6-O-demethylauricepyrone (5), achyrofuran (6), and 5,7-dihydroxy-3,8-dimethoxyflavone (gnaphaliin A), were isolated from the aerial parts of Achyrocline satureioides. Their structures were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies, while the absolute configuration of the sole stereogenic center of 1 was established by vibrational circular dichroism measurements in comparison to density functional theory calculated data. The same (S) absolute configuration of the ?-methylbutyryl chain attached to the phloroglucinol nucleus was assumed for compounds 2-6 based on biogenetic considerations. Derivatives 7-16 were prepared from 1 and 5, and the antimicrobial activities of the isolated metabolites and some of the semisynthetic derivatives against a selected panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as a set of yeast molds, were determined. PMID:25517209

Casero, Carina; Machín, Félix; Méndez-Álvarez, Sebastián; Demo, Mirta; Ravelo, Ángel G; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; Estévez-Braun, Ana

2015-01-23

324

Scolopendin 2, a cationic antimicrobial peptide from centipede, and its membrane-active mechanism.  

PubMed

Scolopendin 2 is a 16-mer peptide (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. We observed that this peptide exhibited antimicrobial activity in a salt-dependent manner against various fungal and bacterial pathogens and showed no hemolytic effect in the range of 1.6?M to 100?M. Circular dichroism analysis showed that the peptide has an ?-helical properties. Furthermore, we determined the mechanism(s) of action using flow cytometry and by investigating the release of intracellular potassium. The results showed that the peptide permeabilized the membranes of Escherichia coli O157 and Candida albicans, resulting in loss of intracellular potassium ions. Additionally, bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol and 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide assays showed that the peptide caused membrane depolarization. Using giant unilamellar vesicles encapsulating calcein and large unilamellar vesicles containing fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, which were similar in composition to typical E. coli O157 and C. albicans membranes, we demonstrated that scolopendin 2 disrupts membranes, resulting in a pore size between 4.8nm and 5.0nm. Thus, we have demonstrated that a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendin 2, exerts its broad-spectrum antimicrobial effects by forming pores in the cell membrane. PMID:25462167

Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Dong Gun

2015-02-01

325

Antimicrobial activity of aqueous and methanol extracts of Juniperus oxycedrus L  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aqueous and methanol extracts of the leaves of Juniperus oxycedrus were investigated for their in vitro antimicrobial properties. The plant was collected from Pelitli Village of Gebze, Kocaeli, in the Marmara region of Turkey. Juniperus oxycedrus is widely used as traditional folk medicine in Turkey for treatment of different infectious diseases. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts against 143 laboratory

? Karaman; F ?ahin; M Güllüce; H Ö?ütçü; M ?engül; A Ad?güzel

2003-01-01

326

Antimicrobial activity of a new vaginal contraceptive NIM76 from neem oil (Azadirachta indica)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efficacy of NIM-76, a spermicidal fraction from neem oil, was investigated for its antimicrobial action against certain bacteria, fungi and Polio virus as compared to whole neem oil. The NIM-76 preparation showed stronger anti-microbial activity than the whole neem oil. It inhibited growth of various pathogens tested including Escherichia coli and Kleibsiella pneumoniae which were not affected by the whole

M SaiRam; G Ilavazhagan; S. K Sharma; S. A Dhanraj; B Suresh; M. M Parida; A. M Jana; Kumar Devendra; W Selvamurthy

2000-01-01

327

Carrier herbal medicine: an evaluation of the antimicrobial and anticancer activity in some frequently used remedies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial properties of some traditional Carrier herbal preparations were evaluated using an agar dilution method. Pitch preparations were screened against known human pathogens: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results indicated definite antimicrobial activity in the pitch preparations of Picea glauca and Pinus contorta and provide a starting point for pharmacognostic evaluation of

E. M. Ritch-Krc; N. J. Turner; G. H. N. Towers

1996-01-01

328

Correlation of Antimicrobial Activities of Various Essential Oils and Their Main Aromatic Volatile Constituents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pure aromatic volatiles p-cymene, carvacrol, eugenol and thymol as well as commercial essential oils of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Origanum vulgare, Pimenta dioica, Pimenta racemosa, Satureja hortensis, Syzygium aromaticum, Thymus vulgaris and Trachyspermum ammi were investigated concerning antimicrobial activities. Therefore, these samples and, as reference substances, synthetic antibiotics and the natural antimicrobial components carveol, m-, o- and p-cresol were tested against

Martina Höferl; Gerhard Buchbauer; Leopold Jirovetz; Erich Schmidt; Albena Stoyanova; Zapriana Denkova; Alexander Slavchev; Margit Geissler

2009-01-01

329

Activity of an Antimicrobial Peptide Mimetic against Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Oral Pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are naturally occurring, broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents that have recently been examined for their utility as therapeutic antibiotics. Unfortunately, they are expensive to produce and are often sensitive to protease digestion. To address this problem, we have examined the activity of a peptide mimetic whose design was based on the structure of magainin, exhibiting its amphiphilic structure. We

Nicholas Beckloff; Danielle Laube; Tammy Castro; David Furgang; Steven Park; David Perlin; Dylan Clements; Haizhong Tang; Richard W. Scott; Gregory N. Tew; Gill Diamond

2007-01-01

330

Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Cissus quadrangularis L.  

PubMed

Extracts of Cissus quadrangularis L. were tested for antioxidant activity by beta-carotene linoleic acid model and also by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl model. The ethyl acetate fraction of both fresh and dry stem extracts at a concentration of 100 ppm showed 64.8% antioxidant activity in the beta-carotene linoleic acid system and 61.6% in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl system. This fraction showed the presence of sterols, vitamin C, and tannins as phytoconstituents. The antioxidant activity of methanol extract and aqueous extract were comparatively less significant than that of ethyl acetate extract, and n-hexane extract showed the least activity. The ethyl acetate extract and methanol extract of both fresh and dry stems further exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus species. The results of the study have implications in the use of C. quadrangularis as an antibacterial agent and more so as an antioxidant in several applications requiring these properties. PMID:12935320

Chidambara Murthy, K N; Vanitha, A; Mahadeva Swamy, M; Ravishankar, G A

2003-01-01

331

Mosquito larvicidal and antimicrobial activity of protein of Solanum villosum leaves  

PubMed Central

Background Mosquitoes are associated with the transmission of malaria, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, filariasis and other viral diseases throughout the globe, apart from being a nuisance pest. Biological control alone or as a part of integrated vector management stands to be a better alternative to the chemical controls aimed against pest mosquitoes. At the same time it is necessary to control bacteria by synthetic or natural means (plant products). Hence the present study was designed to screen the effect of mosquito larvicidal and antimicrobial activitiy of protein isolated from matured leaves of Solanum villosum against mosquito immatures and some pathogenic bacteria. Methods Aqueous solvent extract of fresh mature leaves of S. villosum was tested against 3rd instar larvae of Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Stegomyia aegypti mosquitoes and against four pathogenic bacteria. The protein fraction was isolated and tested for mosquitocidal and antibacterial activities. Amino acid analysis was performed on isolated protein using PICO.TAG amino acid system. SDS-PAGE was also done to detect the bands of amino acid on the basis of their molecular weights. Results Proteins isolated from mature leaves of S. villosum were found to have larvicidal and antimicrobial properties. Analysis of the isolated protein identified fifteen amino acids of which eight were essential amino acids. SDS-PAGE detected seven bands corresponding to different molecular weights in the range of 69–109 KDa. Conclusion Proteins of mature leaves of S. villosum exhibited moderate larvicidal and antimicrobial activities. The study provides considerable scope in exploiting local indigenous resources for isolation of antimicrobial and mosquito larvicidal proteins. PMID:19061512

Chowdhury, Nandita; Laskar, Subrata; Chandra, Goutam

2008-01-01

332

Antimicrobial activity of Nerolidol and its derivatives against airborne microbes and further biological activities  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Nerolidol and its derivatives, namely cis-nerolidol, O-methyl-nerolidol, O-ethyl-nerolidol, (-)-alpha-bisabolol, trans,trans-farnesol and its main natural source Cabreuva essential oil, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against airborne microbes and antifungal properties against plant pat...

333

Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants from India.  

PubMed

The results of a preliminary antimicrobial screening of the methanol extracts of Zingiber officinale, Asteracantha longifolia, Citrus acida, Salacia microsperma and Tinospora cordifolia are reported. PMID:16229969

Samy, R Perumal

2005-12-01

334

Underlying Mechanism of Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Microparticles and Implications for the Treatment of Infectious Diseases  

PubMed Central

The emergence of antibiotic resistant microorganisms is a great public health concern and has triggered an urgent need to develop alternative antibiotics. Chitosan microparticles (CM), derived from chitosan, have been shown to reduce E. coli O157:H7 shedding in a cattle model, indicating potential use as an alternative antimicrobial agent. However, the underlying mechanism of CM on reducing the shedding of this pathogen remains unclear. To understand the mode of action, we studied molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of CM using in vitro and in vivo methods. We report that CM are an effective bactericidal agent with capability to disrupt cell membranes. Binding assays and genetic studies with an ompA mutant strain demonstrated that outer membrane protein OmpA of E. coli O157:H7 is critical for CM binding, and this binding activity is coupled with a bactericidal effect of CM. This activity was also demonstrated in an animal model using cows with uterine diseases. CM treatment effectively reduced shedding of intrauterine pathogenic E. coli (IUPEC) in the uterus compared to antibiotic treatment. Since Shiga-toxins encoded in the genome of bacteriophage is often overexpressed during antibiotic treatment, antibiotic therapy is generally not recommended because of high risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome. However, CM treatment did not induce bacteriophage or Shiga-toxins in E. coli O157:H7; suggesting that CM can be a potential candidate to treat infections caused by this pathogen. This work establishes an underlying mechanism whereby CM exert antimicrobial activity in vitro and in vivo, providing significant insight for the treatment of diseases caused by a broad spectrum of pathogens including antibiotic resistant microorganisms. PMID:24658463

Jeon, Soo Jin; Oh, Manhwan; Yeo, Won-Sik; Galvăo, Klibs N.; Jeong, Kwang Cheol

2014-01-01

335

Secondary and tertiary polydiallylammonium salts: novel polymers with high antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial activity of secondary and tertiary poly(diallylammonium) salts (PDAAs) had not been reported before. Due to difficulties with preparation of polymers from the monomers of the diallylamine (DAA) series in the nonquaternary form, up to recently it was not possible to obtain PDAAs with a sufficiently high molecular mass. Here, we describe the investigations of antimicrobial activity of novel water-soluble cationic polyelectrolytes of the PDAA series, namely secondary poly(diallylammonium trifluoroacetate) (PDAATFA) and tertiary poly(diallylmethylammonium trifluoroacetate) (PDAMATFA), in synthesis of which we have recently succeeded, against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and fungi. We have studied the effect of molecular weight (polymeric chain length) and ionic strength of solution on the biocidal efficiency of those polymers; in addition, the concentration dependences of PDAATFA reduced viscosity in salt-free and KCl aqueous solutions have been investigated. The antimicrobial properties of polybase polydiallylamine (BPDAA), which was obtained in an aqueous solution of PDAATFA in presence of alkali, have been also studied as well as biocidal activity of commercial open-chain polybase branched PEI. Those PDAATFA, BPDAA and PEI polymers served as the systems to study the structure-activity relationships. Transmission electronic microscopy study was carried out to characterize the mode of antimicrobial action of PDAATFA using E. coli . It was shown that the synthesized PDAATFA and PDAMATFA exhibit, unlike the quaternary polymers of this series, a rather high biocidal efficiency that is comparable with the activity of known effective cationic polymer biocides or exceeds it. Novel polyelectrolytes exhibit quite strong biocidal properties at different conditions including aqueous solutions of moderate ionic strength (serum, 0.01 M/0.1 M) and aqueous-alkaline solutions (pH 10.5) until the macrochain retains some positive charge, but complete neutralization of the polyelectrolyte in a 1 M salt solution results in the loss of its biocidal activity. The obtained results evidence that the structure of links, which combine the hydrophobic pyrrolidinium rings with the hydrophilic secondary/tertiary ammonium groups, is responsible for the high biocidal activity of the PDAAs. Polymeric nature of the synthesized compounds is one of the most significant factors of their bactericidal efficiency, unlike their high fungicidal activity, which is evidently related to the secondary/tertiary pyrrolidinium cycle. PMID:19795886

Timofeeva, Larisa M; Kleshcheva, Natalia A; Moroz, Antonina F; Didenko, Lyubov V

2009-11-01

336

Lack of Antimicrobial Bactericidal Activity in Mycobacterium abscessus  

PubMed Central

Antibiotic therapy of infections caused by the emerging pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus is challenging due to the organism's natural resistance toward most clinically available antimicrobials. We investigated the bactericidal activity of antibiotics commonly administered in M. abscessus infections in order to better understand the poor therapeutic outcome. Time-kill curves were generated for clinical M. abscessus isolates, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Escherichia coli by using antibiotics commonly categorized as bactericidal (amikacin and moxifloxacin) or bacteriostatic (tigecycline and linezolid). In addition, the impact of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes on the mode of action of substrate and nonsubstrate aminoglycosides was studied by using M. smegmatis as a model organism. While amikacin and moxifloxacin were bactericidal against E. coli, none of the tested compounds showed bactericidal activity against M. abscessus. Further mechanistic investigations of the mode of action of aminoglycosides in M. smegmatis revealed that the bactericidal activity of tobramycin and gentamicin was restored by disruption of the chromosomal aac(2?) gene in the mycobacterial genome. The lack of bactericidal antibiotics in currently recommended treatment regimens provides a reasonable explanation for the poor therapeutic outcome in M. abscessus infection. Our findings suggest that chromosomally encoded drug-modifying enzymes play an important role in the lack of aminoglycoside bactericidal activity against rapidly growing mycobacteria. PMID:24752273

Maurer, Florian P.; Bruderer, Vera L.; Ritter, Claudia; Castelberg, Claudio; Bloemberg, Guido V.

2014-01-01

337

Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity of plant oils and extracts has been recognized for many years. However, few investigations have compared large numbers of oils and extracts using methods that are directly comparable. In the present study, 52 plant oils and extracts were investigated for activity against Acinetobacter baumanii, Aeromonas veronii biogroup sobria, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia col, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium, Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus aureus, using an agar dilution method. Lemongrass, oregano and bay inhibited all organisms at concentrations of < or = 2.0% (v/v). Six oils did not inhibit any organisms at the highest concentration, which was 2.0% (v/v) oil for apricot kernel, evening primrose, macadamia, pumpkin, sage and sweet almond. Variable activity was recorded for the remaining oils. Twenty of the plant oils and extracts were investigated, using a broth microdilution method, for activity against C. albicans, Staph. aureus and E. coli. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations were 0.03% (v/v) thyme oil against C. albicans and E. coli and 0.008% (v/v) vetiver oil against Staph. aureus. These results support the notion that plant essential oils and extracts may have a role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. PMID:10438227

Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

1999-06-01

338

Antimicrobial Activity of High-Mobility-Group Box 2: a New Function to a Well-Known Protein  

PubMed Central

The human intestinal tract is highly colonized by a vast number of microorganisms. Despite this permanent challenge, infections remain rare, due to a very effective barrier defense system. Essential effectors of this system are antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs), which are secreted by intestinal epithelial and lymphoid cells, balance the gut microbial community, and prevent the translocation of microorganisms. Several antimicrobial proteins have already been identified in the gut. Nonetheless, we hypothesized that additional AMPs are yet to be discovered in this setting. Using biological screening based on antimicrobial function, here we identified competent antibacterial activity of high-mobility-group box 2 (HMGB2) against Escherichia coli. By recombinant expression, we confirmed this biologically new antimicrobial activity against different commensal and pathogenic bacteria. In addition, we demonstrated that the two DNA-binding domains (HMG boxes A and B) are crucial for the antibiotic function. We detected HMGB2 in several gastrointestinal tissues by mRNA analysis and immunohistochemical staining. In addition to the nuclei, we also observed HMGB2 in the cytoplasm of intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, HMGB2 was detectable in vitro in the supernatants of two different cell types, supporting an extracellular function. HMGB2 expression was not changed in inflammatory bowel disease but was detected in certain stool samples of patients, whereas it was absent from control individuals. Taken together, we characterized HMGB2 as an antimicrobial protein in intestinal tissue, complementing the diverse repertoire of gut mucosal defense molecules. PMID:23877675

Küchler, Robert; Schroeder, Bjoern O.; Jaeger, Simon U.; Stange, Eduard F.

2013-01-01

339

Expression, purification and antimicrobial activity of puroindoline A protein and its mutants.  

PubMed

Wheat puroindoline proteins, PINA and PINB, play key roles in determining wheat grain hardness as well as in defending the plant against pathogens. PINA has much greater membrane-binding property and antimicrobial activity because it contains more tryptophan residues in the unique tryptophan-rich domain (TRD). In order to obtain proteins with higher antimicrobial activity, mutants of PINA containing two or three copies of TRD, designated ABBC and ABBBC, respectively, were constructed and expressed in E. coli Rosetta-gami (DE3). Metal affinity chromatography was used to purify the soluble affinity-tagged recombinant proteins. The secondary structures of the recombinant proteins were predicted by the online program Protein Homology/analog Y Recognition Engine v2.0 and experimentally assessed using circular dichroism. Minimum inhibition concentration tests and fluorescence microscope analyses were employed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of the mutants. The results showed that the purified recombinant ABBC was correctly folded and presented significantly higher antimicrobial activities against E. coli and S. aureus than wild-type PINA, suggesting its potential use as an antimicrobial agent. The results also confirmed that TRD is a determinant of the antimicrobial activity of PINA and demonstrated that it is feasible to enhance the antimicrobial activity of PINA by adding one copy of TRD. PMID:22402594

Miao, Yingjie; Chen, Ling; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yajuan; Zheng, Qian; Gao, Chunbao; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

2012-10-01

340

Antiviral and antimicrobial activities of three sesquiterpene lactones from Centaurea solstitialis L. ssp. solstitialis.  

PubMed

Three sesquiterpene lactones (centaurepensin = chlorohyssopifolin A, chlorojanerin and 13-acetyl solstitialin A) isolated from the aerial parts of Centaurea solstitialis L. ssp. solstitialis (Asteraceae) were investigated for antimicrobial and antiviral activities. For the antimicrobial activity assessment, both standard and isolated strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis were employed by the microdilution method. Herpes simplex type-1, a DNA virus, and Parainfluenza, an RNA virus, were employed for the determination of the antiviral activity of these three sesquiterpene lactones using Vero cell lines. Ampicilline, ofloxocine, ketoconazole, fluconazole, acyclovir and oseltamivir were used as the reference drugs. 13-Acetyl solstitialin A displayed remarkable antibacterial activity against isolated strains of E. faecalis at 1 microg/ml concentration, which was close to the effective concentrations of ampicillin. The same compound also showed significant activity against the DNA virus, being as potent as the reference compound acyclovir at maximum and minimum concentrations of 16-<0.00006 microg/ml. This is the first report showing that 13-acetyl solstitialin A possesses significant antiviral activity. PMID:17614269

Ozçelik, Berrin; Gürbüz, Ilhan; Karaoglu, Taner; Ye?ilada, Erdem

2009-01-01

341

Effects of the antimicrobial sulfamethoxazole on groundwater bacterial enrichment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The effects of "trace" (environmentally relevant) concentrations of the antimicrobial agent sulfamethoxazole (SMX) on the growth, nitrate reduction activity, and bacterial composition of an enrichment culture prepared with groundwater from a pristine zone of a sandy drinking-water aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, were assessed by laboratory incubations. When the enrichments were grown under heterotrophic denitrifying conditions and exposed to SMX, noticeable differences from the control (no SMX) were observed. Exposure to SMX in concentrations as low as 0.005 ??M delayed the initiation of cell growth by up to 1 day and decreased nitrate reduction potential (total amount of nitrate reduced after 19 days) by 47% (p = 0.02). Exposure to 1 ??M SMX, a concentration below those prescribed for clinical applications but higher than concentrations typically detected in aqueous environments, resulted in additional inhibitions: reduced growth rates (p = 5 ?? 10-6), lower nitrate reduction rate potentials (p = 0.01), and decreased overall representation of 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. The reduced abundance of Pseudomonas sequences in the libraries was replaced by sequences representing the genus Variovorax. Results of these growth and nitrate reduction experiments collectively suggest that subtherapeutic concentrations of SMX altered the composition of the enriched nitrate-reducing microcosms and inhibited nitrate reduction capabilities. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

Underwood, J.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Repert, D.A.; Baumgartner, L.K.; Smith, R.L.; Roane, T.M.; Barber, L.B.

2011-01-01

342

Surface-engineered core-shell nano-size ferrites and their antimicrobial activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the results of biological study on core-shell structured MFe2O4 (where M = Co, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles and influence of silica- DEG dual coating on their antimicrobial activity. Spherical MFe2O4 nanoparticles were prepared via a Co-precipitation method. The microstructures and morphologies of these nanoparticles were studied by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The antimicrobial activity study carried out in nutrient agar medium with addition of antimicrobial synthesis compound which is tested for its activity against different types of bacteria.

Baraliya, Jagdish D.; Joshi, Hiren H.

2014-04-01

343

Psychotropic effects of antimicrobials and immune modulation by psychotropics: implications for neuroimmune disorders  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Antimicrobial compounds and psychotropic medications often share overlapping mechanisms of actions and pharmacological effects. The immune system appears to be an important site of interaction as several antimicrobials display neurological and, at times, direct psychotropic effects, while psychotropics have shown significant immunomodulatory properties. The isoniazid class of antibiotics for example has been shown to possess monoamine oxidase activity, while selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have shown significant effects on leukocyte populations. As the importance of the immune system's role in CNS homeostasis and disease continues to move to the forefront of neuropsychiatric research, these shared pharmacological effects may provide an important insight, elucidating the complexities in neuroimmune pathophysiology and guiding the development of potential treatments. PMID:23148142

Obregon, Demian; Parker-Athill, Ellisa Carla; Tan, Jun; Murphy, Tanya

2012-01-01

344

Toxicity of essential oil of Satureja khuzistanica: in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-microbial activity.  

PubMed

In nature, essential oils play an important role in the protection of the plants by exerting anti-bacterial, -viral, -fungal, -oxidative, -genotoxic, and free radical scavenging properties, as well as in some cases acting as insecticides. Several Satureja species are used in traditional medicine due to recognized therapeutic properties, namely anti-microbial and cytotoxic activities. The purpose of the present work was to determine the biologic activity of the essential oil of S. khuzistanica Jamzad (Lamiaceae) against four human cancer cell lines, as well as its inhibitory effects against a wide array (i.e. n?=?11) of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The essential oil was isolated by hydro-distillation and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Carvacrol (92.87%) and limonene (1.2%) were found to be the main components of the isolated oil. Anti-microbial activity of the essential oil was assessed using a disc diffusion method; an MTT cytotoxicity assay was employed to test effects of the oil on each cancer cell line. The oil exhibited considerable anti-microbial activity against the majority of the tested bacteria and fungi. The test oil also significantly reduced cell viability of Vero, SW480, MCF7, and JET 3 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with the IC50 values calculated for each cell type being, respectively, 31.2, 62.5, 125, and 125??g/ml. Based on the findings, it is concluded that the essential oil of S. khuzistanica and its major constituents have a potential for further use in anti-bacterial and anti-cancer applications, pending far more extensive testing of toxicities in normal (i.e. primary) cells. PMID:23662744

Yousefzadi, Morteza; Riahi-Madvar, Ali; Hadian, Javad; Rezaee, Fatemeh; Rafiee, Roya; Biniaz, Mehdi

2014-01-01

345

Screening of plant extracts for antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is cumulative resistance against antibiotics of many bacteria. Therefore, the development of new antiseptics and antimicrobial agents for the treatment of skin infections is of increasing interest. We have screened six plant extracts and isolated compounds for antimicrobial effects on bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance. The following plant extracts have been tested: Gentiana lutea, Harpagophytum procumbens, Boswellia serrata

S. Weckesser; K. Engel; B. Simon-Haarhaus; A. Wittmer; K. Pelz; C. M. Schempp

2007-01-01

346

Rapid detection of lytic antimicrobial activity against yeast and filamentous fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rapid method for assessing the lytic activity of antimicrobial agents against yeast and fungi has been developed. The assay is based on the release of the intracellular enzyme, maltase (?-glucosidase). The released maltase activity was measured colorimetrically by the production of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl-?-d-glucopyranoside (PNPG). The lytic activity of different antimicrobial compounds was measured against yeast cells or germinating

Sally N Jewell; Robert H Waldo; Cody C Cain; Joseph O Falkinham

2002-01-01

347

Antimicrobial Activity of Some N-Substituted Amides of Long-Chain Fatty Acids  

PubMed Central

Seventy-three N,N-disubstituted amides of long-chain, principally C18, fatty acids were screened for antimicrobial activity against bacteria, yeasts, and molds. Amides containing an epoxy group exhibit a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity which is further enhanced by unsaturation. Mono-unsaturation alone does not contribute a broad level of activity to the N,N-disubstituted amides of the C18 fatty acids. PMID:5370658

Novak, Arthur F.; Solar, James M.; Mod, Robert R.; Magne, Frank C.; Skau, Evald L.

1969-01-01

348

Search of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.  

PubMed

A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterise the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs. selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed at the Drug Institute in Poland. Over 160 pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. The surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S aureus, E. coil, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains:acyclovir (Awirol 5%, cream), alendronate (Alenato 5 mg, tabl.), alverine (Meteospasmyl 20 mg, caps.), butorphanole (Butamidor 10 mg/ml, amp.), clodronate (Sindronat 400 mg, caps), diclofenac (Olfen 75 mg, amp.), emadastine (Emadine 0.05%, eye dr.), etodolac (Febret 200 mg, caps.), fluvastatine (Lescol 40 mg, tabl.), ketamine (Ketamidor 10%, amp.), levocabastine (Histimet 0.5 mg/ml, eye dr.), losartan (Lorista 50 mg, tabl.), matipranolol (Betaman 0.3% eye dr.), mesalazine (Pentasa 1%, susp.), naproxen (Nalgesin 550 mg, tabl.), oxaprosine (Reumax 600 mg, tabl.), oxymethazoline (Nasivin 0.025%, nose dr.), proxymetacaine (Alcaine 0.5%, eye dr.), ribavirin (Rebetol 200 mg, caps.), rutoside with ascorbic acid (Cerutin 20+200 mg, tabl.), sulodexide (Vessel due F, 250 LSU, caps.), tegaserole (Zelmac 50 mg, tabl.), telmisartan (Pritor 20 mg, tabl.), temosolomide (Temodal 100 mg, caps.), ticlopidine (Ticlid 250 mg, tabl.), tolfenamic acid (Migea rapid 200 mg, tabl.), tramadole (Tramundin 100 mg, tabl.), tropicamide (Tropicamidum 1%, eye dr.). Staphylococcus aureus was susceptible to most of the drugs listed above. Ticlopidine showed activity against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans (MICs equal to: 0.45; 0.45 and 0.65 mg/ml, respectively). Oxymetazoline showed activity against S. aureus and E. coli (MICs: 0.005 and 0.025 mg/ml, respectively). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to alendronate, clondronate, oxaprozine, ribavirin and tramadole (MICs: 10, 63, 60, 3 and 43 mg/ml, respectively). PMID:12669766

Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

2002-01-01

349

Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of three Mentha species essential oils.  

PubMed

The present study describes the antimicrobial activity and free radical scavenging capacity (RSC) of essential oils from Mentha aquatica L., Mentha longifolia L., and Mentha piperita L. The chemical profile of each essential oil was determined by GC-MS and TLC. All essential oils exhibited very strong antibacterial activity, in particularly against Esherichia coli strains. The most powerful was M. piperita essential oil, especially towards multiresistant strain of Shigella sonei and Micrococcus flavus ATTC 10,240. All tested oils showed significant fungistatic and fungicidal activity [expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) values, respectively], that were considerably higher than those of the commercial fungicide bifonazole. The essential oils of M. piperita and M. longifolia were found to be more active than the essential oil of M. aquatica. Especially low MIC (4 microL/mL) and MFC (4 microL/mL) were found with M. piperita oil against Trichophyton tonsurans and Candida albicans (both 8 microL/mL). The RSC was evaluated by measuring the scavenging activity of the essential oils on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and OH radicals. All examined essential oils were able to reduce DPPH radicals into the neutral DPPH-H form, and this activity was dose-dependent. However, only the M. piperita oil reduced DPPH to 50 % (IC50 = 2.53 microg/mL). The M. piperita essential oil also exhibited the highest OH radical scavenging activity, reducing OH radical generation in the Fenton reaction by 24 % (pure oil). According to GC-MS and TLC (dot-blot techniques), the most powerful scavenging compounds were monoterpene ketones (menthone and isomenthone) in the essential oils of M. longifolia and M. piperita and 1,8-cineole in the oil of M. aquatica. PMID:12802721

Mimica-Duki?, Neda; Bozin, Biljana; Sokovi?, Marina; Mihajlovi?, Biserka; Matavulj, Milan

2003-05-01

350

Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Lysostaphin-Coated Hernia Repair Meshes?  

PubMed Central

Bacterial infections by antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains are among the most common postoperative complications in surgical hernia repair with synthetic mesh. Surface coating of medical devices/implants using antibacterial peptides and enzymes has recently emerged as a potentially effective method for preventing infections. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of hernia repair meshes coated by the antimicrobial enzyme lysostaphin at different initial concentrations. Lysostaphin was adsorbed on pieces of polypropylene (Ultrapro) mesh with binding yields of ?10 to 40% at different coating concentrations of between 10 and 500 ?g/ml. Leaching of enzyme from the surface of all the samples was studied in 2% (wt/vol) bovine serum albumin in phosphate-buffered saline buffer at 37°C, and it was found that less than 3% of adsorbed enzyme desorbed from the surface after 24 h of incubation. Studies of antibacterial activity against a cell suspension of S. aureus were performed using turbidity assay and demonstrated that the small amount of enzyme leaching from the mesh surface contributes to the lytic activity of the lysostaphin-coated samples. Colony counting data from the broth count (model for bacteria in wound fluid) and wash count (model for colonized bacteria) for the enzyme-coated samples showed significantly decreased numbers of CFU compared to uncoated samples (P < 0.05). A pilot in vivo study showed a dose-dependent efficacy of lysostaphin-coated meshes in a rat model of S. aureus infection. The antimicrobial activity of the lysostaphin-coated meshes suggests that such enzyme-leaching surfaces could be efficient at actively resisting initial bacterial adhesion and preventing subsequent colonization of hernia repair meshes. PMID:21709102

Satishkumar, Rohan; Sankar, Sriram; Yurko, Yuliya; Lincourt, Amy; Shipp, John; Heniford, B. Todd; Vertegel, Alexey

2011-01-01

351

Multifunctional antimicrobial proteins and peptides: natural activators of immune systems.  

PubMed

In addition to the physical barrier of the stratum corneum, cutaneous innate immunity also includes the release of various humoral mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines, recruitment and activation of phagocytes, and the production of antimicrobial proteins/peptides (AMPs). AMPs form an innate epithelial chemical shield, which provides a front-line component in innate immunity to inhibit microbial invasion; however, this might be an oversimplification of the diverse functions of these molecules. In fact, apart from exhibiting a broad spectrum of microbicidal properties, it is increasingly evident that AMPs display additional activities that are related to the stimulation and modulation of the cutaneous immune system. These diverse functions include chemoattraction and activation of immune and/or inflammatory cells, the production and release of cytokines and chemokines, acceleration of angiogenesis, promotion of wound healing, neutralization of harmful microbial products, and bridging of both innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, better understanding of the functions of AMPs in skin and identification of their signaling mechanisms may offer new strategies for the development of potential therapeutics for the treatment of infection- and/or inflammation-related skin diseases. Here, we briefly outline the structure, regulation of expression, and multifunctional roles of principal skin-derived AMPs. PMID:19601839

Niyonsaba, François; Nagaoka, Isao; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko

2009-01-01

352

Antimicrobial Effects of Interferon-Inducible CXC Chemokines against Bacillus anthracis Spores and Bacilli?  

PubMed Central

Based on previous studies showing that host chemokines exert antimicrobial activities against bacteria, we sought to determine whether the interferon-inducible Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 exhibit antimicrobial activities against Bacillus anthracis. In vitro analysis demonstrated that all three CXC chemokines exerted direct antimicrobial effects against B. anthracis spores and bacilli including marked reductions in spore and bacillus viability as determined using a fluorometric assay of bacterial viability and CFU determinations. Electron microscopy studies revealed that CXCL10-treated spores failed to undergo germination as judged by an absence of cytological changes in spore structure that occur during the process of germination. Immunogold labeling of CXCL10-treated spores demonstrated that the chemokine was located internal to the exosporium in association primarily with the spore coat and its interface with the cortex. To begin examining the potential biological relevance of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity, we used a murine model of inhalational anthrax. Upon spore challenge, the lungs of C57BL/6 mice (resistant to inhalational B. anthracis infection) had significantly higher levels of CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 than did the lungs of A/J mice (highly susceptible to infection). Increased CXC chemokine levels were associated with significantly reduced levels of spore germination within the lungs as determined by in vivo imaging. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel antimicrobial role for host chemokines against B. anthracis that provides unique insight into host defense against inhalational anthrax; these data also support the notion for an innovative approach in treating B. anthracis infection as well as infections caused by other spore-forming organisms. PMID:19179419

Crawford, Matthew A.; Zhu, Yinghua; Green, Candace S.; Burdick, Marie D.; Sanz, Patrick; Alem, Farhang; O'Brien, Alison D.; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M.; Hughes, Molly A.

2009-01-01

353

Antimicrobial effects of interferon-inducible CXC chemokines against Bacillus anthracis spores and bacilli.  

PubMed

Based on previous studies showing that host chemokines exert antimicrobial activities against bacteria, we sought to determine whether the interferon-inducible Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 exhibit antimicrobial activities against Bacillus anthracis. In vitro analysis demonstrated that all three CXC chemokines exerted direct antimicrobial effects against B. anthracis spores and bacilli including marked reductions in spore and bacillus viability as determined using a fluorometric assay of bacterial viability and CFU determinations. Electron microscopy studies revealed that CXCL10-treated spores failed to undergo germination as judged by an absence of cytological changes in spore structure that occur during the process of germination. Immunogold labeling of CXCL10-treated spores demonstrated that the chemokine was located internal to the exosporium in association primarily with the spore coat and its interface with the cortex. To begin examining the potential biological relevance of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity, we used a murine model of inhalational anthrax. Upon spore challenge, the lungs of C57BL/6 mice (resistant to inhalational B. anthracis infection) had significantly higher levels of CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 than did the lungs of A/J mice (highly susceptible to infection). Increased CXC chemokine levels were associated with significantly reduced levels of spore germination within the lungs as determined by in vivo imaging. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel antimicrobial role for host chemokines against B. anthracis that provides unique insight into host defense against inhalational anthrax; these data also support the notion for an innovative approach in treating B. anthracis infection as well as infections caused by other spore-forming organisms. PMID:19179419

Crawford, Matthew A; Zhu, Yinghua; Green, Candace S; Burdick, Marie D; Sanz, Patrick; Alem, Farhang; O'Brien, Alison D; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M; Hughes, Molly A

2009-04-01

354

pH modulates the activity and synergism of the airway surface liquid antimicrobials ?-defensin-3 and LL-37  

PubMed Central

The pulmonary airways are continuously exposed to bacteria. As a first line of defense against infection, the airway surface liquid (ASL) contains a complex mixture of antimicrobial factors that kill inhaled and aspirated bacteria. The composition of ASL is critical for antimicrobial effectiveness. For example, in cystic fibrosis an abnormally acidic ASL inhibits antimicrobial activity. Here, we tested the effect of pH on the activity of an ASL defensin, human ?-defensin-3 (hBD-3), and the cathelicidin-related peptide, LL-37. We found that reducing pH from 8.0 to 6.8 reduced the ability of both peptides to kill Staphylococcus aureus. An acidic pH also attenuated LL-37 killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, we discovered synergism between hBD-3 and LL-37 in killing S. aureus. LL-37 and lysozyme were also synergistic. Importantly, an acidic pH reduced the synergistic effects of combinations of ASL antibacterials. These results indicate that an acidic pH reduces the activity of individual ASL antimicrobials, impairs synergism between them, and thus may disrupt an important airway host defense mechanism. PMID:25512526

Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

2014-01-01

355

Total Phenolic, Total Flavonoids, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Scrophularia Striata Boiss Extracts  

PubMed Central

Background Scrophularia striata (Scrophulariaceae family) is an herbaceous plant that is traditionally used for treatment of microbial infections. Objectives Antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of different extracts (methanolic, ethanolic, aqueous and ethyl acetate) from S. striata aerial parts was evaluated. Materials and Methods The antimicrobial activity of different extracts from S. striata was evaluated against a large number of bacteria and fungi by micro broth dilution. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were measured and their antioxidant activities evaluated by DPPH assay and beta carotene linoleic acid test. Results Antimicrobial screening exhibited the positive relation between the total phenolic content and its antimicrobial activity but their antioxidant activity had a negative relation. Conclusions Further studies are recommended against clinical isolate of sensitive bacteria and deep investigation on flavonoid and phenolic compounds of S. striata and detecting the antioxidant portion in aqueous extract. PMID:24624181

Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Kazempour, Nastaran; Boland Nazar, Ali Reza

2013-01-01

356

Antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of propolis from Melipona orbignyi (Hymenoptera, Apidae).  

PubMed

Propolis from stingless bees is well known for its biologic properties; however, few studies have demonstrated these effects. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of propolis from the stingless bee Melipona orbignyi, found in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The chemical composition of the ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) indicated the presence of aromatic acids, phenolic compounds, alcohols, terpenes and sugars. The EEP was active against the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and the fungus Candida albicans. The EEP showed antioxidant activity by scavenging free radicals and inhibiting hemolysis and lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes incubated with an oxidizing agent. Additionally, EEP promoted cytotoxic activity and primarily necrotic death in K562 erythroleukemia cells. Taken together, these results indicate that propolis from M. orbignyi has therapeutic potential for the treatment and/or prevention of diseases related to microorganism activity, oxidative stress and tumor cell proliferation. PMID:24412556

Campos, Jaqueline Ferreira; dos Santos, Uilson Pereira; Macorini, Luis Fernando Benitez; de Melo, Adriana Mary Mestriner Felipe; Balestieri, José Benedito Perrella; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; de Picoli Souza, Kely; dos Santos, Edson Lucas

2014-03-01

357

Pharmacological properties of Moringa oleifera. 1: Preliminary screening for antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activities of Moringa oleifera leaves, roots, bark and seeds were investigated in vitro against bacteria, yeast, dermatophytes and helminths pathogenic to man. By a disk-diffusion method, it was demonstrated that the fresh leaf juice and aqueous extracts from the seeds inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and that extraction temperatures above 56 degrees C inhibited this activity. No activity was demonstrated against four other pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans. By a dilution method, no activity was demonstrated against six pathogenic dermatophytes. A method was standardized for studying the effect of aqueous extracts on Ascaris lumbricoides eggs, but no activity was exhibited by any part of the tree in contrast to Chenopodium ambrosioides leaf extracts. PMID:1921416

Cáceres, A; Cabrera, O; Morales, O; Mollinedo, P; Mendia, P

1991-07-01

358

Antimicrobial activity of some Pacific Northwest woods against anaerobic bacteria and yeast.  

PubMed

Extracts of woods commonly used for animal bedding were tested for antimicrobial activity. Essential oils from Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) and old growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) as well as methanol extracts of wood from these trees plus western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) were tested for antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria and yeast. The test microbes included Fusobacterium necrophorum, Clostridium perfringens, Actinomyces bovis and Candida albicans which are common to foot diseases and other infections in animals. The essential oils and methanol extracts were tested using a standardized broth assay. Only extracts of Alaska cedar and western juniper showed significant antimicrobial activity against each of the microbes tested. The essential oil of Douglas fir did show antimicrobial activity against A. bovis at the concentrations tested. The methanol extracts of the heartwood of Douglas fir and the sapwood of ponderosa pine showed no antimicrobial activity. The major chemical components of western juniper (cedrol and alpha- and beta-cedrene) and Alaska cedar (nootkatin) were also tested. In western juniper, alpha- and beta-cedrene were found to be active components. Nootkatin showed activity only against C. albicans. The inhibitory activity in Alaska cedar oil was high enough to justify further efforts to define the other chemical components responsible for the antimicrobial activity. PMID:11746838

Johnston, W H; Karchesy, J J; Constantine, G H; Craig, A M

2001-11-01

359

Chemical Composition and Antioxidant/Antimicrobial Activities in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract of Gloiopeltis tenax  

PubMed Central

Gloiopeltis tenax (G. tenax) is widely distributed along the Chinese coastal areas and is commonly used in the treatment of diarrhea and colitis. This study aimed at investigating the bioactivities of the volatile constituents in G. tenax. We extracted the essential constituents of G. tenax by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (CO2-SFE), then identified and analyzed the constituents by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 30 components were identified in the G. tenax extract. The components showed remarkable antioxidant activity (radical scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)), lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity (in a ?-carotene/linoleic acid-coupled oxidation reaction), and hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (by deoxyribose degradation by iron-dependent hydroxyl radical), compared to butylated hydroxytoluene. In microdilution assays, G. tenax extracts showed a moderate inhibitory effects on Staphyloccocus aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 3.9 mg/mL), Enterococcus faecalis (7.8 mg/mL), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.6 mg/mL), and Escherichia coli (3.9 mg/mL). Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of G. tenax were related to the active chemical composition. These results suggest that the CO2-SFE extract from G. tenax has potential to be used as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial agent in food processing. PMID:23342386

Zheng, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yicun; Yao, Fen; Chen, Weizhou; Shi, Ganggang

2012-01-01

360

In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Antimicrobial Peptides Developed Using an Amino Acid-Based Activity Prediction Method  

PubMed Central

To design and discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with high levels of antimicrobial activity, a number of machine-learning methods and prediction methods have been developed. Here, we present a new prediction method that can identify novel AMPs that are highly similar in sequence to known peptides but offer improved antimicrobial activity along with lower host cytotoxicity. Using previously generated AMP amino acid substitution data, we developed an amino acid activity contribution matrix that contained an activity contribution value for each amino acid in each position of the model peptide. A series of AMPs were designed with this method. After evaluating the antimicrobial activities of these novel AMPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, DP7 was chosen for further analysis. Compared to the parent peptide HH2, this novel AMP showed broad-spectrum, improved antimicrobial activity, and in a cytotoxicity assay it showed lower toxicity against human cells. The in vivo antimicrobial activity of DP7 was tested in a Staphylococcus aureus infection murine model. When inoculated and treated via intraperitoneal injection, DP7 reduced the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage solution. Electron microscope imaging and the results indicated disruption of the S. aureus outer membrane by DP7. Our new prediction method can therefore be employed to identify AMPs possessing minor amino acid differences with improved antimicrobial activities, potentially increasing the therapeutic agents available to combat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:24982064

Wu, Xiaozhe; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Xiaolu; Fan, Yingzi; He, Gu; Wan, Yang; Yu, Chaoheng; Tang, Jianying; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Pan, Ying; Liu, Yan; Lu, Lian

2014-01-01

361

Investigation of antimicrobial activity of photothermal therapeutic gold/copper sulfide core/shell nanoparticles to bacterial spores and cells  

PubMed Central

Background Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) were designed as a new type of transducer agent for photothermal therapy (PTT), with attractive features of easy preparation, low cost and small size for targeting. This paper studied for the first time the intrinsic antimicrobial activity of Au/CuS NPs to B. anthracis spores and cells in addition to its PTT effect. Results It was found that Au/CuS NPs were highly efficient in inactivating B. anthracis cells, but not effective to the spores. Treatment with NPs at ~0.83 ?M for 30 min achieved a 7 log reduction in viable cells. The antimicrobial effect was both NPs concentration and treatment time dependent. SEM imaging and the efflux of DNA test demonstrated the damage of cell membrane after NPs treatment, yet further research is necessary to fully understand the precise inactivation mechanism. Conclusions The Au/CuS NPs had strong antimicrobial activity to B. anthracis cells, which showed a great potential to be an effective antimicrobial agent to bacterial cells. PMID:24963345

2014-01-01

362

Development of an antimicrobial material based on a nanocomposite cellulose acetate film for active food packaging.  

PubMed

Nanocomposites based on biopolymers have been recognised as potential materials for the development of new ecofriendly food packaging. In addition, if these materials incorporate active substances in their structure, the potential applications are much higher. Therefore, this work was oriented to develop nanocomposites with antimicrobial activity based on cellulose acetate (CA), a commercial organoclay Cloisite30B (C30B), thymol (T) as natural antimicrobial component and tri-ethyl citrate (TEC) as plasticiser. Nanocomposites were prepared by a solvent casting method and consisted of 5% (w/w) of C30B, 5% (w/w) of TEC and variable content of T (0%, 0.5% and 2% w/w). To evaluate the effect of C30B into the CA matrix, CA films without this organoclay but with T were also prepared. All nanocomposites showed the intercalation of CA into the organoclay structure; furthermore this intercalation was favoured when 2% (w/w) of T was added to the nanocomposite. In spite of the observed intercalation, the presence of C30B inside the CA matrices increased the opacity of the films significantly. On the other hand, T showed a plasticiser effect on the thermal properties of CA nanocomposites decreasing glass transition, melting temperature and melting enthalpy. The presence of T in CA nanocomposites also allowed the control de Listeria innocua growth when these materials were placed in contact with this Gram-positive bacterium. Interestingly, antimicrobial activity was increased with the presence of C30B. Finally, studies on T release showed that the clay structure inside the CA matrix did not affect its release rate; however, this nanofiller affected the partition coefficient KP/FS which was higher to CA nanocomposites films than in CA films without organoclay. The results obtained in the present study are really promising to be applied in the manufacture of food packaging materials. PMID:24345085

Rodríguez, Francisco J; Torres, Alejandra; Peńaloza, Ángela; Sepúlveda, Hugo; Galotto, María J; Guarda, Abel; Bruna, Julio

2014-01-01

363

Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.  

PubMed

The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of essential oils to remove the foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus from food-processing facilities. The effectiveness of 19 essential oils against planktonic cells of S. aureus was firstly assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration. Planktonic cells showed a wide variability in resistance to essential oils, with thyme oil as the most effective, followed by lemongrass oil and then vetiver oil. The eight essential oils most effective against planktonic cells were subsequently tested against 48-h-old biofilms formed on stainless steel. All essential oils reduced significantly (p?effective, but high concentrations were needed to achieve logarithmic reductions over 4 log CFU/cm(2) after 30?min exposure. Alternatively, the use of sub-lethal doses of thyme oil allowed to slow down biofilm formation and to enhance the efficiency of thyme oil and benzalkonium chloride against biofilms. However, some cellular adaptation to thyme oil was detected. Therefore, essential oil-based treatments should be based on the rotation and combination of different essential oils or with other biocides to prevent the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains. PMID:25280938

Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Cabo, Marta L; Rodríguez-Herrera, Juan J

2014-10-01

364

Antimicrobial effects of essential oils in combination with chlorhexidine digluconate.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to compare antimicrobial effects of essential oils alone and in combination with chlorhexidine digluconate against planktonic and biofilm cultures of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus plantarum. The essential oils included cinnamon, tea-tree (Melaleuca alternifola), manuka (Leptospermum scoparium), Leptospermum morrisonii, arnica, eucalyptus, grapefruit, the essential oil mouthrinse Cool Mint Listerine and two of its components, menthol and thymol. Cinnamon exhibited the greatest antimicrobial potency (1.25-2.5 mg/ml). Manuka, L. morrisonii, tea-tree oils, and thymol also showed antimicrobial potency but to a lesser extent. The combination effect of the essential oil-chlorhexidine was greater against biofilm cultures of both S. mutans and L. plantarum than against planktonic cultures. The amount of chlorhexidine required to achieve an equivalent growth inhibition against the biofilm cultures was reduced 4-10-fold in combination with cinnamon, manuka, L. morrisonii, thymol, and Listerine. We conclude that there may be a role for essential oils in the development of novel anticaries treatments. PMID:15943766

Filoche, S K; Soma, K; Sissons, C H

2005-08-01

365

Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of some novel benzimidazole derivatives  

PubMed Central

A series of novel N-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methyl)-4-(1-phenyl-5-substituted-4, 5-dihydro-1-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methyl)-4-(1-phenyl-5-substituted-4, 5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl) benzenamine were synthesized by treating various 1-(4-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methylamino) phenyl)-3-substitutedprop-2-en-1-one with phenyl hydrazine in the presence of sodium acetate through a simple ring closure reaction. The starting material, 1-(4-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methylamino) phenyl)-3-substitutedprop-2-en-1-one,-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methylamino) phenyl)-3-substitutedprop-2-en-1-one, was synthesized from o-phenylenediamine by a multistep synthesis. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic means and elemental analyses. The title compounds were investigated for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal properties against some human pathogenic microorganisms by employing the agar streak dilution method using Ciprofloxacin and Ketoconazole as standard drugs. All title compounds showed activity against the entire strains of microorganism. Structural activity relationship studies reveal that compounds possessing an electron-withdrawing group display better activity than the compounds containing electron-donating groups, whereas the unsubstituted derivatives display moderate activity. Based on the results obtained, N-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methyl)-4-(1-phenyl-5-(4-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl) benzenamine 5i was found to be very active compared with the rest of the compounds and standard drugs that were subjected to antimicrobial assay. PMID:24696814

Krishnanjaneyulu, Immadisetty Sri; Saravanan, Govindaraj; Vamsi, Janga; Supriya, Pamidipamula; Bhavana, Jarugula Udaya; Sunil Kumar, Mittineni Venkata

2014-01-01

366

Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Phytochemicals against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and Their Biofilms  

PubMed Central

Abstract Bacteria can be resistant to multiple antibiotics and we are fast approaching a time when antibiotics will not work on some bacterial infections. New antimicrobial compounds are urgently necessary. Plants are considered the greatest source to obtain new antimicrobials. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial activity of four phytochemicals—7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC), indole-3-carbinol (I3C), salicylic acid (SA) and saponin (SP)—against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, either as planktonic cells or as biofilms. These bacteria are commonly found in hospital-acquired infections. Some aspects on the phytochemicals mode of action, including surface charge, hydrophobicity, motility and quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) were investigated. In addition, the phytochemicals were combined with three antibiotics in order to assess any synergistic effect. 7-HC and I3C were the most effective phytochemicals against E. coli and S. aureus. Both phytochemicals affected the motility and quorum-sensing (QS) activity, which means that they can play an important role in the interference of cell-cell interactions and in biofilm formation and control. However, total biofilm removal was not achieved with any of the selected phytochemicals. Dual combinations between tetracycline (TET), erythromycin (ERY) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) and I3C produced synergistic effects against S. aureus resistant strains. The overall results demonstrates the potential of phytochemicals to control the growth of E. coli and S. aureus in both planktonic and biofilm states. In addition, the phytochemicals demonstrated the potential to act synergistically with antibiotics, contributing to the recycling of old antibiotics that were once considered ineffective due to resistance problems. PMID:25437810

Monte, Joana; Abreu, Ana C.; Borges, Anabela; Simőes, Lúcia Chaves; Simőes, Manuel

2014-01-01

367

Antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities screening of some Brazilian medicinal plants used in Governador Valadares district  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethanol extracts from medicinal plants commonly used by Governador Valadares people were tested for antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity (BST assay). The field survey was conducted during the years 1997-2000 by means of direct interviews with healing men (\\

Beatriz Gonçalves Brasileiro; Virgínia Ramos Pizziolo; Délio Soares Raslan; Claudia Mashrouah Jamal; Dâmaris Silveira

2006-01-01

368

Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil of Kumquat (Fortunella crassifolia Swingle) Peel  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to determine the main constituents of the essential oil isolated from Fortunella crassifolia Swingle peel by hydro-distillation, and to test the efficacy of the essential oil on antimicrobial activity. Twenty-five components, representing 92.36% of the total oil, were identified by GC-MS analysis. The essential oil showed potent antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative (E. coli and S. typhimurium) and Gram-positive (S. aureus, B. cereus, B. subtilis, L. bulgaricus, and B. laterosporus) bacteria, together with a remarkable antifungal activity against C. albicans. In a food model of beef extract, the essential oil was observed to possess an effective capacity to control the total counts of viable bacteria. Furthermore, the essential oil showed strongly detrimental effects on the growth and morphological structure of the tested bacteria. It was suggested that the essential oil from Fortunella crassifolia Swingle peel might be used as a natural food preservative against bacteria or fungus in the food industry. PMID:22489157

Wang, Yong-Wei; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Xu, Pei-Yu; Lan, Ya-Jia; Zhu, Rui-Xue; Zhong, Kai; Huang, Yi-Na; Gao, Hong

2012-01-01

369

Synthesis of lipophilic tyrosyl esters derivatives and assessment of their antimicrobial and antileishmania activities  

PubMed Central

Background Preparation of tyrosyl lipophilic derivatives was carried out as a response to the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries' increasing demand for new lipophilic antioxidants. Results A large series of tyrosyl esters (TyC2 to TyC18:1) with increasing lipophilicity was synthesized in a good yield using lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozyme 435). Spectroscopic analyses of purified esters showed that the tyrosol was esterified on the primary hydroxyl group. Synthetized compounds were evaluated for either their antimicrobial activity, by both diffusion well and minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) methods, or their antileishmanial activity against Leishmania major and Leishmania infantum parasite species. Among all the tested compounds, our results showed that only TyC8, TyC10 and TyC12 exhibited antibacterial and antileishmanial activities. When MIC and IC50 values were plotted against the acyl chain length of each tyrosyl derivative, TyC10 showed a parabolic shape with a minimum value. This nonlinear dependency with the increase of the chain length indicates that biological activities are probably associated to the surfactant effectiveness of lipophilic derivatives. Conclusion These results open up potential applications to use medium tyrosyl derivatives surfactants, antioxidants, antimicrobial and antileishmanial compounds in cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:22264330

2012-01-01

370

Antimicrobial activity of iodoquinol 1%-hydrocortisone acetate 2% gel against ciclopirox and clotrimazole.  

PubMed

Commercially available topical formulations consisting of iodoquinol 1%-hydrocortisone acetate 2%, ciclopirox 0.77%, and clotrimazole 1%-betamethasone dipropionate 0.5% were assessed for their antimicrobial activity against cultures of Micrococcus luteus, Propionibacterium acnes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Malassezia furfur, Microsporum canis, Candida albicans, Trichophyton rubrum, or Epidermophyton floccosum. At 1 and 5 minutes following inoculation into suspensions of each product, aliquots were removed, serially diluted, and plated onto appropriate agar to determine the log reduction in colony-forming units (CFUs) for each organism. Iodoquinol 1% produced the broadest and greatest antimicrobial activity as measured by a 3-log reduction of CFU, active against all microbes tested following incubation times of 1 or 5 minutes, except M luteus. By contrast, ciclopirox 0.77% and clotrimazole 1% showed activity against P aeruginosa and T rubrum, with ciclopirox also killing M luteus, P acnes, M canis, C albicans, and E floccosum at 5 minutes. Iodoquinol 1%-hydrocortisone acetate 2% also was the only product that showed effective antibacterial reduction of MRSA at 1 minute. PMID:19055171

Burnett, Bruce P; Mitchell, Calvin M

2008-10-01

371

In vitro antimicrobial activity of plants used in Cambodian traditional medicine.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to screen 27 plant species used in the traditional medicine of Cambodia for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities. Thirty-three methanolic extracts were tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Candida albicans. Screened by disk diffusion assay, the extracts showed antimicrobial activity especially on Gram-positive bacteria. None of the crude methanolic extracts showed activity against P. aeruginosa. Twenty-five selected extracts were evaluated using a micro-dilution test. Harrisonia perforata (roots) and Hymenodictyon excelsum (bark) exhibited a bactericidal effect against S. aureus at a concentration of 500 microg/ml. Azadirachta indica (bark), Harrisonia perforata (roots and stem) and Shorea obtusa (roots) exhibited a bactericidal effect against M. smegmatis at 250 microg/ml. PMID:17963325

Chea, Aun; Jonville, Marie-Caroline; Bun, Sok-Siya; Laget, Michčle; Elias, Riad; Duménil, Gérard; Balansard, Guy

2007-01-01

372

Antimicrobial polymers.  

PubMed

Better health is basic requirement of human being, but the rapid growth of harmful pathogens and their serious health effects pose a significant challenge to modern science. Infections by pathogenic microorganisms are of great concern in many fields such as medical devices, drugs, hospital surfaces/furniture, dental restoration, surgery equipment, health care products, and hygienic applications (e.g., water purification systems, textiles, food packaging and storage, major or domestic appliances etc.) Antimicrobial polymers are the materials having the capability to kill/inhibit the growth of microbes on their surface or surrounding environment. Recently, they gained considerable interest for both academic research and industry and were found to be better than their small molecular counterparts in terms of enhanced efficacy, reduced toxicity, minimized environmental problems, resistance, and prolonged lifetime. Hence, efforts have focused on the development of antimicrobial polymers with all desired characters for optimum activity. In this Review, an overview of different antimicrobial polymers, their mechanism of action, factors affecting antimicrobial activity, and application in various fields are given. Recent advances and the current clinical status of these polymers are also discussed. PMID:25408272

Jain, Anjali; Duvvuri, L Sailaja; Farah, Shady; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

2014-12-01

373

Antimicrobial activity of flavonoids in medicinal plants from Tafí del Valle (Tucumán, Argentina).  

PubMed

Preliminary studies of flavonoids have been realised in five native species from Tafí del Valle (Tucumán, Argentina) used in popular medicine. Most of compounds detected were flavonoids mono and dihydroxylated in B ring. Screening for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms has been realised with Lippia turbinata, Satureja parvifolia, Sambucus peruviana, Verbena officinalis and Chenopodium graveolens. The total extracts of flavonoids of each plant were tested and four species studied showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:11025172

Hernández, N E; Tereschuk, M L; Abdala, L R

2000-11-01

374

Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of chitosan-alginate nanoparticles: a targeted therapy for cutaneous pathogens  

PubMed Central

Advances in nanotechnology have demonstrated potential application of nanoparticles for effective and targeted drug delivery. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial and immunological properties and the feasibility of using nanoparticles to deliver antimicrobial agents to treat a cutaneous pathogen. Nanoparticles synthesized with chitosan and alginate demonstrated a direct antimicrobial activity in vitro against Propionibacterium acnes, the bacterium linked to the pathogenesis of acne. By electron microscopy imaging, chitosan-alginate nanoparticles were found to induce disruption of the P. acnes cell membrane, providing a mechanism for the bactericidal effect. The chitosan-alginate nanoparticles also exhibited anti-inflammatory properties as they inhibited P. acnes induced inflammatory cytokine production in human monocytes and keratinocytes. Furthermore, benzoyl peroxide, a commonly used anti-acne drug, was effectively encapsulated in the chitosan-alginate nanoparticles and demonstrated superior antimicrobial activity against P. acnes compared to benzoyl peroxide alone while demonstrating less toxicity to eukaryotic cells. Together, these data suggest the potential utility of topical delivery of chitosan-alginate nanoparticle encapsulated drug therapy for the treatment of dermatologic conditions with infectious and inflammatory components. PMID:23190896

Friedman, Adam J; Phan, Jenny; Schairer, David; Champer, Jackson; Qin, Min; Pirouz, Aslan; Blecher, Karin; Oren, Ami; Liu, Phil; Modlin, Robert L; Kim, Jenny

2012-01-01

375

Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon giganteus essential oils alone and in combination.  

PubMed

As part of ongoing research on the chemical composition and the antimicrobial properties of Burkinabe plants essential oils alone and in combination, essential oils (EOs) from leaves of Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon giganteus from Burkina Faso were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Five constituents, which accounted for 96.3% of the oil, were identified in the EO of C. citratus. Geranial (48.1%), neral (34.6%) and myrcene (11.0%) were the major constituents. For C. giganteus a total of eight compounds were identified which represented 86.0% of the oils extracted. The dominant compounds were limonene (42%) and a set of monoterpene alcohols: trans-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol (14.2%), cis-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol (12%), trans-p-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (5.6%) and cis-p-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (5.2%). The EOs were tested against nine bacteria by using disc diffusion and microdilution methods. C. giganteus EO showed antimicrobial effects against all microorganisms tested whereas C. citratus EO failed to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of combinations of the two EOs was quantified by the checkerboard method. Combinations of the two EOs exerted synergistic, additive and indifferent antimicrobial effects. Results of the present investigation provide evidence that the combinations of plant EOs could be assessed for synergistic activity in order to reduce their minimum effective dose. PMID:21665450

Bassolé, I H N; Lamien-Meda, A; Bayala, B; Obame, L C; Ilboudo, A J; Franz, C; Novak, J; Nebié, R C; Dicko, M H

2011-09-15

376

In Vitro Antimicrobial and Modulatory Activity of the Natural Products Silymarin and Silibinin  

PubMed Central

Silymarin is a standardized extract from the dried seeds of the milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.) clinically used as an antihepatotoxic agent. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial and antifungal activity of silymarin and its major constituent (silibinin) against different microbial strains and their modulatory effect on drugs utilized in clinical practice. Silymarin demonstrated antimicrobial activity of little significance against the bacterial strains tested, with MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 512?µg/mL. Meanwhile, silibinin showed significant activity against Escherichia coli with a MIC of 64?µg/mL. The results for the antifungal activity of silymarin and silibinin demonstrated a MIC of 1024?µg/mL for all strains. Silymarin and silibinin appear to have promising potential, showing synergistic properties when combined with antibacterial drugs, which should prompt further studies along this line. PMID:25866771

Rakelly de Oliveira, Dayanne; Relison Tintino, Saulo; Morais Braga, Maria Flaviana Bezerra; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Linde Athayde, Margareth; Douglas Melo Coutinho, Henrique; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Fachinetto, Roselei

2015-01-01

377

Composite PLGA/AgNpPGA/AscH nanospheres with combined osteoinductive, antioxidative, and antimicrobial activities.  

PubMed

The global rise in the resistance of pathogens to conventional antibiotics has created an intensive search for alternative materials with antimicrobial properties. This study is performed with an intention to investigate the combined effects of poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNpPGA) and ascorbic acid (AscH) encapsulated within freeze-dried poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanospheres to obtain a nanomaterial with simultaneous osteoinductive, antioxidative, and prolonged antimicrobial properties. The influence of PLGA/AgNpPGA/AscH particles on (i) viability and superoxide production of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro, (ii) morphology and expression of osteogenic markers in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro, and (iii) antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and a Gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli, was investigated. PLGA/AgNpPGA/AscH nanoparticles showed a superior and extended antibacterial activity against both types of bacteria. The nanoparticles appeared to be capable of delivering ascorbate to the cells, which was evidenced by the significant decrease in the level of superoxides in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and which could have a therapeutic potential in preventing oxidative stress. PLGA/AgNpPGA/AscH nanoparticles had a positive effect on MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells in vitro, promoting: (i) an intimate contact with the cells and preservation of their healthy morphologies; (ii) unreduced cell viability; and (iii) multiple-fold upregulation of two osteogenic markers: osteocalcin and type I procollagen. It is concluded that PLGA/AgNpPGA/AscH nanospheres present a promising new material for the treatment of infections and use in wound dressings and other prophylactic applications. PMID:23984965

Stevanovi?, Magdalena; Uskokovi?, Vuk; Filipovi?, Miloš; Škapin, Sre?o D; Uskokovi?, Dragan

2013-09-25

378

In vitro combinatory antimicrobial effect of plumbagin with oxacillin and tetracycline against Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

Plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), a bicyclic naphthoquinone naturally distributed among Plumbago species, has been reported to have antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms. In this study, plumbagin was examined for its combinatory antimicrobial effect with tetracycline or oxacillin against nine strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including its methicillin- and multidrug-resistant strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined through the broth microdilution method, whereas the combinatory effect was evaluated according to the sum of fractional inhibitory concentration (?FIC) indices. Additive interactions were obtained for both combinations against most of the strains tested. Synergy was obtained for combination with oxacillin against two out of seven strains (?FIC range 0.273-0.281), both were methicillin resistant. Our results proved plumbagin as a compound suitable for anti-Staphylococcal combinatory testing. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of plumbagin synergy with oxacillin against S. aureus strains, including its resistant forms. PMID:25266704

Rondevaldova, Johana; Novy, Pavel; Kokoska, Ladislav

2015-01-01

379

Influence of organic matter, cations and surfactants on the antimicrobial activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil in vitro.  

PubMed

The effect of some potentially interfering substances and conditions on the antimicrobial activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil was investigated. Agar and broth dilution methods were used to determine minimum inhibitory and cidal concentrations of tea tree oil in the presence and absence of each potentially interfering substance. Activity was determined against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and Candida albicans. Minimum inhibitory or cidal concentrations differed from controls by two or more dilutions, for one or more organisms, where Tween-20, Tween-80, skim-milk powder and bovine serum albumin were assessed. These differences were not seen when assays were performed in anaerobic conditions, or in the presence of calcium and magnesium ions. The effect of organic matter on the antimicrobial activity of tea tree oil was also investigated by an organic soil neutralization test. Organisms were exposed to lethal concentrations of tea tree oil ranging from 1-10% (v/v), in the presence of 1-30% (w/v) dry bakers' yeast. After 10 min contact time, viability was determined. At > or = 1%, organic matter compromised the activity of each concentration of tea tree oil against Staphylococcus aureus and C. albicans. At 10% or more, organic matter compromised the activity of each tea tree oil concentration against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Organic matter affected 1 and 2% tea tree oil, but not 4 and 8%, against Escherichia coli. In conclusion, organic matter and surfactants compromise the antimicrobial activity of tea tree oil, although these effects vary between organisms. PMID:10196749

Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

1999-03-01