Sample records for effective antimicrobial activity

  1. Effects and mechanisms of the secondary structure on the antimicrobial activity and specificity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Mai, Xuan-Thanh; Huang, Jinfeng; Tan, Juanjuan; Huang, Yibing; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-07-01

    A 15-mer cationic ?-helical antimicrobial peptide HPRP-A1 was used as the parent peptide to study the effects of peptide secondary structure on the biophysical properties and biological activities. Without changing the amino acid composition of HPRP-A1, we designed two ?-helical peptides with either higher or lower helicity compared with the parent peptide, a ?-sheet peptide and a random coiled peptide using de novo design approach. The secondary structures were confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The three ?-helical peptides exhibited comparable antibacterial activities, but their hemolytic activity varied from extreme hemolysis to no hemolysis, which is correlated with their helicity. The ?-sheet peptide shows poor antibacterial and strong hemolytic activities. More interestingly, the random coil peptide shows no antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria, weak antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, and extremely weak hemolytic activity. Bacterial membrane permeabilization was also testified on peptides with different secondary structures. Tryptophan fluorescence experiment revealed that the peptide binding preference to the lipid vesicles for mimicking the prokaryotic or eukaryotic membranes was consistent with their biological activities. With the de novo design approach, we proved that it is important to maintain certain contents of amphipathic secondary structure for a desirable biological activity. We believe that the de novo design approach of relocation of the amino acids within a template sequence could be an effective approach in optimizing the specificity of an antimicrobial peptide. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25826179

  2. Antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Sung Kim; Eunye Kuk; Kyeong Nam Yu; Jong-Ho Kim; Sung Jin Park; Hu Jang Lee; So Hyun Kim; Young Kyung Park; Yong Ho Park; Cheol-Yong Hwang; Yong-Kwon Kim; Yoon-Sik Lee; Dae Hong Jeong; Myung-Haing Cho

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial effects of silver (Ag) ion or salts are well known, but the effects of Ag nanoparticles on microorganisms and antimicrobial mechanism have not been revealed clearly. Stable Ag nanoparticles were prepared and their shape and size distribution characterized by particle characterizer and transmission electron microscopic study. The antimicrobial activity of Ag nanoparticles was investigated against yeast, Escherichia coli,

  3. Effects of Ascorbic Acid, Glutathione, Thiocyanate, and Iodide on Antimicrobial Activity of Acidified Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Fite, Alemu; Dykhuizen, Rolf; Litterick, Audrey; Golden, Michael; Leifert, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that dietary nitrite augments the antimicrobial activity of gastric acid after conversion to nitric oxide and other reactive nitrogen intermediates, thus resulting in increased resistance against gastrointestinal infection. In this study, we showed that the reducing agents ascorbic acid and glutathione reduced the activity of acidified nitrite against Yersinia enterocolitica (P < 0.001). In contrast, iodide and thiocyanate increased the antimicrobial activity (P < 0.001), whereas hydroxyacids (citrate, lactate, and tartarate) had no measurable effects. PMID:14742231

  4. Effects of Dimerization on the Structure and Biological Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide Ctx-Ha

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzón, E. N.; Cespedes, G. F.; Vicente, E. F.; Nogueira, L. G.; Bauab, T. M.; Castro, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are potential microbicidal agents for the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance. However, the physicochemical properties of each peptide need to be optimized for clinical use. To evaluate the effects of dimerization on the structure and biological activity of the antimicrobial peptide Ctx-Ha, we have synthesized the monomeric and three dimeric (Lys-branched) forms of the Ctx-Ha peptide by solid-phase peptide synthesis using a combination of 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) and t-butoxycarbonyl (Boc) chemical approaches. The antimicrobial activity assay showed that dimerization decreases the ability of the peptide to inhibit growth of bacteria or fungi; however, the dimeric analogs displayed a higher level of bactericidal activity. In addition, a dramatic increase (50 times) in hemolytic activity was achieved with these analogs. Permeabilization studies showed that the rate of carboxyfluorescein release was higher for the dimeric peptides than for the monomeric peptide, especially in vesicles that contained sphingomyelin. Despite different biological activities, the secondary structure and pore diameter were not significantly altered by dimerization. In contrast to the case for other dimeric cAMPs, we have shown that dimerization selectively decreases the antimicrobial activity of this peptide and increases the hemolytic activity. The results also show that the interaction between dimeric peptides and the cell wall could be responsible for the decrease of the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. PMID:22391524

  5. Antimicrobial effect of zinc pyrithione

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GENJI IMOKAWA; HARUO SHIMIZU

    Synopsis The antimicrobial effect of zinc pyrithione has been studied with healthy scalps in relation to its ANTIDANDRUFF effect. Use of zinc pyrithione-containing shampoo sharply reduced the CORNEOCYTE COUNTS, while the similarly active antimicrobial agent, Irgasan DP-300 © had no effect on the corneocyte counts. Quantitative estimation of scalp microorganisms revealed that corresponding to the decrease in dandruff, Pityrospbrum ovale

  6. Effect of fruiting body maturity stage on chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Lactarius sp. mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Barros, Lillian; Baptista, Paula; Estevinho, Letícia M; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2007-10-17

    The effects of fruiting body maturity on chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the wild mushrooms, Lactarius deliciosus and Lactarius piperatus, were evaluated. Immature and mature samples were analyzed for proximate constituents (moisture, fat, crude protein, ash, carbohydrates), nutritional value, and individual composition in fatty acids and sugars. Protein content, MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids), and PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids) percentages increased with the fruiting body maturity stage, while carbohydrate and SFA (saturated fatty acids) content decreased. The maturity stage did not significantly affect the individual sugar profile. The antimicrobial activity of the mushrooms was screened against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and fungi, and correlated to the amounts of phenols, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, and lycopene present in the immature and mature fruiting bodies. Mature fruiting bodies with mature spores presented lower antimicrobial activity, which was in agreement with the bioactive compound content found in those samples. PMID:17927152

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus mutans and their Antiproliferative Effects

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Bersan, Salete Meyre Fernandes; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Góis; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Sartoratto, Adilson; Rehder, Vera Lúcia Garcia; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Teixeira Duarte, Marta Cristina; Ikegaki, Masarahu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the activity of essential oils (EOs) against Streptococcus mutans biofilm by chemically characterizing their fractions responsible for biological and antiproliferative activity. Twenty EO were obtained by hydrodistillation and submitted to the antimicrobial assay (minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations) against S. mutans UA159. Thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used for phytochemical analyses. EOs were selected according to predetermined criteria and fractionated using dry column; the resulting fractions were assessed by MIC and MBC, selected as active fractions, and evaluated against S. mutans biofilm. Biofilms formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Selected EOs and their selected active fractions were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against keratinocytes and seven human tumor cell lines. MIC and MBC values obtained for EO and their active fractions showed strong antimicrobial activity. Chemical analyses mainly showed the presence of terpenes. The selected active fractions inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation (P < 0.05) did not affect glycolytic pH drop and were inactive against keratinocytes, normal cell line. In conclusion, EO showed activity at low concentrations, and their selected active fractions were also effective against biofilm formed by S. mutans and human tumor cell lines. PMID:22685486

  8. Achyrocline satureioides (LAM.) DC (Marcela): antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus spp. and immunomodulating effects on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Calvo, D; Cariddi, L N; Grosso, M; Demo, M S; Maldonado, A M

    2006-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides (LAM.) DC (Compositae) is a sub-bush original from America and distributed in Europe and Africa. It is mainly used in infusions, as digestive, sedative among others and has antimicrobial and antiviral properties. A research was made into the anti-microbial activity of the A. satureioides decoction on the Staphylococcus spp strains. They were isolated from 18 patients with acne lesions and from 7 patients infected with Staphylococcus spp. (5 strains were taken from catheters and 2 from wounds). The strains were classified through biochemical tests and then were seeded in triptein-soy agar with or without decoction to observe the antibacterial activity. On the other hand, cultures of lymphocytes were made from those patients who displayed infections caused by Staphylococcus spp. and from 12 control non-infected individuals. The lymphocytes were stimulated with decoction or PHA-M. Among the expanded, CD8+ T cells, with anti-human CD8 monoclonal antibody were the outstanding ones by indirect IF. The A. satureiodes decoction inhibited 95% of the isolated Staphylococcus spp. strains and stimulated the lymphocyte expansion, of which 40% were CD8+ T cells. The A. satureiodes decoction showed anti-microbial activity and resulted to be an immunostimulating agent on CD8+ T cells, with lesser mitogenic effects than PHA-M. PMID:18293658

  9. Silver nanoparticles with antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans and their cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Mario Alberto; Boegli, Laura; James, Garth; Velasquillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Martínez-Martínez, Rita-Elizabeth; Martínez-Castañón, Gabriel Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel

    2015-10-01

    Microbial resistance represents a challenge for the scientific community to develop new bioactive compounds. The goal of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against a clinical isolate of Streptococcus mutans, antibiofilm activity against mature S. mutans biofilms and the compatibility with human fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs against the planktonic clinical isolate was size and concentration dependent, with smaller AgNPs having a lower minimum inhibitory concentration. A reduction of 2.3 log in the number of colony-forming units of S. mutans was observed when biofilms grown in a CDC reactor were exposed to 100ppm of AgNPs of 9.5±1.1nm. However, AgNPs at high concentrations (>10ppm) showed a cytotoxic effect upon human dermal fibroblasts. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a planktonic S. mutans clinical isolate and killed established S. mutans biofilms, which suggests that AgNPs could be used for prevention and treatment of dental caries. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into therapeutic and preventive strategies. PMID:26117766

  10. Antimicrobial activity against periodontopathogenic bacteria, antioxidant and cytotoxic effects of various extracts from endemic Thermopsis turcica

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Elif Burcu; Aç?k, Leyla; Akca, Gülçin; Sarper, Meral; Elçi, Mualla P?nar; Avcu, Ferit; Vural, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of Thermopsis turcica Kit Tan, Vural & Küçüködük against periodontopathogenic bacteria, its antioxidant activity and cytotoxic effect on various cancer cell lines. Methods In vitro antimicrobial activities of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate (EtAc), n-hexane and water extracts of Thermopsis turcica herb against periodontopathogenic bacteria, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 were tested by agar well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Antioxidant properties of the extracts were evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity and ?-carotene bleaching methods. Amounts of phenolic contents of the extracts were also analysed by using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of the extracts on androgen-insensitive prostate cancer, androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia human cancer cell lines were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Human gingival fibroblast cells were used as a control. Results Our data showed that EtAc extract had the highest antimicrobial effect on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (MIC: 1.562 mg/mL, MBC: 3.124 mg/mL) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (MIC: 0.781 mg/mL, MBC: 1.562 mg/mL). In antioxidant assays, EtAc extract exhibited also the highest radical scavenging activity [IC50=(30.0±0.3) µg/mL] and the highest inhibition [(74.35±0.30)%] against lineloic acide oxidation. The amount of phenolic content of it was also the highest [(162.5±1.2) µg/mg gallic acid]. In cytotoxic assay, only ethanol [IC50=(80.00±1.21) µg/mL] and EtAc extract [IC50=(70.0±0.9) µg/mL] were toxic on acute promyelocytic leukemia cells at 20-100 µg/mL (P<0.05). However, no toxic effect was observed on human gingival fibroblast cells. Conclusions According to our findings, owing to its antioxidant and cytotoxic potential, EtAc extract might include anticancer agents for acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:25183268

  11. Effect of mixed antimicrobial agents and flavors in active packaging films.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Laura; Escudero, Ana; Batlle, Ramón; Nerín, Cristina

    2009-09-23

    Active packaging is an emerging food technology to improve the quality and safety of food products. Many works have been developed to study the antimicrobial activity of essential oils. Essential oils have been traditionally used as flavorings in food, so they have an important odor impact but they have as well antimicrobial properties that could be used to protect the food. Recent developments in antimicrobial active packaging showed the efficiency of essential oils versus bread and bakery products among other applications. However, one of the main problems to face is the odor and taste they could provide to the packaged food. Using some aromas to mask the odor could be a good approach. That is why the main objective of this paper is to develop an antimicrobial packaging material based on the combination of the most active compounds of essential oils (hydrocinnamaldehyde, oregano essential oil, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, and carvacrol) together with some aromas commonly used in the food industry. A study of the concentration required to get the antimicrobial properties, the organoleptic compatibility with typical aroma present in many food systems (vanilla, banana, and strawberry), and the right combination of both systems has been carried out. Antimicrobial tests of both the mentioned aromas, the main components of some essential oils, and the combination of both groups were carried out against bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli), yeasts (Candida albicans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii), and molds (Botrytis cinerae, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium roqueforti, Eurotium repens, Penicillium islandicum, Penicillium commune, Penicillium nalgiovensis). The sensory properties of the combinations were evaluated with a triangular test and classification was by an order test; the odor threshold of the aroma compounds was also studied. The results reveal that none of the aromas had antimicrobial properties. The most antimicrobial compounds are thymol, carvacrol, and cinnamaldehyde, but none of them could be combined with banana aroma, whereas only thymol with strawberry aroma gave the right combined organoleptic profile. All of the antimicrobials under study could be combined with vanilla aroma, providing both antimicrobial property and the odor expected. PMID:19711918

  12. Synergistic effects of guanidine-grafted CMC on enhancing antimicrobial activity and dry strength of paper.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Xu, Yaoguang; Lin, Xinxing; Chen, Lihui; Huang, Liulian; Cao, Shilin; Li, Jian

    2014-09-22

    In order to improve the strength property and antimicrobial activity of paper simultaneously, we prepared a novel multifunctional agent based on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by a simple two-stage method. The first stage was the oxidation of CMC to obtain the dialdehyde CMC (DCMC), and the second stage was the graft of guanidine hydrochloride (GH) onto DCMC to obtain DCMC-GH polymer. The strength property and antimicrobial activity of DCMC-GH-coated copy paper have been studied by the tensile test and inhibition zone method, respectively. The results showed that the dry strength index could increase about 20% after the paper was coated with DCMC-GH. The coating of DCMC-GH on paper also resulted in excellent antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the inhibition zone became larger as the GH content grafted on DCMC increased. The novel DCMC-GH polymer would be a multifunctional coating agent for food packaging paper. PMID:24906770

  13. Effect of Nutrient Media and Bile Salts on Growth and Antimicrobial Activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Custy F. Fernandes; Khem M. Shahani

    1988-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidopbilus strains produced variable quantities of anti- microbial substances in three different media: Elliker's, MRS (deMan, Rogosa, and Sharpe), and LBS (Lactobacillus selection) broths. The interaction be- tween L. acidophilus strain and nutri- ent medium was statistically significant, indicating an influence of the nutrient medium on the level of antimicrobial activity produced. Also statistically sig- nificant different were

  14. Antimicrobial Active Clothes Display No Adverse Effects on the Ecological Balance of the Healthy Human Skin Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Hoefer, Dirk; Hammer, Timo R.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive public use of antimicrobial clothes has raised issues concerning skin health. A placebo-controlled side-to-side study was run with antimicrobial clothes versus fabrics of similar structure but minus the antimicrobial activity, to evaluate possible adverse effects on the healthy skin microflora. Sixty volunteers were enrolled. Each participant received a set of form-fitting T-shirts constructed in 2 halves: an antibacterial half, displaying activities of 3–5 log-step reductions due to silver-finishes or silver-loaded fibres and a nonantibacterial control side. The microflora of the scapular skin was analyzed weekly for opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms over six weeks. The antibacterial halves did not disturb the microflora in number or composition, whereas a silver-containing deodorant displayed a short-term disturbance. Furthermore, parameters of skin morphology and function (TEWL, pH, moisture) did not show any significant shifts. In summary, antimicrobial clothes did not show adverse effects on the ecological balance of the healthy skin microflora. PMID:22363849

  15. High Antimicrobial Effectiveness with Low Hemolytic and Cytotoxic Activity for PEG/Quaternary Copolyoxetanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl chain length of quaternary ammonium/PEG copolyoxetanes has been varied to discern effects on solution antimicrobial efficacy, hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Monomers 3-((4-bromobutoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (BBOx) and 3-((2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (ME2Ox) were used to prepare precursor P[(BBOx)(ME2Ox)-50:50–4 kDa] copolyoxetane via cationic ring opening polymerization. The 1:1 copolymer composition and Mn (4 kDa) were confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. After C–Br substitution by a series of tertiary amines, ionic liquid Cx-50 copolyoxetanes were obtained, where 50 is the mole percent of quaternary repeat units and “x” is quaternary alkyl chain length (2, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 carbons). Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) studies showed Tgs between ?40 and ?60 °C and melting endotherms for C14–50 and C16–50. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A systematic dependence of MIC on alkyl chain length was found. The most effective antimicrobials were in the C6–50 to C12–50 range. C8–50 had better overall performance with MICs of 4 ?g/mL, E. coli; 2 ?g/mL, S. aureus; and 24 ?g/mL, P. aeruginosa. At 5 × MIC, C8–50 effected >99% kill in 1 h against S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa challenges of 108 cfu/mL; log reductions (1 h) were 7, 3, and 5, respectively. To provide additional insight into polycation interactions with bacterial membranes, a geometric model based on the dimensions of E. coli is described that provides an estimate of the maximum number of polycations that can chemisorb. Chain dimensions were estimated for polycation C8–50 with a molecular weight of 5 kDa. Considering the approximations for polycation chemisorption (PCC), it is surprising that a calculation based on geometric considerations gives a C8–50 concentration within a factor of 2 of the MIC, 4.0 (±1.2) ?g/mL for E. coli. Cx-50 copolyoxetane cytotoxicity was low for human red blood cells, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). Selectivities for bacterial kill over cell lysis were among the highest ever reported for polycations indicating good prospects for biocompatibility. PMID:24422429

  16. Effect of addition of 2% chlorhexidine or 10% doxycycline on antimicrobial activity of biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Madan, Molly; Agarwal, Charu; Suri, Navleen

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the addition of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate or 10% doxycycline would enhance the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC-25923), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC-29212), Candida albicans (ATCC-90028), and Streptococcus mutans (MTCC-497). Materials and Methods: Three wells of 4 mm diameter and 4 mm depth on each plate were prepared on the agar medium with standardized suspensions of each microorganism. Biodentine powder mixed with 2% chlorhexidine (0.06 g) or 10% doxycycline (0.30 g) in its liquid or liquid alone was placed to fill each well. Plates were incubated at 37°C as required for microbial growth. A blinded, independent observer measured zones of inhibition. The data were analyzed using independent “t” test to compare the differences among the three cement preparations for different micro-organisms. Results: All Biodentine samples inhibited microbial growth. The highest mean diameters of zone of inhibition for all the micro-organisms were found around Biodentine/chlorhexidine (13.417) followed by Biodentine alone (12.236) and Biodentine/doxycycline (11.25). Conclusion: In conclusion, adding 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in liquid of Biodentine enhanced the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine against all the tested micro-organisms except Candida albicans, while addition of 10% doxycycline decreased the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine. The differences were significant statistically (P < 0.05). PMID:24944453

  17. Antimicrobial Activities of Squalamine Mimics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KEN KIKUCHI; EDWARD M. BERNARD; ANDRZEJ SADOWNIK; STEVEN L. REGEN; DONALD ARMSTRONG

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram- negative rods,

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Dairy Products and Gut: Effect on Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Eva; Landete, José María

    2015-01-01

    The food industry seeks alternatives to satisfy consumer demands of safe foods with a long shelf-life able to maintain the nutritional and organoleptic quality. The application of antimicrobial compounds-producing protective cultures may provide an additional parameter of processing in order to improve the safety and ensure food quality, keeping or enhancing its sensorial characteristics. In addition, strong evidences suggest that certain probiotic strains can confer resistance against infection with enteric pathogens. Several mechanisms have been proposed to support this phenomenon, including antimicrobial compounds secreted by the probiotics, competitive exclusion, or stimulation of the immune system. Recent research has increasingly demonstrated the role of antimicrobial compounds as protective mechanism against intestinal pathogens and therefore certain strains could have an effect on both the food and the gut. In this aspect, the effects of the combination of different strains keep unknown. The development of multistrain probiotic dairy products with good technological properties and with improved characteristics to those shown by the individual strains, able to act not only as protective cultures in foods, but also as probiotics able to exert a protective action against infections, has gained increased interest. PMID:25861634

  19. Antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-03-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  1. [Antimicrobial activity exerted by sodium dichloroisocyanurate].

    PubMed

    D'Auria, F D; Simonetti, G; Strippoli, V

    1989-01-01

    Sodium dichloroisocyanurate is a chlorinated cleaner. It was used for swimming pool sanitation and for the sterilisation of linen. Not recently ago sodium dichloroisocyanurate has substituted hypochlorite for the sterilisation of infant feeding bottles and teats. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate is soluble in water; this condition causes the hydrolysis of sodium dichloroisocyanurate in hypochlorous acid, that is the active agent, isocyanurate and isocyanurate chlorine. These compounds form a chlorine protein that carry out microbicidal activity. In a toxicology study has been shown that no severe changes in the normal metabolic function occurred, furthermore sodium dichloroisocyanurate has not shown teratogenic effects at the concentration of 200 mg/kg. The antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate was evaluated against Gram negative bacteria such as E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium and against some fungi. This study illustrates a rapid antimicrobial activity using concentrations. Our study concentrated on the antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate in some experimental conditions. We tested 66 strains of fungi, 28 Gram positive bacteria and 29 Gram negative bacteria. We also evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate against protozoa such as Trichomonas vaginalis. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated in cultural conditions and non cultural conditions; in these experiments we observed similar action in both the commercial product and pure substance. In cultural conditions sodium dichloroisocyanurate shows a good activity against fungi and bacteria, moreover it can be observed that the serum didn't interfere with its activity. In a non cultural condition the Candida was killed rapidly by the sodium dichloroisocyanurate but this activity is influenced by the growth phase of the yeast. Against mycelial form such as Penicillium and Aspergillus the sodium dichloroisocyanurate needs a longer contact time than yeast form for its activity. It is interesting to note that well known bacteria, that are resistant to the common antimicrobial agents, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were inhibited by sodium dichloroisocyanurate in a rapid bactericidal action. Our data demonstrates that no significant adverse influence on the activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate was shown by pH and by temperature even if in some experimental conditions increased activity was noticed at pH = 6.6. The sodium dichloroisocyanurate has demonstrated good activity against Trichomonas vaginalis. This fact extends the broad-spectrum activity of sodium dichloroisocyanurate to the protozoa. In conclusion, sodium dichloroisocyanurate has demonstrated a good activity against all tested strains, furthermore its activity did not decrease in the presence of 1% of organic substance (serum etc.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2484478

  2. Effect of water-aging on the antimicrobial activities of an ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shi-qiang; Epasinghe, D. Jeevanie; Zhou, Bin; Niu, Li-na; Kimmerling, Kirk A.; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mao, Jing; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS), an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) functionalized with polymerizable methacrylate groups and an antimicrobial agent with a long lipophilic alkyl chain quaternary ammonium group, was synthesized through a silane-based sol–gel route. By dissolving QAMS in methyl methacrylate monomer, this ORMOSIL molecule was incorporated into an auto-polymerizing, powder/liquid orthodontic acrylic resin system, yielding QAMS-containing poly (methyl methacrylate). The QAMS-containing acrylic resin showed a predominant contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 35668) and Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) on the acrylic surface. The antimicrobial activities of QAMS-containing acrylic resin were maintained after a 3 month water-aging period. Bromophenol blue assay showed minimal leaching of quaternary ammonium species when an appropriate amount of QAMS (<4 wt.%) was incorporated into the acrylic resin. The results suggest that QAMS is predominantly co-polymerized with the poly(methyl methacrylate) network, and only a minuscule amount of free QAMS molecules is present within the polymer network after water-aging. Acrylic resin with persistent antimicrobial activities represents a promising method for preventing bacteria- and fungus-induced stomatitis, an infectious disease commonly associated with the wearing of removable orthodontic appliances. PMID:23485857

  3. ?-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammations are among some of the most  prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt ?-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the ?-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, ?-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules. PMID:24756162

  4. ?-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammations are among some of the most prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt ?-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the ?-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, ?-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules. PMID:24756162

  5. Size and Aging Effects on Antimicrobial Efficiency of Silver Nanoparticles Coated on Polyamide Fabrics Activated by Atmospheric DBD Plasma.

    PubMed

    Zille, Andrea; Fernandes, Margarida M; Francesko, Antonio; Tzanov, Tzanko; Fernandes, Marta; Oliveira, Fernando R; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, Teresa; Carneiro, Noémia; Esteves, Maria F; Souto, António P

    2015-07-01

    This work studies the surface characteristics, antimicrobial activity, and aging effect of plasma-pretreated polyamide 6,6 (PA66) fabrics coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), aiming to identify the optimum size of nanosilver exhibiting antibacterial properties suitable for the manufacture of hospital textiles. The release of bactericidal Ag(+) ions from a 10, 20, 40, 60, and 100 nm AgNPs-coated PA66 surface was a function of the particles' size, number, and aging. Plasma pretreatment promoted both ionic and covalent interactions between AgNPs and the formed oxygen species on the fibers, favoring the deposition of smaller-diameter AgNPs that consequently showed better immediate and durable antimicrobial effects against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Surprisingly, after 30 days of aging, a comparable bacterial growth inhibition was achieved for all of the fibers treated with AgNPs <100 nm in size. The Ag(+) in the coatings also favored the electrostatic stabilization of the plasma-induced functional groups on the PA66 surface, thereby retarding the aging process. At the same time, the size-related ratio (Ag(+)/Ag(0)) of the AgNPs between 40 and 60 nm allowed for the controlled release of Ag(+) rather than bulk silver. Overall, the results suggest that instead of reducing the size of the AgNPs, which is associated with higher toxicity, similar long-term effects can be achieved with larger NPs (40-60 nm), even in lower concentrations. Because the antimicrobial efficiency of AgNPs larger than 30 nm is mainly ruled by the release of Ag(+) over time and not by the size and number of the AgNPs, this parameter is crucial for the development of efficient antimicrobial coatings on plasma-treated surfaces and contributes to the safety and durability of clothing used in clinical settings. PMID:26057400

  6. Magnesium Based Materials and their Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Duane Allan

    The overall goals of this body of work were to characterize the antimicrobial properties of magnesium (Mg) metal and nano-magnesium oxide (nMgO) in vitro, to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Mg metal, and to incorporate MgO nanoparticles into a polymeric implant coating and evaluate its in vitro antimicrobial properties. In the course of this work it was found that Mg metal, Mg-mesh, and nMgO have in vitro antimicrobial properties that are similar to a bactericidal antibiotic. For Mg metal, the mechanism of this activity appears to be related to an increase in pH (i.e. a more alkaline environment) and not an increase in Mg2+. Given that Mg-mesh is a Mg metal powder, the assumption is that it has the same mechanism of activity as Mg metal. The mechanism of activity for nMgO remains to be elucidated and may be related to a combination of interaction of the nanoparticles with the bacteria and the alkaline pH. It was further demonstrated that supernatants from suspensions of Mg-mesh and nMgO had the same antimicrobial effect as was noted when the particles were used. The supernatant from Mg-mesh and nMgO was also noted to prevent biofilm formation for two Staphylococcus strains. Finally, poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) composites of Mg-mesh (PCL+Mg-mesh) and nMgO (PCL+nMgO) were produced. Coatings applied to screws inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in thin disc format inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in addition to the E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Pure Mg metal was noted to have some cytotoxic effect on murine fibroblast and osteoblast cell lines, although this effect needs to be characterized further. To address the need for an in vivo model for evaluating implant associated infections, a new closed fracture osteomyelitis model in the femur of the rat was developed. Magnesium, a readily available and inexpensive metal was shown to have antimicrobial properties that appear to be related to its corrosion products and that nMgO has similar effects. Incorporation of nMgO into a PCL composite was easily achieved and revealed similar, although not identical antimicrobial results. This work has provided a strong foundation and methodology for further evaluation of Mg based materials and their antimicrobial properties.

  7. Effects of atrazine, agricultural runoff, and selected effluents on antimicrobial activity of skin peptides in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Gibble, R E; Baer, K N

    2011-05-01

    Atrazine (technical and formulation), agricultural runoff containing atrazine, and treated sewage and landfill effluents were evaluated for their potential to modulate antimicrobial activity of Xenopus laevis skin secretions against the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. This chytrid fungus is implicated in several localized mass mortality events, yet the cause of the susceptibility of amphibians to this newly emergent pathogen is unknown. Antimicrobial peptides secreted from dermal glands are thought to provide critical protection against this pathogen. Chronic exposure of X. laevis larvae to agricultural runoff decreased protein content of collected secretions, while treated wastewater effluents increased protein content. However, the in vitro bioactivity was decreased in treatments with both increased and decreased protein. No differences were observed in protein or bioactivity following laboratory exposures of technical atrazine or a typical atrazine formulation (AAtrex(®) 4L/Top Surf(®)). These findings demonstrate that exposure of an amphibian model to agricultural runoff or effluent from municipal sewage treatment plants and landfills alters peptide production and in vitro activity of protective peptides. Although evidence suggests peptide production and bioactivity is a critical part of amphibian resistance to pathogens such as the chytrid fungus, the implications of observed effects for immunity and infection are not clear. PMID:21453969

  8. Antimicrobial effect and membrane-active mechanism of tea polyphenols against Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shumin; Wang, Wei; Bai, Fengling; Zhu, Junli; Li, Jianrong; Li, Xuepeng; Xu, Yongxia; Sun, Tong; He, Yutang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial effect of tea polyphenols (TP) against Serratia marcescens and examined the related mechanism. Morphology changes of S. marcescens were first observed by transmission electron microscopy after treatment with TP, which indicated that the primary inhibition action of TP was to damage the bacterial cell membranes. The permeability of the outer and inner membrane of S. marcescens dramatically increased after TP treatment, which caused severe disruption of cell membrane, followed by the release of small cellular molecules. Furthermore, a proteomics approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis was used to study the difference of membrane protein expression in the control and TP treatment S. marcescens. The results showed that the expression of some metabolism enzymes and chaperones in TP-treated S. marcescens significantly increased compared to the untreated group, which might result in the metabolic disorder of this bacteria. Taken together, our results first demonstrated that TP had a significant growth inhibition effect on S. marcescens through cell membrane damage. PMID:23979827

  9. Kombucha fermentation and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Sreeramulu, G; Zhu, Y; Knol, W

    2000-06-01

    Kombucha was prepared in a tea broth (0.5% w/v) supplemented with sucrose (10% w/v) by using a commercially available starter culture. The pH decreased steadily from 5 to 2.5 during the fermentation while the weight of the "tea fungus" and the OD of the tea broth increased through 4 days of the fermentation and remained fairly constant thereafter. The counts of acetic acid-producing bacteria and yeasts in the broth increased up to 4 days of fermentation and decreased afterward. The antimicrobial activity of Kombucha was investigated against a number of pathogenic microorganisms. Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia enterolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus epidermis, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus, Helicobacterpylori, and Listeria monocytogenes were found to be sensitive to Kombucha. According to the literature on Kombucha, acetic acid is considered to be responsible for the inhibitory effect toward a number of microbes tested, and this is also valid in the present study. However, in this study, Kombucha proved to exert antimicrobial activities against E. coli, Sh. sonnei, Sal. typhimurium, Sal. enteritidis, and Cm. jejuni, even at neutral pH and after thermal denaturation. This finding suggests the presence of antimicrobial compounds other than acetic acid and large proteins in Kombucha. PMID:10888589

  10. Effectiveness of some recent antimicrobial packaging concepts.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, L; Devlieghere, F; Debevere, J

    2002-01-01

    A new type of active packaging is the combination of food-packaging materials with antimicrobial substances to control microbial surface contamination of foods. For both migrating and non-migrating antimicrobial materials, intensive contact between the food product and packaging material is required and therefore potential food applications include especially vacuum or skin-packaged products, e.g. vacuum-packaged meat, fish, poultry or cheese. Several antimicrobial compounds have been combined with different types of carriers (plastic and rubber articles, paper-based materials, textile fibrils and food-packaging materials). Until now, however, few antimicrobial concepts have found applications as a food-packaging material. Antimicrobial packaging materials cannot legally be used in the EU at the moment. The potential use would require amendments of several different legal texts involving areas such as food additives, food packaging, hygiene, etc. The main objective of this paper is to provide a state of the art about the different types of antimicrobial concepts, their experimental development and commercialization, and to present a case study summarizing the results of investigations on the feasibility of a low-density polyethylene (LDPE)-film containing triclosan to inhibit microbial growth on food surfaces and consequently prolong shelf-life or improve microbial food safety. In contrast with the strong antimicrobial effect in in-vitro simulated vacuum-packaged conditions against the psychrotrophic food pathogen L. monocytogenes, the 1000 mg kg(-1) containing triclosan film did not effectively reduce spoilage bacteria and growth of L. monocytogenes on refrigerated vacuum-packaged chicken breasts stored at 7 degrees C. PMID:11962704

  11. Antimicrobial activity against intraosteoblastic Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Valour, Florent; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Riffard, Natacha; Tasse, Jason; Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Chidiac, Christian; Vandenesch, François; Ferry, Tristan; Laurent, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus persistence in osteoblasts, partly as small-colony variants (SCVs), can contribute to bone and joint infection (BJI) relapses, the intracellular activity of antimicrobials is not currently considered in the choice of treatment strategies for BJI. Here, antistaphylococcal antimicrobials were evaluated for their intraosteoblastic activity and their impact on the intracellular emergence of SCVs in an ex vivo osteoblast infection model. Osteoblastic MG63 cells were infected for 2 h with HG001 S. aureus. After killing the remaining extracellular bacteria with lysostaphin, infected cells were incubated for 24 h with antimicrobials at the intraosseous concentrations reached with standard therapeutic doses. Intracellular bacteria and SCVs were then quantified by plating cell lysates. A bactericidal effect was observed with fosfomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, oxacillin, rifampin, ofloxacin, and clindamycin, with reductions in the intracellular inocula of -2.5, -3.1, -3.9, -4.2, -4.9, -4.9, and -5.2 log10 CFU/100,000 cells, respectively (P < 10(-4)). Conversely, a bacteriostatic effect was observed with ceftaroline and teicoplanin, whereas vancomycin and daptomycin had no significant impact on intracellular bacterial growth. Ofloxacin, daptomycin, and vancomycin significantly limited intracellular SCV emergence. Overall, ofloxacin was the only molecule to combine an excellent intracellular activity while limiting the emergence of SCVs. These data provide a basis for refining the choice of antibiotics to prioritise in the management of BJI, justifying the combination of a fluoroquinolone for its intracellular activity with an anti-biofilm molecule, such as rifampin. PMID:25605365

  12. ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECT OF INTRACANAL SUBSTANCES

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Cláudia de Moura; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Lage-Marques, José Luiz

    2007-01-01

    In some situations, endodontic infections do not respond to therapeutic protocol. In these cases, it is suggested the administration of an alternative intracanal medication that presents a wide spectrum of action and has an in-depth effect on the root canal system. The purpose of this study was to assess the antimicrobial action of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and polyethylene glycol and natrosol vehicles with different associations and concentrations. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by using the agar dilution method. The culture media (Müller-Hinton agar) were prepared containing antimicrobial agents at multiple two-fold dilutions of 0.25 to 16 µg/mL, and with the vehicles at the concentrations of 50, 45, 40, 35, 30 and 25%. Twenty-three microbial strains were selected for the study. Metronidazole was not capable of eliminating any of the tested microorganisms. The association of ciprofloxacin with metronidazole resulted in a reduction of the MIC. The vehicle polyethylene glycol inhibited the growth of 100% of the tested strains, while natrosol inhibited 18% of the strains. Ciprofloxacin formulations with polyethylene glycol presented better effects than those of formulations to which metronidazole was added. It was possible to conclude that ciprofloxacin presented antimicrobial action against all tested bacterial strains, and its association with metronidazole was synergic. The vehicle polyethylene glycol showed antimicrobial effect and the ciprofloxacin/polyethylene glycol association was the most effective combination for reducing the tested bacteria and yeasts. PMID:19089178

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Epilobium spp. extracts.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, L; Tita, B; Evandri, M G; Mazzanti, G

    2001-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the Epilobium angustifolium, E. hirsutum, E. palustre, E. tetragonum and E. rosmarinifolium ethanolic extracts was studied in vitro on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was also evaluated using the Artemia salina test. All the extracts showed antimicrobial activity in a range of concentrations between 10 and 650 microgml of dry extract. E. angustifolium and E. rosmarinifolium had the most broad spectrum of action inhibiting bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The extracts were devoid of toxicity on Artemia salina within the range of antimicrobial concentrations, suggesting that the action is selective on microorganisms. PMID:11482755

  14. Antimicrobial activity of flowers from Anthemis cotula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V Quarenghi; M. L Tereschuk; M. D Baigori; L. R Abdala

    2000-01-01

    The flavonoid containing total extract of Anthemis cotula flowers, tested at the concentration of 200 ?g\\/ml, showed interesting antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive microorganisms.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of flowers from Anthemis cotula.

    PubMed

    Quarenghi, M V; Tereschuk, M L; Baigori, M D; Abdala, L R

    2000-12-01

    The flavonoid containing total extract of Anthemis cotula flowers, tested at the concentration of 200 microg/ml, showed interesting antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive microorganisms. PMID:11077183

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Epilobium spp. extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucia Battinelli; Beatrice Tita; Maria Grazia Evandri; Gabriela Mazzanti

    2001-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the Epilobium angustifolium, E. hirsutum, E. palustre, E. tetragonum and E. rosmarinifolium ethanolic extracts was studied in vitro on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was also evaluated using the Artemia salina test. All the extracts showed antimicrobial activity in a range of concentrations between 10 and 650 ?g\\/ml of

  17. Antimicrobial activity of polysaccharide films containing essential oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Sánchez-González; Maite Cháfer; Manuel Hernández; Amparo Chiralt; Chelo González-Martínez

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial films were prepared by incorporating different concentrations of bergamot (BO), lemon (LO) and tea tree (TTO) essential oils (EO), into chitosan (CH) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) films. Their antibacterial effectiveness against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was studied at 10 °C during a storage period of 12 days. HPMC-EO and CH-EO composite films present a significant antimicrobial activity against

  18. Development of elastin-like recombinamer films with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    da Costa, André; Machado, Raul; Ribeiro, Artur; Collins, Tony; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Gomes, Andreia C; Casal, Margarida

    2015-02-01

    In the present work we explored the ABP-CM4 peptide properties from Bombyx mori for the creation of biopolymers with broad antimicrobial activity. An antimicrobial recombinant protein-based polymer (rPBP) was designed by cloning the DNA sequence coding for ABP-CM4 in frame with the N-terminus of the elastin-like recombinamer consisting of 200 repetitions of the pentamer VPAVG, here named A200. The new rPBP, named CM4-A200, was purified via a simplified nonchromatographic method, making use of the thermoresponsive behavior of the A200 polymer. ABP-CM4 peptide was also purified through the incorporation of a formic acid cleavage site between the peptide and the A200 sequence. In soluble state the antimicrobial activity of both CM4-A200 polymer and ABP-CM4 peptide was poorly effective. However, when the CM4-A200 polymer was processed into free-standing films high antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi was observed. The antimicrobial activity of CM4-A200 was dependent on the physical contact of cells with the film surface. Furthermore, CM4-A200 films did not reveal a cytotoxic effect against both normal human skin fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. Finally, we have developed an optimized ex vivo assay with pig skin demonstrating the antimicrobial properties of the CM4-A200 cast films for skin applications. PMID:25580615

  19. Effect of Peritoneal Dialysis Solution on the Antimicrobial Activity of Cephalosporins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daryl H. Appleby

    1982-01-01

    We studied the effect of peritoneal dialysis solution (PDS) on the antibacterial activity of seven cephalosporins, gentamicin, tobramycin and amikacin. The six bacterial species employed in the study survived in a wide range of concentrations of PDS, however, Staphylococcus aureus did not survive beyond 24 h in PDS. There were no physical incompatibilities between any of the antibiotics and PDS.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Cassia alata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Khan; M. Kihara; A. D. Omoloso

    2001-01-01

    The methanol extracts of leaves, flowers, stem and root barks of Cassia alata showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The activity was increased on fractionation (petrol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate), the dichloromethane fraction of the flower extract being the most effective. No activity was shown against tested moulds.

  1. Synergistic effect and antibiofilm activity between the antimicrobial peptide coprisin and conventional antibiotics against opportunistic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-sok; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Hwang, Ji Hong; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Yangmee; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-01-01

    Coprisin is a 43-mer defensin-like peptide from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus. In this study, we tested its minimum inhibitory concentration and performed combination assays to confirm the antibacterial susceptibility of coprisin and synergistic effects with antibiotics. The synergistic effects were evaluated by testing the effects of coprisin in combination with ampicillin, vancomycin, and chloramphenicol. The results showed that coprisin possessed antibacterial properties and had synergistic activities with the antibiotics. To understand the synergistic mechanism(s), we conducted hydroxyl radical assays. Coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics generated hydroxyl radicals, which are highly reactive oxygen forms and the major property of bactericidal agents. Furthermore, the antibiofilm effect of coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics was investigated. Biofilm formation is the source of many relentless and chronic bacterial infections. The results indicated that coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics also had antibiofilm activity. Therefore, we conclude that coprisin has the potential to be used as a combinatorial therapeutic agent for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. PMID:23053486

  2. Antimicrobial activity of different Finnish monofloral honeys against human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Sanna; Riihinen, Kaisu; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity and phenolic compounds of five Finnish honey products against important human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus were analyzed. Microbroth dilution method and HPLC-DAD were used in antimicrobial testing and phenolic compound determination, respectively. Significant antimicrobial activity (p?antimicrobial activity of Finnish monofloral honeys against streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria. To our knowledge this is also the first report on the antimicrobial effect of honey against S. pneumoniae. PMID:23278378

  3. Medicinal plants and antimicrobial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Ríos; M. C. Recio

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, we analyze the past, present and future of medicinal plants, both as potential antimicrobial crude drugs as well as a source for natural compounds that act as new anti-infection agents. In the past few decades, the search for new anti-infection agents has occupied many research groups in the field of ethnopharmacology. When we reviewed the number

  4. Antimicrobial activity of microencapsulated lemongrass essential oil and the effect of experimental parameters on microcapsules size and morphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernanda V. Leimann; Odinei H. Gonçalves; Ricardo A. F. Machado; Ariovaldo Bolzan

    2009-01-01

    Lemongrass (Cymbopogom citratus) essential oil, known due to its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, was microencapsulated by simple coacervation. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA, 78,000 Da and 88 mol% degree of hydrolysis) crosslinked with glutaraldehyde was used as wall-forming polymer. The influence of stirring rate and oil volume fraction on the microcapsule size distribution were evaluated. Sodium dodecil sulphate (SDS) and Poly(vinyl pirrolidone) were tested in

  5. Temporin L: antimicrobial, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities, and effects on membrane permeabilization in lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Andrea C; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Rufo, Anna; Luzi, Carla; Barra, Donatella; Zhao, Hongxia; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Bozzi, Argante; Di Giulio, Antonio; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    The temporins are a family of small, linear antibiotic peptides with intriguing biological properties. We investigated the antibacterial, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities of temporin L (FVQWFSKFLGRIL-NH2), isolated from the skin of the European red frog Rana temporaria. The peptide displayed the highest activity of temporins studied to date, against both human erythrocytes and bacterial and fungal strains. At variance with other known temporins, which are mainly active against Gram-positive bacteria, temporin L was also active against Gram-negative strains such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa A.T.C.C. 15692 and Escherichia coli D21 at concentrations comparable with those that are microbiocidal to Gram-positive bacteria. In addition, temporin L was cytotoxic to three different human tumour cell lines (Hut-78, K-562 and U-937), causing a necrosis-like cell death, although sensitivity to the peptide varied markedly with the specific cell line tested. A study of the interaction of temporin L with liposomes of different lipid compositions revealed that the peptide causes perturbation of bilayer integrity of both neutral and negatively charged membranes, as revealed by the release of a vesicle-encapsulated fluorescent marker, and that the action of the peptide is modulated to some extent by membrane lipid composition. In particular, the presence of negatively charged lipids in the model bilayer inhibits the lytic power of temporin L. We also show that the release of fluorescent markers caused by temporin L is size-dependent and that the peptide does not have a detergent-like effect on the membrane, suggesting that perturbation of bilayer organization takes place on a local scale, i.e. through the formation of pore-like openings. PMID:12133008

  6. The Antimicrobial Activity of Porphyrin Attached Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lesley

    2008-03-01

    We are interested in testing the antimicrobial activity of a porphyrin that is attached to a polymer. The porphyrin (5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-pryridyl)) was synthesized from methyl 4-formyl benzoate, 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, and pyrrole and attached to a copolymer of polystyrene/poly(vinyl benzyl chloride), which was synthesized by free radical polymerization. The antimicrobial activity of the polymer-attached porphyrin was then determined for gram-negative E. Coli grown to 0.80 OD. In this procedure, glass slides were coated with polymer-attached porphyrin via dip-coating, and the E. Coli bacteria were plated in Luria Broth media. The plates were subsequently exposed to light overnight before they were incubated as porphyrins act as photo-sensitizers when irradiated with light. The polymer-attached porphyrin did exhibit antimicrobial activity and parameters that affect its efficiency will be discussed.

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Root Bark of Salacia reticulata

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, G. P.; Vijay Kanth, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of chloroform and methanolic extracts of Salacia reticulata were tested against gram positive, gram negative and fungus strains using zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentrations. It was observed that both extracts have inhibitory effect towards all microorganisms used in the test. Chloroform extract was more effective than methanolic extract. PMID:22557181

  8. Intracellular Antimicrobial Activity in the Absence of Interferon-?: Effect of Interleukin-12 in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis in Interferon-? Gene-disrupted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alice P.; Murray, Henry W.

    1997-01-01

    Despite permitting uncontrolled intracellular visceral infection for 8 wk, interferon-? (IFN-?) gene knockout (GKO) mice infected with Leishmania donovani proceeded to reduce liver parasite burdens by 50% by week 12. This late-developing IFN-?–independent antileishmanial mechanism appeared to be dependent largely on endogenous tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?): L. donovani infection induced TNF-? mRNA expression in parasitized GKO livers and neutralization of TNF-? reversed control at week 12. 7 d of treatment of infected GKO mice with interleukin-12 (IL-12) readily induced leishmanicidal activity and also partially restored the near-absent tissue granulomatous response, observations that for the first time expand the antimicrobial repertoire of IL-12 to include IFN-?–independent effects. The action of IL-12 against L. donovani was TNF-? dependent and required the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results point to the presence of an IFN-?–independent antimicrobial mechanism, mediated by TNF-?, which remains quiescent until activated late in the course of experimental visceral leishmaniasis. However, as judged by the effect of exogenous IL-12 this quiescent mechanism can readily be induced to rapidly yield enhanced intracellular antimicrobial activity. PMID:9104810

  9. Lipidated Peptidomimetics with Improved Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a series of lipidated ?-AApeptides that mimic the structure and function of natural antimicrobial lipopeptides. Several short lipidated ?-AApeptides show broad-spectrum activity against a range of clinically related Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungus. Their antimicrobial activity and selectivity are comparable or even superior to the clinical candidate pexiganan as well as previously reported linear ?-AApeptides. The further development of lipidated ?-AApeptides will lead to a new class of antibiotics to combat drug resistance. PMID:24900530

  10. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cysteine-free coprisin nonapeptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Daeun; Choi, Hyemin; Kim, Ha Hyung; Kim, Ho; Hwang, Jae Sam; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il

    2014-01-10

    Coprisin is a 43-mer defensin-like peptide from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus. CopA3 (LLCIALRKK-NH?), a 9-mer peptide containing a single free cysteine residue at position 3 of its sequence, was derived from the ?-helical region of coprisin and exhibits potent antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. The single cysteine implies a tendency for dimerization; however, it remains unknown whether this cysteine residue is indispensible for CopA3's antimicrobial activity. To address this issue, in the present study we synthesized eight cysteine-substituted monomeric CopA3 analogs and two dimeric analogs, CopA3 (Dimer) and CopIK (Dimer), and evaluated their antimicrobial effects against bacteria and fungi, as well as their hemolytic activity toward human erythrocytes. Under physiological conditions, CopA3 (Mono) exhibits a 6/4 (monomer/dimer) molar ratio in HPLC area percent, indicating that its effects on bacterial strains likely reflect a CopA3 (Mono)/CopA3 (Dimer) mixture. We also report the identification of CopW, a new cysteine-free nonapeptide derived from CopA3 that has potent antimicrobial activity with virtually no hemolytic activity. Apparently, the cysteine residue in CopA3 is not essential for its antimicrobial function. Notably, CopW also exhibited significant synergistic activity with ampicillin and showed more potent antifungal activity than either wild-type coprisin or melittin. PMID:24321546

  11. Mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide: a critical review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Siqueira Jr; H. P. Lopes

    1999-01-01

    Siqueira Jr JF, Lopes HP. Mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide: a critical review (Review). Interna- tional Endodontic Journal, 32, 361-369, 1999. Literature review The primary function of calcium hydroxide as a routine intracanal medicament is to provide antimicrobial activity. However, the mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide are not well known. Physicochemical properties of this substance may

  12. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Pycnocycla spinosa Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Kazempour, Nastaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pycnocycla spinosa (P. spinosa) a member of the Umbelliferae family is traditionally used for treatment of different ailments. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the total phenolic and flavonoid content of P. spinosa extracts (methanol, ethanol and aqueous) and their antioxidant and antimicrobial effects. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of different extracts of P. spinosa was evaluated using micro broth dilution. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were measured. Their antioxidant effect was evaluated using DPPH assay and ?-carotene linoleic acid test. Results: P. spinosa ethanol extract with higher-level phenolic and flavonoid contents showed the highest antioxidant and antimicrobial effects, in comparison with the other extracts. Bacillus sp. and Streptococcus sp. showed higher sensitivity to P. spinosa ethanol extract. Conclusions: P. spinosa ethanol extract can be used as a mouthwash for treatment of the oral infections. More clinical and toxicological studies are required for providing its efficacy. PMID:25237641

  13. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Achyranthes coynei Sant.

    PubMed Central

    Ankad, Gireesh; Upadhya, Vinayak; Pai, Sandeep R.; Hegde, Harsha V.; Roy, Subarna

    2013-01-01

    Objective To validate the traditional use of Achyranthes coynei (A. coynei) Sant. as an antimicrobial in treatment of various infectious diseases. Methods Leaf extracts of A. coynei obtained through successive solvent extraction using petroleum ether, dichrloromethane, chloroform and methanol were used to screen the antimicrobial activity on five Gram positive, five Gram negative bacteria and two fungi. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by two fold tube-dilution method. Results Methanolic leaf extract was more effective than other three extracts on the tested bacteria. Methanolic extract was efficient on Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC values (0.62±0.00) mg/mL. The fungal organisms were less susceptible against extracts tested. Conclusions These results support the traditional use of leaf extracts of A. coynei as they have antimicrobial potential. Further studies are needed for establishing safety, toxicity and pharmacological activity with phytochemical investigation.

  14. Essential oils with high antimicrobial activity for therapeutic use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. R. Williams; J. K. Stockley; W. Yan; V. N. Home

    1998-01-01

    After a comparison of the antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of Australian tea tree oil, Australian lavender, New Zealand manuka, lemongrass oil, and eucalyptus oil it was found that the relative antimicrobial activity varied depending upon the microorganism under test.Lavender has useful antimicrobial properties and a product was formulated containing a combination of tea tree oil and lavender for

  15. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Withania frutescens.

    PubMed

    El Bouzidi, Laila; Larhsini, Mustapha; Markouk, Mohamed; Abbad, Abdelaziz; Hassani, Lahcen; Bekkouche, Khalid

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, we report for the first time the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Withania frutescens (L.) Pauquy roots and leaves. Total phenolic content was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu method and antioxidant activity was evaluated by the DPPH free radical scavenging and reducing power methods. Antimicrobial activity tests were carried out against ten bacterial species involved in nosocomial infections and two opportunistic clinical yeast isolates. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol leaf fractions exhibited the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 = 4.53 +/- 0.12 and 8.49 +/- 0.46 microg/mL, respectively. The n-butanol root fraction showed the greatest reducing power comparable with that of quercetin at 0.4 mg/mL. The dichloromethane leaf fraction exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with MIC values ranging between 50 and 400 microg/mL, depending on the tested bacteria. However, none of the examined extracts exhibited anticandidal activity. The polyphenol and glycowithanolide constituents appeared to be responsible for the antioxidant capacity of W. frutescens, whereas the observed antimicrobial activity may be due to the presence of withanolides. PMID:22164779

  16. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tea infusions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pilar Almajano; Rosa Carbó; J. Angel López Jiménez; Michael H. Gordon

    2008-01-01

    Tea polyphenols, especially the catechins, are potent antimicrobial and antioxidant agents, with positive effects on human health. White tea is one of the less studied teas but the flavour is more accepted than that of green tea in Europe. The concentrations of various catechins in 13 different kinds of infusion were determined by capillary electrophoresis. The total polyphenol content (Folin–Ciocalteu

  17. Factors affecting antimicrobial activity of MUC7 12-mer, a human salivary mucin-derived peptide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guo-Xian Wei; Alexander N Campagna; Libuse A Bobek

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MUC7 12-mer (RKSYKCLHKRCR), a cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from the human low-molecular-weight salivary mucin MUC7, possesses potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. In order to evaluate the potential therapeutic application of the MUC7 12-mer, we examined the effects of mono- and divalent cations, EDTA, pH, and temperature on its antimicrobial activity. METHODS: Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) were determined using a

  18. Antimicrobial activity of nerolidol and its derivatives against airborne microbes and further biological activities.

    PubMed

    Krist, Sabine; Banovac, Daniel; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Gochev, Velizar K; Wanner, Jürgen; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Nerolidol and its derivatives, namely cis-nerolidol, O-methyl-nerolidol, O-ethyl-nerolidol, (-)-?-bisabolol, trans,trans-farnesol and its main natural source cabreuva essential oil, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against airborne microbes and antifungal properties against plant pathogens. Among the tested compounds, ?-bisabolol was the most effective antimicrobial agent and trans,trans-farnesol showed the best antifungal activity. PMID:25920237

  19. Impedance measurements to study the antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lamiaceae and Compositae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilena Marino; Carla Bersani; Giuseppe Comi

    2001-01-01

    A wide range of essential oils from sage, mint, hyssop, camomile and oregano were tested for their inhibitory effects against nine strains of Gram-negative bacteria and six strains of Gram-positive bacteria. Three principles were used in describing the antimicrobial effects of the essential oils: the overall antimicrobial activity determined by use of an impedometric method, the bactericidal effect determined as

  20. The Antimicrobial Activity of Liposomal Lauric Acids Against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chan, Michael; Carson, Dennis; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Liangfang

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a potential treatment for inflammatory acne is its poor water solubility. Then the LA was incorporated into a liposome formulation to aid its delivery to P. acnes. It's demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of LA was not only well maintained in its liposomal derivatives but also enhanced at low LA concentration. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of LA-loaded liposomes (LipoLA) mainly depended on the LA loading concentration per single liposomes. Further study found that the LipoLA could fuse with the membranes of P. acnes and release the carried LA directly into the bacterial membranes, thereby killing the bacteria effectively. Since LA is a natural compound that is the main acid in coconut oil and also resides in human breast milk and liposomes have been successfully and widely applied as a drug delivery vehicle in the clinic, the LipoLA developed in this work holds great potential of becoming an innate, safe and effective therapeutic medication for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes associated diseases. PMID:19665786

  1. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of five lichen species.

    PubMed

    Mitrovi?, Tatjana; Stamenkovi?, Slaviša; Cvetkovi?, Vladimir; Toši?, Svetlana; Stankovi?, Milan; Radojevi?, Ivana; Stefanovi?, Olgica; Comi?, Ljiljana; Da?i?, Dragana; Cur?i?, Milena; Markovi?, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

  2. Antimicrobial activity of o-carboranylalanine.

    PubMed

    Oros, G; Ujváry, I; Nachman, R J

    1999-01-01

    Functionalized polyhedral carboranes, including amino acid analogs, have unique physicochemical properties and are used as experimental anticancer agents. However, our current knowledge on their effect in nonmammalian biological systems is limited. We investigated the activity spectrum in vitro of o-carboranylalanine (o-Cba), considered to be a highly lipophilic analog of phenylalanine, against representative plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi of various taxonomic position. The antibacterial effect of o-Cba against some species was comparable to that of the widely used agricultural antibiotic, streptomycin. The sensitivity of individual bacterial species to o-Cba within the same genus varied to a greater extent than the average sensitivity of various genera. In general, this carborane-containing amino acid was more toxic to Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus, Corynebacterium, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus) than to Gram negative ones (Agrobacterium, Erwinia, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Xanthomonas). Compared to the commercial fungicide, prochloraz, o-Cba was weakly toxic against various fungi (Zygo- and Ascomycota). It was also inferior to the commercial fungicide metalaxyl in inhibiting the vegetative growth of oomyceteous plant pathogens (Pythium irregulare, Phytophthora cryptogea and Plasmopara halstedii). Against the asexual spores of P. halstedii, o-Cba, however, was over a thousandfold more active than tridemorph, a selective zoospore inhibitor fungicide. For all taxonomic groups, the observed antimicrobial effect of o-Cba could be diminished with histidine, but not with phenylalanine. In studies on healthy and mildew-infected sunflower and tobacco plants o-Cba showed neither fungicidal nor phytotoxic effects at 500 ppm. This is the first report on the biological activity spectrum of a carborane-containing amino acid. PMID:10707765

  3. Antimicrobial silver: An unprecedented anion effect

    PubMed Central

    Swathy, J. R.; Sankar, M. Udhaya; Chaudhary, Amrita; Aigal, Sahaja; Anshup; Pradeep, T.

    2014-01-01

    Silver is an indispensable metal but its use has to be minimised for sustainable growth. Much of the silver lost during use is unrecoverable; an example being its use as an antimicrobial agent, a property known since ages. While developing methods to create an affordable drinking water purifier especially for the developing world, we discovered that 50 parts per billion (ppb) of Ag+ released continuously from silver nanoparticles confined in nanoscale cages is enough to cause antimicrobial activity in conditions of normal water. Here we show that the antibacterial and antiviral activities of Ag+ can be enhanced ~1,000 fold, selectively, in presence of carbonate ions whose concentration was maintained below the drinking water norms. The protective layers of the organisms were affected during the carbonate-assisted antimicrobial activity. It is estimated that ~1,300 tons of silver can be saved annually using this new way to enhance its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25418185

  4. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of herb extracts.

    PubMed

    Denev, Petko; Kratchanova, Maria; Ciz, Milan; Lojek, Antonin; Vasicek, Ondrej; Blazheva, Denitsa; Nedelcheva, Plamena; Vojtek, Libor; Hyrsl, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive data on the antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of extracts from six medicinal plants--blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) leaves, chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) leaves, hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves, lady's mantle (Alchemilla glabra) aerial parts, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) aerial parts and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves. In order to analyze the antioxidant activity of the herbs, several methods (ORAC, TRAP, HORAC and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) were used. Blackberry leaves and meadowsweet extracts revealed the highest antioxidant activities via all methods. All extracts studied blocked almost completely the opsonized zymosan particle-activated ROS production by neutrophils from human whole blood. On the other hand, the effect of extracts on phorbol myristate acetate-activated ROS production was much milder and even nonsignificant in the case of chokeberry leaves. This latter result suggests that extracts (apart from their antioxidative activity) interfere with the signaling cascade of phagocyte activation upstream of the protein kinase C activation. The antimicrobial activity of the investigated extracts against 11 human pathogens was investigated using three different methods. Meadowsweet and blackberry leaves extracts had the highest antimicrobial effect and the lowest minimal inhibiting concentrations (MICs) against the microorganisms tested. PMID:24945135

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of mangrove plant Sonneratia alba

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Shahbudin; Taher, Muhammad; Susanti, Deny; Qaralleh, Haitham; Awang, Anis Fadhlina Izyani Bt

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antimicrobial property of mangrove plant Sonneratia alba (S. alba). Methods The antimicrobial activity was evaluated using disc diffusion and microdilution methods against six microorganisms. Soxhlet apparatus was used for extraction with a series of solvents, n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol in sequence of increasing polarity. Results Methanol extract appeared to be the most effective extract while n-hexane extract showed no activity. The antimicrobial activities were observed against the gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Bacillus cereus (B. cereus), the gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans appeared to be not sensitive to the concentrations tested since no inhibition zone was observed. E. coli (17.5 mm) appeared to be the most sensitive strain followed by S. aureus (12.5 mm) and B. cereus (12.5 mm). Conclusions From this study, it can be concluded that S. alba exhibits antimicrobial activities against certain microorganisms. PMID:23569943

  6. Antimicrobial activity of enterocins from Enterococcus faecalis SL5 against Propionibacterium acnes , the causative agent in acne vulgaris, and its therapeutic effect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bong Seon Kang; Jae-Gu Seo; Gwa-Su Lee; Jung-Hwa Kim; Sei Yeon Kim; Ye Won Han; Hoon Kang; Hyung Ok Kim; Ji Hwan Rhee; Myung-Jun Chung; Young Min Park

    2009-01-01

    A lactic acid bacterial strain was isolated from human fecal specimen and identified as Enterococcus faecalis SL-5. The isolated strain showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive pathogens assayed, especially the highest activity\\u000a against Propionibacterium acnes. The antimicrobial substance was purified and verified as a bacteriocin (named ESL5) of E. faecalis SL-5 by activity-staining using P. acnes as an indicator. N-terminal sequence

  7. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Thymus capitata Essential Oil with Its Preservative Effect against Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated in Minced Beef Meat

    PubMed Central

    El Abed, Nariman; Kaabi, Belhassen; Smaali, Mohamed Issam; Chabbouh, Meriem; Habibi, Kamel; Mejri, Mondher; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Ben Hadj Ahmed, Sami

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and the preservative effect of Thymus capitata essential oil against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in minced beef meat were evaluated. The essential oil extracted was chemically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nineteen components were identified, of which carvacrol represented (88.89%) of the oil. The antioxidant activity was assessed in vitro by using both the DPPH and the ABTS assays. The findings showed that the essential oil exhibited high antioxidant activity, which was comparable to the reference standards (BHT and ascorbic acid) with IC50 values of 44.16 and 0.463 ?g/mL determined by the free-radical scavenging DPPH and ABTS assays, respectively. Furthermore, the essential oil was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity using disc agar diffusion and microdilution methods. The results demonstrated that the zone of inhibition varied from moderate to strong (15–80?mm) and the minimum inhibition concentration values ranged from 0.32 to 20?mg/mL. In addition, essential oil evaluated in vivo against Listeria monocytogenes showed clear and strong inhibitory effect. The application of 0.25 or 1% (v/w) essential oil of T. capitata to minced beef significantly reduced the L. monocytogenes population when compared to those of control samples (P-value??<0.01). PMID:24719640

  8. Antimicrobial activity and biofilm formation inhibition of green tea polyphenols on human teeth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yun-Seok Cho; Jay Jooyoung Oh; Kye-Heon Oh

    2010-01-01

    The antimicrobial effects and biofilm formation inhibition of tea polyphenols (TPP) extracted from Korean green tea (Camellia sinensis L) were evaluated against 12 oral microorganisms. Effective antimicrobial activity against all microorganisms tested, including\\u000a Lactobacillus spp. (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum), Streptococcus spp. (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus salivarius), Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter

  9. Antimicrobial activity of the metals and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-11-01

    The ever increasing resistance of pathogens towards antibiotics has caused serious health problems in the recent years. It has been shown that by combining modern technologies such as nanotechnology and material science with intrinsic antimicrobial activity of the metals, novel applications for these substances could be identified. According to the reports, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles represent a group of materials which were investigated in respect to their antimicrobial effects. In the present review, we focused on the recent research works concerning antimicrobial activity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature indicated that the particle size was the essential parameter which determined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the metal nanoparticles. Combination therapy with the metal nanoparticles might be one of the possible strategies to overcome the current bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents. However, further studies should be performed to minimize the toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to apply as proper alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants especially in biomedical applications. PMID:25280707

  10. Anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of triterpenoids from Strobilanthes callosus nees.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Sahu, P M; Sharma, M K

    2002-05-01

    The anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of the 95% ethanol extract, benzene fraction and isolated triterpenoids of Strobilanthes callosus were investigated. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema inflammation model, the taraxerol showed a high reduction of edema, but the antimicrobial effect observed was lower at the two doses employed. These results confirm the use of this plant in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial herbal drug. PMID:12120818

  11. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Indigofera suffruticosa

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Sônia Pereira; Vieira, Jeymesson Raphael Cardoso; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; Leite, Roberta Maria Pereira; de Menezes Lima, Vera Lúcia; Xavier, Haroudo Satiro; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2006-01-01

    Various organic and aqueous extracts of leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Mill (Fabaceae) obtained by infusion and maceration were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The extracts were tested against 5 different species of human pathogenic bacteria and 17 fungal strains by the agar-solid diffusion method. Most of the extracts were devoid of antifungal and antibacterial activities, except the aqueous extract of leaves of I. suffruticosa obtained by infusion, which showed strong inhibitory activity against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5000 µg ml?1. The MIC values to dermatophyte strains were 2500 µg ml?1 against Trichophyton rubrum (LM-09, LM-13) and Microsporum canis. This study suggests that aqueous extracts of leaves of I. suffruticosa obtained by infusion can be used in the treatment of skin diseases caused by dermatophytes. PMID:16786057

  13. Antimicrobial activity of carvacrol: current progress and future prospectives.

    PubMed

    Nostro, Antonia; Papalia, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    During the last few years the scientific community has shown a considerable interest in the study of plant materials as sources of new compounds to be processed into antimicrobial agents. In this context, carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, has emerged for its wide spectrum activity extended to food spoilage or pathogenic fungi, yeast and bacteria as well as human, animal and plant pathogenic microorganisms including drug-resistant and biofilm forming microorganisms. The antibacterial activity of carvacrol has been attributed to its considerable effects on the structural and functional properties of cytoplasmatic membrane. The data reported in this review provide an overview of the published literature regarding the antimicrobial properties of carvacrol and the recent patents claimed in order to highlight its future applications as a new antimicrobial agent. These could concern either the natural preservation in the cosmetic and food industries or an alternative which supports the conventional antimicrobial protocols. Interestingly, carvacrol alone or associated with one or more synergistic products could be incorporated in different formulations for biomedical and food packaging applications. However, more detailed safety investigations and in vivo studies should be carried out so that this molecule could be used in the future. PMID:22044355

  14. Antimicrobial and antioxidative effects of defatted tea seed meal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Woo-Suk Bang; Young-Min Chung; Byung-Doo Lee; Jin-Cheol Lee; Jong-Bang Eun

    Antimicrobial and antioxidative effects of solvent extracts of defatted tea seed meal (DTSM) were investigated for possible utilization as food ingredients. Of the extracts from DTSM, the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction showed much stronger antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria, S. aureus, M. luteus and S. epidermidis, than did the control benzoic acid solution. It also exhibited stronger effects against the

  15. [Antimicrobial activity of stable silver nanoparticles of a certain size].

    PubMed

    Mukha, Iu P; Eremenko, A M; Smirnova, N P; Mikhienkova, A I; Korchak, G I; Gorchev, V F; Chunikhin, A Iu

    2013-01-01

    Conditions for obtaining stable silver nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm were developed using a binary stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone/sodium dodecylsulphate in optimal ratio. Optical spectra, morphology and dependence of size of the nanoparticles on the amount of reducing agent were studied. Colloidal solutions of nanosilver showed a high bactericidal activity against strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and fungicidal activity against Candida albicans. The mechanism of action of nanosized silver on microbial cell was examined by laser scanning confocal microscope using fluorescent label. First step of antimicrobial effect on microorganisms was membrane damage and penetration of silver nanoparticles into the cell. Prolonged stability of nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activity over the past two years were showed. PMID:23795483

  16. The Effect of Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Herbal Remedy PADMA 28 on Immunological Angiogenesis and Granulocytes Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Radomska-Le?niewska, Dorota M.; Skopi?ski, Piotr; Zdanowski, Robert; Lewicki, S?awomir; Kocik, Janusz; Skopi?ska-Ró?ewska, Ewa; Stankiewicz, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    PADMA 28 is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, angioprotecting, and wound healing properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of this remedy on immunological angiogenesis and granulocytes metabolic activity in Balb/c mice. Mice were fed daily, for seven days, with 5.8?mg of PADMA (calculated from recommended human daily dose) or 0.085?mg (dose in the range of active doses of other herbal extracts studied by us previously). Results. Highly significant increase of newly formed blood vessels number in ex vivo cutaneous lymphocyte-induced angiogenesis test (LIA) after grafting of Balb/c splenocytes from both dosage groups to F1 hybrids (Balb/c × C3H); increase of blood lymphocytes and granulocytes number only in mice fed with lower dose of remedy; and significant suppression of metabolic activity (chemiluminescence test) of blood granulocytes in mice fed with higher dose of PADMA. Conclusion. PADMA 28 behaves as a good stimulator of physiological angiogenesis, but for this purpose it should be used in substantially lower doses than recommended by producers for avoiding the deterioration of granulocyte function. PMID:23864768

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Cationic Antiseptics in Layer-by-Layer Thin Film Assemblies

    E-print Network

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2010-07-14

    , antimicrobial efficacy was found to persist even when films were used four weeks after being prepared. The best films remain effective (i.e. antimicrobially active) for 4-6 days of constant exposure to bacteria-swabbed plates. This technology holds promise...

  18. Antimicrobial activity of naphthoquinones from fusaria.

    PubMed

    Baker, R A; Tatum, J H; Nemec, S

    1990-07-01

    Twenty-two naphthoquinone compounds isolated or derived synthetically from culture extracts of Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum were examined for antimicrobial activity. Fifteen exhibited antibiotic activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and 12 were active against Streptococcus pyogenes, but none were active at the highest rate of 128 micrograms/ml against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Of 8 plant pathogenic bacteria tested against 11 naphthoquinones, Corynebacterium poinsettiae was inhibited by 6 compounds, and Pseudomonas viridiflava was weakly inhibited by one. Only one of a group of 6 fluorescent soil pseudomonads was inhibited by one naphthoquinone. Antifungal activity of 10 compounds against 8 fungal plant pathogens was limited to inhibition of Phytophthora parasitica by one naphthopyran. PMID:2233983

  19. Antimicrobial activity and durability of a novel antimicrobial-impregnated bladder catheter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. O Darouiche; O. Z Hampel; T. B Boone; I. I Raad

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the antimicrobial activity and durability of a novel indwelling bladder catheter impregnated with minocycline and rifampin. Thirty antimicrobial-impregnated bladder catheters were inserted transurethrally in spinal cord-injured patients and removed, in six groups of five catheters each, at 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 or 21 days. Removed catheters had detectable zones of

  20. [Antimicrobial activities of ceftriaxone against fresh, clinically isolated strains].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Koguchi, M; Tanaka, S; Fukayama, S; Ishihara, R; Deguchi, K; Oda, S; Nakane, Y; Fukumoto, T

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate antimicrobial activity of ceftriaxone (CTRX), minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CTRX and control drugs were determined against clinically isolated strains including those from purulent meningitis and liver and biliary tract infections in 1995. The results are summarized as follows; 1. MIC90 of CTRX was 0.05 micrograms/ml against benzylpenicillin (PCG)-insensitive Streptococcus pneumoniae or PCG-resistant S. pneumoniae and it was < or = 0.025 micrograms/ml against beta-lactamase producing strains of Haemophilus influenzae. Antimicrobial activities of CTRX against these strains were stronger than control drugs. 2. MIC distribution of CTRX was in a lower concentration range than those of ceftazidime and flomoxef against extend broad-spectrum beta-lactamase (EBLA)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae. 3. These results suggested that CTRX will be effective against community-acquired pneumonia, purulent meningitis and liver & biliary tract infections. PMID:8851307

  1. Antityrosinase and antimicrobial activities from Thai medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Dej-Adisai, Sukanya; Meechai, Imron; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn; Kummee, Sopa

    2014-04-01

    Various dermatological disorders and microbial skin infection can cause hyperpigmentation. Therefore, screenings for whitening and antimicrobial agents from Thai medicinal plants have been of research interest. Seventy-seven ethanol plant extracts were investigated for antityrosinase activity, eleven samples showed the tyrosinase inhibition more than 50 % were further preliminary screening for antimicrobial activity by agar disc diffusion and broth micro-dilution methods. Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr. (Moraceae) root extract, which showed the potential of tyrosinase inhibition with 90.57 ± 2.93 % and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Trichophyton mentagophytes with inhibition zone as 9.10 ± 0.00, 10.67 ± 0.09, 15.25 ± 0.05 and 6.60 ± 0.17 mm, respectively was selected for phytochemical investigation. Three pure compounds were isolated as artocarpin, cudraflavone C and artocarpanone. And artocarpanone exhibited anti-tyrosinase effect; artocarpin and cudraflavone C also showed the potential of antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis and P. acnes with MIC at 2, 4 and 2 ?g/ml, respectively and MBC at 32 ?g/ml for these bacteria. So, these pure compounds are interesting for further study in order to provide possibilities of new whitening and antibacterial development. This will be the first report of phytochemical investigation of A. integer root. PMID:23835832

  2. Synergistic Antimicrobial Activities of Folic Acid Antagonists and Nucleoside Analogs?

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Johannes; Besier, Silke; Ackermann, Hanns; Wichelhaus, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of folic acid antagonists are supposed to be antagonized by elevated extracellular thymidine concentrations in damaged host tissues. Therefore, this study was aimed at screening for nucleoside analogs that impair bacterial thymidine utilization and analyzing the combined antimicrobial activities of nucleoside analogs and folic acid antagonists in the presence of thymidine. Our screening results revealed that different nucleoside analogs, in particular halogenated derivatives of 2?-deoxyuridine, substantially impaired the bacterial utilization of extracellular thymidine in Staphylococcus aureus. Time-kill methods showed that 5-iodo-2?-deoxyuridine enhanced the extent of killing of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) at 24 h against S. aureus in the presence of thymidine (200 ?g/liter). While SXT (40 mg/liter) alone did not kill bacteria in the presence of thymidine, its combination with the nucleoside analog at a concentration of 8 ?mol/liter showed a bactericidal effect. Moreover, 5-iodo-2?-deoxyuridine combined with SXT in the presence of thymidine showed a broad spectrum of activity against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that the in vitro antimicrobial activity of SXT in the presence of thymidine can be significantly improved by combination with a nucleoside analog. PMID:20028816

  3. Antimicrobial Effects of Interferon-Inducible CXC Chemokines against Bacillus anthracis Spores and Bacilli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Crawford; Yinghua Zhu; Candace S. Green; Marie D. Burdick; Patrick Sanz; Farhang Alem; Alison D. O'Brien; Borna Mehrad; Robert M. Strieter; Molly A. Hughes

    2009-01-01

    Based on previous studies showing that host chemokines exert antimicrobial activities against bacteria, we sought to determine whether the interferon-inducible Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 exhibit antimicrobial activities against Bacillus anthracis. In vitro analysis demon- strated that all three CXC chemokines exerted direct antimicrobial effects against B. anthracis spores and bacilli including marked reductions in spore and bacillus

  4. Antimicrobial activity of enterocins from Enterococcus faecalis SL-5 against Propionibacterium acnes, the causative agent in acne vulgaris, and its therapeutic effect.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bong Seon; Seo, Jae-Gu; Lee, Gwa-Su; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Sei Yeon; Han, Ye Won; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok; Rhee, Ji Hwan; Chung, Myung-Jun; Park, Young Min

    2009-02-01

    A lactic acid bacterial strain was isolated from human fecal specimen and identified as Enterococcus faecalis SL-5. The isolated strain showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive pathogens assayed, especially the highest activity against Propionibacterium acnes. The antimicrobial substance was purified and verified as a bacteriocin (named ESL5) of E. faecalis SL-5 by activity-staining using P. acnes as an indicator. N-terminal sequence of ESL5 was determined (MGAIAKLVAK) and sequence analysis revealed that it is almost identical to the some of enterocins including L50A/B of E. faecium L50 and MR10A/B of E. faecalis MRR 10-3. From the sequencing data of L50A/B structural genes, the nucleotide sequence showed 100% identity with that of the MR10A/B structural genes, implying that ESL5 is an equivalent of enterocin MR10. Meanwhile, we also tested the therapeutic effect of anti-P. acnes activity in patients with mild to moderate acne because of its pathogenic role to acne vulgaris. For this purpose, a concentrated powder of CBT SL-5 was prepared using cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of E. faecalis SL-5 and included in a lotion for application in the patients. The study showed that CBT SL-5 lotion significantly reduced the inflammatory lesions like pustules compared to the placebo lotion. Therefore our results indicate that the anti-P. acnes activity produced by E. faecalis SL-5 has potential role to the treatment of acne as an alternative to topical antibiotics. PMID:19229497

  5. The antimicrobial activity of liposomal lauric acids against Propionibacterium acnes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darren Yang; Dissaya Pornpattananangkul; Teruaki Nakatsuji; Michael Chan; Dennis Carson; Chun-Ming Huang; Liangfang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a

  6. Aedesin: Structure and Antimicrobial Activity against Multidrug Resistant Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, André; Hamel, Rodolphe; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Chauffour, Aurélie; Vittecoq, Marion; Hoh, François; Thomas, Frédéric; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Lionne, Corinne; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance, which is acquired by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, causes infections that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in many clinical settings around the world. Because of the rapidly increasing incidence of pathogens that have become resistant to all or nearly all available antibiotics, there is a need for a new generation of antimicrobials with a broad therapeutic range for specific applications against infections. Aedesin is a cecropin-like anti-microbial peptide that was recently isolated from dengue virus-infected salivary glands of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. In the present study, we have refined the analysis of its structural characteristics and have determined its antimicrobial effects against a large panel of multidrug resistant bacterial strains, directly isolated from infected patients. Based the results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis, Aedesin has a helix-bend-helix structure typical for a member of the family of ?-helix anti-microbial peptides. Aedesin efficiently killed Gram-negative bacterial strains that display the most worrisome resistance mechanisms encountered in the clinic, including resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, 4th generation fluoroquinolones, folate inhibitors and monobactams. In contrast, Gram-positive strains were insensitive to the lytic effects of the peptide. The anti-bacterial activity of Aedesin was found to be salt-resistant, indicating that it is active under physiological conditions encountered in body fluids characterized by ionic salt concentrations. In conclusion, because of its strong lytic activity against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains displaying all types of clinically relevant resistance mechanisms known today, Aedesin might be an interesting candidate for the development of alternative treatment for infections caused by these types of bacteria. PMID:25162372

  7. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Novy, Pavel; Davidova, Hana; Serrano-Rojero, Cecilia Suqued; Rondevaldova, Johana; Pulkrabek, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Eyebright, Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne (Scrophulariaceae), is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Europe for the treatment of various health disorders, especially as eyewash to treat eye ailments such as conjunctivitis and blepharitis that can be associated with bacterial infections. Some Euphrasia species have been previously reported to contain essential oil. However, the composition and bioactivity of E. rostkoviana oil are unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the eyebright essential oil against some organisms associated with eye infections: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. GC-MS analysis revealed more than 70 constituents, with n-hexadecanoic acid (18.47%) as the main constituent followed by thymol (7.97%), myristic acid (4.71%), linalool (4.65%), and anethole (4.09%). The essential oil showed antimicrobial effect against all organisms tested with the exception of P. aeruginosa. The best activity was observed against all Gram-positive bacteria tested with the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512?µg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of E. rostkoviana essential oil and its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26000025

  8. Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Novy, Pavel; Davidova, Hana; Serrano-Rojero, Cecilia Suqued; Rondevaldova, Johana; Pulkrabek, Josef; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Eyebright, Euphrasia rostkoviana Hayne (Scrophulariaceae), is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Europe for the treatment of various health disorders, especially as eyewash to treat eye ailments such as conjunctivitis and blepharitis that can be associated with bacterial infections. Some Euphrasia species have been previously reported to contain essential oil. However, the composition and bioactivity of E. rostkoviana oil are unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the eyebright essential oil against some organisms associated with eye infections: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. GC-MS analysis revealed more than 70 constituents, with n-hexadecanoic acid (18.47%) as the main constituent followed by thymol (7.97%), myristic acid (4.71%), linalool (4.65%), and anethole (4.09%). The essential oil showed antimicrobial effect against all organisms tested with the exception of P. aeruginosa. The best activity was observed against all Gram-positive bacteria tested with the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512?µg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of E. rostkoviana essential oil and its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26000025

  9. Prediction of Antimicrobial Activity of Synthetic Peptides by a Decision Tree Model

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Felipe; Perez, Pedro S.; Baranauskas, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a persistent problem in the public health sphere. However, recent attempts to find effective substitutes to combat infections have been directed at identifying natural antimicrobial peptides in order to circumvent resistance to commercial antibiotics. This study describes the development of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial activity, created in silico by site-directed mutation modeling using wild-type peptides as scaffolds for these mutations. Fragments of antimicrobial peptides were used for modeling with molecular modeling computational tools. To analyze these peptides, a decision tree model, which indicated the action range of peptides on the types of microorganisms on which they can exercise biological activity, was created. The decision tree model was processed using physicochemistry properties from known antimicrobial peptides available at the Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD). The two most promising peptides were synthesized, and antimicrobial assays showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Colossomin C and colossomin D were the most inhibitory peptides at 5 ?g/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The methods described in this work and the results obtained are useful for the identification and development of new compounds with antimicrobial activity through the use of computational tools. PMID:23455341

  10. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides with High Anticancer Activity and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hao; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Chih, Ya-Han; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid ?-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:25970292

  11. Antimicrobial effect of rosemary extracts.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, J; Amiot, M J; Nguyen-The, C

    2000-10-01

    A rosemary extract commercially exploited (Oxy'less) as an antioxidant of lipids in foods was dissolved in ethanol (100 mg/ml), and the solution was tested against foodborne microorganisms. For gram-positive bacteria, the MIC of the ethanolic solution was 1% for Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 0.5% for Listeria monocytogenes, 0.5% for Staphylococcus aureus, 0.13% for Streptococcus mutans, and 0.06% for Bacillus cereus. It slowed the growth of Penicillium roquefortii and Botrytis cinerea. Up to 1% of the ethanolic solution had no activity on the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Erwinia carotovora and on the yeasts Rhodotorula glutinis and Cryptococcus laurentii. Antibacterial activity of the rosemary extract was strongly influenced by the composition of the media. The MIC was reduced by low pH, high NaCl contents, and low temperatures. Low pH and high NaCl concentration had a synergistic effect on the MIC of the rosemary extract for S. aureus. Lipids, surface-active agents, and some proteins decreased its antibacterial activity, whereas pectin had no effect. The inhibitory effect was little modified by heat treatment (100 degrees C). The natural microflora of pasteurized zucchini broth was inhibited by 0.5% of the rosemary extract. The antibacterial activity was linked to the compounds extracted with hexane, which are presumably phenolic diterpenoids. PMID:11041135

  12. Chemical properties and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Slovenian propolis.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Ana; Abramovi?, Helena; Polak, Tomaž; Bertoncelj, Jasna; Jamnik, Polona; Smole Možina, Sonja; Jeršek, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    The chemical composition as well as the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of two EtOH extracts of propolis (PEEs) from Slovenia were determined. EtOH was used as extracting solvent at 70 and 96%, providing the extracts PEE70 and PEE96, respectively. The extraction with 70% EtOH was more efficient than that with 96% EtOH, as the PEE70 was richer in total phenolic compounds than the PEE96. The Slovenian propolis was characterized by different phenolic acids and flavonoids. The PEE96 was slightly richer in three specific compounds, i.e., caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and luteolin, while all other substances detected showed higher contents in the PEE70. The PEE70 showed a stronger reducing power and ability to scavenge free radicals and metal ions than the PEE96. Both PEEs were in the main more effective against Gram-positive bacteria than against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria like Salmonella and Escherichia coli, with the exception of Campylobacter. The PEE96 decreased the intracellular oxidation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a dose-dependent manner. The antimicrobial activities and antioxidant properties were related to the total phenolic contents. The two PEEs have the potential for use as natural antimicrobial and antioxidant additives in foods. PMID:22899615

  13. Effect of postharvest UV-C treatment on the bacterial diversity of Ataulfo mangoes by PCR-DGGE, survival of E. coli and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Rocío; Ramírez-Villatoro, Guadalupe; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Eslava, Carlos; Calderón, Montserrat; Navarro-Ocaña, Arturo; Trejo-Márquez, Andrea; Wacher, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Since Mexico is the second largest exporter of mangoes, its safety assurance is essential. Research in microbial ecology and knowledge of complex interactions among microbes must be better understood to achieve maximal control of pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of UV-C treatments on bacterial diversity of the Ataulfo mangoes surface using PCR-DGGE analysis of variable region V3 of 16S rRNA genes, and the survival of E. coli, by plate counting. The UV-C irradiation reduced the microbial load on the surface of mangoes immediately after treatment and the structure of bacterial communities was modified during storage. We identified the key members of the bacterial communities on the surface of fruits, predominating Enterobacter genus. Genera as Lactococcus and Pantoea were only detected on the surface of non-treated (control) mangoes. This could indicate that these genera were affected by the UV-C treatment. On the other hand, the treatment did not have a significant effect on survival of E. coli. However, genera that have been recognized as antagonists against foodborne pathogens were identified in the bands patterns. Also, phenolic compounds were determined by HPLC and antimicrobial activity was assayed according to the agar diffusion method. The main phenolic compounds were chlorogenic, gallic, and caffeic acids. Mango peel methanol extracts (UV-C treated and control mangoes) showed antimicrobial activity against strains previously isolated from mango, detecting significant differences (P < 0.05) among treated and control mangoes after 4 and 12 days of storage. Ps. fluorescens and Ps. stutszeri were the most sensitive. PMID:23761788

  14. Lipopolysaccharide bound structures of the active fragments of fowlicidin-1, a cathelicidin family of antimicrobial and antiendotoxic peptide from chicken, determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Anirban; Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2009-01-01

    Cathelicidins comprise a major family of host-defense antimicrobial peptides in vertebrates. The C-terminal part of the cathelicidins is bestowed with antimicrobial and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) neutralizing activities. In this work, we repot high resolution solution structures of two nontoxic active fragments, residues 1-16 or RG16 and residues 8-26 or LK19, of fowlicidin-1, a cathelicidin family of peptide from chicken, as a complex with LPS using two-dimensional transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (Tr-NOE) spectroscopy. Both peptides are highly flexible and do not assume any preferred conformations in their free states. Upon complexation with endotoxin or LPS, peptides undergo structural transitions towards folded conformations. Structure calculations reveal that the LK19 peptide adopts a well defined helical structure with a bend at the middle. By contrast, the first seven amino acids of RG16 are found to be flexible followed by a helical conformation for the residues L8-A15. In addition, a truncated version of LK19 encompassing residues A15-K26 or AK12 displays an amphipathic helical structure in LPS. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR studies demonstrate that all peptides, RG16, LK19, and AK12, are in close proximity with LPS, whereby the aromatic residues showed the strongest STD effects. Fluorescence studies with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled LPS in the presence of full-length fowlicidin-1, LK19, RG16, and AK12 indicated that LPS-neutralization property of these peptides may result from plausible dissociation of LPS aggregates. The helical structures of peptide fragments derived from fowlicidin-1 in LPS could be utilized to develop nontoxic antiendotoxic compounds. PMID:18844294

  15. Effect of postharvest UV-C treatment on the bacterial diversity of Ataulfo mangoes by PCR-DGGE, survival of E. coli and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, Rocío; Ramírez-Villatoro, Guadalupe; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Eslava, Carlos; Calderón, Montserrat; Navarro-Ocaña, Arturo; Trejo-Márquez, Andrea; Wacher, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Since Mexico is the second largest exporter of mangoes, its safety assurance is essential. Research in microbial ecology and knowledge of complex interactions among microbes must be better understood to achieve maximal control of pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of UV-C treatments on bacterial diversity of the Ataulfo mangoes surface using PCR-DGGE analysis of variable region V3 of 16S rRNA genes, and the survival of E. coli, by plate counting. The UV-C irradiation reduced the microbial load on the surface of mangoes immediately after treatment and the structure of bacterial communities was modified during storage. We identified the key members of the bacterial communities on the surface of fruits, predominating Enterobacter genus. Genera as Lactococcus and Pantoea were only detected on the surface of non-treated (control) mangoes. This could indicate that these genera were affected by the UV-C treatment. On the other hand, the treatment did not have a significant effect on survival of E. coli. However, genera that have been recognized as antagonists against foodborne pathogens were identified in the bands patterns. Also, phenolic compounds were determined by HPLC and antimicrobial activity was assayed according to the agar diffusion method. The main phenolic compounds were chlorogenic, gallic, and caffeic acids. Mango peel methanol extracts (UV-C treated and control mangoes) showed antimicrobial activity against strains previously isolated from mango, detecting significant differences (P < 0.05) among treated and control mangoes after 4 and 12 days of storage. Ps. fluorescens and Ps. stutszeri were the most sensitive. PMID:23761788

  16. Effects of Allspice, Cinnamon, and Clove Bud Essential Oils in Edible Apple Films on Physical Properties and Antimicrobial Activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The results of the present study show that allspice, cinnamon and clove bud essential oils can be used to prepare apple-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by both direct contact and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films. Application of the a...

  17. Effects of Cultivation Techniques and Processing on Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.:Fr.) Pers. Extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kah Hui Wong; Vikineswary Sabaratnam; Noorlidah Abdullah; Umah Rani Kuppusamy; Murali Naidu

    2009-01-01

    Summary Hericium erinaceus, a temperate mushroom, is currently cultivated in Malaysia. As culti- vation and processing conditions may affect the medicinal properties, antimicrobial and an- tioxidant properties of locally grown H. erinaceus have been investigated. The fruitbodies that were fresh, oven-dried or freeze-dried were extracted with methanol. Their properties were compared to those exhibited by mycelium extract of the same

  18. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  19. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Medilox® super-oxidized water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim Super-oxidized water is one of the broad spectrum disinfectants, which was introduced recently. There are many researches to find reliable chemicals which are effective, inexpensive, easy to obtain and use, and effective for disinfection of microorganisms leading hospital infections. Antimicrobial activity of super-oxidized water is promising. The aim of this study was to investigate the in-vitro antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Medilox® super-oxidized water that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as high level disinfectant. Material and methods In this study, super-oxidized water obtained from Medilox® [Soosan E & C, Korea] device, which had been already installed in our hospital, was used. Antimicrobial activities of different concentrations of super-oxidized water (1/1, 1/2, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20, 1/50, 1/100) at different exposure times (1, 2, 5, 10, 30 min) against six ATCC strains, eight antibiotic resistant bacteria, yeasts and molds were evaluated using qualitative suspension test. Dey-Engley Neutralizing Broth [Sigma-Aldrich, USA] was used as neutralizing agent. Results Medilox® was found to be effective against all standard strains (Acinetobacter baumannii 19606, Escherichia coli 25922, Enterococcus faecalis 29212, Klebsiella pneumoniae 254988, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27853, Staphylococcus aureus 29213), all clinical isolates (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Myroides spp.), and all yeastsat 1/1 dilution in ??1 minute. It was found to be effective on Aspergillus flavus at 1/1 dilution in ??2 minutes and on certain molds in ??5 minutes. Conclusion Medilox® super-oxidized water is a broad spectrum, on-site producible disinfectant, which is effective on bacteria and fungi and can be used for the control of nosocomial infection. PMID:25023905

  20. Antimicrobial and healing activity of kefir and kefiran extract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamila Leite Rodrigues; Lucélia Rita Gaudino Caputo; Jose Carlos Tavares Carvalho; João Evangelista; Jose Maurício Schneedorf

    2005-01-01

    Kefir and its insoluble polysaccharide, kefiran, were both tested for antimicrobial and cicatrizing activities against several bacterial species and Candida albicans using an agar diffusion method. Comparator antimicrobials were also tested. Cicatrizing experiments were carried out on Wistar rats with induced skin lesions and Staphylococcus aureus inoculation, using a topical application of a 70% kefir gel. Both kefir and kefiran

  1. A study of the antimicrobial activity of selected naturally occurring and synthetic coumarins.

    PubMed

    Smyth, T; Ramachandran, V N; Smyth, W F

    2009-05-01

    The antimicrobial activities of 43 naturally occurring and synthetic coumarins were studied. Using a microtitre assay developed in-house, a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including a hospital isolate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA),were utilised. The coumarins exhibiting good bioactivity (i.e. a low minimum inhibitory concentration) against two S. aureus strains were then assessed for their antimicrobial activities against a range of eight clinically isolated MRSA strains. The study showed that nearly one-half of the tested compounds displayed antimicrobial activity. Sixteen of these coumarins also possessed resistance-modifying activity, which reversed the resistance mechanism in MRSA allowing the antimicrobial oxacillin to exert an enhanced effect against an MRSA hospital strain. When tested in combination with oxacillin, 8-iodo-5,7-dihydroxycoumarin (32) had a similar activity to vancomycin, which is the current drug of choice for the treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:19155158

  2. Antiulcer and antimicrobial activity of Anogeissus latifolia.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, R; Vijayakumar, M; Singh, M; Rao, Ch V; Shirwaikar, A; Rawat, A K S; Pushpangadan, P

    2006-06-15

    Ethnobotanically, the bark of Anogeissus latifolia (Roxb. ex DC.) Wall. ex Guill. and Perr.(Combretaceae) has been reported to be used in the treatment of various disorders including stomach and skin diseases. We studied the antiulcer potential and antimicrobial activity of the 50% aqueous alcoholic extract in order to validate ethnobotanical claims regarding the plant use in the above-mentioned disorders. Gastroprotective potential of the Anogeissus latifolia extract (ALE) (100 and 200mg/kg/body weight) was studied on aspirin, cold-resistant stress (CRS), pylorus ligated (PL) and ethanol-induced ulcers. Status of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase along with lipid peroxidation (LPO) was also studied in CRS-induced ulcers. The results of the present study showed for the first time that the ALE possessed gastroprotective activity as evidenced by its significant inhibition in the formation of ulcers induced by physical and chemical agents with a maximum of 84.16% curation (200mg/kg body weight) in CRS-induced ulcers. ALE decreased LPO and SOD with concomitant increase in catalase activity in CRS-induced ulcers. Moderate antibacterial activity and antifungal activity was also observed. High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) showed the presence of gallic acid and ellagic acid (0.95%, w/w, 0.25%, w/w, respectively) in the plant. These findings could justify, at least partially, the inclusion of this plant in the management of gastric disorders in traditional medicine. PMID:16413714

  3. Antimicrobial activity of fermented Theobroma cacao pod husk extract.

    PubMed

    Santos, R X; Oliveira, D A; Sodré, G A; Gosmann, G; Brendel, M; Pungartnik, C

    2014-01-01

    Theobroma cacao L. contains more than 500 different chemical compounds some of which have been traditionally used for their antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulatory, vasodilatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial activities. Spontaneous aerobic fermentation of cacao husks yields a crude husk extract (CHE) with antimicrobial activity. CHE was fractioned by solvent partition with polar solvent extraction or by silica gel chromatography and a total of 12 sub-fractions were analyzed for chemical composition and bioactivity. CHE was effective against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa. Antibacterial activity was determined using 6 strains: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella choleraesuis (Gram-negative). At doses up to 10 mg/mL, CHE was not effective against the Gram-positive bacteria tested but against medically important P. aeruginosa and S. choleraesuis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5.0 mg/mL. Sub-fractions varied widely in activity and strongest antibacterial activity was seen with CHE8 against S. choleraesuis (MIC of 1.0 mg/mL) and CHE9 against S. epidermidis (MIC of 2.5 mg/mL). All bioactive CHE fractions contained phenols, steroids, or terpenes, but no saponins. Fraction CHE9 contained flavonoids, phenolics, steroids, and terpenes, amino acids, and alkaloids, while CHE12 had the same compounds but lacked flavonoids. PMID:25299086

  4. Antimicrobial Actions of the NADPH Phagocyte Oxidase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimental Salmonellosis. I. Effects on Microbial Killing by Activated Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrés Vazquez-Torres; Jessica Jones-Carson; Pietro Mastroeni; Harry Ischiropoulos; Ferric C. Fang

    The contribution of the NADPH phagocyte oxidase (phox) and inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) to the antimicrobial activity of macrophages for Salmonella typhimurium was studied by using peritoneal phagocytes from C57BL\\/6, congenic gp91 phox 2 \\/ 2 , iNOS 2 \\/ 2 , and doubly immunodeficient phox 2 \\/ 2 iNOS 2 \\/ 2 mice. The respiratory burst and

  5. Oxygen limitation favors the production of protein with antimicrobial activity in Pseudoalteromonas sp

    PubMed Central

    López, Ruth; Monteón, Víctor; Chan, Ernesto; Montejo, Rubí; Chan, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on the production of biomass and metabolites with antimicrobial activity of Pseudoalteromonas sp cultured at 0, 150, 250, or 450 revolutions per minute (rev. min-1). Dissolved oxygen (D.O) was monitored during the fermentation process, biomass was quantified by dry weight, and antimicrobial activity was assessed using the disk diffusion method. The bacterium Pseudoalteromonas reached similar concentration of biomass under all experimental agitation conditions, whereas antimicrobial activity was detected at 0 and 150 rev. min-1 registering 0% and 12% of D.O respectively corresponding to microaerophilic conditions. Antibiotic activity was severely diminished when D.O was above 20% of saturation; this corresponded to 250 or 450 rev. min-1. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 80 kilodaltons (kDa) with antimicrobial activity. Pseudoalteromonas is capable of growing under oxic and microaerophilic conditions but the metabolites with antimicrobial activity are induced under microaerophilic conditions. The current opinion is that Pseudoalteromonas are aerobic organisms; we provide additional information on the amount of dissolved oxygen during the fermentation process and its effect on antimicrobial activity. PMID:24031945

  6. Antimicrobial activity of some ricinoleic acid oleic acid derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arthur F. Novak; Gladys C. Clark; Harold P. Dupuy

    1961-01-01

    Ricinoleic and acid oleic acid derivatives were screened for their antimicrobial activity, under optimum growing-conditions,\\u000a against several species of bacteria, yeasts, and molds. Several ricinoleic acid derivatives and petroselinic (iso-oleic) acid\\u000a exhibited considerable activity; in fact, their activity against some micro-organisms was comparable to sorbic and 10-undecenoic\\u000a acid, known antimicrobial agents, as indicated by this test.

  7. Silver activation on thin films of Ag-ZrCN coatings for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, I; Calderon V, S; Escobar Galindo, R; Palacio, C; Henriques, M; Piedade, A P; Carvalho, S

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, with the increase of elderly population and related health problems, knee and hip joint prosthesis are being widely used worldwide. However, failure of these invasive devices occurs in a high percentage thus demanding the revision of the chirurgical procedure. Within the reasons of failure, microbial infections, either hospital or subsequently-acquired, contribute in high number to the statistics. Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) has emerged as one of the major nosocomial pathogens associated with these infections. Silver has a historic performance in medicine due to its potent antimicrobial activity, with a broad-spectrum on the activity of different types of microorganisms. Consequently, the main goal of this work was to produce Ag-ZrCN coatings with antimicrobial activity, for the surface modification of hip prostheses. Thin films of ZrCN with several silver concentrations were deposited onto stainless steel 316L, by DC reactive magnetron sputtering, using two targets, Zr and Zr with silver pellets (Zr+Ag target), in an atmosphere containing Ar, C2H2 and N2. The antimicrobial activity of the modified surfaces was tested against S. epidermidis and the influence of an activation step of silver was assessed by testing samples after immersion in a 5% (w/v) NaClO solution for 5min. The activation procedure revealed to be essential for the antimicrobial activity, as observed by the presence of an inhibition halo on the surface with 11at.% of Ag. The morphology analysis of the surface before and after the activation procedure revealed differences in silver distribution indicating segregation/diffusion of the metallic element to the film's surface. Thus, the results indicate that the silver activation step is responsible for an antimicrobial effect of the coatings, due to silver oxidation and silver ion release. PMID:26117788

  8. Poly(anhydride-esters) comprised exclusively of naturally occurring antimicrobials and EDTA: antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Carbone-Howell, Ashley L; Stebbins, Nicholas D; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2014-05-12

    Carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol are naturally occurring phenolic compounds known to possess antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria, as well as antioxidant activity. Biodegradable poly(anhydride-esters) composed of an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) backbone and antimicrobial pendant groups (i.e., carvacrol, thymol, or eugenol) were synthesized via solution polymerization. The resulting polymers were characterized to confirm their chemical composition and understand their thermal properties and molecular weight. In vitro release studies demonstrated that polymer hydrolytic degradation was complete after 16 days, resulting in the release of free antimicrobials and EDTA. Antioxidant and antibacterial assays determined that polymer release media exhibited bioactivity similar to that of free compound, demonstrating that polymer incorporation and subsequent release had no effect on activity. These polymers completely degrade into components that are biologically relevant and have the capability to promote preservation of consumer products in the food and personal care industries via antimicrobial and antioxidant pathways. PMID:24702678

  9. Poly(anhydride-esters) Comprised Exclusively of Naturally Occurring Antimicrobials and EDTA: Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol are naturally occurring phenolic compounds known to possess antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria, as well as antioxidant activity. Biodegradable poly(anhydride-esters) composed of an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) backbone and antimicrobial pendant groups (i.e., carvacrol, thymol, or eugenol) were synthesized via solution polymerization. The resulting polymers were characterized to confirm their chemical composition and understand their thermal properties and molecular weight. In vitro release studies demonstrated that polymer hydrolytic degradation was complete after 16 days, resulting in the release of free antimicrobials and EDTA. Antioxidant and antibacterial assays determined that polymer release media exhibited bioactivity similar to that of free compound, demonstrating that polymer incorporation and subsequent release had no effect on activity. These polymers completely degrade into components that are biologically relevant and have the capability to promote preservation of consumer products in the food and personal care industries via antimicrobial and antioxidant pathways. PMID:24702678

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Calprotectin Isolated from Human Empyema Fluid Supernatants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Venkatachari Santhanagopalan; Beth L. Hahn; Bruce E. Dunn; John H. Weissner; Peter G. Sohnle

    1995-01-01

    Abscess and empyema fluid supernatants have zinc-reversible antimicrobial activity that is thought to be due to calprotectin, a calcium- and zinc-binding protein present within neutrophil cytoplasm. The present studies were undertaken to determine if calprotectin isolated from human empyema fluid supernatants demonstrated similar antimicrobial activity to that of the original specimens. The characteristics of the calprotectin complex on SDS-PAGE and

  11. Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Coleus amboinicus Lour Exhibited Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Astuti, Puji; Sudarsono, Sudarsono; Nisak, Khoirun; Nugroho, Giri Wisnu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Coleus amboinicus is a medicinal plant traditionally used to treat various diseases such as throat infection, cough and fever, diarrhea, nasal congestion and digestive problems. The plant was explored for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents. Methods: Screening for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents was conducted using agar plug method and antimicrobial activity of promising ethyl acetate extracts was determined by disc diffusion assay. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) - bioautography was performed to localize the bioactive components within the extract. TLC visualization detection reagents were used to preliminary analyze phytochemical groups of the bioactive compounds. Results: Three endophytic fungi were obtained, two of them showed promising potential. Agar diffusion method showed that endophytic fungi CAL-2 exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis, S. aureus and S. thypi, whilst CAS-1 inhibited the growth of B. subtilis. TLC bioautography of ethyl acetate extract of CAL-2 revealed at least three bands exhibited antimicrobial activity and at least two bands showed inhibition of B. subtilis growth. Preliminary analysis of the crude extracts suggests that bioactive compounds within CAL-2 extract are terpenoids, phenolics and phenyl propanoid compounds whilst the antimicrobial agents within CAS-1 extract are terpenoids, propylpropanoids, alkaloids or heterocyclic nitrogen compounds. Conclusion: These data suggest the potential of endophytic fungi of C. amboinicus as source for antimicrobial agents. PMID:25671195

  12. Antimicrobial and antioxidative activity of extracts and essential oils of Myrtus communis L.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Verica; Knezevic, Petar

    2014-04-01

    Since synthetic antimicrobial agents and food additives can cause a number of adverse effects, there is a growing interest from consumers in ingredients from natural sources. Medicinal plants, such as Myrtus communis L. are a source of new compounds which can be used in both the food industry and for medical purposes, primarily as antimicrobial agents. In this review, the characteristics of myrtle essential oils and extracts are summarized, with particular attention to their chemical composition, biological activities and potential applications. PMID:24291016

  13. Peptidotriazoles with antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Güell, Imma; Micaló, Lluís; Cano, Laura; Badosa, Esther; Ferre, Rafael; Montesinos, Emilio; Bardají, Eduard; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We designed and prepared peptidotriazoles based on the antimicrobial peptide BP100 (LysLysLeuPheLysLysIleLeuLysTyrLeu-NH(2)) by introducing a triazole ring in the peptide backbone or onto the side chain of a selected residue. These compounds were screened for their in vitro growth inhibition of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and for their cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells and tobacco leaves. Their proteolytic susceptibility was also analyzed. The antibacterial activity and the hemolysis were influenced by the amino acid that was modified with the triazole as well as by the absence of presence of a substituent in this heterocyclic ring. We identified sequences active against the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (MIC of 1.6-12.5 ?M), and against the fungi Fusarium oxysporum (MIC<6.2-12.5 ?M) with low hemolytic activity (0-23% at 50 ?M), high stability to protease digestion and no phytotoxicity. These peptidotriazoles constitute good candidates to design new antimicrobial agents. PMID:22198367

  14. Effects of materials containing antimicrobial compounds on food hygiene.

    PubMed

    Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig

    2011-07-01

    Surfaces with microorganisms may transfer unwanted microorganisms to food through cross-contamination during processing and preparation. A high hygienic status of surfaces that come in contact with food is important in order to reduce the risk of cross-contamination. During the last decade, products containing antimicrobial compounds, such as cutting boards, knives, countertops, kitchen utensils, refrigerators, and conveyor belts, have been introduced to the market, claiming hygienic effects. Such products are often referred to as "treated articles." Here we review various aspects related to treated articles intended for use during preparation and processing of food. Regulatory issues and methods to assess antibacterial effects are covered. Different concepts for treated articles as well as their antibacterial activity are reviewed. The effects of products with antimicrobials on food hygiene and safety are discussed. PMID:21740725

  15. Investigation of the antimicrobial activity and biocompatibility of magnesium alloy coated with HA and antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jinhuan; Shen, Si; Zhou, Changren; Dang, Xiangli; Jiao, Yanpeng; Li, Lihua; Ding, Shan; Li, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Implant-associated infection is one of the biggest problems in orthopedic surgery. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well-known components of the innate immunity and less susceptible to the development of pathogen resistance compared to conventional antibiotics. Magnesium alloys as potential biodegradable bone implants have been received much attention in biomaterials field. This study investigated the deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings and loading of AMPs on the magnesium alloy surface by a biomimetic method. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results presented that a microporous and plate-like CaP coating was processed on the magnesium alloy surface. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis showed the main component of coating was hydroxyapatite (HA). Degradation assay in vitro showed that the HA coating deposited onto the magnesium alloy was corroded more slowly than the bare one. The amount of AMP loaded in the HA coating was 11.16±1.99 ?g/cm2. The AMP loaded onto HA coatings had slow release for 7 days. The AMP-loaded coating showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Its bacterial inhibition rate exceeded 50% after 4 days and the antibacterial effect was sustained for 7 days. The coated magnesium alloys loaded with AMP could improve rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMMSCs) proliferation. Furthermore, it could also promote alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rBMMSCs. Both radiographic evaluation and histopathology analysis demonstrated that implantation of the coated magnesium alloy into the rabbit femoral condyle had promoted bone repair and showed anti-inflammatory effect. The results showed that the AMP loaded onto HA coatings on the magnesium alloy surface could be considered an ideal orthopedic implant against S. aureus infection. PMID:25631264

  16. Fungi Treated with Small Chemicals Exhibit Increased Antimicrobial Activity against Facultative Bacterial and Yeast Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown “cryptic” secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3–4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances. PMID:25121102

  17. Nutrient composition and antimicrobial activity of sorrel drinks (soborodo).

    PubMed

    Oboh, G; Elusiyan, C A

    2004-01-01

    Aqueous extracts (1,200 mL) of roselle calyx (40 g), fortified with either orange juice or pineapple juice as sweetener and lemon grass as flavorant (sorrel drink), were analyzed with regard to their mineral composition (Na, Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb, Mn, and Ca), vitamin C content, and sensory evaluation. While the medicinal potentials were determined with respect to their inhibitory effect on the growth of Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Lactobacillus sp., and Corynebacterium sp. The results revealed that the roselle extract fortified with orange juice had higher vitamin C content than did those fortified with pineapple juice, while those fortified with pineapple juice had the best general acceptability. Zn, Na, and Ca were generally high in all the drinks; however, fortification with either pineapple or orange juice reduced the mineral content of the roselle extract. However, Pb, Cu, and Mn (toxic metals) were not detected. The antimicrobial effect of the unfortified roselle extract was low against the entire organism; however, fortification with pineapple juice and lemon grass greatly enhanced the inhibition of the growth of those organisms. They all had their highest inhibitory effect on the growth of P. aeruginosa. In view of the high Zn, Ca, Fe, Na, and vitamin C content as well as the antimicrobial activity, this cheaply produced drink from purely local materials could serve as a good replacement for expensive carbonated drinks. PMID:15383229

  18. Effectiveness of antimicrobial food packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, K

    2005-10-01

    Antimicrobial additives have been used successfully for many years as direct food additives. The literature provides evidence that some of these additives may be effective as indirect food additives incorporated into food packaging materials. Antimicrobial food packaging is directed toward the reduction of surface contamination of processed, prepared foods such as sliced meats and Frankfurter sausages (hot dogs). The use of such packaging materials is not meant to be a substitute for good sanitation practices, but it should enhance the safety of food as an additional hurdle for the growth of pathogenic and/or spoilage microorganisms. Studies have focused on establishing methods for coating low-density polyethylene film or barrier films with methyl cellulose as a carrier for nisin. These films have significantly reduced the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in solutions and in vacuum packaged hot dogs. Other research has focused on the use of chitosan to inhibit L. monocytogenes and chlorine dioxide sachets for the reduction of Salmonella on modified atmosphere-packaged fresh chicken breasts. Overall, antimicrobial packaging shows promise as an effective method for the inhibition of certain bacteria in foods, but barriers to their commercial implementation continue to exist. PMID:16227182

  19. Antimicrobial activity of some macrophytes from Lake Manzalah (Egypt).

    PubMed

    Fareed, M F; Haroon, A M; Rabeh, S A

    2008-11-01

    The antimicrobial activities of aqueous and organic solvents (chloroform, ethanol and methanol) extracts of four plants Ceratophyllum demersum L., Eichhornia crassipes, Potamogeton crispus and Potamogeton pectinatus were tested in vitro against seventeen different microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Nine of these identified organisms were obtained from different sources, Bacillus subtilis 1020, Bacillus cereus 1080, Staphylococcus aureus, Erwinia carotovora NCPPB 312, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium italicum. The other eight organisms were isolated from Manzalah lake water and identified using API 20E strip system (BioMereux). One hundred pathogenic bacterial isolates representing eight genera were identified to species level. These organisms are Escherichia coli (20%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (14%), Salmonella colerasuis (13%), Shigella sp. (11%), Serratia liquefaciens (10%), Proteus vulgaris (9%) and Brenneria nigrifluens (7%). The extracts of all tested plants demonstrated antimicrobial activity against the used organisms. The efficiency of the extracts varied with, solvent used in the extraction as well as plant species and the part of plant used. The aqueous extract appeared to be the highly effective extract against all tested organisms especially Fusarium oxysporum causing inhibition zone 48 +/- 0.01 mm, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 59 +/- 0.02 mm and Salmonella cholerasuis 55 +/- 0.01 mm when using P. crispus, P. pectinatus and C. demersum, respectively. Ethanol extracts of C. demersum, P. crispus and E. crassipes root showed antimicrobial activities against all tested organisms except Aspergillus niger. At the same time the extract of P. pectinatus had no effect also on Fusarium oxysporum and the extract of E. crassipes leaves have no effect on Penicillium italicum. On using chloroform extracts Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum showed resistance. Comparing the effect of different plants extracts C. demersum appeared to be the most effective followed by P. pectinatus. Furthermore, the extracts of E. crassipes leaves being more effective than that, of its roots. Elemental analysis were also takes place in water and plant samples and the results revealed the presence of Mn and Pb in higher concentration in P. pectinatus (Mn 603 +/- 4.243 ppm and Pb 44 +/- 2.828 ppm), at the same time the highest values of Fe 1680 +/- 2.2 ppm, Zn 31.5 +/- 2.1 ppm and Cu 26.5 +/- 2.1 ppm were recorded for C. demersum. Comparing the two parts of E. crassipes (leaves and roots), the roots have the highest values of all studied metals. PMID:19205264

  20. Structure-Activity Relationship of Benzophenanthridine Alkaloids from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Having Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Luciana de C.; Zanon, Graciane; Weber, Andréia D.; Neto, Alexandre T.; Mostardeiro, Clarice P.; Da Cruz, Ivana B. M.; Oliveira, Raul M.; Ilha, Vinicius; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2014-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae) is a plant alkaloid that grows in South America and has been used in Brazilian traditional medicine for the treatment of different health problems. The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the steam bark crude methanol extract, fractions, and pure alkaloids of Z. rhoifolium. Its stem bark extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, ranging from 12.5 to 100 µg/mL using bioautography method, and from 125 to 500 µg/mL in the microdilution bioassay. From the dichloromethane basic fraction, three furoquinoline alkaloids (1–3), and nine benzophenanthridine alkaloids (4–12) were isolated and the antimicrobial activity of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids is discussed in terms of structure-activity relationships. The alkaloid with the widest spectrum of activity was chelerythrine (10), followed by avicine (12) and dihydrochelerythrine (4). The minimal inhibitory concentrations of chelerythrine, of 1.50 µg/mL for all bacteria tested, and between 3.12 and 6.25 µg/mL for the yeast tested, show this compound to be a more powerful antimicrobial agent when compared with the other active alkaloids isolated from Z. rhoifolium. To verify the potential importance of the methylenedioxy group (ring A) of these alkaloids, chelerythrine was selected to represent the remainder of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids isolated in this work and was subjected to a demethylation reaction giving derivative 14. Compared to chelerythrine, the derivative (14) was less active against the tested bacteria and fungi. Kinetic measurements of the bacteriolytic activities of chelerythrine against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) were determined by optical density based on real time assay, suggesting that its mechanism of action is not bacteriolytic. The present study did not detect hemolytic effects of chelerythrine on erythrocytes and found a protective effect considering the decrease in TBARS and AOPP (advanced oxidized protein products) levels when compared to the control group. PMID:24824737

  1. Structure-activity relationship of benzophenanthridine alkaloids from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium having antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Luciana de C; Zanon, Graciane; Weber, Andréia D; Neto, Alexandre T; Mostardeiro, Clarice P; Da Cruz, Ivana B M; Oliveira, Raul M; Ilha, Vinicius; Dalcol, Ionara I; Morel, Ademir F

    2014-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae) is a plant alkaloid that grows in South America and has been used in Brazilian traditional medicine for the treatment of different health problems. The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the steam bark crude methanol extract, fractions, and pure alkaloids of Z. rhoifolium. Its stem bark extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, ranging from 12.5 to 100 µg/mL using bioautography method, and from 125 to 500 µg/mL in the microdilution bioassay. From the dichloromethane basic fraction, three furoquinoline alkaloids (1-3), and nine benzophenanthridine alkaloids (4-12) were isolated and the antimicrobial activity of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids is discussed in terms of structure-activity relationships. The alkaloid with the widest spectrum of activity was chelerythrine (10), followed by avicine (12) and dihydrochelerythrine (4). The minimal inhibitory concentrations of chelerythrine, of 1.50 µg/mL for all bacteria tested, and between 3.12 and 6.25 µg/mL for the yeast tested, show this compound to be a more powerful antimicrobial agent when compared with the other active alkaloids isolated from Z. rhoifolium. To verify the potential importance of the methylenedioxy group (ring A) of these alkaloids, chelerythrine was selected to represent the remainder of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids isolated in this work and was subjected to a demethylation reaction giving derivative 14. Compared to chelerythrine, the derivative (14) was less active against the tested bacteria and fungi. Kinetic measurements of the bacteriolytic activities of chelerythrine against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) were determined by optical density based on real time assay, suggesting that its mechanism of action is not bacteriolytic. The present study did not detect hemolytic effects of chelerythrine on erythrocytes and found a protective effect considering the decrease in TBARS and AOPP (advanced oxidized protein products) levels when compared to the control group. PMID:24824737

  2. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-01

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. PMID:26051479

  3. Effect of potassium sorbate on antimicrobial and physical properties of starch-clay nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Hassan; Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Barzegar, Mohsen; Hamidi-Esfahani, Zohreh

    2014-09-22

    Using fresh foods which undergo the least processing operations developed widely in recent years. Active packaging is a novel method for preserving these products. Active starch-clay nanocomposite films which contained potassium sorbate (PS) at a level of 0, 5, 7.5 and 10 g PS/100 g starch were produced and their physical, mechanical and antimicrobial properties were evaluated. In order to evaluate antimicrobial properties of films Aspergillus niger was used. The results showed that 5% of the PS did not produce antimicrobial property in the film, but by increasing the content of the additive in film formulation, antimicrobial effect increased. PS increased water permeability and elongation at break of the films, but decreased tensile strength. The rate of PS migration into the semi-solid medium in starch-nanocomposites was lower than starch films. This shows that nanocomposite films could retain their antimicrobial property for longer time. PMID:24906724

  4. Polyhexamethylene biguanide functionalized cationic silver nanoparticles for enhanced antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Akhtar, Nasrin; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Rajoka, Muhammad Ibrahim; Khalid, Zafar M; Hussain, Irshad

    2012-01-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), a broad spectrum disinfectant against many pathogens, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles. The particles formed were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and TEM to measure their morphology and surface chemistry. PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles were then evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against a gram-negative bacterial strain, Escherichia coli. These silver nanoparticles were found to have about 100 times higher bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities, compared to the previous reports, due to the combined antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and PHMB. In addition to other applications, PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles would be extremely useful in textile industry due to the strong interaction of PHMB with cellulose fabrics. PMID:22625664

  5. Polyhexamethylene biguanide functionalized cationic silver nanoparticles for enhanced antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Akhtar, Nasrin; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Rajoka, Muhammad Ibrahim; Khalid, Zafar M.; Hussain, Irshad

    2012-05-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), a broad spectrum disinfectant against many pathogens, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles. The particles formed were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and TEM to measure their morphology and surface chemistry. PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles were then evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against a gram-negative bacterial strain, Escherichia coli. These silver nanoparticles were found to have about 100 times higher bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities, compared to the previous reports, due to the combined antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and PHMB. In addition to other applications, PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles would be extremely useful in textile industry due to the strong interaction of PHMB with cellulose fabrics.

  6. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Araucaria cookii and Brassaia actinophylla.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Das, A; Chakraborty, P; Suthindhiran, K; Jayasri, M A

    2014-05-01

    Araucaria cookii is an ornamental plant, which are evergreen conifer found in India and in many other European countries. Similarly Brassaia actinophylla is also an ornamental plant with its native from Java, Australia and in U.S. Though these plants are used for various purposes, the medicinal properties of the plants were not investigated. In our study, the two ornamental plants were chosen for screening both antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. The Leaves of the plants were used for preparing crude extract and was prepared by Soxhlet extraction method. For the extraction of the leave extracts, different solvents viz., methanol, chloroform and petroleum ether were used based on our preliminary data. The obtained extracts were condensed and stored. For the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity, the extractions were prepared into various concentrations. For the antioxidant activity DPPH was used as scavenger of the free radicals which showed the inhibition of percentage for Araucaria cookii was 63% and the inhibition percentage for Brassaia actinophylla 41%. For the antimicrobial activity the extracts were checked against two bacterial and two fungal pathogens. The phytochemical analysis assists in the study of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity as to the probable compounds responsible for the activity. The result thus obtained provides a report of Brassaia actinophylla as a possible source of antioxidants and also the use of both extracts as a probable antimicrobial agent. PMID:26031006

  7. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of alcoholic extracts obtained from vegetative organs of A. retroflexus.

    PubMed

    Marina?, Ioana Cristina; Chifiriuc, Carmen; Oprea, Eliza; Laz?r, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    In vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Amaranthus retroflexus leaves and inflorescence alcoholic (ethanol 70%) extracts of various concentrations ranging from 0.78 to 400 ?L/ml were analyzed on different clinical and reference bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtills, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii) and fungal strains (Candida albicans, C. famata, C. utilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using agar disk diffusion method and broth dilution method (MIC determination) for antimicrobial activity and TEAC (Trolox capacity) assay for the evaluation of the antioxidant activity. The adapted diffusion method was used to test the antimicrobial effect of the extracts separately and in combination with a range of standard antibiotics, in order to evidence any synergic effects of A. retroflexus extracts on the antibiotics activity. The extracts showed the highest inhibitory effect against K. pneumoniae and B. subtilis with no activity against S. aureus among the bacterial strains, while in case of the fungal strains the most intensive effect was exhibited against C. famata by both extracts. The A. retroflexus leaves extract improved the ciprofloxacin and ticarcillin-clavulanic acid activity towards the P. aeruginosa clinical strain. The inflorescences extract significantly increased chloramphenicol activity on B. subtilis strain. The antioxidant activity assay showed that the studied extracts exhibited the ability to neutralize the free radicals leading to the conclusion that the tested extracts bear compounds with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial and antioxidant activity that could represent a potential alternative for treating various infectious diseases. PMID:25518569

  8. Copper(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine and o-phenanthroline: Theoretical studies, in vitro antimicrobial activity and alkaline phosphatase inhibitory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Medina, Juan J.; Islas, María S.; López Tévez, Libertad L.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Okulik, Nora B.; Williams, Patricia A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Calculations based on density functional methods are carried out for two Cu(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine (cnge) and o-phenanthroline (o-phen): [Cu(o-phen)2(cnge)](NO3)2?2H2O (1) and [Cu(o-phen)(cnge)(H2O)(NO3)2] (2). The calculated geometrical parameters are in agreement with the experimental values. The results of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) topological analysis of the electron density indicate that the Cu-N(phen) bonds in complex (1) have lower electron density, suggesting that those bonds are stronger in complex (2). Moreover, the ionic character of the Cu-N bond in the complex (1) is slightly stronger than that in the complex (2) and this situation would explain the fact that only complex (2) was stable in water solution. For this reason, the antimicrobial and enzymatic assays were performed using complex (2). It is well known that the increased use of antibiotics has resulted in the development of resistant bacterial and fungal strains. In this context, the study of novel antimicrobial agents has an enormous importance and metal complexes represent an interesting alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this work is to prove the modification of some biological properties like antimicrobial activity or alkaline phosphatase inhibitory activity upon copper complexation.

  9. Development and evaluation of antimicrobial activated carbon fiber filters using Sophora flavescens nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Hwang, Gi Byoung; Seo, SungChul; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2014-09-15

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters have a wide range of applications, including air purification, dehumidification, and water purification, due to their large specific surface area, high adsorption capacity and rate, and specific surface reactivity. However, when airborne microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi adhere to the carbon substrate, ACF filters can become a source of microbial contamination, and their filter efficacy declines. Antimicrobial treatments are a promising means of preventing ACF bio-contamination. In this study, we demonstrate the use of Sophora flavescens in antimicrobial nanoparticles coated onto ACF filters. The particles were prepared using an aerosol process consisting of nebulization-thermal drying and particle deposition. The extract from S. flavescens is an effective, natural antimicrobial agent that exhibits antibacterial activity against various pathogens. The efficiency of Staphylococcus epidermidis inactivation increased with the concentration of S. flavescens nanoparticles in the ACF filter coating. The gas adsorption efficiency of the coated antimicrobial ACF filters was also evaluated using toluene. The toluene-removal capacity of the ACF filters remained unchanged while the antimicrobial activity was over 90% for some nanoparticle concentrations. Our results provide a scientific basis for controlling both bioaerosol and gaseous pollutants using antimicrobial ACF filters coated with S. flavescens nanoparticles. PMID:24951887

  10. Antimicrobial impact of the components of essential oil of Litsea cubeba from Taiwan and antimicrobial activity of the oil in food systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tai-Ti; Yang, Tsung-Shi

    2012-05-01

    Using natural additives to preserve foods has become popular due to consumer demands for nature and safety. Antimicrobial activity is one of the most important properties in many plant essential oils (EOs). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Litsea cubeba (LC-EO) from Taiwan and the antimicrobial impact of individual volatile components in the oil on pathogens or spoilage microorganisms: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Hansenula anomala in vitro, and the antimicrobial activity of the LC-EO against these organisms in food systems were studied. The "antimicrobial impact" (AI) is a new term that combines the effects of minimal microbicidal concentration (MMC) and quantity of an antimicrobial substance. The AI can quantitatively reflect the relative importance of individual components of the EO on the entire antimicrobial activity of the EO. The MMCs of the LC-EO against V. parahaemolyticus, L. monocytogenes, L. plantarum, and H. anomala were determined as 750, 750, 1500, and 375 ?g/g, respectively in vitro. The MMCs of the LC-EO were 3000, 6000, and 12,000 ?g/g for L. monocytogenes in tofu stored at 4 °C, 25 °C, and 37 °C, respectively. The temperature affected the bacterial growth which consequently influenced the MMCs of the LC-EO. The MMCs of the LC-EO were 3000, 6000, and 375 ?g/g for Vibrio spp. in oysters, L. plantarum in orange-milk beverage, and H. anomala in soy sauce, respectively. Except for soy sauce, the food systems exhibited marked matrix effects on diminishing the antimicrobial activity of the LC-EO. Averagely, citral accounted for ca 70% of the total AI value for all the tested organisms, and the rest of the AI value of the LC-EO was determined by all the tested compounds (ca 4%) and the unidentified compounds (ca 26%). PMID:22459760

  11. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of the reactive compounds generated in vitro by Manduca sexta phenoloxidase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Picheng Zhao; Jiajing Li; Yang Wang; Haobo Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Although quinone production and melanin formation are widely recognized as an integral part of the insect defense system, experimental evidence is lacking that the proteolytic activation of prophenoloxidase participates in the direct killing of invading microbes—active phenoloxidase generates quinones that polymerize to form melanin. Here, we report the antimicrobial effect of reactive intermediates produced in phenoloxidase-catalyzed reactions. After being treated

  12. Iontophoresis generates an antimicrobial effect that remains after iontophoresis ceases.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C P; Wagle, N; Anderson, M D; Warren, M M

    1992-01-01

    Iontophoresis required chlorine-containing compounds in the medium for effective microbial population reduction and killing. After iontophoresis ceased, the antimicrobial effect generated by iontophoresis remained but slowly decreased. Antimicrobial effects of iontophoresis may be related to the generation of short-lived chlorine-containing compounds. PMID:1489204

  13. Fractionation of Mastic Gum in Relation to Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Mohammad Sharif; Hazell, Stuart Loyd

    2009-01-01

    Mastic gum is a viscous light-green liquid obtained from the bark of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia. which belongs to the Anacardiaceae family. The gum has been fractionated to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the whole gum and its fractions against various strains of Helicobacter pylori. The polymeric gum fraction was separated from the essential oil and the resin (trunk exudates without essential oil) to assess and compare the anti-H. pylori activity of the polymer fraction against lower molecular weight fractions, the gum itself and masticated gum. The polymer fraction was also oxidized and assessed for antimicrobial activity.

  14. Antimicrobial, antibiofilm and cytotoxic activities of Hakea sericea Schrader extracts

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Ângelo; Breitenfeld, Luiza; Ferreira, Susana; Duarte, Ana Paula; Domingues, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hakea sericea Schrader is an invasive shrub in Portuguese forests. Objective: The goal of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of H. sericea extracts against several strains of microorganisms, including the ability to inhibit the formation of biofilms. Additionally the cytotoxic properties of these extracts, against human cells, were assessed. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of the methanolic extracts of H. sericea was assessed by disk diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value determination. The antibiofilm activity was determined by quantification of total biofilm biomass with crystal violet. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by hemolysis assay and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test. Results: For Gram-positive bacteria, MIC values of H. sericea methanolic extracts ranged between 0.040 and 0.625 mg/mL, whereas the fruits extract yielded the lowest MIC for several strains of microorganisms, namely, S. aureus, B. cereus, L. monocytogenes and clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Stems and fruits extract at 2.5 mg/mL effectively eradicated the biofilm of S. aureus ATCC 25923, SA 01/10 and MRSA 12/10. Regarding leaves extract, hemolysis was not observed, and in the case of stems and fruits, hemolysis was verified only for higher concentrations, suggesting its low toxicity. Fruits extract presented no toxic effect to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) cells however for concentrations of 0.017 and 0.008 mg/mL this extract was able to decrease human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7) viability in about 60%, as MTT test results had confirmed. This is a clearly demonstrator of the cytotoxicity of this extract against MCF-7 cells. PMID:24914310

  15. A screening for antimicrobial activities of Caribbean herbal remedies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The TRAMIL program aims to understand, validate and expand health practices based on the use of medicinal plants in the Caribbean, which is a “biodiversity hotspot” due to high species endemism, intense development pressure and habitat loss. The antibacterial activity was examined for thirteen plant species from several genera that were identified as a result of TRAMIL ethnopharmacological surveys or were reported in ethnobotanical accounts from Puerto Rico. The aim of this study was to validate the traditional use of these plant species for the treatment of bacterial infections, such as conjunctivitis, fever, otitis media and furuncles. Methods An agar disc diffusion assay was used to examine five bacterial strains that are associated with the reported infections, including Staphylococcus saprophyticus (ATCC 15305), S. aureus (ATCC 6341), Escherichia coli (ATCC 4157), Haemophilus influenzae (ATCC 8142), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 7700) and Proteus vulgaris (ATCC 6896), as well as the fungus Candida albicans (ATCC 752). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were determined for each of the extracts that showed inhibitory activity. Results The decoctions of Pityrogramma calomelanos, Tapeinochilus ananassae, and Syzygium jambos, as well as the juice of Gossypium barbadense, showed?>?20% growth inhibition against several bacteria relative to the positive control, which was the antibiotic Streptomycin. Extracts with the best antimicrobial activities were S. jambos that showed MIC?=?31 ?g/mL and MBC?=?1.0 mg/mL against P. vulgaris and T. ananassae that showed MIC?=?15 ?g/mL against S. aureus. Conclusion This report confirms the traditional use of P. calomelanos for the treatment of kidney infections that are associated with stones, as well as the antimicrobial and bactericidal effects of T. ananassae against P. vulgaris and S. saprophyticus and the effects of S. jambos against S. aureus and S. saprophyticus. PMID:23731467

  16. Phytochemical and antimicrobial activities of Himalayan Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc.

    PubMed

    Mamta; Mehrotra, Shubhi; Amitabh; Kirar, Vandana; Vats, Praveen; Nandi, Shoma Paul; Negi, P S; Misra, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the phytochemical and antimicrobial activities and also quantified bioactive nucleoside using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) of five extracts of Indian Himalayan Cordyceps sinensis prepared with different solvents employing accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) technique. The phytochemical potential of these extracts was quantified in terms of total phenolic and total flavonoid content while antioxidant activities were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2 -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Total reducing power (TRP) was determined by converting iron (III) into iron (II) reduction assay. CS(50%Alc) (15.1 ± 0.67mg/g of dry extract) and CS(100%Alc) (19.3 ± 0.33 mg/g of dry extract) showed highest phenolic and flavonoid content, respectively while CS(Aq) extract showed maximum antioxidant activity and the highest concentration of the three nucleosides (adenine 12.8 ± 0.49 mg/g, adenosine 0.36 ± 0.28 mg/g and uracil 0.14 ± 0.36 mg/g of dry extract) determined by HPTLC. The evaluation of extracts for antimicrobial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial strains showed CS(25%Alc), CS(75%Alc) and CS(100%Alc) extract to be more effective against E. coli, P. aerugenosa and B. subtilis giving 9, 7 and 6.5 mm of zone of inhibition (ZOI) in 93.75, 93.75 and 45 ?g concentration, respectively, whereas CS(Aq) extract showed minimal inhibition against these. PMID:25675710

  17. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Costescu, Adrian; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Predoi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of nanosized particles of Ag-doped hydroxyapatite with antibacterial properties is of great interest for the development of new biomedical applications. The aim of this study was the evaluation of Ca10?xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2 nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) for their antibacterial and antifungal activity. Resistance to antimicrobial agents by pathogenic bacteria has emerged in the recent years and became a major health problem. Here, we report a method for synthesizing Ag doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. A silver-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite was synthesized at 100°C in deionised water. Also, in this paper Ag:HAp-NPs are evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungal strains. The specific antimicrobial activity revealed by the qualitative assay is demonstrating that our compounds are interacting differently with the microbial targets, probably due to the differences in the microbial wall structures. PMID:23509801

  18. Phytochemical and antimicrobial activities of the Daniellia oliveri leaves.

    PubMed

    Ahmadu, A; Haruna, A K; Garba, M; Ehinmidu, J O; Sarker, S D

    2004-12-01

    The n-butanol soluble part and four chromatographic fractions of the aqueous ethanolic extract of the leaves of Daniellia oliveri were investigated for antimicrobial properties. All fractions showed activity against Staphylococcus aureus. A chromatographic fraction showed significant activity against the fungus Tricophyton rubrum. PMID:15567251

  19. Screening of some Cuban medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Martínez; J. Betancourt; N. Alonso-González; A. Jauregui

    1996-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of 23 extracts of 12 Cuban plant species reported in traditional medicine were tested. The agar diffusion method was used to assess the activity against four bacteria and one yeast: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The results, evaluated as the diameter of the inhibition zone of microbial growth, showed that nine

  20. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amal G. Al-Bakri; Fatma U. Afifi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the “viable plate

  1. The Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Heterocyclic Derivatives of Totarol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and antimicrobial activity of heterocyclic analogues of the diterpenoid totarol are described. An advanced synthetic intermediate with a ketone on the A-ring is used to attach fused heterocycles, and a carbon-to-nitrogen atom replacement is made on the B-ring by de novo synthesis. A-ring analogues with an indole attached exhibit, for the first time, enhanced antimicrobial activity relative to the parent natural product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the indole analogues do not target the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ as had been hypothesized for totarol. PMID:23119123

  2. The Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Heterocyclic Derivatives of Totarol.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michelle B; O'Brien, Terrence E; Moore, Jared T; Anderson, David E; Foss, Marie H; Weibel, Doug-Las B; Ames, James B; Shaw, Jared T

    2012-08-28

    The synthesis and antimicrobial activity heterocyclic analogs of the diterpenoid totarol are described. An advanced synthetic intermediate with a ketone on the A-ring is used to attach fused heterocycles and a carbon-to-nitrogen atom replacement is made on the B-ring by de novo synthesis. A-ring analogs with an indole attached exhibit, for the first time, enhanced antimicrobial activity relative to the parent natural product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the indole analogs do not target the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ as had been hypothesized for totarol. PMID:23119123

  3. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork. PMID:23834804

  4. Antimicrobial activity of a compound isolated from an oil-macerated garlic extract.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Iwata, N; Katsuzaki, H; Naganawa, R; Ishikawa, K; Fukuda, H; Fujino, T; Suzuki, A

    1998-05-01

    A compound showing antimicrobial activity was isolated from an oil-macerated garlic extract by silica gel column chromatography and preparative TLC. On basis of the results of NMR and MS analyses, it was identified as Z-4,5,9-trithiadeca-1,6-diene-9-oxide (Z-10-devinylajoene; Z-10-DA). Z-10-DA exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against such microorganisms as gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. The antimicrobial activity of Z-10-DA was comparable to that of Z-ajoene, but was superior to that of E-ajoene. Z-10-DA and Z-ajoene are different in respect of substitution of the allyl group by the methyl group flanking a sulfinyl group. This result suggests that substitution by the methyl group would also be effective for the inhibition of microbial growth. PMID:9648236

  5. Foeniculum vulgare essential oils: chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria Graça; Cruz, Cláudia; Faleiro, Leonor; Simões, Mariana T F; Figueiredo, Ana Cristina; Barroso, José G; Pedro, Luis G

    2010-02-01

    The essential oils from Foeniculum vulgare commercial aerial parts and fruits were isolated by hydrodistillation, with different distillation times (30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h), and analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The antioxidant ability was estimated using four distinct methods. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. Remarkable differences, and worrying from the quality and safety point of view, were detected in the essential oils. trans-Anethole (31-36%), alpha-pinene (14-20%) and limonene (11-13%) were the main components of the essentials oil isolated from F. vulgare dried aerial parts, whereas methyl chavicol (= estragole) (79-88%) was dominant in the fruit oils. With the DPPH method the plant oils showed better antioxidant activity than the fruits oils. With the TBARS method and at higher concentrations, fennel essential oils showed a pro-oxidant activity. None of the oils showed a hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity > 50%, but they showed an ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase. The essential oils showed a very low antimicrobial activity. In general, the essential oils isolated during 2 h were as effective, from the biological activity point of view, as those isolated during 3 h. PMID:20334152

  6. Effect of Plant Age on Endophytic Bacterial Diversity of Balloon Flower ( Platycodon grandiflorum ) Root and Their Antimicrobial Activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong Min Kim; Myoung Geun Yun; Ji Joong Cho; Eun Jin Kim; Young Han Lee; Han Dae Yun

    2010-01-01

    Balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) is widely cultivated vegetable and used as a remedy for asthma in East Asia. Experiments were conducted to isolate endophytic\\u000a bacteria from 1-, 3-, and 6-year-old balloon flower roots and to analyze the enzymatic, antifungal, and anti-human pathogenic\\u000a activities of the potential endophytic biocontrol agents obtained. Total 120 bacterial colonies were isolated from the interior\\u000a of

  7. Methodologies for the analysis of antimicrobial effects of immobilized photocatalytic materials.

    PubMed

    Žvab, Urška; Lavren?i? Štangar, Urška; Bergant Maruši?, Martina

    2014-03-01

    Photocatalytic coatings are considered sustainable materials as they only need sunlight for their activation and regeneration. Some photocatalytic disinfecting coatings are already commercialized, but many more are still in the developmental stage. Efficient and reliable analytical methodologies for testing the antimicrobial effects of photocatalytic coatings should therefore be used and further developed (1) to avoid inactive or unstable final products, (2) to allow fast, reproducible, and inexpensive antimicrobial activity measurements, and (3) to reflect real environmental conditions and challenges for these materials. Aiming to improve the existing methodologies of antimicrobial testing, this mini review summarizes and discusses the testing parameters and procedures in this expanding research field, including research on antimicrobial activity of photocatalytic coatings for different applications, i.e., self-cleaning/disinfecting coatings (films) and photocatalytic coatings for water and air treatment/disinfection. PMID:24384751

  8. Poly(ethyleneimines) in dermal applications: biocompatibility and antimicrobial effects.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Bauer, Marius; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Fischer, Dagmar

    2013-11-01

    Cationic polyamines, such as poly(ethyleneimines) (PEIs), may recommend themselves for antimicrobial applications as they can interact with microbial membranes resulting in their disruption. The purpose of the study was the assessment of biocompatibility and antibacterial activity of PEIs with different architectures (branched (b) and linear (l)) and molar masses (0.8-750 kDa). lPEI and bPEI exhibited a strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with a more pronounced effect on the Gram-positive bacteria. lPEIs further demonstrated a higher antibacterial efficacy compared to bPEIs but no significant differences between 5 and 25 kDa were observed. In accordance, antibacterial activity of bPEI did not specifically depend on molar mass. Only slightly lower minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were observed at 5 kDa (S. aureus) and 25 kDa (E. coli) in the tests. As PEIs are compelling candidates for use in antimicrobial treatment, two basic aspects have to be investigated: treatment effectiveness and safety. PEIs clearly induced molecular weight dependent cytotoxic effects in vitro. PEIs with low molecular weight (0.8 and 5 kDa) exhibited higher biocompatibility. Nonetheless, the results confirmed a low genotoxic potential of lPEI and bPEIs. In conclusion, 2.5 kDa-lPEI and 0.8 kDa-bPEI can be recommended for use as antimicrobial polymers in dermal applications due to their high biocompatibility with concomitant antibacterial efficacy. PMID:23948135

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants Against Enterococcus

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Antimicrobial Activity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants Against Enterococcus faecalis By Daniel The knowledge of medicinal plant use by indigenous populations constitutes the most understudied medical the medicinal plants for antibiotic properties. The groups focused on were the Shipibo Indians of the Peruvian

  10. Synthesis and Antimicrobial activity of some new Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Karamunge K.; B, Vibhute Y.

    2013-04-01

    New Schiff bases derived from 4iodoaniline, 4-chloroniline, p- toluidine and halogenohydroxy substituted acetophenone have been synthesized. All the compounds have been characterized by IR, H1NMR and mass spectral, halogen, nitrogen analysis. The synthesized compounds have been screened for antimicrobial activity.

  11. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Bakuchiol against Oral Microorganisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HARUMI KATSURA; RYO-ICHI TSUKIYAMA; AKIKO SUZUKI; MAKIO KOBAYASHI

    2001-01-01

    Bakuchiol was isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia, a tree native to China with various uses in traditional medicine, followed by extraction with ether and column chromatography combined with silica gel and octyldecyl silane. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of bakuchiol against some oral microorganisms were evaluated in vitro. The cell growth of Streptococcus mutans was inhibited in

  12. Effect of varying pH on the susceptibility of Campylobacter pylori to antimicrobial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Grayson; G. M. Eliopoulos; M. J. Ferraro; R. C. Moellering

    1989-01-01

    The susceptibility of 22 clinical isolates ofCampylobacter pylori to eight antimicrobial agents was studied under varying pH conditions. Macrolides (erythromycin, dirythromycin), clindamycin and to a lesser extent quinolones lost efficacy at lowered pH. The activity of ampicillin and metronidazole remained relatively stable throughout the pH range tested. The effect of pH an antimicrobial efficacy may warrant consideration when selecting an

  13. Improved Method for the Determination of Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils in Agar Medium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adnane Remmal; Touria Bouchikhi; Khadija Rhayour; Mohamed Ettayebi; Abdelrhafour Tantaoui-Elaraki

    1993-01-01

    The influence of the number of bacterial cells inoculated and the emulsifying agent used to disperse essential oils (EO) into the culture media on the measurement of the antibacterial activity of EO in an agar medium was determined. The results showed that EO (oregano, thyme and clove) were most effective as antimicrobial agents when the bacterial load was low. Minimum

  14. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from the leaves of two morphotypes of Croton cajucara Benth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariana M. B. Azevedo; Aline Q. Pereira; Francisco C. M. Chaves; Humberto R. Bizzo; Celuta S. Alviano; Daniela S. Alviano

    2012-01-01

    Croton cajucara Benth. (Euphorbiaceae) is a shrub native to Amazon region and locally known as sacaca. Two morphotypes are known, namely white ‘sacaca’ and red ‘sacaca’. The essential oils from the leaves of these morphotypes are rich in linalool and 7-hydroxycalamenene, respectively. The effectiveness of the oils from forty individuals from a germplasm bank regarding the antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus

  15. The effect of pH and chloride concentration on the stability and antimicrobial activity of chlorine-based sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Waters, Brian W; Hung, Yen-Con

    2014-04-01

    Chlorinated water and electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water solutions were made to compare the free chlorine stability and microbicidal efficacy of chlorine-containing solutions with different properties. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was greatest in fresh samples (approximately 9.0 log CFU/mL reduction). Chlorine loss in "aged" samples (samples left in open bottles) was greatest (approximately 40 mg/L free chlorine loss in 24 h) in low pH (approximately 2.5) and high chloride (Cl(-) ) concentrations (greater than 150 mg/L). Reduction of E. coli O157:H7 was also negatively impacted (<1.0 log CFU/mL reduction) in aged samples with a low pH and high Cl(-) . Higher pH values (approximately 6.0) did not appear to have a significant effect on free chlorine loss or numbers of surviving microbial cells when fresh and aged samples were compared. This study found chloride levels in the chlorinated and EO water solutions had a reduced effect on both free chlorine stability and its microbicidal efficacy in the low pH solutions. Greater concentrations of chloride in pH 2.5 samples resulted in decreased free chlorine stability and lower microbicidal efficacy. PMID:24621341

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Amazonian oils against Paenibacillus species.

    PubMed

    Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; dos Santos Alves, Camilla Filippi; Schneider, Taiane; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Aurich, Carlos; Giongo, Janice Luehring; Brandelli, Adriano; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo

    2012-03-01

    The Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the primary bacterial pathogen of honeybee brood and the causative agent of American foulbrood disease (AFB). One of the feasible alternative treatments being used for their control of this disease is essential oils. In this study in vitro antimicrobial activity of Andiroba and Copaíba essential oils against Paenibacillus species, including P. larvae was evaluated. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Mueller-Hinton broth by the microdilution method was assessed. Andiroba registered MIC values of 1.56-25%, while the MICs values obtained for Copaíba oil were of 1.56-12.5%. In order to determine the time-response effect of essential oils on P. larvae, this microorganism was exposed to the oils for up to 48 h. After 24 h treatment with Andiroba oil and after 48 h treatment with Copaíba oil no viable cells of P. larvae ATCC 9545 were observed. The possible toxic effect of essential oils were assessed by the spraying application method of the same concentrations of MICs. Bee mortality was evident only in treatment with Andiroba oil and the Copaíba oil shows no toxic effects after 10 days of observation. Taking together ours results showed for the first time that these oils presented a high activity against Paenibacillus species showing that Copaíba oil may be a candidate for the treatment or prevention of AFB. PMID:22200645

  17. Antimicrobial activity of foodborne Paenibacillus and Bacillus spp. against Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Girardin, Hélène; Albagnac, Christine; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Carlin, Frédéric

    2002-05-01

    The saprophytic Paenibacillus and Bacillus spp. found in cooked chilled foods may have an effect on the growth of Clostridium botulinum, a major microbiological hazard, especially for pasteurized vacuum-packaged products. Culture supernatants of 200 strains of Paenibacillus and Bacillus strains isolated from commercial cooked chilled foods containing vegetables were screened for activity against C. botulinum type A, proteolytic type B, and type E strains in a well diffusion assay. Nineteen strains were positive against C. botulinum. Among those, seven Paenibacillus polymyxa strains showed the highest antibotulinal activity and the largest antimicrobial spectrum against C. botulinum strains. The antibotulinal activity was evaluated throughout the growth of a representative strain of the positive P. polymyxa strains. The antimicrobial activity was detected in the culture supernatant from late-log/early stationary phase of the bacteria, which occurred after 7 to 10 days of incubation at 10 degrees C and after 2 to 3 days at 20 degrees C in nutrient broth and in vegetable purées under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. In co-cultures with the positive strain of P. polymyxa in nutrient broth and vegetable purées, a C. botulinum type E strain was inhibited whenever P. polymyxa reached stationary phase and produced its antimicrobial activity before C. botulinum began its exponential growth phase. The antimicrobial activity of P. polymyxa against C. botulinum was attributed to the production of antimicrobial peptides resistant to high temperature and acidity. Other gram-positive and -negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutans, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Bacillus subtilis) were also sensitive to these antimicrobial peptides. PMID:12030292

  18. C-3 Substituted Lawsonemonoximates of Holmium(III): Synthesis, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jagtap, S. B.; Joshi, S. G.; Litake, G. M.; Kulkarni, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    A series of five new metal complexes of Ho(III) with C-3 substituted derivatives of lawsonemonexime (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthalenediene-1-oxime) were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by melting point, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility. The antimicrobial activity of the compounds were determined by disk diffusion method and broth micro-dilution techniques using Mueller Hinton medium against the following organisms: S. aureus ATCC 6538P, Klebsiella pneumoniae, NCTC 418, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27833, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 23564, E. coli U 1777, E. coli HB101, Proteus morganii NCIM 2860, Providencia stuartii NCIM 2799 and Acinetobacter baumannii U 24. The chelates of Ho(III) with lawsonemonoxime and Ho(III) with 3-bromolawsonemonoxime showed a variable antimicrobial activity against all organisms tested except Pseudomonas and Klebsiella spp. S. aureus was found more sensitive to all ligands and chelates tested; but the MIC values of chelates were considerably less; thus having more antimicrobial effect. PMID:18475938

  19. Biological and anti-microbial activity of irradiated green tea polyphenols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bong-Jeun An; Jae-Hoon Kwak; Jun-Ho Son; Jung-Mi Park; Jin-Young Lee; Cheorun Jo; Myung-Woo Byun

    2004-01-01

    Polyphenols of green tea leaf were separated and irradiated at 40 kGy to investigate the effect of irradiation on changes of biological and anti-microbial activities. The major antioxidative activities, including electron donating, inhibition of xanthine oxidase, metal ion chelating, and inhibition of lipid oxidation were maintained through irradiation, except for superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity at the 200 ppm level. The

  20. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity of the lichens Cladonia furcata, Lecanora atra and Lecanora muralis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity of the acetone extracts of the lichens Cladonia furcata, Lecanora atra and Lecanora muralis. Methods Antioxidant activity was evaluated by five separate methods: free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power, determination of total phenolic compounds and determination of total flavonoid content. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method against six species of bacteria and ten species of fungi. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. Results Of the lichens tested, Lecanora atra had largest free radical scavenging activity (94.7% inhibition), which was greater than the standard antioxidants. Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. The strong relationships between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant effect of tested extracts were observed. Extract of Cladonia furcata was the most active antimicrobial agent with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.78 to 25 mg/mL. All extracts were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 8.51 to 40.22 ?g/mL. Conclusions The present study shows that tested lichen extracts demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer effects. That suggest that lichens may be used as as possible natural antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer agents to control various human, animal and plant diseases. PMID:22013953

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Fluoride and Its in vivo Importance: Identification of Research Questions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Van Loveren

    2001-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the antimicrobial activity of fluoride and its in vivo importance in order to identify research questions. There is a lot of information on mechanisms by which fluoride may interfere with bacterial metabolism and dental plaque acidogenicity. The antimicrobial activity of fluoride products is enhanced when fluoride is associated with antimicrobial cations like Sn2+ and amine. It is

  2. Evaluating the antimicrobial activity of Nisin, Lysozyme and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate incorporated in starch based active food packaging film.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sugandha; Bharti, Anoop

    2015-06-01

    The pleothera of micro organisms obtained from contaminated food cultured in a starch broth was effectively tested against antibacterial agents, i.e. nisin, lysozyme and chelating agent EDTA. A variety of combination treatments of these antimicrobial agents and their incorporation in Starch based active packaging film according to their permissibility standards was done. 4 variables of Nisin concentration (ranging from 0 to 750 IU/ml), 3 variables of lysozyme concentration (ranging from 0 to 500 IU/ml) and 3 variables of EDTA concentration from (0 to 20 ?M) were chosen. Bacterial inhibition by combination of different levels of different factors without antimicrobial films was evaluated using a liquid incubation method. The samples were assayed for turbidity at interval of 2, 4 and 24 h to check effectiveness of combined effects of antimicrobial agents which proved a transitory bactericidal effect for short incubation times. Zone of Inhibition was observed in the antimicrobial films prepared by agar diffusion method. Statistical analysis of experimental data for their antimicrobial spectrum was carried out by multi regression analysis and ANOVA using Design-Expert software to plot the final equation in terms of coded factors as antimicrobial agents. The experimental data indicated that the model was highly significant. Results were also evaluated graphically using response surface showing interactions between two factors, keeping other factor fixed at values at the center of domain. Synergy was also determined among antibacterial agents using the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index which was observed to be 0.56 supporting the hypothesis that nisin and EDTA function as partial synergistically. The presented work aimed to screen in quick fashion the combinatorial effect of three antimicrobial agents and evaluating their efficacy in anti microbial film development. PMID:26028732

  3. Study of the nanomaterials and their antimicrobial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadi, Muntaha

    In the last decade, the world faced huge problems associated with the spread of antimicrobial resistant infections that are essentially untreatable such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. These infections have begun to occur in both hospital and community environments. Developing new antimicrobial surface coatings can hold a great promise to minimize and control various problems that associated with the spreading of infections and biofilms formation, these coatings can be used in medicine where medical devices associated with severe infections, in construction industry and the in food packaging industry. It has been established that single-walled CNTs exhibit a strong antimicrobial activity and can pierce bacterial cell walls. Recently, nanomaterial structures that made from pure carbon such as CNTs have been seen as promising candidates for many potential applications in Biotechnology and bioscience due to the combination of their extraordinary properties that arise from surface area, light weight, strength, flexibility, unique electrical conductivity and many more novel physical and chemical properties at nanoscale level. CNTs have been used widely in biomedical field including drug delivery, gene therapy and creating new biomedical devices with novel properties. Researchers have now made a first step to add carbon nanotubes to antimicrobial agents list. There are two types of CNTs have been used in biomedical research. The first one is a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and the second is a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT). Recent in vitro studies suggest that carbon nanotubes have antimicrobial activity and coating CNTs with nickel nanoparticle could enhance the antimicrobial activity of cabon nanotubes. In order to test this hypothesis, nickel nanoparticles were deposited on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by electrochemical deposition. The carbon nanotubes used in this study were XD-CNTs, SWNTs and Ni-coated CNTs. The structure and the morphology of Ni-coated CNTs were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The SEM results revealed that CNTs provide an excellent surface for electrochemical deposition of nanomaterials. Ni nanoparticles were homogeneously electrodeposited on the surfaces of SWNTs. Antimicrobial activity of CNTs was determined by broth dilution method using six different bacterial strains, three strains of gram negative and three strains of gram positive bacteria. The gram positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis . The gram negative bacteria include Eshericia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aerugenosa. Bactericidal rate was calculated. Based on the results Ni-coated CNTs show much stronger bactericidal property comparing to SWNTs and XD-grade CNTs.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P; Lackner, Maximilian

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid-base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure. PMID:24656357

  5. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Activity and Toxicity Test of Pilea microphylla

    PubMed Central

    Modarresi Chahardehi, Amir; Ibrahim, Darah; Fariza Sulaiman, Shaida

    2010-01-01

    A total of 9 plant extracts were tested, using two different kinds of extracting methods to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities from Pilea microphylla (Urticaceae family) and including toxicity test. Antioxidant activity were tested by using DPPH free radical scavenging, also total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents were determined. Toxicity assay carried out by using brine shrimps. Methanol extract of method I (ME I) showed the highest antioxidant activity at 69.51 ± 1.03. Chloroform extract of method I (CE I) showed the highest total phenolic contents at 72.10 ± 0.71 and chloroform extract of method II (CE II) showed the highest total flavonoid contents at 60.14 ± 0.33. The antimicrobial activity of Pilea microphylla extract was tested in vitro by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The Pilea microphylla extract showed antibacterial activity against some Gram negative and positive bacteria. The extracts did not exhibit antifungal and antiyeast activity. The hexane extract of method I (HE I) was not toxic against brine shrimp (LC50 value was 3880??g/ml). Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial and antioxidative agents in food industry. PMID:20652052

  6. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Bakuchiol against Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Harumi; Tsukiyama, Ryo-Ichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Kobayashi, Makio

    2001-01-01

    Bakuchiol was isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia, a tree native to China with various uses in traditional medicine, followed by extraction with ether and column chromatography combined with silica gel and octyldecyl silane. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of bakuchiol against some oral microorganisms were evaluated in vitro. The cell growth of Streptococcus mutans was inhibited in a bakuchiol concentration-dependent manner, and growth of S. mutans was completely prevented by 20 ?g of bakuchiol per ml. The bactericidal effect of bakuchiol on S. mutans was dependent on temperature and stable under the following conditions: sucrose, 0 to 10% (wt/vol); pH, 3.0 to 7.0; organic acids (3% [wt/vol] citric and malic acids). Bakuchiol showed bactericidal effects against all bacteria tested, including S. mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sobrinus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Actinomyces viscosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, with MICs ranging from 1 to 4 ?g/ml and the sterilizing concentration for 15 min ranging from 5 to 20 ?g/ml. Furthermore, bakuchiol was also effective against adherent cells of S. mutans in water-insoluble glucan in the presence of sucrose and inhibited the reduction of pH in the broth. Thus, bakuchiol would be a useful compound for development of antibacterial agents against oral pathogens and has great potential for use in food additives and mouthwash for preventing and treating dental caries. PMID:11600349

  7. Inducible factors with antimicrobial activity after immune challenge in the haemolymph of Red Palm Weevil (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Mastore, Maristella; Binda Rossetti, Simona; Giovannardi, Stefano; Scarì, Giorgio; Brivio, Maurizio F

    2015-05-01

    Insects are capable of innate immune responses elicited after microbial infection. In this process, the receptor-mediated recognition of foreign bodies and the subsequent activation of immunocompetent cells lead to the synthesis ex novo of a peptide pool with antimicrobial activity. We investigated the inducible immune response of a coleopteran, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, challenged with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. After immunization, we evaluated the presence of antimicrobial peptides using either biochemical analyses or microbiological techniques. The antimicrobial properties of the newly synthesized protein pool, detectable in haemolymph fractions of low molecular mass, showed strong antibacterial activity against various bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp. OX1, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus). In addition to the preliminary study of the mechanism of action of the pool of antimicrobial peptides, we also investigated its effects on bacterial cell walls by means of fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The data suggest that the main effects seem to be directed at destabilizing and damaging the bacterial wall. This study provides data that help us to understand some aspects of the inducible innate immunity in a system model that lacks anticipatory responses. However, the weevil has finely tuned its defensive strategies to counteract effectively microbial infection. PMID:25114180

  8. A demonstration of the antimicrobial effectiveness of various copper surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial contamination on touch surfaces results in increased risk of infection. In the last few decades, work has been done on the antimicrobial properties of copper and its alloys against a range of micro-organisms threatening public health in food processing, healthcare and air conditioning applications; however, an optimum copper method of surface deposition and mass structure has not been identified. Results A proof-of-concept study of the disinfection effectiveness of three copper surfaces was performed. The surfaces were produced by the deposition of copper using three methods of thermal spray, namely, plasma spray, wire arc spray and cold spray The surfaces were then inoculated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After a two hour exposure to the surfaces, the surviving MRSA were assayed and the results compared. The differences in the copper depositions produced by the three thermal spray methods were examined in order to explain the mechanism that causes the observed differences in MRSA killing efficiencies. The cold spray deposition method was significantly more effective than the other methods. It was determined that work hardening caused by the high velocity particle impacts created by the cold spray technique results in a copper microstructure that enhances ionic diffusion, and copper ions are principally responsible for antimicrobial activity. Conclusions This test showed significant microbiologic differences between coatings produced by different spray techniques and demonstrates the importance of the copper application technique. The cold spray technique shows superior anti-microbial effectiveness caused by the high impact velocity imparted to the sprayed particles which results in high dislocation density and high ionic diffusivity. PMID:23537176

  9. Isolation and Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Evaluation of Bio-Active Compounds from Eriobotrya Japonica Stems

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Khaled Nabih; Butnariu, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was carried out to evaluate antimicrobial and antioxidant activities from Eriobotrya japonica stems as well investigation of its chemical composition. Methods: Methanol 80% extract of Eriobotrya japonica stems was tested for antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal strains and for antioxidant activity using oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays and also total content of polyphenols with phytochemical analysis of the extract were determined. Results: The results showed that the extract has a significant antimicrobial activity, it inhibited significantly the growth of Candida albicans suggesting that it can be used in the treatment of fungal infections, and it showed no effect on the other bacterial and fungal strains, the extract has a good antioxidant activity, it has shown high values of oxygen radical absorbance capacity and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, while it showed a low value of polyphenol content. Phytochemical analysis of the extract showed the presence of carbohydrates, terpenes, tannins and flavonoids, further phytochemical analysis resulted in the isolation and identification of three triterpenic acids, oleanolic, ursolic and corosolic acids and four flavonoids, naringenin, quercetin, kaempferol 3-O-?-glucoside and quercetin 3-O-?-rhamnoside. Conclusion: These results may help to discover new chemical classes of natural antimicrobial antioxidant substances. PMID:24409413

  10. The antimicrobial activity, hydrophobicity and toxicity of sulfonium compounds, and their relationship.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Michiasa

    2011-03-01

    The sulfonium compound is a kind of cationic surfactant as well as a quaternary ammonium which has been used widely around the globe. This study investigated the antimicrobial activity, the hydrophobicity, the toxicity of several sulfoniums and their relationship with the aim of clarifying their antimicrobial activity and toxicity, and, furthermore, of predicting their usefulness availability as antimicrobials. As a result, the antimicrobial activity, expressed as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the sulfoniums examined in this study, tended to decrease with the increase of their hydrophobicity, estimated by ClogP, and their antimicrobial activity against the gram-positive bacteria was higher than that against the gram-negative bacteria used in this study. The antimicrobial activities of several sulfoniums against the gram-positive bacteria were higher than those of some common cationic antimicrobials including quaternary ammoniums such as cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and benzalkonium chloride (BKC). In contrast, the antimicrobial activities of the sulfoniums against the gram-negative bacteria were lower than those of some common cationic antimicrobials. Meanwhile the toxicity, in particular, the acute dermal irritation/corrosion of the sulfoniums, tended to be lower than that of common cationic antimicrobials which were toxic in many cases indices. These results suggest that the sulfoniums might become useful antimicrobials which are less hazardous to human health than common cationic antimicrobials. PMID:21467626

  11. Total Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorocatechelin A.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shinji; Nishimura, Shinichi; Hatano, Masaki; Igarashi, Masayuki; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-06-19

    Chlorocatechelin A (1) is a structurally unique microbial siderophore containing two units of 4-chloro-2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (CDB) and a characteristic acylguanidine structure. Purification from the microbe culture is not an easy task due to the lability of the acylguanidine and its chelating nature. Here we report the first convergent total synthesis and antimicrobial activity of chlorocatechelin A (1). The bis-acylated arginine was constructed using a Schotten-Baumann reaction whereas the CDB component was synthesized from o-vanillin (8). Condensation with an ornithine derivative synthesized from 1-benzyl d-glutamate was followed by deprotection in basic and neutral conditions to complete the total synthesis. We examined the antimicrobial activity of chlorocatechelin A (1) and found that this siderophore was active against desferrioxamine B (DFB)-sensitive microbes including the fish pathogen Pasteurella piscicida. PMID:26018853

  12. Antimicrobial activity of UV-induced phenylamides from rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Lin; Yoo, Youngchul; Hahn, Tae-Ryong; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Cho, Man-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Rice produces a wide array of phytoalexins in response to pathogen attacks and UV-irradiation. Except for the flavonoid sakuranetin, most phytoalexins identified in rice are diterpenoid compounds. Analysis of phenolic-enriched fractions from UV-treated rice leaves showed that several phenolic compounds in addition to sakuranetin accumulated remarkably in rice leaves. We isolated two compounds from UV-treated rice leaves using silica gel column chromatography and preparative HPLC. The isolated phenolic compounds were identified as phenylamide compounds: N-trans-cinnamoyltryptamine and N-p-coumaroylserotonin. Expression analysis of biosynthetic genes demonstrated that genes for arylamine biosynthesis were upregulated by UV irradiation. This result suggested that phenylamide biosynthetic pathways are activated in rice leaves by UV treatment. To unravel the role of UV-induced phenylamides as phytoalexins, we examined their antimicrobial activity against rice fungal and bacterial pathogens. N-trans-Cinnamoyltryptamine inhibited the growth of rice brown spot fungus (Bipolaris oryzae). In addition to the known antifungal activity to the blast fungus, sakuranetin had antimicrobial activity toward B. oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani (rice sheath blight fungus). UV-induced phenylamides and sakuranetin also had antimicrobial activity against rice bacterial pathogens for grain rot (Burkholderia glumae), blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae) and leaf streak (X. oryzae pv. oryzicola) diseases. These findings suggested that the UV-induced phenylamides in rice are phytoalexins against a diverse array of pathogens. PMID:25383752

  13. Antimicrobial Activities of Isothiocyanates Against Campylobacter jejuni Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Virginie; Alazzam, Bachar; Ermel, Gwennola; Thepaut, Marion; Rossero, Albert; Tresse, Odile; Baysse, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Food-borne human infection with Campylobacter jejuni is a medical concern in both industrialized and developing countries. Efficient eradication of C. jejuni reservoirs within live animals and processed foods is limited by the development of antimicrobial resistances and by practical problems related to the use of conventional antibiotics in food processes. We have investigated the bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of two phytochemicals, allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC), and benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), against 24 C. jejuni isolates from chicken feces, human infections, and contaminated foods, as well as two reference strains NCTC11168 and 81-176. AITC and BITC displayed a potent antibacterial activity against C. jejuni. BITC showed a higher overall antibacterial effect (MIC of 1.25–5??g?mL?1) compared to AITC (MIC of 50–200??g?mL?1). Both compounds are bactericidal rather than bacteriostatic. The sensitivity levels of C. jejuni isolates against isothiocyanates were neither correlated with the presence of a GGT (?-Glutamyl Transpeptidase) encoding gene in the genome, with antibiotic resistance nor with the origin of the biological sample. However the ggt mutant of C. jejuni 81-176 displayed a decreased survival rate compared to wild-type when exposed to ITC. This work determined the MIC of two ITC against a panel of C. jejuni isolates, showed that both compounds are bactericidal rather than bacteriostatic, and highlighted the role of GGT enzyme in the survival rate of C. jejuni exposed to ITC. PMID:22919644

  14. Antimicrobial activities of isothiocyanates against Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Virginie; Alazzam, Bachar; Ermel, Gwennola; Thepaut, Marion; Rossero, Albert; Tresse, Odile; Baysse, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Food-borne human infection with Campylobacter jejuni is a medical concern in both industrialized and developing countries. Efficient eradication of C. jejuni reservoirs within live animals and processed foods is limited by the development of antimicrobial resistances and by practical problems related to the use of conventional antibiotics in food processes. We have investigated the bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of two phytochemicals, allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC), and benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), against 24 C. jejuni isolates from chicken feces, human infections, and contaminated foods, as well as two reference strains NCTC11168 and 81-176. AITC and BITC displayed a potent antibacterial activity against C. jejuni. BITC showed a higher overall antibacterial effect (MIC of 1.25-5??g?mL(-1)) compared to AITC (MIC of 50-200??g?mL(-1)). Both compounds are bactericidal rather than bacteriostatic. The sensitivity levels of C. jejuni isolates against isothiocyanates were neither correlated with the presence of a GGT (?-Glutamyl Transpeptidase) encoding gene in the genome, with antibiotic resistance nor with the origin of the biological sample. However the ggt mutant of C. jejuni 81-176 displayed a decreased survival rate compared to wild-type when exposed to ITC. This work determined the MIC of two ITC against a panel of C. jejuni isolates, showed that both compounds are bactericidal rather than bacteriostatic, and highlighted the role of GGT enzyme in the survival rate of C. jejuni exposed to ITC. PMID:22919644

  15. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Romanian medicinal plants hydroalcoholic extracts on planktonic and adhered cells.

    PubMed

    Stanciuc, A M; Gaspar, A; Moldovan, L; Saviuc, C; Popa, M; M?ru?escu, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial and antifungal potential of some Romanian medicinal plants, arnica--Arnica montana, wormwood--Artemisia absinthium and nettle--Urtica dioica. In order to perform this antimicrobial screening, we obtained the vegetal extracts and we tested them on a series of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and also against two fungal strains. The vegetal extracts showed antimicrobial activity preferentially directed against the planktonic fungal and bacterial growth, while the effect against biofilm formation and development was demonstrated only against S. aureus and C. albicans. Our in vitro assays indicate that the studied plant extracts are a significant source of natural alternatives to antimicrobial therapy, thus avoiding antibiotic therapy, the use of which has become excessive in recent years. PMID:21717806

  16. Activating the antimicrobial activity of an anionic singlet-oxygen sensitizer through surfactant complexation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Eric H; Pappas, Harry C; Whitten, David G

    2014-05-13

    Cationic oligo-p-phenylene ethynylenes have shown much promise as broad-spectrum light-activated antimicrobial compounds against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The anionic varieties, however, have weak biocidal activity. In this study, a complex is formed between a weakly biocidal anionic oligomer and a cationic surfactant, and the effects on their biocidal activity against Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive S. aureus are explored. The enhancement in biocidal activity that is observed when the complex is irradiated suggests that interfacial surfactant gives the complex a net-positive charge, allowing it to associate strongly with the bacterial membrane. The results of this study demonstrate a method for the enhancement of biocidal activity of singlet-oxygen sensitizers and corroborate the use of surfactants as trans-membrane drug-delivery agents. PMID:24786342

  17. Total antioxidant activity and antimicrobial potency of the essential oil and oleoresin of Zingiber officinale Roscoe

    PubMed Central

    Bellik, Yuva

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil and oleoresin of Zingiber officinale Roscoe. Methods The antioxidant activity was evaluated based on the ability of the ginger extracts to scavenge ABTS°+ free radical. The antimicrobial activity was studied by the disc diffusion method and minimal inhibitory concentration was determined by using the agar incorporation method. Results Ginger extracts exerted significant antioxidant activity and dose-depend effect. In general, oleoresin showed higher antioxidant activity [IC50=(1.820±0.034) mg/mL] when compared to the essential oil [IC50=(110.14±8.44) mg/mL]. In terms of antimicrobial activity, ginger compounds were more effective against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, and less effective against Bacillus cereus. Aspergillus niger was least, whereas, Penicillium spp. was higher sensitive to the ginger extracts; minimal inhibitory concentrations of the oleoresin and essential oil were 2 mg/mL and 869.2 mg/mL, respectively. Moreover, the studied extracts showed an important antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Conclusions The study confirms the wide application of ginger oleoresin and essential oil in the treatment of many bacterial and fungal diseases.

  18. [Antimicrobial activity of Actinomycetale isolated from the lagoon in Algeria].

    PubMed

    Alliouch-Kerboua, Chérifa; Gacemi Kirane, Djamila; La Scola, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the aim of the study of the taxonomy and the antimicrobial activity, a strain of actinomycete SM2/2GF which was isolated from sediment of the lagoon El-Mellah which is situated in the city of El-Kala in the Northeast of Algeria, was tested against diverse pathogenic microorganisms and against a Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila which was isolated from water of the lagoon El-Mellah. The phenotypic and the molecular characteristics show that the isolate SM2/2GF belongs to the kind Streptomyces. This strain showed an antimicrobial activity against a Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila and the positive-Gram bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, as well as the yeast Candida albicans. It has no activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The interesting antimicrobial activity of the strain SM2/2GF against the pathogenic microorganisms could encourage further researches on one or several bioactive molecules which it secretes. PMID:25847739

  19. Effect of antimicrobial peptides from Apis mellifera hemolymph and its optimized version Api88 on biological activities of human monocytes and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Ulrike; Schilling, Erik; Knappe, Daniel; Al-Mekhlafi, Moath; Petersen, Frank; Hoffmann, Ralf; Hauschildt, Sunna

    2013-01-01

    Apidaecin peptides are produced by the honeybee Apis mellifera as a major part of its non-specific defense system against infections. Having verified that the peptides apidaecin 1b and Api88-a designer peptide based on the native apidaecin 1b sequence-are highly active against Gram-negative bacteria, we studied their ability to modulate biological activities of human monocytes and mast cells (MC), two important cell types of the human innate immune system. We could show that both peptides are nontoxic and fairly resistant to degradation in cell culture medium containing 10% FBS. Among the peptides tested we found Api88 to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-? production in a concentration-dependent manner. Resting monocytes did not respond to Api88. Whilst Api88 neither induced migration nor affected the phagocytic activity of monocytes it partially inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates produced in response to LPS. In human MC, however, Api88 triggered degranulation and the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+)-ions. Taken together these data clearly indicate that Api88 is a multifunctional molecule that can modulate biological responses of human monocytes and MC in addition to its antimicrobial activity. PMID:23112010

  20. Characterization and antimicrobial activity of sweetpotato starch-based edible film containing origanum (Thymus capitatus) oil.

    PubMed

    Ehivet, Fabienne E; Min, Byungjin; Park, Mi-Kyung; Oh, Jun-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to characterize the mechanical and barrier properties of sweetpotato starch (SPS)-based film (SPSF) and to investigate the antimicrobial activity of SPSF containing origanum oil (OG) against foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The SPSF was fabricated with the SPS extracted from commercial sweetpotato roots. Tensile strength (TS), percent elongation at break (E), and water vapor permeability (WVP) were determined to characterize the SPSF fabricated with selected SPS concentrations, plasticizers, and the concentrations of plasticizers. The agar diffusion assay was used to determine the antimicrobial activity of SPSF containing selective concentrations of OG against Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. The SPSF fabricated with 2.5% SPS exhibited the greatest TS (4.58 MPa). The TS, E, and WVP of SPSF plasticized with 40% sorbitol exhibited 7.96 MPa, 77.92%, 0.212 ng m/m(2) S Pa, respectively. Therefore, the SPSF fabricated with 2.5% SPS and 40% sorbitol was determined as the optimum film. The antimicrobial activity of the SPSF containing OG increased as the concentration of OG increased. And the SPSF containing OG exhibited greater inhibitory effects against the gram-negative bacteria such as S. Enteritidis and E. coli O157:H7 than the gram-positive L. monocytogenes. The greatest antimicrobial activity was observed against S. Enteritidis when the SPSF containing 2% OG was applied, and the maximum square of zone width was 18.43 mm(2). PMID:21535647

  1. Black cumin (Nigella sativa) and its constituent (thymoquinone): a review on antimicrobial effects

    PubMed Central

    Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh Fazly; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa seeds have wide therapeutic effects and have been reported to have significant effects against many ailments such as skin diseases, jaundice, gastrointestinal problems, anorexia, conjunctivitis, dyspepsia, rheumatism, diabetes, hypertension, intrinsic hemorrhage, paralysis, amenorrhea, anorexia, asthma, cough, bronchitis, headache, fever, influenza and eczema. Thymoquinone (TQ) is one of the most active constituent and has different beneficial properties. Focus on antimicrobial effects, different extracts of N. sativa as well as TQ, have a broad antimicrobial spectrum including Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria, viruses, parasites, schistosoma and fungi. The effectiveness of N. sativa seeds and TQ is variable and depends on species of target microorganisms. The present review paper tries to describe all antimicrobial activities that have been carried out by various researchers. PMID:25859296

  2. Composition and antimicrobial activity of Equisetum arvense L. essential oil.

    PubMed

    Radulovi?, Niko; Stojanovi?, Gordana; Pali?, Radosav

    2006-01-01

    The volatile constituents of the sterile stems of Equisetum arvense L. (Equisetaceae) were investigated for the first time using GC, GC/MS and (13)C-NMR. Twenty-five compounds were identified. Hexahydrofarnesyl acetone (18.34%), cis-geranyl acetone (13.74%), thymol (12.09%) and trans-phytol (10.06%) were the major constituents. A disk diffusion method was used for the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of this oil against a panel of microorganisms (bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enteritidis; fungi: Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans). The 1:10 dilution of the essential oil of Equisetum arvense L. was shown to possess a broad spectrum of a very strong antimicrobial activity against all tested strains. PMID:16397851

  3. Antimicrobial properties of membrane-active dodecapeptides derived from MSI-78.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Claudia; Fernandes, Mariana; Pinheiro, Marina; Maia, Sílvia; Seabra, Catarina L; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Costa, Fabíola; Reis, Salette; Gomes, Paula; Martins, M Cristina L

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics known by their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes and their low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, arising as excellent candidates to fight bacterial infections. In this study we aimed at designing short 12-mer AMPs, derived from a highly effective and broad spectrum synthetic AMP, MSI-78 (22 residues), by truncating this peptide at the N- and/or C-termini while spanning its entire sequence with 1 amino acid (aa) shifts. These designed peptides were evaluated regarding antimicrobial activity against selected gram-positive Staphylococcus strains and the gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The short 12-mer peptide CEM1 (GIGKFLKKAKKF) was identified as an excellent candidate to fight P. aeruginosa infections as it displays antimicrobial activity against this strain and selectivity, with negligible toxicity to mammalian cells even at high concentrations. However, in general most of the short 12-mer peptides tested showed a reduction in antimicrobial activity, an effect that was more pronounced for gram-positive Staphylococcus strains. Interestingly, CEM1 and a highly similar peptide differing by only one aa-shift (CEM2: IGKFLKKAKKFG), showed a remarkably contrasting AMP activity. These two peptides were chosen for a more detailed study regarding their mechanism of action, using several biophysical assays and simple membrane models that mimic the mammalian and bacterial lipid composition. We confirmed the correlation between peptide helicity and antimicrobial activity and propose a mechanism of action based on the disruption of the bacterial membrane permeability barrier. PMID:25680229

  4. Antimicrobial activity of nanoemulsion in combination with cetylpyridinium chloride in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoon Y; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Bienek, Diane R; Lee, Valerie; You, Tao; Alvarez, Rene

    2013-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a serious problematic pathogen due to the ever-increasing presence of antibiotic resistance, demonstrating a need for novel, broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapeutic options. Antimicrobial nanoemulsions are emulsified mixtures of detergent, oil, and water (droplet size, 100 to 800 nm) which have broad antimicrobial activity against bacteria, enveloped viruses, and fungi. Here, we screened the antimicrobial activities of five nanoemulsion preparations against four Acinetobacter baumannii isolates to identify the most suitable preparation for further evaluation. Among them, N5, which contains 10% (vol/vol) Triton X-100, 25% (vol/vol) soybean oil, and 1% (wt/vol) cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), showed the best efficacy against A. baumannii in both its planktonic and biofilm forms and was selected for further study. Our data demonstrate that, while the killing of planktonic forms of A. baumannii was due to the 1% CPC component of our nanoemulsions, the breakdown of biofilms was achieved via the emulsified oil and detergent fractions. Furthermore, we documented the effect of ethanol and NaCl in combination with N5 on planktonic A. baumannii. In killing curves of N5 combined with other agents (ethanol or NaCl), a synergistic effect of a ? 2-log decrease in CFU/ml was observed. The antibiofilm activity of N5 was confirmed via a cell proliferation test and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of exposure to severe environmental conditions, which simulates the field conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan, were evaluated, and this exposure did not affect the overall antimicrobial activity of N5. These studies lay a solid foundation for the utilization of nanoemulsions against the antibiotic-resistant forms of A. baumannii. PMID:23669390

  5. Preliminary screening of some Egyptian weeds for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    El-Abyad, M S; Morsi, N M; Zaki, D A; Shaaban, M T

    1990-01-01

    Eleven Egyptian weeds collected from the Menoufeya district were screened for phytochemical compounds effective against several representatives of bacteria and yeasts. It was found that Soxhlet benzene extracts, especially those of Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., were the most effective. Alkaloids and flavonoids of Capsella gave the highest antibiotic potencies and had the broadest antimicrobial spectra. It is suggested that these alkaloids might consist of yohimbine and ergocristine and the flavonoids included the flavone diosmin. PMID:2336037

  6. Antimicrobial polymers: mechanism of action, factors of activity, and applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larisa Timofeeva; Natalia Kleshcheva

    2011-01-01

    Complex epidemiological situation, nosocomial infections, microbial contamination, and infection risks in hospital and dental\\u000a equipment have led to an ever-growing need for prevention of microbial infection in these various areas. Macromolecular systems,\\u000a due to their properties, allow one to efficiently use them in various fields, including the creation of polymers with the\\u000a antimicrobial activity. In the past decade, the intensive

  7. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1? , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to ?-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  8. Screening antimicrobial activity of various extracts of Urtica dioica.

    PubMed

    Modarresi-Chahardehi, Amir; Ibrahim, Darah; Fariza-Sulaiman, Shaida; Mousavi, Leila

    2012-12-01

    Urtica dioica or stinging nettle is traditionally used as an herbal medicine in Western Asia. The current study represents the investigation of antimicrobial activity of U. dioica from nine crude extracts that were prepared using different organic solvents, obtained from two extraction methods: the Soxhlet extractor (Method I), which included the use of four solvents with ethyl acetate and hexane, or the sequential partitions (Method II) with a five solvent system (butanol). The antibacterial and antifungal activities of crude extracts were tested against 28 bacteria, three yeast strains and seven fungal isolates by the disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. Amoxicillin was used as positive control for bacteria strains, vancomycin for Streptococcus sp., miconazole nitrate (30 microg/mL) as positive control for fungi and yeast, and pure methanol (v/v) as negative control. The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the sensitivity of the samples, whilst the broth dilution method was used for the determination of the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC). The ethyl acetate and hexane extract from extraction method I (EA I and HE I) exhibited highest inhibition against some pathogenic bacteria such as Bacillus cereus, MRSA and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A selection of extracts that showed some activity was further tested for the MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC). MIC values of Bacillus subtilis and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using butanol extract of extraction method II (BE II) were 8.33 and 16.33mg/mL, respectively; while the MIC value using ethyl acetate extract of extraction method II (EAE II) for Vibrio parahaemolyticus was 0.13mg/mL. Our study showed that 47.06% of extracts inhibited Gram-negative (8 out of 17), and 63.63% of extracts also inhibited Gram-positive bacteria (7 out of 11); besides, statistically the frequency of antimicrobial activity was 13.45% (35 out of 342) which in this among 21.71% belongs to antimicrobial activity extracts from extraction method I (33 out of 152 of crude extracts) and 6.82% from extraction method II (13 out of 190 of crude extracts). However, crude extracts from method I exhibited better antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria than the Gram-negative bacteria. The positive results on medicinal plants screening for antibacterial activity constitutes primary information for further phytochemical and pharmacological studies. Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial agents in pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:23342511

  9. Antimicrobial activity of silver/starch/polyacrylamide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2014-07-01

    A novel silver/starch/polyacrylamide nanocomposite hydrogel was prepared by grafting acrylamide onto starch in presence of silver nitrate by use of ammonium persulphate as an initiator and N,N-methylene-bisacrylamide as a crosslinking agent, then reducing the silver ions enclosed in the hydrogel structure to silver nanoparticles by treating the hydrogel with sodium hydroxide solution. All factors which affect the grafting/crosslinking reaction were optimized and the concentration of silver ion was changed from 0ppm to 50ppm. The produced nanocomposite hydrogel was characterized for its nanosilver content and the UV-spectra showed similar absorption spectra at wavelength 405nm for all AgNO3 concentrations but the plasmon showed increase in the intensity of the absorption peak as AgNO3 concentration incorporated to the hydrogel structure increases. The nanocomposite hydrogel was also characterized for its antimicrobial activity toward two types of bacteria and two types of fungi. The results showed that the hydrogel with 0ppm silver content has no antimicrobial activity, and that the antimicrobial activity expressed as inhibition zone increases as the silver content increases from 5ppm to 50ppm. PMID:24769214

  10. Prolonged bacterial exposure to minocycline\\/rifampicin-impregnated vascular catheters does not affect antimicrobial activity of catheters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saima Aslam; Rabih O. Darouiche

    Objectives: We assessed the in vitro effect of exposing various bacteria to minocycline\\/rifampicin- impregnated vascular catheters on the antimicrobial activity of the catheters and the antimicrobial sus- ceptibility of tested organisms. Methods: Segments of minocycline\\/rifampicin-impregnated catheters were placed in agar plates inocu- lated with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE).

  11. Quantitative structure–activity relationships studies for prediction of antimicrobial activity of synthesized disulfonamide derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saliha Alyar; Neslihan Özbek; Kübra Kuzuk?ran; Nurcan Karacan

    2011-01-01

    A new series of disulfonamides were synthesized and assayed as antimicrobial agents against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Escherichia coli. The quantitative structure–activity relationship analysis (QSAR) was applied to find out the correlation between experimentally\\u000a evaluated antimicrobial activities with various parameters of the compounds using stepwise multiple liner regression method.\\u000a The QSAR analysis revealed that the third-order average connectivity index

  12. Antimicrobial activity of certain Indian medicinal plants used in folkloric medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Srinivasan; Sangeetha Nathan; T. Suresh; P. Lakshmana Perumalsamy

    2001-01-01

    Fifty medicinal plants belonging to 26 families were studied for their antimicrobial activity. Among 50 plants tested, 72% showed antimicrobial activity. About 22 plant extracts from 15 families exhibited activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fourteen plants belonging to 11 families did not show activity against any of the bacteria tested. Only nine plant extracts showed antifungal activity. The

  13. Extracellular Streptomyces lividans vesicles: composition, biogenesis and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Schrempf, Hildgund; Merling, Philipp

    2015-07-01

    We selected Streptomyces lividans to elucidate firstly the biogenesis and antimicrobial activities of extracellular vesicles that a filamentous and highly differentiated Gram-positive bacterium produces. Vesicle types range in diameter from 110 to 230?nm and 20 to 60?nm, respectively; they assemble to clusters, and contain lipids and phospholipids allowing their in situ imaging by specific fluorescent dyes. The presence of the identified secondary metabolite undecylprodigiosin provokes red fluorescence of a portion of the heterogeneous vesicle populations facilitating in vivo monitoring. Protuberances containing vesicles generate at tips, and alongside of substrate hyphae, and enumerate during late vegetative growth to droplet-like exudates. Owing to in situ imaging in the presence and absence of a green fluorescent vancomycin derivative, we conclude that protuberances comprising vesicles arise at sites with enhanced levels of peptidoglycan subunits [pentapeptide of lipid II (C55)-linked disaccharides], and reduced levels of polymerized and cross-linked peptidoglycan within hyphae. These sites correlate with enhanced levels of anionic phospholipids and lipids. Vesicles provoke pronounced damages of Aspergillus proliferans, Verticillium dahliae and induced clumping and distortion of Escherichia coli. These harmful effects are likely attributable to the action of the identified vesicular compounds including different enzyme types, components of signal transduction cascades and undecylprodigiosin. Based on our pioneering findings, we highlight novel clues with environmental implications and application potential. PMID:25851532

  14. Antimicrobial activity of new porphyrins of synthetic and natural origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.; Ghazaryan, Robert K.; Paronyan, Marina H.; Ulikhanyan, Ghukas I.; Gyulkhandanyan, Aram G.; Sahakyan, Lida A.

    2012-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation has been successfully used against Gram (+) microorganisms, but most of the photosensitizers (PSs) on Gram (-) bacteria acts weakly. PSs are the natural or synthetic origin dyes, mainly porphyrins. We have synthesized more than 100 new cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins with different functional groups (hydroxyethyl, butyl, allyl, methallyl) and metals (cobalt, iron, copper, zinc, silver and other); from the nettle have also been purified pheophytin (a+b) and pheophytin (a) and have synthesized their Ag-and Zn-metalloporphyrins. It was found that in the dark (cytotoxic) mode, the most highly efficiency against microorganisms showed Agmetalloporphyrins of both types of porphyrins (synthetic and natural). Metalloporphyrin of natural origin Ag-pheophytin (a + b) is a strong antibacterial agent and causes 100% death as the Gram (+) microorganisms (St. aureus and MRSA) and the Gram (-) microorganisms (E.coli and Salmonella). It is established that for the destruction of Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms in photodynamic mode cationic water-soluble synthetic metalloporphyrins, especially Zn-TBut4PyP, many times more effective than pheophytins. In vivo conditions on mice established that the best therapeutic activity against various strains of the microorganism St. aureus has the synthetic metalloporphyrin Ag-TBut4PyP. It is significantly more efficient than known drug "Chlorophyllipt" (2.5-3 times) and leads the survival rate of animals up to 50-60%.

  15. Extracellular Streptomyces lividans vesicles: composition, biogenesis and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Schrempf, Hildgund; Merling, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    We selected Streptomyces lividans to elucidate firstly the biogenesis and antimicrobial activities of extracellular vesicles that a filamentous and highly differentiated Gram-positive bacterium produces. Vesicle types range in diameter from 110 to 230?nm and 20 to 60?nm, respectively; they assemble to clusters, and contain lipids and phospholipids allowing their in situ imaging by specific fluorescent dyes. The presence of the identified secondary metabolite undecylprodigiosin provokes red fluorescence of a portion of the heterogeneous vesicle populations facilitating in vivo monitoring. Protuberances containing vesicles generate at tips, and alongside of substrate hyphae, and enumerate during late vegetative growth to droplet-like exudates. Owing to in situ imaging in the presence and absence of a green fluorescent vancomycin derivative, we conclude that protuberances comprising vesicles arise at sites with enhanced levels of peptidoglycan subunits [pentapeptide of lipid II (C55)-linked disaccharides], and reduced levels of polymerized and cross-linked peptidoglycan within hyphae. These sites correlate with enhanced levels of anionic phospholipids and lipids. Vesicles provoke pronounced damages of Aspergillus proliferans, Verticillium dahliae and induced clumping and distortion of Escherichia coli. These harmful effects are likely attributable to the action of the identified vesicular compounds including different enzyme types, components of signal transduction cascades and undecylprodigiosin. Based on our pioneering findings, we highlight novel clues with environmental implications and application potential. PMID:25851532

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Medicated Soaps Commonly Used By Dar es Salaam Residents in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mwambete, K. D.; Lyombe, F.

    2011-01-01

    An in vitro evaluation of the anti-microbial activity of medicated soaps was conducted using ditch-plate and hand washing techniques. Strains of reference microbes namely Candida albicans (ATCC90028), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC25923), Pseudomonas aureginosa (ATCC27853) and Escherichia coli (ATCC25922) were tested at three different soaps’ concentrations (1.0, 4.0 and 8.0 mg/ml). A total of 16 medicated soaps were assayed for their antimicrobial efficacy. Of these, 13 were medicated and 3 non-medicated soaps, which served as control. Ciprofloxacin and ketaconazole were employed as positive controls. Label disclosure for the soaps’ ingredients and other relevant information were absorbed. The most common antimicrobial active ingredients were triclosan, trichloroxylenol and trichlorocarbanilide. ANOVA for means of zones of inhibition revealed variability of antimicrobial activity among the medicated soaps. Positive correlation (r=0.318; P<0.01) between zones of inhibition and soaps’ concentrations was evidenced. Hand washing frequencies positively correlated with microbial counts. Roberts® soap exhibited the largest zone of inhibition (34 mm) on S. aureus. Candida albicans was the least susceptible microbe. Regency® and Dalan® exhibited the least zone of inhibition on the tested bacteria. Protex®, Roberts®, Family® and Protector® were equally effective (P<0.01) against S. aureus. In conclusion, majority of the assayed medicated soaps have satisfactory antibacterial activity; though lack antifungal effect with exception of Linda® liquid soap. The hand washing technique has proved to be inappropriate for evaluation of soaps’ antimicrobial efficacy due to presence of the skin microflora. PMID:22131630

  17. Antimicrobial activity of chitosan derivatives containing N-quaternized moieties in its backbone: a review.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alessandro F; Facchi, Suelen P; Follmann, Heveline D M; Pereira, Antonio G B; Rubira, Adley F; Muniz, Edvani C

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan, which is derived from a deacetylation reaction of chitin, has attractive antimicrobial activity. However, chitosan applications as a biocide are only effective in acidic medium due to its low solubility in neutral and basic conditions. Also, the positive charges carried by the protonated amine groups of chitosan (in acidic conditions) that are the driving force for its solubilization are also associated with its antimicrobial activity. Therefore, chemical modifications of chitosan are required to enhance its solubility and broaden the spectrum of its applications, including as biocide. Quaternization on the nitrogen atom of chitosan is the most used route to render water-soluble chitosan-derivatives, especially at physiological pH conditions. Recent reports in the literature demonstrate that such chitosan-derivatives present excellent antimicrobial activity due to permanent positive charge on nitrogen atoms side-bonded to the polymer backbone. This review presents some relevant work regarding the use of quaternized chitosan-derivatives obtained by different synthetic paths in applications as antimicrobial agents. PMID:25402643

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Derivatives Containing N-Quaternized Moieties in Its Backbone: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Alessandro F.; Facchi, Suelen P.; Follmann, Heveline D. M.; Pereira, Antonio G. B.; Rubira, Adley F.; Muniz, Edvani C.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan, which is derived from a deacetylation reaction of chitin, has attractive antimicrobial activity. However, chitosan applications as a biocide are only effective in acidic medium due to its low solubility in neutral and basic conditions. Also, the positive charges carried by the protonated amine groups of chitosan (in acidic conditions) that are the driving force for its solubilization are also associated with its antimicrobial activity. Therefore, chemical modifications of chitosan are required to enhance its solubility and broaden the spectrum of its applications, including as biocide. Quaternization on the nitrogen atom of chitosan is the most used route to render water-soluble chitosan-derivatives, especially at physiological pH conditions. Recent reports in the literature demonstrate that such chitosan-derivatives present excellent antimicrobial activity due to permanent positive charge on nitrogen atoms side-bonded to the polymer backbone. This review presents some relevant work regarding the use of quaternized chitosan-derivatives obtained by different synthetic paths in applications as antimicrobial agents. PMID:25402643

  19. Antimicrobial activity of three Mexican Gnaphalium species.

    PubMed

    Villagómez-Ibarra, J R; Sánchez, M; Espejo, O; Zúñiga-Estrada, A; Torres-Valencia, J M; Joseph-Nathan, P

    2001-08-01

    The antibacterial activity of the hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the flowers, leaves and stems of Gnaphalium oxyphyllum var. oxyphyllum, G. liebmannii var. monticola and G. viscosum was investigated. The hexane extracts showed in all cases the higher inhibitions, G. oxyphyllum flower extract exhibiting the wider spectrum of activity. PMID:11543972

  20. Antimicrobial activity of three Mexican Gnaphalium species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Roberto Villagómez-Ibarra; Maricruz Sánchez; Ofelia Espejo; Armida Zúñiga-Estrada; J. Mart??n Torres-Valencia; Pedro Joseph-Nathan

    2001-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of the hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the flowers, leaves and stems of Gnaphaliumoxyphyllum var. oxyphyllum, G. liebmannii var. monticola and G. viscosum was investigated. The hexane extracts showed in all cases the higher inhibitions, G. oxyphyllum flower extract exhibiting the wider spectrum of activity.

  1. Antimicrobial spectrum of activity for meropenem and nine broad spectrum antimicrobials: report from the MYSTIC Program (2002) in North America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R Rhomberg; Ronald N Jones

    2003-01-01

    The Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Program provides susceptibility data for participating medical centers where carbapenems are utilized. The activity of meropenem and nine broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents were assessed against 3,047 bacterial isolates collected during 2002 from 16 North American sites. The overall rank order of susceptibility of the 10 antimicrobial agents tested against Gram-negative isolates was: meropenem

  2. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration.

    PubMed

    Al-Bakri, Amal G; Afifi, Fatma U

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the "viable plate count" method. Four degrees of antimicrobial activity (high, moderate, weak and inactive) against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively, were recorded. The plant extracts of Hypericum triquetrifolium, Ballota undulata, Ruta chalepensis, Ononis natrix, Paronychia argentea and Marrubium vulgare had shown promising antimicrobial activity. This study showed that while both XTT and viable count methods are comparable when estimating the overall antimicrobial activity of experimental substances, there is no strong linear correlation between the two methods. PMID:16831479

  3. Characterization and antimicrobial activity of a pharmaceutical microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Cui, Yinan; Zhu, Songming; Feng, Fengqin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2010-08-16

    The characterization of a pharmaceutical microemulsion system with glycerol monolaurate as oil, ethanol as cosurfactant, Tween 40 as surfactant, sodium diacetate and water, and the antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum have been studied. The influence of ethanol and sodium diacetate on oil solubilization capability was clearly reflected in the phase behavior of these systems. One microemulsion formulation was obtained and remained stable by physical stability studies. The antimicrobial assay using solid medium diffusion method showed that the prepared microemulsion was comparable to the commonly used antimicrobials as positive controls. The kinetics of killing experiments demonstrated that the microemulsion caused a complete loss of viability of bacterial cells (E. coli, S. aureus and B. subtilis) in 1 min, killed over 99% A. niger and P. expansum spores and 99.9% C. albicans cells rapidly within 2 min and resulted in a complete loss of fungal viability in 5 min. The fast killing kinetics of the microemulsion was in good agreement with the transmission electron microscopy observations, indicating the antimembrane activity of the microemulsion on bacterial and fungal cells due to the disruption and dysfunction of biological membranes and cell walls. PMID:20580790

  4. Multilayer hydrogel coatings to combine hemocompatibility and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marion; Vahdatzadeh, Maryam; Konradi, Rupert; Friedrichs, Jens; Maitz, Manfred F; Freudenberg, Uwe; Werner, Carsten

    2015-07-01

    While silver-loaded catheters are widely used to prevent early-onset catheter-related infections [1], long term antimicrobial protection of indwelling catheters remains to be achieved [2] and antiseptic functionalization of coatings often impairs their hemocompatibility characteristics. Therefore, this work aimed to capitalize on the antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles, incorporated in anticoagulant poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-heparin hydrogel coatings [3] on thermoplastic polyurethane materials. For prolonged antimicrobial activity, the silver-containing starPEG-heparin hydrogel layers were shielded with silver-free hydrogel layers of otherwise similar composition. The resulting multi-layered gel coatings showed long term antiseptic efficacy against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains in vitro, and similarly performed well when incubated with freshly drawn human whole blood with respect to hemolysis, platelet activation and plasmatic coagulation. The introduced hydrogel multilayer system thus offers a promising combination of hemocompatibility and long-term antiseptic capacity to meet an important clinical need. PMID:25934292

  5. Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Palladium(II), Cobalt(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyar, Saliha; Adem, ?evki

    2014-10-01

    We report the synthesis of the ligand, salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (salptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Pd(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized for the first time. The structure of the ligand and their complexes were investigated using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR, NMR and LC-MS) measurements. Salptsmh has also been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The complexes were found to have general composition [ML2]. The results of elemental analysis showed 1:2 (metal/ligand) stoichiometry for all the complex. Magnetic and spectral data indicate a square planar geometry for Pd(II) complex and a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Co(II) complexes. The ligand and its metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disk diffusion method against the selected Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Gram negative bacteria: Eschericha coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and carbonic anhydrase I (CA I) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values and it has been found that Pd(II) complex have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than salptsmh and Co(II) complex.

  6. MicroRNA-125a Inhibits Autophagy Activation and Antimicrobial Responses during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Yuk, Jae-Min; Kim, Soo Yeon; Kim, Tae Sung; Jin, Hyo Sun; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding nucleotides that play critical roles in the regulation of diverse biological functions, including the response of host immune cells. Autophagy plays a key role in activating the antimicrobial host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although the pathways associated with autophagy must be tightly regulated at a posttranscriptional level, the contribution of miRNAs and whether they specifically influence the activation of macrophage autophagy during M. tuberculosis infection are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages leads to increased expression of miRNA-125a-3p (miR-125a), which targets UV radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), to inhibit autophagy activation and antimicrobial responses to M. tuberculosis. Forced expression of miR-125a significantly blocked M. tuberculosis-induced activation of autophagy and phagosomal maturation in macrophages, and inhibitors of miR-125a counteracted these effects. Both TLR2 and MyD88 were required for biogenesis of miR-125a during M. tuberculosis infection. Notably, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase significantly inhibited the expression of miR-125a in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. Moreover, either overexpression of miR-125a or silencing of UVRAG significantly attenuated the antimicrobial effects of macrophages against M. tuberculosis. Taken together, these data indicate that miR-125a regulates the innate host defense by inhibiting the activation of autophagy and antimicrobial effects against M. tuberculosis through targeting UVRAG. PMID:25917095

  7. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Blower, Ryan J.; Barksdale, Stephanie M.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly “highly resistant” to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense) peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A) was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2) and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3) were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis. PMID:26196513

  8. Natural products from cyanobacteria with antimicrobial and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzi, Fabiana Albani; Vaz, Marcelo G M V; Alvarenga, Danillo O; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important source of structurally bioactive metabolites, with cytotoxic, antiviral, anticancer, antimitotic, antimicrobial, specific enzyme inhibition and immunosuppressive activities. This study focused on the antitumor and antimicrobial activities of intra and extracellular cyanobacterial extracts. A total of 411 cyanobacterial strains were screened for antimicrobial activity using a subset of pathogenic bacteria as target. The in vitro antitumor assays were performed with extracts of 24 strains tested against two murine cancer cell lines (colon carcinoma CT-26 and lung cancer 3LL). Intracellular extracts inhibited 49 and 35% of Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacterial growth, respectively. Furthermore, the methanolic intracellular extract of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CYP011K and Nostoc sp. CENA69 showed inhibitory activity against the cancer cell lines. The extracellular extract from Fischerella sp. CENA213 and M. aeruginosa NPJB-1 exhibited inhibitory activity against 3LL lung cancer cells at 0.8 µg ml?¹ and Oxynema sp. CENA135, Cyanobium sp. CENA154, M. aeruginosa NPJB-1 and M. aeruginosa NPLJ-4 presented inhibitory activity against CT26 colon cancer cells at 0.8 µg ml?¹. Other extracts were able to inhibit 3LL cell-growth at higher concentrations (20 µg ml?¹) such as Nostoc sp. CENA67, Cyanobium sp. CENA154 and M. aeruginosa NPLJ-4, while CT26 cells were inhibited at the same concentration by Nostoc sp. CENA67 and Fischerella sp. CENA213. These extracts presented very low inhibitory activity on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The results showed that some cyanobacterial strains are a rich source of natural products with potential for pharmacological and biotechnological applications. PMID:24372264

  9. Antimicrobial activity of Wedelia trilobata crude extracts.

    PubMed

    Taddei, A; Rosas-Romero, A J

    1999-05-01

    A biological screening of activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, and fungi of crude extracts from Wedelia trilobata is reported. The n-hexane extract showed antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Gram-positive bacteria); along with Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella group C, Salmonella paratyphi, and Shigella sonnei (Gram-negative bacteria). The ethyl acetate extract was active only against Salmonella group C; and the aqueous extract was inactive against the tested bacteria. None of the tested extracts showed biological activity against the yeasts (Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Rhodotorula rubra) or the fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Mucor sp., Trichophyton rubrum). PMID:10374253

  10. Antimicrobial effect of alexidine and chlorhexidine against Enterococcus faecalis infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Shik; Woo Chang, Seok; Baek, Seung-Ho; Han, Seung Hyun; Lee, Yoon; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that alexidine has greater affinity for the major virulence factors of bacteria than chlorhexidine. The aim of this study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of 1% alexidine with that of 2% chlorhexidine using Enterococcus faecalis-infected dentin blocks. Sixty bovine dentin blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups of 10 each. E. faecalis was inoculated on 60 dentin blocks using the Luppens apparatus for 24 h and then the dentin blocks were soaked in 2% chlorhexidine or 1% alexidine solutions for 5 and 10 min, respectively. Sterile saline was used as a control. The antimicrobial efficacy was assessed by counting the number of bacteria adhering to the dentin surface and observing the degradation of bacterial shape or membrane rupture under a scanning electron microscope. Significantly fewer bacteria were observed in the 2% chlorhexidine- or 1% alexidine-soaked groups than in the control group (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the number of bacteria adhering to the dentinal surface between the two experimental groups or between the two soaking time groups (P>0.05). Ruptured or antiseptic-attached bacteria were more frequently observed in the 10-min-soaked chlorhexidine and alexidine groups than in the 5-min-soaked chlorhexidine and alexidine groups. In conclusion, 10-min soaking with 1% alexidine or 2% chlorhexidine can be effective against E. faecalis infection. PMID:23492900

  11. Dynamic relationships among type IIa bacteriocins: temperature effects on antimicrobial activity and on structure of the C-terminal amphipathic alpha helix as a receptor-binding region.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kamaljit; Andrew, Lena C; Wishart, David S; Vederas, John C

    2004-07-20

    Dynamic aspects of structural relationships among class IIa bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial peptides from lactic acid bacteria (LAB), have been examined by use of circular dichroism (CD), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and activity testing. Pediocin PA-1 is a potent class IIa bacteriocin, which contains a second C-terminal disulfide bond in addition to the highly conserved N-terminal disulfide bond. A mutant of pediocin PA-1, ped[M31Nle], wherein the replacement of methionine by norleucine (Nle) gives enhanced stability toward aerobic oxidation, was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis to study the activity of the peptide in relation to its structure. The secondary structural analysis from CD spectra of ped[M31Nle], carnobacteriocin B2 (cbn B2), and leucocin A (leuA) at different temperatures suggests that the alpha-helical region of these peptides is important for target recognition and activity. Using molecular modeling and dynamic simulations, complete models of pediocin PA-1, enterocin P, sakacin P, and curvacin A in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) were generated to compare structural relationships among this class of bacteriocins. Their high sequence similarity allows for the use of homology modeling techniques. Starting from homology models based on solution structures of leuA (PDB code 1CW6) and cbnB2 (PDB code 1CW5), results of 2-4 ns MD simulations in TFE and water at 298 and 313 K are reported. The results indicate that these peptides have a common helical C-terminal domain in TFE but a more variable beta sheet or coiled N terminus. At elevated temperatures, pediocin PA-1 maintains its overall structure, whereas peptides without the second C-terminal disulfide bond, such as enterocin P, sakacin P, curvacin A, leuA, and cbnB2 experience partial disruption of the helical section. Pediocin PA-1 and ped[M31Nle] were found to be equally active at different temperatures, whereas the other peptides that lack the second C-terminal disulfide bond are 30-50 times less antimicrobially potent at 310 K (37 degrees C) than at 298 K (25 degrees C). These results indicate that the structural changes in the helical region observed at elevated temperatures account for the loss of activity of these peptides. The presence of C-terminal hydrophobic residues on one side of the amphipathic helix in class IIa bacteriocins is an important feature for receptor recognition and specificity toward particular organisms. This study assists in the understanding of structure-activity relationships in type IIa bacteriocins and demonstrates the importance of the conserved C-terminal amphipathic alpha helix for activity. PMID:15248758

  12. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, Cytotoxic Activities and Phytochemical Screening of Some Algerian Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Souâd Akroum; Dalila Satta; Korrichi Lalaoui

    The current study represents the investigation of 16 Algerian plants usually utilized. The methanolic and ethanolic extracts of these plants were tested for their antimicrobial activity (against three Gram-positive bacteria, three Gram-negative bacteria and three yeasts species), their antioxidant activity and cytotoxic activity. Then, a phytochemical screening was realized for the extracts. Our results showed that the highest antimicrobial activity

  13. Antimicrobial activity and identification of potential antimicrobial compounds from aquatic pteridophyte, Azolla microphylla Kaulf.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G; Yadav, R K; Kaushik, G K

    2015-04-01

    Azolla microphylla Kaulf. is an aquatic nitrogen fixing pteridophyte commonly found in aquatic habitats including paddy fields. Methanolic extract of the fronds of A. microphylla was subjected to partial purification by solvent partitioning with diethyl ether and ethyl acetate followed by hydrolysis, and further partitioning with ethyl acetate. The two fractions, thus obtained were tested for antibacterial activity. It was observed that the ethyl acetate fraction inhibited the growth of the pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae. The GC-MS analysis of the ethyl acetate fraction showed several prominent peaks with retention time ranging from 8.83 to 45.54 min. A comparison of these peaks with the GC-MS libraries revealed that it could be eicosenes and heptadecanes with potential of antimicrobial activity. PMID:26011985

  14. Antimicrobial Activities of Three Medicinal Plants and Investigation of Flavonoids of Tripleurospermum disciforme.

    PubMed

    Tofighi, Zahra; Molazem, Maryam; Doostdar, Behnaz; Taban, Parisa; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Yassa, Narguess

    2015-01-01

    Rosa damascena, Tripleurospermum disciforme and Securigera securidaca were used as disinfectant agents and for treatment of some disease in folk medicine of Iran. The antimicrobial effects of different fractions of seeds extract of S. securidaca, petals extract of R. damascena and aerial parts extract of T. disciforme were examined against some gram positive, gram negative and fungi by cup plate diffusion method. The petroleum ether and chloroform fractions of S. securidaca showed antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while its methanol fraction had no antibacterial effects. R. damascena petals extract demonstrated antibacterial activities against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. T. disciforme aerial parts extract exhibited antimicrobial effects only against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. None of the fractions had any antifungal activities. Therefore, present study confirmed utility of these plants as disinfectant agents. Six flavonoids were isolated from T. disciforme: Luteolin, Quercetin-7-O-glucoside, Kaempferol, Kaempferol-7-O-glucoside, Apigenin and Apigenin-7-O-glucoside. The flavonoids and the antimicrobial activity of T. disciforme are reported for the first time. PMID:25561928

  15. Antimicrobial activity of different solvent extracted samples from the flowers of medicinally important Plumeria obstusa.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nasir; Ahmad, Dawood; Bakht, Jehan

    2015-01-01

    The present research work was carried out to investigate the antimicrobial (eight bacteria and one fungus) activities of different solvent (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and isobutanol) extracted samples from flowers of P. obstusa by disc diffusion method. Analysis of the data revealed that all the five extracts from flowers of P. obstusa showed different ranges of antimicrobial activities. Petroleum ether fractions showed inhibitory activities against all the nine microbial species except Klebsiella pneumonia. Ethyl acetate and isobutanol fractions showed inhibitory effects against all the tested microbial species except Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Chloroform and ethanol extracts had varying levels of inhibitions against all of the tested microorganisms. The most susceptible gram positive bacterium was Bacillus subtilis which was inhibited by all the five extracts while the most resistant gram positive bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus. Erwinia carotovora was the most susceptible gram negative bacterium while Pseudomonas aeruginosa was highly resistant among the gram negative bacteria. PMID:25553696

  16. Antimicrobial activity of polyacetylenes from Bellis perennis and their synthetic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Avato, P; Vitali, C; Mongelli, P; Tava, A

    1997-12-01

    The chemical investigation of the essential oils from the aerial organs of Bellis perennis L., the common daisy, showed that polyacetylenes were one of the dominant class of compounds. The major constituents, methyl deca-4,6-diynoate and deca-4,6-diynoic acid, and their structural analogues, deca-4,6-diyne, dimethyl octa-3,5-diyne-1,8-dioate and deca-4,6-diyne-1,10-dioic acid, were synthesised and their antimicrobial activity evaluated. Only deca-4,6-diynoic acid and deca-4,6-diyne-1,10-dioic acid showed antimicrobial activity, being the two compounds mainly effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Structure-activity relationships of the tested polyacetylenes are discussed. PMID:9434600

  17. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of unripe papaya.

    PubMed

    Osato, J A; Santiago, L A; Remo, G M; Cuadra, M S; Mori, A

    1993-01-01

    The meat, seed and pulp of Carica papaya Linn., a popular traditional medicinal herb grown in the tropics, was shown by the agar-cup method to be bacteriostatic against several enteropathogens such as Bacillus subtilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The same parts of papaya were unequivocably demonstrated by electron spin resonance spectrometry to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (5.8 x 10(14) spins/ml), hydroxyl (5.1 x 10(14) spins/ml) and superoxide (1.2 x 10(14) spins/ml) radicals with the seed giving the highest activity at concentrations (IC50) of 2.1, 10.0 and 8.7 mg/ml, respectively. The superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity in the meat, seed and pulp amounts to about 32, 98 and 33 units/ml; comparable to those of soybean paste miso, rice bran and baker's yeast. Vitamin C, malic acid, citric acid and glucose are some of the possible antioxidative components in papaya. Our study correlates the bacteriostatic activity of papaya with its scavenging action on superoxide and hydroxyl radicals which could be part of the cellular metabolism of such enteropathogens. This is indicative of the pathophysiological role of these reactive oxygen species in gastrointestinal diseases and papaya's ability to counteract the oxidative stress. PMID:8412504

  18. Development of a method to quantify in vitro the synergistic activity of "natural" antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Dufour, M; Simmonds, R S; Bremer, P J

    2003-08-25

    Despite numerous papers being published on the use of hurdle technology to control food-borne pathogens or spoilage organisms, there is no commonly accepted methodology to quantify the level of synergistic activity. This paper describes a method to quantify in vitro the synergistic activity of antibacterial agents against bacteria. Initially, a microtiter plate growth assay was used to determine the inhibitory concentrations of four "natural" antimicrobials (nisin, lauricidin, totarol, and the lactoperoxidase system (LPS)) against a panel of eight bacteria. Using the same microtiter system, the impact of various combinations of antimicrobials was assessed. The degree of synergy was based on the analysis of three criteria: (1) increase in lag phase, (2) reduction in culture density after 24 h, (3) and residual viability at 24 h. Only the lactoperoxidase system was active against all the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested. Nisin, lauricidin, and totarol were only effective against the Gram-positive bacteria. The method successfully identified three combinations (nisin-lauricidin, LPS-nisin, and LPS-lauricidin) previously reported to have synergistic activity and highlighted the synergistic activity of two novel combinations (nisin-totarol and LPS-totarol). The development of a quick and reliable method to identify and quantify synergistic activity is a useful screening tool to establish preservative techniques that could have potential antimicrobial synergy in food-based systems. PMID:12878383

  19. Enhancing antibiofilm efficacy in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: effect of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishen, Anil; George, Saji

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a microbubble containing photosensitizer when activated with light would enable comprehensive disinfection of bacterial biofilms in infected root dentin by antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT). Experiments were conducted in two stages. In the stage-1, microbubble containing photosensitizing formulation was tested for its photochemical properties. In the stage-2, the efficacy of microbubble containing photosensitizing formulation was tested on in vitro infected root canal model, developed with monospecies biofilm models of Enterococcus faecalis on root dentin substrate. The findings from this study showed that the microbubble containing photosensitizing formulation was overall the most effective formulation for photooxidation, generation of singlet oxygen, and in disinfecting the biofilm bacteria in the infected root canal model. This modified photosensitizing formulation will have potential advantages in eliminating bacterial biofilms from infected root dentin.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Acanthus ilicifolius: Skin infection pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Govindasamy, Chinnavenkataraman; Arulpriya, Mani

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antimicrobial activity of Acanthus ilicifolius against the skin infecting bacterial and fungal pathogens. Through the literature survey, the mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius was used in skin infection diseases and have potential anti-inflammatory activity. Methods Antimicrobial activity of the leaf extracts was tested using agar well diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were carried out. Results Among the different extracts, chloroform extract showed maximum activity against the bacterial pathogens methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Trichophyton rubrum. Methanol and acetone extracts showed maximum activity against Staphylococcus epidermis and Lactobacillus plantarum respectively. Chloroform extracts showed the lowest MIC (0.5 mg/mL) and MBC (2 mg/mL) values against the skin pathogens compared with other extracts. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of resins, steroids, tannins, glycosides, sugars, carbohydrates, saponins, sterols, terpenoids, phenol, alkaloids, cardiac glycosides and catechol. Conclusions Further, the separation of potential compounds from the crude extracts will be useful for control the skin infection pathogens.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of seven hypericum entities from central Italy.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Cinzia; Cresci, Alberto; Coman, Maria Magdalena; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro; Lucarini, Domenico; Maggi, Filippo

    2007-06-01

    Methanol-acetone extracts from aerial parts of seven entities of the genus Hypericum [H. perforatum L. subsp. perforatum, H. perforatum L. subsp. veronense (Schrank) Ces., H. montanum L., H. hyssopifolium Chaix, H. hirsutum L., H. hircinum L. subsp. majus (Aiton) N. Robson, H. tetrapterum Fr.] growing in the Appennino Umbro-Marchigiano (central Italy) were tested in vitro for their antimicrobial activity against two Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis), two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and the yeast Candida albicans, by the Kirby-Bauer agar diffusion method. The two H. perforatum subspecies were particularly active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, supporting the use of these plants in the traditional medicine of central Italy to treat wounds, skin and infectious diseases. However significant values of inhibition were given also by H. hirsutum against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, and by H. hyssopifolium, H. hircinum subsp. majus and H. tetrapterum against C. albicans. These results suggest that hypericin and hyperforin are the main components responsible for antimicrobial activity, but not the only ones, as other extracts, showing a low level of these compounds, possess evident activity. Isolation of pure compounds from the most active extracts is in progress. PMID:17516331

  2. Effect of biofilm formation on antimicrobial tolerance of Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Sundell, K; Wiklund, T

    2011-05-01

    Treatment of bacterial fish diseases can be complicated by resistant bacterial biofilms harbouring pathogenic bacteria and causing recurrent exposure of fish to infections. In this study, the effect of biofilm formation on antimicrobial tolerance was examined using three bacterial isolates of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum and two antimicrobial agents, oxytetracycline and flumequine, commonly used in aquaculture. Planktonic and biofilm cells were exposed to a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), to a 3 × MIC concentration and to an environmental concentration level of each antimicrobial in 96-well microtitre plates after which growth on agar plates was measured. The type strain NCIMB1947 of F. psychrophilum was further used to study the development of antimicrobial resistance in biofilm cells. The results suggest that at high bacterial densities (>10(7) CFU mL(-1)), biofilm cells of F. psychrophilum are less susceptible to antimicrobial agents. Furthermore, the results imply that biofilm cells of F. psychrophilum may rapidly develop resistance to both oxytetracycline and flumequine if exposed to subinhibitory concentrations of these antimicrobials. PMID:21488905

  3. Antimicrobial activity of some Salvia species essential oils from Iran.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadi, Morteza; Sonboli, Ali; Karimic, Farah; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Asghari, Behvar; Zeinalia, Amineh

    2007-01-01

    The aerial parts of Salvia multicaulis, S. sclarea and S. verticillata were collected at full flowering stage. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by combination of capillary GC and GC-MS. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the essential oils were studied against eight Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumulis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and three fungi (Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger). The results of antibacterial activity tests of the essential oils according to the disc diffusion method and MIC values indicated that all the samples have moderate to high inhibitory activity against the tested bacteria except for P. aeruginosa which was totally resistant. In contrast to antibacterial activity, the oils exhibited no or slight antifungal property, in which only the oil of S. multicaulis showed weak activity against two tested yeasts, C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. PMID:17913065

  4. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of novel 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamidrazones.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana I; Gabriel, Carla; Cerqueira, Fátima; Maia, Marta; Pinto, Eugénia; Sousa, João Carlos; Medeiros, Rui; Proença, M Fernanda; Dias, Alice M

    2014-10-01

    A mild and simple method was developed to prepare a series of fifteen 5-aminoimidazole 4-carboxamidrazones, starting from the easily accessible 5-amino-4-cyanoformimidoyl imidazoles. The antimicrobial activity of these novel amidrazones was screened against Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria and Candida sp. (Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis). Only a subset of compounds displayed fair-moderate activity against S. aureus and E. coli but all exhibited activity against Candida sp. The three most potent antifungal compounds were further tested against Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus and three dermatophytes (Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum gypseum). These three hit compounds strongly inhibited C. krusei and C. neoformans growth, although their activity on filamentous fungi was very weak when compared to the activity on yeasts. PMID:25193230

  5. Non-anti-infective effects of antimicrobials and their clinical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Sapna P; Estes, Lynn L; Steckelberg, James M

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are undoubtedly one of the key advances in the history of modern medicine and infectious diseases, improving the clinical outcomes of infection owing to their inhibitory effects on microbial growth. However, many antimicrobial agents also have biological activities stemming from their interactions with host receptors and effects on host inflammatory responses and other human or bacterial cellular biological pathways. These result in clinical uses of antimicrobial drugs that are distinct from their direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal properties. We reviewed the published literature regarding non-anti-infective therapeutic properties and proposed clinical applications of selected antimicrobials, specifically, macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and ketoconazole. The clinical applications reviewed were varied, and we focused on uses that were clinically relevant (in terms of importance and burden of disease) and where published evidence exists. Such uses include chronic inflammatory pulmonary and skin disorders, chronic periodontitis, gastrointestinal dysmotility, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Most of these potential therapeutic uses are not Food and Drug Administration approved. Clinicians need to weigh the use of antimicrobial agents for their non-anti-infective benefits, considering potential adverse effects and long-term effect on microbial resistance. PMID:25440726

  6. Evaluation of three medicinal plants for anti-microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Gowd M J S; Manoj, Kumar M G; Sai, Shankar A J; Sujatha, B; Sreedevi, E

    2012-07-01

    Herbal remedies have a long history of use for gum and tooth problems such as dental caries. The present microbiological study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three medicinal plants (Terminalia chebula Retz., Clitoria ternatea Linn., and Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck.) Merr.) on three pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Staphylococcus aureus). Aqueous extract concentrations (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%) were prepared from the fruits of Terminalia chebula, flowers of Clitoria ternatea, and leaves of Wedelia chinensis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extract concentrations of each plant was tested using agar well diffusion method and the size of the inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. The results obtained showed that the diameter of zone of inhibition increased with increase in concentration of extract and the antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extracts of the three plants was observed in the increasing order - Wedelia chinensis < Clitoria ternatea < Terminalia chebula. It can be concluded that the tested extracts of all the three plants were effective against dental caries causing bacteria. PMID:23723653

  7. Evaluation of three medicinal plants for anti-microbial activity

    PubMed Central

    Pratap, Gowd M. J. S; Manoj, Kumar M. G.; Sai, Shankar A. J.; Sujatha, B.; Sreedevi, E.

    2012-01-01

    Herbal remedies have a long history of use for gum and tooth problems such as dental caries. The present microbiological study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three medicinal plants (Terminalia chebula Retz., Clitoria ternatea Linn., and Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck.) Merr.) on three pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Staphylococcus aureus). Aqueous extract concentrations (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%) were prepared from the fruits of Terminalia chebula, flowers of Clitoria ternatea, and leaves of Wedelia chinensis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extract concentrations of each plant was tested using agar well diffusion method and the size of the inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. The results obtained showed that the diameter of zone of inhibition increased with increase in concentration of extract and the antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extracts of the three plants was observed in the increasing order – Wedelia chinensis < Clitoria ternatea < Terminalia chebula. It can be concluded that the tested extracts of all the three plants were effective against dental caries causing bacteria. PMID:23723653

  8. Pharmacological Assessment of the Medicinal Potential of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.: Antimicrobial and Toxicity Activities

    PubMed Central

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O.; Afolayan, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Acacia mearnsii De Wild. (Fabaceae) is a medicinal plant used in the treatment of microbial infections in South Africa without scientific validation of its bioactivity and toxicity. The antimicrobial activity of the crude acetone extract was evaluated by both agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while its cytotoxicity effect was assessed with brine shrimp lethality assay. The study showed that both bacterial and fungal isolates were highly inhibited by the crude extract. The MIC values for the gram-positive bacteria (78.1–312.5) ?g/mL, gram-negative bacteria (39.1–625) ?g/mL and fungal isolates (625–5000) ?g/mL differ significantly. The bacteria were more susceptible than the fungal strains tested. The antibiosis determination showed that the extract was more (75%) bactericidal than bacteriostatic (25%) and more fungicidal (66.67%) than fungistatic (33.33%). The cytotoxic activity of the extract was observed between 31.25 ?g/mL and 500 ?g/mL and the LC50 value (112.36 ?g/mL) indicates that the extract was nontoxic in the brine shrimp lethality assay (LC50 > 100 ?g/mL). These results support the use of A. mearnsii in traditional medicine for treatment of microbial infections. The extract exhibiting significant broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and nontoxic effects has potential to yield active antimicrobial compounds. PMID:22605976

  9. Antimicrobial activity of confertifolin from Polygonum hydropiper.

    PubMed

    Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Indwar, Francis; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2010-02-01

    Confertifolin (6,6,9a-trimethyl-4,5,5a,6,7,8,9,9a-octahydronaphtho[1,2-c] furan-3 (1H)-one) was isolated from the essential oil of Polygonum hydropiper L. (Polygonaceae) leaves using column chromatography. Confertifolin showed activity both in bacteria and fungi. The lowest MIC for bacteria was observed against Enterococcus faecalis (31.25 microg/mL). Significant MIC for fungi was observed against Scopulariopsis sp (7.81 microg/mL), Curvularia lunata (7.81 microg/mL), Epidermophyton floccosum (7.81 microg/mL), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (16.62 microg/mL), Trichophyton rubrum (MTCC 296) (16.62 microg/mL), Aspergillus niger (31.25 microg/mL), Botrytis cinerea (31.25 microg/mL) Magnaporthe grisea (62.5 microg/mL), Trichophyton simii (125 microg/mL) and Trichophyton rubrum (clinical isolate) (125 microg/mL). PMID:20645838

  10. PHMB: an effective antimicrobial in wound bioburden management.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Martyn

    The effective management of bacterial bioburden is an essential element of wound care. Recent years have seen the increased use of topical antimicrobial dressings to control colonisation and infection, yet there is concern that some may inhibit wound healing and may have systemic sequelae (World Union of Wound Healing Societies (WUWHS), 2008). This article focuses on the safety and effectiveness of PHMB, an antimicrobial compound that is relatively underused in the UK, and argues that it is an effective option for the management of bacterial colonisation and infection. PMID:22875372

  11. Evaluation of the Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Münir OKTAY

    2004-01-01

    The present work evaluates the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of clary sage (CS) Salvia sclarea L. Antimicrobial, total antioxidant, DPPH radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging and metal chelating activities, reducing power, and total contents of phenolic compounds of dried herb samples extracted with chloroform and acetone were studied. The chloroform extract had stronger total antioxidant activity

  12. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil and various extracts of Salvia tomentosa Miller (Lamiaceae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bektas Tepe; Dimitra Daferera; Atalay Sokmen; Munevver Sokmen; Moschos Polissiou

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil and various extracts (prepared by using solvents of varying polarity) of Salvia tomentosa (Miller). The essential oil was particularly found to possess strong antimicrobial activity while other non-polar extracts and subfractions showed moderate activities while polar extracts remained almost inactive. GC and GC\\/MS

  13. [The antimicrobial activity of sisomicin against fresh clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, K; Yokota, N; Koguchi, M; Nakane, Y; Fukayama, S; Nishimura, Y; Oda, S; Tanaka, S; Kato, M

    1987-11-01

    Antimicrobial activities of sisomicin (SISO) against clinical isolates obtained in the second half of 1986 were investigated together with other 4 aminoglycosides (AGs) (gentamicin (GM), tobramycin (TOB), dibekacin (DKB), amikacin (AMK] and 2 cephems (cefotiam, cefotaxime), and were compared to the results reported in the period of late 1970's through early 1980's in Japan. 1. The incidence of SISO-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the present study was 18% and is comparable to that of the other studies suggesting that the incidence of SISO resistant strains remains on the stable level. The incidence of SISO-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed the tendency of slight increase. 2. SISO-resistant strains of Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens and Citrobacter freundii did not show increase from the 1970/1980 levels. 3. Isolation rates of SISO-resistant indole(+) Proteus varied depending on strains. Isolation rates of SISO-resistant P. vulgaris and Morganella morganii were both as low as 4%, but that of Providencia rettgeri was as high as 60%. Refering to an American study reporting that the Genus Providencia including P. rettgeri showed high incidence of resistance to SISO as well as to GM or TOB, we pointed out that the antimicrobial activity of AGs against Genus Providencia should be evaluated separately from those of other indole(+) Proteus strains. 4. No SISO-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae or P. mirabilis were found. 5. SISO had good antimicrobial activity against most of the investigated species and SISO may still be regarded as one of the clinically useful AGs. PMID:3327965

  14. Biomaterial modification of urinary catheters with antimicrobials to give long-term broadspectrum antibiofilm activity.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Leanne E; Hook, Andrew L; Ashraf, Waheed; Yousef, Anfal; Barrett, David A; Scurr, David J; Chen, Xinyong; Smith, Emily F; Fay, Michael; Parmenter, Christopher D J; Parkinson, Richard; Bayston, Roger

    2015-03-28

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the commonest hospital-acquired infection, accounting for over 100,000 hospital admissions within the USA annually. Biomaterials and processes intended to reduce the risk of bacterial colonization of the catheters for long-term users have not been successful, mainly because of the need for long duration of activity in flow conditions. Here we report the results of impregnation of urinary catheters with a combination of rifampicin, sparfloxacin and triclosan. In flow experiments, the antimicrobial catheters were able to prevent colonization by common uropathogens Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli for 7 to 12weeks in vitro compared with 1-3days for other, commercially available antimicrobial catheters currently used clinically. Resistance development was minimized by careful choice of antimicrobial combinations. Drug release profiles and distribution in the polymer, and surface analysis were also carried out and the process had no deleterious effect on the mechanical performance of the catheter or its balloon. The antimicrobial catheter therefore offers for the first time a means of reducing infection and its complications in long-term urinary catheter users. PMID:25639970

  15. Anthelmintic and antimicrobial activity of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Euphorbia helioscopia L.

    PubMed

    Lone, Bashir A; Bandh, Suhaib A; Chishti, Mohammad Zahoor; Bhat, Fayaz Ahmad; Tak, Hidayatullah; Nisa, Humeera

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anthelmintic and antimicrobial efficacy of Euphorbia helioscopia crude extracts. A worm motility inhibition assay and egg hatch assay were used for in vitro study, and a faecal egg count reduction assay was used for in vivo study. The in vitro study revealed anthelmintic effects of crude methanolic extracts of E. helioscopia on live Haemonchus contortus worms as evident from their paralysis and/or death at 8 h after exposure. Different concentrations (12.5 mg?ml(-1), 25 mg?ml(-1) and 50 mg?ml(-1)) of aqueous and methanolic extracts were used against H. contortus which exhibited dose-dependent anthelmintic effects on H. contortus. Different extracts of E. helioscopia on percent inhibitory egg hatching was very low as compared to levamisole. The antimicrobial activity of extracts ranging from 100 to 500 mg?ml(-1) screened by disc diffusion method against four selected bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas multocida and Escherichia coli) and two fungal strains (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans) was also dose dependent with the extract showing more inhibitory effects against S. aureus and E. coli and a minimum inhibitory effect against A. flavus. It is concluded that the entire plant of E. helioscopia possesses significant anthelmintic and antimicrobial activity and could be a potential alternative for treating cases of helminth infections in ruminants. PMID:23065392

  16. Genetics of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Harbottle, H; Thakur, S; Zhao, S; White, D G

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant strains of bacteria are an increasing threat to animal and human health. Resistance mechanisms to circumvent the toxic action of antimicrobials have been identified and described for all known antimicrobials currently available for clinical use in human and veterinary medicine. Acquired bacterial antibiotic resistance can result from the mutation of normal cellular genes, the acquisition of foreign resistance genes, or a combination of these two mechanisms. The most common resistance mechanisms employed by bacteria include enzymatic degradation or alteration of the antimicrobial, mutation in the antimicrobial target site, decreased cell wall permeability to antimicrobials, and active efflux of the antimicrobial across the cell membrane. The spread of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons has greatly contributed to the rapid dissemination of antimicrobial resistance among several bacterial genera of human and veterinary importance. Antimicrobial resistance genes have been shown to accumulate on mobile elements, leading to a situation where multidrug resistance phenotypes can be transferred to a susceptible recipient via a single genetic event. The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacterial pathogens has severe implications for the future treatment and prevention of infectious diseases in both animals and humans. The versatility with which bacteria adapt to their environment and exchange DNA between different genera highlights the need to implement effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection control programs in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:17127523

  17. Antimicrobial effects of Thai medicinal plants against acne-inducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej; Surassmo, Suvimol; Nukoolkarn, Veena S; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2005-10-01

    Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis have been recognized as pus-forming bacteria triggering an inflammation in acne. The present study was conducted to evaluate antimicrobial activities of Thai medicinal plants against these etiologic agents of acne vulgaris. Crude extracts were tested for antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. The results from the disc diffusion method showed that 13 medicinal plants could inhibit the growth of Propionibacterium acnes. Among those, Senna alata, Eupatorium odoratum, Garcinia mangostana, and Barleria lupulina had strong inhibitory effects. Based on a broth dilution method, the Garcinia mangostana extract had the greatest antimicrobial effect. The MIC values were the same (0.039 mg/ml) for both bacterial species and the MBC values were 0.039 and 0.156 mg/ml against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, respectively. In bioautography assay, the Garcinia mangostana extract produced strong inhibition zones against Propionibacterium acnes. Antimicrobial activity from fractions of column chromatography revealed one of the active compounds in Garcinia mangostana could be mangostin, a xanthone derivative. Taken together, our data indicated that Garcinia mangostana had a strong inhibitory effect on Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Therefore, this plant would be an interesting topic for further study and possibly for an alternative treatment for acne. PMID:16009519

  18. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Persian shallot (Allium hirtifolium).

    PubMed

    Soroush, Setareh; Taherikalani, Morovat; Asadollahi, Parisa; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Taran, Mojtaba; Emaneini, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Sajjad

    2012-01-01

    Allium hirtifolium is a Persian native plant grown in cool mountain slopes of Iran. It has been used as a spice in Iran for many years. According to the literature review, there are no considerable reports on the antimicrobial properties of this plant. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of Persian shallot hydroalcoholic extract and F1 fraction of the plant (containing amino acid derivatives and/or other cationic compounds) was investigated on some Gram positive cocci and bacilli, Gram negative bacilli, two protozoa, a yeast and a fungus. Excellent activity against Candida albicans (MIC = 64 microg/ml, MBC = 128 microg/ml), Leishmania infantum (MIC = 0.2 mg/ml on the first day of study) and Trichomonas vaginalis (MIC = 5 microg/ml in PSDE form) and a moderate activity against Bacillus spp and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (MIC = 128 microg/ml) was observed. The results showed that this plant contains some anti-trichomonas and anti-leishmania components. PMID:23210319

  19. Antimicrobial activity of selected South African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nearly 3,000 plant species are used as medicines in South Africa, with approximately 350 species forming the most commonly traded and used medicinal plants. In the present study, twelve South African medicinal plants were selected and tested for their antimicrobial activities against eight microbial species belonging to fungi, Mycobacteria, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods The radiometric respiratory technique using the BACTEC 460 system was used for susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for other antimicrobial assays. Results The results of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations indicated that the methanol extracts from Acacia karoo, Erythrophleum lasianthum and Salvia africana were able to prevent the growth of all the tested microorganisms. All other samples showed selective activities. MIC values below 100??g/ml were recorded with A. karoo, C. dentate, E. lasianthum, P. obligun and S. africana on at least one of the nine tested microorganisms. The best activity (MIC value of 39.06??g/ml) was noted with S. africana against E. coli, S. aureus and M. audouinii, and Knowltonia vesitoria against M. tuberculosis. Conclusion The overall results of the present work provide baseline information for the possible use of the studied South African plant extracts in the treatment of microbial infections. PMID:22704594

  20. Anti-microbial activities of aerosolized transition metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhipeng; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Wu, Bing; Horst, Angela; Kang, Yisheng; Tang, Yinjie J; Chen, Da-Ren

    2010-07-01

    This study used the electrospray method to create airborne droplets of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and examined their anti-microbial activities, employing Escherichia coli as a model microbial species. We tested the anti-microbial activities of six metal oxide NPs (NiO, ZnO, Fe(2)O(3), Co(3)O(4), CuO, and TiO(2)) in both an aqueous culture medium and an aerosol exposure mode (spraying the particles directly onto the cell surface). In the aqueous medium, the both NPs and stressed E. coli cells severely aggregated. Only NiO NPs (>20 mgL(-1)) showed significant growth inhibition of E. coli ( approximately 30%). In contrast to aqueous exposure, where the direct interactions between NPs and bacteria were limited, aerosol exposure of three metal oxide NPs to E. coli enhanced NP toxicity to cells and dramatically reduced cellular viability. Electrospraying NiO, CuO, or ZnO NPs (20 nm, 20 microg, in 10 min) reduced the total number of living E. coli by more than 88%, 77% and 71%, respectively (compared to the control experiments). However, TiO(2), Co(3)O(4), and Fe(2)O(3) NPs showed no significant antibacterial activities in either the aqueous exposure mode or the aerosol exposure mode. The above observations suggest the potential application of electrosprayed metal oxide NPs to disinfect airborne pathogens. PMID:20478610

  1. Alternative Hand Contamination Technique To Compare the Activities of Antimicrobial and Nonantimicrobial Soaps under Different Test Conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Fuls, Janice L.; Rodgers, Nancy D.; Fischler, George E.; Howard, Jeanne M.; Patel, Monica; Weidner, Patrick L.; Duran, Melani H.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial hand soaps provide a greater bacterial reduction than nonantimicrobial soaps. However, the link between greater bacterial reduction and a reduction of disease has not been definitively demonstrated. Confounding factors, such as compliance, soap volume, and wash time, may all influence the outcomes of studies. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of wash time and soap volume on the relative activities and the subsequent transfer of bacteria to inanimate objects for antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial soaps. Increasing the wash time from 15 to 30 seconds increased reduction of Shigella flexneri from 2.90 to 3.33 log10 counts (P = 0.086) for the antimicrobial soap, while nonantimicrobial soap achieved reductions of 1.72 and 1.67 log10 counts (P > 0.6). Increasing soap volume increased bacterial reductions for both the antimicrobial and the nonantimicrobial soaps. When the soap volume was normalized based on weight (?3 g), nonantimicrobial soap reduced Serratia marcescens by 1.08 log10 counts, compared to the 3.83-log10 reduction caused by the antimicrobial soap (P < 0.001). The transfer of Escherichia coli to plastic balls following a 15-second hand wash with antimicrobial soap resulted in a bacterial recovery of 2.49 log10 counts, compared to the 4.22-log10 (P < 0.001) bacterial recovery on balls handled by hands washed with nonantimicrobial soap. This indicates that nonantimicrobial soap was less active and that the effectiveness of antimicrobial soaps can be improved with longer wash time and greater soap volume. The transfer of bacteria to objects was significantly reduced due to greater reduction in bacteria following the use of antimicrobial soap. PMID:18441107

  2. Alternative hand contamination technique to compare the activities of antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial soaps under different test conditions.

    PubMed

    Fuls, Janice L; Rodgers, Nancy D; Fischler, George E; Howard, Jeanne M; Patel, Monica; Weidner, Patrick L; Duran, Melani H

    2008-06-01

    Antimicrobial hand soaps provide a greater bacterial reduction than nonantimicrobial soaps. However, the link between greater bacterial reduction and a reduction of disease has not been definitively demonstrated. Confounding factors, such as compliance, soap volume, and wash time, may all influence the outcomes of studies. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of wash time and soap volume on the relative activities and the subsequent transfer of bacteria to inanimate objects for antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial soaps. Increasing the wash time from 15 to 30 seconds increased reduction of Shigella flexneri from 2.90 to 3.33 log(10) counts (P = 0.086) for the antimicrobial soap, while nonantimicrobial soap achieved reductions of 1.72 and 1.67 log(10) counts (P > 0.6). Increasing soap volume increased bacterial reductions for both the antimicrobial and the nonantimicrobial soaps. When the soap volume was normalized based on weight (approximately 3 g), nonantimicrobial soap reduced Serratia marcescens by 1.08 log(10) counts, compared to the 3.83-log(10) reduction caused by the antimicrobial soap (P < 0.001). The transfer of Escherichia coli to plastic balls following a 15-second hand wash with antimicrobial soap resulted in a bacterial recovery of 2.49 log(10) counts, compared to the 4.22-log(10) (P < 0.001) bacterial recovery on balls handled by hands washed with nonantimicrobial soap. This indicates that nonantimicrobial soap was less active and that the effectiveness of antimicrobial soaps can be improved with longer wash time and greater soap volume. The transfer of bacteria to objects was significantly reduced due to greater reduction in bacteria following the use of antimicrobial soap. PMID:18441107

  3. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of the essential oils of some Lamiaceae species from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Nurdan; Ugur, Aysel

    2009-08-01

    In this study, antimicrobial activities of the essential oils obtained by using the hydrodistillation method from some lamiaceous plants--Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson ssp. longifolia, M. longifolia (L.) Hudson ssp. typhoides (Briq.) Harley var. typhoides, Mentha pulegium L., Salvia fruticosa Miller, Salvia tomentosa Miller, Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi ssp. glandulosa (Req.) P.W. Ball, Nepeta cadmea Boiss., Lavandula stoechas L. ssp. stoechas, and Ziziphora tenuior L.--were determined by using the disc diffusion method. The plants used in this study were collected from different localities of Mu?la Province, Turkey. All the essential oils isolated from the plants were very effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which included multiple-antibiotic resistant strains, except Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Pseudomonas fluorescens MU 87. The essential oils of the plant species, except S. tomentosa and S. fruticosa, were very effective against Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activities varied depending on the species, subspecies, or variety. In fact, essential oils of some plants belonging to the same taxa but collected from different localities showed different levels of antimicrobial activities. PMID:19735193

  4. Antimicrobial activity, phenolic profile and role in the inflammation of propolis.

    PubMed

    Silva, João Carlos; Rodrigues, Sandra; Feás, Xesús; Estevinho, Leticia M

    2012-05-01

    Nowadays a great amount of information regarding chemical and biological aspects of bee products is available in the literature, but few data on its therapeutic uses are found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phenolic profile, the in vitro antimicrobial activity and effect in the hyaluronidase enzyme (widely related with the inflammation process) of propolis harvested in Portugal. The efficacy of three extracts (hydro-alcoholic, methanolic and aqueous) was also compared. It was chosen the hydro-alcoholic extract, because this was the most effective for extracting phenolic compounds. The antimicrobial activity was accessed in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts, isolated from different biological fluids and the results were then compared with the obtained for reference microorganisms. The propolis from Bragança was the one that possessed the highest polyphenols' content. The sample from Beja showed the less significant inhibition of the hyaluronidase enzyme. Concerning the antimicrobial activity, Candida albicans was the most resistant and Staphylococcus aureus the most sensitive. The reference microorganisms were more sensitive than the ones isolated from biological fluids. PMID:22425940

  5. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis and some other medicinal plants commonly used in South-East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai Wah; Cheah, Emily LC; Saw, Constance LL; Weng, Wanyu; Heng, Paul WS

    2008-01-01

    Background Eight medicinal plants were tested for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different extraction methods were also tested for their effects on the bioactivities of the medicinal plants. Methods Eight plants, namely Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis (Laliaocao), Folium Murraya Koenigii (Jialiye), Rhizoma Arachis Hypogea (Huashenggen), Herba Houttuyniae (Yuxingcao), Epipremnum pinnatum (Pashulong), Rhizoma Typhonium Flagelliforme (Laoshuyu), Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis (Houpo) and Rhizoma Imperatae (Baimaogen) were investigated for their potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Results Extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis had the strongest activities against M. Smegmatis, C. albicans, B. subtilis and S. aureus. Boiled extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis, Folium Murraya Koenigii, Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis and Herba Houttuyniae demonstrated greater antioxidant activities than other tested medicinal plants. Conclusion Among the eight tested medicinal plants, Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis showed the highest antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different methods of extraction yield different spectra of bioactivities. PMID:19038060

  6. Comparison of antibacterial effects between antimicrobial peptide and bacteriocins isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum on three common pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Liu; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Le; Huang, Jian-An

    2015-01-01

    New strategies for the prevention or treatment of infections are required. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriocins isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum on growth and biofilm formation of three common pathogenic microbes. The antibacterial properties of the antimicrobial peptide Tet213 and bacteriocins were tested by the disc diffusion method. Tet213 and bacteriocins showed inhibitory effects on biofilm formation for the three organisms, as observed by fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, Tet213 and the bacteriocins all showed antimicrobial activity against the three bacterial species, with Tet213 having a greater inhibitory effect on S. aureus than the bacteriocins (P < 0.05), while the bacteriocins showed stronger antimicrobial activity against S. sanguis (P < 0.05).

  7. Effect of ozone on oral cells compared with established antimicrobials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karin C. Huth; Franz M. Jakob; Bernd Saugel; Christian Cappello; Ekaterini Paschos; Regina Hollweck; Reinhard Hickel; Korbinian Brand

    2006-01-01

    Ozone has been proposed as an alternative antiseptic agent in dentistry based on reports of its antimicrobial effects in both gaseous and aqueous forms. This study investigated whether gaseous ozone (4 · 106 l gm )3) and aqueous ozone (1.25- 20 l gm l )1) exert any cytotoxic effects on human oral epithelial (BHY) cells and gingival fibroblast (HGF-1) cells

  8. Essential oils and isolated compounds from Lippia alba leaves and flowers: antimicrobial activity and osteoclast apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Juiz, Paulo José Lima; Lucchese, Angelica Maria; Gambari, Roberto; Piva, Roberta; Penolazzi, Letizia; Di Ciano, Martina; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Silva, Franceli; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, essential oils extracted from the leaves and flowers of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E.Br. (L. alba) were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity and their effects on osteoclasts. The periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans; ATCC 43717), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum; ATCC 25586) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis); ATCC 33277) were used in antimicrobial activity assays for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), whereas Bacteroides fragilis (B. fragilis; ATCC 25285) was used as the control microorganism. Osteoclast (OC) apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL assay and Fas receptor expression was detected by immunocytochemistry. The analysis of antimicrobial activity revealed that P. gingivalis had the lowest MIC values, whereas A. actinomycetemcomitans had the highest. L. alba essential oils were found to be toxic to human cells, although the compounds, carvone, limonene and citral, were non-toxic and induced apoptosis in the OCs. This study demonstrates that L. alba has potential biotechnological application in dentistry. In fact periodontal disease has a multifactorial etiology, and the immune response to microbial challenge leads to osteoclast activation and the resorption of the alveolar bone, resulting in tooth loss. PMID:25384405

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Nanoparticle Calcium Hydroxide against Enterococcus Faecalis: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Saedi, Sara; Kazem, Majid; Alam, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) has the ability to invade the dentinal tubules and resist high pH levels. As a result, calcium hydroxide (CH) is not much effective on this bacterium. In theory, nanoparticle calcium hydroxide (NCH) has smaller size and high surface area that enables it to penetrate into the deeper layers of dentin and be more effective on E. faecalis. This in vitro study was designed to compare the antimicrobial activity of NCH and CH against E. faecalis. Methods and Materials: The antimicrobial activity of NCH against E. faecalis was evaluated by two independent tests: the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of intracanal medicament and agar diffusion test (ADT). The efficiency of the medicament in dentinal tubules was evaluated on 23 human tooth blocks that were inoculated with E. faecalis. The tooth blocks were assigned to one control group (saline irrigation) and two experimental groups receiving CH and NCH as intracanal medication. The optical density in each group was assessed with spectrophotometer after collecting samples from dentin depths of 0, 200 and 400 µm. Data were analyzed by SPSS software ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Dunnett’s test. Results: The MIC for NCH was 1/4 of the MIC for CH. NCH with distilled water (DW) produced the greatest inhibition zone in agar diffusion test. NCH had greater antimicrobial activity in dentin samples from depths of 200 and 400 µm compared to CH. Conclusion: The antimicrobial activity of NCH was superior to CH in culture medium. In dentinal tubules the efficacy of NCH was again better than CH on the 200- and 400-µm samples. PMID:25598808

  10. Antimicrobial activity of cobalt imidazolate metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Sonia; Quirós, Jennifer; Canivet, Jerome; Farrusseng, David; Boltes, Karina; Rosal, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    Two cobalt imidazolate metal-organic frameworks were evaluated as a bactericidal material against the growth of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli. Under the most unfavourable conditions, within the exponential growth phase and in the culture media for both microorganisms, the growth inhibition reached over 50% for concentrations of biocidal material in the 5-10mgL(-1) range. The release of metal gives excellent durability with the antibacterial effect persisting after 3months. Both cobalt-based materials can be prepared with simple, cheap and easily accessible commercial ligands, leading to a more affordable possible future application as antimicrobial materials. PMID:25065809

  11. Bioprotective properties of Dragon's blood resin: In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Food preservation is basically done to preserve the natural characteristics and appearance of the food and to increase the shelf life of food. Food preservatives in use are natural, chemical and artificial. Keeping in mind the adverse effects of synthetic food preservatives, there is a need to identify natural food preservatives. The aims of this study were to evaluate in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Dragon's blood resin obtained from Dracaena cinnabari Balf f., with a view to develop safer food preservatives. Methods In this study, three solvents of varying polarity were used to extract and separate the medium and high polarity compounds from the non-polar compounds of the Dragon's blood resin. The extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against the food borne pathogens. The antioxidant activities of the extracts were assessed using DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging, FRAP, metal chelating and reducing power assays. Total phenolics, flavonoids and flavonols of extracts were also estimated using the standard methods. Results Phytochemical analysis of extracts revealed high phenolic content in CH2Cl2 extract of resin. Free radical scavenging of CH2Cl2 extract was found to be highest which is in good correlation with its total phenolic content. All test microorganisms were also inhibited by CH2Cl2 extract. Conclusions Our result provide evidence that CH2Cl2 extract is a potential source of natural antioxidant compounds and exhibited good inhibitory activity against various food borne pathogens. Thus, CH2Cl2 extract of Dragon's blood resin could be considered as possible source of food preservative. PMID:21329518

  12. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki, A. Chinnammal; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity.

  13. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Janaki, A Chinnammal; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity. PMID:25748589

  14. Curvularia Haloperoxidase: Antimicrobial Activity and Potential Application as a Surface Disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Eva H.; Albertsen, Line; Schäfer, Thomas; Johansen, Charlotte; Frisvad, Jens C.; Molin, Søren; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    A presumed antimicrobial enzyme system, the Curvularia haloperoxidase system, was examined with the aim of evaluating its potential as a sanitizing agent. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, Curvularia haloperoxidase facilitates the oxidation of halides, such as chloride, bromide, and iodide, to antimicrobial compounds. The Curvularia haloperoxidase system caused several-log-unit reductions in counts of bacteria (Pseudomonas spp., Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Aeromonas salmonicida, Shewanella putrefaciens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Listeria monocytogenes), yeasts (Candida sp. and Rhodotorula sp.), and filamentous fungi (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubigensis, Aspergillus versicolor, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium paxilli) cultured in suspension. Also, bacteria adhering to the surfaces of contact lenses were killed. The numbers of S. marcescens and S. epidermidis cells adhering to contact lenses were reduced from 4.0 and 4.9 log CFU to 1.2 and 2.7 log CFU, respectively, after treatment with the Curvularia haloperoxidase system. The killing effect of the Curvularia haloperoxidase system was rapid, and 106 CFU of E. coli cells/ml were eliminated within 10 min of treatment. Furthermore, the antimicrobial effect was short lived, causing no antibacterial effect against E. coli 10 min after the system was mixed. Bovine serum albumin (1%) and alginate (1%) inhibited the antimicrobial activity of the Curvularia haloperoxidase system, whereas glucose and Tween 20 did not affect its activity. In conclusion, the Curvularia haloperoxidase system is an effective sanitizing system and has the potential for a vast range of applications, for instance, for disinfection of contact lenses or medical devices. PMID:12902249

  15. Exploring of Antimicrobial Activity of Triphala Mashi—An Ayurvedic Formulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yogesh S. Biradar; Sheetal Jagatap; K. R. Khandelwal; Smita S. Singhania

    2008-01-01

    Triphala Mashi is an ayurvedic formulation that was prepared in our lab. Aqueous and alcoholic extracts of both Triphala and Triphala Mashi were used, to evaluate antimicrobial activity. Comparative phytochemical profile of Triphala and Triphala Mashi was done by preliminary phytochemical screening, total phenolic content and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Antimicrobial activity includes isolation of pathogens from clinical samples, its

  16. Polarity Based Solvents Extraction of Opuntia Dillenii and Zingiber Officinale for In-vitro Antimicrobial Activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muhammad Ihtisham Umar; Aqeel Javeed; Muhammad Ashraf; Amjad Riaz; Muhammad Mahmood Mukhtar; Sheryar Afzal; Rabia Altaf

    2011-01-01

    Extracts from dried stem of Opuntia dillenii and rhizome of Zingiber officinale were evaluated for antimicrobial activities by extraction in non-polar (petroleum ether and chloroform) and polar solvents (methanol and water). Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus showed considerable susceptibility to all extracts of Opuntia dillenii and Zingiber officinale. Ether and chloroform extracts of Opuntia dillenii showed improved antimicrobial activity against

  17. The antimicrobial effects of propolis collected in different regions in the Basque Country (Northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Bonvehí, Josep Serra; Gutiérrez, Arrate Lacalle

    2012-04-01

    The antimicrobial activity of 19 propolis extracts prepared in different solvents (ethanol and propylene glycol) (EEP/PEP), was evaluated against some bacterial and fungal isolates using the agar-well diffusion method. It was verified that all the samples tested showed antimicrobial activity, although results varied considerably between samples. Results revealed that both types of propolis extracts showed highly sensitive antimicrobial action against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi at a concentration of 20% (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisae) with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/ml, with a moderate effect against Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC from 17 to 26 mg/ml). To our knowledge, this is the first study showing elevated antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria [Salmonella enterica (MIC from 0.6 to 1.4 mg/ml)] and lesser activity against Helicobacter pylori (MIC from 6 to 14 mg/ml), while Escherichia coli was resistant. This concluded that the Basque propolis had a strong and dose-dependent activity against most of the microbial strains tested, while database comparison revealed that phenolic substances were responsible for this inhibition, regardless of their geographical origin and the solvent employed for extraction. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences (P ? 0.05) between EEP and PEP extracts. PMID:22805915

  18. Zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase-like activity and in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Iinuma, Katsuhiro; Tsuboi, Isami

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disease, and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. Objective: We examined whether the ascorbic acid derivative zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity. SOD is an enzyme that controls reactive oxygen species production. In addition, the in vitro antimicrobial activity of zinc ascorbate against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli was tested either alone or in combination with a variety of antimicrobial agents; their fractional inhibitory concentration index was determined using checkerboard tests. Methods: The SOD-like activity was measured in comparison with other ascorbic acid derivatives (ascorbic acid, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, and sodium ascorbyl phosphate) and zinc. The antimicrobial susceptibility of twelve strains each of S. aureus and E. coli isolated from patients with dermatological infections was tested, in comparison to a type strain of S. aureus and E. coli. Results: Zinc ascorbate had significant (P < 0.001) SOD-like activity compared with other ascorbic acid derivatives and zinc. Moreover, it showed antimicrobial activity against a type strain of S. aureus and E. coli, and its concentration (0.064% and 0.128% for S. aureus and E. coli, respectively) was sufficiently lower than the normal dose (5%) of other ascorbic acid derivatives. Furthermore, combinations of zinc ascorbate with clindamycin, erythromycin, and imipenem against S. aureus (average fractional inhibitory concentration, 0.59–0.90), and with imipenem against E. coli (average fractional inhibitory concentration, 0.64) isolated from patients with dermatological infections showed an additive effect. Conclusions: Our results provide novel evidence that zinc ascorbate may be effective for acne treatment. PMID:23055762

  19. Selection of enhanced antimicrobial activity posing lactic acid bacteria characterised by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Šalomskien?, Joana; Abraitien?, Asta; Jonkuvien?, Dovil?; Ma?ionien?, Irena; Repe?kien?, J?rat?

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was a detail evaluation of genetic diversity among the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains having an advantage of a starter culture in order to select genotypically diverse strains with enhanced antimicrobial effect on some harmfull and pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial activity of LAB was performed by the agar well diffusion method and was examined against the reference strains and foodborne isolates of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium. Antifungal activity was tested against the foodborne isolates of Candida parapsilosis, Debaromyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia guilliermondii, Yarowia lipolytica, Aspergillus brasiliensis, Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium herbarum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. A total 40 LAB strains representing Lactobacillus (23 strains), Lactococcus (13 strains) and Streptococcus spp. (4 strains) were characterised by repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting which generated highly discriminatory profiles, confirmed the identity and revealed high genotypic heterogeneity among the strains. Many of tested LAB demonstrated strong antimicrobial activity specialised against one or few indicator strains. Twelve LAB strains were superior in suppressing growth of the whole complex of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. These results demonstrated that separate taxonomic units offered different possibilities of selection for novel LAB strains could be used as starter cultures enhancing food preservation. PMID:26139877

  20. Composition, antimicrobial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity of essential oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Unlu, Mehmet; Ergene, Emel; Unlu, Gulhan Vardar; Zeytinoglu, Hulya Sivas; Vural, Nilufer

    2010-11-01

    The essential oil from the bark of Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume was analyzed by GC-MS and bioassays were carried out. Nine constituents representing 99.24% of the oil were identified by GC-MS. The major compounds in the oil were (E)-cinnamaldehyde (68.95%), benzaldehyde (9.94%) and (E)-cinnamyl acetate (7.44%). The antimicrobial activity of the oil was investigated in order to evaluate its efficacy against 21 bacteria and 4 Candida species, using disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods. The essential oil showed strong antimicrobial activity against all microorganisms tested. The cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the essential oil on ras active (5RP7) and normal (F2408) fibroblasts were examined by MTT assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, respectively. The cytotoxicity of the oil was quite strong with IC(50) values less than 20 ?g/mL for both cell lines. 5RP7 cells were affected stronger than normal cells. Morphological observation of apoptotic cells indicated the induction of apoptosis at the high level of the oil, especially in 5RP7 cells. The present study showed the potential antimicrobial and anticarcinogenic properties of the essential oil of cinnamon bark, indicating the possibilities of its potential use in the formula of natural remedies for the topical treatment of infections and neoplasms. PMID:20828600

  1. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants are susceptible to light activated antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic therapy can select for small colony variants of Staphylococcus aureus that are more resistant to antibiotics and can result in persistent infections, necessitating the development of more effective antimicrobial strategies to combat small colony variant infections. Photodynamic therapy is an alternative treatment approach which utilises light in combination with a light-activated antimicrobial agent to kill bacteria via a non-specific mechanism of action. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of 665 nm laser light and the light-activated antimicrobial agent methylene blue was able to successfully kill S. aureus small colony variants. S. aureus and isogenic stable small colony variant were exposed to varying doses (1.93 to 9.65 J/cm2) of 665 nm laser light in the presence of varying concentrations (1 to 20 ?M) of methylene blue. Results The combination of 665 nm laser light and methylene blue was found to be an effective strategy for the killing of small colony variants. At the highest light dose (9.65 J/cm2) and methylene blue concentration (20 ?M) tested, the number of viable bacteria decreased by approximately 6.9 log10 for the wild type and approximately 5 log10 for the small colony variant. Conclusions These results suggest that photodynamic therapy has potential for use in the treatment of superficial infections caused by small colony variants of S. aureus and supports further research in this field. PMID:24010944

  2. Antimicrobial activity of biodegradable polysaccharide and protein-based films containing active agents.

    PubMed

    Kuorwel, Kuorwel K; Cran, Marlene J; Sonneveld, Kees; Miltz, Joseph; Bigger, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Significant interest has emerged in the introduction of food packaging materials manufactured from biodegradable polymers that have the potential to reduce the environmental impacts associated with conventional packaging materials. Current technologies in active packaging enable effective antimicrobial (AM) packaging films to be prepared from biodegradable materials that have been modified and/or blended with different compatible materials and/or plasticisers. A wide range of AM films prepared from modified biodegradable materials have the potential to be used for packaging of various food products. This review examines biodegradable polymers derived from polysaccharides and protein-based materials for their potential use in packaging systems designed for the protection of food products from microbial contamination. A comprehensive table that systematically analyses and categorizes much of the current literature in this area is included in the review. PMID:21535854

  3. Antimicrobial and inhibitory enzyme activity of N-(benzyl) and quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives on plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rabea, Entsar I; Taktak, Nehad E M

    2014-10-13

    Chemical modification of a biopolymer chitosan by introducing quaternary ammonium moieties into the polymer backbone enhances its antimicrobial activity. In the present study, a series of quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives were synthesized and characterized by (1)H-NMR, FT-IR and UV spectroscopic techniques. The antimicrobial activity against crop-threatening bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Erwinia carotovora and fungi Botrytis cinerea, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora infestans were evaluated. The results proved that the grafting of benzyl moiety or quaternization of the derivatives onto chitosan molecule was successful in inhibiting the microbial growth. Moreover, increase water-solubility of the compounds by quaternization significantly increased the activity against bacteria and fungi. Exocellular enzymes including polygalacturonase (PGase), pectin-lyase (PLase), polyphenol oxidase (PPOase) and cellulase were also affected at 1000 mg/L. These compounds especially quaternary-based chitosan derivatives that have good inhibitory effect should be potentially used as antimicrobial agents in crop protection. PMID:25037402

  4. Antimicrobial activity of whey protein based edible films incorporated with oregano, rosemary and garlic essential oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Seydim; G. Sarikus

    2006-01-01

    The use of edible films to release antimicrobial constituents in food packaging is a form of active packaging. Antimicrobial properties of spice extracts are well known, however their application to edible films is limited. In this study, antimicrobial properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) films containing 1.0–4.0% (wt\\/vol) ratios of oregano, rosemary and garlic essential oils were tested against Escherichia

  5. Antimicrobial activity of different filling pastes for deciduous tooth treatment.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, Bruna Feltrin; Pires, Carine Weber; Bresolin, Carmela Rampazzo; Weiss, Rita Niederauer; Praetzel, Juliana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Guedes-Pinto paste is the filling material most employed in Brazil for endodontic treatment of deciduous teeth; however, the Rifocort® ointment has been removed. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of filling pastes, by proposing three new pharmacological associations to replace Rifocort® ointment with drugs of already established antimicrobial power: Nebacetin® ointment, 2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate gel, and Maxitrol® ointment. A paste composed of Iodoform, Rifocort® ointment and Camphorated Paramonochlorophenol (CPC) was employed as the gold standard (G1). The other associations were: Iodoform, Nebacetin® ointment and CPC (G2); Iodoform, 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate gel and CPC (G3); Iodoform, Maxitrol® ointment and CPC (G4). The associations were tested for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), using the methods of dilution on solid medium - orifice agar - and broth dilution. The results were tested using statistical analysis ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis. They showed that all the pastes had a bacteriostatic effect on all the microorganisms, without any statistically significant difference, compared with G1. S. aureus was statistically significant (multiple comparison test of Tukey), insofar as G2 and G3 presented the worst and the best performance, respectively. All associations were bactericidal for E. coli, S. aureus, S. mutans and S. oralis. Only G3 and G4 were bactericidal for E. faecalis, whereas no product was bactericidal for B. subtilis. Thus, the tested pastes have antimicrobial potential and have proved acceptable for endodontic treatment of primary teeth. PMID:25466327

  6. Characterization of antimicrobial peptide activity by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, William K.; Wimley, William C.; Searson, Peter C.; Hristova, Kalina; Merzlyakov, Mikhail

    2008-01-01

    Summary Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy performed on surface-supported bilayer membranes allows for the monitoring of changes in membrane properties, such as thickness, ion permeability, and homogeneity, after exposure to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We show that two model cationic peptides, very similar in sequence but different in activity, induce dramatically different changes in membrane properties as probed by impedance spectroscopy. Moreover, the impedance results excluded the “barrel-stave” and the “toroidal pore” models of AMP mode of action, and are more consistent with the “carpet” and the “detergent” models. The impedance data provide important new insights about the kinetics and the scale of the peptide action which currently are not addressed by the “carpet” and the “detergent” models. The method presented not only provides additional information about the mode of action of a particular AMP, but offers a means of characterizing AMP activity in reproducible, well-defined quantitative terms. PMID:18657512

  7. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of phosphoric acid solution compared to other root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; da SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto; FERRAZ, Caio Cezar Randi; de ALMEIDA, José Flávio Affonso; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid has been suggested as an irrigant due to its effectiveness in removing the smear layer. Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of a 37% phosphoric acid solution to other irrigants commonly used in endodontics. Material and Methods : The substances 37% phosphoric acid, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid, 2% chlorhexidine (solution and gel), and 5.25% NaOCl were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was tested against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces meyeri, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella nigrescens according to the agar diffusion method. The cytotoxicity of the irrigants was determined by using the MTT assay. Results : Phosphoric acid presented higher antimicrobial activity compared to the other tested irrigants. With regard to the cell viability, this solution showed results similar to those with 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution), whereas 17% EDTA and 10% citric acid showed higher cell viability compared to other irrigants. Conclusion : Phosphoric acid demonstrated higher antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution). PMID:26018307

  8. In vitro antimicrobial effects of commercially available mouth-wetting agents.

    PubMed

    Güneri, Pelin; Alpöz, Esin; Epstein, Joel B; Çankaya, Hülya; Ate?, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Products have been developed to provide palliation for persons with dry mouth. In addition to mouth-wetting agents, some products incorporate antimicrobial constituents with the goal of improving oral microbial defenses. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the potential antimicrobial and antifungal effects of two commercially available saliva substitutes on Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans by using the agar-well diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity as measured by the size of the inhibition zone growth for S. mutans and L. acidophilus was observed only with Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse® and BioXtra® gel. The zone of inhibition of Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse was larger than that of BioXtra gel (p= 0.00, p < 0.01). No anticandidal effect was seen with any of the test products. The pH of the preparations, the variations between the amount of active ingredients within the products, and the potential antimicrobial effects of inactive ingredients should be investigated to determine the factors that impacted microbial inhibition. PMID:21729120

  9. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of antimicrobial fatty acids and derivatives against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Peng, Li-juan; Dong, Xiao-wu; Wu, Di; Wu, Vivian Chi-Hua; Feng, Feng-Qin

    2012-02-01

    Fatty acids and derivatives (FADs) are resources for natural antimicrobials. In order to screen for additional potent antimicrobial agents, the antimicrobial activities of FADs against Staphylococcus aureus were examined using a microplate assay. Monoglycerides of fatty acids were the most potent class of fatty acids, among which monotridecanoin possessed the most potent antimicrobial activity. The conventional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were performed to establish two statistically reliable models (conventional QSAR: R(2)=0.942, Q(2)(LOO)=0.910; CoMFA: R(2)=0.979, Q(2)=0.588, respectively). Improved forecasting can be achieved by the combination of these two models that provide a good insight into the structure-activity relationships of the FADs and that may be useful to design new FADs as antimicrobial agents. PMID:22302421

  10. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of calcium hydroxide points.

    PubMed

    Al-Nazhan, Saad

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the antibacterial effect of calcium hydroxide points by using a broth dilution test. Extracts of calcium hydroxide points and a calcium hydroxide paste (Calasept) were tested by using 2 facultative anaerobic bacteria, Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 27352) and Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212). Saline solution was used as a control. Each tested agent was kept in contact with the bacterial species used for the experiment for 5 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, 2 days, and 5 days. Results showed that Calasept paste was effective in killing the tested bacteria, whereas calcium hydroxide points and saline showed bacterial survival in all experimental periods. It was concluded that calcium hydroxide points extract is not an effective antimicrobial agent against the tested bacteria. PMID:12075210

  11. Hydroxy-tryptophan containing derivatives of tritrpticin: modification of antimicrobial activity and membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Jensen, Katharine V; Nguyen, Leonard T; Storey, Douglas G; Vogel, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Tritrpticin is an antimicrobial peptide with a strong microbicidal activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi. The 13-residue peptide is essentially symmetrical and possesses a unique cluster of three Trp residues near the center of its amino acid sequence. The mechanism of action of tritrpticin is believed to involve permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane of susceptible bacteria. However it has been suggested that intracellular targets may also play a role in its antimicrobial activity. In this work the mechanism of action of several tritrpticin derivatives was studied through substitution of the three Trp residues with 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5OHW), a naturally occurring non-ribosomal amino acid. Although it is more polar, 5OHW preserves many of the biophysical and biochemical properties of Trp, allowing the use of fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR techniques to study the interaction of the modified peptides with membrane mimetics. Single or triple 5OHW substitution did not have a large effect on the MIC of the parent peptide against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. However, the mechanism of action was altered by simultaneously replacing all three Trp with 5OHW. Our results suggest that the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria did not constitute the main target of this particular tritrpticin derivative. Since the addition of a hydroxyl group to the indole motif of the Trp residue was able to modify the mechanism of action of the peptides, our data confirm the importance of the Trp cluster in tritrpticin. This work also shows that 5OHW constitutes a new probe to modulate the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action of other Trp-rich antimicrobial peptides. PMID:25178967

  12. Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Huppmann, T., E-mail: teresa.huppmann@tum.de; Leonhardt, S., E-mail: stefan.leonhardt@mytum.de, E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Krampe, E., E-mail: stefan.leonhardt@mytum.de, E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Wintermantel, E., E-mail: wintermantel@tum.de [Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Technische Universität München (Germany); Yatsenko, S., E-mail: s.yatsenko@skz.de; Radovanovic, I., E-mail: i.radovanovic@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de; Bastian, M., E-mail: i.radovanovic@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de [SKZ- German Plastics Center, Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO{sub 2} for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO{sub 2} coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO{sub 2} particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO{sub 2} P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO{sub 2}-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

  13. [Antimicrobial activities of gentamicin against fresh clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, K; Yokota, N; Koguchi, M; Nakane, Y; Fukayama, S; Ishihara, R; Oda, S; Tanaka, S; Sato, K; Fukumoto, T

    1990-10-01

    Antimicrobial activities of gentamicin (GM), compared with activities of other aminoglycosides (AGs) and beta-lactam antibiotics, were studied against clinical isolates obtained during a period of July-December 1989. 1. GM-resistant strains were noted in 24% of Staphylococcus aureus, 12% of Enterobacter spp., 24% of Serratia marcescens, 7% of Morganella morganii and 26% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but no GM-resistant strains were observed among isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris. 2. A majority of GM-resistant strains of S. aureus were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and a large number of GM-resistant strains of Enterobacter spp. was also resistant to new quinolones. GM showed, however, strong antimicrobial activities against new quinolones-resistant strains of S. marcescens, M. morganii and P. aeruginosa. 3. Among all the isolates tested of S. marcescens, 24% were GM-resistant, 72% were tobramycin (TOB)-resistant, 86% were dibekacin (DKB)-resistant and 64% were amikacin (AMK)-resistant, hence the incidence of GM-resistant strains was the lowest. This tendency was also observed with P. vulgaris. However, among P. aeruginosa, 26% were GM-resistant, 14% TOB-resistant, 18% DKB-resistant and 22% AMK-resistant, thus the incidence rate for GM-resistance was somewhat higher. These results suggest that different AGs-modification enzymes were produced by various clinical isolates under the present condition. 4. Comparing the ratio of GM-resistant strains in the present study with those in 1980 and 1983, the ratio increased among S. aureus, while decreases were observed among Enterobacter spp., S. marcescens, P. vulgaris and P. aeruginosa, indicating that a unilateral tendency of increases in GM-resistant strains did not exist among clinical isolates over the years. PMID:2128340

  14. Antimicrobial activity of allyl isothiocyanate used to coat biodegradable composite films as affected by storage and handling conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Weili; Liu, Linshu; Jin, Tony Z

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of storage and handling conditions on the antimicrobial activity of biodegradable composite films (polylactic acid and sugar beet pulp) coated with allyl isothiocyanate (AIT). Polylactic acid and chitosan were incorporated with AIT and used to coat one side of the film. The films were subjected to different storage conditions (storage time, storage temperature, and packed or unpacked) and handling conditions (washing, abrasion, and air blowing), and the antimicrobial activity of the films against Salmonella Stanley in tryptic soy broth was determined. The films (8.16 ?l of AIT per cm(2) of surface area) significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the growth of Salmonella during 24 h of incubation at 22°C, while the populations of Salmonella in controls increased from ca. 4 to over 8 log CFU/ml, indicating a minimum inactivation of 4 log CFU/ml on films in comparison to the growth on controls. Statistical analyses indicated that storage time, storage temperature, and surface abrasion affected the antimicrobial activity of the films significantly (P < 0.05). However, the differences in microbial reduction between those conditions were less than 0.5 log cycle. The results suggest that the films' antimicrobial properties are stable under practical storage and handling conditions and that these antimicrobial films have potential applications in food packaging. PMID:23212023

  15. Antimicrobial activity of allyl isothiocyanate used to coat biodegradable composite films as affected by storage and handling conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the effects of storage and handling conditions on the antimicrobial activity of biodegradable composite films (polylactic acid and sugar beet pulp) coated with allyl isothiocyanate (AIT). Polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan were incorporated with AIT and coated on one side of the film. T...

  16. Antimicrobial activity of chicken and turkey heterophil peptides CHP1, CHP2, THP1, and THP3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen W. Evans; F. Gwen Beach; Kristi M. Moore; Mark W. Jackwood; John R. Glisson; Barry G. Harmon

    1995-01-01

    Four avian heterophil antimicrobial cationic peptides (Chicken Heterophil Peptides 1 and 2, and Turkey Heterophil Peptides 1 and 3) were evaluated for in vitro microbicidal activity against selected avian pathogens and human pathogens which are harbored by birds. At concentrations of 16-2 ?g\\/ml, all four avian peptides effected a greater than 90% reduction in the survival of Candida albicans, Salmonella

  17. Curcumin reduces the antimicrobial activity of ciprofloxacin against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhi

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, N.

    Curcumin reduces the antimicrobial activity of ciprofloxacin against Salmonella Typhimurium fragmentation, SOS response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the bacterial cell. Curcumin, an active research aimed at investigating whether curcumin modulates the action of ciprofloxacin. Method: We

  18. Antimicrobial activity of lemongrass oil against Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to discover new and natural antimicrobial treatments against Salmonella Newport on organic produce, we evaluated the antimicrobial effect of lemongrass essential oil on four different types of organic leafy greens inoculated with S. Newport. The effects of lemongrass treatment exposure...

  19. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents, alone and in combinations, against Burkholderia cepacia isolated from blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, D C; Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1997-08-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a widespread, environmental gram-negative bacillus that is associated with nosocomial infections. This bacterium is considered to be an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients and is inherently resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. To compare the activity of different antimicrobial agents and the potential of combinations against invasive strains of B. cepacia, we collected 36 isolates of B. cepacia from blood cultures and checked their susceptibilities to 13 antimicrobials by broth microdilution method. Most strains tested were susceptible to minocycline (94.4%), ceftazidime (86.1%), ciprofloxacin (83.3%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (83.3%). All strains were resistant to aminoglycosides, and only some strains were susceptible to imipenem (16.7%), aztreonam (19.4%), moxalactam (25.0%), piperacillin (25.0%), and carbenicillin (47.2%). The effects of combinations of ceftazidime with amikacin, ceftazidime with ciprofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin with amikacin were assayed by checkerboard titration method. Synergistic effect was found in 28 out of 36 tested strains (77.8%), when ceftazidime was combined with amikacin, in 25 out of 36 strains (69.4%) when ceftazidime was combined with ciprofloxacin, and in only 8 out of 36 strains (22.2%) when ciprofloxacin was combined with amikacin. PMID:9327247

  20. Scolopendin 2, a cationic antimicrobial peptide from centipede, and its membrane-active mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-02-01

    Scolopendin 2 is a 16-mer peptide (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. We observed that this peptide exhibited antimicrobial activity in a salt-dependent manner against various fungal and bacterial pathogens and showed no hemolytic effect in the range of 1.6?M to 100?M. Circular dichroism analysis showed that the peptide has an ?-helical properties. Furthermore, we determined the mechanism(s) of action using flow cytometry and by investigating the release of intracellular potassium. The results showed that the peptide permeabilized the membranes of Escherichia coli O157 and Candida albicans, resulting in loss of intracellular potassium ions. Additionally, bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol and 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide assays showed that the peptide caused membrane depolarization. Using giant unilamellar vesicles encapsulating calcein and large unilamellar vesicles containing fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, which were similar in composition to typical E. coli O157 and C. albicans membranes, we demonstrated that scolopendin 2 disrupts membranes, resulting in a pore size between 4.8nm and 5.0nm. Thus, we have demonstrated that a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendin 2, exerts its broad-spectrum antimicrobial effects by forming pores in the cell membrane. PMID:25462167

  1. Evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and phenolic profile for Hyssopus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum and Teucrium chamaedrys.

    PubMed

    Vlase, Laurian; Benedec, Daniela; Hanganu, Daniela; Damian, Grigore; Csillag, Ioan; Sevastre, Bogdan; Mot, Augustin C; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Tilea, Ioan

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and to characterize the polyphenolic composition of the ethanolic extracts of Hyssopus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum and Teucrium chamaedrys. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the major phenolic compounds were conducted using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The total polyphenols, caffeic acid derivatives and flavonoids content was spectrophotometrically determined. The phenolic profile showed the presence of phenolic acid derivatives (caftaric, gentisic, caffeic, p-coumaric, chlorogenic and ferulic acids), flavonoid glycosides (rutin, isoquercitrin and quercitrin) and free flavonoid aglycons (luteolin, quercetin), in different concentrations. DPPH radical scavenging assay, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) method, hemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase activity inhibition (HAPX) assay, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) radicals detection were employed, revealing several aspects of the antioxidant activities of these species. The antimicrobial tests were performed using the disk diffusion assay. These extracts contained a large amount of the polyphenolic compounds (77.72, 175.57, and 243.65 mg/g, respectively), and they showed a good antioxidant activity, as witnessed by a number of methods. T. chamaedrys had a high antimicrobial activity. Besides their antioxidant activity, the antimicrobial effect of these extracts confirms the biological activities of these herbal medicinal products. PMID:24786688

  2. Antimicrobial activity of aqueous and methanol extracts of Juniperus oxycedrus L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ? Karaman; F ?ahin; M Güllüce; H Ö?ütçü; M ?engül; A Ad?güzel

    2003-01-01

    Aqueous and methanol extracts of the leaves of Juniperus oxycedrus were investigated for their in vitro antimicrobial properties. The plant was collected from Pelitli Village of Gebze, Kocaeli, in the Marmara region of Turkey. Juniperus oxycedrus is widely used as traditional folk medicine in Turkey for treatment of different infectious diseases. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts against 143 laboratory

  3. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents, alone and in combinations, against Burkholderia cepacia isolated from blood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel C.-T. Lu; Shan-Chwen Chang; Yee-Chun Chen; Kwen-Tay Luh; Wei-Chuan Hsieh

    1997-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a widespread, environmental gram-negative bacillus that is associated with nosocomial infections. This bacterium is considered to be an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients and is inherently resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. To compare the activity of different antimicrobial agents and the potential of combinations against invasive strains of B. cepacia, we collected 36 isolates of B. cepacia

  4. Antimicrobial activity of a new vaginal contraceptive NIM76 from neem oil (Azadirachta indica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M SaiRam; G Ilavazhagan; S. K Sharma; S. A Dhanraj; B Suresh; M. M Parida; A. M Jana; Kumar Devendra; W Selvamurthy

    2000-01-01

    Efficacy of NIM-76, a spermicidal fraction from neem oil, was investigated for its antimicrobial action against certain bacteria, fungi and Polio virus as compared to whole neem oil. The NIM-76 preparation showed stronger anti-microbial activity than the whole neem oil. It inhibited growth of various pathogens tested including Escherichia coli and Kleibsiella pneumoniae which were not affected by the whole

  5. Antimicrobial activity of the extract of stem bark of diplotropis ferruginea benth.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Gs; Rocha, Nfm; Almeida, Jrgs; de Freitas, Apf; Lima, Eo; Filho, Jmb; de Freitas, Rm; Diniz, Melo Mff

    2011-10-01

    This is the first report about the antibacterial activity of Diplotropis ferruginea Benth. In this study, the ethanol extract of D. ferruginea was tested for its antimicrobial activity against strains gram-positive and gram-negative. In order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration, assays were carried out by micro dilution method. The extract was screened for antimicrobial activity, and it showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22224034

  6. Examination of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2004-12-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterize the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs, selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed in the National Institute of Public Health in Poland. Over 180 of pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. A surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains: Actonel 5 mg tabl. (risedronate), Aldan 10 mg tabl. (amlodipine), Aleras 10 mg tabl. (cetirisine), Aspicam 15 mg tabl. (meloxicam), Baikadent 6 mg/g gel (flavons of Scutellariae), Debretin 100 mg tabl. (trimebutine), Ferro-Duo 100 mg tabl. (ferrum), Gastrovent 145 mg caps. (bismuth citrate), Ibum 200 mg caps., Upfen 200 mg tabl. (ibuprofen), Lastet 100 mg caps. (etoposide), Legalon 70 mg tabl. (sylimarin), Madopar 125 tabl. (benserazide, levodopa), Moxenil 100 mg tabl. (nimesulide), Neurotin 800 mg tabl. (gabapentin), Propranolol 40 mg tabl. (propranolol), Rexetin 20 mg tabl. (paroxetine), Salipax 20 mg caps. (fluoxetine), Selofen 10 mg caps. (zaleplon) Stenorol 0.6% powder (halofuginone), Stimuloton 50 mg tabl. (sertraline), Superoptim 0.3 mg tabl. (hipericine), Uversan 50 mg tabl. (arbutine from Arctostaphylos uva ursi). S. aureus strain was susceptible to the most of the drugs listed above. The lowest inhibitory concentration was found for sertraline and hipericine (0.16 and 0.075 mg/mL, respectively). PMID:15909927

  7. Antimicrobial activity of Nerolidol and its derivatives against airborne microbes and further biological activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nerolidol and its derivatives, namely cis-nerolidol, O-methyl-nerolidol, O-ethyl-nerolidol, (-)-alpha-bisabolol, trans,trans-farnesol and its main natural source Cabreuva essential oil, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against airborne microbes and antifungal properties against plant pat...

  8. Design, synthesis and antimicrobial activity of novel benzothiazole analogs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manavendra K; Tilak, Ragini; Nath, Gopal; Awasthi, Satish K; Agarwal, Alka

    2013-05-01

    In an attempt to design and synthesize a new class of antimicrobials, dialkyne substituted 2-aminobenzothiazole was reacted with various substituted aryl azides to generate a small library of 20 compounds (3a-t) by click chemistry. Structures of the newly synthesized compounds were established on the basis of spectral data. These compounds were screened for their antibacterial activity against Gram+ bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis), Gram- bacteria (Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella boydii) and antifungal activity against Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans) as well as molds (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus). The compound 3e showed maximum potency against all Gram+/gram- bacterial strains with MIC value 3.12 ?g/ml, which is two fold more active as compared to standard drug ciprofloxacin (MIC 6.25 ?g/ml). However, all compounds were found ineffective against S. boydii (clinical isolate). Further, only one compound 3n was found to be the most active against all fungal strains with MIC value in the range of 1.56 ?g/ml-12.5 ?g/ml while the remaining compounds showed moderate to weak antifungal activity. PMID:23567952

  9. Antimicrobial activity of an endophytic Xylaria sp.YX-28 and identification of its antimicrobial compound 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoli Liu; Mingsheng Dong; Xiaohong Chen; Mei Jiang; Xin Lv; Jianzhong Zhou

    2008-01-01

    An endophytic Xylaria sp., having broad antimicrobial activity, was isolated and characterized from Ginkgo biloba L. From the culture extracts of this fungus, a bioactive compound P3 was isolated by bioactivity-guided fractionation and\\u000a identified as 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin by nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and mass spectrometry spectral data. The compound\\u000a showed strong antibacterial and antifungal activities in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus [minimal

  10. Antimicrobial activity of extractable conifer heartwood compounds toward Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kelsey, Rick G; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts from heartwood of seven western conifer trees and individual volatile compounds in the extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora ramorum. Extracts from incense and western redcedar exhibited the strongest activity, followed by yellow-cedar, western juniper, and Port-Orford-cedar with moderate activity, and no activity for Douglas-fir and redwood extracts. Chemical composition of the extracts varied both qualitatively and quantitatively among the species with a total of 37 compounds identified by mass spectrometry. Of the 13 individual heartwood compounds bioassayed, three showed strong activity with a Log(10) EC(50) less than or equal to 1.0 ppm (hinokitiol, thymoquinone, and nootkatin), three expressed moderate activity ranging from 1.0-2.0 ppm (nootkatol, carvacrol, and valencene-11,12-diol), four compounds had weak activity at 2.0-3.0 ppm [alpha-terpineol, valencene-13-ol, (+)-beta-cedrene, (-)-thujopsene], and three had no activity [(+)-cedrol, delta-cadinene, and methyl carvacrol]. All of the most active compounds contained a free hydroxyl group, except thymoquinone. The importance of a free hydroxyl was demonstrated by the tremendous difference in activity between carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) 1.81 +/- 0.08 ppm) and methyl carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) >3.0 ppm). A field trial in California, showed that heartwood chips from redcedar placed on the forest floor for 4 months under Umbellularia californica (California bay laurel) with symptoms of P. ramorum leaf blight significantly limited the accumulation of P. ramorum DNA in the litter layer, compared with heartwood chips from redwood. PMID:17929093

  11. Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants from India.

    PubMed

    Samy, R Perumal

    2005-12-01

    The results of a preliminary antimicrobial screening of the methanol extracts of Zingiber officinale, Asteracantha longifolia, Citrus acida, Salacia microsperma and Tinospora cordifolia are reported. PMID:16229969

  12. Antimicrobial activity of a food-grade fully dilutable microemulsion against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Shen, Yan; Weng, Peifang; Zhao, Guoqun; Feng, Fengqin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2009-11-15

    Microemulsions are colloidal nanodispersions of oil and water stabilized by an interfacial film of surfactant molecules, typically in conjunction with a cosurfactant. There is a limited number of reports in the literature on microemulsion use for antimicrobial purposes. The physicochemical characterization of a food-grade fully dilutable microemulsion system with glycerol monolaurate (GML) as oil, organic acids as cosurfactant, Tween 80 as surfactant, and the antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus have been studied in this paper. The influence of organic acids on oil solubilization was clearly reflected in the phase behavior of these systems. Propionic acid demonstrated the greatest capability to improve the oil solubilization among the tested linear and nonlinear chain organic acids and contributed to the formation of U-type microemulsion systems. One microemulsion formulation with an average particle size of 8nm was selected, the composition is GML/propionic acid/Tween 80/water=3:9:8:12. The kinetics of killing experiments demonstrated that the undiluted microemulsion caused a complete loss of viability of E. coli or S. aureus cells in 1min and still had effective bactericidal effects even when diluted, more than 99% viable E. coli cells were killed within 15min and a complete loss of viability was achieved at 45min while more than 99% viable S. aureus cells were killed within 30min and a complete loss of viability was achieved at 60min in the presence of the 10-fold diluted microemulsion. The fast killing kinetics of the ten-fold serial dilutions of microemulsions were in good agreement with the mode of action studies, indicating that the interaction between the antimicrobial microemulsions and bacterial membranes significantly decreased the bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity and induced the quick release of 260nm absorbing materials. This work suggests the potential use of food-grade fully dilutable microemulsions for antimicrobial purposes in beverages or seafood products. PMID:19717202

  13. Antiviral and antimicrobial activities of three sesquiterpene lactones from Centaurea solstitialis L. ssp. solstitialis.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, Berrin; Gürbüz, Ilhan; Karaoglu, Taner; Ye?ilada, Erdem

    2009-01-01

    Three sesquiterpene lactones (centaurepensin = chlorohyssopifolin A, chlorojanerin and 13-acetyl solstitialin A) isolated from the aerial parts of Centaurea solstitialis L. ssp. solstitialis (Asteraceae) were investigated for antimicrobial and antiviral activities. For the antimicrobial activity assessment, both standard and isolated strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis were employed by the microdilution method. Herpes simplex type-1, a DNA virus, and Parainfluenza, an RNA virus, were employed for the determination of the antiviral activity of these three sesquiterpene lactones using Vero cell lines. Ampicilline, ofloxocine, ketoconazole, fluconazole, acyclovir and oseltamivir were used as the reference drugs. 13-Acetyl solstitialin A displayed remarkable antibacterial activity against isolated strains of E. faecalis at 1 microg/ml concentration, which was close to the effective concentrations of ampicillin. The same compound also showed significant activity against the DNA virus, being as potent as the reference compound acyclovir at maximum and minimum concentrations of 16-<0.00006 microg/ml. This is the first report showing that 13-acetyl solstitialin A possesses significant antiviral activity. PMID:17614269

  14. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    1999-06-01

    The antimicrobial activity of plant oils and extracts has been recognized for many years. However, few investigations have compared large numbers of oils and extracts using methods that are directly comparable. In the present study, 52 plant oils and extracts were investigated for activity against Acinetobacter baumanii, Aeromonas veronii biogroup sobria, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia col, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium, Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus aureus, using an agar dilution method. Lemongrass, oregano and bay inhibited all organisms at concentrations of < or = 2.0% (v/v). Six oils did not inhibit any organisms at the highest concentration, which was 2.0% (v/v) oil for apricot kernel, evening primrose, macadamia, pumpkin, sage and sweet almond. Variable activity was recorded for the remaining oils. Twenty of the plant oils and extracts were investigated, using a broth microdilution method, for activity against C. albicans, Staph. aureus and E. coli. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations were 0.03% (v/v) thyme oil against C. albicans and E. coli and 0.008% (v/v) vetiver oil against Staph. aureus. These results support the notion that plant essential oils and extracts may have a role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. PMID:10438227

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of High-Mobility-Group Box 2: a New Function to a Well-Known Protein

    PubMed Central

    Küchler, Robert; Schroeder, Bjoern O.; Jaeger, Simon U.; Stange, Eduard F.

    2013-01-01

    The human intestinal tract is highly colonized by a vast number of microorganisms. Despite this permanent challenge, infections remain rare, due to a very effective barrier defense system. Essential effectors of this system are antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs), which are secreted by intestinal epithelial and lymphoid cells, balance the gut microbial community, and prevent the translocation of microorganisms. Several antimicrobial proteins have already been identified in the gut. Nonetheless, we hypothesized that additional AMPs are yet to be discovered in this setting. Using biological screening based on antimicrobial function, here we identified competent antibacterial activity of high-mobility-group box 2 (HMGB2) against Escherichia coli. By recombinant expression, we confirmed this biologically new antimicrobial activity against different commensal and pathogenic bacteria. In addition, we demonstrated that the two DNA-binding domains (HMG boxes A and B) are crucial for the antibiotic function. We detected HMGB2 in several gastrointestinal tissues by mRNA analysis and immunohistochemical staining. In addition to the nuclei, we also observed HMGB2 in the cytoplasm of intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, HMGB2 was detectable in vitro in the supernatants of two different cell types, supporting an extracellular function. HMGB2 expression was not changed in inflammatory bowel disease but was detected in certain stool samples of patients, whereas it was absent from control individuals. Taken together, we characterized HMGB2 as an antimicrobial protein in intestinal tissue, complementing the diverse repertoire of gut mucosal defense molecules. PMID:23877675

  16. Expression, purification and antimicrobial activity of puroindoline A protein and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yingjie; Chen, Ling; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yajuan; Zheng, Qian; Gao, Chunbao; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2012-10-01

    Wheat puroindoline proteins, PINA and PINB, play key roles in determining wheat grain hardness as well as in defending the plant against pathogens. PINA has much greater membrane-binding property and antimicrobial activity because it contains more tryptophan residues in the unique tryptophan-rich domain (TRD). In order to obtain proteins with higher antimicrobial activity, mutants of PINA containing two or three copies of TRD, designated ABBC and ABBBC, respectively, were constructed and expressed in E. coli Rosetta-gami (DE3). Metal affinity chromatography was used to purify the soluble affinity-tagged recombinant proteins. The secondary structures of the recombinant proteins were predicted by the online program Protein Homology/analog Y Recognition Engine v2.0 and experimentally assessed using circular dichroism. Minimum inhibition concentration tests and fluorescence microscope analyses were employed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of the mutants. The results showed that the purified recombinant ABBC was correctly folded and presented significantly higher antimicrobial activities against E. coli and S. aureus than wild-type PINA, suggesting its potential use as an antimicrobial agent. The results also confirmed that TRD is a determinant of the antimicrobial activity of PINA and demonstrated that it is feasible to enhance the antimicrobial activity of PINA by adding one copy of TRD. PMID:22402594

  17. Surface-engineered core-shell nano-size ferrites and their antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraliya, Jagdish D.; Joshi, Hiren H.

    2014-04-01

    We report the results of biological study on core-shell structured MFe2O4 (where M = Co, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles and influence of silica- DEG dual coating on their antimicrobial activity. Spherical MFe2O4 nanoparticles were prepared via a Co-precipitation method. The microstructures and morphologies of these nanoparticles were studied by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The antimicrobial activity study carried out in nutrient agar medium with addition of antimicrobial synthesis compound which is tested for its activity against different types of bacteria.

  18. Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Novel Peptoids That Mimic the Structure of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Zuckermann, Ronald N; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-07-01

    The constant emergence of new bacterial strains that resist the effectiveness of marketed antimicrobials has led to an urgent demand for and intensive research on new classes of compounds to combat bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptoids comprise one group of potential candidates for antimicrobial drug development. The present study highlights a library of 22 cationic amphipathic peptoids designed to target bacteria. All the peptoids share an overall net charge of +4 and are 8 to 9 residues long; however, the hydrophobicity and charge distribution along the abiotic backbone varied, thus allowing an examination of the structure-activity relationship within the library. In addition, the toxicity profiles of all peptoids were assessed in human red blood cells (hRBCs) and HeLa cells, revealing the low toxicity exerted by the majority of the peptoids. The structural optimization also identified two peptoid candidates, 3 and 4, with high selectivity ratios of 4 to 32 and 8 to 64, respectively, and a concentration-dependent bactericidal mode of action against Gram-negative Escherichia coli. PMID:25941221

  19. Silver Oxynitrate, an Unexplored Silver Compound with Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Activity.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Joe A; Kalan, Lindsay; Bradu, Alexandru; Turner, Raymond J

    2015-07-01

    Historically it has been accepted, and recent research has established, that silver (Ag) is an efficacious antimicrobial agent. A dwindling pipeline of new antibiotics, combined with an increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant infections, is bringing Ag to the fore as a therapeutic compound to treat infectious diseases. Currently, many formulations of Ag are being deployed for commercial and medical purposes, with various degrees of effectiveness at killing microbial cells. Here, we evaluated the antimicrobial and antibiofilm capacity of our lead compound, silver oxynitrate [Ag(Ag3O4)2NO3 or Ag7NO11], against other metal compounds with documented antimicrobial activity, including Ag2SO4, AgNO3, silver sulfadiazine (AgSD), AgO, Ag2O, and CuSO4. Our findings reveal that Ag7NO11 eradicates biofilm and planktonic populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), fluoroquinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (FQRP), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at lower concentrations than those of the other tested metal salts. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Ag7NO11 has an enhanced efficacy for the treatment of biofilm-forming pathogens. PMID:25918137

  20. Evaluating the Antimicrobial Activity of Methonolic Extract of Rhus Succedanea Leaf Gall

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Savitri; Subaramaihha, Sundara Rajan; Subbaiah, Sujan Ganapathy Pasura; Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Lakkappa, Dhananjaya Bhadrapura

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The worldwide increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the undesirable side effects associated with constant use of synthetic drugs has prompted the search for novel antimicrobial agents, particularly those manufactured from plants. This study is designed to ascertain the antibacterial potential of Rhus succedanea leaf gall extracts on the growth of gram-positive and gram–negative bacteria. Methods: The methanolic and hexane extract of different concentrations (100, 250, and 500 ?g/ml) were prepared and their antibacterial efficacy was tested against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Micrococcus luteus, and Staphylococcus aureus using agar well diffusion method and the size of inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. Results: The methanol and hexane extracts differed significantly in their antimicrobial activity with methanol extract showing a potent inhibitory activity in the range of 16±2 to 23±1, which was almost equal to the values of ciprofloxacin (25±3), used as a standard. Further, the methanol extract was mostly potent and effective in inhibiting the growth of gram-negative bacteria, namely, E. coli, when compared to gram –positive bacteria stains, which are responsible for antimicrobial activities. The phytochemical screening showed positive results for the presence of steroids, triterpenes, alkaloids, and carbohydrates. Conclusion: The potent antibacterial activity of Rhus succedanea leaf gall extracts indicates its useful therapeutic application against bacterial infection. Furthermore, this study indicates that the extract might be exploited as natural drug for the treatment of infectious diseases and could be useful in understanding the relations between traditional cures and current medications. PMID:24455483

  1. Determination and Characterization of the Antimicrobial Activity of the Fermented Tea Kombucha

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J Greenwalt; R. A Ledford; KH Steinkraus

    1998-01-01

    Early reports onKombucha, a traditional fermented tea beverage, suggested that it has antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of organisms, and that concentrates of unfermented tea components also have anti microbial properties. Therefore, the focus of this study was to determine and characterizeKombucha'santimicrobial activity using an absorbent disc method. Antimicrobial activity was observed in the fermented samples containing 33 g\\/L total

  2. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of propolis from Melipona orbignyi (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Campos, Jaqueline Ferreira; dos Santos, Uilson Pereira; Macorini, Luis Fernando Benitez; de Melo, Adriana Mary Mestriner Felipe; Balestieri, José Benedito Perrella; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; de Picoli Souza, Kely; dos Santos, Edson Lucas

    2014-03-01

    Propolis from stingless bees is well known for its biologic properties; however, few studies have demonstrated these effects. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of propolis from the stingless bee Melipona orbignyi, found in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The chemical composition of the ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) indicated the presence of aromatic acids, phenolic compounds, alcohols, terpenes and sugars. The EEP was active against the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and the fungus Candida albicans. The EEP showed antioxidant activity by scavenging free radicals and inhibiting hemolysis and lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes incubated with an oxidizing agent. Additionally, EEP promoted cytotoxic activity and primarily necrotic death in K562 erythroleukemia cells. Taken together, these results indicate that propolis from M. orbignyi has therapeutic potential for the treatment and/or prevention of diseases related to microorganism activity, oxidative stress and tumor cell proliferation. PMID:24412556

  3. Copper complexes with bioactive ligands Part I--Antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Dudová, B; Hudecová, D; Pokorný, R; Mikulásová, M; Palicová, M; Segl'a, P; Melník, M

    2001-01-01

    Biological properties of new copper(II) complexes of 2-methylthionicotinate (2-MeSNic) of composition Cu(2-MeSNic)2(MeNia)(2).4H2O (where MeNia is N-methyl-nicotinamide), Cu(2-MeSNic)2(Nia)(2).2H2O (where Nia is nicotinamide) and Cu(2-MeSNic)2L2 (where L is isonicotinamide (iNia) or ethyl nicotinate (EtNic)) are reported. Gram(-)-bacteria (Escherichia coli) are more resistant against Cu(II) complexes than Gram(+)-bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus)--significant antistaphylococcal activity was found with Cu(2-MeSNic)2(MeNia)(2).4H2O (IC50 1.3 mmol/L). Candida parapsilosis was most inhibited by Cu(2-MeSNic)2.H2O and Cu(2-MeSNic)2(MeNia)(2).4H2O (IC50 1.4 mmol/L and 1.5 mmol/L, respectively). Biosynthesis of nucleic acids influenced by Cu(2-MeSNic)2(Nia)(2).2H2O indicated by incorporation of 14C-adenine (IC50(Ade) 0.31 mmol/L) is more sensitive than biosynthesis of proteins indicated by incorporation of 14C-leucine (IC50(Leu) 9.94 mmol/L). Cu(II) complexes with expressed antimicrobial activity showed no mutagenic activity. PMID:11899468

  4. pH modulates the activity and synergism of the airway surface liquid antimicrobials ?-defensin-3 and LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The pulmonary airways are continuously exposed to bacteria. As a first line of defense against infection, the airway surface liquid (ASL) contains a complex mixture of antimicrobial factors that kill inhaled and aspirated bacteria. The composition of ASL is critical for antimicrobial effectiveness. For example, in cystic fibrosis an abnormally acidic ASL inhibits antimicrobial activity. Here, we tested the effect of pH on the activity of an ASL defensin, human ?-defensin-3 (hBD-3), and the cathelicidin-related peptide, LL-37. We found that reducing pH from 8.0 to 6.8 reduced the ability of both peptides to kill Staphylococcus aureus. An acidic pH also attenuated LL-37 killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, we discovered synergism between hBD-3 and LL-37 in killing S. aureus. LL-37 and lysozyme were also synergistic. Importantly, an acidic pH reduced the synergistic effects of combinations of ASL antibacterials. These results indicate that an acidic pH reduces the activity of individual ASL antimicrobials, impairs synergism between them, and thus may disrupt an important airway host defense mechanism. PMID:25512526

  5. Evaluation of in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, genotoxic and anticancer activities of lichen Cetraria islandica.

    PubMed

    Gruji?i?, Darko; Stoši?, Ivana; Kosani?, Marijana; Stanojkovi?, Tatjana; Rankovi?, Branislav; Miloševi?-Djordjevi?, Olivera

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, genotoxic and anticancer activities of Cetraria islandica methanol extract were determined by using free radical and superoxide anion scavenging activity, reducing power, determination of total phenolic compounds and flavonoid contents, broth microdilution minimal inhibitory concentration against five bacterial and five fungal species, cytokinesis block micronucleus (MN) assay on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and the microculture tetrazolium test on FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines. As a result of the study, we found that C. islandica methanol extract exhibited moderate free-radical-scavenging activity with IC50 values 678.38 ?g/ml. Moreover, the tested extract had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. The minimal inhibitory concentration values against the tested microorganisms ranged from 0.312 to 5 mg/ml. The extract increased MN frequency in a dose dependent manner, but it was significant in higher tested concentrations (50, 100 and 200 ?g/ml). No significant differences were observed between NDI values in all treatments and untreated PBLs. In addition, the tested extract had strong anticancer activity towards both cell lines with IC50 values of 22.68 and 33.74 ?g/ml. It can be concluded that the tested extract exhibited a certain level of in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, genotoxic and anticancer activities. PMID:24590925

  6. Molecular mechanism and targets of the antimicrobial activity of metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Oktar, Faik N; Yetmez, Mehmet; Ficai, Denisa; Ficai, Anton; Dumitru, Florica; Pica, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-resistant bacteria to drugs is recognized as a major cause of the increasing number of deaths in hospitals. Killing these bacteria require multiple expensive drugs that can have side effects. Metal nanoparticles may provide a new strategy to combat them. Due the antimicrobial and antiviral properties, nanoparticles (NPs) have outstanding biological properties that can be handled properly for desired applications. This review presents antibacterial and antiviral activity of metal NPs, including the molecular mechanisms by which NPs annihilate multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:25877090

  7. Antimicrobial activity of some coumarin containing herbal plants growing in Finland.

    PubMed

    Ojala, T; Remes, S; Haansuu, P; Vuorela, H; Hiltunen, R; Haahtela, K; Vuorela, P

    2000-11-01

    Antimicrobial screening against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, mold, as well as plant pathogenic fungi, with emphasis on method optimization was carried out on methanol extracts prepared from seven plants grown in Finland. Sensitivity to the extracts was found to vary considerably among the micro-organisms, the extract from Petroselinum crispum and Ruta graveolens showing the highest toxicity against Rhizoctonia solani. The growth of Heterobasidium annosum was inhibited, whereas that of Phytophtora (cactorum) was promoted by all the extracts. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of six natural coumarin compounds were weak, except for the inhibitory effect against Fusarium culmorum. PMID:11025169

  8. Characterization of ?-carrageenan films incorporated plant essential oils with improved antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shojaee-Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Hedayat; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Ghasemlou, Mehran; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh; Khaksar, Ramin

    2014-01-30

    Antioxidant and antimicrobial kappa-carrageenan-based films containing different concentrations of Zataria multiflora Boiss (ZEO) and Mentha pulegium (MEO) essential oils were developed, and their water vapor permeability (WVP), optical, microstructure, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties were characterized. ZEO and MEO decreased the WVP of the emulsified films; for example, 3% ZEO reduced WVP by around 80%. Increasing the content of ZEO or MEO from 1% to 3% (v/v) increased values for elongation at break from 37.43% to 44.74% and from 36.09% to 41.25% respectively. Carrageenan-composite films were less resistant to breakage, more flexible and more opaque with lower gloss. These properties were related to the film's microstructure as analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. ZEO affected the antioxidant properties of the films more markedly than MEO, e.g., ZEO containing films showed DPPH radical scavenging of 80.6% which were two-fold higher than those having MEO. The films' antimicrobial activities were increased by incorporating essential oils, particularly ZEO, which were more effective against the bacteria in the direct-contact method than a vapor phase. S. aureus was found to be the most sensitive bacterium to either ZEO or MEO, followed by B. cereus and E. coli. A highest inhibition zone of 544.05 mm(2) was observed for S. aureus around the films incorporated with 3% (v/v) ZEO. The total inhibitory zone of 3% (v/v) MEO formulated films was 20.43 for S. typhimurium and 10.15 mm(2) for P. aeruginosa. These results revealed that ZEO and MEO have good potential to be incorporated into ?-carrageenan to make antimicrobial and antioxidant edible films for food applications. PMID:24299814

  9. Total Phenolic, Total Flavonoids, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Scrophularia Striata Boiss Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Kazempour, Nastaran; Boland Nazar, Ali Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Scrophularia striata (Scrophulariaceae family) is an herbaceous plant that is traditionally used for treatment of microbial infections. Objectives Antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of different extracts (methanolic, ethanolic, aqueous and ethyl acetate) from S. striata aerial parts was evaluated. Materials and Methods The antimicrobial activity of different extracts from S. striata was evaluated against a large number of bacteria and fungi by micro broth dilution. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were measured and their antioxidant activities evaluated by DPPH assay and beta carotene linoleic acid test. Results Antimicrobial screening exhibited the positive relation between the total phenolic content and its antimicrobial activity but their antioxidant activity had a negative relation. Conclusions Further studies are recommended against clinical isolate of sensitive bacteria and deep investigation on flavonoid and phenolic compounds of S. striata and detecting the antioxidant portion in aqueous extract. PMID:24624181

  10. Antimicrobial activity of some Pacific Northwest woods against anaerobic bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W H; Karchesy, J J; Constantine, G H; Craig, A M

    2001-11-01

    Extracts of woods commonly used for animal bedding were tested for antimicrobial activity. Essential oils from Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) and old growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) as well as methanol extracts of wood from these trees plus western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) were tested for antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria and yeast. The test microbes included Fusobacterium necrophorum, Clostridium perfringens, Actinomyces bovis and Candida albicans which are common to foot diseases and other infections in animals. The essential oils and methanol extracts were tested using a standardized broth assay. Only extracts of Alaska cedar and western juniper showed significant antimicrobial activity against each of the microbes tested. The essential oil of Douglas fir did show antimicrobial activity against A. bovis at the concentrations tested. The methanol extracts of the heartwood of Douglas fir and the sapwood of ponderosa pine showed no antimicrobial activity. The major chemical components of western juniper (cedrol and alpha- and beta-cedrene) and Alaska cedar (nootkatin) were also tested. In western juniper, alpha- and beta-cedrene were found to be active components. Nootkatin showed activity only against C. albicans. The inhibitory activity in Alaska cedar oil was high enough to justify further efforts to define the other chemical components responsible for the antimicrobial activity. PMID:11746838

  11. In vitro and in vivo activities of antimicrobial peptides developed using an amino acid-based activity prediction method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Xiaolu; Fan, Yingzi; He, Gu; Wan, Yang; Yu, Chaoheng; Tang, Jianying; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Pan, Ying; Liu, Yan; Lu, Lian; Yang, Li

    2014-09-01

    To design and discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with high levels of antimicrobial activity, a number of machine-learning methods and prediction methods have been developed. Here, we present a new prediction method that can identify novel AMPs that are highly similar in sequence to known peptides but offer improved antimicrobial activity along with lower host cytotoxicity. Using previously generated AMP amino acid substitution data, we developed an amino acid activity contribution matrix that contained an activity contribution value for each amino acid in each position of the model peptide. A series of AMPs were designed with this method. After evaluating the antimicrobial activities of these novel AMPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, DP7 was chosen for further analysis. Compared to the parent peptide HH2, this novel AMP showed broad-spectrum, improved antimicrobial activity, and in a cytotoxicity assay it showed lower toxicity against human cells. The in vivo antimicrobial activity of DP7 was tested in a Staphylococcus aureus infection murine model. When inoculated and treated via intraperitoneal injection, DP7 reduced the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage solution. Electron microscope imaging and the results indicated disruption of the S. aureus outer membrane by DP7. Our new prediction method can therefore be employed to identify AMPs possessing minor amino acid differences with improved antimicrobial activities, potentially increasing the therapeutic agents available to combat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:24982064

  12. Investigation of antimicrobial activity of photothermal therapeutic gold/copper sulfide core/shell nanoparticles to bacterial spores and cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) were designed as a new type of transducer agent for photothermal therapy (PTT), with attractive features of easy preparation, low cost and small size for targeting. This paper studied for the first time the intrinsic antimicrobial activity of Au/CuS NPs to B. anthracis spores and cells in addition to its PTT effect. Results It was found that Au/CuS NPs were highly efficient in inactivating B. anthracis cells, but not effective to the spores. Treatment with NPs at ~0.83 ?M for 30 min achieved a 7 log reduction in viable cells. The antimicrobial effect was both NPs concentration and treatment time dependent. SEM imaging and the efflux of DNA test demonstrated the damage of cell membrane after NPs treatment, yet further research is necessary to fully understand the precise inactivation mechanism. Conclusions The Au/CuS NPs had strong antimicrobial activity to B. anthracis cells, which showed a great potential to be an effective antimicrobial agent to bacterial cells. PMID:24963345

  13. Development of an antimicrobial material based on a nanocomposite cellulose acetate film for active food packaging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco J; Torres, Alejandra; Peñaloza, Ángela; Sepúlveda, Hugo; Galotto, María J; Guarda, Abel; Bruna, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on biopolymers have been recognised as potential materials for the development of new ecofriendly food packaging. In addition, if these materials incorporate active substances in their structure, the potential applications are much higher. Therefore, this work was oriented to develop nanocomposites with antimicrobial activity based on cellulose acetate (CA), a commercial organoclay Cloisite30B (C30B), thymol (T) as natural antimicrobial component and tri-ethyl citrate (TEC) as plasticiser. Nanocomposites were prepared by a solvent casting method and consisted of 5% (w/w) of C30B, 5% (w/w) of TEC and variable content of T (0%, 0.5% and 2% w/w). To evaluate the effect of C30B into the CA matrix, CA films without this organoclay but with T were also prepared. All nanocomposites showed the intercalation of CA into the organoclay structure; furthermore this intercalation was favoured when 2% (w/w) of T was added to the nanocomposite. In spite of the observed intercalation, the presence of C30B inside the CA matrices increased the opacity of the films significantly. On the other hand, T showed a plasticiser effect on the thermal properties of CA nanocomposites decreasing glass transition, melting temperature and melting enthalpy. The presence of T in CA nanocomposites also allowed the control de Listeria innocua growth when these materials were placed in contact with this Gram-positive bacterium. Interestingly, antimicrobial activity was increased with the presence of C30B. Finally, studies on T release showed that the clay structure inside the CA matrix did not affect its release rate; however, this nanofiller affected the partition coefficient KP/FS which was higher to CA nanocomposites films than in CA films without organoclay. The results obtained in the present study are really promising to be applied in the manufacture of food packaging materials. PMID:24345085

  14. Antitumor Activity of Antimicrobial Peptides Containing CisoDGRC in CD13 Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lei; Zhao, Xinhan; Wang, Pei; Ning, Qian; Meng, Min; Liu, Caigang

    2013-01-01

    Backgroud isoAsp-Gly-Arg (isoDGR) is a derivative of the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif, which is used as a targeted delivery tool to aminopeptidase N (CD13) positive cells. Recent studies have shown that cyclic isoDGR (CisoDGRC) has a more efficient affinity with ?v?3, a type of integrin that overexpresses in tumor cells. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an efficient antitumor peptide that specifically kills tumor cells. In the present study, we designed antimicrobial peptides containing the CisoDGRC motif (CDAK) and assessed its antitumor activity for CD13?/?v?3+ breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro: We assessed the cytotoxicity of CDAK for MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). We performed an apoptosis assay using Annexin-V/PI, DNA ladder, mitochondrial membrane potential, and Caspase-3 and Bcl-2. The effect on cell cycles and affinity with cell were tested using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy and the effect on invasion was analyzed using an invasion assay. CDAK was injected intravenously into tumor-bearing athymic nude mice in vivo experiment. Results CDAK showed cytotoxic activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas HUVEC and HFF were less sensitive to the peptides. CDAK induced apoptosis, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, promoted Caspase-3, and inhibited Bcl-2 expression in the two breast cancer cell lines. In addition, CDAK inhibited proliferation of cancer cell through S phase arrest, and own selective affinity with MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, inhibited the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In vivo, CDAK significant inhibited the progression of the tumor and the generation of neovascularization. Conclusion Antimicrobial peptides containing the CisoDGRC (CDAK) motif could efficiently exhibit the antitumor activity for CD13?/?v?3+ breast cancer cells. PMID:23326440

  15. The antimicrobial effects and metabolomic footprinting of carboxyl-capped bismuth nanoparticles against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Nazari, P; Dowlatabadi-Bazaz, R; Mofid, M R; Pourmand, M R; Daryani, N E; Faramarzi, M A; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Shahverdi, A R

    2014-01-01

    Organic salts of bismuth are currently used as antimicrobial agents against Helicobacter pylori. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of elemental bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) using a serial agar dilution method for the first time against different clinical isolates and a standard strain of H. pylori. The Bi NPs were biologically prepared and purified by a recently described method and subjected to further characterization by infrared spectroscopy and anti-H. pylori evaluation. Infrared spectroscopy results showed the presence of carboxyl functional groups on the surface of biogenic Bi NPs. These biogenic nanoparticles showed good antibacterial activity against all tested H. pylori strains. The resulting MICs varied between 60 and 100 ?g/ml for clinical isolates of H. pylori and H. pylori (ATCC 26695). The antibacterial effect of bismuth ions was also tested against all test strains. The antimicrobial effect of Bi ions was lower than antimicrobial effect of bismuth in the form of elemental NPs. The effect of Bi NPs on metabolomic footprinting of H. pylori was further evaluated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Exposure of H. pylori to an inhibitory concentration of Bi NPs (100 ?g/ml) led to release of some metabolites such as acetate, formic acid, glutamate, valine, glycine, and uracil from bacteria into their supernatant. These findings confirm that these nanoparticles interfere with Krebs cycle, nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism and shows anti-H. pylori activity. PMID:24104691

  16. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Cabo, Marta L; Rodríguez-Herrera, Juan J

    2014-10-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of essential oils to remove the foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus from food-processing facilities. The effectiveness of 19 essential oils against planktonic cells of S. aureus was firstly assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration. Planktonic cells showed a wide variability in resistance to essential oils, with thyme oil as the most effective, followed by lemongrass oil and then vetiver oil. The eight essential oils most effective against planktonic cells were subsequently tested against 48-h-old biofilms formed on stainless steel. All essential oils reduced significantly (p?effective, but high concentrations were needed to achieve logarithmic reductions over 4 log CFU/cm(2) after 30?min exposure. Alternatively, the use of sub-lethal doses of thyme oil allowed to slow down biofilm formation and to enhance the efficiency of thyme oil and benzalkonium chloride against biofilms. However, some cellular adaptation to thyme oil was detected. Therefore, essential oil-based treatments should be based on the rotation and combination of different essential oils or with other biocides to prevent the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains. PMID:25280938

  17. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of some novel benzimidazole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Krishnanjaneyulu, Immadisetty Sri; Saravanan, Govindaraj; Vamsi, Janga; Supriya, Pamidipamula; Bhavana, Jarugula Udaya; Sunil Kumar, Mittineni Venkata

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel N-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methyl)-4-(1-phenyl-5-substituted-4, 5-dihydro-1-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methyl)-4-(1-phenyl-5-substituted-4, 5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl) benzenamine were synthesized by treating various 1-(4-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methylamino) phenyl)-3-substitutedprop-2-en-1-one with phenyl hydrazine in the presence of sodium acetate through a simple ring closure reaction. The starting material, 1-(4-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methylamino) phenyl)-3-substitutedprop-2-en-1-one,-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methylamino) phenyl)-3-substitutedprop-2-en-1-one, was synthesized from o-phenylenediamine by a multistep synthesis. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic means and elemental analyses. The title compounds were investigated for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal properties against some human pathogenic microorganisms by employing the agar streak dilution method using Ciprofloxacin and Ketoconazole as standard drugs. All title compounds showed activity against the entire strains of microorganism. Structural activity relationship studies reveal that compounds possessing an electron-withdrawing group display better activity than the compounds containing electron-donating groups, whereas the unsubstituted derivatives display moderate activity. Based on the results obtained, N-((1H-benzoimidazol-1-yl) methyl)-4-(1-phenyl-5-(4-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl) benzenamine 5i was found to be very active compared with the rest of the compounds and standard drugs that were subjected to antimicrobial assay. PMID:24696814

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Phytochemicals against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and Their Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Monte, Joana; Abreu, Ana C; Borges, Anabela; Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria can be resistant to multiple antibiotics and we are fast approaching a time when antibiotics will not work on some bacterial infections. New antimicrobial compounds are urgently necessary. Plants are considered the greatest source to obtain new antimicrobials. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial activity of four phytochemicals-7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC), indole-3-carbinol (I3C), salicylic acid (SA) and saponin (SP)-against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, either as planktonic cells or as biofilms. These bacteria are commonly found in hospital-acquired infections. Some aspects on the phytochemicals mode of action, including surface charge, hydrophobicity, motility and quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) were investigated. In addition, the phytochemicals were combined with three antibiotics in order to assess any synergistic effect. 7-HC and I3C were the most effective phytochemicals against E. coli and S. aureus. Both phytochemicals affected the motility and quorum-sensing (QS) activity, which means that they can play an important role in the interference of cell-cell interactions and in biofilm formation and control. However, total biofilm removal was not achieved with any of the selected phytochemicals. Dual combinations between tetracycline (TET), erythromycin (ERY) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) and I3C produced synergistic effects against S. aureus resistant strains. The overall results demonstrates the potential of phytochemicals to control the growth of E. coli and S. aureus in both planktonic and biofilm states. In addition, the phytochemicals demonstrated the potential to act synergistically with antibiotics, contributing to the recycling of old antibiotics that were once considered ineffective due to resistance problems. PMID:25437810

  19. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil of Kumquat (Fortunella crassifolia Swingle) Peel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Wei; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Xu, Pei-Yu; Lan, Ya-Jia; Zhu, Rui-Xue; Zhong, Kai; Huang, Yi-Na; Gao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the main constituents of the essential oil isolated from Fortunella crassifolia Swingle peel by hydro-distillation, and to test the efficacy of the essential oil on antimicrobial activity. Twenty-five components, representing 92.36% of the total oil, were identified by GC-MS analysis. The essential oil showed potent antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative (E. coli and S. typhimurium) and Gram-positive (S. aureus, B. cereus, B. subtilis, L. bulgaricus, and B. laterosporus) bacteria, together with a remarkable antifungal activity against C. albicans. In a food model of beef extract, the essential oil was observed to possess an effective capacity to control the total counts of viable bacteria. Furthermore, the essential oil showed strongly detrimental effects on the growth and morphological structure of the tested bacteria. It was suggested that the essential oil from Fortunella crassifolia Swingle peel might be used as a natural food preservative against bacteria or fungus in the food industry. PMID:22489157

  20. Myrtus communis essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activities against food spoilage pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ben Hsouna, Anis; Hamdi, Naceur; Miladi, Ramzi; Abdelkafi, Slim

    2014-04-01

    Myrtus communis is a typical plant of the Mediterranean area, which is mainly used as animal and human food and, in folk medicine, for treating some disorders. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antibacterial and antifungal properties of the essential oils of Myrtus communis (McEO), as well as its phytochemical composition. The GC/MS analysis of the essential oil revealed 17 compounds. Myrtenyl acetate (20.75%), 1,8-cineol (16.55%), ?-pinene (15.59%), linalool (13.30%), limonene (8.94%), linalyl acetate (3.67%), geranyl acetate (2.99%), and ?-terpineol (2.88%) were the major components. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was also investigated on several microorganisms. The inhibition zones and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of bacterial strains were in the range of 16-28?mm and 0.078-2.5?mg/ml, respectively. The inhibitory activity of the McEO against Gram-positive bacteria was significantly higher than against Gram-negative. It also exhibited remarkable activity against several fungal strains. The investigation of the mode of action of the McEO by the time-kill curve against Listeria monocytogenes (food isolate) showed a drastic bactericidal effect after 5?min using a concentration of 312??g/ml. These results evidence that the McEO possesses antimicrobial properties, and it is, therefore, a potential source for active ingredients for food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24706627

  1. Synthesis of acyl thiourea derivatives of chitosan and their antimicrobial activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhimei; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Wang, Lin; Cai, Shengbao; Li, Pengcheng

    2008-02-25

    Three different acyl thiourea derivatives of chitosan (CS) were synthesized and their structures were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The antimicrobial behaviors of CS and its derivatives against four species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Sarcina) and four crop-threatening pathogenic fungi (Alternaria solani, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Saec, and Phyllisticta zingiberi) were investigated. The results indicated that the antimicrobial activities of the acyl thiourea derivatives are much better than that of the parent CS. The minimum value of MIC and MBC of the derivatives against E. coli was 15.62 and 62.49 microg/mL, respectively. All of the acyl thiourea derivatives had a significant inhibitory effect on the fungi in concentrations of 50-500 microg/mL; the maximum inhibitory index was 66.67%. The antifungal activities of the chloracetyl thiourea derivatives of CS are noticeably higher than the acetyl and benzoyl thiourea derivatives. The degree of grafting of the acyl thiourea group in the derivatives was related to antifungal activity; higher substitution resulted in stronger antifungal activity. PMID:18083151

  2. Antimicrobial effect of mastic gum methanolic extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sterer, Nir

    2006-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of mastic gum, an ancient remedy for oral malodor, against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a known odorogenic periopathogenic oral bacterium, was tested using the agar diffusion test. Paper discs impregnated with mastic gum methanolic extract (MME) [0.5-4% (wt/vol)] produced inhibition zones of 10.5-13.7 mm, respectively, without showing signs of hemolysis, whereas chlorhexidine (0.2%)-impregnated discs, which showed greater inhibition (33.5 mm), also produced large and distinctive hemolytic zones (17 mm). Further analysis of the antimicrobial traits of MME revealed a logarithmic ratio between inhibition zone diameter and MME concentration (r = .99), indicating limited water solubility of this material. These results suggest that mastic gum may be used as a potential nontoxic local agent in treating oral malodor and gum disease. PMID:16822220

  3. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of chitosan-alginate nanoparticles: a targeted therapy for cutaneous pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam J; Phan, Jenny; Schairer, David; Champer, Jackson; Qin, Min; Pirouz, Aslan; Blecher, Karin; Oren, Ami; Liu, Phil; Modlin, Robert L; Kim, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have demonstrated potential application of nanoparticles for effective and targeted drug delivery. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial and immunological properties and the feasibility of using nanoparticles to deliver antimicrobial agents to treat a cutaneous pathogen. Nanoparticles synthesized with chitosan and alginate demonstrated a direct antimicrobial activity in vitro against Propionibacterium acnes, the bacterium linked to the pathogenesis of acne. By electron microscopy imaging, chitosan-alginate nanoparticles were found to induce disruption of the P. acnes cell membrane, providing a mechanism for the bactericidal effect. The chitosan-alginate nanoparticles also exhibited anti-inflammatory properties as they inhibited P. acnes induced inflammatory cytokine production in human monocytes and keratinocytes. Furthermore, benzoyl peroxide, a commonly used anti-acne drug, was effectively encapsulated in the chitosan-alginate nanoparticles and demonstrated superior antimicrobial activity against P. acnes compared to benzoyl peroxide alone while demonstrating less toxicity to eukaryotic cells. Together, these data suggest the potential utility of topical delivery of chitosan-alginate nanoparticle encapsulated drug therapy for the treatment of dermatologic conditions with infectious and inflammatory components. PMID:23190896

  4. An antimicrobial modified silicone peritoneal catheter with activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Bayston; Leanne E. Fisher; Klaus Weber

    2009-01-01

    Peritonitis, exit site and tunnel infections are serious complications of peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), which may lead to catheter loss, despite measures taken to reduce the infection rate. Catheters coated with antimicrobials have shown only short-term activity. We have developed a process for conferring broad-spectrum, long-duration antimicrobial activity on CAPD catheters while reducing the risk of resistance. Catheters were processed using

  5. Surface-Bonded Antimicrobial Activity of an Organosilicon Quaternary Ammonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Isquith, A. J.; Abbott, E. A.; Walters, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hydrolysis product of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propyldimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride exhibited antimicrobial activity against a broad range of microorganisms while chemically bonded to a variety of surfaces. The chemical was not removed from surfaces by repeated washing with water, and its antimicrobial activity could not be attributed to a slow release of the chemical, but rather to the surface-bonded chemical. Images PMID:4650597

  6. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Artemisia herba-alba essential oil cultivated in Tunisian arid zone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hedi Mighri; Hafedh Hajlaoui; Ahmed Akrout; Hanen Najjaa; Mohamed Neffati

    2010-01-01

    This study was conceived to examine the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of four essential oil types extracted by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Artemisia herba-alba cultivated in southern Tunisia. The chemical composition was investigated using both capillary GC and GC\\/MS techniques. ?-thujone, ?-thujone, ?-thujone\\/?-thujone and 1,8-cineole\\/camphor\\/?-thujone\\/?-thujone were respectively, the major components of these oil types. The antimicrobial activity of

  7. A study of the antimicrobial activity of selected naturally occurring and synthetic coumarins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Smyth; V. N. Ramachandran; W. F. Smyth

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of 43 naturally occurring and synthetic coumarins were studied. Using a microtitre assay developed in-house, a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including a hospital isolate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA),were utilised. The coumarins exhibiting good bioactivity (i.e. a lowminimum inhibitory concentration) against two S. aureus strains were then assessed for their antimicrobial activities against a range

  8. Antimicrobial activity of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheeses and yogurts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The biopreservation of foods using bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated directly from foods is an innovative approach. The objectives of this study were to isolate and identify bacteriocinogenic LAB from various cheeses and yogurts and evaluate their antimicrobial effects on selected spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in vitro as well as on a food commodity. LAB were isolated using MRS and M17 media. The agar diffusion bioassay was used to screen for bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) producing LAB using Lactobacillus sakei and Listeria innocua as indicator organisms. Out of 138 LAB isolates, 28 were found to inhibit these bacteria and were identified as strains of Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eight isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity at 5°C and 20°C against L. innocua, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides using the agar diffusion bioassay, and also against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia frucitcola using the microdilution plate method. The effect of selected LAB strains on L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions was also investigated. Twenty percent of our isolates produced BLS inhibiting the growth of L. innocua and/or Lact. sakei. Organic acids and/or H2O2 produced by LAB and not the BLS had strong antimicrobial effects on all microorganisms tested with the exception of E. coli. Ent. faecium, Strep. thermophilus and Lact. casei effectively inhibited the growth of natural microflora and L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions. Bacteriocinogenic LAB present in cheeses and yogurts may have potential to be used as biopreservatives in foods. PMID:22963659

  9. Antimicrobial activity of lactoperoxidase system incorporated into cross-linked alginate films.

    PubMed

    Yener, Fatih Y G; Korel, Figen; Yemenicio?lu, Ahmet

    2009-03-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial effect of lactoperoxidase (LPS) incorporated alginate films was investigated on Escherichia coli (NRRL B-3008), Listeria innocua (NRRL B-33314), and Pseudomonas fluorescens (NRRL B-253) in presence of different concentrations of H(2)O(2) (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mM) and KSCN (1, 2, and 4 mM). The incorporation of 70 nmol ABTS/min/cm(2) LPS into alginate films gave 0.66 to 0.85 nmol ABTS/min/cm(2) enzyme activity at 0.2 to 0.8 mM H(2)O(2) concentration range. The antimicrobial activity of LPS system on target bacteria changed according to the concentrations of KSCN and H(2)O(2). The growth of all tested bacteria was prevented for a 6-h period by applying LPS system in presence of 0.4 or 0.8 mM H(2)O(2) and 4 mM KSCN. At 0.8 mM H(2)O(2) and 4 mM KSCN, the LPS system also inhibited growth of L. innocua and P. fluorescens for a 24-h incubation period, whereas E. coli growth could not be inhibited for 24 h under these conditions. At 0.2 mM H(2)O(2) and 1 to 4 mM KSCN, a considerable inhibitory effect was obtained only on P. fluorescens. The decreasing order of the resistance of studied bacteria to LPS system is as follows: E. coli, L. innocua, and P. fluorescens. The developed antimicrobial system has a good potential for use in meat, poultry, and seafood since alginate coatings are already used in these products. Further studies are needed to test the LPS incorporated edible films in real food systems. PMID:19323761

  10. Antimicrobial activities of saponin-rich guar meal extract 

    E-print Network

    Hassan, Sherif Mohamed

    2009-05-15

    Three saponin-rich extracts (20, 60, 100% methanol), four 100% methanol subfractions and seven independently acquired fractions (A-G) from guar meal, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. (syn. C. psoraloides), were evaluated for antimicrobial and hemolytic...

  11. Antimicrobial activities of saponin-rich guar meal extract

    E-print Network

    Hassan, Sherif Mohamed

    2009-05-15

    Three saponin-rich extracts (20, 60, 100% methanol), four 100% methanol subfractions and seven independently acquired fractions (A-G) from guar meal, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. (syn. C. psoraloides), were evaluated for antimicrobial and hemolytic...

  12. In vitro combinatory antimicrobial effect of plumbagin with oxacillin and tetracycline against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rondevaldova, Johana; Novy, Pavel; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), a bicyclic naphthoquinone naturally distributed among Plumbago species, has been reported to have antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms. In this study, plumbagin was examined for its combinatory antimicrobial effect with tetracycline or oxacillin against nine strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including its methicillin- and multidrug-resistant strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined through the broth microdilution method, whereas the combinatory effect was evaluated according to the sum of fractional inhibitory concentration (?FIC) indices. Additive interactions were obtained for both combinations against most of the strains tested. Synergy was obtained for combination with oxacillin against two out of seven strains (?FIC range 0.273-0.281), both were methicillin resistant. Our results proved plumbagin as a compound suitable for anti-Staphylococcal combinatory testing. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of plumbagin synergy with oxacillin against S. aureus strains, including its resistant forms. PMID:25266704

  13. Liquid-crystalline ordering of antimicrobial peptide-DNA complexes controls TLR9 activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan W.; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Xian, Wujing; Lee, Calvin; Frasca, Loredana; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2015-07-01

    Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can trigger the production of type I interferon (IFN) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) by binding to endosomal Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9; refs , , , , ). It is also known that the formation of DNA-antimicrobial peptide complexes can lead to autoimmune diseases via amplification of pDC activation. Here, by combining X-ray scattering, computer simulations, microscopy and measurements of pDC IFN production, we demonstrate that a broad range of antimicrobial peptides and other cationic molecules cause similar effects, and elucidate the criteria for amplification. TLR9 activation depends on both the inter-DNA spacing and the multiplicity of parallel DNA ligands in the self-assembled liquid-crystalline complex. Complexes with a grill-like arrangement of DNA at the optimum spacing can interlock with multiple TLR9 like a zipper, leading to multivalent electrostatic interactions that drastically amplify binding and thereby the immune response. Our results suggest that TLR9 activation and thus TLR9-mediated immune responses can be modulated deterministically.

  14. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of Bacillus subtilis strains isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Sevdalina; Kozhuharova, Lubka

    2010-07-01

    Antagonistic Bacillus strains were isolated from soil and analyzed for the purpose of determining whether they could be used as natural biological agents. Primary in vitro screening for antagonism of the isolates was performed against five phytopathogenic mould fungi. Strains TS 01 and ZR 02 exhibited the most pronounced inhibitory effects. They were identified as Bacillus subtilis on the basis of their morphological, cultural and physiology-biochemical properties as well as their hierarchical cluster analysis conducted by means of computer program SPSS. The antimicrobial activity of the strains from cultural medium and sterile filtrate were determined in vitro against a great number of predominantly phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria. TS 01 and ZR 02 strains exhibited very broad and at the same time degree varying antibiotic spectra of activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Many of them were tested against sensitivity to the antimicrobial action of B. subtilis for the very first time. B. subtilis TS 01 and ZR 02 showed highest antifungal activity (sterile zone in diameter over 37 mm) against Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea, Monilia linhartiana 869, Phytophthora cryptogea 759/1 and Rhizoctonia sp. The most sensitive bacterial species were found to be Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Ro and Xanthomonas campestris with sterile zones 48.0 and 50.0 mm in diameter, respectively. The latter draws a conclusion that the isolated and identified Bacillus subtilis strains are promising natural biocontrol agents and should be further studied and tested for control of numerous plant diseases. PMID:24026925

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Tunisian quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) pulp and peel polyphenolic extracts.

    PubMed

    Fattouch, Sami; Caboni, Pierluigi; Coroneo, Valentina; Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Angioni, Alberto; Dessi, Sandro; Marzouki, Nejib; Cabras, Paolo

    2007-02-01

    Quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) fruit aqueous acetone extracts were evaluated. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry were used for the identification and quantification of the phenolic compounds. The total phenolic content of the pulp and peel parts ranged from 37 to 47 and 105 to 157 mg/100 g of fresh weight, respectively. Chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid) was the most abundant phenolic compound in the pulp (37%), whereas rutin (quercetin 3-O-rutinoside) was the main one in the peel (36%). The radical scavenging potential of the extracts was determined and compared with that of synthetic antioxidants. The stronger properties corresponded to those obtained from peel material with a 70-80% inhibitory effect on DPPH radicals. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts against different microorganism strains was also investigated. Quince peel extract was the most active for inhibiting bacteria growth with minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations in the range of 102-5 x 103 microg polyphenol/mL. It seems that chlorogenic acid acts in synergism with other components of the extracts to exhibit their total antimicrobial activities. PMID:17263500

  16. Liquid-crystalline ordering of antimicrobial peptide-DNA complexes controls TLR9 activation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nathan W; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Xian, Wujing; Lee, Calvin; Frasca, Loredana; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard C L

    2015-07-01

    Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can trigger the production of type I interferon (IFN) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) by binding to endosomal Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9; refs , , , , ). It is also known that the formation of DNA-antimicrobial peptide complexes can lead to autoimmune diseases via amplification of pDC activation. Here, by combining X-ray scattering, computer simulations, microscopy and measurements of pDC IFN production, we demonstrate that a broad range of antimicrobial peptides and other cationic molecules cause similar effects, and elucidate the criteria for amplification. TLR9 activation depends on both the inter-DNA spacing and the multiplicity of parallel DNA ligands in the self-assembled liquid-crystalline complex. Complexes with a grill-like arrangement of DNA at the optimum spacing can interlock with multiple TLR9 like a zipper, leading to multivalent electrostatic interactions that drastically amplify binding and thereby the immune response. Our results suggest that TLR9 activation and thus TLR9-mediated immune responses can be modulated deterministically. PMID:26053762

  17. Comparative study of antimicrobial activity of AgBr and Ag nanoparticles (NPs).

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Petr; Kvitek, Libor; Panacek, Ales; Prucek, Robert; Hrbac, Jan; Vecerova, Renata; Zboril, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The diverse mechanism of antimicrobial activity of Ag and AgBr nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and also against several strains of candida was explored in this study. The AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by simple precipitation of silver nitrate by potassium bromide in the presence of stabilizing polymers. The used polymers (PEG, PVP, PVA, and HEC) influence significantly the size of the prepared AgBr NPs dependently on the mode of interaction of polymer with Ag+ ions. Small NPs (diameter of about 60-70 nm) were formed in the presence of the polymer with low interaction as are PEG and HEC, the polymers which interact with Ag+ strongly produce nearly two times bigger NPs (120-130 nm). The prepared AgBr NPs were transformed to Ag NPs by the reduction using NaBH4. The sizes of the produced Ag NPs followed the same trends--the smallest NPs were produced in the presence of PEG and HEC polymers. Prepared AgBr and Ag NPs dispersions were tested for their biological activity. The obtained results of antimicrobial activity of AgBr and Ag NPs are discussed in terms of possible mechanism of the action of these NPs against tested microbial strains. The AgBr NPs are more effective against gram-negative bacteria and tested yeast strains while Ag NPs show the best antibacterial action against gram-positive bacteria strains. PMID:25781988

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Brazilian propolis extracts against rumen bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Sílvia Cristina; Zeoula, Lúcia Maria; Franco, Selma Lucy; Peres, Lucimar Pontara; Arcuri, Pedro Braga; Forano, Evelyne

    2013-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of three Brazilian propolis extracts was evaluated on bacterial strains representing major rumen functional groups. The extracts were prepared using different concentrations of propolis and alcohol, resulting in different phenolic compositions. The propolis extracts inhibited the growth of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85, Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1, Ruminococcus albus 7, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens D1, Prevotella albensis M384, Peptostreptococcus sp. D1, Clostridium aminophilum F and Streptococcus bovis Pearl11, while R. albus 20, Prevotella bryantii B?4 and Ruminobacter amylophilus H18 were resistant to all the extracts. The inhibited strains showed also different sensitivity to propolis; the hyper-ammonia-producing bacteria (C. aminophilum F and Peptostreptococcus sp. D1) being the most sensitive. Inhibition of hyper-ammonia-producing bacteria by propolis would be beneficial to the animal. The extract containing the lowest amount of phenolic compounds (LLOS C3) showed the lowest antimicrobial activity against all the bacteria. The major phenolic compounds identified in the propolis extracts (naringenin, chrysin, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and Artepillin C) were also evaluated on four sensitive strains. Only naringenin showed inhibitory effect against all strains, suggesting that naringenin is one of the components participating to the antibacterial activity of propolis. PMID:23653262

  19. Laurel leaf extracts for honeybee pest and disease management: antimicrobial, microsporicidal, and acaricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Natalia; Fernández, Natalia J; Porrini, Martín P; Gende, Liesel B; Álvarez, Estefanía; Buffa, Franco; Brasesco, Constanza; Maggi, Matías D; Marcangeli, Jorge A; Eguaras, Martín J

    2014-02-01

    A diverse set of parasites and pathogens affects productivity and survival of Apis mellifera honeybees. In beekeeping, traditional control by antibiotics and molecules of synthesis has caused problems with contamination and resistant pathogens. In this research, different Laurus nobilis extracts are tested against the main honeybee pests through an integrated point of view. In vivo effects on bee survival are also evaluated. The ethanol extract showed minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 208 to 416 ?g/mL, having the best antimicrobial effect on Paenibacillus larvae among all substances tested. Similarly, this leaf extract showed a significant antiparasitic activity on Varroa destructor, killing 50 % of mites 24 h after a 30-s exposure, and on Nosema ceranae, inhibiting the spore development in the midgut of adult bees ingesting 1?×?10(4) ?g/mL of extract solution. Both ethanol extract and volatile extracts (essential oil, hydrolate, and its main component) did not cause lethal effects on adult honeybees. Thus, the absence of topical and oral toxicity of the ethanol extract on bees and the strong antimicrobial, microsporicidal, and miticidal effects registered in this study place this laurel extract as a promising integrated treatment of bee diseases and stimulates the search for other bioactive phytochemicals from plants. PMID:24288051

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides Derived from Indolicidin and Ranalexin against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Hassan Mahmood; Le, Cheng Foh; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Isa, Diyana Mohd; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics in order to defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, thirteen antimicrobial peptides were designed based on two natural peptides indolicidin and ranalexin. Our results revealed that four hybrid peptides RN7-IN10, RN7-IN9, RN7-IN8, and RN7-IN6 possess potent antibacterial activity against 30 pneumococcal clinical isolates (MIC 7.81-15.62µg/ml). These four hybrid peptides also showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity (7.81µg/ml) against S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and E. coli. Furthermore, the time killing assay results showed that the hybrid peptides were able to eliminate S. pneumoniae within less than one hour which is faster than the standard drugs erythromycin and ceftriaxone. The cytotoxic effects of peptides were tested against human erythrocytes, WRL-68 normal liver cell line, and NL-20 normal lung cell line. The results revealed that none of the thirteen peptides have cytotoxic or hemolytic effects at their MIC values. The in silico molecular docking study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of peptides with three pneumococcal virulent targets by Autodock Vina. RN7IN6 showed a strong affinity to target proteins; autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) based on rigid docking studies. Our results suggest that the hybrid peptides could be suitable candidates for antibacterial drug development. PMID:26046345

  1. Anti-leishmanial, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of phenolic derivatives from Tibouchina paratropica.

    PubMed

    Tracanna, María I; Fortuna, Antonio M; Cárdenas, Angel V Contreras; Marr, Alexandra K; McMaster, W Robert; Gómez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Sánchez-Arreola, Eugenio; Hernández, Luis Ricardo; Bach, Horacio

    2015-03-01

    A new phenolic derivative, 2,8-dihydroxy-7H-furo[2,3-f]chromen-7-one (1), together with isoquercitrin (2), was isolated from the aerial parts of Tibouchina paratropica. Compound structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Both compounds show antimicrobial activity towards a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens, and compound 1 displayed potent anti-parasitic activity against Leishmania donovani (IC50 ?=?0.809?µg/mL). In addition, an 85% reduction in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was recorded when macrophages challenged with lipopolysaccharide were exposed to compound 1, but no effect on the anti-inflammatory IL-10 was observed. Compound 2 showed neither anti-parasitic nor anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, no cytotoxic activities were observed against the human-derived macrophage THP-1 cells. PMID:25417600

  2. Screening of plants used in Argentine folk medicine for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Anesini, C; Perez, C

    1993-06-01

    Screening of 132 extracts from Argentine folk-medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity has been conducted using a penicillin G resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger as test microorganisms. Cephazolin, ampicillin and miconazole were used as standard antibiotics and concentration-response curves were obtained using the agar-well diffusion method. Boiling water extracts of plant materials were tested and 12 species were active against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas 10 were effective against Escherichia coli and 4 against Aspergillus niger. Tabebuia impetiginosa bark, Achyrocline sp. aerials parts, Larrea divaricata leaves, Rosa borboniana flowers, Punica granatum fruit pericarp, Psidium guineense fruit pericarp, Lithrea ternifolia leaves and Allium sativum bulbs produced some of the more active extracts. PMID:8412245

  3. Inhaled antimicrobial therapy - Barriers to effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Weers, Jeffry

    2014-09-01

    Inhaled antibiotics dramatically improve targeting of drug to the site of respiratory infections, while simultaneously minimizing systemic exposure and associated toxicity. The high local concentrations of antibiotic may enable more effective treatment of multi-drug resistant pathogens. This review explores barriers to effective treatment with inhaled antibiotics. In addition, potential opportunities for improvements in treatment are reviewed. PMID:25193067

  4. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of herbal plants used in the traditional medicine of Jordan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adel M Mahasneh; Ahmad A El-Oqlah

    1999-01-01

    Petroleum ether, ethanol, butanol, and aqueous crude extracts of the whole aerial parts of nine plants exhibited variable degrees of antimicrobial activity against four bacterial and three fungal species. Methanol and hexane extracts did not show any activity. Compared with standard antibiotics, extracts had low to moderate activity. The activity spectrum is wide against gram-positive and negative bacteria as well

  5. Physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity, and antimicrobial activity of sulphated zirconia nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mftah, Ae; Alhassan, Fatah H; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat; Webster, Thomas J; Sh-eldin, Mohammed; Rasedee, Abdullah; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Rashid, Shah Samiur

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle sulphated zirconia with Brønsted acidic sites were prepared here by an impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 hours. The characterization was completed using X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunner-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the anticancer and antimicrobial effects were investigated for the first time. This study showed for the first time that the exposure of cancer cells to sulphated zirconia nanoparticles (3.9–1,000 ?g/mL for 24 hours) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, as determined by (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Similar promising results were observed for reducing bacteria functions. In this manner, this study demonstrated that sulphated zirconia nanoparticles with Brønsted acidic sites should be further studied for a wide range of anticancer and antibacterial applications. PMID:25632233

  6. Silver Nanoparticle Impregnated Bio-Based Activated Carbon with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, R.; Suriyaraj, S. P.; Jayavignesh, V.; Swaminathan, K.

    2013-08-01

    The present study involves the production of silver nanoparticles using a novel yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae BU-MBT CY-1 isolated from coconut cell sap. The biological reduction of silver nitrate by the isolate was deducted at various time intervals. The yeast cells after biological silver reduction were harvested and subjected to carbonization at 400°C for 1 h and its properties were analyzed using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope attached with energy dispersive spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The average size of the silver nanoparticles present on the surface of the carbonized silver containing yeast cells (CSY) was 19 ± 9 nm. The carbonized control yeast cells (CCY) did not contain any particles on its surface. The carbonized silver nanoparticles containing yeast cells (CSY) were made into bioactive emulsion and tested for its efficacy against various pathogenic Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The antimicrobial activity studies indicated that CSY bioactive nanoemulsion was effective against Gram negative organisms than Gram positive organism.

  7. Structure-activity relationship of a u-type antimicrobial microemulsion system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Yu, Liyi; Que, Fei; Feng, Fengqin

    2013-01-01

    The structure-activity relationship of a U-type antimicrobial microemulsion system containing glycerol monolaurate and ethanol at a 1?1 mass ratio as oil phase and Tween 20 as surfactant were investigated along a water dilution line at a ratio of 80?20 mass% surfactant/oil phase, based on a pseudo-ternary phase diagram. The differential scanning calorimetry results showed that in the region of up to 33% water, all water molecules are confined to the hydrophilic core of the reverse micelles, leading to the formation of w/o microemulsion. As the water content increases, the water gains mobility, and transforms into bicontinuous in the region of 33-39% water, and finally the microemulsion become o/w in the region of above 39% water. The microstructure characterization was confirmed by the dynamic light scattering measurements and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscope observation. The antimicrobial activity assay using kinetics of killing analysis demonstrated that the microemulsions in w/o regions exhibited relatively high antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus due to the antimicrobial oil phase as the continuous phase, while the antimicrobial activity started to decrease when the microemulsions entered the bicontinuous region, and decreased rapidly as the water content increased in the o/w region, as a result of the dilution of antimicrobial oil droplets in the aqueous continuous phase. PMID:24204605

  8. Structure-Activity Relationship of a U-Type Antimicrobial Microemulsion System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Yu, Liyi; Que, Fei; Feng, Fengqin

    2013-01-01

    The structure-activity relationship of a U-type antimicrobial microemulsion system containing glycerol monolaurate and ethanol at a 1?1 mass ratio as oil phase and Tween 20 as surfactant were investigated along a water dilution line at a ratio of 80?20 mass% surfactant/oil phase, based on a pseudo-ternary phase diagram. The differential scanning calorimetry results showed that in the region of up to 33% water, all water molecules are confined to the hydrophilic core of the reverse micelles, leading to the formation of w/o microemulsion. As the water content increases, the water gains mobility, and transforms into bicontinuous in the region of 33–39% water, and finally the microemulsion become o/w in the region of above 39% water. The microstructure characterization was confirmed by the dynamic light scattering measurements and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscope observation. The antimicrobial activity assay using kinetics of killing analysis demonstrated that the microemulsions in w/o regions exhibited relatively high antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus due to the antimicrobial oil phase as the continuous phase, while the antimicrobial activity started to decrease when the microemulsions entered the bicontinuous region, and decreased rapidly as the water content increased in the o/w region, as a result of the dilution of antimicrobial oil droplets in the aqueous continuous phase. PMID:24204605

  9. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Allium ascalonicum against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Amin, M; Kapadnis, B P

    2005-08-01

    To study antimicrobial activity of shallot in comparison with that of garlic and onion against 23 strains of fungi and bacteria, water extracts of garlic, shallot and onion bulbs were prepared. Each extract was studied in different forms for their antimicrobial activity viz., fresh extract, dry extract and autoclaved extract. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal lethal concentrations of these extracts were determined against all organisms by broth dilution susceptibility test. Fresh extract of garlic showed greater antimicrobial activity as compared to similar extracts of onion and shallot. However, dried and autoclaved extracts of shallot showed more activity than similar extracts of onion and garlic. Fungi were more sensitive to shallot extract than bacteria. Amongst bacteria, B. cereus was most sensitive (MIC=5 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum bactericidal concentration of shallot extract amongst bacteria tested was 5 mg ml(-1) for B. cereus. Amongst fungi, Aureobasidium pullulans and Microsporum gypseum were most sensitive (MIC= 0.15 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum lethal concentration was 2.5 mg ml(-1) for Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. It was therefore, expected that the antimicrobial principle of shallot was different than the antimicrobial compounds of onion and garlic. In addition, the antimicrobial component of the shallot extract was stable at 121 degrees C. PMID:16121720

  10. Preparation and evaluation of antimicrobial activity of nanosystems for the control of oral pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pupe, Carolina Gonçalves; Villardi, Michele; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Rocha, Helvécio Vinícius Antunes; Maia, Lucianne Cople; de Sousa, Valeria Pereira; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2011-01-01

    Background Diseases that affect the buccal cavity are a public health concern nowadays. Chlorhexidine and nystatin are the most commonly used drugs for the control of buccal affections. In the search for more effective antimicrobials, nanotechnology can be successfully used to improve the physical chemical properties of drugs whilst avoiding the undesirable side effects associated with its use. Herein described are studies using nystatin and chlorhexidine with sodium montmorillonite (MMTNa), and chlorhexidine with ?-cyclodextrin and two derivatives methyl-?-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin in the development of antimicrobial nanosystems. Methods The nanosystems were prepared by kneading and solubilization followed by freeze-drying technique. The nanosystems were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Nanosystem antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans strains was evaluated with inhibition halo analysis. Results The nanocarriers MMTNa and cyclodextrins showed good yields. XRPD, FTIR, and DSC analysis confirmed the proposed nanosystems formation and the suitability of the production methods. The nanosystems that showed best antimicrobial effect were chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes and CHX:MMTNa 60% cation exchange capacity – 24 hours. Conclusion The nanosystem formulations present higher stability for all chlorhexidine inclusion complexes compared with pure chlorhexidine. The nystatin nanosystems have the potential to mask the bitter taste, justifying subsequent in-vivo studies. For these reasons, further studies are being carried out to evaluate their application in professional formulations. PMID:22114490

  11. Antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of Ag plasma-modified hierarchical TiO2 film on titanium surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Liu, Xuanyong; Qiao, Yuqin; Zhu, Hongqin; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-01-01

    To improve the antimicrobial ability and cytocompatibility of biomedical titanium implants, many efforts have been made to modify their surface topography and chemical composition. In this work, Ag plasma-modified hierarchical TiO2 film was fabricated on titanium surface via acid etching to produce micropit, hydrothermal treatment to generate TiO2 nanorod and subsequent plasma immersion ion implantation process to impregnate Ag into TiO2 surface. In view of the potential clinical applications, their antimicrobial activity, bioactivity and cytocompatibility were systematically evaluated. The hierarchical TiO2 film showed enhanced bioactivity and bacteriostatic effect on both microbes due to more negative zeta potential, constructing the first defense line against microbial adhesion by electrostatic repulsion. Addition of embedded Ag remarkably enhanced the antimicrobial efficiency toward both microbes based on Schottky contact without Ag(+) release, establishing the second defense line targeting microbial membrane. Furthermore, the addition of Ag degraded the bioactivity very little and exerted nearly no adverse or even promoted effect on MG63 cell functions, including adhesion, spreading and proliferation. This work illustrates a two-defense-line antimicrobial activity in darkness with both prior electrostatic repulsion to inhibit most microbes adhesion and posterior biocidal action to kill residual ones that luckily infiltrated through the first defense line, and provide proof of concept using both clinically relevant human pathogens. In conclusion, the Ag-embedded hierarchical TiO2 film with excellent antimicrobial activity, bioactivity and cytocompatibility provides a promising candidate for orthopedic and dental implants. PMID:24077111

  12. Antimicrobial and toxicological activities of five medicinal plant species from Cameroon Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases caused by multiresistant microbial strains are on the increase. Fighting these diseases with natural products may be more efficacious. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic, ethylacetate (EtOAc) and hexanic fractions of five Cameroonian medicinal plants (Piptadeniastum africana, Cissus aralioides, Hileria latifolia, Phyllanthus muellerianus and Gladiolus gregasius) against 10 pathogenic microorganisms of the urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts. Methods The fractions were screened for their chemical composition and in vivo acute toxicity was carried out on the most active extracts in order to assess their inhibitory selectivity. The agar well-diffusion and the micro dilution methods were used for the determination of the inhibition diameters (ID) and Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) respectively on 8 bacterial species including two Gram positive species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis), and six Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi) and two fungal isolates (Candida albicans, Candida krusei). The chemical composition was done according to Harbone (1976), the acute toxicity evaluation according to WHO protocol and the hepatic as well as serum parameters measured to assess liver and kidney functions. Results The chemical components of each plant's extract varied according to the solvent used, and they were found to contain alkaloids, flavonoids, polyphenols, triterpens, sterols, tannins, coumarins, glycosides, cardiac glycosides and reducing sugars. The methanolic and ethylacetate extracts of Phyllanthus muellerianus and Piptadeniastum africana presented the highest antimicrobial activities against all tested microorganisms with ID varying from 8 to 26 mm and MIC from 2.5 to 0.31 mg/ml. The in vivo acute toxicity study carried out on the methanolic extracts of Phyllanthus muellerianus and Piptadeniastrum africana indicated that these two plants were not toxic. At the dose of 4 g/kg body weight, kidney and liver function tests indicated that these two medicinal plants induced no adverse effect on these organs. Conclusion These results showed that, all these plant's extracts can be used as antimicrobial phytomedicines which can be therapeutically used against infections caused by multiresistant agents. Phyllanthus muellerianus, Piptadeniastum africana, antimicrobial, acute toxicity, kidney and liver function tests, Cameroon Traditional Medicine PMID:21867554

  13. Self-assembly and antimicrobial activity of long-chain amide-functionalized ionic liquids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Teresa; Ribosa, Isabel; Perez, Lourdes; Manresa, Angeles; Comelles, Francesc

    2014-11-01

    Surface active amide-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) consisting of a long alkyl chain (C6C14) connected to a polar head group (methylimidazolium or pyridinium cation) via an amide functional group were synthesized and their thermal stability, micellar properties and antimicrobial activity in aqueous solution investigated. The incorporation of an amide group increased the thermal stability of the functionalized ionic liquids compared to simple alkyl chain substituted ionic liquids. The surface activity and aggregation behaviour in aqueous solution of amide-functionalized ionic liquids were examined by tensiometry, conductivity and spectrofluorimetry. Amide-functionalized ILs displayed surface activity and their critical micelle concentration (cmc) in aqueous media decreased with the elongation of the alkyl side chain as occurs for typical surfactants. Compared to non-functionalized ILs bearing the same alkyl chain, ionic liquids with an amide moiety possess higher surface activity (pC20) and lower cmc values. The introduction of an amide group in the hydrophobic chain close to the polar head enhances adsorption at the air/water interface and micellization which could be attributed to the H-bonding in the headgroup region. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against a panel of representative Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. Amide-functionalized ILs with more than eight carbon atoms in the side chain showed broad antimicrobial activity. Antibacterial activities were found to increase with the alkyl chain length being the C12 homologous the most effective antimicrobial agents. The introduction of an amide group enhanced significantly the antifungal activity as compared to non-functionalized ILs. PMID:25277287

  14. Single bath process for imparting antimicrobial activity and ultraviolet protective property to bamboo viscose fabric

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ajoy K. Sarkar; Subhash Appidi

    2009-01-01

    Bamboo viscose, a new cellulose-based textile material was investigated for biomedical applications such as ultraviolet protective\\u000a ability and antimicrobial activity. Untreated bamboo viscose fabric was found to afford poor protection against UV radiation\\u000a and also possessed minimal antimicrobial properties. To enhance UV protection characteristics, fabrics were subjected to different\\u000a treatments viz., dyeing; finishing with commercial UV absorbers; and one-bath dyeing

  15. Antimicrobial activity of chitosan-based films including spices’ essential oils and functional extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Hernández-Ochoa; C. A. Macías-Castañeda; G. V. Nevárez-Moorillón; E. Salas-Muñoz; F. Sandoval-Salas

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) and functional extracts (EXs) from cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), clove (Eugenia caryohyllata), and elecampane (Inula helenium L.) were used as antimicrobial ingredients for the elaboration of edible films. EOs were extracted by hydrodistillation and EXs were obtained by co-hydrodistillation using fatty acid ethyl esters (E6 and E7) as co-solvents. Antimicrobial activities of EOs and EXs were evaluated

  16. Antimicrobial Activities of Amphiphilic Peptides Covalently Bonded to a Water-Insoluble Resin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SHARON L. HAYNIE; GRACE A. CRUM; ANDBRUCE A. DOELE

    1995-01-01

    A series of polymer-bound antimicrobial peptides was prepared, and the peptides were tested for their antimicrobial activities. The immobilized peptides were prepared by a strategy that used solid-phase peptide synthesis that linked the carboxy-terminal amino acid with an ethylenediamine-modified polyamide resin (PepsynK). The acid-stable, permanent amide bond between the support and the nascent peptide renders the peptide resistant to cleavage

  17. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activities of sporaricin A, a new aminoglycoside.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, F; Saino, Y; Koshi, T; Hattori, Y

    1980-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of sporaricin A, a new aminoglycoside, was compared with that of amikacin, dibekacin, and gentamicin. Sporaricin A showed a broad spectrum of activity against various gram-positive and -negative bacteria, including amikacin-, dibekacin-, or gentamicin-resistant strains. Sporaricin A inhibited more than 90% of clinical isolates of staphylococci, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Serratia, and Proteus, except for P. morganii and P. inconstans, at the concentration of 3.13 microgram/ml. This activity, except for that against Serratia, was similar to that of amikacin. Against P. inconstans and S. marcescens, sporaricin A was more effective than amikacin, dibekacin, and gentamicin. However, its activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was relatively weak in comparison with three other aminoglycosides. Sporaricin A was highly effective against bacteria that had various aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes and that were resistant to the other drugs tested, but it was not active against those with aminoglycoside 3-acetyltransferase-I. The activity of sporaricin A tended to be greater with a reduction in inoculum size of bacteria and an increase in medium pH and decreased slightly in the presence of 10 to 50% horse serum. The in vitro activity was confirmed by in vivo tests in experimental infections with various bacteria. Its protective effect seemed to be equal to or greater than that of amikacin or dibekacin. PMID:7425599

  18. Comparative in vitro activity of norfloxacin (MK-0366) and ten other oral antimicrobial agents against urinary bacterial isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M Y; Gruninger, R P; Nelson, S M; Klicker, R E

    1982-01-01

    The in vitro activity of a new oral antimicrobial agent, norfloxacin (MK-0366), was compared with those of nalidixic acid, nitrofurantoin, co-trimoxazole, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, cinoxacin, tetracycline, ampicillin, carbenicillin, and cephalexin against 628 urinary bacterial isolates. Norfloxacin was the most active antimicrobial agent tested against the gram-negative bacilli. It was less active than a few of the other antimicrobial agents against enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:6213200

  19. Human ?-Defensin 4 with Non-Native Disulfide Bridges Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Himanshu; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Human defensins play multiple roles in innate immunity including direct antimicrobial killing and immunomodulatory activity. They have three disulfide bridges which contribute to the stability of three anti-parallel ?-strands. The exact role of disulfide bridges and canonical ?-structure in the antimicrobial action is not yet fully understood. In this study, we have explored the antimicrobial activity of human ?-defensin 4 (HBD4) analogs that differ in the number and connectivity of disulfide bridges. The cysteine framework was similar to the disulfide bridges present in ?-conotoxins, an unrelated class of peptide toxins. All the analogs possessed enhanced antimicrobial potency as compared to native HBD4. Among the analogs, the single disulfide bridged peptide showed maximum potency. However, there were no marked differences in the secondary structure of the analogs. Subtle variations were observed in the localization and membrane interaction of the analogs with bacteria and Candida albicans, suggesting a role for disulfide bridges in modulating their antimicrobial action. All analogs accumulated in the cytosol where they can bind to anionic molecules such as nucleic acids which would affect several cellular processes leading to cell death. Our study strongly suggests that native disulfide bridges or the canonical ?-strands in defensins have not evolved for maximal activity but they play important roles in determining their antimicrobial potency. PMID:25785690

  20. Antimicrobial activity of some ethnomedicinal plants used by Paliyar tribe from Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Ayyanar, Muniappan; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2006-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial activity of 18 ethnomedicinal plant extracts were evaluated against nine bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ervinia sp, Proteus vulgaris) and one fungal strain (Candida albicans). The collected ethnomedicinal plants were used in folk medicine in the treatment of skin diseases, venereal diseases, respiratory problems and nervous disorders. Methods Plants were collected from Palni hills of Southern Western Ghats and the ethnobotanical data were gathered from traditional healers who inhabit the study area. The hexane and methanol extracts were obtained by cold percolation method and the antimicrobial activity was found using paper disc diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India. Results The results indicated that out of 18 plants, 10 plants exhibited antimicrobial activity against one or more of the tested microorganisms at three different concentrations of 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/disc. Among the plants tested, Acalypha fruticosa, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Toddalia asiatica,Cassia auriculata, Punica granatum and Syzygium lineare were most active. The highest antifungal activity was exhibited by methanol extract of Peltophorum pterocarpum and Punica granatum against Candida albicans. Conclusion This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the some ethnomedicinal plants used in folkloric medicine. Compared to hexane extract, methanol extract showed significant activity against tested organisms. This study also showed that Toddalia asiatica, Syzygium lineare, Acalypha fruticosa and Peltophorum pterocarpum could be potential sources of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:17042964

  1. Egyptian propolis: 3. Antioxidant, antimicrobial activities and chemical composition of propolis from reclaimed lands.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Ahmed G; Abd El Hady, Faten K

    2002-01-01

    The free radical scavenging effect of two propolis samples collected from reclaimed land, Egypt as well as of vitamin C and caffeic acid in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical system was determined. The antimicrobial (Staphylococcus aureus; Escherichia coli and Candida albicans) activity was also investigated. The results of the free radical scavenging effect of El-Saff and Ismailia propolis showed a concentration-dependent activity. The antioxidant activity was varied according to the examined material. It was obvious that caffeic acid and vitamin C showed the highest activity if compared with the propolis samples. El- Saff propolis had a higher antioxidant activity than Ismailia propolis, it showed a higher antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and a higher anti-fungal activity against Candida albicans. While the Ismailia propolis had a higher antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, than El-Saff propolis. The chemical composition of propolis samples was investigated by GC/MS, where 75 compounds were identified, 22 being new for propolis. The Ismailia propolis was characterized by the presence of a highly significant amount of aromatic acid esters (47.3%) and triterpenoids (17.3%), while El-Saff propolis contained 3% and 1.9% respectively. The new esters belonged to 4-methoxyhydrocinnamic acid, hydroferulic acid and ferulic acid. El-Saff propolis had a very high significant amount (27%) of 2,6-bis-(pentanyloxy)-4-pentanylphenethanol, which is also a new compound for propolis. PMID:12064746

  2. Collagen Patches Impregnated with Antimicrobial Agents Have High Local Antimicrobial Efficacy and Achieve Effective Tissue Gluing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Baar; C. Schörner; M. Röllinghoff; M. Radespiel-Tröger; H. P. Hümmer; R. T. Carbon

    2001-01-01

    Background: Local antimicrobial systems have gained importance, as illustrated by current, research on drug delivery systems (DDS). We\\u000a aimed to develop materials that combine hemostatic and antimicrobial efficacy as well as adhesiveness for use in surgical\\u000a tissue management.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods: Materials were evaluated by in vitro studies employing microbiological and technological methods.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results: Antimicrobial impregnation of a collagen fleece,

  3. The intestinal anti-inflammatory effect of minocycline in experimental colitis involves both its immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natividad Garrido-Mesa; Desirée Camuesco; Belén Arribas; Mònica Comalada; Elvira Bailón; Margarita Cueto-Sola; Pilar Utrilla; Ana Nieto; Antonio Zarzuelo; María Elena Rodríguez-Cabezas; Julio Gálvez

    2011-01-01

    Some antibiotics, including minocycline, have recently been reported to display immunomodulatory properties in addition to their antimicrobial activity. The use of a compound with both immunomodulatory and antibacterial properties could be very interesting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), so the aim of our study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of minocycline in several experimental models of

  4. Aliphatic acid-conjugated antimicrobial peptides - potential agents with anti-tumor, multidrug resistance-reversing activity and enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Wang, Xuekun; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-07-28

    Compared with traditional therapeutics, antimicrobial peptides as novel anti-tumor agents have prominent advantages of higher specificity and circumvention of multi-drug resistance. In a previous study, we found that B1, an antimicrobial peptide derived from Cathelicidin-BF15, presented specific anti-tumor activity against several tumor cells. Since aliphatic chain-conjugated peptides have shown ameliorative activity and stability, we conjugated aliphatic acids with different lengths to the amino terminal of B1. All the conjugated peptides exhibited improved anti-tumor activity over B1. Further investigations revealed that the peptides were capable of disrupting the cell membrane, stimulating cytochrome c release into the cytosol, which results in apoptosis. The peptides also acted against multidrug resistant cells and had multidrug resistance-reversing effects. Additionally, conjugation of aliphatic acid enhanced the peptide stability in plasma. In summary, aliphatic acid-modified peptides might be promising anti-tumor agents in the future. PMID:26083110

  5. P10 ALTERNATIVE USES AND COLLATERAL EFFECTS OF ANTIMICROBIALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Throughout history and nature, antimicrobials have had applications in addition to treating diseases. Certain insects use antimicrobials as disinfectants. Ancient Nubians incorporated antibiotics in the manufacture of ‘booza’, a traditional alcoholic beverage in their culture. For the last four d...

  6. Cerecidins, novel lantibiotics from Bacillus cereus with potent antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Li; Teng, Kunling; Sun, Shutao; Sun, Zhizeng; Zhong, Jin

    2014-04-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified antimicrobial peptides that are widely produced by Gram-positive bacteria, including many species of the Bacillus group. In the present study, one novel gene cluster coding lantibiotic cerecidins was unveiled in Bacillus cereus strain As 1.1846 through genomic mining and PCR screening. The designated cer locus is different from that of conventional class II lantibiotics in that it included seven tandem precursor cerA genes, one modification gene (cerM), two processing genes (cerT and cerP), one orphan regulator gene (cerR), and two immunity genes (cerF and cerE). In addition, one unprecedented quorum sensing component, comQXPA, was inserted between cerM and cerR. The expression of cerecidins was not detected in this strain of B. cereus, which might be due to repressed transcription of cerM. We constitutively coexpressed cerA genes and cerM in Escherichia coli, and purified precerecidins were proteolytically processed with the endoproteinase GluC and a truncated version of putative serine protease CerP. Thus, two natural variants of cerecidins A1 and A7 were obtained which contained two terminal nonoverlapping thioether rings rarely found in lantibiotics. Both cerecidins A1 and A7 were active against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria. Cerecidin A7, especially its mutant Dhb13A, showed remarkable efficacy against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), and even Streptomyces. PMID:24532070

  7. The antimicrobial effects of wood-associated polyphenols on food pathogens and spoilage organisms.

    PubMed

    Plumed-Ferrer, Carme; Väkeväinen, Kati; Komulainen, Heli; Rautiainen, Maarit; Smeds, Annika; Raitanen, Jan-Erik; Eklund, Patrik; Willför, Stefan; Alakomi, Hanna-Leena; Saarela, Maria; von Wright, Atte

    2013-06-01

    The antimicrobial effects of the wood-associated polyphenolic compounds pinosylvin, pinosylvin monomethyl ether, astringin, piceatannol, isorhapontin, isorhapontigenin, cycloXMe, dHIMP, ArX, and ArXOH were assessed against both Gram-negative (Salmonella) and Gram-positive bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus) and yeasts (Candida tropicalis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Particularly the stilbenes pinosylvin, its monomethyl ether and piceatannol demonstrated a clear antimicrobial activity, which in the case of pinosylvin was present also in food matrices like sauerkraut, gravlax and berry jam, but not in milk. The destabilization of the outer membrane of Gram-negative microorganisms, as well as interactions with the cell membrane, as indicated by the NPN uptake and LIVE/DEAD viability staining experiments, can be one of the specific mechanisms behind the antibacterial action. L. monocytogenes was particularly sensitive to pinosylvin, and this effect was also seen in L. monocytogenes internalized in intestinal Caco2 cells at non-cytotoxic pinosylvin concentrations. In general, the antimicrobial effects of pinosylvin were even more prominent than those of a related stilbene, resveratrol, well known for its various bioactivities. According to our results, pinosylvin could have potential as a natural disinfectant or biocide in some targeted applications. PMID:23624538

  8. Synthesis, photophysical and antimicrobial activity of new water soluble ammonium quaternary benzanthrone in solution and in polylactide film.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Desislava; Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Makki, Mohamad Saleh I; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad; Abd?l-Rahman, Reda Mohamed; Asiri, Abdullah M; Grabchev, Ivo

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis of a new cationic water soluble fluorescent 1-[(7-oxo-7H-benzo[de]anthracen-3-ylcarbamoyl)-methyl]-triethylammonium chloride (B) has been described. Due to the presence of the quaternary amino group, the compound is soluble in water. Its photophysical characteristics in aqueous solution and organic solvents with different polarity have been determined using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The photostability of compound B has been investigated in aqueous media. The newly synthesized compound has been tested in vitro for its antimicrobial activity against eight bacterial and two yeasts cultures. The results obtained suggest that the newly synthesized compound is effective in treating the relevant pathogens and is suitable in designing new effective antimicrobial preparations. The incorporation of the compound into thin polylactic acid film and its release into water solution has been also investigated. It was demonstrated that the compound released from the polymer polylactic acid matrix exhibited a prolonged good antibacterial activity. PMID:25596400

  9. Fabrication of Phaeodactylum tricornutum extract-loaded gelatin nanofibrous mats exhibiting antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyo Won; Kang, Min Ji; Bae, Jin Hee; Hur, Sung Bum; Kim, Ick-Soo; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Microalgae have recently been recognized as a valuable resource for various applications. Phaeodactylum tricornutum is a diatom that lives in marine water and has an unusually high content of lipids. In this study, we added P. tricornutum into a gelatin dope solution to examine the effect of this diatom using electrospinning. The addition of P. tricornutum extracts increased the conductivity of the dope solution but had little effect on the viscosity. Due to the increased conductivity, the fiber diameter was reduced compared with the neat gelatin nanofiber. The loading of P. tricornutum extracts was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy, and the incorporation of lipids was detected through gas chromatography. The P. tricornutum-loaded nanofiber mat exhibited anti-microbial activity against Escherichia coli and multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The cell viability test showed that the P. tricornutum-loaded nanofiber has no cytotoxicity. We expect that this antimicrobial P. tricornutum-loaded gelatin nanofiber mat can be applied as a wound dressing. PMID:24239540

  10. Truncated antimicrobial peptides from marine organisms retain anticancer activity and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Ching; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Wu, Jen-Leih

    2013-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were recently determined to be potential candidates for treating drug-resistant bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to develop shorter AMP fragments that combine maximal bactericidal effect with minimal synthesis cost. We first synthesized a series of truncated forms of AMPs (anti-lipopolysaccharide factor from shrimp, epinecidin from grouper, and pardaxin from Pardachirus marmoratus). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of modified AMPs against ten bacterial species were determined. We also examined the synergy between peptide and non-peptide antibiotics. In addition, we measured the inhibitory rate of cancer cells treated with AMPs by MTS assay. We found that two modified antibacterial peptides (epinecidin-8 and pardaxin-6) had a broad range of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, epinecidin and pardaxin were demonstrated to have high antibacterial and anticancer activities, and both AMPs resulted in a significant synergistic improvement in the potencies of streptomycin and kanamycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Neither AMP induced significant hemolysis at their MICs. In addition, both AMPs inhibited human epithelial carcinoma (HeLa) and fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cell growth. The functions of these truncated AMPs were similar to those of their full-length equivalents. In conclusion, we have successfully identified shorter, inexpensive fragments with maximal bactericidal activity. This study also provides an excellent basis for the investigation of potential synergies between peptide and non-peptide antibiotics, for a broad range of antimicrobial and anticancer activities. PMID:23598079

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Seven Essential Oils From Iranian Aromatic Plants Against Common Causes of Oral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Ghadiri, Pooria; Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Moein, Mohammad Reza; Mehriar, Peiman; Bahrani, Farideh; Golzar, Tahereh; Pakshir, Keyvan; Fani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past two decades, there has been a growing trend in using oral hygienic products originating from natural resources such as essential oils (EOs) and plant extracts. Seven aromatic plants used in this study are among popular traditional Iranian medicinal plants with potential application in modern medicine as anti-oral infectious diseases. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of essential oils from seven medicinal plants against pathogens causing oral infections. Materials and Methods: The chemical compositions of EOs distilled from seven plants were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These plants included Satureja khuzestanica, S. bachtiarica, Ocimum sanctum, Artemisia sieberi, Zataria multiflora, Carum copticum and Oliveria decumbens. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was evaluated by broth micro-dilution in 96 well plates as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. Results: The tested EOs inhibited the growth of examined oral pathogens at concentrations of 0.015-16 µL/mL. Among the examined oral pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis had the highest Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) and Minimum Microbicidal Concentrations (MMCs). Of the examined EOs, S. khuzestanica, Z. multiflora and S. bachtiarica, showed the highest antimicrobial activities, respectively, while Artemisia sieberi exhibited the lowest antimicrobial activity. Conclusions: The excellent antimicrobial activities of the tested EOs might be due to their major phenolic or alcoholic monoterpenes with known antimicrobial activities. Hence, these EOs can be possibly used as an antimicrobial agent in treatment and control of oral pathogens. PMID:25793100

  12. Antimicrobial Effect of 7-O-Butylnaringenin, a Novel Flavonoid, and Various Natural Flavonoids against Helicobacter pylori Strains

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sun Hee; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Kee-Tae; Park, Yong-Sun; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Ahn, Dong Uk; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of a novel flavonoid (7-O-butylnaringenin) on Helicobacter pylori 26695, 51, and SS1 strains and its inhibitory effect on the urease activity of the strains were evaluated and compared with those of several natural flavonoids. First, various flavonoids were screened for antimicrobial activities using the paper disc diffusion method. Hesperetin and naringenin showed the strongest antimicrobial effects among the natural flavonoids tested, and thus hesperetin and naringenin were selected for comparison with 7-O-butylnaringenin. The antimicrobial effect of 7-O-butylnaringenin was greater than that of the hesperetin and naringenin. H. pylori 51 was more sensitive to 7-O-butylnaringenin (2 log reduction of colony forming units, p < 0.05) than the other two strains at 200 ?M. 7-O-Butylnaringenin also showed the highest inhibitory effect against urease activity of H. pylori. Morphological changes of H. pylori 26695 treated with these flavonoids indicated that both hesperetin and 7-O-butylnaringenin at 200 ?M damaged the cell membranes. PMID:24169409

  13. Antimicrobial activity of the surface coatings on TiAlZr implant biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Daniela; Grecu, Mihaela; Ungureanu, Camelia; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2011-12-01

    This study is devoted to antimicrobial activity of new surface coatings on TiAlZr. Ti alloys such as TiAlZr are used as implant biomaterials, but, despite the good behavior of such alloys in simulated conditions, bacterial infections appear after the introduction of an implant into the body. The infections are typically caused by the adherence and colonization of bacteria on the surfaces of the implants. The study presents preparation and surface morphology characterization of coatings obtained via anodizing, as well as biomimetic coatings with hydroxyapatite and silver ions with and without antibiotic. The percentage inhibition of Escherichia coli bacteria growth was evaluated for each of the studied coating, and a Trojan-horse model of silver nanoparticles (nAg) antibacterial activity at interface was proposed. Such coatings could be more important taking into account that antibacterial treatments with antibiotics are becoming less effective due to their intensive use. PMID:21889399

  14. Comparative In Vitro Activities of Gemifloxacin, Other Quinolones, and Nonquinolone Antimicrobials against Obligately Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kleinkauf, Niels; Ackermann, Grit; Schaumann, Reiner; Rodloff, Arne C.

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro activity of gemifloxacin was compared to that of other quinolone and nonquinolone antimicrobials against 204 anaerobes by the agar dilution technique. The data indicate that gemifloxacin has a rather selective anaerobic activity. Most Peptostreptococcus, Porphyromonas, and Fusobacterium species are susceptible, while gemifloxacin's activity against other gram-negative anaerobes appears to be variable. PMID:11353648

  15. In vitro antimicrobial activity of propolis and Arnica montana against oral pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Koo; B. P. F. A. Gomes; P. L. Rosalen; G. M. B. Ambrosano; Y. K. Park; J. A. Cury

    2000-01-01

    Arnica and propolis have been used for thousands of years in folk medicine for several purposes. They possess several biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiviral and tissue regenerative, among others. Although the antibacterial activity of propolis has already been demonstrated, very few studies have been done on bacteria of clinical relevance in dentistry. Also, the antimicrobial activity of Arnica

  16. Broad Activity against Porcine Bacterial Pathogens Displayed by Two Insect Antimicrobial Peptides Moricin and Cecropin B

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Han; Wang, Chunmei; Guo, Xiaozhen; Li, Wentao; Wang, Yang; He, Qigai

    2013-01-01

    In response to infection, insects produce a variety of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to kill the invading pathogens. To study their physicochemical properties and bioactivities for clinical and commercial use in the porcine industry, we chemically synthesized the mature peptides Bombyx mori moricin and Hyalophora cecropia cecropin B. In this paper, we described the antimicrobial activity of the two AMPs. Moricin exhibited antimicrobial activity on eight strains tested with minimal inhibitory concentration values (MICs) ranging between 8 and 128 ?g/ml, while cecropin B mainly showed antimicrobial activity against the Gramnegative strains with MICs ranging from 0.5 to 16 ?g/ml. Compared to the potent antimicrobial activity these two AMPs displayed against most of the bacterial pathogens tested, they exhibited limited hemolytic activity against porcine red blood cells. The activities of moricin and cecropin B against Haemophilus parasuis SH 0165 were studied in further detail. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of moricin and cecropin B treated H. parasuis SH 0165 indicated extensive damage to the membranes of the bacteria. Insights into the probable mechanism utilized by moricin and cecropin B to eliminate pathogens are also presented. The observations from this study are important for the future application of AMPs in the porcine industry. PMID:23456332

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper Alloys Against Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Nosocomial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Eser, Ozgen Koseoglu; Ergin, Alper; Hascelik, Gulsen

    2015-08-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance demanded novel approaches for the prevention of nosocomial infections, and metallic copper surfaces have been suggested as an alternative for the control of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in surfaces in the hospital environment. This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of copper material for invasive MDR nosocomial pathogens isolated over time, in comparison to stainless steel. Clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n:4), OXA-23 and OXA-58 positive, MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (n:6) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n:4) were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of coupons containing 99 % copper and a brass alloy containing 63 % copper was assessed against stainless steel. All the materials demonstrated statistically significant differences within each other for the logarithmic reduction of microorganisms. Among the three materials, the highest reduction of microorganisms was seen in 99 % copper and the least in stainless steel. The result was statistically significant especially for 0, 2, and 4 h (P = 0.05). 99 % copper showed a bactericidal effect at less than 1 h for MRSA and at 2 h for P. aeruginosa. 63 % copper showed a bactericidal effect at 24 h for P. aeruginosa strains only. Stainless steel surfaces exhibited a bacteriostatic effect after 6 h for P. aeruginosa strains only. 99 % copper reduced the number of bacteria used significantly, produced a bactericidal effect and was more effective than 63 % copper. The use of metallic copper material could aid in reducing the concentration of bacteria, especially for invasive nosocomial pathogens on hard surfaces in the hospital environment. PMID:26044991

  18. Effect of antimicrobial activity of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on antagonistic potential of Pleurotus species against Trichoderma harzianum in dual culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Angelini; R. Pagiotti; B. Granetti

    2008-01-01

    Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) essential oil was investigated for its “in vitro” ability to control Trichoderma harzianum, a fungal contaminant that causes extensive losses in the cultivation of Pleurotus species. The antifungal activity of M. alternifolia essential oil and antagonist activities between Pleurotus species against three T. harzianum strains were studied in dual-culture experiments on an agar-based medium in which different concentrations of

  19. Black cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) lysates exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Sagheer, Mehwish; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Iqbal, Junaid; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    It is hypothesized that animals living in polluted environments possess antimicrobials to counter pathogenic microbes. The fact that snakes feed on germ-infested rodents suggests that they encounter pathogenic microbes and likely possess antimicrobials. The venom is used only to paralyze the rodent, but the ability of snakes to counter potential infections in the gut due to disease-ridden rodents requires robust action of the immune system against a broad range of pathogens. To test this hypothesis, crude lysates of different organs of Naja naja karachiensis (black cobra) were tested for antimicrobial properties. The antimicrobial activities of extracts were tested against selected bacterial pathogens (neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Streptococcus pneumonia), protist (Acanthamoeba castellanii), and filamentous fungus (Fusarium solani). The findings revealed that plasma and various organ extracts of N. n. karachiensis exhibited antimicrobial activity against E. coli K1, MRSA, P. aeruginosa, S. pneumoniae, A. castellanii, and F. solani in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of this study are promising for the development of new antimicrobials. PMID:24625321

  20. Effects of oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral on antimicrobial, mechanical and barrier properties of carrot puree films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Huan; Wei, Jing; Ma, Zhongsu

    2011-02-01

    The effects against staphfloccus aureus and escherichia coli of oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral in chitosan-corn starch-gelatin-carrot puree films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations were investigated along with the mechanical and barrier properties of the films. The presence of oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral did not change the good oxygen barrier of the films, but did significantly modify tensile properties and water vapor permeability, and made films darker. The data also show that the antimicrobial activities were in the following order: cinnamaldehyde > carvacrol > oregano oil > citral. Moreover, the antimicrobial films were more effective against staphfloccus aureus than against the escherichia coli. This study showed that oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral, especially the first three, could be used to prepare antimicrobial edible films for food applications.

  1. Review of antimicrobial and antioxidative activities of chitosans in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    shellfish, arises from the fact that they are reported to exhibit numerous health-related beneficial effects, including strong antibiotic and antioxidative activities in foods. The extraordinary interest in the chemistry and application in agriculture, horticulture, environmental science, industry,...

  2. Antimicrobial Activities of Amine and Guanidine Functionalized Cholic Acid Derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHUNHONG LI; MATTHEW R. LEWIS; AMY B. GILBERT; MARK D. NOEL; DAVID H. SCOVILLE; GLENN W. ALLMAN; PAUL B. SAVAGE

    1999-01-01

    Compounds in a series of cholic acid derivatives, designed to mimic the activities of polymyxin B and its derivatives, act as both potent antibiotics and effective permeabilizers of the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria. Some of these compounds rival polymyxin B in antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria and are also very active against gram-positive organisms. Other compounds interact synergistically with

  3. Antimicrobial activity of the imipenem/rifampicin combination against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Bao, Wanguo; Guo, Na; Chen, Haiying; Cheng, Wei; Jin, Kunqi; Shen, Fengge; Xu, Jiancheng; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; An, Yanan; Zhang, Kaiyu; Wang, Feng; Yu, Lu

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial activity of imipenem and rifampicin alone and in combination against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for each isolate grown in suspension and in biofilm using a microbroth dilution method. Chequerboard assays and the agar disk diffusion assay were used to determine synergistic, indifferent or antagonistic interactions between imipenem and rifampicin. We used the tissue culture plate method for A. baumannii biofilm formation to measure the percentage of biofilm inhibition and the amount of extracellular DNA after the treatment. To understand the synergistic mechanisms, we conducted hydroxyl radical formation assays. The results were verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Imipenem and rifampicin showed effective antimicrobial activity against suspensions and biofilm cultures of A. baumannii, respectively. Synergistic antimicrobial effects between imipenem and rifampicin were observed in 13 and 17 of the 20 clinical isolates when in suspension and in biofilms, respectively. Imipenem and rifampicin alone and in combination generated hydroxyl radicals, which are highly reactive oxygen forms and the major components of bactericidal agents. Furthermore, treatment with imipenem and rifampicin individually or in combination has obvious antibiofilm effects. The synergistic activity of imipenem and rifampicin against clinical isolates of A. baumannii (in suspension and in biofilms) was observed in vitro. Therefore, we conclude that imipenem combined with rifampicin has the potential to be used as a combinatorial therapy for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by A. baumannii. PMID:25298216

  4. PROLONGED STABILITY OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY IN PERITONEAL DIALYSIS SOLUTIONSa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David P. Dooley; J. Robert Tyler; William G. Wortham; Linda S. Harrison; William F. Starnes; George R. Collins; Irene S. Ozuna; Patty L. Violet; John A. Ward

    ? ? ? ? ? Objective: To evaluate the stability of the antimicrobial chemical and bioactivity of gentamicin, vancomycin, and gentamicin and vancomycin in combination, and the sta- bility of the bioactivity of ceftazidime, admixed in stan- dard peritoneal dialysis solutions and then maintained over a 14-day period at room temperature or under refrigeration. ? ? ? ? ? Setting:

  5. Antimicrobial effects of coprisin on wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jingoo; Han, Seon-Young; Ji, Ae-Ri; Park, Jin-Kyu; Hong, Il-Hwa; Ki, Mi-Ran; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Dong Gun; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are naturally produced antibiotics that play important roles in host defense mechanisms. These proteins are found in variety of animal and plant species. The antibiotic effects of AMPs are gaining attention for use in human medicine. In this study, the antimicrobial effects of coprisin, a novel AMP isolated from the dung beetle (Copris tripartitus), were evaluated. The peptide was used to treat rats with wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Coprisin accelerated wound closure both grossly and microscopically compared with the untreated group. Additionally, treatment with this peptide decreased phosphorylated-Smad2/3 (p-Smad2/3) levels, a downstream factor of the transforming growth factor-? signaling pathway which is believed to inhibit reepithelization, in the nucleus and cytoplasm of regenerating cells. Moreover, increased cell populations and angiogenesis were observed in lesions treated with coprisin, suggesting that this peptide promotes wound healing via its antimicrobial activity against S.?aureus. Our results demonstrated that coprisin is a potential therapeutic agent that can possibly replace traditional antibiotics and overcome microbial resistance. PMID:24134388

  6. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activities of 5-Arylidene-thiazolidine-2,4-dione Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ivanildo Mangueira; da Silva Filho, João; Santiago, Priscila Brandão Gomes da Silva; do Egito, Micalyne Soares; de Souza, Carlos André; Gouveia, Frederico Leite; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Sena, Kêsia Xisto da Fonseca Ribeiro; de Faria, Antonio Rodolfo; Brondani, Dalci José; de Albuquerque, Julianna Ferreira Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is considered one of the world's major public health concerns. The main cause of bacterial resistance is the improper and repeated use of antibiotics. To alleviate this problem, new chemical substances against microorganisms are being synthesized and tested. Thiazolidines are compounds having many pharmacological activities including antimicrobial activities. For this purpose some thiazolidine derivatives substituted at position 5 in the thiazolidine nucleus were synthesized and tested against several microorganisms. Using a disc diffusion method, antimicrobial activity was verified against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and alcohol acid resistant bacteria and yeast. The minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined. All derivatives showed antimicrobial activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria, with MIC values ranging from 2 to 16?µg/mL. PMID:24895565

  7. Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides Has an Antitumour Effect in Human Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Winder; Walter H. Günzburg; Volker Erfle; Brian Salmons

    1998-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides cecropin and melittin are known to exhibit antitumour activity in tumour derived cell lines. To achieve a similar effectin vivothese peptides would have to be given repeatedly to maintain therapeutic levels, which may be pharmacologically unfavourable. The expression of the genes encoding such antimicrobial peptides in the desired cell type may circumvent these problems. Expression constructs carrying

  8. In Vitro Antimicrobial Effectiveness of 5 Catheter Insertion-Site Dressings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shubhangi Bhende; Stephen Rothenburger

    Polyurethane foam dressing impregnated with chlorhexidine gluconate was compared with 4 silver dressings for antimicrobial effi- cacy. Efficacy of antimicrobial dressings was evaluated using zone of inhibition assay against 7 clinically relevant bacteria and yeast. The test was carried out for up to 7 consecutive days by transferring the dressings daily. Microbiocidal activity exhibited by different dressings within the zone

  9. Insight into the antimicrobial activities of coprisin isolated from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus, revealed by structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Shin, Soyoung; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Shin, Areum; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Kim, Yangmee

    2013-02-01

    The novel 43-residue, insect defensin-like peptide coprisin, isolated from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus, is a potent antibiotic with bacterial cell selectivity, exhibiting antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria without exerting hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. Tests against Staphylococcus aureus using fluorescent dye leakage and depolarization measurements showed that coprisin targets the bacterial cell membrane. To understand structure-activity relationships, we determined the three-dimensional structure of coprisin in aqueous solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that coprisin has an amphipathic ?-helical structure from Ala(19) to Arg(28), and ?-sheets from Gly(31) to Gln(35) and Val(38) to Arg(42). Coprisin has electropositive regions formed by Arg(28), Lys(29), Lys(30), and Arg(42) and ITC results proved that coprisin and LPS have electrostatically driven interactions. Using measurements of nitric oxide release and inflammatory cytokine production, we provide the first verification of the anti-inflammatory activity and associated mechanism of an insect defensin, demonstrating that the anti-inflammatory actions of the defensin-like peptide, coprisin, are initiated by suppressing the binding of LPS to toll-like receptor 4, and subsequently inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear translocation of NF-kB. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that an amphipathic helix and an electropositive surface in coprisin may play important roles in its effective interaction with bacterial cell membranes and, ultimately, in its high antibacterial activity and potent anti-inflammatory activity. In addition to elucidating the antimicrobial action of coprisin, this work may provide insight into the mechanism of action of insect defense systems. PMID:23137439

  10. Chemical Constituents and Evaluation of Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Activities of Kielmeyera coriacea Mart. & Zucc. Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Carla de M.; do Nascimento, Evandro A.; de Morais, Sérgio A. L.; de Oliveira, Alberto; Chang, Roberto; Cunha, Luís C. S.; Martins, Mário M.; Martins, Carlos Henrique G.; Moraes, Thaís da S.; Rodrigues, Paulla V.; da Silva, Cláudio V.; de Aquino, Francisco J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Many essential oils (EOs) of different plant species possess interesting antimicrobial effects on buccal microorganisms and cytotoxic properties. EOs of Kielmeyera coriacea Mart. & Zucc. were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The EO from leaves is rich in sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. The three major compounds identified were germacrene-D (24.2%), (E)-caryophyllene (15.5%), and bicyclogermacrene (11.6%). The inner bark EO is composed mainly of sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons and the major components are alpha-copaene (14.9%) and alpha-(E)-bergamotene (13.0%). The outer bark EO is composed mainly of oxygenated sesquiterpenes and long-chain alkanes, and the major components are alpha-eudesmol (4.2%) and nonacosane (5.8%). The wood EO is mainly composed of long-chain alkanes and fatty acids, and the major components are nonacosane (9.7%) and palmitic acid (16.2%). The inner bark EO showed the strongest antimicrobial activity against the anaerobic bacteria Prevotella nigrescens (minimum inhibitory concentration-MIC of 50?µg?mL?1). The outer bark and wood EOs showed MICs of 100?µg?mL?1 for all aerobic microorganisms tested. The EOs presented low toxicity to Vero cells. These results suggest that K. coriacea, a Brazilian plant, provide initial evidence of a new and alternative source of substances with medicinal interest. PMID:25960759

  11. An in Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Ten Iranian-Made Toothpastes

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Assar, Shokrollah

    2009-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial agents have been used as a chemotherapeutic agent to improve oral health. This in vitro study was carried out to determine the antimicrobial activity of ten Iranian-made toothpastes against commonly found bacteria in the oral cavity. Methods: The microorganisms used in this study were Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Actinomyces viscosus and Candida albicans. Sterile discs impregnated with 10 Iranian-made toothpastes; Paveh, Saviz, Latifeh II, Bath, Darugar II, Darugar I, Close up, Tage, Pooneh III and Nasim, which were separately used on agar plates. Crest Cavity Protection toothpaste and Sterile pyrogenfree distilled water were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The samples were tested in triplicate, at full strength, 1:1 and 1:3 dilutions. Inhibition zones were measured in millimeter after 48 hr. The data were analyzed by the ANOVA and t-test. Results: All tested toothpastes demonstrated an antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity of Bath on S. mutans, Paveh on S. sanguis, Paveh, Saviz, Latifeh III and Darugar II on C. albicans were similar to the activity of Crest Cavity Protection. The antimicrobial activity of Pooneh III and Nasim on S. mutans, Bath on S. sanguis and A. viscosus, and Bath and Pooneh III on C. albicans were significantly higher and the others were significantly lower than the positive control. While, the activity of Crest Cavity Protection was the same as Pooneh III, it showed a weaker activity compared with Bath. Conclusion: Apart from Bath and Pooneh III, the other Iranian-made toothpastes tested in this study showed a lower antimicrobial activity compared to Crest Cavity Protection. PMID:21528037

  12. Hybrid peptide ATCUN-sh-Buforin: Influence of the ATCUN charge and stereochemistry on antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Libardo, M Daben J; Paul, Thomas J; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria has resulted in the need to develop more potent antimicrobials that target microorganisms in a novel manner. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs) show great potential for drug development because of their broad activity and unique mechanism of action. Several AMPs contain an Amino Terminal Copper and Nickel (ATCUN) binding motif; however, its function has not yet been determined. We have previously demonstrated that the activity of a truncated version of Buforin II (sh-Buforin, RAGLQFPVGRVHRLLRK-NH2) increases by the addition of an ATCUN motif. We now focus our current studies on understanding the effect of: 1) a positively charged ATCUN sequence, and 2) l-to-d amino acid substitution on the hybrid peptides. We identified that the addition of a positively charged ATCUN motif increases the affinity of the ATCUN-AMP for DNA but does not always result in an enhanced antimicrobial activity over a neutral ATCUN motif. The all-d peptides exhibited up to a 32-fold increase in antimicrobial activity compared to the all-l peptides. The larger activity of the all-d peptides is the result of a larger DNA cleavage activity and higher stability towards proteolysis. Cytotoxicity assays determined that, at their MIC, these peptides caused less than 8% hemolysis and, at 128 ?M, no toxicity to HeLa and HEK293 cell lines. These results indicate that the ATCUN-AMP hybrids are an attractive alternative for treating infectious diseases and provide key insights into the role of the ATCUN motif in naturally-occurring AMPs. PMID:25891844

  13. Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus Strains with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16?S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3?h, 0.3% bile salts for 4?h, and 1.9?mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3?h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits. PMID:25105147

  14. Probiotic potential of Lactobacillus strains with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits. PMID:25105147

  15. ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES OF IXORA COCCINEA L. (RUBIACEAE)

    PubMed Central

    Latha, P.G.; Abraham, T.K.; Panikkar, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity was detected in the 50% ethanolic extract of Ixora coccinea. The effective inhibitory concentration of the extract against both the bacterial test organisms and the fungal test organisms studied was 125 ug mL-1, beyond which the inhibitory activity declined and the organisms started reviving from the effect of the antimicrobial principle. PMID:22556712

  16. In Vitro Model of Colonization Resistance by the Enteric Microbiota: Effects of Antimicrobial Agents Used in Food-Producing Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, R. Doug; Johnson, Shemedia J.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2008-01-01

    A bioassay was developed to measure the minimum concentration of an antimicrobial drug that disrupts the colonization resistance mediated by model human intestinal microbiota against Salmonella invasion of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The bioassay was used to measure the minimum disruptive concentrations (MDCs) of drugs used in animal agriculture. The MDCs varied from 0.125 ?g/ml for some broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs (e.g., streptomycin) to 16 ?g/ml for drugs with limited spectra of antimicrobial activity (e.g., lincomycin). The acceptable daily intake (ADI) residue concentration calculated on the basis of the MDCs were higher for erythromycin, lincomycin, and tylosin than the ADI residue concentrations calculated on the basis of the MICs. The MDC-based ADI values for apramycin, bacitracin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin G, streptomycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin were lower than the reported MIC-based ADI values. The effects of antimicrobial drugs at their MDCs on the bacterial composition of the microbiota were observed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA sequences amplified by PCR. Changes in the population composition of the model colonization resistance microbiota occurred simultaneously with reduced colonization resistance. The results of this study suggest that direct assessment of the effects of antimicrobial drugs on colonization resistance in an in vitro model can be useful in determining ADI values. PMID:18227184

  17. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Ocimum gratissimum L. From different populations of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Matasyoh, Lexa G; Matasyoh, Josphat C; Wachira, Francis N; Kinyua, Miriam G; Muigai, Anne W Thairu; Mukiama, Titus K

    2008-01-01

    Hydro-distilled volatile oils from the leaves of Ocimum gratissimum L. (Lamiaceae) of 13 populations of different silvicultural zones were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aereus, Bacillus spp.) and gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Samonella typhi, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis) bacteria and a pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. All the essential oils are active to the tested microbiles with different strength. The highest antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosae and Proteus mirabilis) was observed from the eastern Kenya (Meru) oil. Meru oil was the best and its effectiveness was consistent on nearly all the microbes tested. The oil from the plant growing in the coastal region of Kenya (Mombasa) showed the best effect only on gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis). Both oils (Meru and Mombasa) were dominated by monoterpenes accounting for 92.48% and 81.37% respectively. The monoterpene fraction was characterized by a high percentage of eugenol (68.8%) for Meru oil and 74.10% for Mombasa oil. The other major monoterpene was methyl eugenol (13.21%). Camphor (0.95%) was observed only in the Meru oil. (Cis)-Ocimene, (trans)-ocimene and beta-pinene were present in both Meru and Mombasa oils. The sesquiterpenes present in fairly good amounts in both oils were germacrene D and (trans)-caryophyllene. The minor sesquiterpenes were alpha-farnesene (0.85%) and beta-bisabolene (0.74%) which were present in the Meru oil only. PMID:20161936

  18. Antimicrobial activity, acute toxicity and cytoprotective effect of Crassocephalum vitellinum (Benth.) S. Moore extract in a rat ethanol-HCl gastric ulcer model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A decoction of Crassocephallum vitellinum (Benth.) S. Moore (Asteraceae) is used in Kagera Region to treat peptic ulcers. This study seeks to evaluate an aqueous ethanol extract of aerial parts of the plant for safety and efficacy. Methods An 80% ethanolic extract of C. vitellinum at doses of 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body wt was evaluated for ability to protect Sprague Dawley rats from acidified ethanol gastric ulceration in comparison with 40 mg/kg body wt pantoprazole. The extract and its dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and aqueous fractions were also evaluated for acute toxicity in mice, brine shrimp toxicity, and antibacterial activity against four Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Salmonella typhi (NCTC 8385), Vibrio cholera (clinical isolate), and Streptococcus faecalis (clinical isolate). The groups of phytochemicals present in the extract were also determined. Results The ethanolic extract of C. vitellinum dose-dependently protected rat gastric mucosa against ethanol/HCl insult to a maximum of 88.3% at 800 mg/kg body wt, affording the same level of protection as by 40 mg/kg body wt pantoprazole. The extract also exhibited weak antibacterial activity against S. typhi and E. coli, while its ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and aqueous fractions showed weak activity against K. pneumonia, S.typhi, E. coli and V. cholera. The extract was non-toxic to mice up to 5000 mg/kg body wt, and the total extract (LC50?=?37.49 ?g/ml) and the aqueous (LC50?=?87.92 ?g/ml), ethyl acetate (LC50?=?119.45 ?g/ml) and dichloromethane fractions (88.79 ?g/ml) showed low toxicity against brine shrimps. Phytochemical screening showed that the extract contains tannins, saponins, flavonoids, and terpenoids. Conclusion The results support the claims by traditional healers that a decoction of C.vitellinum has antiulcer activity. The mechanism of cytoprotection is yet to be determined but the phenolic compounds present in the extract may contribute to its protective actions. However, the dose conferring gastro-protection in the rat is too big to be translated to clinical application; thus bioassay guided fractionation to identify active compound/s or fractions is needed, and use of more peptic ulcer models to determine the mechanism for the protective action. PMID:24552147

  19. Actinomycetes with antimicrobial activity isolated from paper wasp (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae) nests.

    PubMed

    Madden, Anne A; Grassetti, Andrew; Soriano, Jonathan-Andrew N; Starks, Philip T

    2013-08-01

    Actinomycetes-a group of antimicrobial producing bacteria-have been successfully cultured and characterized from the nest material of diverse arthropods. Some are symbionts that produce antimicrobial chemicals found to protect nest brood and resources from pathogenic microbes. Others have no known fitness relationship with their associated insects, but have been found to produce antimicrobials in vitro. Consequently, insect nest material is being investigated as a new source of novel antimicrobial producing actinomycetes, which could be harnessed for therapeutic potential. To extend studies of actinomycete-insect associations beyond soil-substrate dwelling insects and wood boring excavators, we conducted a preliminary assessment of the actinomycetes within the nests of the paper wasp, Polistes dominulus (Christ). We found that actinomycetes were readily cultured from nest material across multiple invasive P. dominulus populations-including members of the genera Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Actinoplanes. Thirty of these isolates were assayed for antimicrobial activity against the challenge bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Serratia marcescens, and Bacillus subtilis. Sixty percent of isolates inhibited the growth of at least one challenge strain. This study provides the first assessment of bacteria associated with nests of P. dominulus, and the first record of antimicrobial producing actinomycetes isolated from social wasps. We provide a new system to explore nest associated actinomycetes from a ubiquitous and cosmopolitan group of insects. PMID:23905732

  20. In vitro activities of 36 antimicrobial agents against clinically isolated Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Teng, L J; Ho, S W; Chang, S C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1991-08-01

    Thirty-six antimicrobial agents were evaluated for in vitro activities against 100 clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each agent for each isolate was determined by the agar dilution method. Among 25 beta-lactam antibiotics, the most active agent was imipenem with an MIC90 and a geometric mean of 1 and 0.15 micrograms/ml, respectively; followed by ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Ampicillin-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, moxalactam, and flomoxef were the next most active agents. Piperacillin, ticarcillin, ceftizoxime, cefotaxime, cefuzonam, cefoxitin, and cefmetazole were equally active with the MIC50s ranging from 4 to 16 micrograms/ml, and MIC90s ranging from 32 to greater than or equal to 256 micrograms/ml. The remaining 10 beta-lactam antibiotics, ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, cefoperazone, cefmenoxime, ceftazidime, cefpirome, aztreonam, and carumonam were less active. All isolates were resistant to cefotiam at a low breakpoint. Among 6 quinolones, ciprofloxacin was the most active agent with an MIC50 and an MIC90 of 4 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. All isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid, pipemidic acid, cinoxacin, enoxacin, and norfloxacin. Among 5 frequently used agents, chloramphenicol, ornidazole, and metronidazole were the most effective agents which inhibited 100% of the isolates at 8, 2, and 2 micrograms/ml, respectively; while clindamycin and minocycline had less activity. PMID:1683376

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Essential Oils Against Microorganisms Deteriorating Fruit Juices

    PubMed Central

    Sarhan, M. M.; Abu Shahla, A. N. K.; Abou El-Khair, E. K.

    2006-01-01

    Seventeen microbial species including 10 fungal taxa, two yeasts and five bacteria, were isolated from freshly prepared orange, guava and banana juices kept in open bottles at room temperature for 7 days. Eight different essential oils, from local herbs, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against these test organisms. The essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum basilicum and Origanum majorana were found to be highly effective against these microorganisms. Aspergillus niger, A. flavus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the most prevalent microorganisms in juice, showed the highest resistance against these essential oils. GC-MS analysis showed that while e-citral, a'-myrcene, and z-citral represent the major components (75.1%) of the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus; bezynen,1-methyl-4-(2-propenyl), 1,8-cineole and trans-a'-bisabolene were the main components (90.6%) of Ocimum basilicum; whereas 3-cyclohexen-1-01,4-methyl-1(1-methylethyl)-(CAS), c-terpinene and trans-caryophyllene represent the major components (65.1%) of Origanum majorana. These three essential oils were introduced into juices by two techniques namely, fumigation and direct contact. The former technique showed more fungicidal effect than the latter one against A. flavus, A. niger, and S. cerevisiae. The essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus by comparison to other test oils showed the strongest effect against these fungi with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 1.5 µl/ml medium and a sublethal concentration of 1.0 µl/ml. The antimicrobial activity of this oil is thermostable at 121? for 30 min. PMID:24039503

  2. Diallyl sulfide content and antimicrobial activity against food-borne pathogenic bacteria of chives (Allium schoenoprasum).

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2008-11-01

    Chives, a member of the Alliaceae family, have been used in food and medicine in Thailand for a long time. Diallyl sulfides (diallyl monosulfide, dially disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, and diallyl tetrasulfide) are believed to be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of plants in this family. In this study, chive oil was examined for its diallyl sulfide content and its antimicrobial activity against some strains of food-borne pathogenic bacteria. Chive oil had a very low concentration of diallyl monosulfide in comparison with the other diallyl sulfides. They inhibited all pathogenic bacteria used in this study with a different degree of inhibition. Chive oil was also shown to be able to inhibit Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a food model. This study is the first report describing not only the diallyl disulfide content of chive oil, but also its antimicrobial activity against food-borne pathogens in both a test tube and food model. PMID:18997412

  3. Cutaneous Injury Induces the Release of Cathelicidin Anti-Microbial Peptides Active Against Group A Streptococcus

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Cutaneous Injury Induces the Release of Cathelicidin Anti- Microbial Peptides Active Against Group in the protection of skin against wound infections, the anti-microbial activity of LL-37 and CRAMP was determined- cessing from the inactive prostorage form to the mature C-terminal peptide. Analysis of anti-micro- bial

  4. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiulcer and analgesic activities of nettle ( Urtica dioica L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ?lhami Gülçin; Ö. ?rfan Küfrevio?lu; Münir Oktay; Mehmet Emin Büyükokuro?lu

    2004-01-01

    In this study, water extract of nettle (Urtica dioica L.) (WEN) was studied for antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiulcer and analgesic properties. The antioxidant properties of WEN were evaluated using different antioxidant tests, including reducing power, free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, and metal chelating activities. WEN had powerful antioxidant activity. The 50, 100 and 250?g amounts of

  5. Antimicrobial activity of long-chain, water-soluble, dendritic tricarboxylato amphiphiles

    E-print Network

    Falkinham, Joseph

    Antimicrobial activity of long-chain, water-soluble, dendritic tricarboxylato amphiphiles Andre´ A activities of three series of homologous, dendritic tricarboxy- lato (three-headed) amphiphiles against a battery of bacteria and fungi. Methods: Three series of homologous dendritic amphiphiles were synthesized

  6. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical study of Vernonia glabra (Steetz) Oliv. & Hiern. in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kitonde, Catherine Kadogo; Fidahusein, Dossaji Saifuddin; Lukhoba, Catherine Wanjiru; Jumba, Miriam Musamia

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases are prevalent and life threatening in Kenya. Majority of the sick are seeking herbal remedies in search of effective, safe, and affordable cure. This project aims to investigate the antimicrobial activity and presence of active phytochemical compounds in different parts of Vernonia glabra; a plant used by herbalists in various regions of Kenya, for the treatment of gastrointestinal problems. The plant sample was collected in January 2010 in Machakos, and different parts dried at room temperature under shade, ground into powder and extracted in Dichloromethane: Methanol in the ratio 1:1, and water. These crude extracts were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus niger for antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion technique. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for active crude extracts were done using disc diffusion technique after the failure of agar and broth dilution methods. It was observed that the organic crude extracts of flower, leaf, stem, root, and/or entire plant, showed activity against at least one of the four micro-organisms screened, and at concentrations lower than the aqueous crude extracts. Organic crude extract of the leaf showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus (mean inhibition zone of 1.85), recording higher activity than the commercially used standard antibiotic (Streptomycin mean inhibition zone of 1.30). The organic crude extract of flower showed significant activity only against S. aureus, with the lowest MIC of 1.5625 mg/100µl, compared to streptomycin with M.I.C of 6.25 mg/100µl. Thin Layer Chromatography-Bioautography Agar-Overlay showed that, flower alkaloids (50% active), root sapogenins (43.8% active), and root terpenoids (38.5% active) were identified as the potential antibacterial compounds against S. aureus. These results suggest that, V. glabra contains phytochemicals of medicinal properties and justify the use of V. glabra in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of microbial based diseases. However, research on toxicity which is missing in this study is recommended for V. glabra in order to verify, validate and document the safety of this medicinal plant to the society. PMID:24082337

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Coronarin D and Its Synergistic Potential with Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Reuk-ngam, Nanthawan; Chimnoi, Nitirat; Techasakul, Supanna

    2014-01-01

    Coronarin D is a labdane-type diterpene from the rhizomes of Hedychium coronarium. In the view of our ongoing effort to explore its novel biological activity, antimicrobial activity study of coronarin D was performed. The results showed that coronarin D was active against tested Gram-positive bacteria, inactive for tested Gram-negative bacteria, and weakly active against tested fungi. The antibacterial effect of the combination of coronarin D with nine classical antibiotics against four Gram-positive bacteria was also evaluated. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) of coronarin D-antibiotics combinations, calculated from the checkerboard assay, were used as synergism indicator. Out of 36 combinations, 47% showed total synergism, 33% had partial synergistic interaction, 17% showed no effect, and 3% showed antagonism. By combination with coronarin D at concentration of 0.25 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), the activities of antibiotics were boosted to 4- to 128-fold. These finding suggested an attractive approach to combat the infectious diseases by using coronarin D-antibiotic drug combination. PMID:24949458

  8. The effect of gramicidin, a topical contraceptive and antimicrobial agent with anti-HIV activity,against herpes simplex viruses type 1 and 2 in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Bourinbaiar; C. F. Coleman

    1997-01-01

    Summary.  ?The effect of an anti-HIV compound, gramicidin, previously used as a topical antibiotic and vaginal contraceptive, on the\\u000a replication of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) type 1 and 2 has been examined. Human WI-38 fibroblasts were inoculated with either\\u000a HSV type in the presence of serial dilutions of gramicidin and reduction in viral yield was measured by ELISA. The 50% inhibitory

  9. Antimicrobial activity of isothiocyanates from cruciferous plants against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Dias, Carla; Aires, Alfredo; Saavedra, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Purified isothiocyanates from cruciferous plants (Brassicacea, Syn. Cruciferae) plants were evaluated against 15 isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolated from diabetic foot-ulcer patients aiming the study of the potential usage of allyl-isothiocyanate, benzyl-isothiocyanate and 2-phenylethyl-isothiocyanate against this important bacteria. Disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods were used to access the antimicrobial activity. The index (Ia) and rate (Ra) of the antibacterial activity for each compound were calculated. The results showed a highly dose-dependent compound and chemical structure antibacterial effectiveness. The results showed a strong relation between the chemical structure of isothiocyanates and its antibacterial effectiveness. The benzyl-isothiocyanate was the most effective with a minimum inhibitory concentration varying between 2.9 and 110 µg·mL(-1) with an antibacterial activity rate up to 87%. Moreover, their antibacterial activity was mainly bactericidal. This study provides scientific evidence that isothiocyanates have an interesting biological value and must be considered as an important tool to be used against MRSA. PMID:25353177

  10. Antimicrobial, insecticidal and phytotoxic activities of Cotinus coggyria Scop. essential oil (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Ulukanli, Zeynep; Karabörklü, Salih; Bozok, Fuat; Çenet, Menderes; Oztürk, Bintu?; Balcilar, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil of Cotinus coggyria Scop.' leaves was found to be rich in ?-pinene (43.1%), limonene (21.3%) and ?-myrcene (8.5%). In the antimicrobial screening, essential oil was notably active on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC BAA-977, Candida albicans ATCC 14053 and C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019 using the disc diffusion and volatilisation assays. The fumigant assay of the essential oil caused 70% and 100% mortality on the two pest adults of Acanthoscelides obtectus and Tribolium castaneum at 80 ?L L?¹ air concentration at 96 h, respectively. In the toxicity assay on weeds, a dose-dependent decrease was observed in the germination and seedling growth of Silybum marianum and Portulaca oleracea. The present results indicated that oil could be suggested as an effective biocontrol agent in various fields. PMID:24980636

  11. Synthesis and characterization of new diiodocoumarin derivatives with promising antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hany M; El-Wahab, Ashraf H F Abd; El-Agrody, Ahmed M; Bedair, Ahmed H; Eid, Fathy A; Khafagy, Mostafa M; Abd-El-Rehem, Kamal A

    2011-01-01

    A series of 6,8-diiodocoumarin-3-N-carboxamides (4-11) were prepared. Treatment of ethyl 6,8-diiodocoumarin-3-carboxylate (1) with ethyl cyanoacetate/NH(4)OAc gave ethyl 2-(3-carbamoyl-6,8-diiodocoumarin-4-yl)-2-cyanoacetate (12) and 2-amino-4-hydroxy-7,9-diiodocoumarino[3,4-c]pyridine-1-carbonitrile (13), and treatment with acetone in the presence of NH(4)OAc or methylamine gave the ethyl 4-oxo-2,6-methano-2-methyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-8,10-diiodobenzo[2,1-g]-2H-1,3-oxazocine-5-carboxylate derivatives 14a,b. All compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity and the compounds 12-14a,b exhibited a pronounced effect on all tested microorganisms. PMID:22238548

  12. Synthesis and characterization of new diiodocoumarin derivatives with promising antimicrobial activities

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hany M; EL-Agrody, Ahmed M; Bedair, Ahmed H; Eid, Fathy A; Khafagy, Mostafa M; Abd-EL-Rehem, Kamal A

    2011-01-01

    Summary A series of 6,8-diiodocoumarin-3-N-carboxamides (4–11) were prepared. Treatment of ethyl 6,8-diiodocoumarin-3-carboxylate (1) with ethyl cyanoacetate/NH4OAc gave ethyl 2-(3-carbamoyl-6,8-diiodocoumarin-4-yl)-2-cyanoacetate (12) and 2-amino-4-hydroxy-7,9-diiodocoumarino[3,4-c]pyridine-1-carbonitrile (13), and treatment with acetone in the presence of NH4OAc or methylamine gave the ethyl 4-oxo-2,6-methano-2-methyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-8,10-diiodobenzo[2,1-g]-2H-1,3-oxazocine-5-carboxylate derivatives 14a,b. All compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity and the compounds 12–14a,b exhibited a pronounced effect on all tested microorganisms. PMID:22238548

  13. Effect of efflux pump inhibitors on antimicrobial resistance and in vivo colonization of Campylobacter jejuni

    E-print Network

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Effect of efflux pump inhibitors on antimicrobial resistance and in vivo colonization, TN Summary CmeABC, a multidrug efflux pump, contributes to Campylobacter resistance to a broad of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on the susceptibility of Campylobacter to various antimicrobials. Presence

  14. Linum usitatissimum (linseed\\/flaxseed) fixed oil: antimicrobial activity and efficacy in bovine mastitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaurav Kaithwas; Alok Mukerjee; P. Kumar; Dipak K. Majumdar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  In vitro antimicrobial activity and in vivo therapeutic efficacy of L. usitatissimum (linseed\\/flaxseed) fixed oil in bovine mastitis were investigated.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  In vitro antimicrobial activity of L. usitatissimum fixed oil was evaluated against a number of microorganisms by disc diffusion method and MIC determination. The in vivo efficacy\\u000a of the oil was evaluated in nine mastitis-affected cows divided into three groups

  15. Carrier herbal medicine: an evaluation of the antimicrobial and anticancer activity in some frequently used remedies.

    PubMed

    Ritch-Krc, E M; Turner, N J; Towers, G H

    1996-07-01

    The antimicrobial properties of some traditional Carrier herbal preparations were evaluated using an agar dilution method. Pitch preparations were screened against known human pathogens: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results indicated definite antimicrobial activity in the pitch preparations of Picea glauca and Pinus contorta and provide a starting point for pharmacognostic evaluation of these species. In addition, cytoxicity assays, to test the anticancer activity of methanolic extracts of Alnus incana and Shepherdia canadensis against mouse mastocytoma cells, were shown to be positive. PMID:8771456

  16. Air-ozonolysis to generate contact active antimicrobial surfaces: activation of polyethylene and polystyrene followed by covalent graft of quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Fadida, Tania; Kroupitski, Yulia; Peiper, Uri M; Bendikov, Tatyana; Sela Saldinger, Shlomo; Poverenov, Elena

    2014-10-01

    Air-ozonolysis was revealed as an accessible and effective approach for surface activation and further functionalization of hydrocarbon polymers. Antimicrobial contact active polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS) were designed by generation on their surfaces OH-functional groups and covalent graft of dimethyloctadecyl [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl] ammonium chloride (C18-TSA) quaternary ammonium salt. The shortened analog, trimethyl [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl] ammonium chloride (C1-TSA), was also covalently attached to the activated PE and PS surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FTIR confirmed the surface modifications. Scanning electron (SEM) and confocal microscopy were utilized to monitor surface morphology and bacteria interactions. The antimicrobial effect of the C18-TSA grafted polymer surfaces was demonstrated on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria species including human pathogen, Salmonella enterica. The shorter C1-TSA grafted polymers did not demonstrate bactericidal activity, suggesting the critical role of the alkyl chain length. The described strategy may establish a new general and safe platform for future development and application of contact active antimicrobial polymers. PMID:25064479

  17. Antimicrobial activity of a novel adhesive containing chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) against the resident microflora in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Neal; Wibaux, Anne; Ward, Colleen; Paulson, Daryl S.; Johnson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of a new, transparent composite film dressing, whose adhesive contains chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), against the native microflora present on human skin. Methods CHG-containing adhesive film dressings and non-antimicrobial control film dressings were applied to the skin on the backs of healthy human volunteers without antiseptic preparation. Dressings were removed 1, 4 or 7 days after application. The bacterial populations underneath were measured by quantitative cultures (cylinder-scrub technique) and compared with one another as a function of time. Results The mean baseline microflora recovery was 3.24 log10 cfu/cm2. The mean log reductions from baseline measured from underneath the CHG-containing dressings were 0.87, 0.78 and 1.30 log10 cfu/cm2 on days 1, 4 and 7, respectively, compared with log reductions of 0.67, ?0.87 and ?1.29 log10 cfu/cm2 from underneath the control film dressings. There was no significant difference between the log reductions of the two treatments on day 1, but on days 4 and 7 the log reduction associated with the CHG adhesive was significantly higher than that associated with the control adhesive. Conclusions The adhesive containing CHG was associated with a sustained antimicrobial effect that was not present in the control. Incorporating the antimicrobial into the adhesive layer confers upon it bactericidal properties in marked contrast to the non-antimicrobial adhesive, which contributed to bacterial proliferation when the wear time was ?4 days. PMID:24722839

  18. The ability of streptomycin-loaded chitosan-coated magnetic nanocomposites to possess antimicrobial and antituberculosis activities

    PubMed Central

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat; Hussein Al Ali, Samer Hassan; Husseiny, Mohamed I; Geilich, Benjamin M; Webster, Thomas J; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by the coprecipitation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ iron salts in alkali media. MNPs were coated by chitosan (CS) to produce CS-MNPs. Streptomycin (Strep) was loaded onto the surface of CS-MNPs to form a Strep-CS-MNP nanocomposite. MNPs, CS-MNPs, and the nanocomposites were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and were evaluated for their antibacterial activity. The antimicrobial activity of the as-synthesized nanoparticles was evaluated using different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For the first time, it was found that the nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activities against the tested microorganisms (albeit with a more pronounced effect against Gram-negative than Gram-positive bacteria), and thus, should be further studied as a novel nano-antibiotic for numerous antimicrobial and antituberculosis applications. Moreover, since these nanoparticle bacteria fighters are magnetic, one can easily envision magnetic field direction of these nanoparticles to fight unwanted microorganism presence on demand. Due to the ability of magnetic nanoparticles to increase the sensitivity of imaging modalities (such as magnetic resonance imaging), these novel nanoparticles can also be used to diagnose the presence of such microorganisms. In summary, although requiring further investigation, this study introduces for the first time a new type of magnetic nanoparticle with microorganism theranostic properties as a potential tool to both diagnose and treat diverse microbial and tuberculosis infections. PMID:25995633

  19. Structure?Activity Relationships of Antimicrobial Gallic Acid Derivatives from Pomegranate and Acacia Fruit Extracts against Potato Bacterial Wilt Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A; Al-Mahdy, Dalia A; Salah El Dine, Riham; Fahmy, Sherifa; Yassin, Aymen; Porzel, Andrea; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial wilts of potato, tomato, pepper, and or eggplant caused by Ralstonia solanacearum are among the most serious plant diseases worldwide. In this study, the issue of developing bactericidal agents from natural sources against R. solanacearum derived from plant extracts was addressed. Extracts prepared from 25 plant species with antiseptic relevance in Egyptian folk medicine were screened for their antimicrobial properties against the potato pathogen R. solancearum by using the disc-zone inhibition assay and microtitre plate dilution method. Plants exhibiting notable antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogen include extracts from Acacia arabica and Punica granatum. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of A. arabica and P. granatum resulted in the isolation of bioactive compounds 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid and gallic acid, in addition to epicatechin. All isolates displayed significant antimicrobial activities against R. solanacearum (MIC values 0.5-9?mg/ml), with 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid being the most effective one with a MIC value of 0.47?mg/ml. We further performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study for the inhibition of R. solanacearum growth by ten natural, structurally related benzoic acids. PMID:26080741

  20. Antimicrobial Compounds in Tears

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here. PMID:23880529

  1. Seasonal effect on Brazilian propolis antibacterial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M Sforcin; A Fernandes; C. A. M Lopes; V Bankova; S. R. C Funari

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of microorganisms towards the antibiotic action of propolis has been widely investigated. Since reports dealing with seasonal effect on propolis activity are not available, this assay was carried out aiming to observe the in vitro antimicrobial activity of propolis, collected during the four seasons, on bacterial strains isolated from human infections. Dilution of ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP)

  2. Antimicrobial activity of polyphenol-rich fractions from Sida alba L. (Malvaceae) against co-trimoxazol-resistant bacteria strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The increased resistance of microorganisms to the currently used antimicrobials has lead to the evaluation of other agents that might have antimicrobial activity. Medicinal plants are sources of phytochemicals which are able to initiate different biological activities including antimicrobials Materials and methods In vitro antibacterial (MIC, MBC and time-kill studies) of polyphenol-rich fractions from Sida alba L. (Malvaceae) was assessed using ten bacteria strains (Gram-negative and Gram-positive). Results All test bacteria were susceptible to the polyphenol-rich fractions. Time-kill results showed that after 5 h exposition there was no viable microorganism in the initial inoculum and the effect of polyphenol-rich fractions was faster on Enterococcus faecalis (Gram-positive bacterium) comparatively to the other bacteria strains. Conclusion The data analysis indicates that the tested of polyphenol-rich fractions has significant effects when compared with the standard antibiotic. These results therefore justify the traditional use of sida alba L., alone or in combination with other herbs to treat bacterial infections. PMID:22364123

  3. Differential Roles of Antimicrobials in the Acquisition of Drug Resistance through Activation of the SOS Response in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis M; Cortés, Pilar; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi; Aranda, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The effect of antimicrobials on SOS-mediated mutagenesis induction depends on the bacterial species and the antimicrobial group. In this work, we studied the effect of different families of antimicrobial agents used in clinical therapy against Acinetobacter baumannii in the induction of mutagenesis in this multiresistant Gram-negative pathogen. The data showed that ciprofloxacin and tetracycline induce SOS-mediated mutagenesis, whereas colistin and meropenem, which are extensively used in clinical therapy, do not. PMID:25896685

  4. The antimicrobial activity of lactoferrin: Current status and perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Orsi

    2004-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a multifunctional iron glycoprotein which is known to exert a broad-spectrum primary defense activity against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Its iron sequestering property is at the basis of the bacteriostatic effect, which can be counteracted by bacterial pathogens by two mechanisms: the production of siderophores which bind ferric ion with high affinity and transport it into

  5. In vitro evaluation of antimicrobial activities of various commercial essential oils, oleoresin and pure compounds against food pathogens and application in ham.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Dominic; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the application of commercially available essential oils (EOs) and oleoresins to control bacterial pathogens for ready to eat food. In this study, sixty seven commercial EOs, oleoresins (ORs) and pure compounds were used to evaluate in vitro their antimicrobial activity against six food pathogens. These products were first screened for their antimicrobial activity using disk diffusion assay. Forty one products were then chosen for further analysis to determine their minimum inhibitory concentration against 6 different bacteria. There were 5 different products (allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamon Chinese cassia, cinnamon OR, oregano and red thyme) that showed high antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria. Further analysis examined the effect of four selected EOs on controlling the growth rate of mixed cultures of Listeria monocytogenes in ham. A reduction of the growth rate by 19 and 10% was observed when oregano and cinnamon cassia EOs were respectively added in ham at a concentration of 500 ppm. PMID:24012976

  6. Comparative in vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of nosocomial isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and synergistic activities of nine antimicrobial combinations.

    PubMed

    Marques, M B; Brookings, E S; Moser, S A; Sonke, P B; Waites, K B

    1997-05-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 69 nosocomial Acinetobacter isolates were determined by the broth microdilution method. Fourteen (20%) isolates were resistant to at least two aminoglycosides and two extended-spectrum penicillins. Nine antimicrobial combinations were then tested for synergy against these 14 isolates by checkerboard titration: imipenem with ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and tobramycin and ampicillin-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ticarcillin-clavulanate with amikacin and tobramycin. Synergy was detected with one or more antimicrobial combinations against 9 of 14 (64%) isolates, partial synergy was detected with one or more combinations against all 14 isolates, and an additive effect alone was observed with two different combinations against two isolates. No antagonism was detected with any combination. Imipenem plus either amikacin or tobramycin resulted in a synergistic or partial synergistic response against all 14 isolates. Specific combinations showing synergy against A. baumannii isolates were imipenem with tobramycin (four isolates), imipenem with amikacin (three isolates), ampicillin-sulbactam with tobramycin (six isolates), ampicillin-sulbactam with amikacin (three isolates), and ticarcillin-clavulanate with tobramycin (one isolate). Genotyping by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis showed that 9 of the 14 isolates were of one strain, 4 isolates were of a second strain, and the remaining isolate was of a different strain. Eight of 14 (57%) patients infected with resistant A. baumannii isolates died. Only 3 of 14 patients had received a therapeutic regimen which was tested for synergy. Clinical studies are needed to determine the significance of these findings. PMID:9145838

  7. Antimicrobial Activity and Phytochemical Constituents of Leaf Extracts of Cassia auriculata.

    PubMed

    Murugan, T; Wins, J Albino; Murugan, M

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a wide variety of phytochemical constituents, which are secondary metabolites and are used either directly or indirectly in the pharmaceutical industry. 'For centuries, man has effectively used various components of plants or their extracts for the treatment of many diseases, including bacterial infections. In the present study methanol, chloroform and aqueous extracts of Cassia auriculata leaf were subjected for antimicrobial activity by well-diffusion method against six bacterial strains namely Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. The results revealed that the methanol and chloroform extracts exhibited strong inhibitory activity against all the tested organisms (zone of inhibition of 12-20 mm), except Pseudomonas aeruginosa (zone of inhibition 10 mm or nil). The aqueous extracts showed moderate activity by 'Zone of inhibition ?12 or nil). The extracts were screened for their phytochemical constituents by standard protocols' and were shown to contain carbohydrates, proteins, alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, saponins and tannins. The antibacterial activity of these extracts is possibly linked to the presence of flavonoids, steroid, saponins and/or tannins. Further studies are needed to determine the precise active principles from Cassia auriculata. PMID:23901174

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from the edible aromatic plant Aristolochia delavayi.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Jian; Njateng, Guy S S; He, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Gu, Jian-Long; Chen, Shan-Na; Du, Zhi-Zhi

    2013-11-01

    The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Aristolochia delavayi Franch. (Aristolochiaceae), a unique edible aromatic plant consumed by the Nakhi (Naxi) people in Yunnan, China, was investigated using GC/MS analysis. In total, 95 components, representing more than 95% of the oil composition, were identified, and the main constituents found were (E)-dec-2-enal (52.0%), (E)-dodec-2-enal (6.8%), dodecanal (3.35%), heptanal (2.88%), and decanal (2.63%). The essential oil showed strong inhibitory activity (96% reduction) of the production of bacterial volatile sulfide compounds (VSC) by Klebsiella pneumoniae, an effect that was comparable with that of the reference compound citral (91% reduction). Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and the isolated major compound against eight bacterial and six fungal strains were evaluated. The essential oil showed significant antibacterial activity against Providencia stuartii and Escherichia coli, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 3.9 to 62.5 ?g/ml. The oil also showed strong inhibitory activity against the fungal strains Trichophyton ajelloi, Trichophyton terrestre, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, and Cryptococcus neoformans, with MIC values ranging from 3.9 to 31.25 ?g/ml, while (E)-dec-2-enal presented a lower antifungal activity than the essential oil. PMID:24243612

  9. Antimicrobial activity of extracts and topical products of the stem bark of Spathodea campanulata for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ofori-Kwakye, K; Kwapong, A A; Adu, F

    2009-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of the aqueous, ethanol, methanol and petroleum ether Soxhlet extracts of sundried stem bark of Spathodea campanulata P. Beauv. (Bignoniaceae) was investigated by testing the extracts against B. subtilis, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the methanol extract was determined against the four bacteria strains and C. albicans using the broth dilution method. Four topical products were prepared by incorporating the methanol extract of S. campanulata (20 % w/w) into aqueous cream, soft paraffin, emulsifying ointment and simple ointment bases and evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial efficacy. The effect of storage time on the activity of the methanol extract of S. campanulata and S. campanulata extract incorporated in aqueous cream base was also investigated. The methanol and ethanol extracts showed good activity while the aqueous and petroleum ether extracts exhibited little activity. The methanol extract showed the best antibacterial activity. The MIC of the methanol extract of S. campanulata was: C. albicans (45 - 50 mg/ml), B. subtilis and E. coli (50 - 55 mg/ml), P. aeruginosa (60 - 65 mg/ml), S. aureus (145 - 150 mg/ml). Antimicrobial activity of S. campanulata in the topical bases was in the order: aqueous cream > emulsifying ointment > simple ointment > white soft paraffin. Antimicrobial activity of S. campanulata in aqueous cream decreased (p < 0.05) upon storage at room temperature for 6-months. The antifungal activity of the methanol extract of S. campanulata was reduced (p < 0.05) upon storage while antibacterial activity was largely unaffected. PMID:20209009

  10. Analysis of antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of Juniperus excelsa M. B subsp. Polycarpos (K. Koch) Takhtajan essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Moein, M. R.; Ghasemi, Y.; Moein, S.; Nejati, M.

    2010-01-01

    Juniperus excelsa M.B subsp. Polycarpos (K.Koch), collected from south of Iran, was subjected to hydrodistillation using clevenger apparatus to obtain essential oil. The essential was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and studied for antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant activities. The results indicated ?-pinene (67.71%) as the major compound and ?-cedral (11.5%), ?3-carene (5.19%) and limonene (4.41%) in moderate amounts. Antimicrobial tests were carried out using disk diffusion method, followed by the measurement of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were susceptible to essential oil. The oil showed radical scavenging and antioxidant effects. PMID:21808554

  11. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Chromolaena laevigata during flowering and fruiting stages.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Cynthia; Lago, João H G; Perazzo, Fábio F; Ferreira, Karen S; Lima, Marcos E L; Moreno, Paulo R H; Young, Maria C M

    2013-04-01

    The chemical compositions and antimicrobial activities of essential oils from the leaves, stems, capitula, and cypselas of Chromolaena laevigata were evaluated at two different phenological stages, flowering and fruiting. Thirty-eight compounds were identified in the crude oils by GC/MS. The sesquiterpene laevigatin was the major constituent of the leaf, capitulum, and cypsela oils, while the sesquiterpene spathulenol was the main component in the stem oils. The antimicrobial activities of the oils were evaluated against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Stem oil obtained from Chromolaena laevigata during the fruiting stage generally showed the highest activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 62.5??g/ml against Candida albicans and S. aureus, and 500??g/ml against P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Pure laevigatin exhibited MIC values of 500 and 125??g/ml against C. albicans and S. aureus, respectively, indicating that this constituent could be responsible, at least in part, for the antimicrobial activities detected in the crude oils. More studies concerning the biological activities of isolated derivatives are required to improve our knowledge of the antimicrobial potential of volatile compounds present in native plants. PMID:23576348

  12. Green Synthesis of AgNPs Stabilized with biowaste and their antimicrobial activities

    PubMed Central

    Jasuja, Nakuleshwar Dut; Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Reza, Mohtashim; Joshi, Suresh C.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, rapid reduction and stabilization of Ag+ ions with different NaOH molar concentration (0.5 mM, 1.0 mM and 1.5 mM) has been carried out in the aqueous solution of silver nitrate by the bio waste peel extract of P.granatum. Generally, chemical methods used for the synthesis of AgNPs are quite toxic, flammable and have adverse effect in medical application but green synthesis is a better option due to eco-friendliness, non-toxicity and safe for human. Stable AgNPs were synthesized by treating 90 mL aqueous solution of 2 mM AgNO3 with the 5 mL plant peels extract (0.4% w/v) at different NaOH concentration (5 mL). The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM. Further, antimicrobial activities of AgNPs were performed on Gram positive i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilius and Gram negative i.e. E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. The AgNPs synthesized at 1.5 mM NaOH concentration had shown maximum zone of inhibition (ZOI) i.e. 49 ± 0.64 in E. coli, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilius had shown 40 ± 0.29 mm, 28 ± 0.13 and 42 ± 0.49 mm ZOI respectively. The MIC value of 30 ?g/mL observed for E. coli Whereas, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilius and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had shown 45 ?g/mL, 38 ?g/mL, 35 ?g/mL respectively. The study revealed that AgNPs had shown significant antimicrobial activity as compared to Streptomycin. PMID:25763037

  13. Green Synthesis of AgNPs Stabilized with biowaste and their antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Jasuja, Nakuleshwar Dut; Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Reza, Mohtashim; Joshi, Suresh C

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, rapid reduction and stabilization of Ag+ ions with different NaOH molar concentration (0.5 mM, 1.0 mM and 1.5 mM) has been carried out in the aqueous solution of silver nitrate by the bio waste peel extract of P.granatum. Generally, chemical methods used for the synthesis of AgNPs are quite toxic, flammable and have adverse effect in medical application but green synthesis is a better option due to eco-friendliness, non-toxicity and safe for human. Stable AgNPs were synthesized by treating 90 mL aqueous solution of 2 mM AgNO? with the 5 mL plant peels extract (0.4% w/v) at different NaOH concentration (5 mL). The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM. Further, antimicrobial activities of AgNPs were performed on Gram positive i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilius and Gram negative i.e. E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. The AgNPs synthesized at 1.5 mM NaOH concentration had shown maximum zone of inhibition (ZOI) i.e. 49 ± 0.64 in E. coli, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilius had shown 40 ± 0.29 mm, 28 ± 0.13 and 42 ± 0.49 mm ZOI respectively. The MIC value of 30 ?g/mL observed for E. coli Whereas, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilius and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had shown 45 ?g/mL, 38 ?g/mL, 35 ?g/mL respectively. The study revealed that AgNPs had shown significant antimicrobial activity as compared to Streptomycin. PMID:25763037

  14. Gemini Alkyldeoxy-D-Glucitolammonium Salts as Modern Surfactants and Microbiocides: Synthesis, Antimicrobial and Surface Activity, Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Brycki, Bogumi?; Szulc, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Dimeric quaternary alkylammonium salts possess a favourable surface and antimicrobial activity. In this paper we describe synthesis, spectroscopic analysis, surface and antimicrobial activity as well as biodegradability of polymethylene-?,?-bis(N,N-dialkyl-N-deoxy-D-glucitolammonium iodides), a new group of dimeric quaternary ammonium salts. This new group of gemini surfactants can be produced from chemicals which come from renewable sources. The structure of products has been determined by the FTIR and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The biodegradability, surface activity and antimicrobial efficacy against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum were determined. The influence of the number of alkyl chains and their lengths on surface and antimicrobial properties has been shown. In general, dimeric quaternary alkyldeoxy-D-glucitolammonium salts with long alkyl substituents show favourable surface properties and an excellent antimicrobial activity. PMID:24416314

  15. Gemini alkyldeoxy-D-glucitolammonium salts as modern surfactants and microbiocides: synthesis, antimicrobial and surface activity, biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Brycki, Bogumi?; Szulc, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Dimeric quaternary alkylammonium salts possess a favourable surface and antimicrobial activity. In this paper we describe synthesis, spectroscopic analysis, surface and antimicrobial activity as well as biodegradability of polymethylene-?,?-bis(N,N-dialkyl-N-deoxy-D-glucitolammonium iodides), a new group of dimeric quaternary ammonium salts. This new group of gemini surfactants can be produced from chemicals which come from renewable sources. The structure of products has been determined by the FTIR and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The biodegradability, surface activity and antimicrobial efficacy against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum were determined. The influence of the number of alkyl chains and their lengths on surface and antimicrobial properties has been shown. In general, dimeric quaternary alkyldeoxy-D-glucitolammonium salts with long alkyl substituents show favourable surface properties and an excellent antimicrobial activity. PMID:24416314

  16. Biologically active polymers: synthesis and antimicrobial activity of modified glycidyl methacrylate polymers having a quaternary ammonium and phosphonium groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    El-Refaie Kenawy; Fouad I Abdel-Hay; Abd El-Raheem R El-Shanshoury; Mohamed H El-Newehy

    1998-01-01

    Polymers with antibacterial activity have been synthesized by chemical modification of poly(glycidyl methacrylate). The glycidyl methacrylate was polymerized by the free radical polymerization technique. The poly(glycidyl methacrylate) was hydrolyzed and was chloroacetylated using chloroacetyl chloride. The chloroacetylated product was modified to yield polymers with either quaternary ammonium or phosphonium salts. The antimicrobial activity of the modified glycidyl methacrylate polymers has

  17. CXCL14 Displays Antimicrobial Activity against Respiratory Tract Bacteria and Contributes to Clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pulmonary Infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chen; Basilico, Paola; Cremona, Tiziana Patrizia; Collins, Paul; Moser, Bernhard; Benarafa, Charaf; Wolf, Marlene

    2015-06-15

    CXCL14 is a chemokine with an atypical, yet highly conserved, primary structure characterized by a short N terminus and high sequence identity between human and mouse. Although it induces chemotaxis of monocytic cells at high concentrations, its physiological role in leukocyte trafficking remains elusive. In contrast, several studies have demonstrated that CXCL14 is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide that is expressed abundantly and constitutively in epithelial tissues. In this study, we further explored the antimicrobial properties of CXCL14 against respiratory pathogens in vitro and in vivo. We found that CXCL14 potently killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in a dose-dependent manner in part through membrane depolarization and rupture. By performing structure-activity studies, we found that the activity against Gram-negative bacteria was largely associated with the N-terminal peptide CXCL141-13. Interestingly, the central part of the molecule representing the ?-sheet also maintained ?62% killing activity and was sufficient to induce chemotaxis of THP-1 cells. The C-terminal ?-helix of CXCL14 had neither antimicrobial nor chemotactic effect. To investigate a physiological function for CXCL14 in innate immunity in vivo, we infected CXCL14-deficient mice with lung pathogens and we found that CXCL14 contributed to enhanced clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our comprehensive studies reflect the complex bactericidal mechanisms of CXCL14, and we propose that different structural features are relevant for the killing of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Taken together, our studies show that evolutionary-conserved features of CXCL14 are important for constitutive antimicrobial defenses against pneumonia. PMID:25964486

  18. Food Antimicrobials Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Padilla, Adriana; Soto, Karen M.; Hernández Iturriaga, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Natural food antimicrobials are bioactive compounds that inhibit the growth of microorganisms involved in food spoilage or food-borne illness. However, stability issues result in degradation and loss of antimicrobial activity. Nanoencapsulation allows protection of antimicrobial food agents from unfavorable environmental conditions and incompatibilities. Encapsulation of food antimicrobials control delivery increasing the concentration of the antimicrobials in specific areas and the improvement of passive cellular absorption mechanisms resulted in higher antimicrobial activity. This paper reviews the present state of the art of the nanostructures used as food antimicrobial carriers including nanoemulsions, nanoliposomes, nanoparticles, and nanofibers. PMID:24995363

  19. Antimicrobial activity of spherical silver nanoparticles: evidence for induction of a prolonged bacterial lag phase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Recently, there has been a great deal of interest surrounding the discovery that Ag[0] nanoparticles (Np) are more effective antimicrobial agents in terms of the minimum effective concentration than their Ag[+] counterparts. Methods: Both solid and liquid phase experiments were perform...

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Rauvolfia tetraphylla and Physalis minima leaf and callus extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nayeemulla Shariff; M. S. Sudarshana; S. Umesha; P. Hariprasad

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activity of Rauvolfia tetraphylla and Physalis minima leaf and callus extracts were studied against selected pathogenic fungi and bacteria, following broth dilution assay. Leaves and calli were extracted using absolute alcohol, benzene, chloroform, methanol and petroleum ether. Among the five solvents used, leaf and callus extracted in chloroform of both the plants were found to be

  1. Essential oils of Retama raetam from Libya: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bahlul Zayed Sh Awen; C. Ramachandra Unnithan; Subban Ravi; Adel Kermagy; J. M. Sasikumar; Amal S. Khrbash; Wafa Lutfi Ekreem

    2011-01-01

    Retama raetam (Forssk) Webb & Berthel is well known in the folk medicine of North and East Mediterranean regions for the treatment of microbial infections. The powdered leaves are used to heal circumcision wounds and used as an antiseptic for wounds, skin rash and pruritus. In this study, to validate this antiseptic property, the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of

  2. Physicochemical characterization and antimicrobial activity from seed oil of Pongamia pinnata, a potential biofuel crop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vigya Kesari; Archana Das; Latha Rangan

    2010-01-01

    Oil analysis and antimicrobial activity from seeds of elite genotype of Pongamia pinnata was carried out in the current study. The highest oil yield (33%) from seeds was recovered in n-Hexane. Physico-chemical properties of crude oil established suitability of P. pinnata for its use as a potential biofuel crop. The total mono unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid 46%) present in

  3. Composition and antimicrobial activity of the leaf essential oil of Litsea nakaii from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chen-Lung; Wang, Eugene I-Chen; Lee, Pei-Yeh; Su, Yu-Chang

    2009-06-01

    The leaf essential oil of Litsea nakaii was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed to determine its composition and yield. Fifty-five compounds were identified, the main components being alpha-humulene (15.5%), delta-cadinene (9.2%), (E)-beta-ocimene (8.1%), and delta-selinene (7.1%). The leaf oil exhibited excellent antimicrobial activities. PMID:19634339

  4. Phenanthrene and phenylpropanoid constituents from the roots of Cymbidium Great Flower 'Marylaurencin' and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Kazuko; Baba, Chihiro; Iseki, Kanako; Ito, Takuya; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Kawano, Sachiko; Hashimoto, Toshihiro

    2014-10-01

    Two new phenanthrenes, and one new phenylpropanoid, named ephemeranthoquinone C (1), and marylaurencinols C (2) and D (3), were isolated from the roots of Cymbidium Great Flower 'Marylaurencin', respectively. These structures were determined on the basis of 2D NMR experiments. The compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Trichophyton rubrum. PMID:25027023

  5. Isolation, Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity at Diverse Dilution of Wheat Puroindoline Protein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vinod Kumar Dhatwalia; O. P. Sati; M. K. Tripathi; Ashok Kumar

    3 Abstract: During the hydrated part of seeds life, i.e. maturation and germination, seeds are very sensitive to viruses, fungi and bacteria. Many proteins involved in the microbial defense mechanism of plants. Puroindoline is the main component of a new family of proteins that has been suggested to exert an antimicrobial activity in plant seeds. Puroindoline has been Isolated from

  6. Complete genome of Bacillus sp. Pc3 isolated from the Antarctic seawater with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenbin; Cui, Pengfei; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus sp. Pc3 was isolated from the Antarctic seawater with strong antifungal activity against several plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we report the complete sequence of the 3.9-Mbp genome of this strain. The genome sequence may provide fundamental molecular information on elucidating the metabolic pathway of antimicrobial compounds in this strain. PMID:25636910

  7. Phenol content related to antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Passiflora spp. extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alessandra Bendini; Lorenzo Cerretani; Luca Pizzolante; Tullia Gallina Toschi; Flavia Guzzo; Stefania Ceoldo; Andrea Maria Marconi; Filippo Andreetta; Marisa Levi

    2006-01-01

    Methanolic extracts were prepared from different organs of plants from five Passiflora species obtained by zygotic embryo culture and evaluated for their capacity to quench DPPH and ABTS•+ radicals in comparison to that of Trolox, a water soluble vitamin-E analogue. Moreover their antimicrobial activity against E. coli was tested by agar diffusion and turbidity assays. P. nitida, P. foetida, and

  8. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER AND ZINC ACCUMULATED BY EASTERN OYSTER AMEBOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. Submitted. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper and Zinc Accumulated by Eastern Oyster Amebocytes. J. Shellfish Res. 54 p. (ERL,GB 1196). The distribution of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica near terrestrial watersheds has led to a general impression t...

  9. The quantitative determination of phenolic acids and antimicrobial activity of Symphoricarpos albus (L.) Blake.

    PubMed

    Szaufer-Hajdrych, Miros?awa; Go?li?ska, Olga

    2004-01-01

    The content of phenolic acids was determined in the extracts and fractions from leaves, flowers and fruits of Symphoricarpos albus (L.) Blake (Caprifoliaceae) by the Arnov's method. Antimicrobial activity of all extracts against Gram-positive anti Gram-negative microorganisms has been tested. PMID:15259860

  10. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of folklore: Mallotus peltatus leaf extract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debprasad Chattopadhyay; G Arunachalam; Asit B Mandal; Tapas K Sur; Subash C Mandal; S. K Bhattacharya

    2002-01-01

    Since ages Mallotus peltatus (Geist) Muell. Arg. var acuminatus (Euphorbiaceae) leaf and stem bark is used in folk medicine to cure intestinal ailments and skin infections. In several intestinal ailments, localized inflammation is of common occurrence and hence we have evaluated the antimicrobial as well as anti-inflammatory activity of M. peltatus leaf extract. The crude methanol extract of M. peltatus

  11. Antimicrobial activity of snakin-defensin hybrid protein in tobacco and potato plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To augment plant protection against phytopathogens, we constructed a fusion gene for the simultaneous expression of snakin-1 (SN1) and defensin-1 (PTH1) antimicrobial proteins as a hybrid protein (SAP) in plant cells. Prior to in vivo evaluation of SAP phytoprotective activity, the hybrid protein ex...

  12. Antimicrobial activity of oregano oil on iceberg lettuce with different attachment conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, the antimicrobial activity of oregano oil was investigated under different attachment conditions of Salmonella spp. to iceberg lettuce. Inoculated lettuce was either not dried or dried for 30 min, 60 min or 120 min, under either static air or moving air. Washing iceberg lettuce with 5...

  13. Antimicrobial activity of L. plantarum, isolated from a traditional lactic acid fermentation of table olives

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Health Antimicrobial activity of L. plantarum, isolated from a traditional lactic acid fermentation Abstract -- Lactobacillus plantarum strain LB17.2b, isolated from traditional table olive fermentation has- petitors of L. plantarum from olive fermentation brines. Bioactivity was quantified against Weis- sella

  14. Inactivation of staphylococcal virulence factors using a light-activated antimicrobial agent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Tubby; Michael Wilson; Sean P Nair

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the limitations of antibiotic therapy is that even after successful killing of the infecting microorganism, virulence factors may still be present and cause significant damage to the host. Light-activated antimicrobials show potential for the treatment of topical infections; therefore if these agents can also inactivate microbial virulence factors, this would represent an advantage over conventional antibiotic therapy.

  15. Activity of an Antimicrobial Peptide Mimetic against Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Oral Pathogens? †

    PubMed Central

    Beckloff, Nicholas; Laube, Danielle; Castro, Tammy; Furgang, David; Park, Steven; Perlin, David; Clements, Dylan; Tang, Haizhong; Scott, Richard W.; Tew, Gregory N.; Diamond, Gill

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are naturally occurring, broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents that have recently been examined for their utility as therapeutic antibiotics. Unfortunately, they are expensive to produce and are often sensitive to protease digestion. To address this problem, we have examined the activity of a peptide mimetic whose design was based on the structure of magainin, exhibiting its amphiphilic structure. We demonstrate that this compound, meta-phenylene ethynylene (mPE), exhibits antimicrobial activity at nanomolar concentrations against a variety of bacterial and Candida species found in oral infections. Since Streptococcus mutans, an etiological agent of dental caries, colonizes the tooth surface and forms a biofilm, we quantified the activity of this compound against S. mutans growing under conditions that favor biofilm formation. Our results indicate that mPE can prevent the formation of a biofilm at nanomolar concentrations. Incubation with 5 nM mPE prevents further growth of the biofilm, and 100 nM mPE reduces viable bacteria in the biofilm by 3 logs. Structure-function analyses suggest that mPE inhibits the bioactivity of lipopolysaccharide and binds DNA at equimolar ratios, suggesting that it may act both as a membrane-active molecule, similar to magainin, and as an intracellular antibiotic, similar to other AMPs. We conclude that mPE and similar molecules display great potential for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. PMID:17785509

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Euplotin C, the Sesquiterpene Taxonomic Marker from the Marine Ciliate Euplotes crassus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dianella Savoia; Claudio Avanzini; Tiziano Allice; Emanuela Callone; Graziano Guella; Fernando Dini

    2004-01-01

    Strains of the marine ciliate protist Euplotes crassus produce exclusive terpenoids called euplotins that play an ecological role. Among these derivatives, euplotin C is the main of four secondary metabolites isolated from cultures of this protozoon and represents the sesquiterpene taxonomic marker from E. crassus. Because different terpenoid metabolites of plant origin showed a certain antimicrobial activity, we assessed the

  17. Antimicrobial peptide shows enhanced activity and reduced toxicity upon grafting to chitosan polymers.

    PubMed

    Sahariah, Priyanka; Sørensen, Kasper K; Hjálmarsdóttir, Martha Á; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Jensen, Knud J; Másson, Már; Thygesen, Mikkel B

    2015-07-25

    Here we report that grafting of a short antimicrobial peptide, anoplin, to chitosan polymers is a strategy for abolishing the hemolytic propensity, and at the same time increasing the activity of the parent peptide. Anoplin-chitosan conjugates were synthesized by CuAAC reaction of multiple peptides through 2-azidoacetyl groups on chitosan. PMID:26096124

  18. Antimicrobial activities of tea catechins and theaflavins and tea extracts against Bacillus cereus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of seven green tea catechins and four black tea theaflavins, generally referred to as flavonoids, as well as the aqueous extracts (infusions) of 36 commercial black, green, oolong, white, and herbal teas against Bacillus cereus (strain RM3190) incubated at 2...

  19. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. C. Silva; L. Barbosa; L. N. Seito; A. Fernandes Junior

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus

  20. Composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of some medicinal and spice plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Cvijovic; D. Djukic; L. Mandic; G. Acamovic-Djokovic; M. Pesakovic

    2010-01-01

    An examination was made on the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of four medicinal plants Carum carvi, Coriandrum sativum, Hyssopus officinalis, and Eucalyptus globulus, the first three of which are also used as culinary spice herbs. Carum carvi L. and Coriandrum sativum L. belong to the Apiacea family. In traditional medicine, Carum carvi is used in the form of a

  1. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. C. Silva; L. Barbosa; L. N. Seito; A. Fernandes Junior

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus

  2. Antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms by extracts from herbal Jordanian plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amjad Khalil; Basem F. Dababneh; Ahmad H. Al-Gabbiesh

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to study antimicrobial activity of a group of herbal medicinal plants, including Achillea biebersteinii, Phlomis viscosa, Ainworthia trachycarpa, Solanum elaeagnifolium, Arum hygrophilum, Varthemia iphionoides, Crupina crupinastrum, Teucrium polium, Achillea santolina, Micromeria nervosa, Chenopodium murate, Ballota philistaea, Onosma roussaei, Fagonia mollis, Marrubium vulgare, Calotropis procera, Salvia hierosolymitana, Ballota undulata, Hallogeton alopecuroides, Scrophularia hierochuntica and Nonea melanocarpa, grown in

  3. Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Kalisiak, Jaros?aw; Korthals, Keith; Lauwaet, Tineke; Cheung, Dae Young; Lozano, Ricardo; Cobo, Eduardo R.; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.; Berg, Douglas E.; Gillin, Frances D.; Fokin, Valery V.; Sharpless, K. Barry; Eckmann, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole and other 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are among the most effective antimicrobials available against many important anaerobic pathogens, but evolving resistance is threatening their long-term clinical utility. The common 5-NIs were developed decades ago, yet little 5-NI drug development has since taken place, leaving the true potential of this important drug class unexplored. Here we report on a unique approach to the modular synthesis of diversified 5-NIs for broad exploration of their antimicrobial potential. Many of the more than 650 synthesized compounds, carrying structurally diverse functional groups, have vastly improved activity against a range of microbes, including the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterial pathogens Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, and Bacteroides fragilis. Furthermore, they can overcome different forms of drug resistance, and are active and nontoxic in animal infection models. These findings provide impetus to the development of structurally diverse, next-generation 5-NI drugs as agents in the antimicrobial armamentarium, thus ensuring their future viability as primary therapeutic agents against many clinically important infections. PMID:24101497

  4. Phytochemical composition and antimicrobial activities of the essential oils and organic extracts from pelargonium graveolens growing in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pelargonium graveolens (P. graveolens) L. is an aromatic and medicinal plant belonging to the geraniacea family. Results The chemical compositions of the essential oil as well as the in vitro antimicrobial activities were investigated. The GC-MS analysis of the essential oil revealed 42 compounds. Linallol L, Citronellol, Geraniol, 6-Octen-1-ol, 3,7-dimethyl, formate and Selinene were identified as the major components. The tested oil and organic extracts exhibited a promising antimicrobial effect against a panel of microorganisms with diameter inhibition zones ranging from 12 to 34?mm and MICs values from 0.039 to10 mg/ml. The investigation of the phenolic content showed that EtOAc, MeOH and water extracts had the highest phenolic contents. Conclusion Overall, results presented here suggest that the essential oil and organic extracts of P. graveolens possesses antimicrobial and properties, and is therefore a potential source of active ingredients for food and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:23216669

  5. Antimutagenic and antimicrobial activities of pu-erh tea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    She-Ching Wu; Gow-Chin Yen; Bor-Sen Wang; Chih-Kwang Chiu; Wen-Jye Yen; Lee-Wen Chang; Pin-Der Duh

    2007-01-01

    The biological action of water extract of pu-erh tea (WEPT) was evaluated by Salmonella mutagenesis assay and bacteria test. Like green tea, oolong tea and black tea, WEPT showed neither cytotoxicity and nor mutagenicity toward Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with or without S9 mix (an external metabolic activation system). WEPT at 0.5–5mg\\/plate expressed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect against both

  6. Mechanism of a prototypical synthetic membrane-active antimicrobial: Efficient hole-punching via interaction with negative intrinsic curvature lipids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Gordon, Vernita D.; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Davis, Matthew A.; DeVries, Clarabelle; Som, Abhigyan; Cronan, John E.; Tew, Gregory N.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2008-01-01

    Phenylene ethynylenes comprise a prototypical class of synthetic antimicrobial compounds that mimic antimicrobial peptides produced by eukaryotes and have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. We show unambiguously that bacterial membrane permeation by these antimicrobials depends on the presence of negative intrinsic curvature lipids, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids, found in high concentrations within bacterial membranes. Plate-killing assays indicate that a PE-knockout mutant strain of Escherichia coli drastically out-survives the wild type against the membrane-active phenylene ethynylene antimicrobials, whereas the opposite is true when challenged with traditional metabolic antibiotics. That the PE deletion is a lethal mutation in normative environments suggests that resistant bacterial strains do not evolve because a lethal mutation is required to gain immunity. PE lipids allow efficient generation of negative curvature required for the circumferential barrel of an induced membrane pore; an inverted hexagonal HII phase, which consists of arrays of water channels, is induced by a small number of antimicrobial molecules. The estimated antimicrobial occupation in these water channels is nonlinear and jumps from ?1 to 3 per 4 nm of induced water channel length as the global antimicrobial concentration is increased. By comparing to exactly solvable 1D spin models for magnetic systems, we quantify the cooperativity of these antimicrobials. PMID:19106303

  7. Polar extracts from (Tunisian) Acacia salicina Lindl. Study of the antimicrobial and antigenotoxic activities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methanolic, aqueous and Total Oligomer Flavonoids (TOF)-enriched extracts obtained from the leaves of Acacia salicina 'Lindl.' were investigated for antibacterial, antimutagenic and antioxidant activities. Methods The antimicrobial activity was tested on the Gram positive and Gram negative reference bacterial strains. The Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities against direct acting mutagens, methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPD), and indirect acting mutagens, 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and benzo[a]pyrene (B(a)P) were performed with S. typhimurium TA102 and TA98 assay systems. In addition, the enzymatic and nonenzymatic methods were employed to evaluate the anti-oxidative effects of the tested extracts. Results A significant effect against the Gram positive and Gram negative reference bacterial strains was observed with all the extracts. The mutagenic and antimutagenic studies revealed that all the extracts decreased the mutagenicity induced by B(a)P (7.5 ?g/plate), 2-AA (5 ?g/plate), MMS (1.3 mg/plate) and NOPD (10 ?g/plate). Likewise, all the extracts showed an important free radical scavenging activity towards the superoxide anion generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay system, as well as high Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), against the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS)+• radical. TOF-enriched extract exhibited the highest protective effect against free radicals, direct acting-mutagen and metabolically activated S9-dependent mutagens. Conclusions The present study indicates that the extracts from A. salicina leaves are a significant source of compounds with the antimutagenic and antioxidant activities, and this may be useful for developing potential chemopreventive substances. PMID:22490278

  8. Antimicrobial effects of new 1-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-acetanilides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Jantová; D. Hudecová; Š. Stankovský; K. Špirková

    1994-01-01

    Fourteen synthetically prepared 1-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)acetanilides were tested for antimicrobial effect. None of the prepared\\u000a derivatives influenced theB. subtilis, P. fluorescens nor the tested yeasts. Only the derivatives with substituents in positionspara orortho andpara were biologically effective. The widest antimicrobial spectrum was manifested by the pentachloro derivative, which was effective\\u000a with G+ and G? bacteria and with filamentous fungi.

  9. Antimicrobial action effect and stability of nanosized silica hybrid Ag complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwa-Jung; Park, Hae-Jun; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Nanosized silica hybrid silver complex (NSS) showing strong antifungal activity, in which nanosilver (nano-Ag) was bound to silica (SiO2) molecules, was synthesized via gamma-irradiation at room temperature. NSS was characterized via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The FESEM images and EDXS data showed that well-dispersed 3-to-10-nm Ag nanoparticles (core part) were loaded onto the outer parts of 5-to-20 nm SiO2 nanoparticles. The antifungal efficiency of NSS was evaluated against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. In the case of Rhizoctonia solani, the growth rate was decreased typically by more than 90% at a 6 microg/ml concentration of NSS as a medium additive. The antifungal-action mechanism was investigated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the NSS treatment against Botrytis cinerea. The stability and antimicrobial activity of NSS were determined, using the plate culture method, from several water samples containing NSS after 7-day NSS treatment. Moreover, the NSS solution maintained stable antifungal activity for at least 24 mos. These results suggest that NSS, an environment-friendly nanomaterial, can be used as strongly effective growth inhibitor of various microorganisms, making it applicable to diverse antimicrobial-control systems. PMID:22121607

  10. Comparative analysis of polyphenolic profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tunisian pome fruit pulp and peel aqueous acetone extracts.

    PubMed

    Fattouch, S; Caboni, P; Coroneo, V; Tuberoso, C; Angioni, A; Dessi, S; Marzouki, N; Cabras, P

    2008-02-13

    Pome trees, apple, pear, and quince, are classified into the subfamily Pomoideae, belonging to the Rosaceae family. Their autumnal fruits are consumed worldwide in different forms, that is, fresh or transformed into jams, jelly, juices, etc. Their well-established beneficial properties to human health were found mainly related to their phenolic content. Pulp and peel aqueous acetone extracts obtained from Tunisian fruits at commercial maturity were comparatively evaluated for their phenolic profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials. The phenolic compounds present in the extracts were identified and quantified using RP-HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS techniques. Significant differences in the chromatographic profiles among these fruits, as well as between pulp and peel extracts of each fruit, were observed. Quince, followed by 'Red Delicious', peel extracts showed the highest phenolic content (160.33 and 110.90 mg/100 g of fresh weight). The stronger inhibitory effect on DPPH radicals corresponded to those obtained from peel materials. A comparative analysis of the antimicrobial potential against a range of microorganism strains was also carried out. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus were the most sensitive to the active extracts. Among the examined phenolic extracts, 'Red Delicious' and quince peels showed the highest effects for inhibiting bacteria growth. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations ranged from 10(2) to 10(4) microg of polyphenol/mL. Red skin apple and quince peels could be of great interest as important antioxidant and antimicrobial polyphenol sources. PMID:18181568

  11. Toxicity of Australian essential oil Backhousia citriodora (Lemon myrtle). Part 1. Antimicrobial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Hayes; B. Markovic

    2002-01-01

    The antimicrobial and toxicological properties of the Australian essential oil, lemon myrtle, (Backhousia citriodora) were investigated. Lemon myrtle oil was shown to possess significant antimicrobial activity against the organisms Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Aspergillus niger, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Propionibacterium acnes comparable to its major component-citral. An in vitro toxicological study based on

  12. Studies on the antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp toxicity of Zeyheria tuberculosa (Vell.) Bur. (Bignoniaceae) extracts and their main constituents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Lysete A Bastos; Maria Raquel F Lima; Lucia M Conserva; Vânia S Andrade; Eliana MM Rocha; Rosangela PL Lemos

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs, the emergence of human pathogenic microorganisms resistant to major classes of antibiotics has been increased and has caused many clinical problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate for the first time the in vitro antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp lethality of extracts

  13. Role of Amphiphilicity in the Design of Synthetic Mimics of Antimicrobial Peptides with Gram-Negative Activity

    E-print Network

    Tew, Gregory N.

    Role of Amphiphilicity in the Design of Synthetic Mimics of Antimicrobial Peptides with Gram) with facially amphiphilic (FA) and disrupted amphiphilic (DA) topologies were designed and synthesized to directly assess the role of amphiphilicity on their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram

  14. Osmitopsis asteriscoides (Asteraceae)-the antimicrobial activity and essential oil composition of a Cape-Dutch remedy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvaro Viljoen; Sandy van Vuuren; Erika Ernst; Michael Klepser; Bet?l Demirci; Husnu Ba?er; Ben-Erik van Wyk

    2003-01-01

    The essential oil composition and antimicrobial activity of Osmitopsis asteriscoides, a medicinal plant used in traditional herbal preparations in South Africa has been investigated. Three different antimicrobial methods (disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration by micro-titer plate and time-kill studies) were comparatively evaluated against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A preliminary screening was done using the disc diffusion method

  15. The Complex Dynamics of Antimicrobial Activity in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Louis B.

    2013-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is a complex environment of mutualistic associations. As bacteria form a major component of fecal content, the natural balance of the colon can be significantly altered by exposure to antimicrobial agents. However, the effects of antimicrobial therapy on fecal content are difficult to predict and can at times be quite surprising. The emergence and spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci are cases in point. Resistance to the glycopeptide vancomycin emerged in enterococci (primarily in Enterococcus faecium) in the late 1980s in both Europe and the United States. In Europe, this emergence was tied to the use of the glycopeptide antibiotic avoparcin to promote growth in food animals and had little actual impact on hospital infections. In the United States, where avoparcin has never been licensed, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) emerged as a major hospital pathogen. Paradoxically, while the initial entry of the vancomycin resistance determinants into enterococci was almost certainly driven by high fecal concentrations of vancomycin associated with treatment for Clostridium difficile colitis, clinical infection and outbreaks were more frequently tied to use of extended-spectrum cephalosporins and agents with potent activity against anaerobic bacteria. Animal studies suggest that cephalosporins promote initial VRE colonization because of the frequent concomitant high-level resistance to ?-lactam antibiotics expressed by these strains. Anti-anaerobic agents appear to increase the output of VRE in the feces, presumably by reducing the number of competitive flora in the colon. Intravenously administered vancomycin appears to have little impact because it achieves negligible concentrations in the feces after short courses. Thus, the spread of glycopeptide resistance in enterococci is promoted in a large measure by the administration of non-glycopeptide antibiotics. PMID:23874016

  16. Immobilization and orientation-dependent activity of a naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Soares, Jason W; Kirby, Romy; Doherty, Laurel A; Meehan, Alexa; Arcidiacono, Steven

    2015-08-01

    A naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide, SMAP-29, was synthesized with an n-terminal or c-terminal cysteine, termed c_SMAP and SMAP_c, respectively, for site-directed immobilization to superparamagnetic beads. Immobilized SMAP orientation-dependent activity was probed against multiple bacteria of clinical interest including Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus anthracis sterne and Staphylococcus aureus. A kinetic microplate assay was employed to reveal both concentration and time-dependent activity for elucidation of minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and sub-lethal effects. Immobilized SMAP activity was equivalent or reduced compared with soluble SMAP_c and c_SMAP regardless of immobilization orientation, with only one exception. A comparison of immobilized SMAP_c and c_SMAP activity revealed a bacteria-specific potency dependent on immobilization orientation, which was contrary to that seen in solution, wherein SMAP_c was more potent against all bacteria than c_SMAP. Sub-MBC kinetic studies displayed the influence of peptide exposure to the cells with multiple bacteria exhibiting increased susceptibility and efficacy at lower concentrations upon extended exposure (i.e. MBC enhancement). For instances in which complete killing was not achieved, two predominant effects were evident: retardation of growth rate and an increased lag phase. Both effects, seen independently and concomitantly, indicate some degree of induced cellular damage that can serve as a predictor toward eventual cell death. SMAP_c immobilized on glass through standard silanization chemistry was also investigated to ascertain the influence of substrate on activity against select bacteria. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26018607

  17. The antimicrobial activity of Azadirachta indica, Mimusops elengi, Tinospora cardifolia, Ocimum sanctum and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate on common endodontic pathogens: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Kunjal S.; Sanghvi, Zarna; Parmar, Girish; Shah, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To check the antimicrobial activity of Azadirachta indica (Neem), Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi), Mimusops elelngi (Bakul), Tinospora cardifolia (Giloy) and Chlorhexidine Gluconate (CHX) on common endodontic pathogens like Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis and staphylococcus aureus. Materials and Methods: The agar diffusion test was used to check the antimicrobial activity of the Methanolic extracts of the medicinal plants along with CHX. Six different concentrations of the tested agents were used for the study. The values of Zone of Inhibition were tabulated according to the concentration of the tested agent and data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni post- hoc tests. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentrations (MBC) values were also recorded. Results: All the plants extracts showed considerable antimicrobial activity against selected endodontic pathogens. At 3mg. concentration, O.sanctum was the most effective against S. mutans, M. elengi showed highest zone of inhibition against E.faecalis, whereas CHX was the most effective agent against S.aureus. CHX was also the most consistent of all the medicaments testes, showing inhibitory effect against all the tree pathogens at all the selected concentrations. Conclusions: The Methanolic extract of A.Indica, O.sanctum, M. Elengi, T.cardifolia and Chlorhexidine Gluconate has considerable antimicrobial activity against S. mutans, E. faecalis and S. aureus. PMID:24966766

  18. Interaction and effectiveness of antimicrobials along with healing-promoting agents in a novel biocellulose wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-10-01

    An ideal wound dressing should keep the wound moist, allow oxygen permeation, adsorb wound exudate, accelerate re-epithelialization for wound closure, reduce pain and healing time, and prevent infection. Our novel biocellulose-based wound dressing was composed of three components: 1) biocellulose (BC), intended to create a moist and oxygen-permeated environment with exudate adsorption; 2) silk sericin (SS) known for its enhancement of collagen type I production, which is critical for re-epithelialization; and 3) the antiseptic polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB). To deliver an effective BC wound dressing, the interactions between the components (PHMB vs. SS) needed to be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, we investigated important parameters such as the loading sequence, loading concentration, and loading amount of the active compounds to ensure that the BC wound dressing could provide both antimicrobial activity and promote collagen production during healing. The loading sequence of SS and PHMB into BC was critical to maintain PHMB antimicrobial activity; silk sericin needed to be loaded before PHMB to avoid any negative impacts. The minimum PHMB concentration was 0.3% w/v for effective elimination of all tested bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The amounts of SS and PHMB in BC were optimized to ensure that the dressings released the optimal amounts of both SS to enhance fibroblast collagen production and PHMB for effective antimicrobial activity. PMID:26117743

  19. 1,5-Benzodiazepine derivatives as potential antimicrobial agents: design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan-Zhi; Li, Xiao-Qing; An, Ying-Shuang

    2015-05-01

    36 Novel 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives were rationally designed and synthesized according to the principle of superposition of bioactive substructures by the combination of 1,5-benzodiazepines, thiophene or thiazole and ester group. The structures of the target compounds have been characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MS and elemental analysis. The structure of was further determined using X-ray single crystal diffraction. All synthesized 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against C. neoformans, C. neoformans clinical isolates, C. albicans, E. coli and S. aureus. The bioactive assay results revealed that most of the 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives exhibited considerable potency against all of the tested strains. In particular, compounds and (MIC: 2-6 ?g mL(-1), MFC: 10-14 ?g mL(-1)) exhibited excellent antifungal activity and were found to be 32-64 and 9-12.8 times more potent than the reference drugs against C. neoformans, respectively. Moreover, compound (MIC: 40 ?g mL(-1)) displayed equipotent antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus compared to the reference drugs. The most potent of the synthesized compounds and were further studied by evaluating their cytotoxicities, and the results showed that they had relatively low level cytotoxicity for BV2 cell. A preliminary study of the structure-activity relationship revealed that substituents in the phenyl ring and the thiophene ring had a great effect on the antimicrobial activity of these compounds. In addition, the thiazole ring at C2 may be a pharmacophore of these compounds and COOC2H5 group at C3 is the best substituent for the maintenance of antimicrobial activities at low concentrations (1.5625 ?g per disc). PMID:25875695

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Bacillus sp. strain FAS1 isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Moshafi, Mohammad Hasan; Forootanfar, Hamid; Ameri, Alieh; Ameri, Alieh; Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Dehghan-Noudeh, Gholamreza; Razavi, Mojdeh

    2011-07-01

    During screening for antibiotic producing microorganisms from environmental soil samples, the supernatant of a bacterial isolate was found to have antibacterial and antifungal activity on the standard indicator species. The standard cylinder-plate method was used to determine the inhibitory effect of the crude supernatant of each isolate on 6 bacterial and 3 fungal standard strains by measuring the diameter of inhibition zone. The highest inhibition zone on Aspergillus niger belonged to culture broth of isolate FAS1 by 25 mm, and this isolate was the most efficient microorganism to inhibit standard bacterial and fungal species. Based on morphological and biochemical properties as well as 16S rDNA gene analysis, the selected isolate (isolate FAS(1)) belonged to Bacillus genus. Investigation on the ability of different culture media for antibiotic production led to select Luria-Bertani media for further studies. Treatment of the culture broth of the isolate FAS(1) using typical protease didn't decrease the antimicrobial activity of the supernatant. After extracting of culture broth of the selected isolate by ethyl acetate as an organic solvent, the inhibitory effect was mainly increased. More investigation was done by bioautography method where the ethyl acetate fraction of the broth culture was separated on TLC by chloroform:methanol, 60:40 as mobile phase and R(f) were calculated for inhibition spots. PMID:21715259

  1. Dye-release assay for investigation of antimicrobial peptide activity in a competitive lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Gagne, Eve; Gehman, John D; Whitwell, Thomas C; Separovic, Frances

    2014-09-01

    A dye-release method for investigating the effect of a competitive lipid environment on the activity of two membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides (AMP), maculatin 1.1 and aurein 1.2, is presented. The results support the general conclusion that AMP have greater affinity for negatively charged membranes, for example bacterial membranes, than for the neutral membrane surface found in eukaryotic cells, but only within a competitive lipid environment. Indeed, in a single-model membrane environment, both peptides were more potent against neutral vesicles than against charged vesicles. The approach was also used to investigate the effect of pre-incubating the peptides in a neutral lipid environment then introducing charged lipid vesicles. Maculatin was shown to migrate from the neutral lipid bilayers, where pores had already formed, to the charged membrane bilayers. This result was also observed for charged-to-charged bilayers but, interestingly, not for neutral-to-neutral lipid interfaces. Aurein was able to migrate from either lipid environment, indicating weaker binding to lipid membranes, and a different molecular mechanism for lysis of lipid bilayers. Competitive lipid environments could be used to assess other critical conditions that modulate the activity of membrane peptides or proteins. PMID:24906225

  2. Phenolics, sugars, antimicrobial and free-radical-scavenging activities of Melicoccus bijugatus Jacq. fruits from the Dominican Republic and Florida.

    PubMed

    Bystrom, Laura M; Lewis, Betty A; Brown, Dan L; Rodriguez, Eloy; Obendorf, Ralph L

    2009-06-01

    Edible fruits of the native South American tree Melicoccus bijugatus Jacq. are consumed fresh or in traditional food, drink and medicinal preparations. Some therapeutic effects of these fruits may be due to phenolics and sugars. Aqueous acetone, methanol or ethanol tissue extracts of different cultivars or collections of M. bijugatus fruits from the Dominican Republic and Florida were analyzed for total phenolics and free radical scavenging activity by UV-vis spectroscopy, sugars by gas chromatography, and antimicrobial activity by the disc diffusion assay. Total phenolics and free radical scavenging activities ranked: seed coat > embryo > pulp extracts. Montgomery cultivar fruits had the highest total phenolics. For sugars: pulp > embryo and highest in Punta Cana fruit pulp. In all extracts: sucrose > glucose and fructose. Glucose:fructose ratios were 1:1 (pulp) and 0.2:1 (embryo). Pulp extracts had dose-response antibacterial activity and pulp and embryo extracts had antifungal activity against one yeast species. Phenolics and sugars were confirmed with thin-layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Sugar-free pulp fractions containing phenolics had slightly more antimicrobial activity than H2O-soluble pulp fractions with sugars. Results indicate M. bijugatus fruits contain phenolics, sugars and other H2O-soluble compounds consistent with therapeutic uses. PMID:19444610

  3. Antioxidant, cytotoxic, and antimicrobial activity of Alnus incana (L.) ssp. incana Moench and A. viridis (Chaix) DC ssp. viridis extracts.

    PubMed

    Stevi?, Tatjana; Savikin, Katarina; Zduni?, Gordana; Stanojkovi?, Tatjana; Jurani?, Zorica; Jankovi?, Teodora; Menkovi?, Nebojsa

    2010-06-01

    Antioxidant, cytotoxic, and antimicrobial activities of leaves, bark, and cone extracts of Alnus incana (L.) Moench ssp. incana and endemic species A. viridis (Chaix) DC ssp. viridis were evaluated. All extracts were found to be strong 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavengers, exhibiting 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 3.3-18.9 microg/mL, and also showed activity in inhibition of lipid peroxidation with IC(50) values ranging from 38.5 to 157.4 microg/mL. A. incana and A. viridis extracts exhibited significant cytotoxic effects toward HeLa cells, with IC(50) values ranging from 26.02 to 68.5 microg/mL. The most active extract of A. incana bark also contained great amounts of total phenolics (316.2 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g). In our experiment all extracts were virtually nontoxic on brine shrimps. Extracts were screened for activity against 15 microorganisms, and all extracts investigated showed antimicrobial activity. The most active were dry extracts of cones of A. incana and A. viridis with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.117 to 0.129 mg/mL. PMID:20438323

  4. Antimalarial, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, DNA interaction and SOD like activities of tetrahedral copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Jugal V.; Gajera, Sanjay B.; Patel, Mohan N.

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes with P, O-donor ligand and different fluoroquinolones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic spectra, TGA, EPR, FT-IR and LC-MS spectroscopy. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and displays very good antimicrobial activity. The binding strength and binding mode of the complexes with Herring Sperm DNA (HS DNA) have been investigated by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The studies suggest the classical intercalative mode of DNA binding. Gel electrophoresis assay determines the ability of the complexes to cleave the supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using nonenzymatic NBT/NADH/PMS system and found to have good antioxidant activity. All the complexes show good cytotoxic and in vitro antimalarial activities.

  5. Polyphenolic content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Lycium barbarum L. and Lycium chinense Mill. leaves.

    PubMed

    Mocan, Andrei; Vlase, Laurian; Vodnar, Dan Cristian; Bischin, Cristina; Hanganu, Daniela; Gheldiu, Ana-Maria; Oprean, Radu; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Cri?an, Gianina

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and the polyphenolic content of Lycium barbarum L. and L. chinense Mill. leaves. The different leave extracts contain important amounts of flavonoids (43.73 ± 1.43 and 61.65 ± 0.95 mg/g, respectively) and showed relevant antioxidant activity, as witnessed by the quoted methods. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of target phenolic compounds were achieved using a HPLC-UV-MS method. Rutin was the dominant flavonoid in both analysed species, the highest amount being registered for L. chinense. An important amount of chlorogenic acid was determined in L. chinense and L. barbarum extracts, being more than twice as high in L. chinense than in L. barbarum. Gentisic and caffeic acids were identified only in L. barbarum, whereas kaempferol was only detected in L. chinense. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH, TEAC, hemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase activity inhibition (HAPX) and inhibition of lipid peroxidation catalyzed by cytochrome c assays revealing a better antioxidant activity for the L. chinense extract. Results obtained in the antimicrobial tests revealed that L. chinense extract was more active than L. barbarum against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. The results suggest that these species are valuable sources of flavonoids with relevant antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. PMID:25014533

  6. Chemical Compositions, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oils of Piper caninum Blume

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Wan; Ahmad, Farediah; Yen, Khong Heng; Sirat, Hasnah Mohd

    2011-01-01

    Chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the fresh leaves and stems oils of Piper caninum were investigated. A total of forty eight constituents were identified in the leaves (77.9%) and stems (87.0%) oil which were characterized by high proportions of phenylpropanoid, safrole with 17.1% for leaves and 25.5% for stems oil. Antioxidant activities were evaluated by using ?-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching, DPPH radical scavenging and total phenolic content. Stems oil showed the highest inhibitory activity towards lipid peroxidation (114.9 ± 0.9%), compared to BHT (95.5 ± 0.5%), while leaves oil showed significant total phenolic content (27.4 ± 0.5 mg GA/g) equivalent to gallic acid. However, the essential oils showed weak activity towards DPPH free-radical scavenging. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity revealed that both oils exhibited strong activity against all bacteria strains with MIC values in the range 62.5 to 250 ?g/mL, but weak activity against fungal strains. These findings suggest that the essential oils can be used as antioxidant and antimicrobial agents for therapeutic, nutraceutical industries and food manufactures. PMID:22174627

  7. Antimicrobial effect of photodynamic therapy using a highly pure chlorin e6

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong-Hwan Park; Yeon-Hee Moon; Iel-Soo Bang; Yong-Chul Kim; Soo-A Kim; Sang-Gun Ahn; Jung-Hoon Yoon

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a highly pure chlorin\\u000a e6 (Ce6), against various pathogenic bacteria. To examine the antimicrobial effect of Ce6-mediated PDT against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, inhibition zone formation, CFU quantification, and bacterial viability were evaluated. Inhibition zone\\u000a analysis

  8. Antimicrobial activity of nisin against Oenococcus oeni and other wine bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beatriz Rojo-Bezares; Yolanda Sáenz; Myriam Zarazaga; Carmen Torres; Fernanda Ruiz-Larrea

    2007-01-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin used against food spoilage bacteria. Sulphur dioxide is a potent antioxidant as well as an antimicrobial agent widely used in the wine industry. In this study we describe the effect of these important antibacterial agents on the growth of a collection of 64 lactic acid bacteria (23 Oenococcus, 29 Lactobacillus, 3 Leuconostoc and 9 Pediococcus), 23

  9. Antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde and sporan against enteric pathogens on iceberg lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cinnamaldehyde and sporan alone or in combination with acetic acid (20%) were evaluated for their antimicrobial effects against E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on lettuce. Iceberg lettuce leaves were cut into pieces (2 x 3 cm) and inoculated with 50 µL (5 droplets of 10µl) cocktail of five strains o...

  10. Antimicrobial activities of extracts from tropical Atlantic marine plants against marine pathogens and saprophytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Engel; Melany P. Puglisi; Paul R. Jensen; William Fenical

    2006-01-01

    Studies investigating disease resistance in marine plants have indicated that secondary metabolites may have important defensive functions against harmful marine microorganisms. The goal of this study was to systematically screen extracts from marine plants for antimicrobial effects against marine pathogens and saprophytes. Lipophilic and hydrophilic extracts from species of 49 marine algae and 3 seagrasses collected in the tropical Atlantic

  11. Screening of Amazonian plants from the Adolpho Ducke forest reserve, Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil, for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Ana Lúcia Basílio; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Oliveira, Viviana Maria Araújo de; Fernandes, Ormezinda Celeste Cristo; Cauper, Gláucia Socorro de Barros; Pohlit, Adrian Martin

    2008-02-01

    Tropical forests are species-rich reserves for the discovery and development of antimicrobial drugs. The aim of this work is to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of Amazon plants found within the National Institute on Amazon Research's Adolpho Ducke forest reserve, located in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil. 75 methanol, chloroform and water extracts representing 12 plant species were tested for antimicrobial activity towards strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus oralis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans using the gel-diffusion method. Active extracts were further evaluated to establish minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and antimicrobial profiles using bioautography on normal-phase thin-layer chromatography plates. Diclinanona calycina presented extracts with good antimicrobial activity and S. oralis and M. smegmatis were the most sensitive bacteria. D. calycina and Lacmellea gracilis presented extracts with the lowest MIC (48.8 microg/ml). D. calycina methanol and chloroform leaf extracts presented the best overall antimicrobial activity. All test organisms were sensitive to D. calycina branch chloroform extract in the bioautography assay. This is the first evaluation of the biological activity of these plant species and significant in vitro antimicrobial activity was detected in extracts and components from two species, D. calycina and L. gracilis. PMID:18368234

  12. Optimized antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of titanate nanofibers containing silver

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yong Hua; Yin, Zi Fei; Xin, Hai Liang; Zhang, Hui Qing; Sheng, Jia Yu; Yang, Yan Long; Du, Juan; Ling, Chang Quan

    2011-01-01

    Titanate nanofibers containing silver have been demonstrated through the experiments reported herein to have effective antifungal and antiproliferative activities in the presence of UV light. The titanate nanofibers containing silver can be fabricated by means of ion exchange followed by a topochemical process in an environment suitable for reductive reactions. Excellent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiproliferative activities could be demonstrated by both Ag2Ti5O11 · xH2O and Ag/titanate (UV light irradiation) due to their unique structures and compositions, which have photocatalytic activities to generate reactive oxygen species and capabilities to continuously release the silver ions. Therefore these materials have the potential to produce a membrane for the treatment of superficial malignant tumor, esophageal cancer, or cervical carcinoma. They may also hold utility if incorporated into a coating on stents in moderate and advanced stage esophageal carcinoma or for endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage. These approaches may significantly reduce infections, inhibit tumor growth, and importantly, improve quality of life and prolong survival time for patients with tumors. PMID:21845048

  13. Anticough and antimicrobial activities of Psidium guajava Linn. leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Jaiarj, P; Khoohaswan, P; Wongkrajang, Y; Peungvicha, P; Suriyawong, P; Saraya, M L; Ruangsomboon, O

    1999-11-01

    The anticough activity of Psidium guajava Linn. (guava) leaf extract was evaluated in rats and guinea pigs. The results showed that water extract of the plant at doses of 2 and 5 g/kg, p.o. decreased the frequency of cough induced by capsaicin aerosol by 35 and 54%, respectively, as compared to the control, within 10 min after injection of the extract, (P < 0.01). However, the anticough activity is less potent than that of 3 mg/kg dextromethorphan which decreased frequency of cough by 78% (P < 0.01). An experiment on isolated rat tracheal muscle showed that the extract directly stimulated muscle contraction and also synergized with the stimulatory effect of pilocarpine. This effect was antagonized by an atropine. Moreover, growth of Staphylococcus aureus and beta-streptococcus group A, as determined by the disc diffusion method, was inhibited by water, methanol and chloroform extract of dry guava leaves (P < 0.001). The LD50 of guava leaf extract was more than 5 g/kg, p.o. These results suggest that guava leaf extract is recommended as a cough remedy. PMID:10619385

  14. Natural phenolic metabolites from endophytic Aspergillus sp. IFB-YXS with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wei, Wei; Shi, Jing; Chen, Chaojun; Zhao, Guoyan; Jiao, Ruihua; Tan, Renxiang

    2015-07-01

    Prompted by the pressing necessity to conquer phytopathogenic infections, the antimicrobial compounds were characterized with bioassay-guided method from the ethanol extract derived from the solid-substrate fermentation of Aspergillus sp. IFB-YXS, an endophytic fungus residing in the apparently healthy leave of Ginkgo biloba L. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and mechanism(s) of these bioactive compounds against phytopathogens. Among the compounds, xanthoascin (1) is significantly inhibitory on the growth of the phytopathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganense subsp. Sepedonicus with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.31?g/ml, which is more potent than streptomycin (MIC 0.62?g/ml), an antimicrobial drug co-assayed herein as a positive reference. Moreover, terphenyl derivatives 3, 5 and 6 are also found to be active against other phytopathogens including Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Swings, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola Swings, Erwinia amylovora and Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans etc. The antibacterial mechanism of xanthoascin (1) was addressed to change the cellular permeability of the phytopathogens, leading to the remarkable leakage of nucleic acids out of the cytomembrane. The work highlights the possibility that xanthoascin (1), an analogue of xanthocillin which is used to be an approved antibiotic, may find its renewed application as a potent antibacterial agrichemical. This study contributes to the development of new antimicrobial drugs, especially against C. michiganense subsp. Sepedonicus. PMID:26004581

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil from Seeds of Carum carvi and Its Composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaripa Begum; M Nazrul; Islam Bhuiyan; Jasim Uddin Chowdhury; M Nuzmul Hoque; M Nural Anwar

    2008-01-01

    The essential oil of Carum carvi L. seeds was screened for its antimicrobial activity against ten pathogenic bacteria and six phytopathogenic fungi. The essential oil showed promising inhibitory activity against all the test bacteria, even at 2 µ µµ µµl\\/disc. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 100-300 ppm) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, 200-400 ppm) values of essential oil were determined.

  16. Medical-grade honey enriched with antimicrobial peptides has enhanced activity against antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. H. S. Kwakman; Boer den L; C. P. Ruyter-Spira; T. Creemers-Molenaar; J. P. F. G. Helsper; C. M. J. E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; S. A. J. Zaat; A. A. te Velde

    2011-01-01

    Honey has potent activity against both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant bacteria, and is an interesting agent for topical\\u000a antimicrobial application to wounds. As honey is diluted by wound exudate, rapid bactericidal activity up to high dilution\\u000a is a prerequisite for its successful application. We investigated the kinetics o