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Sample records for effective antimicrobial activity

  1. Antimicrobial Activities of Chemokines: Not Just a Side-Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marlene; Moser, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The large family of chemoattractant cytokines (chemokines) embraces multiple, in part unrelated functions that go well beyond chemotaxis. Undoubtedly, the control of immune cell migration (chemotaxis) is the single, unifying response mediated by all chemokines, which involves the sequential engagement of chemokine receptors on migrating target cells. However, numerous additional cellular responses are mediated by some (but not all) chemokines, including angiogenesis, tumor cell growth, T-cell co-stimulation, and control of HIV-1 infection. The recently described antimicrobial activity of several chemokines is of particular interest because antimicrobial peptides are thought to provide an essential first-line defense against invading microbes at the extremely large body surfaces of the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal-urinary tract. Here we summarize the current knowledge about chemokines with antimicrobial activity and discuss their potential contribution to the control of bacterial infections that may take place at the earliest stage of antimicrobial immunity. In the case of homeostatic chemokines with antimicrobial function, such as CXCL14, we propose an immune surveillance function in healthy epithelial tissues characterized by low-level exposure to environmental microbes. Inflammatory chemokines, i.e., chemokines that are produced in tissue cells in response to microbial antigens (such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns) may be more important in orchestrating the cellular arm in antimicrobial immunity. PMID:22837760

  2. Effects of different heat treatments on lysozyme quantity and antimicrobial activity of jenny milk.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Labella, C; Elshafie, H S; Camele, I; Musto, M; Paolino, R; D'Adamo, C; Freschi, P

    2016-07-01

    Thermal treatments are used to improve milk microbial safety, shelf life, and biological activity of some of its components. However, thermal treatments can reduce the nutritional quality of milk, affecting the molecular structure of milk proteins, such as lysozyme, which is a very important milk component due to its antimicrobial effect against gram-positive bacteria. Jenny milk is characterized by high lysozyme content. For this reason, in the last few years, it has been used as an antimicrobial additive in dairy products as an alternative to hen egg white lysozyme, which can cause allergic reactions. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pasteurization and condensation on the concentration and antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk. Furthermore, lysozyme quantity and activity were tested in raw and pasteurized milk after condensation at 40 and 20% of the initial volume. Reversed-phase HPLC was performed under fluorescence detection to monitor lysozyme in milk samples. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the tested milk against Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus mojavensis, Clavibacter michiganensis, Clostridium tyrobutyricum, Xanthomonas campestris, and Escherichia coli. Condensation and pasteurization did not affect the concentration or antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk, except for B. mojaventis, which showed resistance to lysozyme in milk samples subjected to heat treatments. Moreover, lysozyme in jenny milk showed antimicrobial activity similar to synthetic antibiotics versus some gram-positive strains and also versus the gram-negative strain X. campestris. PMID:27157571

  3. Antimicrobial activity of isopteropodine.

    PubMed

    García, Rubén; Cayunao, Cesia; Bocic, Ronny; Backhouse, Nadine; Delporte, Carle; Zaldivar, Mercedes; Erazo, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation for the determination of antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa, has led to the isolation of isopteropodine (0.3%), a known Uncaria pentacyclic oxindol alkaloid that exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria. PMID:16042336

  4. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on antimicrobial activity and quality of Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Al-Habsi, Nasser A; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2012-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey is of major interest to beekeepers and the honey industry. In this study, the effect of high hydrostatic pressure and thermal treatments on antimicrobial activity and quality parameters (principally, diastase number and hydroxymethylfurfural levels (HMF)) of Manuka honey were investigated. The honey was subjected to different pressures (100-800MPa) at 25°C for a range of holding times (15-120min). The antimicrobial activity was found to increase with applied pressure for a given holding time, while the diastase number and HMF levels remained, more or less, unaffected. The percentage inhibition in microbial growth correlated linearly (R(2)=0.94) with methyglyoxal concentration in the honey after treatment over the entire range of pressure, temperature and holding times studied. Maximum percentage inhibition (78.83%) was achieved when honey was subjected to 800MPa compared to the control (57.93%). Thermal treatments at higher temperatures were found to have a detrimental effect on antimicrobial activity based on percentage inhibition as well as methylglyoxal content. Thus, it can be concluded that the levels of methylglyoxal, and therefore the antimicrobial effect of Manuka honey, can be enhanced by using high pressure processing without adversely affecting honey quality. PMID:22953879

  5. Effects of nisin on the antimicrobial activity of d-limonene and its nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijie; Vriesekoop, Frank; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao

    2014-05-01

    d-Limonene has been considered to be a safer alternative compared to synthetic antimicrobial food additives. However, its hydrophobic and oxidative nature has limited its application in foods. The purpose of this research was to study effects of nisin on the antimicrobial activity of d-limonene and its nanoemulsion and develop a novel antimicrobial delivery system by combining the positive effect of these two antibacterial agents at the same time. By the checkerboard method, both the synergistic and additive effects of d-limonene and nisin were found against four selected food-related microorganisms. Then, d-limonene nanoemulsion with or without nisin was prepared by catastrophic phase inversion method, which has shown good droplet size and stability. The positive effects and outstanding antimicrobial activity of d-limonene nanoemulsion with nisin were confirmed by MICs comparison, scanning electron microscopy and determination of cell constituents released. Overall, the research described in the current article would be helpful in developing a more effective antimicrobial system for the production and preservation of foods. PMID:24360455

  6. Automation of antimicrobial activity screening.

    PubMed

    Forry, Samuel P; Madonna, Megan C; López-Pérez, Daneli; Lin, Nancy J; Pasco, Madeleine D

    2016-03-01

    Manual and automated methods were compared for routine screening of compounds for antimicrobial activity. Automation generally accelerated assays and required less user intervention while producing comparable results. Automated protocols were validated for planktonic, biofilm, and agar cultures of the oral microbe Streptococcus mutans that is commonly associated with tooth decay. Toxicity assays for the known antimicrobial compound cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) were validated against planktonic, biofilm forming, and 24 h biofilm culture conditions, and several commonly reported toxicity/antimicrobial activity measures were evaluated: the 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50), the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Using automated methods, three halide salts of cetylpyridinium (CPC, CPB, CPI) were rapidly screened with no detectable effect of the counter ion on antimicrobial activity. PMID:26970766

  7. Antimicrobial activity of antiproteinases.

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M

    2002-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass neutrophil elastase inhibitors have been shown to be important in the control of lung inflammation. In addition to inhibiting the enzyme neutrophil elastase, these low-molecular-mass compounds (10 kDa) have been shown to have other activities. For example, secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and elastase-specific inhibitor/SKALP (skin-derived antileucoproteinase)/elafin have also been shown to have "defensin"-like antimicrobial activities. Indeed, these inhibitors have antimicrobial properties in vitro against bacteria, fungi and, potentially, HIV. In addition, we have shown, using an adenovirus-mediated gene transfer overexpression strategy, that elafin is also active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice in vivo. The mechanism of action is currently under investigation. In addition to these direct or indirect effects on microbes, it has been shown that lipopolysaccharide is able to up-regulate SPLI production in macrophages in vitro, and that the addition of recombinant SLPI to human monocytes or the transfection of macrophages with SPLI can down-regulate pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor, presumably to limit self-damaging excessive inflammation. Using viral gene transfer vectors, we are currently investigating the potential of these inhibitors in various models of inflammation in vivo. PMID:12023836

  8. Essential oils--their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and effect on intestinal cell viability.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Dusan; Dusan, Fabian; Sabol, Marián; Marián, Sabol; Domaracká, Katarína; Katarína, Domaracká; Bujnáková, Dobroslava; Dobroslava, Bujnáková

    2006-12-01

    Essential oils are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. The main objective of this study was to evaluate possible harmful effects of four commonly used essential oils and their major components on intestinal cells. Antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts against enteroinvasive Escherichia coli was dose dependent. However, doses of essential oils with the ability to completely inhibit bacterial growth (0.05%) showed also relatively high cytotoxicity to intestinal-like cells cultured in vitro. Lower doses of essential oils (0.01%) had only partial antimicrobial activity and their damaging effect on Caco-2 cells was only modest. Cell death assessment based on morphological and viability staining followed by fluorescence microscopy showed that essential oils of cinnamon and clove and their major component eugenol had almost no cytotoxic effect at lower doses. Although essential oil of oregano and its component carvacrol slightly increased the incidence of apoptotic cell death, they showed extensive antimicrobial activity even at lower concentrations. Relatively high cytotoxicity was demonstrated by thyme oil, which increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death incidence. In contrast, its component thymol showed no cytotoxic effect as well as greatly-reduced ability to inhibit visible growth of the chosen pathogen in the doses used. On the other hand, the addition of all essential oils and their components at lower doses, with the exception of thyme oil, to bacterial suspension significantly reduced the cytotoxic effect of E. coli on Caco-2 cells after 1h culture. In conclusion, it is possible to find appropriate doses of essential oils showing both antimicrobial activity and very low detrimental effect on intestinal cells. PMID:16919909

  9. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity and bronchodialator effect of a polyherbal drug-Shrishadi

    PubMed Central

    Kajaria, Divya Kumari; Gangwar, Mayank; Kumar, Dharmendra; Kumar Sharma, Amit; Tilak, Ragini; Nath, Gopal; Tripathi, Yamini Bhusan; Tripathi, JS; Tiwari, SK

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate antimicrobial and bronchodialator effect of hydroalcholic extract of polyherbal drug Shirishadi containing Shirisha (Albezzia lebbeck), Nagarmotha (Cyprus rotandus) & Kantakari (Solanum xanthocarpum). Methods Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and MIC, MBC, MFC were calculated by micro dilution method. Hydroalcholic extract of this preparation was investigated for its phytochemical analysis, phenol and flavonoid were determined by spectrophotometric method and in vivo bronchodilator effect was analysed by convulsion time. Results The phytochemical tests revealed presence of alkaloids, anthraquinones, carbohydrates, flavonoids, saponins and tannins. The antimicrobial result showed the MIC of 6.25 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and 12.5 mg/mL for Escherichia coli and 12.5 mg/mL against remaining bacteria tested, with strong antifungal activity. The maximum inhibition zone is found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC 16 mg/mL. Drug showed significant bronchodilator effect with 27.86% & 36.13% increase in preconvulsion time of guinea pigs pretreated with 100 & 200 mg/kg body weight of extract. Conclusions The study reveals that the extracts possess antibacterial activity and antifungal activity in a dose dependent manner. This antimicrobial property may be due to presence of several saponins, further studies are highly needed for the drug development. PMID:23569869

  10. Heat treatment effects on the antimicrobial activity of macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in milk.

    PubMed

    Zorraquino, M A; Althaus, R L; Roca, M; Molina, M P

    2011-02-01

    Antibiotic residues in milk can cause serious problems for consumers and the dairy industry. Heat treatment of milk may diminish the antimicrobial activity of these antibiotic residues. This study analyzed the effect of milk processing (60 °C for 30 min, 120 °C for 20 min, and 140 °C for 10 s) on the antimicrobial activity of milk samples fortified with three concentrations of three macrolides (erythromycin: 20, 40 and 80 μg/liter; spiramycin: 100, 200, and 400 μg/liter; and tylosin: 500, 1,000, and 2,000 μg/liter) and one lincosamide (lincomycin: 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 μg/liter). To measure the loss of antimicrobial activity, a bioassay based on the growth inhibition of Micrococcus luteus was done. The data were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model. The results indicate that treatment at 120 °C for 20 min produces inactivation percentages of 93% (erythromycin), 64% (spiramycin), 51% (tylosin), and 5% (lincomycin), while treatment at 140 °C for 10 s results in generally lower percentages (30% erythromycin, 35% spiramycin, 12% tylosin, and 5% lincomycin). The lowest loss or lowest reduction of antimicrobial activity (21% erythromycin and 13% spiramycin) was obtained by treatment at 60 °C for 30 min. PMID:21333154

  11. Effects of heating, storage, and ultraviolet exposure on antimicrobial activity of garlic juice.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Noori S; Saloom, Khelod Y; Akmal, M; Al-Waili, Thia N; Al-Waili, Ali N; Al-Waili, Hamza; Ali, Amjed; Al-Sahlani, Karem

    2007-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of heating, storage, and ultraviolet exposure on antimicrobial activity of garlic juice and its bacteriocidal activity against common human pathogens. Antimicrobial activity of fresh garlic juice was tested against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus hemolyticus B, S. hemolyticus A, Klebsiella sp., Shigella dysenteriae, and Candida albicans using the disc method. The dilution method was performed by addition of garlic juice to broth media to obtain 1-100% concentrations as vol/vol or wt/vol. Garlic juice was used after 24 hours of storage at 4 degrees C, heating to 100 degrees C for 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes, heating to 80 degrees C for 60 minutes, and 4 hours of exposure to ultraviolet light. Re-culture of specimens taken from garlic-induced negative media was performed in fresh broth free of garlic juice. Results showed that all the isolates were sensitive to fresh garlic juice; the most sensitive was C. albicans, and the least sensitive was S. hemolyticus A. Heating to 100 degrees C for 30 and 60 minutes completely abolished the antimicrobial activity, while heating for 5 and 10 minutes, storage for 24 hours, and 4 hours of ultraviolet exposure decreased it. Garlic juice was bactericidal at concentrations of 5% and more. Thus garlic juice has marked antimicrobial activity that makes it a potential agent to be tested in clinical trials. The antimicrobial activity was compromised by storage and heating; therefore it is advisable to use fresh garlic and avoid boiling it for more than 5 minutes during cooking. PMID:17472490

  12. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus mutans and their Antiproliferative Effects

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Bersan, Salete Meyre Fernandes; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Góis; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Sartoratto, Adilson; Rehder, Vera Lúcia Garcia; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Teixeira Duarte, Marta Cristina; Ikegaki, Masarahu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the activity of essential oils (EOs) against Streptococcus mutans biofilm by chemically characterizing their fractions responsible for biological and antiproliferative activity. Twenty EO were obtained by hydrodistillation and submitted to the antimicrobial assay (minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations) against S. mutans UA159. Thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used for phytochemical analyses. EOs were selected according to predetermined criteria and fractionated using dry column; the resulting fractions were assessed by MIC and MBC, selected as active fractions, and evaluated against S. mutans biofilm. Biofilms formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Selected EOs and their selected active fractions were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against keratinocytes and seven human tumor cell lines. MIC and MBC values obtained for EO and their active fractions showed strong antimicrobial activity. Chemical analyses mainly showed the presence of terpenes. The selected active fractions inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation (P < 0.05) did not affect glycolytic pH drop and were inactive against keratinocytes, normal cell line. In conclusion, EO showed activity at low concentrations, and their selected active fractions were also effective against biofilm formed by S. mutans and human tumor cell lines. PMID:22685486

  14. Which Approach Is More Effective in the Selection of Plants with Antimicrobial Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Santana, Elidiane Fonseca; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Coutinho, Felipe Neves; Castro, Ricardo Henrique Acre; Pisciottano, Maria Nelly Caetano; Amorim, Elba Lúcia Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The development of the present study was based on selections using random, direct ethnopharmacological, and indirect ethnopharmacological approaches, aiming to evaluate which method is the best for bioprospecting new antimicrobial plant drugs. A crude extract of 53 species of herbaceous plants collected in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil was tested against 11 microorganisms. Well-agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) techniques were used. Ten extracts from direct, six from random, and three from indirect ethnopharmacological selections exhibited activities that ranged from weak to very active against the organisms tested. The strain most susceptible to the evaluated extracts was Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC analysis revealed the best result for the direct ethnopharmacological approach, considering that some species yielded extracts classified as active or moderately active (MICs between 250 and 1000 µg/mL). Furthermore, one species from this approach inhibited the growth of the three Candida strains. Thus, it was concluded that the direct ethnopharmacological approach is the most effective when selecting species for bioprospecting new plant drugs with antimicrobial activities. PMID:23878595

  15. Which approach is more effective in the selection of plants with antimicrobial activity?

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Santana, Elidiane Fonseca; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Coutinho, Felipe Neves; Castro, Ricardo Henrique Acre; Pisciottano, Maria Nelly Caetano; Amorim, Elba Lúcia Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The development of the present study was based on selections using random, direct ethnopharmacological, and indirect ethnopharmacological approaches, aiming to evaluate which method is the best for bioprospecting new antimicrobial plant drugs. A crude extract of 53 species of herbaceous plants collected in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil was tested against 11 microorganisms. Well-agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) techniques were used. Ten extracts from direct, six from random, and three from indirect ethnopharmacological selections exhibited activities that ranged from weak to very active against the organisms tested. The strain most susceptible to the evaluated extracts was Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC analysis revealed the best result for the direct ethnopharmacological approach, considering that some species yielded extracts classified as active or moderately active (MICs between 250 and 1000 µg/mL). Furthermore, one species from this approach inhibited the growth of the three Candida strains. Thus, it was concluded that the direct ethnopharmacological approach is the most effective when selecting species for bioprospecting new plant drugs with antimicrobial activities. PMID:23878595

  16. Silver nanoparticles with antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans and their cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Mario Alberto; Boegli, Laura; James, Garth; Velasquillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Martínez-Martínez, Rita-Elizabeth; Martínez-Castañón, Gabriel Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel

    2015-10-01

    Microbial resistance represents a challenge for the scientific community to develop new bioactive compounds. The goal of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against a clinical isolate of Streptococcus mutans, antibiofilm activity against mature S. mutans biofilms and the compatibility with human fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs against the planktonic clinical isolate was size and concentration dependent, with smaller AgNPs having a lower minimum inhibitory concentration. A reduction of 2.3 log in the number of colony-forming units of S. mutans was observed when biofilms grown in a CDC reactor were exposed to 100 ppm of AgNPs of 9.5±1.1 nm. However, AgNPs at high concentrations (>10 ppm) showed a cytotoxic effect upon human dermal fibroblasts. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a planktonic S. mutans clinical isolate and killed established S. mutans biofilms, which suggests that AgNPs could be used for prevention and treatment of dental caries. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into therapeutic and preventive strategies. PMID:26117766

  17. Effect of cellulose and lignin on disintegration, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of PLA active films.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Fortunati, E; Dominici, F; Giovanale, G; Mazzaglia, A; Balestra, G M; Kenny, J M; Puglia, D

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the effects on antimicrobial, antioxidant, migration and disintegrability activities of ternary nanocomposite films based on poly(lactic acid) incorporating two biobased nanofillers, (cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and lignin nanoparticles (LNP)), in two different amounts (1 and 3% wt.). Results from antimicrobial tests revealed a capacity to inhibit the Gram negative bacterial growth of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni along the time, offering innovative opportunities against dangerous bacterial plant pathogens. LNP proved to be highly efficient in antioxidation activity, based on the disappearance of the absorption band at 517nm of the free radical, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) upon reduction by an antiradical compound; moreover the combination of LNP and CNC generates a synergistic positive effect in the antioxidation response of PLA ternary films. Furthermore, all the studied formulations showed a disintegrability value up to 90% after 15days of incubation in composting conditions. Migration results showed that the films can be considered suitable for application in food packaging field. PMID:27126170

  18. Antimicrobial activity against periodontopathogenic bacteria, antioxidant and cytotoxic effects of various extracts from endemic Thermopsis turcica

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Elif Burcu; Açık, Leyla; Akca, Gülçin; Sarper, Meral; Elçi, Mualla Pınar; Avcu, Ferit; Vural, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of Thermopsis turcica Kit Tan, Vural & Küçüködük against periodontopathogenic bacteria, its antioxidant activity and cytotoxic effect on various cancer cell lines. Methods In vitro antimicrobial activities of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate (EtAc), n-hexane and water extracts of Thermopsis turcica herb against periodontopathogenic bacteria, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 were tested by agar well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Antioxidant properties of the extracts were evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity and β-carotene bleaching methods. Amounts of phenolic contents of the extracts were also analysed by using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of the extracts on androgen-insensitive prostate cancer, androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia human cancer cell lines were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Human gingival fibroblast cells were used as a control. Results Our data showed that EtAc extract had the highest antimicrobial effect on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (MIC: 1.562 mg/mL, MBC: 3.124 mg/mL) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (MIC: 0.781 mg/mL, MBC: 1.562 mg/mL). In antioxidant assays, EtAc extract exhibited also the highest radical scavenging activity [IC50=(30.0±0.3) µg/mL] and the highest inhibition [(74.35±0.30)%] against lineloic acide oxidation. The amount of phenolic content of it was also the highest [(162.5±1.2) µg/mg gallic acid]. In cytotoxic assay, only ethanol [IC50=(80.00±1.21) µg/mL] and EtAc extract [IC50=(70.0±0.9) µg/mL] were toxic on acute promyelocytic leukemia cells at 20-100 µg/mL (P<0.05). However, no toxic effect was observed on human gingival fibroblast cells

  19. Effect of mixed antimicrobial agents and flavors in active packaging films.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Laura; Escudero, Ana; Batlle, Ramón; Nerín, Cristina

    2009-09-23

    Active packaging is an emerging food technology to improve the quality and safety of food products. Many works have been developed to study the antimicrobial activity of essential oils. Essential oils have been traditionally used as flavorings in food, so they have an important odor impact but they have as well antimicrobial properties that could be used to protect the food. Recent developments in antimicrobial active packaging showed the efficiency of essential oils versus bread and bakery products among other applications. However, one of the main problems to face is the odor and taste they could provide to the packaged food. Using some aromas to mask the odor could be a good approach. That is why the main objective of this paper is to develop an antimicrobial packaging material based on the combination of the most active compounds of essential oils (hydrocinnamaldehyde, oregano essential oil, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, and carvacrol) together with some aromas commonly used in the food industry. A study of the concentration required to get the antimicrobial properties, the organoleptic compatibility with typical aroma present in many food systems (vanilla, banana, and strawberry), and the right combination of both systems has been carried out. Antimicrobial tests of both the mentioned aromas, the main components of some essential oils, and the combination of both groups were carried out against bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli), yeasts (Candida albicans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii), and molds (Botrytis cinerae, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium roqueforti, Eurotium repens, Penicillium islandicum, Penicillium commune, Penicillium nalgiovensis). The sensory properties of the combinations were evaluated with a triangular test and classification was by an order test; the odor threshold of the aroma compounds was also

  20. Synergistic effects of guanidine-grafted CMC on enhancing antimicrobial activity and dry strength of paper.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Xu, Yaoguang; Lin, Xinxing; Chen, Lihui; Huang, Liulian; Cao, Shilin; Li, Jian

    2014-09-22

    In order to improve the strength property and antimicrobial activity of paper simultaneously, we prepared a novel multifunctional agent based on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by a simple two-stage method. The first stage was the oxidation of CMC to obtain the dialdehyde CMC (DCMC), and the second stage was the graft of guanidine hydrochloride (GH) onto DCMC to obtain DCMC-GH polymer. The strength property and antimicrobial activity of DCMC-GH-coated copy paper have been studied by the tensile test and inhibition zone method, respectively. The results showed that the dry strength index could increase about 20% after the paper was coated with DCMC-GH. The coating of DCMC-GH on paper also resulted in excellent antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the inhibition zone became larger as the GH content grafted on DCMC increased. The novel DCMC-GH polymer would be a multifunctional coating agent for food packaging paper. PMID:24906770

  1. Stability, antimicrobial activity, and effect of nisin on the physico-chemical properties of fruit juices.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Junior, Adelson Alves; de Araújo Couto, Hyrla Grazielle Silva; Barbosa, Ana Andréa Teixeira; Carnelossi, Marcelo Augusto Guitierrez; de Moura, Tatiana Rodrigues

    2015-10-15

    Heat processing is the most commonly used hurdle for inactivating microorganisms in fruit juices. However, this preservation method could interfere with the organoleptic characteristics of the product. Alternative methods have been proposed and bacteriocins such as nisin are potential candidates. However, the approval of bacteriocins as food additives is limited, especially in foods from vegetal origin. We aimed to verify the stability, the effect on physico-chemical properties, and the antimicrobial activity of nisin in different fruit juices. Nisin remained stable in fruit juices (cashew, soursop, peach, mango, passion fruit, orange, guava, and cupuassu) for at least 30 days at room or refrigerated temperature and did not cause any significant alterations in the physico-chemical characteristics of the juices. Besides, nisin favored the preservation of vitamin C content in juices. The antimicrobial activity of nisin was tested against Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes in cashew, soursop, peach, and mango juices. Nisin caused a 4-log reduction in viable cells of A. acidoterrestris in soursop, peach, and mango juices after 8h of incubation, and no viable cells were detected in cashew juices. After 24h of incubation in the presence of nisin, no viable cells were detected, independently of the juices. To S. aureus, at 24h of incubation in the presence of nisin, viable cells were only detected in mango juices, representing a 4-log decrease as compared with the control treatment. The number of viable cells of B. cereus at 24h of incubation in the presence of nisin represented at least a 4-log decrease compared to the control treatment. When the antimicrobial activity of nisin was tested against L. monocytogenes in cashew and soursop juices, no reduction in the viable cell number was observed compared to the control treatment after 24h of incubation. Viable cells were four and six times less than in the

  2. Antimicrobial activities of Barringtonia acutangula.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Polfreman, David; MacGeachan, Jodie; Gray, Alexander I

    2005-06-01

    Crude extracts and VLC fractions from the stem bark of Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn (Fam. Lecythidaceae) were screened for their antimicrobial activities against two Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria and two fungi using a microdilution titre assay. Among the crude extracts, petroleum ether extract showed good activity against all test organisms. The VLC fraction PE 16 was found to be very effective against Bacillus subtilis (MIC=25 microg/ml) and Aspergillus niger (MIC=12.5 microg/ml). The activities were compared to standard antibiotics-kanamycin and fluconazole. The major compound from PE16 was identified as 12, 20(29)-lupadien-3-ol by NMR spectroscopy. PMID:16114086

  3. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, K; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and fungi. Some had little or no hemolytic activity. The hydrophobicity of the sterol backbone and the length and the cationic charge of the side chains appeared to be critical determinants of activity. One of the squalamine mimics, SM-7, was bactericidal against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus; its activity was decreased by divalent or monovalent cations and by bovine serum albumin. Subinhibitory concentrations of SM-7 markedly enhanced the antimicrobial activity of rifampin against gram-negative rods. These results suggest that the compounds may disrupt an outer membrane of gram-negative rods. Squalamine mimics are a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. The antagonism of their activity by serum and albumin and their hemolytic properties may limit their use as systemic agents. The squalamine mimics, because of their potencies, broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, and potential for systemic toxicity, appear to be good candidates for development as topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:9210661

  4. Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics--a Finnish perspective.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2007-06-01

    In Finland, berries are part of the traditional diet significantly contributing to the intake of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. Compositional data on phenolic compounds in berries has been rapidly accumulating and included in the national food composition database. Among the different bioactive substances in berries, phenolic compounds including flavonoids, tannins, and phenolic acids have received considerable interest due to their effects in food and health. A great amount of in vitro evidence exists showing that berry phenolics are powerful antioxidants. However, the antioxidant effect of berry phenolics is strongly dependent on the choice of berry raw material, as the antioxidant activity differs between the different phenolic constituents, including anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins. In foods, the antioxidant effect is also influenced by the structure of food. Tannin-containing berries exhibit antimicrobial properties against pathogenic bacteria, thus offering many new applications for food industry. Much of the interest in berry phenolics has focused on cranberries and both cultivated and wild blueberries, although also other berries including black currants, cloudberries, lingonberries, and red raspberries possess promising bioactivities that may have relevance to human health. Antioxidant activity of berry phenolics, in addition to other mechanisms, may contribute to human health, but the possible relationship remains yet to be scientifically substantiated. PMID:17492800

  5. Effect of gamma irradiation on chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Thymus vulgaris and Mentha pulegium essential oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zantar, Said; Haouzi, Rachid; Chabbi, Mohamed; Laglaoui, Amin; Mouhib, Mohammed; Mohammed Boujnah; Bakkali, Mohammed; Zerrouk, Mounir Hassani

    2015-10-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation doses (10, 20 and 30 kGy) on chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Thymus vulgaris and Mentha pulegium essential oils (EOs) have been studied. The chromatographic analysis showed that the studied EOs were constituted mainly by carvacrol for T. vulgaris and pulegone for M. pulegium. Gamma irradiation on the studied doses, affects quantitatively and not qualitatively some components of the investigated oils. This effect was dose dependent. While the antioxidant activity remains stable at any dose applied for the plants studied, the antimicrobial activity increased in the irradiated samples for gram negative bacteria and did not change for gram+bacteria. This study supports that gamma irradiation employed at sterilizing doses did not compromise the biological activities of medicinal and aromatic plants.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of Securidaca longipedunculata.

    PubMed

    Ajali, U; Chukwurah, B K C

    2004-11-01

    The folk herbal uses of Securidaca longipedunculata in the treatment of diarrhea, boils, gonorrhea, and cough prompted phytochemical analyses and antimicrobial activity screening of extracts of the root. Some flavonoids isolated showed activity against many micro-organisms. These flavonoids were isolated using chromatographic methods. PMID:15636189

  7. Antimicrobial Active Clothes Display No Adverse Effects on the Ecological Balance of the Healthy Human Skin Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Hoefer, Dirk; Hammer, Timo R.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive public use of antimicrobial clothes has raised issues concerning skin health. A placebo-controlled side-to-side study was run with antimicrobial clothes versus fabrics of similar structure but minus the antimicrobial activity, to evaluate possible adverse effects on the healthy skin microflora. Sixty volunteers were enrolled. Each participant received a set of form-fitting T-shirts constructed in 2 halves: an antibacterial half, displaying activities of 3–5 log-step reductions due to silver-finishes or silver-loaded fibres and a nonantibacterial control side. The microflora of the scapular skin was analyzed weekly for opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms over six weeks. The antibacterial halves did not disturb the microflora in number or composition, whereas a silver-containing deodorant displayed a short-term disturbance. Furthermore, parameters of skin morphology and function (TEWL, pH, moisture) did not show any significant shifts. In summary, antimicrobial clothes did not show adverse effects on the ecological balance of the healthy skin microflora. PMID:22363849

  8. The effect of thiol functional group incorporation into cationic helical peptides on antimicrobial activities and spectra.

    PubMed

    Wiradharma, Nikken; Khan, Majad; Yong, Lin-Kin; Hauser, Charlotte A E; Seow, See Voon; Zhang, Shuguang; Yang, Yi-Yan

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been proposed as blueprints for the development of new antimicrobial agents for the treatment of drug resistant infections. A series of synthetic AMPs capable of forming α-helical structures and containing free-sulfhydryl groups are designed in this study ((LLKK)(2)C, C(LLKK)(2)C, (LLKK)(3)C, C(LLKK)(3)C). In particular, the AMP with 2 cysteine residues at the terminal ends of the peptide and 2 repeat units of LLKK, i.e., C(LLKK)(2)C, has been demonstrated to have high selectivity towards a wide range of microbes from Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aerogenosa, and yeast Candida albicans over red blood cells. At the MIC levels, this peptide does not induce significant hemolysis, and its MIC values occur at the concentration of more than 10 times of their corresponding 50% hemolysis concentrations (HC(50)). Microscopy studies suggest that this peptide kills microbial cells by inducing pores of ∼20-30 nm in size in microbial membrane on a short time scale, which further develops to grossly damaged membrane envelope on a longer time scale. Multiple treatments of microbes with this peptide at sub MIC concentration do not induce resistance, even up to passage 10. However, the same treatment with conventional antibiotics penicillin G or ciprofloxacin easily develop resistance in the treated microbes. In addition, the peptides are shown not to induce secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α in human monocytes as compared to lipopolysaccharide, which implies additional safety aspects of the peptides to be used as both systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. Therefore, this study provides an excellent basis to develop promising antimicrobial agents that possess a broad range of antimicrobial activities with less susceptibility for development of drug resistance. PMID:21906803

  9. High Antimicrobial Effectiveness with Low Hemolytic and Cytotoxic Activity for PEG/Quaternary Copolyoxetanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl chain length of quaternary ammonium/PEG copolyoxetanes has been varied to discern effects on solution antimicrobial efficacy, hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Monomers 3-((4-bromobutoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (BBOx) and 3-((2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (ME2Ox) were used to prepare precursor P[(BBOx)(ME2Ox)-50:50–4 kDa] copolyoxetane via cationic ring opening polymerization. The 1:1 copolymer composition and Mn (4 kDa) were confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. After C–Br substitution by a series of tertiary amines, ionic liquid Cx-50 copolyoxetanes were obtained, where 50 is the mole percent of quaternary repeat units and “x” is quaternary alkyl chain length (2, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 carbons). Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) studies showed Tgs between −40 and −60 °C and melting endotherms for C14–50 and C16–50. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A systematic dependence of MIC on alkyl chain length was found. The most effective antimicrobials were in the C6–50 to C12–50 range. C8–50 had better overall performance with MICs of 4 μg/mL, E. coli; 2 μg/mL, S. aureus; and 24 μg/mL, P. aeruginosa. At 5 × MIC, C8–50 effected >99% kill in 1 h against S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa challenges of 108 cfu/mL; log reductions (1 h) were 7, 3, and 5, respectively. To provide additional insight into polycation interactions with bacterial membranes, a geometric model based on the dimensions of E. coli is described that provides an estimate of the maximum number of polycations that can chemisorb. Chain dimensions were estimated for polycation C8–50 with a molecular weight of 5 kDa. Considering the approximations for polycation chemisorption (PCC), it is surprising that a calculation based on geometric considerations gives a C8–50 concentration within a factor of 2 of the MIC, 4.0 (±1.2) μg/mL for

  10. High antimicrobial effectiveness with low hemolytic and cytotoxic activity for PEG/quaternary copolyoxetanes.

    PubMed

    King, Allison; Chakrabarty, Souvik; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xiaomei; Ohman, Dennis E; Wood, Lynn F; Abraham, Sheena; Rao, Raj; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2014-02-10

    The alkyl chain length of quaternary ammonium/PEG copolyoxetanes has been varied to discern effects on solution antimicrobial efficacy, hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Monomers 3-((4-bromobutoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (BBOx) and 3-((2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (ME2Ox) were used to prepare precursor P[(BBOx)(ME2Ox)-50:50-4 kDa] copolyoxetane via cationic ring opening polymerization. The 1:1 copolymer composition and Mn (4 kDa) were confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. After C-Br substitution by a series of tertiary amines, ionic liquid Cx-50 copolyoxetanes were obtained, where 50 is the mole percent of quaternary repeat units and "x" is quaternary alkyl chain length (2, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 carbons). Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) studies showed Tgs between -40 and -60 °C and melting endotherms for C14-50 and C16-50. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . A systematic dependence of MIC on alkyl chain length was found. The most effective antimicrobials were in the C6-50 to C12-50 range. C8-50 had better overall performance with MICs of 4 μg/mL, E. coli ; 2 μg/mL, S. aureus ; and 24 μg/mL, P. aeruginosa . At 5 × MIC, C8-50 effected >99% kill in 1 h against S. aureus , E. coli , and P. aeruginosa challenges of 10(8) cfu/mL; log reductions (1 h) were 7, 3, and 5, respectively. To provide additional insight into polycation interactions with bacterial membranes, a geometric model based on the dimensions of E. coli is described that provides an estimate of the maximum number of polycations that can chemisorb. Chain dimensions were estimated for polycation C8-50 with a molecular weight of 5 kDa. Considering the approximations for polycation chemisorption (PCC), it is surprising that a calculation based on geometric considerations gives a C8-50 concentration within a factor of 2 of the MIC, 4.0 (±1.2) μg/mL for E. coli . Cx-50

  11. Effect of addition of 2% chlorhexidine or 10% doxycycline on antimicrobial activity of biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Madan, Molly; Agarwal, Charu; Suri, Navleen

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the addition of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate or 10% doxycycline would enhance the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC-25923), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC-29212), Candida albicans (ATCC-90028), and Streptococcus mutans (MTCC-497). Materials and Methods: Three wells of 4 mm diameter and 4 mm depth on each plate were prepared on the agar medium with standardized suspensions of each microorganism. Biodentine powder mixed with 2% chlorhexidine (0.06 g) or 10% doxycycline (0.30 g) in its liquid or liquid alone was placed to fill each well. Plates were incubated at 37°C as required for microbial growth. A blinded, independent observer measured zones of inhibition. The data were analyzed using independent “t” test to compare the differences among the three cement preparations for different micro-organisms. Results: All Biodentine samples inhibited microbial growth. The highest mean diameters of zone of inhibition for all the micro-organisms were found around Biodentine/chlorhexidine (13.417) followed by Biodentine alone (12.236) and Biodentine/doxycycline (11.25). Conclusion: In conclusion, adding 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in liquid of Biodentine enhanced the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine against all the tested micro-organisms except Candida albicans, while addition of 10% doxycycline decreased the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine. The differences were significant statistically (P < 0.05). PMID:24944453

  12. Effects of allspice, cinnamon, and clove bud essential oils in edible apple films on physical properties and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Du, W-X; Olsen, C W; Avena-Bustillos, R J; McHugh, T H; Levin, C E; Friedman, Mendel

    2009-09-01

    Essential oils (EOs) derived from plants are rich sources of volatile terpenoids and phenolic compounds. Such compounds have the potential to inactivate pathogenic bacteria on contact and in the vapor phase. Edible films made from fruits or vegetables containing EOs can be used commercially to protect food against contamination by pathogenic bacteria. EOs from cinnamon, allspice, and clove bud plants are compatible with the sensory characteristics of apple-based edible films. These films could extend product shelf life and reduce risk of pathogen growth on food surfaces. This study evaluated physical properties (water vapor permeability, color, tensile properties) and antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes of allspice, cinnamon, and clove bud oils in apple puree film-forming solutions formulated into edible films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations. Antimicrobial activities were determined by 2 independent methods: overlay of the film on top of the bacteria and vapor phase diffusion of the antimicrobial from the film to the bacteria. The antimicrobial activities against the 3 pathogens were in the following order: cinnamon oil > clove bud oil > allspice oil. The antimicrobial films were more effective against L. monocytogenes than against the S. enterica. The oils reduced the viscosity of the apple solutions and increased elongation and darkened the colors of the films. They did not affect water vapor permeability. The results show that apple-based films with allspice, cinnamon, or clove bud oils were active against 3 foodborne pathogens by both direct contact with the bacteria and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films. PMID:19895483

  13. Regulation of IDO activity by oxygen supply: inhibitory effects on antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Silvia K; Ebel, Sebastian; Keil, Eric; Woite, Claudia; Ernst, Joachim F; Benzin, Anika E; Rupp, Jan; Däubener, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid for human beings as well as for some microorganisms. In human cells the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) reduces local tryptophan levels and is therefore able to mediate broad-spectrum effector functions: IDO activity restricts the growth of various clinically relevant pathogens such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. On the other hand, it has been observed that IDO has immunoregulatory functions as it efficiently controls the activation and survival of T-cells. Although these important effects have been analysed in much detail, they have been observed in vitro using cells cultured in the presence of 20% O₂ (normoxia). Such high oxygen concentrations are not present in vivo especially within infected and inflamed tissues. We therefore analysed IDO-mediated effects under lower oxygen concentrations in vitro and observed that the function of IDO is substantially impaired in tumour cells as well as in native cells. Hypoxia led to reduced IDO expression and as a result to reduced production of kynurenine, the downstream product of tryptophan degradation. Consequently, effector functions of IDO were abrogated under hypoxic conditions: in different human cell lines such as tumour cells (glioblastoma, HeLa) but also in native cells (human foreskin fibroblasts; HFF) IDO lost the capacity to inhibit the growth of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), parasites (Toxoplasma gondii) or viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1). Additionally, IDO could no longer efficiently control the proliferation of T-cells that have been co-cultured with IDO expressing HFF cells in vitro. In conclusion, the potent antimicrobial as well as immunoregulatory functions of IDO were substantially impaired under hypoxic conditions that pathophysiologically occurs in vivo. PMID:23675474

  14. Regulation of IDO Activity by Oxygen Supply: Inhibitory Effects on Antimicrobial and Immunoregulatory Functions

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Eric; Woite, Claudia; Ernst, Joachim F.; Benzin, Anika E.; Rupp, Jan; Däubener, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid for human beings as well as for some microorganisms. In human cells the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) reduces local tryptophan levels and is therefore able to mediate broad-spectrum effector functions: IDO activity restricts the growth of various clinically relevant pathogens such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. On the other hand, it has been observed that IDO has immunoregulatory functions as it efficiently controls the activation and survival of T-cells. Although these important effects have been analysed in much detail, they have been observed in vitro using cells cultured in the presence of 20% O2 (normoxia). Such high oxygen concentrations are not present in vivo especially within infected and inflamed tissues. We therefore analysed IDO-mediated effects under lower oxygen concentrations in vitro and observed that the function of IDO is substantially impaired in tumour cells as well as in native cells. Hypoxia led to reduced IDO expression and as a result to reduced production of kynurenine, the downstream product of tryptophan degradation. Consequently, effector functions of IDO were abrogated under hypoxic conditions: in different human cell lines such as tumour cells (glioblastoma, HeLa) but also in native cells (human foreskin fibroblasts; HFF) IDO lost the capacity to inhibit the growth of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), parasites (Toxoplasma gondii) or viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1). Additionally, IDO could no longer efficiently control the proliferation of T-cells that have been co-cultured with IDO expressing HFF cells in vitro. In conclusion, the potent antimicrobial as well as immunoregulatory functions of IDO were substantially impaired under hypoxic conditions that pathophysiologically occurs in vivo. PMID:23675474

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Dairy Products and Gut: Effect on Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Eva; Landete, José María

    2015-01-01

    The food industry seeks alternatives to satisfy consumer demands of safe foods with a long shelf-life able to maintain the nutritional and organoleptic quality. The application of antimicrobial compounds-producing protective cultures may provide an additional parameter of processing in order to improve the safety and ensure food quality, keeping or enhancing its sensorial characteristics. In addition, strong evidences suggest that certain probiotic strains can confer resistance against infection with enteric pathogens. Several mechanisms have been proposed to support this phenomenon, including antimicrobial compounds secreted by the probiotics, competitive exclusion, or stimulation of the immune system. Recent research has increasingly demonstrated the role of antimicrobial compounds as protective mechanism against intestinal pathogens and therefore certain strains could have an effect on both the food and the gut. In this aspect, the effects of the combination of different strains keep unknown. The development of multistrain probiotic dairy products with good technological properties and with improved characteristics to those shown by the individual strains, able to act not only as protective cultures in foods, but also as probiotics able to exert a protective action against infections, has gained increased interest. PMID:25861634

  16. Antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria in dairy products and gut: effect on pathogens.

    PubMed

    Arqués, Juan L; Rodríguez, Eva; Langa, Susana; Landete, José María; Medina, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The food industry seeks alternatives to satisfy consumer demands of safe foods with a long shelf-life able to maintain the nutritional and organoleptic quality. The application of antimicrobial compounds-producing protective cultures may provide an additional parameter of processing in order to improve the safety and ensure food quality, keeping or enhancing its sensorial characteristics. In addition, strong evidences suggest that certain probiotic strains can confer resistance against infection with enteric pathogens. Several mechanisms have been proposed to support this phenomenon, including antimicrobial compounds secreted by the probiotics, competitive exclusion, or stimulation of the immune system. Recent research has increasingly demonstrated the role of antimicrobial compounds as protective mechanism against intestinal pathogens and therefore certain strains could have an effect on both the food and the gut. In this aspect, the effects of the combination of different strains keep unknown. The development of multistrain probiotic dairy products with good technological properties and with improved characteristics to those shown by the individual strains, able to act not only as protective cultures in foods, but also as probiotics able to exert a protective action against infections, has gained increased interest. PMID:25861634

  17. Antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens and immunomodulatory effects and toxicity of geopropolis produced by the stingless bee Melipona fasciculata Smith

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Native bees of the tribe Meliponini produce a distinct kind of propolis called geopropolis. Although many pharmacological activities of propolis have already been demonstrated, little is known about geopropolis, particularly regarding its antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens. The present study aimed at investigating the antimicrobial activity of M. fasciculata geopropolis against oral pathogens, its effects on S. mutans biofilms, and the chemical contents of the extracts. A gel prepared with a geopropolis extract was also analyzed for its activity on S. mutans and its immunotoxicological potential. Methods Antimicrobial activities of three hydroalcoholic extracts (HAEs) of geopropolis, and hexane and chloroform fractions of one extract, were evaluated using the agar diffusion method and the broth dilution technique. Ethanol (70%, v/v) and chlorhexidine (0.12%, w/w) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Total phenol and flavonoid concentrations were assayed by spectrophotometry. Immunotoxicity was evaluated in mice by topical application in the oral cavity followed by quantification of biochemical and immunological parameters, and macro-microscopic analysis of animal organs. Results Two extracts, HAE-2 and HAE-3, showed inhibition zones ranging from 9 to 13 mm in diameter for S. mutans and C. albicans, but presented no activity against L. acidophilus. The MBCs for HAE-2 and HAE-3 against S. mutans were 6.25 mg/mL and 12.5 mg/mL, respectively. HAE-2 was fractionated, and its chloroform fraction had an MBC of 14.57 mg/mL. HAE-2 also exhibited bactericidal effects on S. mutans biofilms after 3 h of treatment. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in total phenol and flavonoid concentrations were observed among the samples. Signs toxic effects were not observed after application of the geopropolis-based gel, but an increase in the production of IL-4 and IL-10, anti-inflammatory cytokines, was detected. Conclusions In summary

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Commercial Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajjar, Priyanka; Pettee, Brian; Britt, David W.; Huang, Wenjie; Johnson, William P.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2009-07-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are finding increased use in applications ranging from biosensors to prophylactic antimicrobials embedded in socks. The release of heavy metal-containing nanoparticles (NP) into the environment may be harmful to the efficacy of beneficial microbes that function in element cycling, pollutant degradation, and plant growth. Antimicrobial activity of commercial NP of Ag, CuO, and ZnO is demonstrated here against the beneficial soil microbe, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which was modified to serve as a bioluminescent sentinel organism. "As manufactured" preparations of nano- Ag, -CuO, and -ZnO caused rapid, dose dependent loss of light output in the biosensor. Bulk equivalents of these products showed no inhibitory activity, indicating that particle size was determinant in activity.

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  20. [Antimicrobial activity exerted by sodium dichloroisocyanurate].

    PubMed

    D'Auria, F D; Simonetti, G; Strippoli, V

    1989-01-01

    Sodium dichloroisocyanurate is a chlorinated cleaner. It was used for swimming pool sanitation and for the sterilisation of linen. Not recently ago sodium dichloroisocyanurate has substituted hypochlorite for the sterilisation of infant feeding bottles and teats. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate is soluble in water; this condition causes the hydrolysis of sodium dichloroisocyanurate in hypochlorous acid, that is the active agent, isocyanurate and isocyanurate chlorine. These compounds form a chlorine protein that carry out microbicidal activity. In a toxicology study has been shown that no severe changes in the normal metabolic function occurred, furthermore sodium dichloroisocyanurate has not shown teratogenic effects at the concentration of 200 mg/kg. The antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate was evaluated against Gram negative bacteria such as E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium and against some fungi. This study illustrates a rapid antimicrobial activity using concentrations. Our study concentrated on the antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate in some experimental conditions. We tested 66 strains of fungi, 28 Gram positive bacteria and 29 Gram negative bacteria. We also evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate against protozoa such as Trichomonas vaginalis. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated in cultural conditions and non cultural conditions; in these experiments we observed similar action in both the commercial product and pure substance. In cultural conditions sodium dichloroisocyanurate shows a good activity against fungi and bacteria, moreover it can be observed that the serum didn't interfere with its activity. In a non cultural condition the Candida was killed rapidly by the sodium dichloroisocyanurate but this activity is influenced by the growth phase of the yeast. Against mycelial form such as Penicillium and Aspergillus the sodium dichloroisocyanurate needs a longer contact time than yeast form

  1. The antimicrobial efficiency of silver activated sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Đolić, Maja B.; Rajaković-Ognjanović, Vladana N.; Štrbac, Svetlana B.; Rakočević, Zlatko Lj.; Veljović, Đorđe N.; Dimitrijević, Suzana I.; Rajaković, Ljubinka V.

    2015-12-01

    This study is focused on the surface modifications of the materials that are used for antimicrobial water treatment. Sorbents of different origin were activated by Ag+-ions. The selection of the most appropriate materials and the most effective activation agents was done according to the results of the sorption and desorption kinetic studies. Sorption capacities of selected sorbents: granulated activated carbon (GAC), zeolite (Z), and titanium dioxide (T), activated by Ag+-ions were following: 42.06, 13.51 and 17.53 mg/g, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of Ag/Z, Ag/GAC and Ag/T sorbents were tested against Gram-negative bacteria E. coli, Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and yeast C. albicans. After 15 min of exposure period, the highest cell removal was obtained using Ag/Z against S. aureus and E. coli, 98.8 and 93.5%, respectively. Yeast cell inactivation was unsatisfactory for all three activated sorbents. The antimicrobial pathway of the activated sorbents has been examined by two separate tests - Ag+-ions desorbed from the activated surface to the aqueous phase and microbial cell removal caused by the Ag+-ions from the solid phase (activated surface sites). The results indicated that disinfection process significantly depended on the microbial-activated sites interactions on the modified surface. The chemical state of the activating agent had crucial impact to the inhibition rate. The characterization of the native and modified sorbents was performed by X-ray diffraction technique, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The concentration of adsorbed and released ions was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial efficiency of activated sorbents was related not only to the concentration of the activating agent, but moreover on the surface characteristics of the material, which affects the distribution and the accessibility of the activating agent.

  2. Effect of water-aging on the antimicrobial activities of an ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shi-Qiang; Epasinghe, D Jeevanie; Zhou, Bin; Niu, Li-Na; Kimmerling, Kirk A; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Mao, Jing; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-06-01

    Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS), an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) functionalized with polymerizable methacrylate groups and an antimicrobial agent with a long lipophilic alkyl chain quaternary ammonium group, was synthesized through a silane-based sol-gel route. By dissolving QAMS in methyl methacrylate monomer, this ORMOSIL molecule was incorporated into an auto-polymerizing, powder/liquid orthodontic acrylic resin system, yielding QAMS-containing poly(methyl methacrylate). The QAMS-containing acrylic resin showed a predominant contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 35668) and Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) on the acrylic surface. The antimicrobial activities of QAMS-containing acrylic resin were maintained after a 3month water-aging period. Bromophenol blue assay showed minimal leaching of quaternary ammonium species when an appropriate amount of QAMS (<4wt.%) was incorporated into the acrylic resin. The results suggest that QAMS is predominantly co-polymerized with the poly(methyl methacrylate) network, and only a minuscule amount of free QAMS molecules is present within the polymer network after water-aging. Acrylic resin with persistent antimicrobial activities represents a promising method for preventing bacteria- and fungus-induced stomatitis, an infectious disease commonly associated with the wearing of removable orthodontic appliances. PMID:23485857

  3. Effect of water-aging on the antimicrobial activities of an ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shi-qiang; Epasinghe, D. Jeevanie; Zhou, Bin; Niu, Li-na; Kimmerling, Kirk A.; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mao, Jing; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS), an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) functionalized with polymerizable methacrylate groups and an antimicrobial agent with a long lipophilic alkyl chain quaternary ammonium group, was synthesized through a silane-based sol–gel route. By dissolving QAMS in methyl methacrylate monomer, this ORMOSIL molecule was incorporated into an auto-polymerizing, powder/liquid orthodontic acrylic resin system, yielding QAMS-containing poly (methyl methacrylate). The QAMS-containing acrylic resin showed a predominant contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 35668) and Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) on the acrylic surface. The antimicrobial activities of QAMS-containing acrylic resin were maintained after a 3 month water-aging period. Bromophenol blue assay showed minimal leaching of quaternary ammonium species when an appropriate amount of QAMS (<4 wt.%) was incorporated into the acrylic resin. The results suggest that QAMS is predominantly co-polymerized with the poly(methyl methacrylate) network, and only a minuscule amount of free QAMS molecules is present within the polymer network after water-aging. Acrylic resin with persistent antimicrobial activities represents a promising method for preventing bacteria- and fungus-induced stomatitis, an infectious disease commonly associated with the wearing of removable orthodontic appliances. PMID:23485857

  4. Size and Aging Effects on Antimicrobial Efficiency of Silver Nanoparticles Coated on Polyamide Fabrics Activated by Atmospheric DBD Plasma.

    PubMed

    Zille, Andrea; Fernandes, Margarida M; Francesko, Antonio; Tzanov, Tzanko; Fernandes, Marta; Oliveira, Fernando R; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, Teresa; Carneiro, Noémia; Esteves, Maria F; Souto, António P

    2015-07-01

    This work studies the surface characteristics, antimicrobial activity, and aging effect of plasma-pretreated polyamide 6,6 (PA66) fabrics coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), aiming to identify the optimum size of nanosilver exhibiting antibacterial properties suitable for the manufacture of hospital textiles. The release of bactericidal Ag(+) ions from a 10, 20, 40, 60, and 100 nm AgNPs-coated PA66 surface was a function of the particles' size, number, and aging. Plasma pretreatment promoted both ionic and covalent interactions between AgNPs and the formed oxygen species on the fibers, favoring the deposition of smaller-diameter AgNPs that consequently showed better immediate and durable antimicrobial effects against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Surprisingly, after 30 days of aging, a comparable bacterial growth inhibition was achieved for all of the fibers treated with AgNPs <100 nm in size. The Ag(+) in the coatings also favored the electrostatic stabilization of the plasma-induced functional groups on the PA66 surface, thereby retarding the aging process. At the same time, the size-related ratio (Ag(+)/Ag(0)) of the AgNPs between 40 and 60 nm allowed for the controlled release of Ag(+) rather than bulk silver. Overall, the results suggest that instead of reducing the size of the AgNPs, which is associated with higher toxicity, similar long-term effects can be achieved with larger NPs (40-60 nm), even in lower concentrations. Because the antimicrobial efficiency of AgNPs larger than 30 nm is mainly ruled by the release of Ag(+) over time and not by the size and number of the AgNPs, this parameter is crucial for the development of efficient antimicrobial coatings on plasma-treated surfaces and contributes to the safety and durability of clothing used in clinical settings. PMID:26057400

  5. Leaves Antimicrobial Activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra L.

    PubMed

    Irani, Mahboubeh; Sarmadi, Marziyeh; Bernard, Françoise; Ebrahimi Pour, Gholam Hossein; Shaker Bazarnov, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) is an important medicinal plant. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of ethanolic and aqueous extracts from licorice leaves were studied compared to root extracts activities. Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans were used as test organisms. Antimicrobial activity was tested by paper disc agar diffusion and serial dilution methods in order to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The root and leave extracts showed activity against Candida albicans, and tested gram-positive bacteria in a dose dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of the leaves was the most active extract against gram-positive bacteria. Its effectiveness against strains provides hope that it can serve as an alternative therapeutic agent. PMID:24381608

  6. Magnesium Based Materials and their Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Duane Allan

    The overall goals of this body of work were to characterize the antimicrobial properties of magnesium (Mg) metal and nano-magnesium oxide (nMgO) in vitro, to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Mg metal, and to incorporate MgO nanoparticles into a polymeric implant coating and evaluate its in vitro antimicrobial properties. In the course of this work it was found that Mg metal, Mg-mesh, and nMgO have in vitro antimicrobial properties that are similar to a bactericidal antibiotic. For Mg metal, the mechanism of this activity appears to be related to an increase in pH (i.e. a more alkaline environment) and not an increase in Mg2+. Given that Mg-mesh is a Mg metal powder, the assumption is that it has the same mechanism of activity as Mg metal. The mechanism of activity for nMgO remains to be elucidated and may be related to a combination of interaction of the nanoparticles with the bacteria and the alkaline pH. It was further demonstrated that supernatants from suspensions of Mg-mesh and nMgO had the same antimicrobial effect as was noted when the particles were used. The supernatant from Mg-mesh and nMgO was also noted to prevent biofilm formation for two Staphylococcus strains. Finally, poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) composites of Mg-mesh (PCL+Mg-mesh) and nMgO (PCL+nMgO) were produced. Coatings applied to screws inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in thin disc format inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in addition to the E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Pure Mg metal was noted to have some cytotoxic effect on murine fibroblast and osteoblast cell lines, although this effect needs to be characterized further. To address the need for an in vivo model for evaluating implant associated infections, a new closed fracture osteomyelitis model in the femur of the rat was developed. Magnesium, a readily available and inexpensive metal was shown to have antimicrobial properties that appear to be related to its corrosion products and

  7. Antimicrobial activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Villar, A; Mares, M; Rios, J L; Canton, E; Gobernado, M

    1987-04-01

    The antimicrobial in vitro activity of 14 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids was investigated by agar diffusion and agar dilution methods against several genera of microorganisms that included Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lysteria, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Shigella, Mycobacterium and Candida. Anolobine was the most active compound against grampositive bacteria with MIC90 between 12 and 50 mg/l; less active were anonaine, lysicamine and liriodenine. All the alkaloids of the noraporphine and oxoaporphine groups, with the exception of isopiline, showed activity against Mycobacterium phlei (MIC 6-25 mg/l). Candida albicans ATCC26555 was inhibited by anonaine, nornantenine and xylopine (MIC 3-12 mg/l). None of the alkaloids tested had a significant activity against gramnegative rods. The action against susceptible microorganisms was bactericidal. PMID:3615557

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on the antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities of Glycyrrhiza glabra root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima Khattak, Khanzadi; James Simpson, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    The efficacy of gamma irradiation as a method of decontamination for food and herbal materials is well established. In the present study, Glycyrrhiza glabra roots were irradiated at doses 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 kGy in a cobalt-60 irradiator. The irradiated and un-irradiated control samples were evaluated for phenolic contents, antimicrobial activities and DPPH scavenging properties. The result of the present study showed that radiation treatment up to 20 kGy does not affect the antifungal and antibacterial activity of the plant. While sample irradiated at 25 kGy does showed changes in the antibacterial activity against some selected pathogens. No significant differences in the phenolic contents were observed for control and samples irradiated at 5, 10 and 15 kGy radiation doses. However, phenolic contents increased in samples treated with 20 and 25 kGy doses. The DPPH scavenging activity significantly ( p<0.05) increased in all irradiated samples of the plant.

  9. IN-VITRO ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF BRONCHOSOL.

    PubMed

    Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Michalak, Anna; Kędzia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bronchosol is a traditional medicinal product in the form of syrup used in cough and impeded expectoration. The active ingredients that it contains include extracts from the herb of thyme, the root of primrose and thymol. It is recommended in disorders of the respiratory tract when expectoration is impeded and secretion of liquid mucus in bronchi is insufficient. Antimicrobial activity of the components of Bronchosol, especially thyme and thymol, has frequently been reported in the literature. To date, there have not been any studies to confirm such activity of Bronchosol, though. The results of our research are the first one to point to the great activity of Bronchosol against microorganisms causing infections of the respiratory tract. It has been demonstrated that this product displayed antimicrobial activity against reference strains as well as strains of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria and fungi isolated from patients. The confirmation of the antimicrobial activity of Bronchosol provides an explanation of its effectiveness in the therapy of the respiratory tract infections. PMID:26642688

  10. Hybrid surfactants decorated with copper ions: aggregation behavior, antimicrobial activity and anti-proliferative effect.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep; Hassan, P A; Aswal, V K

    2016-09-14

    In the present study, the emphasis is laid on the self aggregation behavior of copper based inorganic-organic hybrids in aqueous media. The two complexes, cationic hexadecyl pyridinium trichloro cuprate (1 : 1), [Cp](+)[CuCl3](-), and bishexadecylpyridinium tetrachloro cuprate (2 : 1), [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-), were synthesized using the ligand insertion method. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The copper complexes were found to be thermally stable, and in the solid state, they possessed the perovskite arrangement with [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-) exhibiting superior stability and crystallinity. The self aggregation behavior of the prepared complexes was analyzed in solution phase (in aqueous medium) using surface tension, conductivity, XRD and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the presence of copper as a co-ion in both the stoichiometries results in lower critical micellization concentrations than their precursor. Micellization was thermodynamically spontaneous and micelles formed were ellipsoidal in shape and underwent a prolate ellipsoidal growth with an increase in the concentration of metallosurfactant, as estimated from the SANS. Furthermore, these metallosurfactants were investigated for biocompatibility (using hemolytic assay), antimicrobial activity (fungus and bacteria) and cytotoxicity using human cancerous cells. The hemolysis activity was found to depend on the aggregated state of the metallosurfactants, displaying the highest activity in the monomeric state, and the minimum for post micellar concentrations. The surfactants were found to enhance the antibacterial activity by twofold or more, with the addition of metal in both the stoichiometries. On the contrary, for anticancer and antifungal activities, barely any regular trend or generalization could be obtained

  11. Antimicrobial activity of preparation Bioaron C.

    PubMed

    Gawron-Gzella, Anne; Michalak, Anna; Kędzia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of sirupus Bioaron C, a preparation, whose main ingredient is an extract from the leaves of Aloe arborescens, was tested against different microorganisms isolated from patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The experiments were performed on 40 strains: 20 strains of anaerobic bacteria, 13 strains of aerobic bacteria and 7 strains of yeast-like fungi from the genus Candida and on 18 reference strains (ATCC). The antimicrobial activity of Bioaron C (MBC and MFC) was determined at undiluted concentration. Bioaron C proved to be very effective against the microorganisms causing infections. At the concentration recommended by the producer, the preparation showed biocidal activity (MBC, MFC) against the strains of the pathogenic microorganisms, which cause respiratory infections most frequently, including, among others, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Parvimonas micra, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus anginosus, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, already after 15 min. The MIC of Bioaron C against most of the tested microorganisms was 5 to 100 times lower than the usually applied concentration. The great antimicrobial activity means that the preparation may be used in the prevention and treatment of infections of the upper respiratory tract. Bioaron C may be an alternative or complement to classical therapy, especially in children. PMID:25362808

  12. Antimicrobial activity of honokiol and magnolol isolated from Magnolia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Ho, K Y; Tsai, C C; Chen, C P; Huang, J S; Lin, C C

    2001-03-01

    The antimicrobial activity of honokiol and magnolol, the main constituents of Magnolia officinalis was investigated. The antimicrobial activity was assayed by the agar dilution method using brain heart infusion medium and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determined for each compound using a twofold serial dilution assay. The results showed that honokiol and magnolol have a marked antimicrobial effect (MIC = 25 microg/mL) against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis, but did not show antimicrobial activity (MIC > or = 100 microg/mL) for Shigella flexneii, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicate that honokiol and magnolol, although less potent than tetracycline, show a significant antimicrobial activity for periodontal pathogens. Hence we suggest that honokiol and magnolol might have the potential to be an adjunct in the treatment of periodontitis. PMID:11268114

  13. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Choi, B S; Kwon, K C; Lee, S O; Kwak, H J; Lee, C H

    2000-08-01

    Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue 2 are reported. The synthesis of 2 was accomplished from bisnoralcohol 3. The spermidine moiety was introduced via reductive amination of an appropriately functionalized 3beta-aminosterol with spermidinyl aldehyde 17 utilizing sodium triacetoxyborohydride as the reducing agent. Compound 2 shows weaker antimicrobial activity than squalamine. PMID:11003150

  14. A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

  15. Assessing the antimicrobial activities of Ocins.

    PubMed

    Choyam, Shilja; Lokesh, Dhanashree; Kempaiah, Bettadaiah Bheemakere; Kammara, Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a zone of inhibition on a solid substrate indicates the bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides such as bacteriocin and enterocin. The indicator strain plays a significant role in bacteriocin assays. Other characteristics of bacteriocins, such as their dispersal ability and the different zymogram components, also affect bacteriocin assays. However, universal well diffusion assays for antimicrobials, irrespective of their ability to diffuse (bacteriocin and enterocin), do not exist. The ability of different zymography components to generate non-specific activities have rarely been explored in the literature. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the impact of major factors (diffusion and rate of diffusion) in a solid substrate bioassay, and to document the adverse effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate in zymograms used to estimate the approximate molecular weight of bacteriocins. PMID:26441952

  16. Assessing the antimicrobial activities of Ocins

    PubMed Central

    Choyam, Shilja; Lokesh, Dhanashree; Kempaiah, Bettadaiah Bheemakere; Kammara, Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a zone of inhibition on a solid substrate indicates the bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides such as bacteriocin and enterocin. The indicator strain plays a significant role in bacteriocin assays. Other characteristics of bacteriocins, such as their dispersal ability and the different zymogram components, also affect bacteriocin assays. However, universal well diffusion assays for antimicrobials, irrespective of their ability to diffuse (bacteriocin and enterocin), do not exist. The ability of different zymography components to generate non-specific activities have rarely been explored in the literature. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the impact of major factors (diffusion and rate of diffusion) in a solid substrate bioassay, and to document the adverse effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate in zymograms used to estimate the approximate molecular weight of bacteriocins. PMID:26441952

  17. Effective antimicrobial activity of Cbf-14, derived from a cathelin-like domain, against penicillin-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lingman; Wang, Yanrong; Wang, Mengxiao; Tian, Yuwei; Kang, Wei; Liu, Hanhan; Wang, Hui; Dou, Jie; Zhou, Changlin

    2016-05-01

    Cbf-14, a cationic peptide derived from a cathelin-like domain, was designed by inserting the highly α-helical sequence RLLR into an antibacterial sequence and deleting the inactive amino acids in Cbf-K16. Clinical penicillin-resistant isolates as well as NDM-1-carrying Escherichia coli and a correspondingly infected mice model were employed to evaluate Cbf-14 antibacterial activity. The results showed that Cbf-14 possessed potent antimicrobial effects with an MIC of 8-64 μg/ml, and killed almost all bacteria within 240 min. Cbf-14-treated mice achieved an 80% survival rate and approximate 2.5 log unit reduction in CFU in tissues; additionally, this peptide significantly suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the disaggregation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), suggesting its anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, Cbf-14, concentration higher than 2 × MIC value, increased membrane uptake to NPN and PI dye by 96.2% and 63.7%, respectively, neutralised the negative zeta potential of LPS and bacteria surface, and induced 100% leakage of liposome-entrapped calcein and cytoplasmic membrane disruption of E. coli, indicating obvious membrane permeation. Finally, it bound to DNA and respectively evoked 85.0% and 63.3% inhibition of gene replication and protein expression of NDM-1 at sub-MIC concentration in E. coli BL21 (DE3)-NDM-1. These data indicated that Cbf-14 possessed effective antimicrobial activity against penicillin-resistant bacteria in vitro/vivo through membrane disruption, DNA binding, down-regulating NDM-1 expression by plasmid replication inhibition, and anti-inflammatory activity by LPS disaggregation, suggesting a potential anti-infective clinical agent. PMID:26897538

  18. Antimicrobial activity of garlic against oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Groppo, F C; Ramacciato, J C; Motta, R H L; Ferraresi, P M; Sartoratto, A

    2007-05-01

    The antimicrobial activity of two garlic clones' (1: purple and 2: white) crude extracts against oral microbiota was evaluated in vitro (study 1) and in vivo (study 2). Study 1 consisted of the evaluation of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations against nine streptococci strains. In study 2, a 2.5% garlic (clone 2) solution was used as a mouthwash in a 5-week study by 30 subjects. Blood agar and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar were inoculated with subjects' saliva to quantify oral microorganisms and mutans streptococci. Study 1 showed MIC ranging from 0.5 to 32.0 mg ml(-1) for clone 2 and from 8 to 64.0 mg ml(-1) for clone 1. MBC ranged from 1.0 to 128.0 mg ml(-1) and from 8.0 to 128.0 mg ml(-1) regarding clones 2 and 1 respectively. Study 2 showed that 2.5% garlic mouthwash solution had good antimicrobial activity against mutans streptococci and oral microorganisms. Maintenance of reduced salivary levels of streptococci was observed after 2 weeks at the end of mouthwash use. Unpleasant taste (100%), halitosis (90%) and nausea (30%) were reported by subjects after the end of the study. It was concluded that the garlic clones have antimicrobial properties in vitro against streptococci and anticariogenic properties against oral microorganism in spite of its adverse effects. PMID:17461963

  19. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of Terminalia catappa root.

    PubMed

    Pawar, S P; Pal, S C

    2002-06-01

    The effect against bacteria of petroleum ether (60-80 degrees C), chloroform and methanolic extract of dried root of Terminalia catappa Linn. (combrataceae) was employed by cup plate agar diffusion method. The chloroform extract showed prominent antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and E. coli as compared to other tested microorganisms, while petroleum ether extract was devoid of antimicrobial activity. The methanolic: extract exhibited MIC of 0.065 mg/ml against E. coli. and chloroform extract exhibited MIC of 0.4 mg/ml against S. aureus The chloroform has well as methanolic extracts showed good antimicrobial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms. PMID:12649950

  20. Effects of montmorillonite on properties of methyl cellulose/carvacrol based active antimicrobial nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tunç, Sibel; Duman, Osman; Polat, Tülin Gürkan

    2016-10-01

    The effect of montmorillonite and carvacrol (as an antimicrobial agent) on the wettability, mechanical, gas barrier, thermal and color properties of methyl cellulose-based nanocomposite films was investigated. To make a comparison among the film samples, methyl cellulose (MC) film and methyl cellulose/montmorillonite (MC/MMT) and methyl cellulose/carvacrol/montmorillonite (MC/CRV/MMT) nanocomposite films with different clay concentration were prepared. The interactions among MMT, CRV and film matrix were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. The contact angle value of MC film showed an increase of 2.5 fold with the incorporation of 60wt.% MMT into the film matrix. The addition of clay into the film matrix increased the melting point of MC film and improved the mechanical properties of film material. The tensile stress of pure MC film exhibited an increase of 9.2MPa in the presence of 60wt.% MMT. With the addition of MMT into the film matrixes, water vapor permeability values of MC film and MC/CRV film were decreased by 28% and 13%, respectively. The incorporation of 60wt.% MMT into the film matrix caused to a decrease of 47 fold for MC film and 16 fold for MC/CRV film in the oxygen permeability of film sample. The addition of CRV into MC film and MC/MMT nanocomposite films with different clay concentration reduced the mechanical strengths of film materials. Oxygen permeability values of MC film and MC/MMT nanocomposite films decreased with the inclusion of CRV into the film matrix. PMID:27312637

  1. The effect of standard heat and filtration processing procedures on antimicrobial activity and hydrogen peroxide levels in honey

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cuilan; Campbell, Leona T.; Blair, Shona E.; Carter, Dee A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the antimicrobial properties of honey. In most honey types, antimicrobial activity is due to the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but this can vary greatly among samples. Honey is a complex product and other components may modulate activity, which can be further affected by commercial processing procedures. In this study we examined honey derived from three native Australian floral sources that had previously been associated with H2O2-dependent activity. Antibacterial activity was seen in four red stringybark samples only, and ranged from 12 to 21.1% phenol equivalence against Staphylococcus aureus. Antifungal activity ranged from MIC values of 19–38.3% (w/v) against Candida albicans, and all samples were significantly more active than an osmotically equivalent sugar solution. All honey samples were provided unprocessed and following commercial processing. Processing was usually detrimental to antimicrobial activity, but occasionally the reverse was seen and activity increased. H2O2 levels varied from 0 to 1017 μM, and although samples with no H2O2 had little or no antimicrobial activity, some samples had relatively high H2O2 levels yet no antimicrobial activity. In samples where H2O2 was detected, the correlation with antibacterial activity was greater in the processed than in the unprocessed samples, suggesting other factors present in the honey influence this activity and are sensitive to heat treatment. Antifungal activity did not correlate with the level of H2O2 in honey samples, and overall it appeared that H2O2 alone was not sufficient to inhibit C. albicans. We conclude that floral source and H2O2 levels are not reliable predictors of the antimicrobial activity of honey, which currently can only be assessed by standardized antimicrobial testing. Heat processing should be reduced where possible, and honey destined for medicinal use should be retested post-processing to ensure that activity levels have not changed

  2. ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECT OF INTRACANAL SUBSTANCES

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Cláudia de Moura; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Lage-Marques, José Luiz

    2007-01-01

    In some situations, endodontic infections do not respond to therapeutic protocol. In these cases, it is suggested the administration of an alternative intracanal medication that presents a wide spectrum of action and has an in-depth effect on the root canal system. The purpose of this study was to assess the antimicrobial action of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and polyethylene glycol and natrosol vehicles with different associations and concentrations. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by using the agar dilution method. The culture media (Müller-Hinton agar) were prepared containing antimicrobial agents at multiple two-fold dilutions of 0.25 to 16 µg/mL, and with the vehicles at the concentrations of 50, 45, 40, 35, 30 and 25%. Twenty-three microbial strains were selected for the study. Metronidazole was not capable of eliminating any of the tested microorganisms. The association of ciprofloxacin with metronidazole resulted in a reduction of the MIC. The vehicle polyethylene glycol inhibited the growth of 100% of the tested strains, while natrosol inhibited 18% of the strains. Ciprofloxacin formulations with polyethylene glycol presented better effects than those of formulations to which metronidazole was added. It was possible to conclude that ciprofloxacin presented antimicrobial action against all tested bacterial strains, and its association with metronidazole was synergic. The vehicle polyethylene glycol showed antimicrobial effect and the ciprofloxacin/polyethylene glycol association was the most effective combination for reducing the tested bacteria and yeasts. PMID:19089178

  3. Antimicrobial Activity against Intraosteoblastic Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Riffard, Natacha; Tasse, Jason; Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Chidiac, Christian; Vandenesch, François; Ferry, Tristan; Laurent, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus persistence in osteoblasts, partly as small-colony variants (SCVs), can contribute to bone and joint infection (BJI) relapses, the intracellular activity of antimicrobials is not currently considered in the choice of treatment strategies for BJI. Here, antistaphylococcal antimicrobials were evaluated for their intraosteoblastic activity and their impact on the intracellular emergence of SCVs in an ex vivo osteoblast infection model. Osteoblastic MG63 cells were infected for 2 h with HG001 S. aureus. After killing the remaining extracellular bacteria with lysostaphin, infected cells were incubated for 24 h with antimicrobials at the intraosseous concentrations reached with standard therapeutic doses. Intracellular bacteria and SCVs were then quantified by plating cell lysates. A bactericidal effect was observed with fosfomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, oxacillin, rifampin, ofloxacin, and clindamycin, with reductions in the intracellular inocula of −2.5, −3.1, −3.9, −4.2, −4.9, −4.9, and −5.2 log10 CFU/100,000 cells, respectively (P < 10−4). Conversely, a bacteriostatic effect was observed with ceftaroline and teicoplanin, whereas vancomycin and daptomycin had no significant impact on intracellular bacterial growth. Ofloxacin, daptomycin, and vancomycin significantly limited intracellular SCV emergence. Overall, ofloxacin was the only molecule to combine an excellent intracellular activity while limiting the emergence of SCVs. These data provide a basis for refining the choice of antibiotics to prioritise in the management of BJI, justifying the combination of a fluoroquinolone for its intracellular activity with an anti-biofilm molecule, such as rifampin. PMID:25605365

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Epilobium spp. extracts.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, L; Tita, B; Evandri, M G; Mazzanti, G

    2001-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the Epilobium angustifolium, E. hirsutum, E. palustre, E. tetragonum and E. rosmarinifolium ethanolic extracts was studied in vitro on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was also evaluated using the Artemia salina test. All the extracts showed antimicrobial activity in a range of concentrations between 10 and 650 microgml of dry extract. E. angustifolium and E. rosmarinifolium had the most broad spectrum of action inhibiting bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The extracts were devoid of toxicity on Artemia salina within the range of antimicrobial concentrations, suggesting that the action is selective on microorganisms. PMID:11482755

  5. Photodynamic antimicrobial activity of hypocrellin A.

    PubMed

    Su, Yujie; Sun, Jun; Rao, Shengqi; Cai, Yujie; Yang, Yanjun

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy is a recently developed therapeutic option that combines a non-toxic photosensitizer with harmless visible light to damage the microbial cell. Hypocrellin A (HA), a natural occurring lipid-soluble perylenequinone pigment, has gained considerable interest since its anticancer and antiviral activities have been reported. Here, we examined the antimicrobial activity of HA against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium). The results indicate that HA has a photodynamic antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria when CaCl(2) or MgCl(2) was employed. A loose binding has been established between HA and the organisms. Molecular oxygen is significantly involved in the photodynamic action of HA. Furthermore, HA maintains a photodynamic activity in terms of both types I and II reactions. Our results confirm the potential of HA to be used as a photosensitizer in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. PMID:21300554

  6. The effect of copper(II), iron(II) sulphate, and vitamin C combinations on the weak antimicrobial activity of (+)-catechin against Staphylococcus aureus and other microbes.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Andrew C; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Gould, Simon W J; Fielder, Mark D; Naughton, Declan P; Kelly, Alison F

    2012-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to improve the activity of plant compounds with low antimicrobial efficacy. (+)-Catechin, a weak antimicrobial tea flavanol, was combined with putative adjuncts and tested against different species of bacteria. Copper(II) sulphate enhanced (+)-catechin activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis or Escherichia coli. Attempts to raise the activity of (+)-catechin against two unresponsive species, S. aureus and E. coli, with iron(II) sulphate, iron(III) chloride, and vitamin C, showed that iron(II) enhanced (+)-catechin against S. aureus, but not E. coli; neither iron(III) nor combined iron(II) and copper(II), enhanced (+)-catechin activity against either species. Vitamin C enhanced copper(II) containing combinations against both species in the absence of iron(II). Catalase or EDTA added to active samples removed viability effects suggesting that active mixtures had produced H(2)O(2)via the action of added metal(II) ions. H(2)O(2) generation by (+)-catechin plus copper(II) mixtures and copper(II) alone could account for the principal effect of bacterial growth inhibition following 30 minute exposures as well as the antimicrobial effect of (+)-catechin-iron(II) against S. aureus. These novel findings about a weak antimicrobial flavanol contrast with previous knowledge of more active flavanols with transition metal combinations. Weak antimicrobial compounds like (+)-catechin within enhancement mixtures may therefore be used as efficacious agents. (+)-Catechin may provide a means of lowering copper(II) or iron(II) contents in certain crop protection and other products. PMID:23138340

  7. Hurdle Effect of Antimicrobial Activity Achieved by Time Differential Releasing of Nisin and Chitosan Hydrolysates from Bacterial Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hui-Ling; Lin, Shih-Bin; Chen, Li-Chen; Chen, Hui-Huang

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the combined antimicrobial effect of nisin and chitosan hydrolysates (CHs) by regulating the antimicrobial reaction order of substances due to differential releasing rate from hydroxypropylmethylcellulose-modified bacterial cellulose (HBC). The minimum inhibitory concentration of nisin against Staphylococcus aureus and that of CHs against Escherichia coli were 6 IU and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Hurdle and additive effects in antimicrobial tests were observed when nisin was used 6 h before CH treatment against S. aureus; similar effects were observed when CH was used before nisin treatment against E. coli. Simultaneously combined treatment of nisin and CHs exhibited the low antimicrobial effect. HBC was then selected as the carrier for the controlled release of nisin and CHs. A 90% inhibition in the growth of S. aureus and E. coli was achieved when 30 IU-nisin-containing HBC and 62.5 μg/mL-CH-containing HBC were used simultaneously. The controlled release of nisin and CHs by using HBC minimized the interaction between nisin and CHs as well as increased the number of microbial targets. PMID:27074534

  8. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity and Effect on Biofilm Production of a White Grape Juice (Vitis vinifera) Extract

    PubMed Central

    Filocamo, Angela; Bisignano, Carlo; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of a white grape juice extract (WGJe) against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, and the fungus Aspergillus niger. WGJe was also tested on the production of bacterial biofilms in vitro. Results. WGJe inhibited in vitro most Gram-positive bacteria tested, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P being the most sensitive strain (MIC values of 3.9 μg/mL). The effect was bactericidal at the concentration of 500 μg/mL. Amongst the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli was the only susceptible strain (MIC and MBC of 2000 μg/mL). No effect on the growth of Candida sp. and the fungus Aspergillus niger was detected (MIC values > 2000 μg/mL). WGJe inhibited the biofilms formation of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a dose-dependent effect. Conclusions. WGJe exerted both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity in vitro. The presented results could be used to develop novel strategies for the treatment of skin infections and against potential respiratory pathogens. PMID:26770255

  9. The effects of silver nanoparticles on antimicrobial activity of ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM)

    PubMed Central

    Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Izadi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background Although, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and new experimental cement (CEM) are good root filling cements, but had no or low antimicrobial activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of addition of silver nanoparticles (SNP) to these two cements on antimicrobial effects against five most dental infection related microorganisms. Material and Methods Two suspensions of 100 and 200 ppm of SNP were prepared and 180 μl of microbial suspension with 1.5 × 108 CFU/ml of each respected microorganisms were re-suspended in deionized water or each of SNP suspensions. After that, 60 μg of MTA and CEM were added to each tube. In one tube, the mixture of all above mentioned microorganisms were added as a source of microorganism. Colonies were counted after 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours intervals of incubation at 35°C on blood agar for evaluation of antimicrobial efficacy. Results MTA and CEM had antibacterial activities on all microorganisms’ strains except for Enterococcus faecalis and mixture group. MTA had better antibacterial activity than CEM but the difference was not significant (p<0.05). The combination of SNP with two cements resulted in significantly higher antimicrobial activities (p<0.05). Also, there was no statistically significant difference between two SNP concentrations (p>0.05). Conclusions Mixture of MTA and CEM with different concentrations of SNP significantly increased the antibacterial activity. Key words:Mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium-enriched mixture, silver nanoparticle, antimicrobial activity. PMID:26855701

  10. A new cryptic cationic antimicrobial peptide from human apolipoprotein E with antibacterial activity and immunomodulatory effects on human cells.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Sgambati, Valeria; Zanfardino, Anna; Smaldone, Giovanni; Cafaro, Valeria; Angrisano, Tiziana; Pedone, Emilia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Capasso, Domenica; Haney, Evan F; Izzo, Viviana; Varcamonti, Mario; Notomista, Eugenio; Hancock, Robert E W; Di Donato, Alberto; Pizzo, Elio

    2016-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) possess fast and broad-spectrum activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as fungi. It has become increasingly evident that many AMPs, including those that derive from fragments of host proteins, are multifunctional and able to mediate various immunomodulatory functions and angiogenesis. Among these, synthetic apolipoprotein-derived peptides are safe and well tolerated in humans and have emerged as promising candidates in the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. Here, we report the characterization of a new AMP corresponding to residues 133-150 of human apolipoprotein E. Our results show that this peptide, produced either by chemical synthesis or by recombinant techniques in Escherichia coli, possesses a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. As shown for several other AMPs, ApoE (133-150) is structured in the presence of TFE and of membrane-mimicking agents, like SDS, or bacterial surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and an anionic polysaccharide, alginate, which mimics anionic capsular exo-polysaccharides of several pathogenic microorganisms. Noteworthy, ApoE (133-150) is not toxic toward several human cell lines and triggers a significant innate immune response, assessed either as decreased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines in differentiated THP-1 monocytic cells or by the induction of chemokines released from PBMCs. This novel bioactive AMP also showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on human keratinocytes, suggesting its potential use as a model for designing new immunomodulatory therapeutics. PMID:27028511

  11. Peptides and proteins with antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Lôbo, Katiuscia Menezes; Bezerra, Denise Aline Casimiro; Lôbo, Inalzuir

    2008-01-01

    The increase of microbial resistance to antibiotics has led to a continuing search for newer and more effective drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are generally found in animals, plants, and microorganisms and are of great interest to medicine, pharmacology, and the food industry. These peptides are capable of inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms. They can attack parasites, while causing little or no harm to the host cells. The defensins are peptides found in granules in the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and are responsible for the defense of the organism. Several animal defensins, like dermaseptin, antileukoprotease, protegrin, and others, have had their activities and efficacy tested and been shown to be effective against bacteria, fungi, and protists; there are also specific defensins from invertebrates, e.g., drosomycin and heliomicin; from plants, e.g., the types A and B; and the bacteriocins, e.g., acrocin, marcescin, etc. The aim of the present work was to compile a comprehensive bibliographic review of the diverse potentially antimicrobial peptides in an effort to systematize the current knowledge on these substances as a contribution for further researches. The currently available bibliography does not give a holistic approach on this subject. The present work intends to show that the mechanism of defense represented by defensins is promising from the perspective of its application in the treatment of infectious diseases in human, animals and plants. PMID:21264153

  12. Temporin L: antimicrobial, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities, and effects on membrane permeabilization in lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Andrea C; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Rufo, Anna; Luzi, Carla; Barra, Donatella; Zhao, Hongxia; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Bozzi, Argante; Di Giulio, Antonio; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    The temporins are a family of small, linear antibiotic peptides with intriguing biological properties. We investigated the antibacterial, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities of temporin L (FVQWFSKFLGRIL-NH2), isolated from the skin of the European red frog Rana temporaria. The peptide displayed the highest activity of temporins studied to date, against both human erythrocytes and bacterial and fungal strains. At variance with other known temporins, which are mainly active against Gram-positive bacteria, temporin L was also active against Gram-negative strains such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa A.T.C.C. 15692 and Escherichia coli D21 at concentrations comparable with those that are microbiocidal to Gram-positive bacteria. In addition, temporin L was cytotoxic to three different human tumour cell lines (Hut-78, K-562 and U-937), causing a necrosis-like cell death, although sensitivity to the peptide varied markedly with the specific cell line tested. A study of the interaction of temporin L with liposomes of different lipid compositions revealed that the peptide causes perturbation of bilayer integrity of both neutral and negatively charged membranes, as revealed by the release of a vesicle-encapsulated fluorescent marker, and that the action of the peptide is modulated to some extent by membrane lipid composition. In particular, the presence of negatively charged lipids in the model bilayer inhibits the lytic power of temporin L. We also show that the release of fluorescent markers caused by temporin L is size-dependent and that the peptide does not have a detergent-like effect on the membrane, suggesting that perturbation of bilayer organization takes place on a local scale, i.e. through the formation of pore-like openings. PMID:12133008

  13. In vitro screening of mare's milk antimicrobial effect and antiproliverative activity.

    PubMed

    Guri, Anilda; Paligot, Michele; Crèvecoeur, Sebastien; Piedboeuf, Benoit; Claes, Jonathan; Daube, Georges; Corredig, Milena; Griffiths, M W; Delcenserie, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effect of mare's milk on virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and observe its potential activity on proliferation of adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Different supernatants of mare's milk, raw or heat-treated at 65°C for 15 s or 30 min, were studied. The changes in hilA gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium in presence of mare's milk supernatants were assessed using a reporter luminescent strain. A significant decrease in hilA gene expression was observed with all tested supernatants. Virulence gene expression was then assessed using qPCR on a wild-type strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. A significant decrease of hilA and ssrB2 gene expression was observed with raw milk supernatants but not with heat-treated supernatants. The same supernatants were administered to Caco-2 cells to measure their proliferation rate. A significant reduction of proliferative effect was observed only with raw milk supernatants. This study reports that raw mare's milk was able to modulate virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and exerts antiproliferative effects on Caco-2 cells. These results may offer new approaches for promoting gastrointestinal health. PMID:26656278

  14. Access to effective antimicrobials: a worldwide challenge.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Matsoso, Precious; Pant, Suraj; Brower, Charles; Røttingen, John-Arne; Klugman, Keith; Davies, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen substantial improvements in life expectancy and access to antimicrobials, especially in low-income and lower-middle-income countries, but increasing pathogen resistance to antimicrobials threatens to roll back this progress. Resistant organisms in health-care and community settings pose a threat to survival rates from serious infections, including neonatal sepsis and health-care-associated infections, and limit the potential health benefits from surgeries, transplants, and cancer treatment. The challenge of simultaneously expanding appropriate access to antimicrobials, while restricting inappropriate access, particularly to expensive, newer generation antimicrobials, is unique in global health and requires new approaches to financing and delivering health care and a one-health perspective on the connections between pathogen transmission in animals and humans. Here, we describe the importance of effective antimicrobials. We assess the disease burden caused by limited access to antimicrobials, attributable to resistance to antimicrobials, and the potential effect of vaccines in restricting the need for antibiotics. PMID:26603918

  15. Effect of Different Obturation Materials on Residual Antimicrobial Activity of 2% Chlorhexidine in Dentin at Different Time Intervals: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Bolhari, Behnam; Dehghan, Somayyeh; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Bahador, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE on residual antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (CHX) in human root dentin and suggest the best filling material when CHX is used as final irrigant. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty-four single-rooted human teeth were selected for this study. Canals were instrumented to the apical size #35. Smear layer was removed using 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA and then 108 teeth were irrigated with 2% CHX and randomly divided into three groups of gutta percha/AH26, Resilon/RealSeal SE and positive controls. Each group was divided into three subgroups for different time intervals (one, three and six weeks). Thirty-six teeth, as negative controls, were irrigated with saline and obturated with gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE. Dentin powder was prepared at the afore-mentioned intervals. After exposure to Enterococcus faecalis for 24 hours, colony forming units (CFUs) were counted and residual antimicrobial activity was calculated. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and one-way ANOVA. The significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: The antimicrobial activity of CHX gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner but it maintained over 95% of its antimicrobial activity after six weeks. Moreover, Resilon/RealSeal SE significantly decreased the antimicrobial activity of CHX in comparison with gutta-percha/AH26 (P<0.05). Conclusion: After a final irrigation with CHX, gutta-percha/AH26 is a better choice for root canal obturation. PMID:27252755

  16. Antimicrobial activity of polycationic peptides.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Barchiesi, F; Del Prete, M S; Scalise, G

    1999-11-01

    The in vitro activity of six polycationic peptides, buforin II, cecropin P1, indolicidin, magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin, were evaluated against several clinical isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic bacteria, yeasts, Pneumocystis carinii and Cryptosporidium parvum, by using microbroth dilution methods. The peptides exhibited different antibacterial activities and rapid time-dependent killing. The gram-negative organisms were more susceptible to buforin II and cecropin P1, whereas buforin II and ranalexin were the most active compounds against the gram-positive strains. Similarly, ranalexin showed the highest activity against Candida spp., whereas magainin II exerted the highest anticryptococcal activity. Finally, the peptides showed high anti-Pneumocystis activity, whereas no compound had strong inhibitory effect on C. parvum. PMID:10612440

  17. The Antimicrobial Activity of Porphyrin Attached Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lesley

    2008-03-01

    We are interested in testing the antimicrobial activity of a porphyrin that is attached to a polymer. The porphyrin (5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-pryridyl)) was synthesized from methyl 4-formyl benzoate, 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, and pyrrole and attached to a copolymer of polystyrene/poly(vinyl benzyl chloride), which was synthesized by free radical polymerization. The antimicrobial activity of the polymer-attached porphyrin was then determined for gram-negative E. Coli grown to 0.80 OD. In this procedure, glass slides were coated with polymer-attached porphyrin via dip-coating, and the E. Coli bacteria were plated in Luria Broth media. The plates were subsequently exposed to light overnight before they were incubated as porphyrins act as photo-sensitizers when irradiated with light. The polymer-attached porphyrin did exhibit antimicrobial activity and parameters that affect its efficiency will be discussed.

  18. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships. PMID:25429559

  19. Multidrug Pump Inhibitors Uncover Remarkable Activity of Plant Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Tegos, George; Stermitz, Frank R.; Lomovskaya, Olga; Lewis, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Plant antimicrobials are not used as systemic antibiotics at present. The main reason for this is their low level of activity, especially against gram-negative bacteria. The reported MIC is often in the range of 100 to 1,000 μg/ml, orders of magnitude higher than those of common broad-spectrum antibiotics from bacteria or fungi. Major plant pathogens belong to the gram-negative bacteria, which makes the low level of activity of plant antimicrobials against this group of microorganisms puzzling. Gram-negative bacteria have an effective permeability barrier, comprised of the outer membrane, which restricts the penetration of amphipathic compounds, and multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs), which extrude toxins across this barrier. It is possible that the apparent ineffectiveness of plant antimicrobials is largely due to the permeability barrier. We tested this hypothesis in the present study by applying a combination of MDR mutants and MDR inhibitors. A panel of plant antimicrobials was tested by using a set of bacteria representing the main groups of plant pathogens. The human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were also tested. The results show that the activities of the majority of plant antimicrobials were considerably greater against the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus megaterium and that disabling of the MDRs in gram-negative species leads to a striking increase in antimicrobial activity. Thus, the activity of rhein, the principal antimicrobial from rhubarb, was potentiated 100- to 2,000-fold (depending on the bacterial species) by disabling the MDRs. Comparable potentiation of activity was observed with plumbagin, resveratrol, gossypol, coumestrol, and berberine. Direct measurement of the uptake of berberine, a model plant antimicrobial, confirmed that disabling of the MDRs strongly increases the level of penetration of berberine into the cells of gram-negative bacteria. These

  20. Antimicrobial activity of different Finnish monofloral honeys against human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Sanna; Riihinen, Kaisu; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity and phenolic compounds of five Finnish honey products against important human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus were analyzed. Microbroth dilution method and HPLC-DAD were used in antimicrobial testing and phenolic compound determination, respectively. Significant antimicrobial activity (p < 0.01) against all the tested pathogens was found from willow herb (Epilobium angustifolium), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) honeys. This is the first report on antimicrobial activity of Finnish monofloral honeys against streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria. To our knowledge this is also the first report on the antimicrobial effect of honey against S. pneumoniae. PMID:23278378

  1. Antimicrobial activity of different Finnish monofloral honeys against human pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Sanna; Riihinen, Kaisu; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2013-09-01

    The antimicrobial activity and phenolic compounds of five Finnish honey products against important human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus were analyzed. Microbroth dilution method and HPLC-DAD were used in antimicrobial testing and phenolic compound determination, respectively. Significant antimicrobial activity (p < 0.01) against all the tested pathogens was found from willow herb (Epilobium angustifolium), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) honeys. This is the first report on antimicrobial activity of Finnish monofloral honeys against streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria. To our knowledge this is also the first report on the antimicrobial effect of honey against S. pneumoniae. PMID:23278378

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Protamine against Oral Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Sang Moo; Lee, Si Young

    2015-01-01

    Protamine is an arginine-rich polycationic protein extracted from sperm cells of vertebrates including fishes such as salmon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the suppressive effects of protamine on the growth of oral pathogens for possible usage in dental materials. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by the microdilution method. Twelve strains of oral viridans streptococci, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Candida albicans were suppressed by protamine. MIC and MBC values were between 0.009 ~ 20 mg/mL and 0.019 ~ 80 mg/mL, respectively. The bactericidal activities of protamine against susceptible bacterial species were dependent on the concentration of protamine and incubation time. Based on the results of this study, protamine would be a useful compound for the development of antimicrobial agents against oral pathogens in dental materials. PMID:26699859

  3. Use of rosemary, oregano, and a commercial blend of essential oils in broiler chickens: in vitro antimicrobial activities and effects on growth performance.

    PubMed

    Mathlouthi, N; Bouzaienne, T; Oueslati, I; Recoquillay, F; Hamdi, M; Urdaci, M; Bergaoui, R

    2012-03-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 3 essential oils [oregano, rosemary, and a commercial blend of essential oils (BEO)] against pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and to evaluate their effects on broiler chicken performances. The chemical composition of the essential oils was determined using the gas chromatography interfaced with a mass spectroscopy. The disc diffusion method, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were applied for the determination of antimicrobial activities of essential oils. In vivo study, a total of seven hundred fifty 1-d-old male broiler chickens were assigned to 6 dietary treatment groups: basal diet (control; CON), CON + 44 mg of avilamycin/kg (A), CON + 100 mg of rosemary essential oil/kg (ROS), CON + 100 mg of oregano essential oil/kg (OR), CON + 50 mg of rosemary and 50 mg of oregano essential oils/kg (RO), and CON + 1,000 mg of BEO/kg (essential oil mixture, EOM). The essential oils isolated from rosemary and oregano were characterized by their greater content of 1,8-cineole (49.99%) and carvacrol (69.55%), respectively. The BEO was mainly represented by the aldehyde (cinnamaldehyde) and the monoterpene (1,8-cineole) chemical groups. The results of the disc diffusion method indicated that the rosemary essential oil had antibacterial activity (P ≤ 0.05) against only 3 pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli (8 mm), Salmonella indiana (11 mm), and Listeria innocua (9 mm). The essential oil of oregano had antimicrobial activities (P ≤ 0.05) on the same bacteria as rosemary but also on Staphylococcus aureus (22 mm) and Bacillus subtilis (12 mm). Oregano essential oil had greater (P ≤ 0.05) antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria than rosemary essential oil but they had no synergism between them. The BEO showed an increased antimicrobial activity (P ≤ 0.05) against all studied bacteria (pathogenic and

  4. Bacillus clausii probiotic strains: antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Pinchuk, Irina

    2004-07-01

    The clinical benefits observed with probiotic use are mainly attributed to the antimicrobial substances produced by probiotic strains and to their immunomodulatory effects. Currently, the best-documented probiotic bacteria used in human therapy are lactic acid bacteria. In contrast, studies aiming to characterize the mechanisms responsible for the probiotic beneficial effects of Bacillus are rare. The current work seeks to contribute to such characterization by evaluating the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities of probiotic B. clausii strains. B. clausii strains release antimicrobial substances in the medium. Moreover, the release of these antimicrobial substances was observed during stationary growth phase and coincided with sporulation. These substances were active against Gram-positive bacteria, in particular against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, and Clostridium difficile. The antimicrobial activity was resistant to subtilisin, proteinase K, and chymotrypsin treatment, whereas it was sensitive to pronase treatment. The evaluation of the immunomodulatory properties of probiotic B. clausii strains was performed in vitro on Swiss and C57 Bl/6j murine cells. The authors demonstrate that these strains, in their vegetative forms, are able to induce NOS II synthetase activity, IFN-gamma production, and CD4 T-cell proliferation. PMID:15220667

  5. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of pleurocidin against cariogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Tao, Rui; Tong, Zhongchun; Lin, Yuan; Xue, Yunpeng; Wang, Wei; Kuang, Rong; Wang, Ping; Tian, Yu; Ni, Longxing

    2011-08-01

    Dental caries is a common oral bacterial infectious disease of global concern. Prevention and treatment of caries requires control of the dental plaque formed by pathogens such as Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Pleurocidin, produced by Pleuronectes americanus, is an antimicrobial peptide that exerts broad-spectrum activity against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Moreover, pleurocidin shows less hemolysis and is less toxic than other natural peptides. In the present study, we investigated whether pleurocidin is an effective antibiotic peptide against common cariogenic microorganisms and performed a preliminary study of the antimicrobial mechanism. We assayed minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal bactericide concentration (MBC) and bactericidal kinetics and performed a spot-on-lawn assay. The BioFlux system was used to generate bacterial biofilms under controllable flow. Fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were used to analyze and observe biofilms. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the bacterial membrane. MIC and MBC results showed that pleurocidin had different antimicrobial activities against the tested oral strains. Although components of saliva could affect antimicrobial activity, pleurocidin dissolved in saliva still showed antimicrobial effects against oral microorganisms. Furthermore, pleurocidin showed a favorable killing effect against BioFlux flow biofilms in vitro. Our findings suggest that pleurocidin has the potential to kill dental biofilms and prevent dental caries. PMID:21703317

  6. [Antimicrobial activity of cefodizime against clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Ishihara, R; Ishii, Y; Nakazawa, A; Deguchi, K; Matsumoto, Y; Nishinari, C; Nakane, Y; Fukumoto, T

    1996-10-01

    In order to evaluate antimicrobial activity of cefodizime (CDZM), minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CDZM and control drugs were determined against clinical isolates collected from nation-wide medical institutions and in our laboratory from September to December of 1992 and from September to December of 1995. The results are summarized as follows: 1. Bacterial species with no or few strains resistant to CDZM included Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Citrobacter koseri, Proteus mirabilis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The range of MIC values of CDZM against Klebsiella pneumoniae was spread. Other strains, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella subgenus Branhamella catarrhalis, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Providencia spp., Peptostreptococcus spp. and Bacteroides fragilis group were resistant to cephems including CDZM. 2. The MIC90's of CDZM were 0.05 approximately 3.13 micrograms/ml against Streptococcus spp., H. influenzae, M. (B.) catarrhalis, E. coli, Klebsiella spp., P. mirabilis, N. gonorrhoeae and Peptostreptococcus spp. obtained in 1995 that were frequently found in daily treatment of infections. It appears that the effectiveness of CDZM was still relatively high against community-acquired infections. 3. Among H. influenzae isolates included imipenem (IPM)-resistant and norfloxacin (NFLX)-resistant strains. The MIC-range of CDZM against strains collected in 1995 including IPM-resistant and NFLX-resistant strains was < or = 0.025 approximately 0.1 microgram/ml, and MIC90 against these strains was 0.05 microgram/ml. CDZM showed strong antimicrobial activities against H. influenzae strains resistant to carbapenems and new-quinolones. PMID:8986558

  7. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Different Antimicrobial Peptides against a Range of Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ebbensgaard, Anna; Mordhorst, Hanne; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Nielsen, Claus Gyrup; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hansen, Egon Bech

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of a Selected Set of Antimicrobial Peptides The rapid emergence of resistance to classical antibiotics has increased the interest in novel antimicrobial compounds. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent an attractive alternative to classical antibiotics and a number of different studies have reported antimicrobial activity data of various AMPs, but there is only limited comparative data available. The mode of action for many AMPs is largely unknown even though several models have suggested that the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play a crucial role in the attraction and attachment of the AMP to the bacterial membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. We compared the potency of Cap18, Cap11, Cap11-1-18m2, Cecropin P1, Cecropin B, Bac2A, Bac2A-NH2, Sub5-NH2, Indolicidin, Melittin, Myxinidin, Myxinidin-NH2, Pyrrhocoricin, Apidaecin and Metalnikowin I towards Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas salmonicida, Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia ruckeri by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations. Additional characteristics such as cytotoxicity, thermo and protease stability were measured and compared among the different peptides. Further, the antimicrobial activity of a selection of cationic AMPs was investigated in various E. coli LPS mutants. Cap18 Shows a High Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity Of all the tested AMPs, Cap18 showed the most efficient antimicrobial activity, in particular against Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, Cap18 is highly thermostable and showed no cytotoxic effect in a hemolytic assay, measured at the concentration used. However, Cap18 is, as most of the tested AMPs, sensitive to proteolytic digestion in vitro. Thus, Cap18 is an excellent candidate for further development into practical use; however, modifications that should reduce the protease sensitivity would be needed. In addition, our

  8. Antistaphylococcal Activity of Oritavancin and Its Synergistic Effect in Combination with Other Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gengrong; Pankuch, Glenn; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Oritavancin exhibited in vitro activity against 169 strains of vancomycin-susceptible, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with MICs ranging from 0.03 to 1 μg/ml and against vancomycin-intermediate MRSA (VISA; n = 29), heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate MRSA (hVISA; n = 5), and vancomycin-resistant MRSA (n = 5) strains, with MICs ranging from 0.12 to 4 μg/ml. For 10 MRSA isolates comprising 5 VISA and 5 hVISA strains, synergy between oritavancin and gentamicin, linezolid, or rifampin was observed against most of the strains tested using a time-kill method. PMID:25022588

  9. Antimicrobial activity of magnolol and honokiol against periodontopathic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chang, B; Lee, Y; Ku, Y; Bae, K; Chung, C

    1998-05-01

    Magnolol (1) and honokiol (2), main compounds from the stem bark of Magnolia obovata Thunb., were evaluated for an antimicrobial activity against periodontopathic microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella gingivalis, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, and Veillonella disper, and a cytotoxicity against human gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Our results indicate that magnolol and honokiol, although less potent than chlorhexidine, show a significant antimicrobial activity against these microorganisms, and a relatively low cytotoxic effect on human gingival cells. Thus, it is suggested that magnolol and honokiol may have a potential therapeutic use as a safe oral antiseptic for the prevention and the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:9619121

  10. Combination Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guozhi; Baeder, Desiree Y.; Regoes, Roland R.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient and conserved across the tree of life. Their efficacy over evolutionary time has been largely attributed to their mechanisms of killing. Yet, the understanding of their pharmacodynamics both in vivo and in vitro is very limited. This is, however, crucial for applications of AMPs as drugs and also informs the understanding of the action of AMPs in natural immune systems. Here, we selected six different AMPs from different organisms to test their individual and combined effects in vitro. We analyzed their pharmacodynamics based on the Hill function and evaluated the interaction of combinations of two and three AMPs. Interactions of AMPs in our study were mostly synergistic, and three-AMP combinations displayed stronger synergism than two-AMP combinations. This suggests synergism to be a common phenomenon in AMP interaction. Additionally, AMPs displayed a sharp increase in killing within a narrow dose range, contrasting with those of antibiotics. We suggest that our results could lead a way toward better evaluation of AMP application in practice and shed some light on the evolutionary consequences of antimicrobial peptide interactions within the immune system of organisms. PMID:26729502

  11. Poisson Parameters of Antimicrobial Activity: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sestraş, Radu E.; Jäntschi, Lorentz; Bolboacă, Sorana D.

    2012-01-01

    A contingency of observed antimicrobial activities measured for several compounds vs. a series of bacteria was analyzed. A factor analysis revealed the existence of a certain probability distribution function of the antimicrobial activity. A quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis for the overall antimicrobial ability was conducted using the population statistics associated with identified probability distribution function. The antimicrobial activity proved to follow the Poisson distribution if just one factor varies (such as chemical compound or bacteria). The Poisson parameter estimating antimicrobial effect, giving both mean and variance of the antimicrobial activity, was used to develop structure-activity models describing the effect of compounds on bacteria and fungi species. Two approaches were employed to obtain the models, and for every approach, a model was selected, further investigated and found to be statistically significant. The best predictive model for antimicrobial effect on bacteria and fungi species was identified using graphical representation of observed vs. calculated values as well as several predictive power parameters. PMID:22606039

  12. Antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Jeana M.E.; Chang, Marilene R.; Brito, Daniela Z.; Farias, Katyuce S.; Damasceno-Junior, Geraldo A.; Turatti, Izabel C.C.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Santos, Edson A.; Carollo, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima - an abundant plant from the Brazilian Pantanal region - against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The crude extracts and fractions showed activity in all tested microorganisms. The chloroform fraction of the leaves and roots showed the most antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, with an MIC of 500 μg/mL. This fraction was submitted to bioautographic assays to characterize the activity of the compounds. Two bands from the leaves (L-A and L-B) and three bands from the roots (R-C, R-D and R-E) were bioactive. Within the root-derived bands, the terpene derivatives stigmasterol, kaurenoic acid and kaura-9(11), 16-dien-18-oic acid were identified. Antibiotic activity of A. latissima is reported for the first time. PMID:26691468

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  14. Antimicrobial activity of alcohols from Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Marek; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Boguś, Mieczysława I; Wieloch, Wioletta; Włóka, Emilia; Paszkiewicz, Monika; Przybysz, Elżbieta; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2012-10-01

    Information on the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of cuticular alcohols on growth and virulence of insecticidal fungi is unavailable. Therefore, we set out to describe the content of cuticular and internal alcohols in the body of housefly larvae, pupae, males and females. The total cuticular alcohols in larvae, males and females of Musca domestica were detected in comparable amounts (4.59, 3.95 and 4.03 μg g(-1) insect body, respectively), but occurred in smaller quantities in pupae (2.16 μg g(-1)). The major free alcohol in M. domestica larvae was C(12:0) (70.4%). Internal alcohols of M. domestica larvae were not found. Among cuticular pupae alcohols, C(12:0) (31.0%) was the most abundant. In the internal lipids of pupae, only five alcohols were identified in trace amounts. The most abundant alcohol in males was C(24:0) (57.5%). The percentage content of cuticular C(24:0) in males and females (57.5 and 36.5%, respectively) was significantly higher than that of cuticular lipids in larvae and pupae (0.9 and 5.6%, respectively). Only two alcohols were present in the internal lipids of males in trace amounts (C(18:0) and C(20:0)). The most abundant cuticular alcohols in females were C(24:0) (36.5%) and C(12:0) (26.8%); only two alcohols (C(18:0) and C(20:0)) were detected in comparable amounts in internal lipids (3.61±0.32 and 5.01±0.42 μg g(-1), respectively). For isolated alcohols, antimicrobial activity against 10 reference strains of bacteria and fungi was determined. Individual alcohols showed approximately equal activity against fungal strains. C(14:0) was effective against gram-positive bacteria, whereas gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all tested alcohols. Mixtures of alcohols found in cuticular lipids of larvae, pupae, males and females of M. domestica generally presented higher antimicrobial activity than individual alcohols. In contrast, crude extracts containing both cuticular and internal lipids showed no antifungal activity against the

  15. Antimicrobial activity of syringic acid against Cronobacter sakazakii and its effect on cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Sun, Yi; Zheng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Xiaorong; Song, Kaikuo; Jia, Zhenyu; Chen, Yifei; Yang, Miaochun; Liu, Xin; Dong, Rui; Xia, Xiaodong

    2016-04-15

    Syringic acid (SA) has been reported to exhibit antibacterial ability against various microorganisms, but little work has been done on its effect on Cronobacter sakazakii. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of SA against various C. sakazakii strains were determined. Moreover, changes in intracellular ATP concentration, intracellular pH (pHin), membrane potential and membrane integrity were measured to evaluate the influence of SA on cell membrane. Finally, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) was used to assess the morphological changes of bacterial cells caused by SA. It was shown that the MICs of SA against all tested C. sakazakii strains were 5mg/mL. SA retarded bacterial growth, and caused cell membrane dysfunction, which was evidenced by intracellular ATP concentration decrease, pHin reduction, cell membrane hyperpolarization and changes in cellular morphology. These findings indicated that SA has potential to be developed as a natural preservative to control C. sakazakii in foods associated with this pathogen and prevent related infections. PMID:26616929

  16. Molybdenum doped titanium dioxide photocatalytic coatings for use as hygienic surfaces: the effect of soiling on antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Fisher, L; Ostovapour, S; Kelly, P; Whitehead, K A; Cooke, K; Storgårds, E; Verran, J

    2014-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) surfaces doped with molybdenum (Mo) were investigated to determine if their photocatalytic ability could enhance process hygiene in the brewery industry. Doping TiO2 with Mo showed a 5-log reduction in bacterial counts within 4 to 24 h and a 1-log reduction in yeast numbers within 72 h. The presence of a dilute brewery soil on the surface did not interfere with antimicrobial activity. The TiO2-Mo surface was also active in the dark, showing a 5-log reduction in bacteria within 4 to 24 h and a 1-log reduction in yeast numbers within 72 h, suggesting it could have a novel dual function, being antimicrobial and photocatalytic. The study suggests the TiO2-Mo coating could act as a secondary barrier in helping prevent the build-up of microbial contamination on surfaces within the brewery industry, in particular in between cleaning/disinfection regimes during long production runs. PMID:25184432

  17. Morphology and oxygen incorporation effect on antimicrobial activity of silver thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, Rita; Manninen, N. K.; Fialho, Luísa; Henriques, Mariana; Carvalho, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    Ag and AgxO thin films were deposited by non-reactive and reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering, respectively, with the final propose of functionalizing the SS316L substrate with antibacterial properties. The coatings were characterized chemically, physically and structurally. The coatings nanostructure was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the coatings morphology was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD and XPS analyses suggested that Ag thin film is composed by metallic Ag, which crystallizes in fcc-Ag phase, while the AgxO thin film showed both metallic Ag and Agsbnd O bonds, which crystalize in fcc-Ag and silver oxide phases. The SEM results revealed that Ag thin film formed a continuous layer, while AgxO layer was composed of islands with hundreds of nanometers surrounded by small nanoparticles with tens of nanometers. The surface wettability and surface tension parameters were determined by contact angle measurements, being found that Ag and AgxO surfaces showed very similar behavior, with all the surfaces showing a hydrophobic character. In order to verify the antibacterial behavior of the coatings, halo inhibition zone tests were realized for Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus. Ag coatings did not show antibacterial behavior, contrarily to AgxO coating, which presented antibacterial properties against the studied bacteria. The presence of silver oxide phase along with the development of different morphology was pointed as the main factors in the origin of the antibacterial effect found in AgxO thin film. The present study demonstrated that AgxO coating presented antibacterial behavior and its application in cardiovascular stents is promising.

  18. Effects of solution chemistry on antimicrobial activities of silver nanoparticles against Gordonia sp.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Li, Xuan; Soule, Tanya; Yorio, Francis; Orr, Louisa

    2016-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) are the largest and fastest growing category of nanotechnology-based medicines and consumer products. Silver can have great toxicity to some aquatic organisms and, as a biocidal agent, may also damage or alter the most abundant and vulnerable beneficial microorganisms in the environment, such as Gordonia sp. However, considering the complex chemical background of natural waters, silver NPs can have complicated interactions with background chemicals such as chloride, surfactants, and dissolved natural organic matters (NOM). The results of this study show that the average particle size and dispersivity of silver NPs and the surface characteristics play an important role in the toxicity of silver NPs. Aggregation was enhanced for silver NPs in 10mM NaNO3, but not much in 10mM NaCl due to reactions with chloride. However, the presence of 3mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or 8mgC/L Suwannee River (SR) NOM appeared to reduce the aggregation of silver NPs. Regarding the bactericidal effect of silver NPs, solubility analysis suggests silver NPs inactivate Gordonia sp. differently from Ag(+) and/or a slow release of Ag(+) from silver NPs. When the silver NP concentration was raised from 7.3 to 29.2mg/L in DI water, the log inactivation rate of Gordonia sp. increased from 0.16±0.04 to 0.45±0.13. However, with 29.2mg/L silver NPs the log inactivation rate reached 1.40±0.26 in 3mM SDS. The presence of SRNOM mitigated the bactericidal efficacy of silver NPs due to surface coating/adsorption. On the other hand, 10mM NaCl reduced the log inactivation rate to 0.07±0.07 due to the formation of likely less toxic silver chloride species, such as AgCl, AgCl2(-), AgCl3(2-), and AgCl4(3-). PMID:27228306

  19. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Achyranthes coynei Sant.

    PubMed Central

    Ankad, Gireesh; Upadhya, Vinayak; Pai, Sandeep R.; Hegde, Harsha V.; Roy, Subarna

    2013-01-01

    Objective To validate the traditional use of Achyranthes coynei (A. coynei) Sant. as an antimicrobial in treatment of various infectious diseases. Methods Leaf extracts of A. coynei obtained through successive solvent extraction using petroleum ether, dichrloromethane, chloroform and methanol were used to screen the antimicrobial activity on five Gram positive, five Gram negative bacteria and two fungi. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by two fold tube-dilution method. Results Methanolic leaf extract was more effective than other three extracts on the tested bacteria. Methanolic extract was efficient on Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC values (0.62±0.00) mg/mL. The fungal organisms were less susceptible against extracts tested. Conclusions These results support the traditional use of leaf extracts of A. coynei as they have antimicrobial potential. Further studies are needed for establishing safety, toxicity and pharmacological activity with phytochemical investigation.

  20. Antimicrobial Peptide from the Wild Bee Hylaeus signatus Venom and Its Analogues: Structure-Activity Study and Synergistic Effect with Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nešuta, Ondřej; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Buděšínský, Miloš; Slaninová, Jiřina; Bednárová, Lucie; Hadravová, Romana; Straka, Jakub; Veverka, Václav; Čeřovský, Václav

    2016-04-22

    Venoms of hymenopteran insects have attracted considerable interest as a source of cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In the venom of the solitary bee Hylaeus signatus (Hymenoptera: Colletidae), we identified a new hexadecapeptide of sequence Gly-Ile-Met-Ser-Ser-Leu-Met-Lys-Lys-Leu-Ala-Ala-His-Ile-Ala-Lys-NH2. Named HYL, it belongs to the category of α-helical amphipathic AMPs. HYL exhibited weak antimicrobial activity against several strains of pathogenic bacteria and moderate activity against Candida albicans, but its hemolytic activity against human red blood cells was low. We prepared a set of HYL analogues to evaluate the effects of structural modifications on its biological activity and to increase its potency against pathogenic bacteria. This produced several analogues exhibiting significantly greater activity compared to HYL against strains of both Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa even as their hemolytic activity remained low. Studying synergism of HYL peptides and conventional antibiotics showed the peptides act synergistically and preferentially in combination with rifampicin. Fluorescent dye propidium iodide uptake showed the tested peptides were able to facilitate entrance of antibiotics into the cytoplasm by permeabilization of the outer and inner bacterial cell membrane of P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that treatment of P. aeruginosa with one of the HYL analogues caused total disintegration of bacterial cells. NMR spectroscopy was used to elucidate the structure-activity relationship for the effect of amino acid residue substitution in HYL. PMID:26998557

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF EXTRACTS FROM ECUADORIAN LICHENS.

    PubMed

    Matvieieva, N A; Pasichnyk, L A; Zhytkevych, N V; Jacinto, Pabón Garcés Galo; Pidgorskyi, V S

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of the ethanolic, isopropanolic, acetone, DMSO and aqueous extracts of the two lichen species from Ecuadorian highland, Usnea sp. and Stereocaulon sp. were explored in vitro against bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by the disc-diffusion method. Also the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined. The strongest antimicrobial activity was found in DMSO extract of Usnea sp. compared to antibacterial activity of ciprfloxacin and cefazolin antibiotics. The inhibition zone was 28 mm, 30 mm, 31mm (DMSO extract, ciprfloxacin and cefazolin respectively) in case of B. subtilis usage as the test bacteria. MIC value for Usnea sp. and Stereocaulon sp. DMSO extracts was 0.4 mg/ml. E. coli was resistant to all kinds of extracts. The S. aureus sensitivity to lichen DMSO extracts was comparable to sensitivity of these microorganisms to tetracycline and vancomycin. Thereby, most kinds of extracts (ethanol, isopropanol, hexane, DMSO and acetone solvents) from Ecuadorian lichens Usnea sp. and Stereocaulon sp. with the exception of aqueous Stereocaulon sp. extracts possessed antibacterial activity against B. subtilis. DMSO lichen extracts had also antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. At the same time the extracts studied didn't demonstrate antibacterial activity against the representatives of the most common and harmful phytopathogenic bacteria tested. Further investigations of Ecuadorian lichens especially study of plants collected from extremal highland biotops can be very important in study of possibility of treatment of numerous diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26214895

  2. Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Activities of PR-39 Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Agustiandari, Herfita; van Dijk, Albert; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Johanna L. M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2014-01-01

    The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal) amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-α production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:24755622

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Michelia champaca.

    PubMed

    Khan, M R; Kihara, M; Omoloso, A D

    2002-12-01

    The methanol extracts of leaves, seeds, stem and root barks, stem and root heart-woods of Michelia champaca and the obtained fractions (petrol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, butanol) exhibited a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. Fractionation drastically enhanced the level of activity particularly in all fractions of the stem bark and dichloromethane fraction of the root bark. Some fractions of the leaves, stem and root barks demonstrated antifungal activity against some of the tested moulds. Liriodenine was the active constituent of the root bark, with a broader and, in some cases, better level of activity as compared to the standard. PMID:12490248

  4. Antimicrobial silver: An unprecedented anion effect

    PubMed Central

    Swathy, J. R.; Sankar, M. Udhaya; Chaudhary, Amrita; Aigal, Sahaja; Anshup; Pradeep, T.

    2014-01-01

    Silver is an indispensable metal but its use has to be minimised for sustainable growth. Much of the silver lost during use is unrecoverable; an example being its use as an antimicrobial agent, a property known since ages. While developing methods to create an affordable drinking water purifier especially for the developing world, we discovered that 50 parts per billion (ppb) of Ag+ released continuously from silver nanoparticles confined in nanoscale cages is enough to cause antimicrobial activity in conditions of normal water. Here we show that the antibacterial and antiviral activities of Ag+ can be enhanced ~1,000 fold, selectively, in presence of carbonate ions whose concentration was maintained below the drinking water norms. The protective layers of the organisms were affected during the carbonate-assisted antimicrobial activity. It is estimated that ~1,300 tons of silver can be saved annually using this new way to enhance its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25418185

  5. Antimicrobial silver: an unprecedented anion effect.

    PubMed

    Swathy, J R; Sankar, M Udhaya; Chaudhary, Amrita; Aigal, Sahaja; Anshup; Pradeep, T

    2014-01-01

    Silver is an indispensable metal but its use has to be minimised for sustainable growth. Much of the silver lost during use is unrecoverable; an example being its use as an antimicrobial agent, a property known since ages. While developing methods to create an affordable drinking water purifier especially for the developing world, we discovered that 50 parts per billion (ppb) of Ag(+) released continuously from silver nanoparticles confined in nanoscale cages is enough to cause antimicrobial activity in conditions of normal water. Here we show that the antibacterial and antiviral activities of Ag(+) can be enhanced ~1,000 fold, selectively, in presence of carbonate ions whose concentration was maintained below the drinking water norms. The protective layers of the organisms were affected during the carbonate-assisted antimicrobial activity. It is estimated that ~1,300 tons of silver can be saved annually using this new way to enhance its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25418185

  6. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Čomić, Ljiljana; Đačić, Dragana; Ćurčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

  7. Antimicrobial activity of nerolidol and its derivatives against airborne microbes and further biological activities.

    PubMed

    Krist, Sabine; Banovac, Daniel; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Gochev, Velizar K; Wanner, Jürgen; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Nerolidol and its derivatives, namely cis-nerolidol, O-methyl-nerolidol, O-ethyl-nerolidol, (-)-α-bisabolol, trans,trans-farnesol and its main natural source cabreuva essential oil, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against airborne microbes and antifungal properties against plant pathogens. Among the tested compounds, α-bisabolol was the most effective antimicrobial agent and trans,trans-farnesol showed the best antifungal activity. PMID:25920237

  8. Antimicrobial activities of naphthazarins from Arnebia euchroma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chien-Chang; Syu, Wan-Jr; Li, Shyh-Yuan; Lin, Chia-Hung; Lee, Gum-Hee; Sun, Chang-Ming

    2002-12-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of extract of Arnebia euchroma led to the isolation of alkannin (1), shikonin (2), and their derivatives (3-8) as the active principles against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The stereochemistry of alpha-methylbutyryl alkannin (8) is revealed for the first time, and the antimicrobial activity of 8 was compared with its corresponding diastereomer (9). The derivatives 3-9 showed stronger anti-MRSA activity [minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from 1.56 to 3.13 microg/mL] than alkannin or shikonin (MIC = 6.25 microg/mL). Anti-MRSA activity of derivatives was bactericidal with minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)/MIC < or = 2. In a time-kill assay, the bactericidal activity against MRSA was achieved as rapidly as 2 h. The derivatives 3-9 were also active against vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (F935) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (CKU-17) with MICs similar to those with MRSA. Aromatic ester derivatives were also synthesized for antimicrobial activity comparison. None of these compounds were active against Gram-negative bacteria tested. Their cytotoxicity was also evaluated on selected cancer cell lines, and they expressed their activity in the range 0.6-5.4 microg/mL (CD(50)). Our results indicate that the ester derivatives of alkannin are potential candidates of anti-MRSA and anti-VRE agents with antitumor activity. PMID:12502328

  9. Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Eileen F.; Clarke, Siobhan F.; Marques, Tatiana M.; Hill, Colin; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul; O’Doherty, Robert M.; Shanahan, Fergus; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of serious health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and a variety of cancers among others and has been repeatedly shown to be associated with a higher risk of mortality. The relatively recent discovery that the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiota may affect the risk of developing obesity and related disorders has led to an explosion of interest in this distinct research field. A corollary of these findings would suggest that modulation of gut microbial populations can have beneficial effects with respect to controlling obesity. In this addendum, we summarize our recent data, showing that therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota using different antimicrobial strategies may be a useful approach for the management of obesity and metabolic conditions. In addition, we will explore some of the mechanisms that may contribute to microbiota-induced susceptibility to obesity and metabolic diseases. PMID:23018760

  10. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of herb extracts.

    PubMed

    Denev, Petko; Kratchanova, Maria; Ciz, Milan; Lojek, Antonin; Vasicek, Ondrej; Blazheva, Denitsa; Nedelcheva, Plamena; Vojtek, Libor; Hyrsl, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive data on the antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of extracts from six medicinal plants--blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) leaves, chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) leaves, hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves, lady's mantle (Alchemilla glabra) aerial parts, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) aerial parts and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves. In order to analyze the antioxidant activity of the herbs, several methods (ORAC, TRAP, HORAC and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) were used. Blackberry leaves and meadowsweet extracts revealed the highest antioxidant activities via all methods. All extracts studied blocked almost completely the opsonized zymosan particle-activated ROS production by neutrophils from human whole blood. On the other hand, the effect of extracts on phorbol myristate acetate-activated ROS production was much milder and even nonsignificant in the case of chokeberry leaves. This latter result suggests that extracts (apart from their antioxidative activity) interfere with the signaling cascade of phagocyte activation upstream of the protein kinase C activation. The antimicrobial activity of the investigated extracts against 11 human pathogens was investigated using three different methods. Meadowsweet and blackberry leaves extracts had the highest antimicrobial effect and the lowest minimal inhibiting concentrations (MICs) against the microorganisms tested. PMID:24945135

  11. Improving short antimicrobial peptides despite elusive rules for activity.

    PubMed

    Mikut, Ralf; Ruden, Serge; Reischl, Markus; Breitling, Frank; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hilpert, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can effectively kill a broad range of life threatening multidrug-resistant bacteria, a serious threat to public health worldwide. However, despite great hopes novel drugs based on AMPs are still rare. To accelerate drug development we studied different approaches to improve the antibacterial activity of short antimicrobial peptides. Short antimicrobial peptides seem to be ideal drug candidates since they can be synthesized quickly and easily, modified and optimized. In addition, manufacturing a short peptide drug will be more cost efficient than long and structured ones. In contrast to longer and structured peptides short AMPs seem hard to design and predict. Here, we designed, synthesized and screened five different peptide libraries, each consisting of 600 9-mer peptides, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Each library is presenting a different approach to investigate effectiveness of an optimization strategy. The data for the 3000 peptides were analyzed using models based on fuzzy logic bioinformatics and plausible descriptors. The rate of active or superior active peptides was improved from 31.0% in a semi-random library from a previous study to 97.8% in the best new designed library. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26687790

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Indigofera suffruticosa

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Sônia Pereira; Vieira, Jeymesson Raphael Cardoso; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; Leite, Roberta Maria Pereira; de Menezes Lima, Vera Lúcia; Xavier, Haroudo Satiro; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2006-01-01

    Various organic and aqueous extracts of leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Mill (Fabaceae) obtained by infusion and maceration were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The extracts were tested against 5 different species of human pathogenic bacteria and 17 fungal strains by the agar-solid diffusion method. Most of the extracts were devoid of antifungal and antibacterial activities, except the aqueous extract of leaves of I. suffruticosa obtained by infusion, which showed strong inhibitory activity against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5000 µg ml−1. The MIC values to dermatophyte strains were 2500 µg ml−1 against Trichophyton rubrum (LM-09, LM-13) and Microsporum canis. This study suggests that aqueous extracts of leaves of I. suffruticosa obtained by infusion can be used in the treatment of skin diseases caused by dermatophytes. PMID:16786057

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Indigofera suffruticosa.

    PubMed

    Leite, Sônia Pereira; Vieira, Jeymesson Raphael Cardoso; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; Leite, Roberta Maria Pereira; de Menezes Lima, Vera Lúcia; Xavier, Haroudo Satiro; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2006-06-01

    Various organic and aqueous extracts of leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Mill (Fabaceae) obtained by infusion and maceration were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The extracts were tested against 5 different species of human pathogenic bacteria and 17 fungal strains by the agar-solid diffusion method. Most of the extracts were devoid of antifungal and antibacterial activities, except the aqueous extract of leaves of I. suffruticosa obtained by infusion, which showed strong inhibitory activity against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5000 microg ml(-1). The MIC values to dermatophyte strains were 2500 microg ml(-1) against Trichophyton rubrum (LM-09, LM-13) and Microsporum canis. This study suggests that aqueous extracts of leaves of I. suffruticosa obtained by infusion can be used in the treatment of skin diseases caused by dermatophytes. PMID:16786057

  14. Destabilization of α-Helical Structure in Solution Improves Bactericidal Activity of Antimicrobial Peptides: Opposite Effects on Bacterial and Viral Targets

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Fox, Marc A.; Gumbleton, Mark; Beck, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    We have previously examined the mechanism of antimicrobial peptides on the outer membrane of vaccinia virus. We show here that the formulation of peptides LL37 and magainin-2B amide in polysorbate 20 (Tween 20) results in greater reductions in virus titer than formulation without detergent, and the effect is replicated by substitution of polysorbate 20 with high-ionic-strength buffer. In contrast, formulation with polysorbate 20 or high-ionic-strength buffer has the opposite effect on bactericidal activity of both peptides, resulting in lesser reductions in titer for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the differential action of polysorbate 20 and salt on the virucidal and bactericidal activities correlates with the α-helical content of peptide secondary structure in solution, suggesting that the virucidal and bactericidal activities are mediated through distinct mechanisms. The correlation of a defined structural feature with differential activity against a host-derived viral membrane and the membranes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria suggests that the overall helical content in solution under physiological conditions is an important feature for consideration in the design and development of candidate peptide-based antimicrobial compounds. PMID:26824944

  15. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Thymus capitata Essential Oil with Its Preservative Effect against Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated in Minced Beef Meat

    PubMed Central

    El Abed, Nariman; Kaabi, Belhassen; Smaali, Mohamed Issam; Chabbouh, Meriem; Habibi, Kamel; Mejri, Mondher; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Ben Hadj Ahmed, Sami

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and the preservative effect of Thymus capitata essential oil against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in minced beef meat were evaluated. The essential oil extracted was chemically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nineteen components were identified, of which carvacrol represented (88.89%) of the oil. The antioxidant activity was assessed in vitro by using both the DPPH and the ABTS assays. The findings showed that the essential oil exhibited high antioxidant activity, which was comparable to the reference standards (BHT and ascorbic acid) with IC50 values of 44.16 and 0.463 μg/mL determined by the free-radical scavenging DPPH and ABTS assays, respectively. Furthermore, the essential oil was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity using disc agar diffusion and microdilution methods. The results demonstrated that the zone of inhibition varied from moderate to strong (15–80 mm) and the minimum inhibition concentration values ranged from 0.32 to 20 mg/mL. In addition, essential oil evaluated in vivo against Listeria monocytogenes showed clear and strong inhibitory effect. The application of 0.25 or 1% (v/w) essential oil of T. capitata to minced beef significantly reduced the L. monocytogenes population when compared to those of control samples (P-value  <0.01). PMID:24719640

  16. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Thymus capitata Essential Oil with Its Preservative Effect against Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated in Minced Beef Meat.

    PubMed

    El Abed, Nariman; Kaabi, Belhassen; Smaali, Mohamed Issam; Chabbouh, Meriem; Habibi, Kamel; Mejri, Mondher; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Ben Hadj Ahmed, Sami

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and the preservative effect of Thymus capitata essential oil against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in minced beef meat were evaluated. The essential oil extracted was chemically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nineteen components were identified, of which carvacrol represented (88.89%) of the oil. The antioxidant activity was assessed in vitro by using both the DPPH and the ABTS assays. The findings showed that the essential oil exhibited high antioxidant activity, which was comparable to the reference standards (BHT and ascorbic acid) with IC50 values of 44.16 and 0.463 μ g/mL determined by the free-radical scavenging DPPH and ABTS assays, respectively. Furthermore, the essential oil was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity using disc agar diffusion and microdilution methods. The results demonstrated that the zone of inhibition varied from moderate to strong (15-80 mm) and the minimum inhibition concentration values ranged from 0.32 to 20 mg/mL. In addition, essential oil evaluated in vivo against Listeria monocytogenes showed clear and strong inhibitory effect. The application of 0.25 or 1% (v/w) essential oil of T. capitata to minced beef significantly reduced the L. monocytogenes population when compared to those of control samples (P-value  <0.01). PMID:24719640

  17. Destabilization of α-Helical Structure in Solution Improves Bactericidal Activity of Antimicrobial Peptides: Opposite Effects on Bacterial and Viral Targets.

    PubMed

    Ulaeto, David O; Morris, Christopher J; Fox, Marc A; Gumbleton, Mark; Beck, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    We have previously examined the mechanism of antimicrobial peptides on the outer membrane of vaccinia virus. We show here that the formulation of peptides LL37 and magainin-2B amide in polysorbate 20 (Tween 20) results in greater reductions in virus titer than formulation without detergent, and the effect is replicated by substitution of polysorbate 20 with high-ionic-strength buffer. In contrast, formulation with polysorbate 20 or high-ionic-strength buffer has the opposite effect on bactericidal activity of both peptides, resulting in lesser reductions in titer for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the differential action of polysorbate 20 and salt on the virucidal and bactericidal activities correlates with the α-helical content of peptide secondary structure in solution, suggesting that the virucidal and bactericidal activities are mediated through distinct mechanisms. The correlation of a defined structural feature with differential activity against a host-derived viral membrane and the membranes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria suggests that the overall helical content in solution under physiological conditions is an important feature for consideration in the design and development of candidate peptide-based antimicrobial compounds. PMID:26824944

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Antarctic bryozoans: an ecological perspective with potential for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Blanca; Sala-Comorera, Laura; Angulo-Preckler, Carlos; Vázquez, Jennifer; Jesús Montes, M; García-Aljaro, Cristina; Mercadé, Elena; Blanch, Anicet R; Avila, Conxita

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Antarctic bryozoans and the ecological functions of the chemical compounds involved remain largely unknown. To determine the significant ecological and applied antimicrobial effects, 16 ether and 16 butanol extracts obtained from 13 different bryozoan species were tested against six Antarctic (including Psychrobacter luti, Shewanella livingstonensis and 4 new isolated strains) and two bacterial strains from culture collections (Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus). Results from the bioassays reveal that all ether extracts exhibited antimicrobial activity against some bacteria. Only one butanol extract produced inhibition, indicating that antimicrobial compounds are mainly lipophilic. Ether extracts of the genus Camptoplites inhibited the majority of bacterial strains, thus indicating a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Moreover, most ether extracts presented activities against bacterial strains from culture collections, suggesting the potential use of these extracts as antimicrobial drugs against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25232675

  19. [Antimicrobial activity of orthodontic band cements].

    PubMed

    Pavic, J; Arriagada, M; Elgueta, J; García, C

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of enamel decalcification and caries beneath orthodontic bands, has indicated the need for a new enamel binding adhesive orthodontic cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, in vitro, on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus, acidophillus, of three materials used to cements the orthodontic bands. The cements studied were: Zinc phosphate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, and Policarboxylate cement. Thirty petri plates were seeded with S. mutans, and thirty with L. acidophillus; on each plate three pellet were placed, one of each cement studied. Petri plates were incubated under microaerophilic conditions at 37 C, and checked at 72 hrs. for Streptococcus, mutans, and four days for Lactobacillus acidophillus to evaluate the inhibition zone. The results were tabulated for each material. It was demonstrated that exists important variations in the antimicrobial properties of the materials studied, as in the microbial sensitivity to these cements. PMID:2135908

  20. The Antimicrobial Activity of Different Mouthwashes in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Mat Ludin, C.M.; Md Radzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Seven different brands of mouthwashes were assessed for the inhibition of growth of oral micro-organisms. The results showed wide variations in their effectiveness: Those containing cationic surfactants and complex organic nitrogenous compounds were more active than the older formulations based on phenols. A list was compiled ranking the mouthwashes according to their antimicrobial activity, which did not always agree with the manufacturer’s claims or indication for use. PMID:22893755

  1. The Effect of Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Herbal Remedy PADMA 28 on Immunological Angiogenesis and Granulocytes Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota M.; Skopiński, Piotr; Zdanowski, Robert; Lewicki, Sławomir; Kocik, Janusz; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Stankiewicz, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    PADMA 28 is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, angioprotecting, and wound healing properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of this remedy on immunological angiogenesis and granulocytes metabolic activity in Balb/c mice. Mice were fed daily, for seven days, with 5.8 mg of PADMA (calculated from recommended human daily dose) or 0.085 mg (dose in the range of active doses of other herbal extracts studied by us previously). Results. Highly significant increase of newly formed blood vessels number in ex vivo cutaneous lymphocyte-induced angiogenesis test (LIA) after grafting of Balb/c splenocytes from both dosage groups to F1 hybrids (Balb/c × C3H); increase of blood lymphocytes and granulocytes number only in mice fed with lower dose of remedy; and significant suppression of metabolic activity (chemiluminescence test) of blood granulocytes in mice fed with higher dose of PADMA. Conclusion. PADMA 28 behaves as a good stimulator of physiological angiogenesis, but for this purpose it should be used in substantially lower doses than recommended by producers for avoiding the deterioration of granulocyte function. PMID:23864768

  2. Antimicrobial activity of the metals and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-11-01

    The ever increasing resistance of pathogens towards antibiotics has caused serious health problems in the recent years. It has been shown that by combining modern technologies such as nanotechnology and material science with intrinsic antimicrobial activity of the metals, novel applications for these substances could be identified. According to the reports, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles represent a group of materials which were investigated in respect to their antimicrobial effects. In the present review, we focused on the recent research works concerning antimicrobial activity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature indicated that the particle size was the essential parameter which determined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the metal nanoparticles. Combination therapy with the metal nanoparticles might be one of the possible strategies to overcome the current bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents. However, further studies should be performed to minimize the toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to apply as proper alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants especially in biomedical applications. PMID:25280707

  3. Review of antimicrobial and antioxidative activities of chitosans in food.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Juneja, Vijay K

    2010-09-01

    Interest in chitosan, a biodegradable, nontoxic, non-antigenic, and biocompatible biopolymer isolated from shellfish, arises from the fact that chitosans are reported to exhibit numerous health-related beneficial effects, including strong antimicrobial and antioxidative activities in foods. The extraordinary interest in the chemistry and application in agriculture, horticulture, environmental science, industry, microbiology, and medicine is attested by about 17,000 citations on this subject in the Scopus database. A special need exists to develop a better understanding of the role of chitosans in ameliorating foodborne illness. To contribute to this effort, this overview surveys and interprets our present knowledge of the chemistry and antimicrobial activities of chitosan in solution, as powders, and in edible films and coating against foodborne pathogens, spoilage bacteria, and pathogenic viruses and fungi in several food categories. These include produce, fruit juices, eggs and dairy, cereal, meat, and seafood products. Also covered are antimicrobial activities of chemically modified and nanochitosans, therapeutic properties, and possible mechanisms of the antimicrobial, antioxidative, and metal chelating effects. Further research is suggested in each of these categories. The widely scattered data on the multifaceted aspects of chitosan microbiology, summarized in the text and in 10 tables and 8 representative figures, suggest that low-molecular-weight chitosans at a pH below 6.0 presents optimal conditions for achieving desirable antimicrobial and antioxidative-preservative effects in liquid and solid foods. We are very hopeful that the described findings will be a valuable record and resource for further progress to improve microbial food safety and food quality. PMID:20828484

  4. Antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of some essential oils.

    PubMed

    Aridoğan, Buket Cicioğlu; Baydar, Hasan; Kaya, Selçuk; Demirci, Mustafa; Ozbaşar, Demir; Mumcu, Ethem

    2002-12-01

    In this study the composition and antimicrobial properties of essential oils obtained from Origanum onites, Mentha piperita, Juniperus exalsa, Chrysanthemum indicum, Lavandula hybrida, Rosa damascena, Echinophora tenuifolia, Foeniculum vulgare were examined. To evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of these eight aromatic extracts; their in vitro antimicrobial activities were determined by disk diffusion testing, according to the NCCLS criteria. Escherichia coli (ATTC 25922), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATTC 27853 were used as standard test bacterial strains. Origanum onites recorded antimicrobial activity against all test bacteria, and was strongest against Staphylococcus aureus. For Rosa damascena, Mentha piperita and Lavandula hybrida antimicrobial activity was recorded only to Staphylococcus aureus. Juniperus exalsa, and Chrysanthemum indicum exhibited antibacterial activities against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. We also examined the in vitro antimicrobial activities of some components of the essential oils and found some components with antimicrobial activity. PMID:12510839

  5. Repurposing the Antihistamine Terfenadine for Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a rapidly growing health threat in the U.S., with resistance to several commonly prescribed treatments. A high-throughput screen identified the antihistamine terfenadine to possess, previously unreported, antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and other Gram-positive bacteria. In an effort to repurpose this drug, structure–activity relationship studies yielded 84 terfenadine-based analogues with several modifications providing increased activity versus S. aureus and other bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanism of action studies revealed these compounds to exert their antibacterial effects, at least in part, through inhibition of the bacterial type II topoisomerases. This scaffold suffers from hERG liabilities which were not remedied through this round of optimization; however, given the overall improvement in activity of the set, terfenadine-based analogues provide a novel structural class of antimicrobial compounds with potential for further characterization as part of the continuing process to meet the current need for new antibiotics. PMID:25238555

  6. Antimicrobial activity of bone cements embedded with organic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Perni, Stefano; Thenault, Victorien; Abdo, Pauline; Margulis, Katrin; Magdassi, Shlomo; Prokopovich, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Infections after orthopedic surgery are a very unwelcome outcome; despite the widespread use of antibiotics, their incidence can be as high as 10%. This risk is likely to increase as antibiotics are gradually losing efficacy as a result of bacterial resistance; therefore, novel antimicrobial approaches are required. Parabens are a class of compounds whose antimicrobial activity is employed in many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. We developed propylparaben nanoparticles that are hydrophilic, thus expanding the applicability of parabens to aqueous systems. In this paper we assess the possibility of employing paraben nanoparticles as antimicrobial compound in bone cements. The nanoparticles were embedded in various types of bone cement (poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA], hydroxyapatite, and brushite) and the antimicrobial activity was determined against common causes of postorthopedic surgery infections such as: Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Nanoparticles at concentrations as low as 1% w/w in brushite bone cement were capable of preventing pathogens growth, 5% w/w was needed for hydroxyapatite bone cement, while 7% w/w was required for PMMA bone cement. No detrimental effect was determined by the addition of paraben nanoparticles on bone cement compression strength and cytocompatibility. Our results demonstrate that paraben nanoparticles can be encapsulated in bone cement, providing concentration-dependent antimicrobial activity; furthermore, lower concentrations are needed in calcium phosphate (brushite and hydroxyapatite) than in acrylic (PMMA) bone cements. These nanoparticles are effective against a wide spectrum of bacteria, including those already resistant to the antibiotics routinely employed in orthopedic applications, such as gentamicin. PMID:26487803

  7. Molecular Design, Structures, and Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Haruko; Palermo, Edmund F.; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics which are effective against drug-resistant bacteria without contributing to resistance development. We have designed and developed antimicrobial copolymers with cationic amphiphilic structures based on the mimicry of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. These copolymers exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no adverse hemolytic activity. Notably, these polymers also did not result in any measurable resistance development in E. coli. The peptide-mimetic design principle offers significant flexibility and diversity in the creation of new antimicrobial materials and their potential biomedical applications. PMID:23832766

  8. Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus against microbial flora of cervicovaginal infections

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Subramanyam; Shouri, Raju Naidu Devanaboyaina; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the probiotic nature of Lactobacillus in preventing cervical pathogens by studying the effectiveness of antimicrobial activity against vaginal pathogens. Methods Lactobacilli were isolated from healthy vaginal swabs on selective media and different pathogenic bacteria were isolated by using different selective media. The Lactobacillus strains were tested for the production of hydrogen peroxide and antimicrobial compounds along with probiotic properties. Results Of the 10 isolated Lactobacillus strains, strain 1, 3 and 6 are high hydrogen peroxide producers and the rest were low producers. Results of pH and amines tests indicated that pH increased with fishy odour in the vaginal fluids of cervicovaginal infection patients when compared with vaginal fluids of healthy persons. The isolates were found to be facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-capsule forming and catalase-negative bacilli. The results of antimicrobial activity of compounds indicated that 280 and 140 µg/mL was the minimum concentration to inhibit the growth of both pathogens and test organisms respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrated that Lactobacillus producing antimicrobial compounds inhibits the growth of cervical pathogens, revealing that the hypothesis of preventing vaginal infection by administering probiotic organisms has a great appeal to patients, which colonize the vagina to help, restore and maintain healthy vagina.

  9. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  10. [Antimicrobial activity of stable silver nanoparticles of a certain size].

    PubMed

    Mukha, Iu P; Eremenko, A M; Smirnova, N P; Mikhienkova, A I; Korchak, G I; Gorchev, V F; Chunikhin, A Iu

    2013-01-01

    Conditions for obtaining stable silver nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm were developed using a binary stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone/sodium dodecylsulphate in optimal ratio. Optical spectra, morphology and dependence of size of the nanoparticles on the amount of reducing agent were studied. Colloidal solutions of nanosilver showed a high bactericidal activity against strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and fungicidal activity against Candida albicans. The mechanism of action of nanosized silver on microbial cell was examined by laser scanning confocal microscope using fluorescent label. First step of antimicrobial effect on microorganisms was membrane damage and penetration of silver nanoparticles into the cell. Prolonged stability of nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activity over the past two years were showed. PMID:23795483

  11. Green synthesis of biogenic silver nanomaterials using Raphanus sativus extract, effects of stabilizers on the morphology, and their antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Naved; Khan, Tabrez Alam; Khan, Zaheer; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    The present study explores the reducing and capping potentials of aqueous Raphanus sativus root extract for the synthesis of silver nanomaterials for the first time in the absence and presence of two stabilizers, namely, water-soluble starch and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The surface properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques. The mean size of AgNPs, ranging from 3.2 to 6.0 nm, could be facilely controlled by merely varying the initial [extract], [CTAB], [starch], and [Ag(+)] ions. The agglomeration number, average number of silver atoms per nanoparticle, and changes in the fermi potentials were calculated and discussed. The AgNPs were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against different pathogenic organisms. The inhibition action was due to the structural changes in the protein cell wall. PMID:26458821

  12. Simultaneous Antibiofilm and Antiviral Activities of an Engineered Antimicrobial Peptide during Virus-Bacterium Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Jeffrey A.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Kiedrowski, Megan R.; Yang, Guanyi; Deslouches, Berthony; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antimicrobial-resistant infections are an urgent public health threat, and development of novel antimicrobial therapies has been painstakingly slow. Polymicrobial infections are increasingly recognized as a significant source of severe disease and also contribute to reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials. Chronic infections also are characterized by their ability to resist clearance, which is commonly linked to the development of biofilms that are notorious for antimicrobial resistance. The use of engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) is attractive due to the slow development of resistance to these fast-acting antimicrobials and their ability to kill multidrug-resistant clinical isolates, key elements for the success of novel antimicrobial agents. Here, we tested the ability of an eCAP, WLBU2, to disrupt recalcitrant Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. WLBU2 was capable of significantly reducing biomass and viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms formed on airway epithelium and maintained activity during viral coinfection, a condition that confers extraordinary levels of antibiotic resistance. Biofilm disruption was achieved in short treatment times by permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, we observed simultaneous reduction of infectivity of the viral pathogen respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). WLBU2 is notable for its ability to maintain activity across a broad range of physiological conditions and showed negligible toxicity toward the airway epithelium, expanding its potential applications as an antimicrobial therapeutic. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial-resistant infections are an urgent public health threat, making development of novel antimicrobials able to effectively treat these infections extremely important. Chronic and polymicrobial infections further complicate antimicrobial therapy, often through the development of microbial biofilms. Here, we describe the ability of an engineered antimicrobial peptide to disrupt biofilms

  13. Simultaneous Antibiofilm and Antiviral Activities of an Engineered Antimicrobial Peptide during Virus-Bacterium Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Jeffrey A; Lashua, Lauren P; Kiedrowski, Megan R; Yang, Guanyi; Deslouches, Berthony; Montelaro, Ronald C; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant infections are an urgent public health threat, and development of novel antimicrobial therapies has been painstakingly slow. Polymicrobial infections are increasingly recognized as a significant source of severe disease and also contribute to reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials. Chronic infections also are characterized by their ability to resist clearance, which is commonly linked to the development of biofilms that are notorious for antimicrobial resistance. The use of engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) is attractive due to the slow development of resistance to these fast-acting antimicrobials and their ability to kill multidrug-resistant clinical isolates, key elements for the success of novel antimicrobial agents. Here, we tested the ability of an eCAP, WLBU2, to disrupt recalcitrant Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. WLBU2 was capable of significantly reducing biomass and viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms formed on airway epithelium and maintained activity during viral coinfection, a condition that confers extraordinary levels of antibiotic resistance. Biofilm disruption was achieved in short treatment times by permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, we observed simultaneous reduction of infectivity of the viral pathogen respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). WLBU2 is notable for its ability to maintain activity across a broad range of physiological conditions and showed negligible toxicity toward the airway epithelium, expanding its potential applications as an antimicrobial therapeutic. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial-resistant infections are an urgent public health threat, making development of novel antimicrobials able to effectively treat these infections extremely important. Chronic and polymicrobial infections further complicate antimicrobial therapy, often through the development of microbial biofilms. Here, we describe the ability of an engineered antimicrobial peptide to disrupt biofilms formed by the

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Nanoemulsion on Cariogenic Planktonic and Biofilm Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Rawls, H Ralph; Valerie, A Lee

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Nanoemulsions (NE) are a unique class of disinfectants produced by mixing a water immiscible liquid phase into an aqueous phase under high shear forces. NE have antimicrobial properties and are also effective anti-biofilm agents. Materials and Methods The effectiveness of nanoemulsion and its components was determined against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei by live/dead staining. In vitro antimicrobial effectiveness of nanoemulsion against planktonic Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, Actinomyces viscosus, Candida albicans and mixed culture was determined by a serial dilution technique to obtain minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC). In addition, efficacy was investigated by kinetics of killing, adherence and biofilm assays. Results Compared to its components, nanoemulsion showed notable antimicrobial activity against biofilm organisms, up to 83.0% kill within 1 min. NE dilutions ranging from 243 to 19683 were effective against planktonic S. mutans, L. casei, A. viscosus, C. albicans and mixed culture of these four strains as shown through MIC/MBC assays. NE showed antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells at high dilutions, confirmed by time kill studies. The level of adhesion on glass surface was reduced by 94.2 to 99.5 % in nanoemulsion treated groups (p < 0.001). 4-day-old S. mutans, L. casei, A. viscosus, C. albicans and mixed cultures biofilms treated with NE showed reductions of bacterial counts with decreasing dilutions (p < 0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that nanoemulsion has effective anti-cariogenic activity against cariogenic microorganisms and may be a useful medication in the prevention of caries. PMID:21807359

  15. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-01-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice. PMID:8945527

  16. Antimicrobial activities of some Euphorbia species.

    PubMed

    Kirbag, Sevda; Erecevit, Pınar; Zengin, Fikriye; Guvenc, Ayşe Nilay

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts and latex of some Euphorbia species used for medical purposes in Turkey were investigated. The extracts of Euphorbia aleppica L., Euphorbia szovitsii Fisch.&Mey. var. harputensis Aznav. ex M. S. Khan, Euphorbia falcata L. sub. falcata var. falcata, Euphorbia denticulata Lam., Euphorbia macroclada Boiss., Euphorbia cheiradenia Boiss.&Hohen, Euphorbia virgata Waldst.&Kit., Euphorbia petiolata Banks&Sol. were prepared with methanol. The antimicrobial activities of these extracts were examined on test microorganisms as follows: Staphylococcus aureus COWAN 1, Bacillus megaterium DSM 32, Proteus vulgaris FMC 1, Klebsiella pneumonia FMC 5, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSM 50071, Candida albicans FMC 17, Candida glabrata ATCC 66032, Epidermophyton sp. and Trichophyton sp. by the disc diffusion methods and well agar method. The MIC values of extracts were determined according to the broth microdulitions method. Results indicated that extracts of Euphorbia species inhibited the growth of tested microorganisms in the different ratio. Also, the MIC values of extracts were determined as 31,2-1000 µg. PMID:24311840

  17. Antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from Swietenia macrophylla leaves.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Darah; Lee, Chong Chai; Sheh-Hong, Lim

    2014-02-01

    The endophytic fungi isolated from leaves of Swietenia macrophylla of different ages were examined for antimicrobial activity. The agar plug diffusion assay was used for primary screening, followed by the disc diffusion method. A total of 461 filamentous endophytic fungi were isolated and cultured to examine their antimicrobial properties. In the primary screen, 315 isolates (68.3%) exhibited activity against at least one of the test pathogenic microorganisms. The percentage of isolates exhibiting antimicrobial activity increased with leaf age. Endophytic fungal assemblages, as well as those isolates exhibiting antimicrobial properties appeared to increase with leaf age. The main antimicrobial compounds were produced extracellularly by the endophytic fungi. The results suggest that healthy leaves at older stages of growth can be a potential source for the isolation of endophytic fungi with antimicrobial properties. PMID:24689302

  18. The antiviral and antimicrobial activities of licorice, a widely-used Chinese herb

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqiang; Yang, Rui; Yuan, Bochuan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is a common herb which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. More than 20 triterpenoids and nearly 300 flavonoids have been isolated from licorice. Recent studies have shown that these metabolites possess many pharmacological activities, such as antiviral, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and other activities. This paper provides a summary of the antiviral and antimicrobial activities of licorice. The active components and the possible mechanisms for these activities are summarized in detail. This review will be helpful for the further studies of licorice for its potential therapeutic effects as an antiviral or an antimicrobial agent. PMID:26579460

  19. Quaternized Chitosan as an Antimicrobial Agent: Antimicrobial Activity, Mechanism of Action and Biomedical Applications in Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Ma, Rui; Lin, Chucheng; Liu, Ziwei; Tang, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a linear polysaccharide with good biodegradability, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, which makes it potentially useful for biomedical applications, including an antimicrobial agent either alone or blended with other polymers. However, the poor solubility of CS in most solvents at neutral or high pH substantially limits its use. Quaternary ammonium CS, which was prepared by introducing a quaternary ammonium group on a dissociative hydroxyl group or amino group of the CS, exhibited improved water solubility and stronger antibacterial activity relative to CS over an entire range of pH values; thus, this quaternary modification increases the potential biomedical applications of CS in the field of anti-infection. This review discusses the current findings on the antimicrobial properties of quaternized CS synthesized using different methods and the mechanisms of its antimicrobial actions. The potential antimicrobial applications in the orthopedic field and perspectives regarding future studies in this field are also considered. PMID:23325051

  20. Antityrosinase and antimicrobial activities from Thai medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Dej-Adisai, Sukanya; Meechai, Imron; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn; Kummee, Sopa

    2014-04-01

    Various dermatological disorders and microbial skin infection can cause hyperpigmentation. Therefore, screenings for whitening and antimicrobial agents from Thai medicinal plants have been of research interest. Seventy-seven ethanol plant extracts were investigated for antityrosinase activity, eleven samples showed the tyrosinase inhibition more than 50 % were further preliminary screening for antimicrobial activity by agar disc diffusion and broth micro-dilution methods. Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr. (Moraceae) root extract, which showed the potential of tyrosinase inhibition with 90.57 ± 2.93 % and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Trichophyton mentagophytes with inhibition zone as 9.10 ± 0.00, 10.67 ± 0.09, 15.25 ± 0.05 and 6.60 ± 0.17 mm, respectively was selected for phytochemical investigation. Three pure compounds were isolated as artocarpin, cudraflavone C and artocarpanone. And artocarpanone exhibited anti-tyrosinase effect; artocarpin and cudraflavone C also showed the potential of antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis and P. acnes with MIC at 2, 4 and 2 μg/ml, respectively and MBC at 32 μg/ml for these bacteria. So, these pure compounds are interesting for further study in order to provide possibilities of new whitening and antibacterial development. This will be the first report of phytochemical investigation of A. integer root. PMID:23835832

  1. Antimicrobial activity of grapefruit seed and pulp ethanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Cvetnić, Zdenka; Vladimir-Knezević, Sanda

    2004-09-01

    Antibacterial and antifungal activity of ethanolic extract of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf., Rutaceae) seed and pulp was examined against 20 bacterial and 10 yeast strains. The level of antimicrobial effects was established using an in vitro agar assay and standard broth dilution susceptibility test. The contents of 3.92% of total polyphenols and 0.11% of flavonoids were determined spectrometrically in crude ethanolic extract. The presence of flavanones naringin and hesperidin in the extract was confirmed by TLC analysis. Ethanolic extract exibited the strongest antimicrobial effect against Salmonella enteritidis (MIC 2.06%, m/V). Other tested bacteria and yeasts were sensitive to extract concentrations ranging from 4.13% to 16.50% (m/V). PMID:15610620

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Euphorbia hirta and Asystasia gangeticum.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, M; Rao, Ch V; Rao, P M; Raju, D B; Venkateswarlu, Y

    2006-07-01

    The ethanolic extracts of the dry fruits of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, aerial parts of Euphorbia hirta and flowers of Asystasia gangeticum were tested for antimicrobial activity. The three plants exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, particularly against Escherichia coli (enteropathogen), Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:16730921

  3. Effects of Allspice, Cinnamon, and Clove Bud Essential Oils in Edible Apple Films on Physical Properties and Antimicrobial Activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The results of the present study show that allspice, cinnamon and clove bud essential oils can be used to prepare apple-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by both direct contact and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films. Application of the a...

  4. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Novy, Pavel; Davidova, Hana; Serrano-Rojero, Cecilia Suqued; Rondevaldova, Johana; Pulkrabek, Josef; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Eyebright, Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne (Scrophulariaceae), is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Europe for the treatment of various health disorders, especially as eyewash to treat eye ailments such as conjunctivitis and blepharitis that can be associated with bacterial infections. Some Euphrasia species have been previously reported to contain essential oil. However, the composition and bioactivity of E. rostkoviana oil are unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the eyebright essential oil against some organisms associated with eye infections: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. GC-MS analysis revealed more than 70 constituents, with n-hexadecanoic acid (18.47%) as the main constituent followed by thymol (7.97%), myristic acid (4.71%), linalool (4.65%), and anethole (4.09%). The essential oil showed antimicrobial effect against all organisms tested with the exception of P. aeruginosa. The best activity was observed against all Gram-positive bacteria tested with the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512 µg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of E. rostkoviana essential oil and its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26000025

  5. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Novy, Pavel; Davidova, Hana; Serrano-Rojero, Cecilia Suqued; Rondevaldova, Johana; Pulkrabek, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Eyebright, Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne (Scrophulariaceae), is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Europe for the treatment of various health disorders, especially as eyewash to treat eye ailments such as conjunctivitis and blepharitis that can be associated with bacterial infections. Some Euphrasia species have been previously reported to contain essential oil. However, the composition and bioactivity of E. rostkoviana oil are unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the eyebright essential oil against some organisms associated with eye infections: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. GC-MS analysis revealed more than 70 constituents, with n-hexadecanoic acid (18.47%) as the main constituent followed by thymol (7.97%), myristic acid (4.71%), linalool (4.65%), and anethole (4.09%). The essential oil showed antimicrobial effect against all organisms tested with the exception of P. aeruginosa. The best activity was observed against all Gram-positive bacteria tested with the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512 µg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of E. rostkoviana essential oil and its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26000025

  6. Antimicrobial activity of toothpastes containing natural extracts, chlorhexidine or triclosan.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Andiara; Ferreira, Danielly Cunha Araújo; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; da Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra; Nelson-Filho, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of toothpastes containing natural extracts, chlorhexidine or triclosan. The effectiveness of toothpastes containing natural extracts (Parodontax®), 0.12% chlorhexidine (Cariax®), 0.3% triclosan (Sanogil®) or fluoride (Sorriso®, control) was evaluated against yeasts, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using the disk diffusion method. Water was used as a control. Disks impregnated with the toothpastes were placed in Petri dishes containing culture media inoculated with 23 indicative microorganisms by the pour plate method. After incubation, the inhibition growth halos were measured and statistical analyses (α=0.05) were performed. The results indicated that all formulations, except for conventional toothpaste (Sorriso®), showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. The toothpaste containing natural extracts (Parodontax®) was the only product able to inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The toothpastes containing chlorhexidine, triclosan or natural extracts presented antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. PMID:25252251

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of the effect of gamma radiation on the physical parameters of biosynthesized silver/chitosan nano-particles and their antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Mohamed E.; Eid, May M.; Khattab, Om kolthoum H.; El-Hallouty, Salwa M.; El-Marakby, Seham M.; Mahmoud, Doaa A.

    2015-09-01

    Studying the effect of pH on the biosynthesis of silver/chitosan nanoparticles (Ag/CS NPs) using Aspergillus deflectus and Penicillium pinophilum as reducing agents, showed very weak surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Ag/CS NPs at certain pH. In this paper, the effect of irradiation on the synthesis of Ag/CS at non-optimum pH was evaluated and thereby, the antimicrobial effect of the biosynthesized Ag/CS NPs. The SPR of the AgNPs was analyzed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The active groups responsible for the reduction and capping of the AgNPs were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and their shape and size were determined via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. UV/Visible spectroscopy confirmed the appearance of AgNPs’ SPR. Additionally, the FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the Ag/CS NP formation. Data also revealed that increasing both the pH and irradiation dose resulted in a decrease of the Ag/CS NPs’ size. DLS and HRTEM results showed that the best pH for biosynthesis of Ag/Cs is 7.5 at 50 kGy considering the particle size and crystallinity. Also, pH 8.5 gave the best antimicrobial activity of the Ag/CS NPs from Penicillium against both S. aureus and E. coli, while 8.5 and 7.5 were the best in the same order, for Ag/CS from Aspergillus.

  8. Effects of Egg Shell Membrane Hydrolysates on Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Wrinkle, Anti-Microbial Activity and Moisture-Protection.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinhee; Park, Kimoon; Yoo, Youngji; Kim, Jongkeun; Yang, Heejin; Shin, Youngjae

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of eggshell membrane hydrolysates (ESMH) on the anti-inflammatory, anti-wrinkle, anti-microbial activity, and moisture-protection for cosmetic use. Whole ESMH (before fractionation), and fraction I (>10 kDa), fraction II (3-10 kDa), and fraction III (<3 kDa) of the hydrolysates were assessed in this experiment. As lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IFN-γ caused the inflammation on Raw264.7 cell, whole ESMH and fraction I showed to be effective in inhibiting the induction of cell inflammation depending on the concentration, and also showed outstanding effect to suppress the skin inflammation. Fraction I inhibited collagenase and elastase activities to a greater extent than the other fractions, while all fractions had antibiotic effects at concentrations of 10 mg/disc and 20 mg/disc. In addition, it showed the moisture protection effects of skin on the holding amount and losing amount of moisture in upper-inner arm of the human body with a relatively low loss rate in skin, which confirmed that the hydrolyzed fractions of ESM helps to form the superior protective layer of moisture. It was concluded that ESMH fractions with different molecular weights, especially the 10 kDa fraction, have anti-lipopolysaccharide, anti-IFN-γ-induced inflammation, anti- collagenase and elastase activities, and thus can be used as a cosmetic agent to protect skin. PMID:26760742

  9. Effects of Egg Shell Membrane Hydrolysates on Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Wrinkle, Anti-Microbial Activity and Moisture-Protection

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jinhee; Park, Kimoon; Yoo, Youngji; Kim, Jongkeun; Yang, Heejin; Shin, Youngjae

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of eggshell membrane hydrolysates (ESMH) on the anti-inflammatory, anti-wrinkle, anti-microbial activity, and moisture-protection for cosmetic use. Whole ESMH (before fractionation), and fraction I (>10 kDa), fraction II (3-10 kDa), and fraction III (<3 kDa) of the hydrolysates were assessed in this experiment. As lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IFN-γ caused the inflammation on Raw264.7 cell, whole ESMH and fraction I showed to be effective in inhibiting the induction of cell inflammation depending on the concentration, and also showed outstanding effect to suppress the skin inflammation. Fraction I inhibited collagenase and elastase activities to a greater extent than the other fractions, while all fractions had antibiotic effects at concentrations of 10 mg/disc and 20 mg/disc. In addition, it showed the moisture protection effects of skin on the holding amount and losing amount of moisture in upper-inner arm of the human body with a relatively low loss rate in skin, which confirmed that the hydrolyzed fractions of ESM helps to form the superior protective layer of moisture. It was concluded that ESMH fractions with different molecular weights, especially the 10 kDa fraction, have anti-lipopolysaccharide, anti-IFN-γ-induced inflammation, anti- collagenase and elastase activities, and thus can be used as a cosmetic agent to protect skin. PMID:26760742

  10. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides with High Anticancer Activity and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hao; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Chih, Ya-Han; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:25970292

  11. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  12. Antimicrobial activity of natural Respitol-B and its main components against poultry microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Kazempour, Nastaran; Valian, Mahdi

    2013-10-01

    Poultries are infected to different kinds of microbial infections during their growth. For prevent of these diseases, many farmers use the synthetic antimicrobial agents. Whereas, the poultries participate in food cycle of human, the residues of these agents enter in human and cause many undesired side effects. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of Respitol-B and its main components (eucalyptus oil and menthol) was evaluated on different kinds of microorganisms including gram positive, gram negative bacteria, yeast and fungi in vitro conditions by disc diffusion and micro broth dilution assays. The gram positive bacteria, yeast and fungi is more sensitive than Gram negative ones to Respitol-B. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium is less sensitive to Respitol-B. Evaluation of menthol and eucalyptus oil for their antimicrobial activities exhibited that the antimicrobial activity of menthol is higher than that of eucalyptus oil. Eucalyptus oil had the best effect on Vibrio cholerae, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus flavus but had no effect on others. The antimicrobial activity of menthol is observable and its presence in Respitol-B enhances the antimicrobial activity of Respitol-B. Respitol-B as a 100% herbal drug has antimicrobial effect and can be used as alternative therapy for preventing and controlling of infections. PMID:24502173

  13. Effect of postharvest UV-C treatment on the bacterial diversity of Ataulfo mangoes by PCR-DGGE, survival of E. coli and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, Rocío; Ramírez-Villatoro, Guadalupe; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Eslava, Carlos; Calderón, Montserrat; Navarro-Ocaña, Arturo; Trejo-Márquez, Andrea; Wacher, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Since Mexico is the second largest exporter of mangoes, its safety assurance is essential. Research in microbial ecology and knowledge of complex interactions among microbes must be better understood to achieve maximal control of pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of UV-C treatments on bacterial diversity of the Ataulfo mangoes surface using PCR-DGGE analysis of variable region V3 of 16S rRNA genes, and the survival of E. coli, by plate counting. The UV-C irradiation reduced the microbial load on the surface of mangoes immediately after treatment and the structure of bacterial communities was modified during storage. We identified the key members of the bacterial communities on the surface of fruits, predominating Enterobacter genus. Genera as Lactococcus and Pantoea were only detected on the surface of non-treated (control) mangoes. This could indicate that these genera were affected by the UV-C treatment. On the other hand, the treatment did not have a significant effect on survival of E. coli. However, genera that have been recognized as antagonists against foodborne pathogens were identified in the bands patterns. Also, phenolic compounds were determined by HPLC and antimicrobial activity was assayed according to the agar diffusion method. The main phenolic compounds were chlorogenic, gallic, and caffeic acids. Mango peel methanol extracts (UV-C treated and control mangoes) showed antimicrobial activity against strains previously isolated from mango, detecting significant differences (P < 0.05) among treated and control mangoes after 4 and 12 days of storage. Ps. fluorescens and Ps. stutszeri were the most sensitive. PMID:23761788

  14. Antimicrobial evaluation of new metallic complexes with xylitol active against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans: MIC determination, post-agent effect and Zn-uptake.

    PubMed

    Santi, E; Facchin, G; Faccio, R; Barroso, R P; Costa-Filho, A J; Borthagaray, G; Torre, M H

    2016-02-01

    Xylitol (xylH5) is metabolized via the pentose pathway in humans, but it is unsuitable as an energy source for many microorganisms where it produces a xylitol-induced growth inhibition and disturbance in protein synthesis. For this reason, xylitol is used in the prophylaxis of several infections. In the search of better antimicrobial agents, new copper and zinc complexes with xylitol were synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectrosco pic methods: Na2[Cu3(xylH−4)2]·NaCl·4.5H2O (Cu-xyl) and [Zn4(xylH−4)2(H2O)2]·NaCl·3H2O (Zn-xyl). Both copper and zinc complexes presented higher MIC against Pseudomona aeruginosa than the free xylitol while two different behaviors were found against Candida albicans depending on the complex. The growth curves showed that Cu-xyl presented lower activity than the free ligand during all the studied period. In the case of Znxyl the growth curves showed that the inhibition of the microorganism growth in the first stage was equivalent to that of xylitol but in the second stage (after 18 h) Zn-xyl inhibited more. Besides, the PAE (post agent effect)obtained for Zn-xyl and xyl showed that the recovery from the damage of microbial cells had a delay of 14 and 13 h respectively. This behavior could be useful in prophylaxis treatments for infectious diseases where it is important that the antimicrobial effect lasts longer. With the aim to understand the microbiological activities the analysis of the particle size, lipophilicity and Zn uptake was performed. PMID:26619097

  15. Mechanisms of the Antimicrobial Activities of Graphene Materials.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Zhaojun; Luo, Yang

    2016-02-24

    A thorough understanding of the antimicrobial mechanisms of graphene materials (GMs) is critical to the manipulation of highly efficient antimicrobial nanomaterials for future biomedical applications. Here we review the most recent studies of GM-mediated antimicrobial properties. This review covers the physicochemical properties of GMs, experimental surroundings, and selected microorganisms as well as the interaction between GMs and selected microorganisms to explore controversial antimicrobial activities. Finally, we rationally analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed mechanisms and provide new insights into the remaining challenges and perspectives for future studies. PMID:26824139

  16. Prediction of Antimicrobial Activity of Synthetic Peptides by a Decision Tree Model

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Felipe; Perez, Pedro S.; Baranauskas, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a persistent problem in the public health sphere. However, recent attempts to find effective substitutes to combat infections have been directed at identifying natural antimicrobial peptides in order to circumvent resistance to commercial antibiotics. This study describes the development of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial activity, created in silico by site-directed mutation modeling using wild-type peptides as scaffolds for these mutations. Fragments of antimicrobial peptides were used for modeling with molecular modeling computational tools. To analyze these peptides, a decision tree model, which indicated the action range of peptides on the types of microorganisms on which they can exercise biological activity, was created. The decision tree model was processed using physicochemistry properties from known antimicrobial peptides available at the Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD). The two most promising peptides were synthesized, and antimicrobial assays showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Colossomin C and colossomin D were the most inhibitory peptides at 5 μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The methods described in this work and the results obtained are useful for the identification and development of new compounds with antimicrobial activity through the use of computational tools. PMID:23455341

  17. Antimicrobial activities against periodontopathic bacteria of Pittosporum tobira and its active compound.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Hyun; Jeong, Yong Joon; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Dae Won; Kang, Se Chan; Khoa, Hoang Viet Bach; Le, Le Ba; Cho, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The study of medicinal plants for treatment of periodontitis is of great value to establish their efficacy as sources of new antimicrobial drugs. Five hundred and fifty eight Korean local plant extracts were screened for antibacterial activity against representative periodontopathic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Among the various medicinal plants, the alcohol extract of Pittosporum tobira, which significantly exhibited antibacterial effect for all tested strains, showed the highest activity in the antimicrobial assays. NMR analyses revealed that R1-barrigenol, a triterpene sapogenin, was the most effective compound in P. tobira. These results demonstrated that P. tobira possesses antimicrobial properties and would be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of periodontitis. PMID:24662076

  18. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role during innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we ex...

  19. Activity of abundant antimicrobials of the human airway.

    PubMed

    Travis, S M; Conway, B A; Zabner, J; Smith, J J; Anderson, N N; Singh, P K; Greenberg, E P; Welsh, M J

    1999-05-01

    Human airways produce several antimicrobial factors; the most abundant are lysozyme and lactoferrin. Despite their likely importance in preventing infection, and their possible key role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), we know little about their antibacterial activity in the context of the CF airway. We found that abundant airway antimicrobial factors kill common CF pathogens, although Burkholderia was relatively resistant. To study the antibacterial activity, we developed a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative in vitro luminescence assay. Because NaCl concentrations may be elevated in CF airway surface liquid, we tested the effect of salt on antibacterial activity. Activity of individual factors and of airway lavage fluid was inhibited by high ionic strength, and it was particularly sensitive to divalent cations. However, it was not inhibited by nonionic osmolytes and thus did not require hypotonic liquid. The inhibition by ionic strength could be partially compensated by increased concentrations of antibacterial factors, thus there was no one unique salt concentration for inhibition. CF airway secretions also contain abundant mucin and elastase; however, these had no effect on antibacterial activity of lysozyme, lactoferrin, or airway lavage fluids. When studied at low NaCl concentrations, CF and non-CF airway lavage fluids contained similar levels of antibacterial activity. These results suggest approaches toward developing treatments aimed at preventing or reducing airway infections in individuals with CF. PMID:10226057

  20. Antimicrobial use in swine production and its effect on the swine gut microbiota and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Holman, Devin B; Chénier, Martin R

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobials have been used in swine production at subtherapeutic levels since the early 1950s to increase feed efficiency and promote growth. In North America, a number of antimicrobials are available for use in swine. However, the continuous administration of subtherapeutic, low concentrations of antimicrobials to pigs also provides selective pressure for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and resistance determinants. For this reason, subtherapeutic antimicrobial use in livestock remains a source of controversy and concern. The swine gut microbiota demonstrates a number of changes in response to antimicrobial administration depending on the dosage, duration of treatment, age of the pigs, and gut location that is sampled. Both culture-independent and -dependent studies have also shown that the swine gut microbiota contains a large number of antimicrobial resistance determinants even in the absence of antimicrobial exposure. Heavy metals, such as zinc and copper, which are often added at relatively high doses to swine feed, may also play a role in maintaining antimicrobial resistance and in the stability of the swine gut microbiota. This review focuses on the use of antimicrobials in swine production, with an emphasis on the North American regulatory context, and their effect on the swine gut microbiota and on antimicrobial resistance determinants in the gut microbiota. PMID:26414105

  1. Studies on Anticancer Activities of Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, David W.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-01-01

    In spite of great advances in cancer therapy, there is considerable current interest in developing anticancer agents with a new mode of action because of the development of resistance by cancer cells towards current anticancer drugs. A growing number of studies have shown that some of the cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are toxic to bacteria but not to normal mammalian cells, exhibit a broad spectrum of cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Such studies have considerably enhanced the significance of AMPs, both synthetic and from natural sources, which have been of importance both for an increased understanding of the immune system and for their potential as clinical antibiotics. The electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged components of bacterial and cancer cells and the positively charged AMPs is believed to play a major role in the strong binding and selective disruption of bacterial and cancer cell membranes, respectively. However, it is unclear why some host defense peptides are able to kill cancer cells when others do not. In addition, it is not clear whether the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the antibacterial and anticancer activities of AMPs are the same or different. In this article, we review various studies on different AMPs that exhibit cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. The suitability of cancer cell-targeting AMPs as cancer therapeutics is also discussed. PMID:18078805

  2. Antimicrobial activity of fermented Theobroma cacao pod husk extract.

    PubMed

    Santos, R X; Oliveira, D A; Sodré, G A; Gosmann, G; Brendel, M; Pungartnik, C

    2014-01-01

    Theobroma cacao L. contains more than 500 different chemical compounds some of which have been traditionally used for their antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulatory, vasodilatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial activities. Spontaneous aerobic fermentation of cacao husks yields a crude husk extract (CHE) with antimicrobial activity. CHE was fractioned by solvent partition with polar solvent extraction or by silica gel chromatography and a total of 12 sub-fractions were analyzed for chemical composition and bioactivity. CHE was effective against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa. Antibacterial activity was determined using 6 strains: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella choleraesuis (Gram-negative). At doses up to 10 mg/mL, CHE was not effective against the Gram-positive bacteria tested but against medically important P. aeruginosa and S. choleraesuis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5.0 mg/mL. Sub-fractions varied widely in activity and strongest antibacterial activity was seen with CHE8 against S. choleraesuis (MIC of 1.0 mg/mL) and CHE9 against S. epidermidis (MIC of 2.5 mg/mL). All bioactive CHE fractions contained phenols, steroids, or terpenes, but no saponins. Fraction CHE9 contained flavonoids, phenolics, steroids, and terpenes, amino acids, and alkaloids, while CHE12 had the same compounds but lacked flavonoids. PMID:25299086

  3. Antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial activity of Calpurnia aurea leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Ethiopia, Calpurnia aurea is used for the treatment of syphilis, malaria, rabies, diabetes, hypertension, diarrhoea, leishmaniasis, trachoma, elephantiasis, fungal diseases and different swellings. However, despite its traditional usage as an antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial agent, there is limited or no information regarding its effectiveness and mode of action in diarrhoea which may be caused by Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. Hence, we evaluated the 80% methanol (MeOH) extract of dried and powdered leaves of C. aurea for its antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial activities. Methods Swiss albino mice of either sex were divided into five groups (five/group): Group I served as control and received vehicle (1% Tween 80) at a dose of 10 ml/kg orally; Group II served as standard and received loperamide at the dose of 3 mg/kg orally; Groups III, IV and V served as test groups and received the 80% MeOH leaf extract of C. aurea at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg orally, respectively. Diarrhoea was induced by oral administration of 0.5 ml castor oil to each mouse, 1 h after the above treatments. During an observation period of 4 h, time of onset of diarrhea, total number of faecal output (frequency of defecation) and weight of faeces excreted by the animals were recorded. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance followed by Tukey post test. Antimicrobial activity test was conducted using agar well diffusion assay. Clinical isolates tested were Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Results In castor oil induced diarrhea model, the 80% methanol leaf extract of C. aurea at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg and the standard drug loperamide (3 mg/kg) significantly reduced the time of onset of diarrhea, the frequency of defecation (total number of faecal output) and weight of faeces. C. aurea leaf extract

  4. Antimicrobial activities of Saudi honey against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nahari, Alaa A.M.; Almasaudi, Saad B.; Abd El-Ghany, El Sayed M.; Barbour, Elie; Al Jaouni, Soad K.; Harakeh, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Five types of imported and local honey were screened for both their bacteriocidal/bacteriostatic activities against both Imipenem resistant and sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both Brain Heart infusion broth and Mueller–Hinton agar. The results indicated that the effect was concentration and type of honey dependant. All types of honey tested exerted a full inhibition of bacterial growth at the highest concentration tested of 50% at 24 h of contact. The inhibitory effect of honey on bacterial growth was clear with concentrations of 20% and 10% and this effect was most evident in the case of Manuka honey as compared to Nigella sativa honey and Seder honey. Manuka honey UMF +20 showed a bacteriocidal activity on both Imipenem resistant and sensitive P. aeruginosa, while Seder honey and N. sativa honey exerted only a bacteriostatic effect. Manuka honey UMF +10 showed most effect on antimicrobial resistance. Manuka honey UMF +10 had an effect on modulation of Imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The results indicated that various types of honey affected the test organisms differently. Modulation of antimicrobial resistance was seen in the case Manuka honey UMF +10. PMID:26288553

  5. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Mexican medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Jacobo-Salcedo, Maria del Rosario; Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Salazar-Olivo, Luis A; Carranza-Alvarez, Candy; González-Espíndola, Luis Angel; Domínguez, Fabiola; Maciel-Torres, Sandra Patricia; García-Lujan, Concepción; González-Martínez, Marisela del Rocio; Gómez-Sánchez, Maricela; Estrada-Castillón, Eduardo; Zapata-Bustos, Rocio; Medellin-Milán, Pedro; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2011-12-01

    The antimicrobial effects of the Mexican medicinal plants Guazuma ulmifolia, Justicia spicigera, Opuntia joconostle, O. leucotricha, Parkinsonia aculeata, Phoradendron longifolium, P. serotinum, Psittacanthus calyculatus, Tecoma stans and Teucrium cubense were tested against several human multi-drug resistant pathogens, including three Gram (+) and five Gram (-) bacterial species and three fungal species using the disk-diffusion assay. The cytotoxicity of plant extracts on human cancer cell lines and human normal non-cancerous cells was also evaluated using the MTT assay. Phoradendron longifolium, Teucrium cubense, Opuntia joconostle, Tecoma stans and Guazuma ulmifolia showed potent antimicrobial effects against at least one multidrug-resistant microorganism (inhibition zone > 15 mm). Only Justicia spicigera and Phoradendron serotinum extracts exerted active cytotoxic effects on human breast cancer cells (IC50 < or = 30 microg/mL). The results showed that Guazuma ulmifolia produced potent antimicrobial effects against Candida albicans and Acinetobacter lwoffii, whereas Justicia spicigera and Phoradendron serotinum exerted the highest toxic effects on MCF-7 and HeLa, respectively, which are human cancer cell lines. These three plant species may be important sources of antimicrobial and cytotoxic agents. PMID:22312741

  6. Synergistic Antimicrobial Activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Amber; Khan, Adnan; Borghetto, Ilaria; Kazmi, Shahana U.; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates.” We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens PMID:25719410

  7. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of the Hybrid Molecules between Sulfonamides and Active Antimicrobial Pleuromutilin Derivative.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangzhu; Yang, Dexue; Pan, Zhikun; Lai, Lihong; Liu, Jianhua; Fang, Binghu; Shi, Shuning

    2015-08-01

    A series of novel hybrid molecules between sulfonamides and active antimicrobial 14-o-(3-carboxy-phenylsulfide)-mutilin were synthesized, and their in vitro antibacterial activities were evaluated by the broth microdilution. Results indicated that these compounds displayed potent antimicrobial activities in vitro against various drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococci and streptococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and mycoplasma. In particular, sulfapyridine analog (6c) exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycoplasma, including Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 0.016-0.063 μg/mL), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 0.016 μg/mL), Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC = 0.032-0.063 μg/mL), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MIC = 0.004 μg/mL), with respect to other synthesized compounds and reference drugs sulfonamide (MIC = 8-128 μg/mL) and valnemulin (MIC = 0.004-0.5 μg/mL). Furthermore, comparison between MIC values of pleuromutilin-sulfonamide hybrids 6a-f with pleuromutilin parent compound 3 revealed that these modifications at 14 position side chain of the pleuromutilin with benzene sulfonamide could greatly improve the antibacterial activity especially against Gram-positives. PMID:25431015

  8. Antimicrobial activities of three species of family mimosaceae.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Adeel; Mahmood, Aqeel; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of crude methanolic extract of leaves of Acacia nilotica L., Albizia lebbeck L. and Mimosa himalayana Gamble belonging to family mimosaceae were investigated in this research work. Antibacterial activity was studied by agar well diffusion method against one gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and three gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia. Crude extract of all plants showed best activity against gram-negative bacterial strains while minor inhibition zones were found against gram positive bacterial strains. Antifungal activity of crude plant extract was screened by agar tube dilution method against Aspergillus nigar and Aspergillus flavus. These results showed that these plants extracts have potential against bacterias, while against fungi their activity is not much effective. PMID:22186331

  9. Rational design of tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides with enhanced antimicrobial activities and specificities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Yuan; Huang, Kuo-Chun; Yip, Bak-Sau; Tu, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Heng-Li; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Trp-rich antimicrobial peptides play important roles in the host innate defense mechanism of many plants and animals. A series of short Trp-rich peptides derived from the C-terminal region of Bothrops asper myothoxin II, a Lys49 phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), were found to reproduce the antimicrobial activities of their parent molecule. Of these peptides, KKWRWWLKALAKK-designated PEM-2-was found to display improved activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. To improve the antimicrobial activity of PEM-2 for potential clinical applications further, we determined the solution structure of PEM-2 bound to membrane-mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles by two-dimensional NMR methods. The DPC micelle-bound structure of PEM-2 adopts an α-helical conformation and the positively charged residues are clustered together to form a hydrophilic patch. The surface electrostatic potential map indicates that two of the three tryptophan residues are packed against the peptide backbone and form a hydrophobic face with Leu7, Ala9, and Leu10. A variety of biophysical and biochemical experiments, including circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry, were used to show that PEM-2 interacted with negatively charged phospholipid vesicles and efficiently induced dye release from these vesicles, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of PEM-2 could be due to interactions with bacterial membranes. Potent analogues of PEM-2 with enhanced antimicrobial and less pronounced hemolytic activities were designed with the aid of these structural studies. PMID:20865718

  10. Comparison of the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of twenty unsaturated sesquiterpene dialdehydes from plants and mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Anke, H; Sterner, O

    1991-08-01

    Twenty unsaturated sesquiterpene dialdehydes were tested for antimicrobial, algaecidal, cytotoxic, and mutagenic activity. In addition to the known antifungal activity, polygodial (1) also exhibited antibacterial and cytotoxic activity; epipolygodial (2) was slightly less active. The most active compounds were: isovelleral (7), isoisovelleral (8), velleral (20), and methylmarasmate (6). With the exception of velleral (20), they also exhibited mutagenic activity in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Derivatization to less polar compounds usually increased the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects and reduced mutagenicity, while the introduction of hydroxyl groups had the reverse effect. PMID:1775575

  11. Oxidized amylose with high carboxyl content: A promising solubilizer and carrier of linalool for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Ye, Youxin; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Songling; Chen, Jing; Wang, Shiting; Li, Defu; Mu, Changdao

    2016-12-10

    The oxidized amyloses with different carboxyl content were prepared to include linalool for antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. The results show that linalool can be effectively reserved from volatilization through encapsulation into amylose and oxidized amyloses. The inclusion ability of oxidized amyloses towards linalool is decreasing with the increase of oxidation level due to the depolymerization of amylose. However, the solubilization effect of oxidized amyloses to linalool is enhanced efficiently owning to the high water solubility of oxidized amyloses. It is interesting that the inclusion complexes have good antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. Linalool solubilized by oxidized amyloses presents better antimicrobial performance than that solubilized by amylose, mainly resulting from that amylose-linalool inclusion complex would aggregate and retrograde fast in aqueous solution, which is disadvantageous for the release of linalool. The study suggests that oxidized amylose is a promising solubilizer and carrier of linalool for antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. PMID:27577891

  12. Silver activation on thin films of Ag-ZrCN coatings for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, I; Calderon V, S; Escobar Galindo, R; Palacio, C; Henriques, M; Piedade, A P; Carvalho, S

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, with the increase of elderly population and related health problems, knee and hip joint prosthesis are being widely used worldwide. However, failure of these invasive devices occurs in a high percentage thus demanding the revision of the chirurgical procedure. Within the reasons of failure, microbial infections, either hospital or subsequently-acquired, contribute in high number to the statistics. Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) has emerged as one of the major nosocomial pathogens associated with these infections. Silver has a historic performance in medicine due to its potent antimicrobial activity, with a broad-spectrum on the activity of different types of microorganisms. Consequently, the main goal of this work was to produce Ag-ZrCN coatings with antimicrobial activity, for the surface modification of hip prostheses. Thin films of ZrCN with several silver concentrations were deposited onto stainless steel 316 L, by DC reactive magnetron sputtering, using two targets, Zr and Zr with silver pellets (Zr+Ag target), in an atmosphere containing Ar, C2H2 and N2. The antimicrobial activity of the modified surfaces was tested against S. epidermidis and the influence of an activation step of silver was assessed by testing samples after immersion in a 5% (w/v) NaClO solution for 5 min. The activation procedure revealed to be essential for the antimicrobial activity, as observed by the presence of an inhibition halo on the surface with 11 at.% of Ag. The morphology analysis of the surface before and after the activation procedure revealed differences in silver distribution indicating segregation/diffusion of the metallic element to the film's surface. Thus, the results indicate that the silver activation step is responsible for an antimicrobial effect of the coatings, due to silver oxidation and silver ion release. PMID:26117788

  13. Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Coleus amboinicus Lour Exhibited Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Astuti, Puji; Sudarsono, Sudarsono; Nisak, Khoirun; Nugroho, Giri Wisnu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Coleus amboinicus is a medicinal plant traditionally used to treat various diseases such as throat infection, cough and fever, diarrhea, nasal congestion and digestive problems. The plant was explored for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents. Methods: Screening for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents was conducted using agar plug method and antimicrobial activity of promising ethyl acetate extracts was determined by disc diffusion assay. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) - bioautography was performed to localize the bioactive components within the extract. TLC visualization detection reagents were used to preliminary analyze phytochemical groups of the bioactive compounds. Results: Three endophytic fungi were obtained, two of them showed promising potential. Agar diffusion method showed that endophytic fungi CAL-2 exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis, S. aureus and S. thypi, whilst CAS-1 inhibited the growth of B. subtilis. TLC bioautography of ethyl acetate extract of CAL-2 revealed at least three bands exhibited antimicrobial activity and at least two bands showed inhibition of B. subtilis growth. Preliminary analysis of the crude extracts suggests that bioactive compounds within CAL-2 extract are terpenoids, phenolics and phenyl propanoid compounds whilst the antimicrobial agents within CAS-1 extract are terpenoids, propylpropanoids, alkaloids or heterocyclic nitrogen compounds. Conclusion: These data suggest the potential of endophytic fungi of C. amboinicus as source for antimicrobial agents. PMID:25671195

  14. Comparative Study of Surface-Active Properties and Antimicrobial Activities of Disaccharide Monoesters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Song, Fei; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Wei, Wei; Feng, Fengqin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sugar or fatty acid in sugar ester compounds on the surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of these compounds. Disaccharides of medium-chain fatty acid monoesters were synthesized through transesterifications by immobilized lipase (Lipozyme TLIM) to yield nine monoesters for subsequent study. Their antimicrobial activities were investigated using three pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Candida albicans. Their surface-active properties including air–water surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and foaming and emulsion power and stability were also studied. The results showed that all of the tested monoesters were more effective against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) than against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacterium). The results demonstrated that the carbon chain length was the most important factor influencing the surface properties, whereas degree of esterification and hydrophilic groups showed little effect. PMID:25531369

  15. Comparative study of surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of disaccharide monoesters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Song, Fei; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Wei, Wei; Feng, Fengqin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sugar or fatty acid in sugar ester compounds on the surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of these compounds. Disaccharides of medium-chain fatty acid monoesters were synthesized through transesterifications by immobilized lipase (Lipozyme TLIM) to yield nine monoesters for subsequent study. Their antimicrobial activities were investigated using three pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Candida albicans. Their surface-active properties including air-water surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and foaming and emulsion power and stability were also studied. The results showed that all of the tested monoesters were more effective against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) than against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacterium). The results demonstrated that the carbon chain length was the most important factor influencing the surface properties, whereas degree of esterification and hydrophilic groups showed little effect. PMID:25531369

  16. Antimicrobial activity of flavonoids from leaves of Tagetes minuta.

    PubMed

    Tereschuk, M L; Riera, M V; Castro, G R; Abdala, L R

    1997-05-01

    The total extract and fractions with different solvents, obtained from leaves of Tagetes minuta, showed several degrees of antimicrobial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms. The same fractions were inactive against Lactobacillus, Zymomonas and Saccharomices species. The major component of the extract: quercetagetin-7-arabinosyl-galactoside, showed significant antimicrobial activity on pathogen microorganisms tested. Correlation results were carried out using chloramphenicol as standard antibiotic. PMID:9201613

  17. Antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of silver nanoparticle thermosensitive gel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hongmei; Pan, Xin; Xie, Xiaobao; Wu, Chuanbin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of silver nanoparticles incorporated into thermosensitive gel (S-T-Gel) on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Patients and methods This study investigated the growth, permeability, and morphology of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in order to observe the action of S-T-Gel on the membrane structure of these three bacteria. The cell morphology of normal and treated bacteria cells was assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the effects of S-T-Gel on genome DNA of bacterial cells were evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results S-T-Gel showed promising activity against Staphylococcus aureus and moderate activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The observation with TEM suggested that S-T-Gel may destroy the structure of bacterial cell membranes in order to enter the bacterial cell. S-T-Gel then condensed DNA and combined and coagulated with the cytoplasm of the damaged bacteria, resulting in the leakage of the cytoplasmic component and the eventual death of these three bacteria. In addition, the analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis demonstrated that S-T-Gel could increase the decomposability of genome DNA. Conclusion These results about promising antimicrobial activity and mechanism of S-T-Gel may be useful for further research and development in in-vivo studies. PMID:22131833

  18. Antimicrobial activity of mosquito cecropin peptides against Francisella.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Akanksha; Gupta, Kajal; Shah, Ruhee; van Hoek, Monique L

    2016-10-01

    Francisella tularensis is the cause of the zoonotic disease tularemia. In Sweden and Scandinavia, epidemiological studies have implicated mosquitoes as a vector. Prior research has demonstrated the presence of Francisella DNA in infected mosquitoes but has not shown definitive transmission of tularemia from a mosquito to a mammalian host. We hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides, an important component of the innate immune system of higher organisms, may play a role in mosquito host-defense to Francisella. We established that Francisella sp. are susceptible to two cecropin antimicrobial peptides derived from the mosquito Aedes albopictus as well as Culex pipiens. We also demonstrated induced expression of Aedes albopictus antimicrobial peptide genes by Francisella infection C6/36 mosquito cell line. We demonstrate that mosquito antimicrobial peptides act against Francisella by disrupting the cellular membrane of the bacteria. Thus, it is possible that antimicrobial peptides may play a role in the inability of mosquitoes to establish an effective natural transmission of tularemia. PMID:27235883

  19. Size-dependent antimicrobial effects of novel palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Adams, Clara P; Walker, Katherine A; Obare, Sherine O; Docherty, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0 ± 0.1 nm, 2.5 ± 0.2 nm and 3.1 ± 0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions (2.5 × 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9) M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ≥ 10(-5) M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

  20. Size-Dependent Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Palladium Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Clara P.; Walker, Katherine A.; Obare, Sherine O.; Docherty, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0±0.1 nm, 2.5±0.2 nm and 3.1±0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions (2.5×10−4, 10−5, 10−6, 10−7, 10−8, and 10−9 M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ≥10−5 M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

  1. Poly(anhydride-esters) comprised exclusively of naturally occurring antimicrobials and EDTA: antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Carbone-Howell, Ashley L; Stebbins, Nicholas D; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2014-05-12

    Carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol are naturally occurring phenolic compounds known to possess antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria, as well as antioxidant activity. Biodegradable poly(anhydride-esters) composed of an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) backbone and antimicrobial pendant groups (i.e., carvacrol, thymol, or eugenol) were synthesized via solution polymerization. The resulting polymers were characterized to confirm their chemical composition and understand their thermal properties and molecular weight. In vitro release studies demonstrated that polymer hydrolytic degradation was complete after 16 days, resulting in the release of free antimicrobials and EDTA. Antioxidant and antibacterial assays determined that polymer release media exhibited bioactivity similar to that of free compound, demonstrating that polymer incorporation and subsequent release had no effect on activity. These polymers completely degrade into components that are biologically relevant and have the capability to promote preservation of consumer products in the food and personal care industries via antimicrobial and antioxidant pathways. PMID:24702678

  2. Effectiveness of antimicrobial food packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, K

    2005-10-01

    Antimicrobial additives have been used successfully for many years as direct food additives. The literature provides evidence that some of these additives may be effective as indirect food additives incorporated into food packaging materials. Antimicrobial food packaging is directed toward the reduction of surface contamination of processed, prepared foods such as sliced meats and Frankfurter sausages (hot dogs). The use of such packaging materials is not meant to be a substitute for good sanitation practices, but it should enhance the safety of food as an additional hurdle for the growth of pathogenic and/or spoilage microorganisms. Studies have focused on establishing methods for coating low-density polyethylene film or barrier films with methyl cellulose as a carrier for nisin. These films have significantly reduced the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in solutions and in vacuum packaged hot dogs. Other research has focused on the use of chitosan to inhibit L. monocytogenes and chlorine dioxide sachets for the reduction of Salmonella on modified atmosphere-packaged fresh chicken breasts. Overall, antimicrobial packaging shows promise as an effective method for the inhibition of certain bacteria in foods, but barriers to their commercial implementation continue to exist. PMID:16227182

  3. Peptidotriazoles with antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Güell, Imma; Micaló, Lluís; Cano, Laura; Badosa, Esther; Ferre, Rafael; Montesinos, Emilio; Bardají, Eduard; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We designed and prepared peptidotriazoles based on the antimicrobial peptide BP100 (LysLysLeuPheLysLysIleLeuLysTyrLeu-NH(2)) by introducing a triazole ring in the peptide backbone or onto the side chain of a selected residue. These compounds were screened for their in vitro growth inhibition of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and for their cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells and tobacco leaves. Their proteolytic susceptibility was also analyzed. The antibacterial activity and the hemolysis were influenced by the amino acid that was modified with the triazole as well as by the absence of presence of a substituent in this heterocyclic ring. We identified sequences active against the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (MIC of 1.6-12.5 μM), and against the fungi Fusarium oxysporum (MIC<6.2-12.5 μM) with low hemolytic activity (0-23% at 50 μM), high stability to protease digestion and no phytotoxicity. These peptidotriazoles constitute good candidates to design new antimicrobial agents. PMID:22198367

  4. Polymer-Ag nanocomposites with enhanced antimicrobial activity against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lin; Lu, Zhentan; Zhang, Xinge; Li, Chaoxing; Jia, Yanxia

    2014-09-24

    Herein, a nontoxic nanocomposite is synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate in the presence of a cationic polymer displaying strong antimicrobial activity against bacterial infection. These nanocomposites with a large concentration of positive charge promote their adsorption to bacterial membranes through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, the synthesized nanocomposites with polyvalent and synergistic antimicrobial effects can effectively kill both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria without the emergence of bacterial resistance. Morphological changes obtained by transmission electron microscope observation show that these nanocomposites can cause leakage and chaos of intracellular contents. Analysis of the antimicrobial mechanism confirms that the lethal action of nanocomposites against the bacteria started with disruption of the bacterial membrane, subsequent cellular internalization of the nanoparticles, and inhibition of intracellular enzymatic activity. This novel antimicrobial material with good cytocompatibility promotes healing of infected wounds in diabetic rats, and has a promising future in the treatment of other infectious diseases. PMID:25170799

  5. Synergistic Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides and Antibiotics against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Nuding, Sabine; Frasch, Tina; Schaller, Martin; Stange, Eduard F.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating rates of health care-associated infections caused by Clostridium difficile, with increasing recurrence and rising antibiotic resistance rates, have become a serious problem in recent years. This study was conducted to explore whether a combination of antibiotics with human antimicrobial peptides may lead to an increase in antibacterial activity. The in vitro activities of the antimicrobial peptides HBD1 to HBD3, HNP1, HD5, and LL-37 and the antibiotics tigecycline, moxifloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem alone or in combination against 10 toxinogenic and 10 nontoxinogenic C. difficile strains were investigated. Bacterial viability was determined by flow cytometry and toxin production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). When combined at subinhibitory concentrations, antimicrobial peptides and antibiotics generally led to an additive killing effect against toxinogenic and nontoxinogenic C. difficile strains. However, LL-37 and HBD3 acted in synergism with all the antibiotics that were tested. Electron microscopy revealed membrane perturbation in bacterial cell walls by HBD3. In 3 out of 10 toxinogenic strains, HBD3, LL-37, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem administration led to an increased toxin release which was not neutralized by the addition of HNP1. Antimicrobial peptides increase the bacterial killing of antibiotics against C. difficile regardless of the antibiotics' mode of action. Membrane perturbation in or pore formation on the bacterial cell wall may enhance the uptake of antibiotics and increase their antibacterial effect. Therefore, a combination of antibiotics with antimicrobial peptides may represent a promising novel approach to the treatment of C. difficile infections. PMID:25022581

  6. Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Methods Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. Results The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 μg/mL), ABTS (2763.48 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for

  7. Immunomodulatory and Antimicrobial Activity of Babassu Mesocarp Improves the Survival in Lethal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Dayanna S.; Barcellos, Priscila S.; Gonçalves, Azizedite G.

    2016-01-01

    Attalea speciosa syn Orbignya phalerata Mart. (babassu) has been used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases. Aim of the study. To investigate the antimicrobial and immunological activity of babassu mesocarp extract (EE). Material and Methods. The in vitro antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disk diffusion assay and by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The flavonoids and phenolic acids content were determined by chromatography. The in vivo assays were performed in Swiss mice submitted to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mice received EE subcutaneously (125 or 250 mg/Kg), 6 hours after the CLP. The number of lymphoid cells was quantified and the cytokines production was determined by ELISA after 12 h. Results. EE was effective as antimicrobial to E. faecalis, S. aureus, and MRSA. EE is rich in phenolic acids, a class of compounds with antimicrobial and immunological activity. An increased survival can be observed in those groups, possibly due to a significant inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6. Conclusions. The EE showed specific antimicrobial activity in vitro and an important antiseptic effect in vivo possibly due to the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity.

  8. In vitro antimicrobial activity of four Ficus carica latex fractions against resistant human pathogens (antimicrobial activity of Ficus carica latex).

    PubMed

    Aref, Houda Lazreg; Salah, Karima Bel Hadj; Chaumont, Jean Pierre; Fekih, Abdelwaheb; Aouni, Mahjoub; Said, Khaled

    2010-01-01

    Methanolic, hexanoïc, chloroformic and ethyl acetate extracts of Ficus carica latex were investigated for their in vitro antimicrobial proprieties against five bacteria species and seven strains of fungi. The green fruit latex was collected from Chott Mariam Souse, Middle East coast of Tunisia. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts was evaluated and based respectively on the inhibition zone using the disc-diffusion assay, minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) for bacterial testing and the method by calculating inhibition percentage (I%) for fungi-inhibiting activities. The methanolic extract had no effect against bacteria except for Proteus mirabilis while the ethyl acetate extract had inhibition effect on the multiplication of five bacteria species (Enterococcus fecalis, Citobacter freundei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Echerchia coli and Proteus mirabilis). For the opportunist pathogenic yeasts, ethyl acetate and chlorophormic fractions showed a very strong inhibition (100%); methanolic fraction had a total inhibition against Candida albicans (100%) at a concentration of 500 microg/ml and a negative effect against Cryptococcus neoformans. Microsporum canis was strongly inhibited with methanolic extract (75%) and totally with ethyl acetate extract at a concentration of 750 microg/ml. Hexanoïc extract showed medium results. PMID:20067867

  9. Diverse antimicrobial activity from Enterococcus faecium NRRL B-30746 bacteriocin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic therapy to resolve bacterial disease has been compromised by the increased prevalence and magnitude of bacterial antibiotic resistance. In our efforts to identify new effective antimicrobials, bacteria isolated from poultry intestinal contents were screened for bacteriocin synthesis again...

  10. QSAR study of antimicrobial activity of some 3-nitrocoumarins and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Debeljak, Zeljko; Skrbo, Armin; Jasprica, Ivona; Mornar, Ana; Plecko, Vanda; Banjanac, Mihajlo; Medić-Sarić, Marica

    2007-01-01

    A new class of antimicrobial agents, 3-nitrocoumarins and related compounds, has been chosen as a subject of the present study. In order to explore their activity and molecular properties that determine their antimicrobial effects, QSAR models have been proposed. Most of the 64 descriptors used for the development were extracted from semiempirical and density functional theory (DFT) founded calculations. For this study literature data containing results of microbiological activity screening of 33 coumarin derivatives against selected clinical isolates of C. albicans (CA) and S. aureus (SA) have been selected. Multivariate predictive models based on random forests (RF) and two hybrid classification approaches, genetic algorithms (GA) associated with either support vector machines (SVM) or k nearest neighbor (kNN), have been used for establishment of QSARs. An applied feature selection approach enabled two-dimensional linear separation of active and inactive compounds, which was a necessary tool for rational candidate design and descriptor relevance interpretation. Candidate molecules were checked by cross-validated models, and selected derivatives have been synthesized. Their antimicrobial activities were compared to antimicrobial activities of the representative derivatives from the original set in terms of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against chosen SA and CA ATCC strains. High ranking of descriptors consistent with the degree of hydrolytic instability of selected compounds is common to models of antimicrobial activity against both microorganisms. However, descriptor ranking indicates different antimicrobial mechanisms of action of chosen coumarin derivatives against selected microbial species. PMID:17489552

  11. In vitro antimicrobial activity of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Bisignano, Carlo; Filocamo, Angela; Faulks, Richard M; Mandalari, Giuseppina

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of polyphenol-rich fractions derived from raw shelled and roasted salted pistachios. American Type Culture Collection (ATCC), food and clinical isolates, of Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mirabilis), Gram-positive bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus), the yeasts Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis and the fungus Aspergillus niger were used. Pistachio extracts were active against Gram-positive bacteria with a bactericidal effect observed against L. monocytogenes (ATCC strains and food isolates), S. aureus and MRSA clinical isolates. Extracts from raw shelled pistachios were more active than those from roasted salted pistachios. The bactericidal activity of pistachio extracts could be used to help control the growth of some microorganisms in foods to improve safety and may find application as a topical treatment for S. aureus. PMID:23350629

  12. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value. PMID:26469996

  13. Nanoliposomes containing Eucalyptus citriodora as antibiotic with specific antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Cui, Haiying; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Xuejing; Bortolini, Christian; Chen, Menglin; Liu, Lei; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-02-14

    Bacterial infections are a serious issue for public health and represent one of the major challenges of modern medicine. In this work, a selective antimicrobial strategy based on triggering of pore-forming toxin, which is secreted by infective bacteria, was designed to fight Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial activity is realized by employing Eucalyptus citriodora oil as antibiotic which in this study is encapsulated in nanoliposomes. PMID:25573466

  14. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-01

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. PMID:26051479

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ccahuana-Vasquez, Renzo Alberto; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa was tested in vitro to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on selected microbial strains. The tested strains were oral clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus spp., Candida albicans, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The tested concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa ranged from 0.25-5% in Müeller-Hinton agar. Three percent Uncaria tomentosa inhibited 8% of Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 52% of S. mutans and 96% of Staphylococcus spp. The tested concentrations did not present inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It could be concluded that micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa presented antimicrobial activity on Enterobacteriaceae, S. mutans and Staphylococcus spp. isolates. PMID:17426895

  16. Application of Artificial Intelligence to the Prediction of the Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Daynac, Mathieu; Cortes-Cabrera, Alvaro; Prieto, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) are vastly used as natural antibiotics in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). Their intrinsic chemical variability and synergisms/antagonisms between its components make difficult to ensure consistent effects through different batches. Our aim is to evaluate the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of their antimicrobial activity. Methods. The chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of 49 EOs, extracts, and/or fractions was extracted from NCCLS compliant works. The fast artificial neural networks (FANN) software was used and the output data reflected the antimicrobial activity of these EOs against four common pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Clostridium perfringens as measured by standardised disk diffusion assays. Results. ANNs were able to predict >70% of the antimicrobial activities within a 10 mm maximum error range. Similarly, ANNs were able to predict 2 or 3 different bioactivities at the same time. The accuracy of the prediction was only limited by the inherent errors of the popular antimicrobial disk susceptibility test and the nature of the pathogens. Conclusions. ANNs can be reliable, fast, and cheap tools for the prediction of the antimicrobial activity of EOs thus improving their use in CAM. PMID:26457111

  17. Copper(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine and o-phenanthroline: Theoretical studies, in vitro antimicrobial activity and alkaline phosphatase inhibitory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Medina, Juan J.; Islas, María S.; López Tévez, Libertad L.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Okulik, Nora B.; Williams, Patricia A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Calculations based on density functional methods are carried out for two Cu(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine (cnge) and o-phenanthroline (o-phen): [Cu(o-phen)2(cnge)](NO3)2ṡ2H2O (1) and [Cu(o-phen)(cnge)(H2O)(NO3)2] (2). The calculated geometrical parameters are in agreement with the experimental values. The results of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) topological analysis of the electron density indicate that the Cu-N(phen) bonds in complex (1) have lower electron density, suggesting that those bonds are stronger in complex (2). Moreover, the ionic character of the Cu-N bond in the complex (1) is slightly stronger than that in the complex (2) and this situation would explain the fact that only complex (2) was stable in water solution. For this reason, the antimicrobial and enzymatic assays were performed using complex (2). It is well known that the increased use of antibiotics has resulted in the development of resistant bacterial and fungal strains. In this context, the study of novel antimicrobial agents has an enormous importance and metal complexes represent an interesting alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this work is to prove the modification of some biological properties like antimicrobial activity or alkaline phosphatase inhibitory activity upon copper complexation.

  18. Fungi Treated with Small Chemicals Exhibit Increased Antimicrobial Activity against Facultative Bacterial and Yeast Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown “cryptic” secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3–4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances. PMID:25121102

  19. Antimicrobial activity of Eucalyptus globulus oil, xylitol and papain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mota, Valéria de Siqueira; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of the Eucalyptus globulus essential oil, and of the xylitol and papain substances against the following microorganisms: Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Samonella sp.; Staphylococus aureus; Proteus vulgaris; Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. METHOD The in vitro antimicrobial evaluation was used by means of the agar diffusion test and evaluation of the inhibition zone diameter of the tested substances. Chlorhexidine 0.5% was used as control. RESULTS The Eucalyptus globulus oil showed higher inhibition than chlorhexidine when applied to Staphylococcus aureus, and equal inhibition when applied to the following microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans. Papain 10% showed lower antimicrobial effect than chlorhexidine in relation to Candida albicans. Xylitol showed no inhibition of the tested microorganisms. CONCLUSION The Eucalyptus globulus oil has antimicrobial activity against different microorganisms and appears to be a viable alternative as germicidal agent hence, further investigation is recommended. PMID:25992819

  20. Antimicrobial effect of chitosan nanoparticles on streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chávez de Paz, Luis E; Resin, Anton; Howard, Kenneth A; Sutherland, Duncan S; Wejse, Peter L

    2011-06-01

    Nanoparticle complexes were prepared from chitosans of various molecular weights (MW) and degrees of deacetylation (DD). The antimicrobial effect was assessed by the Live/Dead BacLight technique in conjunction with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and image analysis. Nanocomplexes prepared from chitosans with high MW showed a low antimicrobial effect (20 to 25% of cells damaged), whereas those prepared from low-MW chitosans showed high antimicrobial effect (>95% of cells damaged). PMID:21498764

  1. Antimicrobial Effect of Chitosan Nanoparticles on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms▿

    PubMed Central

    Chávez de Paz, Luis E.; Resin, Anton; Howard, Kenneth A.; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Wejse, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle complexes were prepared from chitosans of various molecular weights (MW) and degrees of deacetylation (DD). The antimicrobial effect was assessed by the Live/Dead BacLight technique in conjunction with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and image analysis. Nanocomplexes prepared from chitosans with high MW showed a low antimicrobial effect (20 to 25% of cells damaged), whereas those prepared from low-MW chitosans showed high antimicrobial effect (>95% of cells damaged). PMID:21498764

  2. Antimicrobial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles, and silver chloride nanoparticles: an overview and comments.

    PubMed

    Durán, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Seabra, Amedea B

    2016-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of biogenic-synthesized silver-based nanoparticles has been the focus of increasing interest. As the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles is highly dependent on their size and surface, the complete and adequate characterization of the nanoparticle is important. This review discusses the characterization and antimicrobial activity of biogenic synthesized silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles. By revising the literature, there is confusion in the characterization of these two silver-based nanoparticles, which consequently affects the conclusion regarding to their antimicrobial activities. This review critically analyzes recent publications on the synthesis of biogenic silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles by attempting to correlate the characterization of the nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity. It was difficult to correlate the size of biogenic nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity, since different techniques are employed for the characterization. Biogenic synthesized silver-based nanoparticles are not completely characterized, particularly the nature of capped proteins covering the nanomaterials. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of theses nanoparticles is assayed by using different protocols and strains, which difficult the comparison among the published papers. It is important to select some bacteria as standards, by following international foundations (Pharmaceutical Microbiology Manual) and use the minimal inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution assays from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, which is the most common assay used in antibiotic ones. Therefore, we conclude that to have relevant results on antimicrobial effects of biogenic silver-based nanoparticles, it is necessary to have a complete and adequate characterization of these nanostructures, followed by standard methodology in microbiology protocols. PMID:27289481

  3. Identification and Antimicrobial Activity Detection of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Corn Stover Silage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxia; Ni, Kuikui; Pang, Huili; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin; Jin, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    A total of 59 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from corn stover silage. According to phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and recA gene polymerase chain reaction amplification, these LAB isolates were identified as five species: Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum subsp. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Enterococcus mundtii, Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, respectively. Those strains were also screened for antimicrobial activity using a dual-culture agar plate assay. Based on excluding the effects of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide, two L. plantarum subsp. plantarum strains ZZU 203 and 204, which strongly inhibited Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971T, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698T and Escherichia coli ATCC 11775T were selected for further research on sensitivity of the antimicrobial substance to heat, pH and protease. Cell-free culture supernatants of the two strains exhibited strong heat stability (60 min at 100°C), but the antimicrobial activity was eliminated after treatment at 121°C for 15 min. The antimicrobial substance remained active under acidic condition (pH 2.0 to 6.0), but became inactive under neutral and alkaline condition (pH 7.0 to 9.0). In addition, the antimicrobial activities of these two strains decreased remarkably after digestion by protease K. These results preliminarily suggest that the desirable antimicrobial activity of strains ZZU 203 and 204 is the result of the production of a bacteriocin-like substance, and these two strains with antimicrobial activity could be used as silage additives to inhibit proliferation of unwanted microorganism during ensiling and preserve nutrients of silage. The nature of the antimicrobial substances is being investigated in our laboratory. PMID:25924957

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Ulva reticulata and its endophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, K. I.; Swati, V. I.; Vanka, Kanth Swaroop; Osborne, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    Seaweeds are known to exhibit various antimicrobial properties, since it harbours an enormous range of indigenous bioactive compounds. The emergence of drug resistant strains has directed to the identification of prospective metabolites from seaweed and its endophytes, thereby exploiting the properties in resisting bacterial diseases. The current study was aimed to assess the antimicrobial activity of extracts obtained from Ulva reticulate, for which metabolites of Ulva reticulata and its endophytes were extracted and assessed against human pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, and Bacillus subtilis. It was observed that the hexane extract of isolate VITDSJ2 was effective against all the tested pathogens but a significant inhibition was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Further, Gas chromatography coupled with Mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed the existence of phenol, 3, 5-bis (1, 1-dimethylethyl) in the crude hexane extract which is well-known to possess antibacterial activity. The effective isolate VITDSJ2 was identified to be the closest neighbour of Pseudomonas stutzeri by phenotypic and genotypic methods. The crude extracts of the seaweed Ulva reticulata was also screened for antibacterial activity and the hexane extract was effective in showing inhibition against all the tested pathogens. The compound in the crude extract of Ulva reticulata was identified as hentriacontane using GC-MS. The extracts obtained from dichloromethane did not show significant activity in comparison with the hexane extracts. Hence the metabolites of Ulva reticulata and the bacterial secondary metabolites of the endophytes could be used in the treatment of bacterial infections.

  5. Investigating the effects of L- to D-amino acid substitution and deamidation on the activity and membrane interactions of antimicrobial peptide anoplin.

    PubMed

    Won, Amy; Khan, Mourin; Gustin, Sorin; Akpawu, Akuvi; Seebun, Deeptee; Avis, Tyler J; Leung, Bonnie O; Hitchcock, Adam P; Ianoul, Anatoli

    2011-06-01

    Isolated from the venom sac of solitary spider wasp, Anoplius samariensis, anoplin is the smallest linear α-helical antimicrobial peptide found naturally with broad spectrum activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and little hemolytic activity toward human erythrocytes. Deamidation was found to decrease the peptide's antibacterial properties. In the present work, interactions of amidated (Ano-NH2) and deamidated (Ano-OH) forms of anoplin as well as Ano-NH2 composed of all D-amino acids (D-Ano-NH2) with model cell membranes were investigated by means of Langmuir Blodgett (LB) technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and carboxyfluorescein leakage assay in order to gain a better understanding of the effect of these peptide modifications on membrane binding and lytic properties. According to LB, all three peptides form stable monolayers at the air/water interface with Ano-NH2 occupying a slightly greater area per molecule than Ano-OH. All three forms of the peptide interact preferentially with anionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG), rather than zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid monolayer. Peptides form nanoscale clusters in zwitterionic but not in anionic monolayers. Finally, membrane lytic activity of all derivatives was found to depend strongly on membrane composition and lipid/peptide ratio. The results suggest that amidated forms of peptides are likely to possess higher membrane binding affinity due to the increased charge. PMID:21078293

  6. Influence of montmorillonite on antimicrobial activity of tetracycline and ciprofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guocheng; Pearce, Cody W.; Gleason, Andrea; Liao, Libing; MacWilliams, Maria P.; Li, Zhaohui

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotics are used not only to fight infections and inhibit bacterial growth, but also as growth promotants in farm livestock. Farm runoff and other farm-linked waste have led to increased antibiotic levels present in the environment, the impact of which is not completely understood. Soil, more specifically clays, that the antibiotic contacts may alter its effectiveness against bacteria. In this study a swelling clay mineral montmorillonite was preloaded with antibiotics tetracycline and ciprofloxacin at varying concentrations and bioassays were conducted to examine whether the antibiotics still inhibited bacterial growth in the presence of montmorillonite. Escherichia coli was incubated with montmorillonite or antibiotic-adsorbed montmorillonite, and then the number of viable bacteria per mL was determined. The antimicrobial activity of tetracycline was affected in the presence of montmorillonite, as the growth of non-resistant bacteria was still found even when extremely high TC doses were used. Conversely, in the presence of montmorillonite, ciprofloxacin did inhibit E. coli bacterial growth at high concentrations. These results suggest that the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents in clayey soils depends on the amount of antibiotic substance present, and on the interactions between the antibiotic and the clays in the soil, as well.

  7. Effects of Annatto (Bixa orellana L.) Seeds Powder on Physicochemical Properties, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Pork Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Cuong, Tran Van; Chin, Koo Bok

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the powder produced by ball-milling the outer layer of annatto (Bixa orellana L.) seeds on the physicochemical properties as well as the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties over 14 d of refrigerated storage (4±1℃). Five pork patty treatments were produced containing three different concentrations of annatto seeds, 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5% (ANT0.1, ANT0.25, ANT0.5), 0.1% ascorbic acid (AA0.1), and a control (CTL). Based on the results, annatto seed powder appeared to show antioxidant activity. The Hunter color values of pork patties were affected by the addition of annatto seed powder, which increased the redness and yellowness values, but decreased the lightness of the patties (p<0.05). To evaluate the antioxidative effects of annatto on pork patties, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide values (POV) were analyzed over 14 d of refrigerated storage. Treatments containing annatto seed showed lower TBARS and POV than control (CTL) samples (p<0.05). The volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) of the pork patties containing annatto seeds were lower than that of CTL at the end of storage (p<0.05). Although no differences in total bacterial counts were observed between control and treated patties, those containing annatto seeds had lower microbial counts for Enterobacteriacease than CTL or AA 0.1%. Therefore, annatto seed powder might be a good source of natural antioxidants for the production of meat products. PMID:27621688

  8. Effects of Annatto (Bixa orellana L.) Seeds Powder on Physicochemical Properties, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Pork Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Tran Van; Chin, Koo Bok

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the powder produced by ball-milling the outer layer of annatto (Bixa orellana L.) seeds on the physicochemical properties as well as the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties over 14 d of refrigerated storage (4±1℃). Five pork patty treatments were produced containing three different concentrations of annatto seeds, 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5% (ANT0.1, ANT0.25, ANT0.5), 0.1% ascorbic acid (AA0.1), and a control (CTL). Based on the results, annatto seed powder appeared to show antioxidant activity. The Hunter color values of pork patties were affected by the addition of annatto seed powder, which increased the redness and yellowness values, but decreased the lightness of the patties (p<0.05). To evaluate the antioxidative effects of annatto on pork patties, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide values (POV) were analyzed over 14 d of refrigerated storage. Treatments containing annatto seed showed lower TBARS and POV than control (CTL) samples (p<0.05). The volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) of the pork patties containing annatto seeds were lower than that of CTL at the end of storage (p<0.05). Although no differences in total bacterial counts were observed between control and treated patties, those containing annatto seeds had lower microbial counts for Enterobacteriacease than CTL or AA 0.1%. Therefore, annatto seed powder might be a good source of natural antioxidants for the production of meat products. PMID:27621688

  9. Structure-Activity Relationship of Benzophenanthridine Alkaloids from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Having Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Luciana de C.; Zanon, Graciane; Weber, Andréia D.; Neto, Alexandre T.; Mostardeiro, Clarice P.; Da Cruz, Ivana B. M.; Oliveira, Raul M.; Ilha, Vinicius; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2014-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae) is a plant alkaloid that grows in South America and has been used in Brazilian traditional medicine for the treatment of different health problems. The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the steam bark crude methanol extract, fractions, and pure alkaloids of Z. rhoifolium. Its stem bark extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, ranging from 12.5 to 100 µg/mL using bioautography method, and from 125 to 500 µg/mL in the microdilution bioassay. From the dichloromethane basic fraction, three furoquinoline alkaloids (1–3), and nine benzophenanthridine alkaloids (4–12) were isolated and the antimicrobial activity of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids is discussed in terms of structure-activity relationships. The alkaloid with the widest spectrum of activity was chelerythrine (10), followed by avicine (12) and dihydrochelerythrine (4). The minimal inhibitory concentrations of chelerythrine, of 1.50 µg/mL for all bacteria tested, and between 3.12 and 6.25 µg/mL for the yeast tested, show this compound to be a more powerful antimicrobial agent when compared with the other active alkaloids isolated from Z. rhoifolium. To verify the potential importance of the methylenedioxy group (ring A) of these alkaloids, chelerythrine was selected to represent the remainder of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids isolated in this work and was subjected to a demethylation reaction giving derivative 14. Compared to chelerythrine, the derivative (14) was less active against the tested bacteria and fungi. Kinetic measurements of the bacteriolytic activities of chelerythrine against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) were determined by optical density based on real time assay, suggesting that its mechanism of action is not bacteriolytic. The present study did not detect hemolytic effects of chelerythrine on erythrocytes and found a protective effect

  10. Preparation and antimicrobial activity of scleraldehyde from Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Gladstone Christopher; Kanth, Swarna V; Chandrasekaran, B; Raghava Rao, J; Nair, B U

    2010-10-13

    The present study investigates the antimicrobial activity of oxidized schizophyllan (scleraldehyde) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by diffusion and tube dilution analysis. Schizophyllan is a natural polysaccharide produced by fungi of the genus Schizophyllum. Periodate oxidation specifically cleaves the vicinal glycols in scleraldehyde to form their dialdehyde derivatives. The antibacterial activity exhibited by scleraldehyde was defined using various tests such as the disc diffusion assay, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). MIC and MBC values were found to be in the range of 3.0-8.0 mg/mL. Hence, the present studies establish that the scleraldehyde possesses effective antibacterial properties and can be used as a biopreservative for preservation of raw hides and skins. PMID:20817154

  11. Polyhexamethylene biguanide functionalized cationic silver nanoparticles for enhanced antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Akhtar, Nasrin; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Rajoka, Muhammad Ibrahim; Khalid, Zafar M.; Hussain, Irshad

    2012-05-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), a broad spectrum disinfectant against many pathogens, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles. The particles formed were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and TEM to measure their morphology and surface chemistry. PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles were then evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against a gram-negative bacterial strain, Escherichia coli. These silver nanoparticles were found to have about 100 times higher bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities, compared to the previous reports, due to the combined antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and PHMB. In addition to other applications, PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles would be extremely useful in textile industry due to the strong interaction of PHMB with cellulose fabrics.

  12. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad Reza; White, Kenneth; Qharebeglou, Mohammad; Ansar, Malek Moein

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol. PMID:26877857

  13. An endogenous ribonuclease inhibitor regulates the antimicrobial activity of ribonuclease 7 in the human urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Spencer, John D; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Eichler, Tad; Wang, Huanyu; Kline, Jennifer; Justice, Sheryl S; Cohen, Daniel M; Hains, David S

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies stress the importance of antimicrobial peptides in protecting the urinary tract from infection. Previously, we have shown that ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is a potent antimicrobial peptide that has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against uropathogenic bacteria. The urothelium of the lower urinary tract and intercalated cells of the kidney produce RNase 7, but regulation of its antimicrobial activity has not been well defined. Here, we characterize the expression of an endogenous inhibitor, ribonuclease inhibitor (RI), in the urinary tract and evaluate its effect on the antimicrobial activity of RNase 7. Using RNA isolated from non-infected human bladder and kidney tissue, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that RNH1, the gene encoding RI, is constitutively expressed throughout the urinary tract. With pyelonephritis, RNH1 expression and RI peptide production significantly decrease. Immunostaining localized RI production to the umbrella cells of the bladder and intercalated cells of the renal collecting tubule. In vitro assays showed that RI bound to RNase 7 and suppressed its antimicrobial activity by blocking its ability to bind the cell wall of uropathogenic bacteria. Thus, these results demonstrate a new immunomodulatory role for RI and identified a unique regulatory pathway that may affect how RNase 7 maintains urinary tract sterility. PMID:24107847

  14. An endogenous ribonuclease inhibitor regulates the antimicrobial activity of ribonuclease 7 in the human urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Eichler, Tad; Wang, Huanyu; Kline, Jennifer; Justice, Sheryl S.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Hains, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies stress the importance of antimicrobial peptides in protecting the urinary tract from infection. Previously, we have shown that ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is a potent antimicrobial peptide that has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against uropathogenic bacteria. The urothelium of the lower urinary tract and intercalated cells of the kidney produce RNase 7 but regulation of its antimicrobial activity has not been well defined. Here we characterize the expression of an endogenous inhibitor, ribonuclease inhibitor (RI), in the urinary tract and evaluate its effect on RNase 7’s antimicrobial activity. Using RNA isolated from non-infected human bladder and kidney tissue, quantitative real-time PCR showed that RNH1, the gene encoding RI, is constitutively expressed throughout the urinary tract. With pyelonephritis, RNH1 expression and RI peptide production significantly decrease. Immunostaining localized RI production to the umbrella cells of the bladder and intercalated cells of the renal collecting tubule. In vitro assays showed that RI bound to RNase 7 and suppressed its antimicrobial activity by blocking its ability to bind the cell wall of uropathogenic bacteria. Thus, these results demonstrate a new immunomodulatory role for RI and identified a unique regulatory pathway that may affect how RNase 7 maintains urinary tract sterility. PMID:24107847

  15. Residual antimicrobial activity after canal irrigation with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    White, R R; Hays, G L; Janer, L R

    1997-04-01

    We previously reported that the in vitro antimicrobial activity of a 2.0% chlorhexidine endodontic irrigant was equivalent to that of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite. The purpose of this study was to determine if chlorhexidine irrigants could instill substantive antimicrobial activity in instrumented root canals in vitro. Human teeth were instrumented using 2.0% or 0.12% chlorhexidine as irrigants. After instrumentation, the root canals were filled with sterile water, and samples of the root canal fluid were absorbed with paper points at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment. The paper points were assayed for antimicrobial activity by placing them on agar plate surfaces inoculated with Streptococcus mutans and measuring zones of inhibition. Antimicrobial activity was present in all 2.0% chlorhexidine-treated teeth throughout the 72-h testing period and in most teeth, in relatively lower concentrations, for 6 to 24 h after irrigation with 0.12% chlorhexidine. These results indicate that chlorhexidine instills substantive antimicrobial activity when used as an endodontic irrigant. PMID:9594771

  16. Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

    2004-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of human α-defensin 5 and its linear analogs: N-terminal fatty acylation results in enhanced antimicrobial activity of the linear analogs.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Basil; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-09-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5) exhibits broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and plays an important role in mucosal immunity of the small intestine. Although there have been several studies, the structural requirements for activity and mechanism of bacterial killing is yet to be established unequivocally. In this study, we have investigated the antimicrobial activity of HD5 and linear analogs. Cysteine deletions attenuated the antibacterial activity considerably. Candidacidal activity was affected to a lesser extent. Fatty acid conjugated linear analogs showed antimicrobial activity comparable activity to HD5. Effective surface charge neutralization of bacteria was observed for HD5 as compared to the non-fatty acylated linear analogs. Our results show that HD5 and non-fatty acylated linear analogs enter the bacterial cytoplasm without causing damage to the bacterial inner membrane. Although fatty acylated peptides exhibited antimicrobial activity comparable to HD5, their mechanism of action involved permeabilization of the Escherichia coli inner membrane. HD5 and analogs had the ability to bind plasmid DNA. HD5 had greater binding affinity to plasmid DNA as compared to the analogs. The three dimensional structure of HD5 favors greater interaction with the bacterial cell surface and also with DNA. Antibacterial activity of HD5 involves entry into bacterial cytoplasm and binding to DNA which would result in shut down of the bacterial metabolism leading to cell death. We show how a moderately active linear peptide derived from the α-defensin HD5 can be engineered to enhance antimicrobial activity almost comparable to the native peptide. PMID:26206286

  18. Antimicrobial effect of Pistacia atlantica leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Ali Roozegar, Mohamad; Azizi Jalilian, Farid; Reza Havasian, Mohamad; Panahi, Jafar; Pakzad, Iraj

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of the mastic tree (Pistacia atlantica) under in vitro conditions has been reported. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of the plant leaf extract (aqueous) on bacterial load in mouth and saliva. The leaf of the Pistacia atlantica plant was collected and cleaned, dried at 40⁰c and then powdered. The extraction was carried out using the maceration method in vacuum with the rotary evaporator device. Bacterial inhibition (Streptococcus species) by the leaf extract was studied using the disc diffusion and embedding sink diffusion methods. The values of MIC and MBC were determined. The collected data was further analyzed using t-test and repeated measure statistical tests. The disc diffusion technique showed a significant inhibitory effect for Pistacia atlantica leaf extract on S. mutans (ATCC 35668) and S. mitis (ATCC 49456) with inhibition zones of 19 and 25 millimeters, respectively. This is for the highest leaf extract concentration used in this study (p<0.01). The values of MIC and MBC for S.mutans was 60, 90 μg/ml and for S. mitis was 75, 110 μg/ml (p<0.01 significance). The leaf extract has no significant effect on S. salivarius (ATCC 13419). Thus, the antimicrobial properties of the aqueous leaf extract from Pistacia atlantica is demonstrated in this study. PMID:27212840

  19. Antimicrobial effect of Pistacia atlantica leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Ali Roozegar, Mohamad; Azizi Jalilian, Farid; Reza Havasian, Mohamad; Panahi, Jafar; Pakzad, Iraj

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of the mastic tree (Pistacia atlantica) under in vitro conditions has been reported. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of the plant leaf extract (aqueous) on bacterial load in mouth and saliva. The leaf of the Pistacia atlantica plant was collected and cleaned, dried at 40⁰c and then powdered. The extraction was carried out using the maceration method in vacuum with the rotary evaporator device. Bacterial inhibition (Streptococcus species) by the leaf extract was studied using the disc diffusion and embedding sink diffusion methods. The values of MIC and MBC were determined. The collected data was further analyzed using t-test and repeated measure statistical tests. The disc diffusion technique showed a significant inhibitory effect for Pistacia atlantica leaf extract on S. mutans (ATCC 35668) and S. mitis (ATCC 49456) with inhibition zones of 19 and 25 millimeters, respectively. This is for the highest leaf extract concentration used in this study (p<0.01). The values of MIC and MBC for S.mutans was 60, 90 μg/ml and for S. mitis was 75, 110 μg/ml (p<0.01 significance). The leaf extract has no significant effect on S. salivarius (ATCC 13419). Thus, the antimicrobial properties of the aqueous leaf extract from Pistacia atlantica is demonstrated in this study. PMID:27212840

  20. Antimicrobial activity of tannins from Terminalia citrina.

    PubMed

    Burapadaja, S; Bunchoo, A

    1995-08-01

    Isolation of the fruit CH3OH extract of Terminalia citrina yielded five known tannins identified as corilagin (1) (3), punicalagin (2) (4), 1,3,6-tri-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (3) (5), chebulagic acid (4) (6), and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (5) (7) by comparison of their physical and spectral data with those of authentic samples. These tannins were tested for antimicrobial action. PMID:7480186

  1. Selected Antimicrobial Activity of Topical Ophthalmic Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Margaret M.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Patel, Robin; Pulido, Jose S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endophthalmitis is a rare complication of intravitreal injection (IVI). It is recommended that povidone-iodine be the last agent applied before IVI. Patients have reported povidone-iodine application to be the most bothersome part of IVIs. Topical anesthetics have been demonstrated to have antibacterial effects. This study compared the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of topical anesthetic eye drops (proparacaine 0.5%, tetracaine 0.5%, lidocaine 2.0%) and the antiseptic, 5.0% povidone-iodine, against two organisms causing endophthalmitis after IVI. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentration values of topical anesthetics, povidone-iodine, preservative benzalkonium chloride (0.01%), and saline control were determined using five isolates of each Staphylococcus epidermidis and viridans group Streptococcus species (VGS). A broth microdilution technique was used with serial dilutions. Results Lidocaine (8.53 × 10−5mol/mL) had MICs of 4.27 to 8.53 × 10−5 mol/mL, and tetracaine (1.89 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 9.45 × 10−6 mol/mL for all isolates. Proparacaine (1.7 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.32 to 5.3 × 10−7 and 4.25 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively). Benzalkonium chloride (3.52 × 10−7 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.86 × 10−9 to 1.1 × 10−8 and 4.40 × 10−8 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Povidone-iodine (1.37 × 10−4 mol/mL) had MICs of 2.14 to 4.28 × 10−6 and 8.56 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Conclusion Proparacaine was the anesthetic with the lowest MICs, lower than that of povidone-iodine. Benzalkonium chloride had lower MICs than proparacaine. All tested anesthetics and povidone-iodine inhibited growth of S. epidermidis and VGS at commercially available concentrations. Translational Relevance For certain patients, it could be possible to use topical anesthetic after povidone-iodine for comfort without inhibiting and perhaps contributing additional antimicrobial

  2. Effect of Selectively Introducing Arginine and D-Amino Acids on the Antimicrobial Activity and Salt Sensitivity in Analogs of Human Beta-Defensins

    PubMed Central

    Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human β-defensins HBD-1and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs. PMID:24086767

  3. Peptides from the scorpion Vaejovis punctatus with broad antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Carreto, Santos; Jiménez-Vargas, Juana María; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar; Ortiz, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial potential of two new non-disulfide bound peptides, named VpAmp1.0 (LPFFLLSLIPSAISAIKKI, amidated) and VpAmp2.0 (FWGFLGKLAMKAVPSLIGGNKSSSK) is here reported. These are 19- and 25-aminoacid-long peptides with +2 and +4 net charges, respectively. Their sequences correspond to the predicted mature regions from longer precursors, putatively encoded by cDNAs derived from the venom glands of the Mexican scorpion Vaejovis punctatus. Both peptides were chemically synthesized and assayed against a variety of microorganisms, including pathogenic strains from clinical isolates and strains resistant to conventional antibiotics. Two shorter variants, named VpAmp1.1 (FFLLSLIPSAISAIKKI, amidated) and VpAmp2.1 (FWGFLGKLAMKAVPSLIGGNKK), were also synthesized and tested. The antimicrobial assays revealed that the four synthetic peptides effectively inhibit the growth of both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiaea) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, with MICs in the range of 2.5-24.0 μM; yeasts (Candida albicans and Candida glabrata) with MICs of 3.1-50.0 μM; and two clinically isolated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-including a multi-drug resistant one- with MICs in the range of 4.8-30.5 μM. A comparison between the activities of the original peptides and their derivatives gives insight into the structural/functional role of their distinctive residues. PMID:26352292

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Gel-entrapped catechins toward oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Muneaki; Saito, Hideo; Kikuchi, Kuniyoshi; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Toyama, Yoshio; Takami, Masao; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity contains almost half of the commensal bacterial population present in the human body. An increase in the number of these microorganisms may result in systemic diseases such as infective endocarditis and aspiration pneumonia as well as oral infections. It is essential to control the total numbers of these microorganisms in order to suppress disease onset. Thus, we examined the antimicrobial activity of a newly developed gel-entrapped catechin (GEC) preparation against oral microorganisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of GEC was determined based on the relationship between a modified agar diffusion method and a broth microdilution method. GEC inhibited the growth of the Actinomyces, periodontopathic bacteria and Candida strains tested, but did not inhibit the growth of the oral streptococci that are important in the normal oral flora. Commercially available moisture gels containing antimicrobial components showed antimicrobial activity against all of the tested strains. After a series of washes and after a 24-h incubation, GEC retained the antimicrobial activity of the catechins. Catalase prevented GEC-induced growth inhibition of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans suggesting that hydrogen peroxide may be involved in the antimicrobial activity of catechins. These results suggest that GEC may be useful for controlling oral microorganism populations and reducing the accumulation of dental plaque, thereby helping to prevent periodontal disease and oral candidiasis. PMID:21532150

  5. Antimicrobial effect of extracts from Chinese chive, cinnamon, and corni fructus.

    PubMed

    Mau, J; Chen, C; Hsieh, P

    2001-01-01

    Extracts were prepared from Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum), cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia), and corni fructus (Cornus officinalis) and used to evaluate their antimicrobial activity on common foodborne microorganisms, alone and in combination. The mixed extract, consisting of three extracts in equal volumes, showed an entire antimicrobial spectrum and had excellent stability to heat, pH, and storage. The mixed extract exhibited better inhibition on growth of Escherichia coli than potassium sorbate at 2-5 mg/mL. The mixed extract inhibited the growth of Pichia membranaefaciens at levels as low as 2 mg/mL. When the mixed extract was used in foods, the expected antimicrobial effect in orange juice, pork, and milk was observed. After gel filtration chromatography, each extract was partially purified into fractions, and one fraction in each extract showed enhanced antimicrobial activity. Overall, the mixed extract was of promising potential for incorporation into various food products for which a natural antimicrobial additive is desired. PMID:11170575

  6. Effect of floral sources on the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activities of honeys in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Je-Ruei; Ye, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ting-Yu; Wang, Yun-Wen; Peng, Chi-Chung

    2013-08-15

    We evaluated the antioxidant, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities of honey made from different floral sources, including the medicinal herb Bidens pilosa, fruit trees, Dimocarpus longan, Litchi chinensis, and Citrus maxima, the Taiwanese endemic plant Aglaia formosana, and a multifloral forest. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the honey made from B. pilosa were significantly higher than those of the other honeys. The honey from B. pilosa also had significantly greater scavenging activities for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) and hydroxyl radical, and substantially more reducing power. In addition, the honey from B. pilosa showed greater antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. However, B. pilosa honey showed little inhibitory activity against IL-8 secretion, whereas the other honeys did. These findings suggest that the levels of antioxidant and antibacterial activities are attributable to the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of honeys, while the IL-8 inhibition is attributable to components other than phenols. PMID:23561193

  7. Sol-gel synthesis of thorn-like ZnO nanoparticles endorsing mechanical stirring effect and their antimicrobial activities: Potential role as nano-antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Farhan; Ansari, Akhter H; Hameedullah, M; Ahmad, Ejaz; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Zia, Qamar; Baig, Umair; Zaheer, Mohd Rehan; Alam, Mohammad Mezbaul; Khan, Abu Mustafa; AlOthman, Zeid A; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2016-01-01

    The effect of mechanical stirring on sol-gel synthesis of thorn-like ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and antimicrobial activities is successfully reported in this study. The in-house synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, TGA, DSC and UV-visible spectroscopy. The X-Ray Diffraction analysis revealed the wurtzite crystal lattice for ZnO-NPs with no impurities present. The diametric measurements of the synthesized thorn-like ZnO-NPs (morphology assessed by SEM) were well accounted to be less than 50 nm with the help of TEM. Relative decrease in aspect ratio was observed on increasing the agitation speed. The UV-visible spectroscopy showed the absorption peaks of the ZnO-NPs existed in both UVA and UVB region. A hypsochromic shift in λmax was observed when stirring pace was increased from 500 rpm to 2000 rpm. The FTIR spectroscopy showed the absorption bands of the stretching modes of Zn-O between 500 cm(-1) to 525 cm(-1). The Thermal analysis studies revealed better stability for ZnO-NPs prepared at 2000 rpm (ZnO-2000 rpm). TGA revealed the weight loss between two main temperatures ranges viz. around (90 °C-120 °C) and (240 °C-280 °C). Finally, the effect of ZnO-NPs prepared at different stirring conditions on the growth of Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis), Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and a fungi (Candida albicans) were examined; which showed good antibacterial as well as antifungal properties. These findings introduce a simple, inexpensive process to synthesize ZnO-NPs using conventional methods without the use of sophisticated equipments and its application as a potent nano-antibiotic. PMID:27349836

  8. Sol-gel synthesis of thorn-like ZnO nanoparticles endorsing mechanical stirring effect and their antimicrobial activities: Potential role as nano-antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd Farhan; Ansari, Akhter H.; Hameedullah, M.; Ahmad, Ejaz; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Zia, Qamar; Baig, Umair; Zaheer, Mohd Rehan; Alam, Mohammad Mezbaul; Khan, Abu Mustafa; AlOthman, Zeid A.; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2016-01-01

    The effect of mechanical stirring on sol-gel synthesis of thorn-like ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and antimicrobial activities is successfully reported in this study. The in-house synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, TGA, DSC and UV-visible spectroscopy. The X-Ray Diffraction analysis revealed the wurtzite crystal lattice for ZnO-NPs with no impurities present. The diametric measurements of the synthesized thorn-like ZnO-NPs (morphology assessed by SEM) were well accounted to be less than 50 nm with the help of TEM. Relative decrease in aspect ratio was observed on increasing the agitation speed. The UV-visible spectroscopy showed the absorption peaks of the ZnO-NPs existed in both UVA and UVB region. A hypsochromic shift in λmax was observed when stirring pace was increased from 500 rpm to 2000 rpm. The FTIR spectroscopy showed the absorption bands of the stretching modes of Zn-O between 500 cm−1 to 525 cm−1. The Thermal analysis studies revealed better stability for ZnO-NPs prepared at 2000 rpm (ZnO-2000 rpm). TGA revealed the weight loss between two main temperatures ranges viz. around (90 °C–120 °C) and (240 °C–280 °C). Finally, the effect of ZnO-NPs prepared at different stirring conditions on the growth of Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis), Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and a fungi (Candida albicans) were examined; which showed good antibacterial as well as antifungal properties. These findings introduce a simple, inexpensive process to synthesize ZnO-NPs using conventional methods without the use of sophisticated equipments and its application as a potent nano-antibiotic. PMID:27349836

  9. A screening for antimicrobial activities of Caribbean herbal remedies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The TRAMIL program aims to understand, validate and expand health practices based on the use of medicinal plants in the Caribbean, which is a “biodiversity hotspot” due to high species endemism, intense development pressure and habitat loss. The antibacterial activity was examined for thirteen plant species from several genera that were identified as a result of TRAMIL ethnopharmacological surveys or were reported in ethnobotanical accounts from Puerto Rico. The aim of this study was to validate the traditional use of these plant species for the treatment of bacterial infections, such as conjunctivitis, fever, otitis media and furuncles. Methods An agar disc diffusion assay was used to examine five bacterial strains that are associated with the reported infections, including Staphylococcus saprophyticus (ATCC 15305), S. aureus (ATCC 6341), Escherichia coli (ATCC 4157), Haemophilus influenzae (ATCC 8142), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 7700) and Proteus vulgaris (ATCC 6896), as well as the fungus Candida albicans (ATCC 752). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were determined for each of the extracts that showed inhibitory activity. Results The decoctions of Pityrogramma calomelanos, Tapeinochilus ananassae, and Syzygium jambos, as well as the juice of Gossypium barbadense, showed > 20% growth inhibition against several bacteria relative to the positive control, which was the antibiotic Streptomycin. Extracts with the best antimicrobial activities were S. jambos that showed MIC = 31 μg/mL and MBC = 1.0 mg/mL against P. vulgaris and T. ananassae that showed MIC = 15 μg/mL against S. aureus. Conclusion This report confirms the traditional use of P. calomelanos for the treatment of kidney infections that are associated with stones, as well as the antimicrobial and bactericidal effects of T. ananassae against P. vulgaris and S. saprophyticus and the effects of S. jambos against S

  10. Antimicrobial, antibiofilm and cytotoxic activities of Hakea sericea Schrader extracts

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Ângelo; Breitenfeld, Luiza; Ferreira, Susana; Duarte, Ana Paula; Domingues, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hakea sericea Schrader is an invasive shrub in Portuguese forests. Objective: The goal of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of H. sericea extracts against several strains of microorganisms, including the ability to inhibit the formation of biofilms. Additionally the cytotoxic properties of these extracts, against human cells, were assessed. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of the methanolic extracts of H. sericea was assessed by disk diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value determination. The antibiofilm activity was determined by quantification of total biofilm biomass with crystal violet. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by hemolysis assay and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test. Results: For Gram-positive bacteria, MIC values of H. sericea methanolic extracts ranged between 0.040 and 0.625 mg/mL, whereas the fruits extract yielded the lowest MIC for several strains of microorganisms, namely, S. aureus, B. cereus, L. monocytogenes and clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Stems and fruits extract at 2.5 mg/mL effectively eradicated the biofilm of S. aureus ATCC 25923, SA 01/10 and MRSA 12/10. Regarding leaves extract, hemolysis was not observed, and in the case of stems and fruits, hemolysis was verified only for higher concentrations, suggesting its low toxicity. Fruits extract presented no toxic effect to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) cells however for concentrations of 0.017 and 0.008 mg/mL this extract was able to decrease human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7) viability in about 60%, as MTT test results had confirmed. This is a clearly demonstrator of the cytotoxicity of this extract against MCF-7 cells. PMID:24914310

  11. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Costescu, Adrian; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Predoi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of nanosized particles of Ag-doped hydroxyapatite with antibacterial properties is of great interest for the development of new biomedical applications. The aim of this study was the evaluation of Ca10−xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2 nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) for their antibacterial and antifungal activity. Resistance to antimicrobial agents by pathogenic bacteria has emerged in the recent years and became a major health problem. Here, we report a method for synthesizing Ag doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. A silver-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite was synthesized at 100°C in deionised water. Also, in this paper Ag:HAp-NPs are evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungal strains. The specific antimicrobial activity revealed by the qualitative assay is demonstrating that our compounds are interacting differently with the microbial targets, probably due to the differences in the microbial wall structures. PMID:23509801

  12. Phytochemical and antimicrobial activities of Himalayan Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc.

    PubMed

    Mamta; Mehrotra, Shubhi; Amitabh; Kirar, Vandana; Vats, Praveen; Nandi, Shoma Paul; Negi, P S; Misra, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the phytochemical and antimicrobial activities and also quantified bioactive nucleoside using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) of five extracts of Indian Himalayan Cordyceps sinensis prepared with different solvents employing accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) technique. The phytochemical potential of these extracts was quantified in terms of total phenolic and total flavonoid content while antioxidant activities were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2 -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Total reducing power (TRP) was determined by converting iron (III) into iron (II) reduction assay. CS(50%Alc) (15.1 ± 0.67mg/g of dry extract) and CS(100%Alc) (19.3 ± 0.33 mg/g of dry extract) showed highest phenolic and flavonoid content, respectively while CS(Aq) extract showed maximum antioxidant activity and the highest concentration of the three nucleosides (adenine 12.8 ± 0.49 mg/g, adenosine 0.36 ± 0.28 mg/g and uracil 0.14 ± 0.36 mg/g of dry extract) determined by HPTLC. The evaluation of extracts for antimicrobial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial strains showed CS(25%Alc), CS(75%Alc) and CS(100%Alc) extract to be more effective against E. coli, P. aerugenosa and B. subtilis giving 9, 7 and 6.5 mm of zone of inhibition (ZOI) in 93.75, 93.75 and 45 μg concentration, respectively, whereas CS(Aq) extract showed minimal inhibition against these. PMID:25675710

  13. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of alcoholic extracts obtained from vegetative organs of A. retroflexus.

    PubMed

    Marinaş, Ioana Cristina; Chifiriuc, Carmen; Oprea, Eliza; Lazăr, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    In vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Amaranthus retroflexus leaves and inflorescence alcoholic (ethanol 70%) extracts of various concentrations ranging from 0.78 to 400 μL/ml were analyzed on different clinical and reference bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtills, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii) and fungal strains (Candida albicans, C. famata, C. utilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using agar disk diffusion method and broth dilution method (MIC determination) for antimicrobial activity and TEAC (Trolox capacity) assay for the evaluation of the antioxidant activity. The adapted diffusion method was used to test the antimicrobial effect of the extracts separately and in combination with a range of standard antibiotics, in order to evidence any synergic effects of A. retroflexus extracts on the antibiotics activity. The extracts showed the highest inhibitory effect against K. pneumoniae and B. subtilis with no activity against S. aureus among the bacterial strains, while in case of the fungal strains the most intensive effect was exhibited against C. famata by both extracts. The A. retroflexus leaves extract improved the ciprofloxacin and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid activity towards the P. aeruginosa clinical strain. The inflorescences extract significantly increased chloramphenicol activity on B. subtilis strain. The antioxidant activity assay showed that the studied extracts exhibited the ability to neutralize the free radicals leading to the conclusion that the tested extracts bear compounds with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial and antioxidant activity that could represent a potential alternative for treating various infectious diseases. PMID:25518569

  14. Antimicrobial effect of garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Goncagul, Gulsen; Ayaz, Erol

    2010-01-01

    Medicinal plants like pumpkin seed, thyme, onion, Nigella sativa, lemon balm, and stinging nettle are used extensively today. One of these plants used most intensively and widespread is garlic. In this context, fresh shape, powder state and oil of garlic have been used all around the world, especially in Far East for centuries. It is scientifically proven that garlic is effectively used in cardiovascular diseases as a regulator of blood pressure, with dropper effects on glycaemia and high blood cholesterol, against bacterial, viral, mycotic and parasitic infections. It's also known that garlic is a wonderful plant having the properties of empowering immune system, anti-tumour and antioxidant effects. In this article, the summary of properties of garlic and its use against bacterial diseases is given. This article is a short review of recent patents on antimicrobial effect of garlic. PMID:19929845

  15. Structure-antimicrobial activity relationship between pleurocidin and its enantiomer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juneyoung

    2008-01-01

    To develop novel antibiotic peptides useful as therapeutic drugs, the enantiomeric analogue of pleurocidin (Ple), which is a well known 25-mer antimicrobial peptide, was designed for proteolytic resistance by D-amino acids substitution. The proteolytic resistance was confirmed by using HPLC after the digestion with various proteases. To investigate the antibiotic effect of L- and D-Ple, the antibacterial activity and hemolytic effect were tested against human erythrocytes. The D-Ple showed a decreased antibacterial activity and a dramatically decreased hemolytic activity compared with L-Ple. The hemolytic effect of analogue was further confirmed by using calcein leakage measurement with liposome. To elucidate these results, the secondary structure of the peptides was investigated by using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results revealed that D-Ple, as well as L-Ple, had typical α-helical structures which were mirror images, with a different helicity. These results suggested that the discrepancy of the structure between the two peptides made their antibacterial activity distinct. PMID:18779649

  16. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of gold/silver-tellurium nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Cang, Jinshun; Roy, Prathik; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2014-06-11

    Gold-tellurium nanostructures (Au-Te NSs), silver-tellurium nanostructures (Ag-Te NSs), and gold/silver-tellurium nanostructures (Au/Ag-Te NSs) have been prepared through galvanic reactions of tellurium nanotubes (Te NTs) with Au(3+), Ag(+), and both ions, respectively. Unlike the use of less environmentally friendly hydrazine, fructose as a reducing agent has been used to prepare Te NTs from TeO2 powders under alkaline conditions. The Au/Ag-Te NSs have highly catlaytic activity to convert nonfluorescent Amplex Red to form fluorescent product, revealing their great strength of generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Au/Ag-Te NSs relative to the other two NSs exhibit greater antimicrobial activity toward the growth of E. coli, S. enteritidis, and S. aureus; the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of Au/Ag-Te NSs were much lower (>10-fold) than that of Ag-Te NSs and Au-Te NSs. The antibacterial activity of Au/Ag-Te NSs is mainly due to the release of Ag(+) ions and Te-related ions and also may be due to the generated ROS which destroys the bacteria membrane. In vitro cytotoxicity and hemolysis analyses have revealed their low toxicity in selected human cell lines and insignificant hemolysis in red blood cells. In addition, inhibition zone measurements using a Au/Ag-Te NSs-loaded konjac jelly film have suggested that it has great potential in practial application such as wound dressing for reducing bacterial wound infection. Having great antibacterial activitiy and excellent biocompatibility, the low-cost Au/Ag-Te NSs hold great potential as effective antimicrobial drugs. PMID:24832728

  17. Antimicrobial activity of submicron glass fibres incorporated as a filler to a dental sealer.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Tejeda, L; Cabal, B; Torrecillas, R; Prado, C; Fernandez-Garcia, E; López-Piriz, R; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Penide, J; Moya, J S

    2016-01-01

    Two types of antimicrobial glass fibers containing ZnO and CaO, with diameters ranging from tens of nanometers to 1 µm, were successfully fabricated by a laser spinning technique. The antimicrobial performance was corroborated according to ISO 20743:2013, by using gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and gram-positive (Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans and Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria, and yeast (Candida krusei) (more than 3 logs of reduction). The metabolic activity and endosomal system of eukaryotic cells were not altered by using eluents of CaO glass submicrometric fibers and ZnO fibers at 1 : 10 dilution as cellular media (viability rates over 70%). A dental material was functionalized by embedding ZnO nanofibers above the percolation threshold (20% wt), creating a three-dimensional (3D) fiber network that added an antimicrobial profile. This new ZnO glass fiber composite is proved non-cytotoxic and preserved the antimicrobial effect after immersion in human saliva. This is the first time that a fiber-reinforced liner with strong antimicrobial-activity has been created to prevent secondary caries. The potential of developing new fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with antimicrobial properties opens up an extensive field of dental applications where most important diseases have an infectious origin. PMID:27509353

  18. [Isolation and antimicrobial activities of actinomycetes from vermicompost].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jun; Yan, Shuang-lin; Min, Chang-li; Yang, Yan

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, actinomycetes were isolated from vermicompost by tablet coating method. Antimicrobial activities of actinomycetes were measured by the agar block method. Strains with high activity were identified based on morphology and biochemical characteristics, as well as 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The results showed that 26 strains of actinomycetes were isolated, 16 of them had antimicrobial activities to the test strains which accounts for 61.54% of all strains. Among the 16 strains, the strain QYF12 and QYF22 had higher antimicrobial activity to Micrococcus luteus, with a formed inhibition zone of 27 mm and 31 mm, respectively. While the strain QYF26 had higher antimicrobial activity to Bacillus subtilis, and the inhibition zone diameter was 21 mm. Based on the identification of strains with high activity, the strain QYF12 was identified as Streptomyces chartreusis, the strain QYF22 was S. ossamyceticus and the strain QYF26 was S. gancidicus. This study provided a theoretical basis for further separate antibacterial product used for biological control. PMID:26137678

  19. Inducible ASABF-Type Antimicrobial Peptide from the Sponge Suberites domuncula: Microbicidal and Hemolytic Activity in Vitro and Toxic Effect on Molluscs in Vivo†

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C.; Korzhev, Michael; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Batel, Renato; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2011-01-01

    Since sponges, as typical filter-feeders, are exposed to a high load of attacking prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, they are armed with a wide arsenal of antimicrobial/cytostatic low-molecular-weight, non-proteinaceous bioactive compounds. Here we present the first sponge agent belonging to the group of ASABF-type antimicrobial peptides. The ASABF gene was identified and cloned from the demosponge Suberites domuncula. The mature peptide, with a length of 64 aa residues has a predicted pI of 9.24, and comprises the characteristic CSα β structural motif. Consequently, the S. domuncula ASABF shares high similarity with the nematode ASABFs; it is distantly related to the defensins. The recombinant peptide was found to display besides microbicidal activity, anti-fungal activity. In addition, the peptide lyses human erythrocytes. The expression of ASABF is upregulated after exposure to the apoptosis-inducing agent 2,2′-dipyridyl. During the process of apoptosis of surface tissue of S. domuncula, grazing gastropods (Bittium sp.) are attracted by quinolinic acid which is synthesized through the kynurenine pathway by the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAD). Finally, the gastropods are repelled from the sponge tissue by the ASABF. It is shown that the effector peptide ASABF is sequentially expressed after the induction of the HAD gene and a caspase, as a central enzyme executing apoptosis. PMID:22073005

  20. Inducible ASABF-type antimicrobial peptide from the sponge Suberites domuncula: microbicidal and hemolytic activity in vitro and toxic effect on molluscs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C; Korzhev, Michael; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Batel, Renato; Müller, Werner E G

    2011-01-01

    Since sponges, as typical filter-feeders, are exposed to a high load of attacking prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, they are armed with a wide arsenal of antimicrobial/cytostatic low-molecular-weight, non-proteinaceous bioactive compounds. Here we present the first sponge agent belonging to the group of ASABF-type antimicrobial peptides. The ASABF gene was identified and cloned from the demosponge Suberites domuncula. The mature peptide, with a length of 64 aa residues has a predicted pI of 9.24, and comprises the characteristic CSα β structural motif. Consequently, the S. domuncula ASABF shares high similarity with the nematode ASABFs; it is distantly related to the defensins. The recombinant peptide was found to display besides microbicidal activity, anti-fungal activity. In addition, the peptide lyses human erythrocytes. The expression of ASABF is upregulated after exposure to the apoptosis-inducing agent 2,2'-dipyridyl. During the process of apoptosis of surface tissue of S. domuncula, grazing gastropods (Bittium sp.) are attracted by quinolinic acid which is synthesized through the kynurenine pathway by the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAD). Finally, the gastropods are repelled from the sponge tissue by the ASABF. It is shown that the effector peptide ASABF is sequentially expressed after the induction of the HAD gene and a caspase, as a central enzyme executing apoptosis. PMID:22073005

  1. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J.; Dong, He

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would

  2. Phytochemical, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities of different citrus juice concentrates.

    PubMed

    Oikeh, Ehigbai I; Omoregie, Ehimwenma S; Oviasogie, Faith E; Oriakhi, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The search for new antimicrobial compounds is ongoing. Its importance cannot be overemphasized in an era of emerging resistant pathogenic organisms. This study therefore investigated the phytochemical composition and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of different citrus juice concentrates. Fruit juices of Citrus tangerine (tangerine), Citrus paradisi (grape), Citrus limon (lemon), and Citrus aurantifolia (lime) were evaluated. Antimicrobial activities against five bacterial and three fungal strains were evaluated. The results revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, cardiac glycosides, and reducing sugars in all the juice concentrates. DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging capacities varied with tangerine and grape juices having better scavenging capacities than lemon and lime juices. Grape juice was observed to have a significantly higher (P < 0.05) ferric-reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) value (364.2 ± 10.25 μmol/L Fe(II)/g of the extract) than the reference antioxidant, ascorbic acid (312.88 ± 5.61 μmol/L). Antimicrobial studies revealed differential antimicrobial activities against different microbial strains. Zones of inhibition ranging from 4 to 26 mm were observed for the antibacterial tests with 0-24 mm for antifungal test. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bacteriostatic concentrations (MBC) for concentrates against bacterial strains ranged from 12.5 to 200 μg/mL. Lemon and lime juice concentrates had lower MIC and MBC values with orange and tangerine having the highest values. Minimum fungicidal concentrations ranged from 50 to 200 μg/mL. The results of this study suggest that these juice concentrates may have beneficial antimicrobial roles that can be exploited in controlling unwanted microbial growth. PMID:26788316

  3. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork. PMID:23834804

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacteriocins and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosinos, Eleftherios H.; Mataragas, Marios; Paramithiotis, Spiros

    Bacteriocins are peptides or proteins that exert an antimicrobial action against a range of microorganisms. Their production can be related to the antagonism within a certain ecological niche, as the producer strain, being itself immune to its action, generally gains a competitive advantage. Many Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms have been found to produce bacteriocins. The former, and especially the ones produced by lactic acid bacteria, has been the field of intensive research during the last decades mainly due to their properties that account for their suitability in food preservation and the benefits arising from that, and secondarily due to the broader inhibitory spectrum compared to the ones produced by Gramnegative microorganisms.

  5. Antimicrobial effect of nylon fiber immersed with nano-silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryono, Agus; Harmami, Sri Budi; Sondari, Dewi

    2010-05-01

    The development of new products based on the immobilization of nanoparticles on fibers has recently received a growing interest from both the academic and industrial sectors. A wide range of nanoparticles and nano-structures can be immobilized on fibers, which brings new properties to the final product. In the present work, silver nanoparticle was immobilized on nylon fibers by immersed deposition method as an antimicrobial agent. Silver colloid was produced by chemical reduction of silver salt (silver nitrate) solution, in the presence of sodium citrate. Synthesis of silver colloid was carried out by using chemical reduction method at temperature of 95 and 100°C. The mixture was heated until color changed into pale yellow. UV-Vis spectrometry indicated formation of silver nanoparticles. UV-Vis analysis was reported that the absorption spectrum of silver nanoparticles showed a maximum between 420 and 450 nm. Characterization of silver nanoparticles was conducted using Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that silver nanoparticles forms aggregates on the surface of fiber, during deposition process. The size of aggregates varied from 19.9 +/- 4.8 nm to 49.5 +/- 12.5 nm. To evaluate the antimicrobial effects against microorganisms, we used representative microorganisms S. aureus. Silver nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity reducing bacterial growth.

  6. [Antimicrobially effective compounded medications. Clinical value and critical comments].

    PubMed

    Eifler-Bollen, R; Fluhr, J W

    2005-08-01

    Triphenyl-methan dyes, traditionally used in dermatology should be reevaluated with caution. Their use should be limited due to the uncertain pharmacological-toxicological risk-benefit ratio and the lack of pharmacological quality of the raw substances. Sometimes antimicrobial activity is insufficient and the cytotoxic effects, along with the inhibition of wound healing, make these dyes less suitable for topical treatment in dermatology. Chinolinolsulfat (Chinosol) and Clioquinol should be used in low concentrations and only on small areas. Due to their negative benefit-risk profile ethracidinlactate-monohydrate (Rivanol) and phenylmercuri-borate (Mercuchrom) should not be used as topical antimicrobial substances. The present publication is intended to give practical recommendations on compounded medications for topical antimicrobial use. Even though some of the cited compounds must be considered critically, we recommend the topical use of chlorhexidine salts, polihexanide, triclosan, polyvidone iodide and silver compounds. Useful standardised compounded formulations containing these four groups are listed in the NRF (Neues Rezeptur Formularium: New German Pharmacopoeia for compounded medication). PMID:15933865

  7. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  8. Phytochemical screening and in vitro antimicrobial activity of Thymus lanceolatus Desf. from Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Benbelaïd, Fethi; Khadir, Abdelmounaïm; Abdoune, Mohamed Amine; Bendahou, Mourad

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antimicrobial activity of an endemic Thyme, Thymus lanceolatus (T. lanceolatus), against a large number of pathogens. Methods Four solvent extracts were evaluated for antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion method and MIC determination on twenty-one strains. Results T. lanceolatus extracts showed a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, especially ethanol extract with inhibition zone diameters ranging from 14 to 32 mm, and MIC values from 0.052 to 0.500 mg/mL. Chloroform extract was more active against Gram-positive bacteria, since it has an inhibitory potency on Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis at only 31 µg/mL. While, hexane and water extracts were less effective since they were inactive against several strains. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that T. lanceolatus has a strong antimicrobial potential, which justifies its use in folk medicine for treatment of infectious diseases. Since this species is poorly investigated, further refined studies on it pure secondary metabolites are needed and very important, in the perspective to identify new antimicrobial molecules from this endemic plant.

  9. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of rosemary extracts linked to their polyphenol composition.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Silvia; Scheyer, Tamara; Romano, Catalina S; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2006-02-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis extracts were investigated by a combination of bioassays and biochemical analysis to identify bioactive compounds. The 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydracyl hydrate (DPPH) radical scavenging method, Folin-Ciocaulteau method and HPLC chromatography were used to study the distribution and levels of antioxidants (AOXs). Antimicrobial activity analysis was carried out using the disk diffusion and broth dilution techniques. A good correlation between the AOX activities and total phenol content in the extracts was found. Although all rosemary extracts showed a high radical scavenging activity, a different efficacy as antimicrobial agent was observed. Methanol extract containing 30% of carnosic acid, 16% of carnosol and 5% of rosmarinic acid was the most effective antimicrobial against Gram positive bacteria (minimal inhibition concentration, MIC, between 2 and 15 mug/ml), Gram negative bacteria (MIC between 2 and 60 mug/ml) and yeast (MIC of 4 mug/ml). By contrast, water extract containing only 15% of rosmarinic acid showed a narrow activity. MIC value of the methanol and water extracts is in a good correlation with the values obtained with pure carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid, respectively. Therefore, our results suggested that the antimicrobial rosemary extracts efficacy was associated with their specific phenolic composition. Carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid may be the main bioactive antimicrobial compounds present in rosemary extracts. From a practical point of view, rosemary extract may be a good candidate for functional foods as well as for pharmaceutical plant-based products. PMID:16390832

  10. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) using the broth macrodilution method. Results: The tested essential oils produced variable antibacterial effect, while Chamomile blue oil demonstrated no antibacterial activity. Origanum, Thyme, and Basil oils were ineffective on P. aeruginosa isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 0.12% to 1.50% (v/v) for tea tree oil, 0.25-4% (v/v) for origanum and thyme oil, 0.50% to >4% for basil oil and >4% for chamomile blue oil. Compared to literature data on reference strains, the reported MIC values were different by 2SD, denoting less successful antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils are influenced by the strain origin (wild, reference, drug sensitive, or resistant) and it should be taken into consideration whenever investigating the plants’ potential for developing new antimicrobials. PMID:27366345