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Sample records for effective magnetic fields

  1. Magnetic field effect on charged Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, M.; Velasco, R. M.; Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the effective diffusion of a spherical self-propelled charged particle swimming at low Reynolds number, and subject to a time-dependent magnetic field and thermal agitation. We find that the presence of an external magnetic field may reduce or enhance (depending on the type of swimming and magnetic field applied) the swimmer's effective diffusion, hence we get another possible strategy to control its displacement. For swimmers performing reciprocal motion, and under an oscillating time-dependent magnetic field, mechanical resonance appears when the swimmer and magnetic frequencies coincide, thus enhancing the particle's effective diffusion. Our analytical results are compared with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement.

  2. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  3. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  4. Abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet → singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  5. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet → singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  6. Solar Magnetic Field: Zeeman and Hanle Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, J.; Murdin, P.

    2001-10-01

    An external magnetic field causes the atomic energy levels to split into different sublevels, and the emitted radiation becomes polarized. This phenomenon is called the ZEEMAN EFFECT. When atoms in a magnetic field scatter radiation via bound-bound transitions, the phase relations or quantum interferences between the Zeeman-split sublevels give rise to POLARIZATION phenomena that go under the nam...

  7. Magnetocaloric effect in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishin, A. M.

    Calculations of magnetic entropy change, Δ SM, and magnetocaloric effect, Δ T, in 3d and 4f magnetics have been carried out, based on the molecular field theory. Δ SM and Δ T have been studied as a function of Debye temperature, θ D, Lande factor, gj, quantum number of total mechanical momentum, J, and also of magnetic phase transition temperatures. Limiting values of Δ SM and Δ T have been determined in extremely strong magnetic fields. The results obtained are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the use of ferromagnetic alloys Tb x Gd 1-x as operating devices of magnetic refrigerating machines in the room temperature range is more efficient than the use of pure Gd. These alloys have been found to have high specific refrigerant capacity over a wide range of fields from 0.1 to 6 T, which enables one to develop highly economic refrigeration devices in which weak fields are applied.

  8. Effects of static magnetic fields on plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent experiment on STS-107 (MFA-Biotube) we took advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the gravity receptor cells of flax roots, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (Δ ≊ < 0). High gradient magnetic fields (HGMF, grad(H2/2) up to 109-1010 Oe2/cm) of the experimental chambers (MFCs) repelled amyloplasts from the zones of stronger field thus providing a directional stimulus for plant gravisensing system in microgravity, and causing the roots to react. Such reaction was observed in the video downlink pictures. Unfortunately, the ``Columbia'' tragedy caused loss of the plant material and most of the images, thus preventing us from detailed studies of the results. Currently we are looking for a possibility to repeat this experiment. Therefore, it is very important to understand, what other effects (besides displacing amyloplasts) static magnetic fields with intensities 0 to 2.5104 Oe, and with the size of the area of non-uniformity 10-3 to 1 cm. These effects were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are insignificant. Both theoretical estimations and control experiments confirm, that

  9. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  10. Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the rate of DNA synthesis catalysed by polymerases β with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ in the catalytic sites were detected. No difference in enzymatic activity was found between polymerases β carrying 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions with spinless, non-magnetic nuclei 24Mg and 26Mg. However, 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nucleus 25Mg were shown to suppress enzymatic activity by two to three times with respect to the enzymatic activity of polymerases β with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. Such an isotopic dependence directly indicates that in the DNA synthesis magnetic mass-independent isotope effect functions. Similar effect is exhibited by polymerases β with Zn2+ ions carrying magnetic 67Zn and non-magnetic 64Zn nuclei, respectively. A new, ion–radical mechanism of the DNA synthesis is suggested to explain these effects. Magnetic field dependence of the magnesium-catalysed DNA synthesis is in a perfect agreement with the proposed ion–radical mechanism. It is pointed out that the magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects may be used for medicinal purposes (trans-cranial magnetic treatment of cognitive deceases, cell proliferation, control of the cancer cells, etc). PMID:23851636

  11. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  12. Effect of magnetic field in malaria diagnosis using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Yuen, Clement

    2011-07-01

    The current gold standard method of Malaria diagnosis relies on the blood smears examination. The method is laborintensive, time consuming and requires the expertise for data interpretation. In contrast, Raman scattering from a metabolic byproduct of the malaria parasite (Hemozoin) shows the possibility of rapid and objective diagnosis of malaria. However, hemozoin concentration is usually extremely low especially at the early stage of malaria infection, rendering weak Raman signal. In this work, we propose the sensitive detection of enriched β-hematin, whose spectroscopic properties are equivalent to hemozoin, based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by using magnetic nanoparticles. A few orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal of β-hematin can be achieved using magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the effect of magnetic field on SERS enhancement is investigated. Our result demonstrates the potential of SERS using magnetic nanoparticles in the effective detection of hemozoin for malaria diagnosis.

  13. Effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cyclotron motion coherence at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Gleb; Kostyukevich, Yury; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Blakney, Greg T; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional code based on the particle-in-cell algorithm modified to account for the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field was applied to determine the effect of Z(1), Z(2), Z(3), Z(4), X, Y, ZX, ZY, XZ(2) YZ(2), XY and X(2)-Y(2) components of an orthogonal magnetic field expansion on ion motion during detection in an FT-ICR cell. Simulations were performed for magnetic field strengths of 4.7, 7, 14.5 and 21 Tesla, including experimentally determined magnetic field spatial distributions for existing 4.7 T and 14.5 T magnets. The effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cloud stabilization ("ion condensation") at high numbers of ions was investigated by direct simulations of individual ion trajectories. Z(1), Z(2), Z(3) and Z(4) components have the largest effect (especially Z(1)) on ion cloud stability. Higher magnetic field strength and lower m/z demand higher relative magnetic field homogeneity to maintain cloud coherence for a fixed time period. The dependence of mass resolving power upper limit on Z(1) inhomogeneity is evaluated for different magnetic fields and m/z. The results serve to set the homogeneity requirements for various orthogonal magnetic field components (shims) for future FT-ICR magnet design. PMID:26307725

  14. Hanle Effect Diagnostics of the Coronal Magnetic Field: A Test Using Realistic Magnetic Field Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N.-E.; Solanki, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2009-06-01

    Our understanding of coronal phenomena, such as coronal plasma thermodynamics, faces a major handicap caused by missing coronal magnetic field measurements. Several lines in the UV wavelength range present suitable sensitivity to determine the coronal magnetic field via the Hanle effect. The latter is a largely unexplored diagnostic of coronal magnetic fields with a very high potential. Here we study the magnitude of the Hanle-effect signal to be expected outside the solar limb due to the Hanle effect in polarized radiation from the H I Lyα and β lines, which are among the brightest lines in the off-limb coronal FUV spectrum. For this purpose we use a magnetic field structure obtained by extrapolating the magnetic field starting from photospheric magnetograms. The diagnostic potential of these lines for determining the coronal magnetic field, as well as their limitations are studied. We show that these lines, in particular H I Lyβ, are useful for such measurements.

  15. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time- independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  16. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time-independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  17. Ram pressure stripping in elliptical galaxies - II. Magnetic field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Min-Su; Ruszkowski, Mateusz

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of magnetic fields and turbulence on ram pressure stripping in elliptical galaxies using ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We consider weakly magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) characterized by subsonic turbulence, and two orientations of the magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) - parallel and perpendicular to the direction of the galaxy motion through the ICM. While the stronger turbulence enhances the ram pressure stripping mass-loss, the magnetic fields tend to suppress the stripping rates, and the suppression is stronger for parallel fields. However, the effect of magnetic fields on the mass stripping rate is mild. Nevertheless, the morphology of the stripping tails depends significantly on the direction of the ICM magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field geometry on the tail morphology is much stronger than that of the level of the ISM turbulence. The tail has a highly collimated shape for parallel fields, while it has a sheet-like morphology in the plane of the ICM magnetic field for perpendicular fields. The magnetic field in the tail is amplified irrespectively of the orientation of the ICM field. More strongly magnetized regions in the ram pressure stripping tails are expected to have systematically higher metallicity due to the strong concentration of the stripped ISM than the less magnetized regions. Strong dependence of the morphology of the stripped ISM on the magnetic field could potentially be used to constrain the relative orientation of the ram pressure direction and the dominant component of the ICM magnetic field.

  18. Effect of zero magnetic field on cardiovascular system and microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Yu. I.; At'kov, O. Yu.; Vasin, A. L.; Breus, T. K.; Sasonko, M. L.; Pishchalnikov, R. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of zero magnetic field conditions on cardiovascular system of healthy adults have been studied. In order to generate zero magnetic field, the facility for magnetic fields modeling "ARFA" has been used. Parameters of the capillary blood flow, blood pressure, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring were measured during the study. All subjects were tested twice: in zero magnetic field and, for comparison, in sham condition. The obtained results during 60 minutes of zero magnetic field exposure demonstrate a clear effect on cardiovascular system and microcirculation. The results of our experiments can be used in studies of long-term stay in hypo-magnetic conditions during interplanetary missions.

  19. Effect of zero magnetic field on cardiovascular system and microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel, Yu I; At'kov, O Yu; Vasin, A L; Breus, T K; Sasonko, M L; Pishchalnikov, R Yu

    2016-02-01

    The effects of zero magnetic field conditions on cardiovascular system of healthy adults have been studied. In order to generate zero magnetic field, the facility for magnetic fields modeling "ARFA" has been used. Parameters of the capillary blood flow, blood pressure, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring were measured during the study. All subjects were tested twice: in zero magnetic field and, for comparison, in sham condition. The obtained results during 60 minutes of zero magnetic field exposure demonstrate a clear effect on cardiovascular system and microcirculation. The results of our experiments can be used in studies of long-term stay in hypo-magnetic conditions during interplanetary missions. PMID:26948007

  20. Effects of a magnetic field on the germination of plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Noriyuki; Nakagawa, Jun; Kitazawa, Koichi

    1999-04-01

    The effects of a nonuniform magnetic field on the germination of plants were studied. When a 10 T magnetic field was applied at the center of a superconducting magnet, a cucumber shoot germinating in a horizontal bore leaned towards the field center. In contrast, the root grew in the direction opposite the shoot. The observed result seemed to have occurred as a result of the magnetic force influencing the geotaxis of the cucumber. This idea was supported qualitatively by analysis results of the experimental data. Knowledge obtained in this study will be helpful for the evaluation of the effect of the magnetic field on living bodies and suggests the possibility of applying magnetic fields in other areas of research.

  1. Magnetic field control of the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Kehlberger, Andreas; Guo, Er-Jia; Kläui, Mathias; Nowak, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    The origin of the suppression of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect by applied magnetic fields is studied. We perform numerical simulations of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion for an atomistic spin model and calculate the magnon accumulation in linear temperature gradients for different strengths of applied magnetic fields and different length scales of the temperature gradient. We observe a decrease of the magnon accumulation with increasing magnetic field and we reveal that the origin of this effect is a field dependent change of the frequency distribution of the propagating magnons. With increasing field the magnonic spin currents are reduced due to a suppression of parts of the frequency spectrum. By comparison with measurements of the magnetic field dependent longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in YIG thin films with various thicknesses, we find qualitative agreement between our model and the experimental data, demonstrating the importance of this effect for experimental systems.

  2. Magnetic field effects on gravitational waves from binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2008-04-01

    Observational evidence indicates that a fair number of neutron star binaries and neutron star-black hole binaries have a sizable magnetic field which can be responsible for powering pulsars and colimating jets. Magnetic field effects additionally can have a strong influence on the dynamics of the fluid by redistributing angular momentum through different mechanisms (magnetic winding and braking, magneto-rotational instabilities) depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the typical time scales involved in the process. These processes can affect the multipolar structure of the source and consequently the produced gravitational wave. We present results of neutron star binary mergers both with and without magnetic field and discuss the magnetic effects on the gravitational waves, fluid structure, and merger timescale.

  3. Plasma wave instability in a quantum field effect transistor with magnetic field effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li-Ping; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2013-08-15

    The current-carrying state of a nanometer Field Effect Transistor (FET) may become unstable against the generation of high-frequency plasma waves and lead to generation of terahertz radiation. In this paper, the influences of magnetic field, quantum effects, electron exchange-correlation, and thermal motion of electrons on the instability of the plasma waves in a nanometer FET are reported. We find that, while the electron exchange-correlation suppresses the radiation power, the magnetic field, the quantum effects, and the thermal motion of electrons can enhance the radiation power. The radiation frequency increases with quantum effects and thermal motion of electrons, but decreases with electron exchange-correlation effect. Interestingly, we find that magnetic field can suppress the quantum effects and the thermal motion of electrons and the radiation frequency changes non-monotonely with the magnetic field. These properties could make the nanometer FET advantageous for realization of practical terahertz oscillations.

  4. Effects of Magnetic Fields on Bar Substructures in Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-03-01

    To study the effects of magnetic fields on the properties of bar substructures, we run two-dimensional, ideal MHD simulations of barred galaxies under the influence of a non-axisymmetric bar potential. In the bar regions, magnetic fields reduce density compression in the dust-lane shocks, while removing angular momentum further from the gas at the shocks. This evidently results in a smaller and more distributed ring, and a larger mass inflows rate to the galaxy center in models with stronger magnetic fields. In the outer regions, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates, amplifying magnetic fields near the corotation resonance. In the absence of spiral arms, the amplified fields naturally shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The reader is refereed to Kim & Stone (2012) for a detailed presentation of the simulation outcomes.

  5. Optical investigation of effective permeability of dilute magnetic dielectrics with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ananya; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The prime objective of this paper is to investigate the magnetic nature of dilute magnetic dielectrics (DMD) under variation of external magnetic field. The said variation is studied over developed nano-sized Gadolinium Oxide as a DMD system. The observed experimental field variation of the effective magnetic permeability is analyzed results of optical experiment. The experiment records the variation of Brewster angle of incident polarized LASER beam from the surface of developed DMD specimen with applied out of plane external magnetic field. The effective refractive index and hence relative magnetic permeability were estimated following electro-magnetic theory. The overall results obtained and agreement between theory and experiment are good.

  6. New approaches to thermoelectric cooling effects in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, A.; Darling, T.W.; Freibert, F.

    1997-05-01

    The authors review thermoelectric effects in a magnetic field at a phenomenological level. Discussions of the limiting performance and problems with its computation for both Peltier and Ettingshausen coolers are presented. New principles to guide the materials scientists are discussed for magnetic effects, and a brief review of the subtle measurement problems is presented.

  7. Magnetic field modulation of chirooptical effects in magnetoplasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Prieto, Patricia; García, Fernando; Cebollada, Alfonso; González, Maria Ujué; García-Martin, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    In this work we analyse the magnetic field effects on the chirooptical properties of magnetoplasmonic chiral structures. The structures consist of two-dimensional arrays of Au gammadions in which thin layers of Co have been inserted. Due to the magnetic properties of the Au/Co interface the structures have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy which favours magnetic saturation along the surface normal, allowing magnetic field modulation of the chirooptical response with moderate magnetic fields. These structures have two main resonances. The resonance at 850 nm has a larger chirooptical response than the resonance at 650 nm, which, on the other hand, exhibits a larger magnetic field modulation of its chirooptical response. This dissimilar behaviour is due to the different physical origin of the chirooptical and magneto-optical responses. Whereas the chirooptical effects are due to the geometry of the structures, the magneto-optical response is related to the intensity of the electromagnetic field in the magnetic (Co) layers. We also show that the optical chirality can be modulated by the applied magnetic field, which suggests that magnetoplasmonic chiral structures could be used to develop new strategies for chirooptical sensing. PMID:24569696

  8. Diffraction patterns in ferrofluids: Effect of magnetic field and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, S.; Mohan, Shalini; Pai, Chintamani

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report the experimental observation of diffraction patterns in a ferrofluid comprising of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in hexane by a 10 mW He-Ne laser beam. An external dc magnetic field (0-2 kG) was applied perpendicular to the beam. The diffraction pattern showed a variation at different depths of the sample in both zero and applied magnetic field. The patterns also exhibit a change in shape and size as the external field is varied. This effect arises due to thermally induced self-diffraction under the influence of gravity and external magnetic field.

  9. Effects of solar magnetic field on cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goncher, G. A.; Kolomeets, E. V.; Lyakhova, A. K.; Slyunyaeva, N. V.; Stekolnikov, N. V.

    1985-01-01

    Aspects of the problem of galactic cosmic ray propagation, including inversion of the solar total magnetic field and an analysis of data related to the heliomagnetic cycle are discussed. It is noted that the global structure of the solar magnetic field results in an additional flux of galactic cosmic rays generated by curvature and gradient drifts. An analysis of heliomagnetic cycle data shows that the latitudinal gradient results in a N-S asymmetry, with the amplitude of the effect growing with depth in the atmosphere. The inversion of the solar total magnetic field, drift effects, and other space distributions are found to contribute to a 22-year cycle of solar activity.

  10. Effects of magnetic field on anisotropic temperature relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chao; Ren Haijun; Cai Huishan; Li Ding

    2013-03-15

    In a strongly magnetized plasma, where the particles' thermal gyro-radii are smaller than the Debye length, the magnetic field greatly affects the plasma's relaxation processes. The expressions for the time rates of change of the electron and ion parallel and perpendicular temperatures are obtained and calculated analytically for small anisotropies through considering binary collisions between charged particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field by using perturbation theory. Based on these expressions, the effects of the magnetic field on the relaxation of anisotropic electron and ion temperatures due to electron-electron collisions, ion-ion collisions, and electron-ion collisions are investigated. Consequently, the relaxation times of anisotropic electron and ion temperatures to isotropy are calculated. It is shown that electron-ion collisions can affect the relaxation of an anisotropic ion distribution in the strong magnetic field.

  11. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  12. Magnetic field effect on flow parameters of blood along with magnetic particles in a cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shashi; Singh, Uaday; Katiyar, V. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of external uniform magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles is reported through a mathematical model using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approach. The fluid is acted upon by a varying pressure gradient and an external uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylindrical tube. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations were solved numerically and found that flow parameters are affected by the influence of magnetic field. Further, artificial blood (75% water+25% Glycerol) along with iron oxide magnetic particles were prepared and transported into a glass tube with help of a peristaltic pump. The velocity of artificial blood along with magnetic particles was experimentally measured at different magnetic fields ranging from 100 to 600 mT. The model results show that the velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under the influence of magnetic field, which is supported by our experimental results.

  13. A magnetic field effect on learning in male golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Łopuch, Sylwia

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this experiment was to investigate the influence of repeated exposure to 10, 20, 30 or 40 Hz magnetic fields at 0.1T on the learning of male golden hamsters in a Skinner box, in which the animals learned to press a lever to receive a food reward. The latency of the first response was not affected by exposure to the magnetic fields used in this experiment. No significant field-dependent effects on the performance of the task were observed in males exposed to 10 and 20 Hz magnetic fields at 0.1T. However, exposure significantly improved the learning of the task in animals exposed to 30 and 40 Hz magnetic fields at 0.1T. PMID:19150395

  14. Diffusion affected magnetic field effect in exciplex fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Burshtein, Anatoly I.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.

    2014-07-14

    The fluorescence of the exciplex, {sup 1}[D{sup +δ}A{sup −δ}], formed at contact of photoexcited acceptor {sup 1}A{sup *} with an electron donor {sup 1}D, is known to be very sensitive to an external magnetic field, reducing the spin conversion efficiency in the resulting geminate radical ion pair, {sup 1,3}[D{sup +}…A{sup −}]. The relative increase of the exciplex fluorescence in the highest magnetic field compared to the lowest one, known as the magnetic field effect, crucially depends on the viscosity of the solvent. This phenomenon first studied experimentally is at first reproduced here theoretically. The magnetic field effect is shown to vanish in both limits of high and low solvent diffusivity reaching a maximum in between. It is also very sensitive to the solvent dielectric constant and to the exciplex and radical-ion pair conversion rates.

  15. Effects of magnetic fields on dissolution of arthritis causing crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2015-05-01

    The number of gout patients has rapidly increased because of excess alcohol and salt intake. The agent responsible for gout is the monosodium urate (MSU) crystal. MSU crystals are found in blood and consist of uric acid and sodium. As a substitute for drug dosing or excessive water intake, physical stimulation by magnetic fields represents a new medical treatment for gout. In this study, we investigated the effects of a magnetic field on the dissolution of a MSU crystal suspension. The white MSU crystal suspension was dissolved in an alkaline solution. We measured the light transmission of the MSU crystal suspension by a transmitted light measuring system. The magnetic field was generated by a horizontal electromagnet (maximum field strength was 500 mT). The MSU crystal suspension that dissolved during the application of a magnetic field of 500 mT clearly had a higher dissolution rate when compared with the control sample. We postulate that the alkali solution promoted penetration upon diamagnetic rotation and this magnetic field orienting is because of the pronounced diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy of the MSU crystal. The results indicate that magnetic fields represent an effective gout treatment approach.

  16. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Evans, Emrys W.; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Wallace, Mark I.; MacKenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor.

  17. Collisional effects on Rayleigh-Taylor-induced magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Flaig, M.; Plewa, T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Hager, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V.

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic-field generation from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability was predicted more than 30 years ago, though experimental measurements of this phenomenon have only occurred in the past few years. These pioneering observations demonstrated that collisional effects are important to B-field evolution. To produce fields of a measurable strength, high-intensity lasers irradiate solid targets to generate the nonaligned temperature and density gradients required for B-field generation. The ablation process naturally generates an unstable system where RT-induced magnetic fields form. Field strengths inferred from monoenergetic-proton radiographs indicate that in the ablation region diffusive effects caused by finite plasma resistivity are not negligible. Results from the first proof-of-existence experiments are reviewed and the role of collisional effects on B-field evolution is discussed in detail.

  18. Lattice Study of Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterowd, Christopher; Detar, Carleton; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of graphene ranks as one of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years. As a strongly interacting system whose low-energy excitations are described by the Dirac equation, graphene has many similarities with other strongly interacting field theories, particularly quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Graphene, along with other relativistic field theories, have been predicted to exhibit spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) when an external magnetic field is present. Using nonperturbative methods developed to study QCD, we study the low-energy effective field theory (EFT) of graphene subject to an external magnetic field. We find strong evidence supporting the existence of SSB at zero-temperature and characterize the dependence of the chiral condensate on the external magnetic field. We also present results for the mass of the Nambu-Goldstone boson and the dynamically generated quasiparticle mass that result from the SSB.

  19. Effect of a Magnetic Field on Drosophila under Supercooled Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Makoto; Terayama, Hayato; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Matsushita, Masayuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Under subzero degree conditions, free water contained in biological cells tends to freeze and then most living things die due to low temperatures. We examined the effect of a variable magnetic field on Drosophila under supercooled conditions (a state in which freezing is not caused even below the freezing point). Under such supercooled conditions with the magnetic field at 0°C for 72 hours, −4°C for 24 hours and −8°C for 1 hour, the Drosophila all survived, while all conversely died under the supercooled conditions without the magnetic field. This result indicates a possibility that the magnetic field can reduce cell damage caused due to low temperatures in living things. PMID:23284809

  20. Effect of a magnetic field on Drosophila under supercooled conditions.

    PubMed

    Naito, Munekazu; Hirai, Shuichi; Mihara, Makoto; Terayama, Hayato; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Matsushita, Masayuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Under subzero degree conditions, free water contained in biological cells tends to freeze and then most living things die due to low temperatures. We examined the effect of a variable magnetic field on Drosophila under supercooled conditions (a state in which freezing is not caused even below the freezing point). Under such supercooled conditions with the magnetic field at 0°C for 72 hours, -4°C for 24 hours and -8°C for 1 hour, the Drosophila all survived, while all conversely died under the supercooled conditions without the magnetic field. This result indicates a possibility that the magnetic field can reduce cell damage caused due to low temperatures in living things. PMID:23284809

  1. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    magnetic field may cause different biological effects at the cellular, tissue and organ levels. They may be functionally related to systems that regulate plant metabolism including the intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis. However, our understanding of very complex fundamental mechanisms and sites of interactions between weak magnetic fields and biological systems is still incomplete and still deserve strong research efforts.

  2. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Miedzik, Jan; Daniłko, Dariusz; Barral, Serge

    2015-04-15

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  3. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miedzik, Jan; Barral, Serge; Daniłko, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  4. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Kawasumi, Masashi; Saito, Masao

    The effect of magnetic field on cell has long been investigated, but there are few quantitative investigations of the migration of cells. Cell-migration is important as one of the fundamental activities of the cell. This study proposes a method to evaluate quantitatively the cell-diffusion constant and the effect of static magnetic field on cell migration. The cell-lines are neuroblastoma (NG108-15), fibroblastoma (NIH/3T3) and osteoblastoma (MC3T3-E1). The static magnetic field of 30 mT or 120 mT is impressed by a permanent magnet in vertical or horizontal direction to the dish. It is shown that the cell-diffusion constant can represent the cell migration as the cell activity. It is found that the cell migration is enhanced by exposure to the magnetic field, depending on the kind of cell. It is conjectured that the effect of static magnetic field affects the cell migration, which is at the downstream of the information transmission.

  5. Lifshitz effects on vector condensate induced by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Liu, Mo-Lin; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhuo-Qun

    2014-05-01

    By numerical and analytical methods, we study in detail the effects of the Lifshitz dynamical exponent z on the vector condensate induced by an applied magnetic field in the probe limit. Concretely, in the presence of the magnetic field, we obtain the Landau level independent of z, and we also find the critical value by coupling a Maxwell complex vector field and an SU(2) field into a (3+1)-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, respectively. The research results show that for the two models with the lowest Landau level, the increasing z improves the response of the critical temperature to the applied magnetic field even without the charge density, and the analytical results uphold the numerical results. In addition, we find that, even in the Lifshitz black hole, the Maxwell complex vector model is still a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model. Furthermore, we construct the square vortex lattice and discuss the implications of these results.

  6. Magnetic field effects on the NiO magnon spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, J.; Grimsditch, M.; Materials Science Division; Centro Atomico Bariloche; CIC Nanogune

    2010-03-15

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the eight antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) modes of NiO has been studied experimentally using Brillouin light scattering. The results are reproduced by a model that includes the effects of exchange, dipolar coupling, a small cubic anisotropy, and Zeeman terms. Magnetic fields up to 7 T were applied along several NiO crystalline directions. The agreement between theory and experiment provides additional proof that the model, recently introduced to explain the existence of the AFMR multiplet, is indeed valid. Deviations between simulations and experiments, together with a review of previously published results, indicate that large magnetostrictive effects are present in NiO.

  7. The effects of static magnetic fields on bone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Ding, Chong; Ren, Li; Zhou, Yimin; Shang, Peng

    2014-05-01

    All the living beings live and evolve under geomagnetic field (25-65 μT). Besides, opportunities for human exposed to different intensities of static magnetic fields (SMF) in the workplace have increased progressively, such SMF range from weak magnetic field (<1 mT), moderate SMF (1 mT-1 T) to high SMF (>1 T). Given this, numerous scientific studies focus on the health effects and have demonstrated that certain magnetic fields have positive influence on our skeleton systems. Therefore, SMF is considered as a potential physical therapy to improve bone healing and keep bones healthy nowadays. Here, we review the mechanisms of effects of SMF on bone tissue, ranging from physical interactions, animal studies to cellular studies. PMID:24556024

  8. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  9. In Situ Magnetic Field Measurement using the Hanle Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a simple method of in situ magnetic field mapping near zero points in magnetic fields. It is ideal for measuring trapping parameters such the field gradient and curvature, and should be applicable in most experiments with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or similar setup. This method works by probing atomic transitions in a vacuum, and is based on the Hanle effect, which alters the polarization of spontaneous emission in the presence of a magnetic field. Unlike most techniques based on the Hanle effect, however, we look only at intensity. Instead of measuring polarization we use the change in directional radiation patterns caused by a magnetic field. Using one of the cooling beams for our MOT, along with a linear polarizer, a narrow slit, and an inexpensive webcam, we measure the three dimensional position of a magnetic field zero point within our vacuum to within +/-1 mm and the gradient through the zero point to an accuracy of 4%. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF PULSED MAGNETIC FIELDS ON ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper contains a critical review of the available literature on the subject of the effects of developing animals from exposure to pulsed magnetic fields (PMF). he workshop at which this presentation was originally made discussed the reproductive effects in women from the use...

  11. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A. D.; Dalslet, B. T.; Skieller, D. H.; Lee, K. H.; Okkels, F.; Hansen, M. F.

    2010-07-05

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can be significantly enhanced by a geometric factor. For the samples in the present study, we demonstrate an enhancement of the sensor output by a factor of about 100 compared to cross-shaped sensors. The presented construction opens a new design and application area of the planar Hall effect, which we term planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

  12. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; del Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  13. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1995-11-04

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday`s law. We previously determined that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here we calculate the electron density including both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. We calculate the potential required to establish a constant electron density, and compare with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest.

  14. Orbital effect of magnetic field on the Majorana phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Bas; Akhmerov, Anton R.

    2016-06-01

    Studies of Majorana bound states in semiconducting nanowires frequently neglect the orbital effect of a magnetic field. Systematically studying its role leads us to several conclusions for designing Majoranas in this system. Specifically, we show that for experimentally relevant parameter values the orbital effect of a magnetic field has a stronger impact on the dispersion relation than the Zeeman effect. While Majoranas do not require the presence of only one dispersion subband, we observe that the size of the Majoranas becomes unpractically large, and the band gap unpractically small, when more than one subband is filled. Since the orbital effect of a magnetic field breaks several symmetries of the Hamiltonian, it leads to the appearance of large regions in parameter space with no band gap whenever the magnetic field is not aligned with the wire axis. The reflection symmetry of the Hamiltonian with respect to the plane perpendicular to the wire axis guarantees that the wire stays gapped in the topologically nontrivial region as long as the field is aligned with the wire.

  15. Current-Produced Magnetic Field Effects on Current Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Stone, N. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Current collection by an infinitely long, conducting cylinder in a magnetized plasma, taking into account the magnetic field of the collected current, is discussed. A region of closed magnetic surfaces disconnects the cylinder from infinity. Due to this, the collected current depends on the ratio between this region and the plasma sheath region and, under some conditions, current reduction arises. The current collection along a realistic "bare wire" space tether is considered. A number of factors are taken into account, including the resistance of the wire and shielding resulting from the current-induced magnetic field produced by current flow in the tether. The plasma density, tether length and radius, the geomagnetic field strength and angle to the orbital velocity vector were all used as parameters in the study. It is shown that magnetic shielding for certain tether system configurations, when combined with particular values of the governing parameters, significantly reduces the collected current. Specifically, it is shown that an electrodynamic tether in the "thruster" mode suffers greater reduction from magnetic shielding than a tether with the same characteristics deployed in the "generator" mode. We find that, for both modes, current-induced magnetic shielding becomes more significant as plasma density and wire radius increase. The same is true for the dependence on the angle of the geomagnetic field to the orbital velocity vector and the motion-induced electric field for the generator mode For the thruster mode, the effect is larger for smaller angles. In both operating modes, the shielding is more important for smaller angles between the tether and magnetic field. In addition to the above dependencies, the effect for the thruster mode essentially depends on the tether length. In general, any parametric change that increases tether current, relative to the strength of the electric field between the tether and the ambient plasma, will increase the shielding

  16. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ∼ 5–10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ∼0.1–0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  17. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ˜ 5-10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ˜0.1-0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  18. Magnetic field effects in flavoproteins and related systems.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emrys W; Dodson, Charlotte A; Maeda, Kiminori; Biskup, Till; Wedge, C J; Timmel, Christiane R

    2013-10-01

    Within the framework of the radical pair mechanism, magnetic fields may alter the rate and yields of chemical reactions involving spin-correlated radical pairs as intermediates. Such effects have been studied in detail in a variety of chemical systems both experimentally and theoretically. In recent years, there has been growing interest in whether such magnetic field effects (MFEs) also occur in biological systems, a question driven most notably by the increasing body of evidence for the involvement of such effects in the magnetic compass sense of animals. The blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome is placed at the centre of this debate and photoexcitation of its bound flavin cofactor has indeed been shown to result in the formation of radical pairs. Here, we review studies of MFEs on free flavins in model systems as well as in blue-light photoreceptor proteins and discuss the properties that are crucial in determining the magnetosensitivity of these systems. PMID:24511388

  19. Magnetic field effects in flavoproteins and related systems

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Emrys W.; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Maeda, Kiminori; Biskup, Till; Wedge, C. J.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the radical pair mechanism, magnetic fields may alter the rate and yields of chemical reactions involving spin-correlated radical pairs as intermediates. Such effects have been studied in detail in a variety of chemical systems both experimentally and theoretically. In recent years, there has been growing interest in whether such magnetic field effects (MFEs) also occur in biological systems, a question driven most notably by the increasing body of evidence for the involvement of such effects in the magnetic compass sense of animals. The blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome is placed at the centre of this debate and photoexcitation of its bound flavin cofactor has indeed been shown to result in the formation of radical pairs. Here, we review studies of MFEs on free flavins in model systems as well as in blue-light photoreceptor proteins and discuss the properties that are crucial in determining the magnetosensitivity of these systems. PMID:24511388

  20. Effects of Horizontal Magnetic Fields on Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rekha

    2007-02-01

    Local helioseismology techniques seek to probe the subsurface magnetic fields and flows by observing waves that emerge at the solar surface after passing through these inhomogeneities. Active regions on the surface of the Sun are distinguished by their strong magnetic fields, and techniques such as time-distance helioseismology can provide a useful diagnostic for probing these structures. Above the active regions, the fields fan out to create a horizontal magnetic canopy. We investigate the effect of a uniform horizontal magnetic field on the travel time of acoustic waves by considering vertical velocity in a simple plane-parallel adiabatically stratified polytrope. It is shown that such fields can lower the upper turning point of p-modes and hence influence their travel time. It is found that acoustic waves reflected from magnetically active regions have travel times up to a minute less than for waves similarly reflected in quiet regions. It is also found that sound speeds are increased below the active regions. These findings are consistent with time-distance measurements.

  1. Effects of simulated cosmological magnetic fields on the galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the effects of varying the intensity of the primordial magnetic seed field on the global properties of the galaxy population in ideal magnetohydrodynamic cosmological simulations performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We vary the seed field in our calculations in a range of values still compatible with the current cosmological upper limits. We show that above a critical intensity of ≃10-9 G, the additional pressure arising from the field strongly affects the evolution of gaseous structures, leading to a suppression of the cosmic star formation history, which is stronger for larger seed fields. This directly reflects into a lower total galaxy count above a fixed stellar mass threshold at all redshifts, and a lower galaxy number density at fixed stellar mass and a less massive stellar component at fixed virial mass at all mass scales. These signatures may be used, in addition to the existing methods, to derive tighter constraints on primordial magnetic seed field intensities.

  2. New approaches to thermoelectric cooling effects in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, A.; Darling, T.W.; Freibert, F.; Trugman, S.A.; Moshopoulou, E.; Sarrao, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    The authors review thermoelectric effects in a magnetic field at a phenomenological level. Discussions of the limiting performance and problems with its computation for both Peltier and Ettingshausen coolers are presented. New principles are discussed to guide the materials scientist in the search for better Ettingshausen materials, and a brief review of the subtle measurement problems is presented.

  3. Effect of elongational flow on ferrofuids under a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, S; Do, Younghae; Lopez, J M

    2013-07-01

    To set up a mathematical model for the flow of complex magnetic fluids, noninteracting magnetic particles with a small volume or an even point size are typically assumed. Real ferrofluids, however, consist of a suspension of particles with a finite size in an almost ellipsoid shape as well as with particle-particle interactions that tend to form chains of various lengths. To come close to the realistic situation for ferrofluids, we investigate the effect of elongational flow incorporated by the symmetric part of the velocity gradient field tensor, which could be scaled by a so-called transport coefficient λ(2). Based on the hybrid finite-difference and Galerkin scheme, we study the flow of a ferrofluid in the gap between two concentric rotating cylinders subjected to either a transverse or an axial magnetic field with the transport coefficient. Under the influence of a transverse magnetic field with λ(2)=0, we show that basic state and centrifugal unstable flows are modified and are inherently three-dimensional helical flows that are either left-winding or right-winding in the sense of the azimuthal mode-2, which is in contrast to the generic cases. That is, classical modulated rotating waves rotate, but these flows do not. We find that under elongational flow (λ(2)≠0), the flow structure from basic state and centrifugal instability flows is modified and their azimuthal vorticity is linearly changed. In addition, we also show that the bifurcation threshold of the supercritical centrifugal unstable flows under a magnetic field depends linearly on the transport coefficient, but it does not affect the general stabilization effect of any magnetic field. PMID:23944545

  4. Removal of earth's magnetic field effect on magnetoelastic resonance sensors by an antisymmetric bias field

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Suess, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are used in a wide field of wireless sensing applications. The sensing element is a low-cost magnetostrictive ribbon whose resonant frequency depends on the measured quantity. The accuracy of magnetoelastic sensors is limited by the fact that the resonant frequency is also affected by the earth's magnetic field. In this paper we present a technique to minimize this effect by applying an antisymmetric magnetic bias field to the ribbon. The ribbon's response to external perturbation fields was measured and compared to a conventional sensor design. Our results show that the influence of the earth's magnetic field could be reduced by 77%. PMID:23565035

  5. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  6. Fractional quantum Hall effect in a tilted magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papić, Z.

    2013-06-01

    We discuss the orbital effect of a tilted magnetic field on the quantum Hall effect in parabolic quantum wells. Many-body states realized at the fractional (1)/(3) and (1)/(2) filling of the second electronic subband are studied using finite-size exact diagonalization. In both cases, we obtain the phase diagram consisting of a fractional quantum Hall fluid phase that persists for moderate tilts, and eventually undergoes a direct transition to the stripe phase. It is shown that tilting of the field probes the geometrical degree of freedom of fractional quantum Hall fluids, and can be partly related to the effect of band-mass anisotropy.

  7. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Evans, Emrys W; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A; Wallace, Mark I; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor. PMID:27001735

  8. Biological effects of magnetic fields from superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1989-12-01

    Physical interaction mechanisms and potential biological effects of static and slowly time-varying magnetic fields are summarized. The results of laboratory and human health studies on this topic are related to the fringe magnetic field levels anticipated to occur in the proximity of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems. The observed biological effects of magnetic fields include: (1) magnetic induction of electrical potentials in the circulatory system and other tissues, (2) magneto-orientation of macromolecules and membranes in strong magnetic fields, and (3) Zeeman interactions with electronic spin states in certain classes of charge transfer reactions. In general, only the first of these interactions is relevant to the establishment of occupational exposure guidelines. Physical hazards posed by the interactions of magnetic fields with cardiac pacemakers and other implanted medical devices, e.g., aneurysm clips and prostheses, are important factors that must also be considered in establishing exposure guidelines. Proposed guidelines for limiting magnetic field exposure are discussed. 50 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Magnetic field effects on plant growth, development, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Massimo E.

    2014-01-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) is a natural component of our environment. Plants, which are known to sense different wavelengths of light, respond to gravity, react to touch and electrical signaling, cannot escape the effect of GMF. While phototropism, gravitropism, and tigmotropism have been thoroughly studied, the impact of GMF on plant growth and development is not well-understood. This review describes the effects of altering magnetic field (MF) conditions on plants by considering plant responses to MF values either lower or higher than those of the GMF. The possible role of GMF on plant evolution and the nature of the magnetoreceptor is also discussed. PMID:25237317

  10. Effective field model of roughness in magnetic nano-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lepadatu, Serban

    2015-12-28

    An effective field model is introduced here within the micromagnetics formulation, to study roughness in magnetic structures, by considering sub-exchange length roughness levels as a perturbation on a smooth structure. This allows the roughness contribution to be separated, which is found to give rise to an effective configurational anisotropy for both edge and surface roughness, and accurately model its effects with fine control over the roughness depth without the explicit need to refine the computational cell size to accommodate the roughness profile. The model is validated by comparisons with directly roughened structures for a series of magnetization switching and domain wall velocity simulations and found to be in excellent agreement for roughness levels up to the exchange length. The model is further applied to vortex domain wall velocity simulations with surface roughness, which is shown to significantly modify domain wall movement and result in dynamic pinning and stochastic creep effects.

  11. The Effect of Varying Magnetic Field Gradient on Combustion Dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzdalenko, Vera; Zake, Maija; Barmina, Inesa; Gedrovics, Martins

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the recent experimental research is to provide control of the combustion dynamics and complex measurements (flame temperature, heat production rate, and composition of polluting emissions) for pelletized wood biomass using a non-uniform magnetic field that produces magnetic force interacting with magnetic moment of paramagnetic oxygen. The experimental results have shown that a gradient magnetic field provides enhanced mixing of the flame compounds by increasing combustion efficiency and enhancing the burnout of volatiles.

  12. Effect of Magnetic Field Gradient on Effectiveness of the Magnetic Sifter for Cell Purification.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M; Wilson, Robert J; Wang, Shan X

    2013-01-01

    In our experiments with NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen, we demonstrate capture efficiencies above 90% even at sample flow rates of 5 ml/h through our microfabricated magnetic sifter. We also improve the elution efficiencies from between 50% and 60% to close to 90% via optimization of the permanent magnet size and position used to magnetize the sifter. We then explain our observations via the use of finite element software for magnetic field and field gradient distributions, and a particle tracing algorithm, illustrating the impact of magnetic field gradients on the performance of the magnetic sifter. The high capture and elution efficiencies observed here is especially significant for magnetic separation of biologically interesting but rare moieties such as cancer stem cells for downstream analysis. PMID:23515873

  13. Effect of Magnetic Field Gradient on Effectiveness of the Magnetic Sifter for Cell Purification

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M.; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2013-01-01

    In our experiments with NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen, we demonstrate capture efficiencies above 90% even at sample flow rates of 5 ml/h through our microfabricated magnetic sifter. We also improve the elution efficiencies from between 50% and 60% to close to 90% via optimization of the permanent magnet size and position used to magnetize the sifter. We then explain our observations via the use of finite element software for magnetic field and field gradient distributions, and a particle tracing algorithm, illustrating the impact of magnetic field gradients on the performance of the magnetic sifter. The high capture and elution efficiencies observed here is especially significant for magnetic separation of biologically interesting but rare moieties such as cancer stem cells for downstream analysis. PMID:23515873

  14. Magnetic field effects on non-vacuum binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2009-05-01

    Observational evidence suggests that sizeable magnetic fields are present in a fair number of neutron star binaries and neutron star-black hole binaries. These magnetic fields can have a strong influence on the fluid's dynamics, the energetics of the system and even the production of gravitational radiation. We present results of non-vacuum binary neutron star and black hole- neutron star collisions and examine the influence of magnetic fields on the gravitational waves, fluid structure and dynamical behavior of the system.

  15. Electric fields and chiral magnetic effect in Cu + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-03-01

    The non-central Cu + Au collisions can create strong out-of-plane magnetic fields and in-plane electric fields. By using the HIJING model, we study the general properties of the electromagnetic fields in Cu + Au collisions at 200 GeV and their impacts on the charge-dependent two-particle correlator γq1q2 = < cos ⁡ (ϕ1 +ϕ2 - 2ψRP) > (see main text for definition) which was used for the detection of the chiral magnetic effect (CME). Compared with Au + Au collisions, we find that the in-plane electric fields in Cu + Au collisions can strongly suppress the two-particle correlator or even reverse its sign if the lifetime of the electric fields is long. Combining with the expectation that if γq1q2 is induced by elliptic-flow driven effects we would not see such strong suppression or reversion, our results suggest to use Cu + Au collisions to test CME and understand the mechanisms that underlie γq1q2.

  16. Magnetic field evolution in white dwarfs: The hall effect and complexity of the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, A. G.; Van Horn, H. M.; Wood, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of the magnetic fields in white dwarfs, taking into account the Hall effect. Because this effect depends nonlinearly upon the magnetic field strength B, the time dependences of the various multipole field components are coupled. The evolution of the field is thus significantly more complicated than has been indicated by previous investigations. Our calculations employ recent white dwarf evolutionary sequences computed for stars with masses 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 solar mass. We show that in the presence of a strong (up to approximately 10(exp 9) G) internal toroidal magnetic field; the evolution of even the lowest order poloidal modes can be substantially changed by the Hall effect. As an example, we compute the evolution of an initially weak quadrupole component, which we take arbitrarily to be approximately 0.1%-1% of the strength of a dominant dipole field. We find that coupling provided by the Hall effect can produce growth of the ratio of the quadrupole to the dipole component of the surface value of the magnetic field strength by more than a factor of 10 over the 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 10) year cooling lifetime of the white dwarf. Some consequences of these results for the process of magnetic-field evolution in white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  17. Magnetic field fiber sensor based on the magneto-birefringence effect of magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xueqin; Chen, Jiajia; Shi, Fuquan; Chen, Daru; Ren, Zhijun; Peng, Baojin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the magneto-birefringence effect of magnetic fluid (MF) is adopted to form an innovative fiber optic magnetic field sensor. The sensitive section is fabricated via a D-shaped microstructure inscribed in a high-birefringence fiber Sagnac loop with a femtosecond laser. The D-shaped microstructure facilitates good combination of the optical-fiber Sagnac interferometer with the magneto-birefringence effect of MF without suffering from absorption loss and manual alignment. Experimental results show the good performance of the magnetic field fiver sensor, particularly its high stable extinction ratio. Preliminary results are provided, and the magnetic field sensitivity of 0.0823 nm/mT can be further improved by increasing the depth and length of the D-shaped microstructure.

  18. Effect of primordial magnetic fields on the ionization history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, Jens; Paoletti, D.; Finelli, F.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Primordial magnetic fields (PMF) damp at scales smaller than the photon diffusion and free-streaming scale. This leads to heating of ordinary matter (electrons and baryons), which affects both the thermal and ionization history of our Universe. Here, we study the effect of heating due to ambipolar diffusion and decaying magnetic turbulence. We find that changes to the ionization history computed with recfast are significantly overestimated when compared with CosmoRec. The main physical reason for the difference is that the photoionization coefficient has to be evaluated using the radiation temperature rather than the matter temperature. A good agreement with CosmoRec is found after changing this aspect. Using Planck 2013 data and considering only the effect of PMF-induced heating, we find an upper limit on the rms magnetic field amplitude of B0 ≲ 1.1 nG (95 per cent c.l.) for a stochastic background of PMF with a nearly scale-invariant power spectrum. We also discuss uncertainties related to the approximations for the heating rates and differences with respect to previous studies. Our results are important for the derivation of constraints on the PMF power spectrum obtained from measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with full-mission Planck data. They may also change some of the calculations of PMF-induced effects on the primordial chemistry and 21cm signals.

  19. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2008-02-01

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  20. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  1. Effect of readout magnetic-field direction on trilayer magnetically induced super resolution media (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanoi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Sugimoto, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Shono, K.

    1997-04-01

    Among the proposed magnetically induced super resolution media, double-mask rear aperture detection (RAD) has the greatest potential for use in high-density land/groove recording.1 We proposed a trilayer double-mask RAD media that does not require a large initializing magnetic field.2 In this paper, we report the land/groove recording on the trilayer media for a 0.4 μm mark length and 0.7 μm track pitch. We found that crosstalk drastically changed depending on the direction of the readout magnetic field, and that the crosswrite is related to crosstalk. When applying the readout magnetic field in the erasing direction, the value of crosstalk was about -25 dB and a large crosswrite effect was observed. Conversely, the crosstalk was below -45 dB and no crosswrite effect was observed when applying the magnetic field in the writing direction. CNRs had almost the same value of 48 dB for both the above cases. To investigate the mask formation while applying the readout field in the writing direction, we precisely observed the wave form of the isolated marks. The carrier level rose twice with increasing readout field. However, the position of the leading edge mainly changed when increasing the field. We think that the low crosstalk is attributable to the enhancement of the front mask area. The trilayer media enables an areal density of 3 Gbit/in.2

  2. Effects of non-linearities on magnetic field generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nalson, Ellie; Malik, Karim A.; Christopherson, Adam J. E-mail: achristopherson@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic fields are present on all scales in the Universe. While we understand the processes which amplify the fields fairly well, we do not have a ''natural'' mechanism to generate the small initial seed fields. By using fully relativistic cosmological perturbation theory and going beyond the usual confines of linear theory we show analytically how magnetic fields are generated. This is the first analytical calculation of the magnetic field at second order, using gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory, and including all the source terms. To this end, we have rederived the full set of governing equations independently. Our results suggest that magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup -30}- 10{sup -27} G can be generated (although this depends on the small scale cut-off of the integral), which is largely in agreement with previous results that relied upon numerical calculations. These fields are likely too small to act as the primordial seed fields for dynamo mechanisms.

  3. Effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    A two-fluid, two-dimensional model of the plasma expansion in a divergent magnetic nozzle is used to investigate the effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on the acceleration and divergence of the plasma jet self-consistently. The induced field is diamagnetic and opposes the applied one, increasing the divergence of the magnetic nozzle and weakening its strength. This has a direct impact on the propulsive performance of the device, the demagnetization and detachment of the plasma, and can lead to the appearance of zero-field points and separatrix surfaces downstream. In contrast, the azimuthal induced field, albeit non-zero, is small in all cases of practical interest.

  4. Magnetorheological effect in the magnetic field oriented along the vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzhir, P. Magnet, C.; Fezai, H.; Meunier, A.; Bossis, G.; Rodríguez-Arco, L.; López-López, M. T.; Zubarev, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we have studied the magnetorheological (MR) fluid rheology in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity. Experimentally, the MR fluid flow was realized in the Couette coaxial cylinder geometry with the magnetic field parallel to the symmetry axis. The rheological measurements were compared to those obtained in the cone-plate geometry with the magnetic field perpendicular to the lower rheometer plate. Experiments revealed a quasi-Bingham behavior in both geometries with the stress level being just a few dozens of percent smaller in the Couette cylindrical geometry at the same internal magnetic field. The unexpectedly high MR response in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity is explained by stochastic fluctuations of positions and orientations of the particle aggregates. These fluctuations are induced by magnetic interactions between them. Once misaligned from the vorticity direction, the aggregates generate a high stress independent of the shear rate, and thus assimilated to the suspension apparent (dynamic) yield stress. Quantitatively, the fluctuations of the aggregate orientation are modeled as a rotary diffusion process with a diffusion constant proportional to the mean square interaction torque. The model gives a satisfactory agreement with the experimental field dependency of the apparent yield stress and confirms the nearly quadratic concentration dependency σ{sub Y}∝Φ{sup 2.2}, revealed in experiments. The practical interest of this study lies in the development of MR smart devices with the magnetic field nonperpendicular to the channel walls.

  5. The effect of Birkeland currents on magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peroomian, Vahe; Lyons, Larry R.; Schulz, Michael

    1996-01-01

    A technique was developed for the inclusion of large scale magnetospheric current systems in magnetic field models. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland current systems are included in the source surface model of the terrestrial magnetosphere. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland currents are placed in the model using a series of field aligned, infinitely thin wire segments. The normal component of the magnetic field from these currents is calculated on the surface of the magnetopause and shielded using image current carrying wires placed outside of the magnetosphere. It is found that the inclusion of the Birkeland currents in the model results in a northward magnetic field in the near-midnight tail, leading to the closure of previously open flux in the tail, and a southward magnetic field in the flanks. A sunward shift in the separatrix is observed.

  6. Interplanetary magnetic field effects on high latitude ionospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Relations between the electric field and the electric current in the ionosphere can be established on the basis of a system of mathematical and physical equations provided by the equations of current continuity and Ohm's law. For this reason, much of the synthesis of electric field and plasma velocity data in the F-region is made with the aid of similar data sets derived from field-aligned current and horizontal current measurements. During the past decade, the development of a self-consistent picture of the distribution and behavior of these measurements has proceeded almost in parallel. The present paper is concerned with the picture as it applies to the electric field and plasma drift velocity and its dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. Attention is given to the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the northward interplanetary magnetic field.

  7. Magnetic field effect in organic films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Bhoj Raj

    In this work, we focused on the magnetic field effect in organic films and devices, including organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We measured magnetic field effect (MFE) such as magnetoconductance (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in OLEDs based on several pi- conjugated polymers and small molecules for fields |B|<100 mT. We found that both MC(B) and MEL(B) responses in bipolar devices and MC(B) response in unipolar devices are composed of two B-regions: (i) an 'ultra-small' region at |B| < 1-2 mT, and (ii) a monotonic response region at |B| >˜2mT. Magnetic field effect (MFE) measured on three isotopes of Poly (dioctyloxy) phenylenevinylene (DOO-PPV) showed that both regular and ultra-small effects are isotope dependent. This indicates that MFE response in OLED is mainly due to the hyperfine interaction (HFI). We also performed spectroscopy of the MFE including magneto-photoinduced absorption (MPA) and magneto-photoluminescence (MPL) at steady state conditions in several systems. This includes pristine Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyl-oxy)-1,4-phenylene-vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, MEH-PPV films subjected to prolonged illumination, and MEH-PPV/[6,6]-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend, as well as annealed and pristine C60 thin films. For comparison, we also measured MC and MEL in organic diodes based on the same materials. By directly comparing the MPA and MPL responses in films to MC and MEL in organic diodes based on the same active layers, we are able to relate the MFE in organic diodes to the spin densities of the excitations formed in the device, regardless of whether they are formed by photon absorption or carrier injection from the electrodes. We also studied magneto-photocurrent (MPC) and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a 'standard' Poly (3-hexylthiophene)/PCBM device at various Galvinoxyl radical wt%. We found that the MPC reduction with Galvinoxyl wt% follows the same trend as that of the

  8. Electric current and magnetic field effects on bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, Elizabeth Louise

    The ability of bacteria to form and grow as biofilm presents a major challenge in clinical medicine. Through this work, two alternative electromagnetic treatment strategies were investigated to combat bacterial biofilms like those that cause chronic infections on indwelling medical devices. Direct electric current (DC) was applied at current densities of 0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm2 alone and in conjunction with antibiotic. Unlike most previous studies, chloride ions were included in the treatment solution at a physiologically-relevant concentration. Using this approach, low levels of DC alone were demonstrated to have a dose-responsive, biocidal effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms with no synergistic enhancement of antibiotic activity. Through a series of experiments using chemical measures, cell viability, and global gene expression, electrolytic generation of chlorine, a potent disinfectant, was identified as the predominant mechanism by which DC kills bacteria in biofilm. The second treatment strategy investigated weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) as a noninvasive approach, involving an extension of concepts from well-studied ELF-MF effects observed in eukaryotic systems to bacterial biofilm. S. epidermidis biofilms grown in weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) at Ca2+ and K+ ion resonance frequencies were assessed using global gene expression to determine if S. epidermidis in biofilm detect and respond to ELF-MFs. Frequency-dependent changes in gene expression were observed with upregulation of genes involved in transposase activity, signal transduction systems, and membrane transport processes indicating possible effects consistent with theories of ELF-MF induced changes in ion transport reported in eukaryotic cells. This is the first transcriptome study to indentify ELF-MF effects in bacteria. While no direct biocidal effect was observed with ELF-MF treatment, alteration of membrane

  9. Magnetic Nanoparticle Quantitation with Low Frequency Magnetic Fields: Compensating for Relaxation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kuehlert, Esra; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Reeves, Daniel B.; Perreard, Irina M.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the number of nanoparticles present in tissue is central to many in vivo and in vitro applications. Magnetic nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro using the harmonics of their magnetization produced in a sinusoidal magnetic field. However, relaxation effects damp the magnetic harmonics rendering them of limited use in quantitation. We show that an accurate measure of the number of nanoparticles can be made by correcting for relaxation effects. Correction for relaxation reduced errors of 50% for larger nanoparticles in high relaxation environments to 2%. The result is a method of nanoparticle quantitation capable of in vivo and in vitro applications including histopathology assays, quantitative imaging, drug delivery and thermal therapy preparation. PMID:23867287

  10. Performance of a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2008-01-01

    While Hall thrusters can operate at high efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad envelope down to 100W while maintaining an efficiency of 45- 55%. Scaling to low power while holding the main dimensionless parameters constant requires a decrease in the thruster channel size and an increase in the magnetic field strength. Increasing the magnetic field becomes technically challenging since the field can saturate the miniaturized inner components of the magnetic circuit and scaling down the magnetic circuit leaves very little room for magnetic pole pieces and heat shields. An alternative approach is to employ a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) geometry. Laboratory model CHTs have operated at power levels ranging from the order of 50 Watts up to 1 kW. These thrusters exhibit performance characteristics which are comparable to conventional, annular Hall thrusters of similar size. Compared to the annular Hall thruster, the CHT has a lower insulator surface area to discharge chamber volume ratio. Consequently, there is the potential for reduced wall losses in the channel of a CHT, and any reduction in wall losses should translate into lower channel heating rates and reduced erosion. This makes the CHT geometry promising for low-power applications. Recently, a CHT that uses permanent magnets to produce the magnetic field topology was tested. This thruster has the promise of reduced power consumption over previous CHT iterations that employed electromagnets. Data are presented for two purposes: to expose the effect different controllable parameters have on the discharge and to summarize performance measurements (thrust, Isp, efficiency) obtained using a thrust stand. These data are used to gain insight into the thruster's operation and to allow for quantitative comparisons between the permanent magnet CHT and the electromagnet CHT.

  11. Effect of steady magnetic field on human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mileva, M.; Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Pantev, T.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to steady magnetic field (SMF) for different periods of time did not elicit statistically reliable increase in chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Metaphase analysis of Crepis capilaris cells revealed that SMF (9 k0e, 200 0e/cm) for 2 days did not induce chromosome aberrations. Nor were any changes demonstrated in roots of beans, onions and L-fibroblasts of subcutaneous tissue of mice and Chinese hamsters. The obtained data are indicative of absence of cytogenetic effect of SMF. The level and spectrum of chromosome aberrations did not exceed the values for spontaneous chromatic fragments in cultures. Cytogenetic analysis of DEDE cells of the Chinese hamster revealed a mild mutagenic effect of SMF. Chromosomal aberrations were also demonstrated after exposure (5 min) of garlic roots.

  12. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  13. Effects of the 9-T magnetic field on MRS photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-10-01

    The experimental results on the performance of the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiode in the strong magnetic field of 9T, and the possible impact of the quench of the magnet at 9.5T on sensor's operation are reported. The measurement method used is being described. The results of the work agree with the expectations that the MRS photodiode is not exhibiting sensitivity to the magnetic field presence. This result is essential for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector.

  14. Experimental Study of Magnetic Field Effect on dc Corona Discharge in Low Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabbas, K.

    2014-09-01

    In the present paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effect of applying a transverse magnetic field on the dc corona discharge behavior in low vacuum. In general, two experiments were carried out in this work: the first is the ionization-region magnetic field experiment, and the second was the drift region magnetic field experiment. In these experiments, permanent magnets were used to produce magnetic field. The degree of vacuum used in this test was 0.4×105 Pa. It is found that the effect of the magnetic field increases as the degree of vacuum increases. It is also seen from this study that the corona current values are higher with magnetic fields than without magnetic fields. The experimental results indicate that the enhancement of the magnetic field near the wire discharge electrode has a significant influence on the increment of the discharge current. The effect of the magnetic field on the discharge current is the most significant with the negative corona discharges rather than with positive corona discharge. In contrast to, the curves were demonstrated that the application of magnetic fields in drift region magnetic field does not significantly change the corona discharge current. Discharge characteristics of magnetically enhanced corona discharges, extracted from this study, can be applied to various industrial applications, such as, in an electrostatic enhancement filter for the purpose of capturing fine particles, and as effective method for production of high ozone concentrations in a generator as compared to the ultraviolet (UV) radiation method.

  15. Magnetic field-aligned coupling effects on ionospheric plasma structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Vickrey, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical description of the electrical coupling and dynamics of plasma structure in the E and F regions. The scale size dependence of the electric field coupling along the magnetic field is examined for a realistic background ionosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that, while normalized potentials map reciprocally between two altitudes, the potential disturbance caused by a fixed amplitude plasma density perturbation does not. The magnitude of electrostatic potential created by structured ionization is also shown to be strongly dependent on the altitude of the structure. The role of diffusion parallel to the magnetic field in the redistribution and decay of plasma structure is illustrated.

  16. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K p indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (ΔBRS with ΔMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow ( K-index with ΔMPPG; r s=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect.

  17. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K ( p ) indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaBRS with DeltaMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow (K-index with DeltaMPPG; r (s)=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect. PMID:16983578

  18. Effect of applied magnetic field on a microwave plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Juan; Xu Yingqiao; Meng Zhiqiang; Yang Tielian

    2008-02-15

    Theoretical analysis and calculation show that applying a magnetic field in a microwave plasma thruster operating at 2.45 GHz can improve the thruster performance, whereby an electron cyclotron resonant layer at thruster startup state contributes to the increase of microwave energy dissipated in plasma, and a strong magnetic field up to 0.5 T can increase the peak temperature of inside plasma when the thruster operates in steady state. Experimental measurements of the thruster with applied field and operating on argon gas show high coupling efficiency. Plasma plume diagnostics deduce a high degree of gas ionization in the thruster cavity. This shows the feasibility of operating a microwave plasma thruster with an applied magnetic field.

  19. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  20. Magnetic field effects on superconductivity in alkali metal intercalates of MoS2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Flood, D. J.; Wagoner, D. E.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of a magnetic field on the superconducting transition in MoS2 intercalated with potassium and sodium were studied. It was found that the potassium intercalated MoS2 has better properties in a magnetic field. In zero magnetic field the transition to superconductivity begins near 6.4 K. Diagrams of the basic circuitry for superconducting transition studies, and charts showing critical magnetic field versus critical temperature for the intercalated MoS2 are included.

  1. Regularities in temperature, magnetic field and pressure effect on the resistive properties of magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, P. I.; Kucherenko, S. S.

    2002-08-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure, magnetic field and temperature on resistivity behaviour of bulk and film samples La 0.9Mn 1.1O 3 and La 0.56Ca 0.24Mn 1.2O 3 at action of magnetic field and temperature has been analysed. It is established that the maximum of magnetoresistive and the revealed baroresistive, magnetobaroresistive effects coincide at the same temperature Tpp. This temperature is equal to the "metal-semiconductor" phase transition temperature Tms. "Cooling" and "heating" effects of pressure and magnetic field have been revealed. A mutual correspondence of T- P- H (6.2 K, 1 kbar, 2.7 kOe) influence on polycrystalline sample La 0.9Mn 1.1O 3 resistivity has been determined. The linear change of Tms( P) and Tms( H) in La 0.9Mn 1.1O 3, La 0.56Ca 0.24Mn 1.2O 3 resistivity have been found. An importance of the regularities of elastic-deforming correspondence of T- H- P influence on magnetic, resistivity properties, phase transitions and effects was elucidated and explained. An alternating influence of T- H- P and its role in resistivity has been pointed. A correlation between structural, elastic and resistive properties is specified.

  2. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard; Motakef, Shariar

    2001-01-01

    TMF is based on imposing a controlled phase-shift in a train of electromagnets, forming a stack. Thus, the induced magnetic field can be considered to be travelling along the axis of the stack. The coupling of this traveling wave with an electrically conducting fluid results in a basic flow in a form of a single axisymmetric roll. The magnitude and direction of this flow can be remotely controlled. Furthermore, it is possible to localize the effect of this force field though activating only a number of the magnets. This force field generated in the fluid can, in principle, be used to control and modify convection in the molten material. For example, it can be used to enhance convective mixing in the melt, and thereby modify the interface shape, and macrosegregation. Alternatively, it can be used to counteract thermal and/or solutal buoyancy forces. High frequency TMF can be used in containerless processing techniques, such as float zoning, to affect the very edge of the fluid so that Marangoni flow can be counter balanced. The proposed program consists of basic fundamentals and applications. Our goal in conducting the following experiments and analyses is to establish the validity of TMF as a new tool for solidification processes. Due to its low power consumption and simplicity of design, this tool may find wide spread use in a variety of space experiments. The proposed ground based experiments are intended to establish the advantages and limitations of employing this technique. In the fundamentals component of the proposed program, we will use theoretical tools and experiments with mercury to establish the fundamental aspects of TMF-induced convection through a detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of flow field. In this work, we will conduct a detailed parametric study involving the effects of magnetic field strength, frequency, wave vector, and the fluid geometry. The applications component of this work will be focused on

  3. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  4. Confinement effects from interacting chromo-magnetic and axion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Spallucci, Euro

    2006-05-01

    We study a non-Abelian gauge theory with a pseudo scalar coupling phiTr(F*μνFμν) in the case where a constant chromo-electric, or chromo-magnetic, strength expectation value is present. We compute the interaction potential within the framework of gauge-invariant, path-dependent, variables formalism. While in the case of a constant chromo-electric field strength expectation value the static potential remains Coulombic, in the case of a constant chromo-magnetic field strength the potential energy is the sum of a Coulombic and a linear potential, leading to the confinement of static charges.

  5. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Capture of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinaka, Chelsea; Brazel, Chris; Shah, Rhythm

    2013-11-01

    It is hypothesized that magnetic nanoparticles may be used in active targeting cancer treatment by localizing the particles in the area of the tumor. To test this hypothesis static and electromagnetic fields were applied to a flow system, and UV-VIS spectroscopy was used to calculate the percentage of particles captured. Uncoated Maghemite nanopowder and FluidMAG-PAD (Chemicell) nanoparticles coated with polyacrylamide were used. Dynamic light scattering was used to look at particles size with and without proteins. Proteins caused the uncoated particles to aggregate. The static field captured approximately 15% of the maghemite nanoparticles in water in a flowing at 0.1 mL/s when using two neodymium magnets laid lengthwise along 2 mm inner diameter tubing. The electromagnetic field pulled the uncoated particles out of the dispersion, but did not capture any in one place. The FluidMAG-PAD particles could not be pulled out of solution by the static field or the electromagnetic field. In order to effectively treat cancer, nanoparticles with a coating would have to be used to avoid opsonization and aggregation within the blood stream; however they cannot be so well dispersed as to not be affected by the magnetic field. The uncoated particles exhibited the capture desired, but do not interact well with proteins. A stronger magnetic field may allow the same capture of the coated particles, but it may also be important to look for a dispersion of nanoparticles not quite as well dispersed as the FluidMAG-PAD. Support from NSF grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz body force induced in electrically conducting fluids can be utilized for a number of materials processing technologies. An application of strong static magnetic fields can be beneficial for damping convection present during solidification. On the other hand, alternating magnetic fields can be used to reduce as well as to enhance convection. However, only special types of time dependent magnetic fields can induce a non-zero time averaged Lorentz force needed for convection control. One example is the rotating magnetic field. This field configuration induces a swirling flow in circular containers. Another example of a magnetic field configuration is the traveling magnetic field (TMF). It utilizes axisymmetric magnetostatic waves. This type of field induces an axial recirculating flow that can be advantageous for controlling axial mass transport, such as during solidification in long cylindrical tubes. Incidentally, this is the common geometry for crystal growth research. The Lorentz force induced by TMF can potentially counter-balance the buoyancy force, diminishing natural convection, or even setting up the flow in reverse direction. Crystal growth process in presence of TMF can be then significantly modified. Such properties as the growth rate, interface shape and macro segregation can be affected and optimized. Melt homogenization is the other potential application of TMF. It is a necessary step prior to solidification. TMF can be attractive for this purpose, as it induces a basic flow along the axis of the ampoule. TMF can be a practical alloy mixing method especially suited for solidification research in space. In the theoretical part of this work, calculations of the induced Lorentz force in the whole frequency range have been completed. The basic flow characteristics for the finite cylinder geometry are completed and first results on stability analysis for higher Reynolds numbers are obtained. A theoretical model for TMF mixing is also developed

  7. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  8. The effect on medical metal implants by magnetic fields of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mesgarzadeh, M; Revesz, G; Bonakdarpour, A; Betz, R R

    1985-01-01

    Forces and torques, due to a 0.3 Tesla magnetic field were evaluated on ten hip prostheses and ten hemostat clips. Measurements were performed with an instrument utilizing the movement of a laser beam caused by the deflection of a cantilever. The results indicate effects, if any, to be smaller than the instrument's sensitivity which, at its highest, was 7 mg of force and 125 mg.cm of torque. PMID:4059940

  9. Effect of magnetic fields on melt-spun Nd2Fe14B-based ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nguyen, Vuong; Rong, Chuanbing; Ding, Yong; Liu, J. Ping

    2012-04-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on microstructure and magnetic properties of Nd2Fe14B-based melt-spun ribbons is investigated. The magnetic field was applied in perpendicular or parallel direction to the ribbon plane during quench with a field strength up to several kilo Oersteds. The XRD patterns and TEM graphs show a strong grain size reduction upon the magnetic field application. The magnetic field also enhances the (00l) texture of ribbons when the field is perpendicular to the ribbon plane. The refined microstructure with significantly reduced grain size leads to enhanced magnetic exchange interactions between the hard and soft phases in the Nd2Fe14B/Fe nanocomposite ribbons. This magnetic field-assisted melt-spinning technique is promising for producing nanocomposite magnets with enhanced energy density.

  10. Oblique magnetic field effects over stability in superposed viscous ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothimani, S.; Anjali Devi, S. P.

    2000-12-01

    The interface of two superposed viscous ferrofluids of infinite depth in the presence of an uniform magnetic field oblique to the interface is considered. The fluids are assumed to be incompressible and a surface tension T acts on the interface. Solutions of the linear problem and the linear dispersion relation are found. Exchange of stabilities are discussed for various cases.

  11. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  12. On Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Battaner, E.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields are present in all astrophysical media. However, many models and interpretations of observations often ignore them, because magnetic fields are difficult to handle and because they produce complicated morphological features. Here we will comment on the basic intuitive properties, which even if not completely true, provide a first guiding insight on the physics of a particular astrophysical problem. These magnetic properties are not mathematically demonstrated here. How magnetic fields evolve and how they introduce dynamical effects are considered, also including a short comment on General Relativity Magnetohydrodynamics. In a second part we consider some audacious and speculative matters. They are answers to three questions: a) How draw a cube without lifting the pencil from the paper so that when the pen passes through the same side do in the same direction? B) Are MILAGRO anisotropies miraculous? C) Do cosmic magnetic lenses exist?. The last two questions deal with issues related with the interplay between magnetic fields and cosmic ray propagation.

  13. Effect of magnetic field profile on the anode fall in a Hall-effect thruster discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2006-05-15

    The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the anode fall in an E-vectorxB-vector discharge of a Hall thruster is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region are measured with a biased probe in three configurations of the magnetic field. It is observed that the anode fall in a Hall thruster can be changed from negative to positive by creating a magnetic field configuration with a zero magnetic field region. Similar configurations are utilized in some advanced Hall thrusters, like an ATON thruster. Results of the measurements are employed to model a Hall thruster with different magnetic field configurations, including the one with a zero-field region. Different anode sheath regimes observed experimentally are used to set the boundary conditions for the quasineutral plasma. Numerical solutions obtained with a hydrodynamic quasi-one-dimensional model suggest that varying the magnetic field configuration affects the electron mobility both inside and outside the channel, as well as the plasma density distribution along the axis.

  14. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields. PMID:21441722

  15. Tuning of random lasers by means of external magnetic fields based on the Voigt effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasempour Ardakani, Abbas; Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bahrampour, Ali Reza

    2013-04-01

    It has been proposed that emission spectrum of random lasers with magnetically active semiconductor constituents can be made tunable by external magnetic fields. By employing the FDTD method, the spectral intensity and spatial distribution of electric field are calculated in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is numerically shown that due to the magneto-optical Voigt effect, the emission spectrum of a semiconductor-based random laser can be made tunable by adjusting the external magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field on the localization length of the laser modes is investigated. It is also shown that the spatial distribution of electric field exhibited remarkable modification with variation of magnetic field.

  16. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  17. Influence of nuclear spin on chemical reactions: Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    1983-01-01

    The course of chemical reactions involving radical pairs may depend on occurrence and orientation of nuclear spins in the pairs. The influence of nuclear spins is maximized when the radical pairs are confined to a space that serves as a cage that allows a certain degree of independent diffusional and rotational motion of the partners of the pair but that also encourages reencounters of the partners within a period which allows the nuclear spins to operate on the odd electron spins of the pair. Under the proper conditions, the nuclear spins can induce intersystem crossing between triplet and singlet states of radical pairs. It is shown that this dependence of intersystem crossing on nuclear spin leads to a magnetic isotope effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of separating isotopes on the basis of nuclear spins rather than nuclear masses and also leads to a magnetic field effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of influencing the course of polymerization by the application of weak magnetic fields. PMID:16593273

  18. Effect of magnetic field on noncollinear magnetism in classical bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasrija, Kanika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of a bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional square lattice in the presence of an external magnetic field. The study is motivated by the relevance of this simple model to the non-collinear magnetism and the consequent ferroelectric behavior in the recently discovered high-temperature multiferroic, cupric oxide (CuO). We show that an external magnetic field stabilizes a non-coplanar magnetic phase, which is characterized by a finite ferromagnetic moment along the direction of the applied magnetic field and a spiral spin texture if projected in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Real-space analysis highlights a coexistence of non-collinear regions with ferromagnetic clusters. The results are also supported by simple variational calculations.

  19. In-plane magnetic field effect on switching voltage and thermal stability in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grezes, C.; Rojas Rozas, A.; Ebrahimi, F.; Alzate, J. G.; Cai, X.; Katine, J. A.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Khalili Amiri, P.; Wang, K. L.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of in-plane magnetic field on switching voltage (Vsw) and thermal stability factor (Δ) are investigated in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs). Dwell time measurements are used to determine the voltage dependence of the energy barrier height for various in-plane magnetic fields (Hin), and gain insight into the Hin dependent energy landscape. We find that both Vsw and Δ decrease with increasing Hin, with a dominant linear dependence. The results are reproduced by calculations based on a macrospin model while accounting for the modified magnetization configuration in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  20. Assessment of biological effects associated with magnetic fields from a superconducting magnetic energy storage plant: Final report. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1986-04-01

    This report provides a detailed evaluation of the potential biological effects of fringe magnetic fields associated with a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) plant. The aspects of magnetic fields that are discussed include mechanisms of interaction of static and slowly time-varying magnetic fields with living systems; biological effects of magnetic fields on human and subhuman species, including the results of both laboratory studies and human epidemiological surveys; physical hazards posed by the interactions of magnetic fields with metallic implants, e.g., aneurysm clips and prostheses, and with medical electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers; extant guidelines for occupational exposure to magnetic fields are summarized; recommendations for defining acceptable levels of exposure to SMES magnetic fields by occupational personnel and the population-at-large; and recommendations concerning several areas of research that would further our understanding of magnetic field interactions with living systems, and would provide additional elements of information required for the development of future exposure standards. 328 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Destabilizing effect of time-dependent oblique magnetic field on magnetic fluids streaming in porous media.

    PubMed

    El-Dib, Yusry O; Ghaly, Ahmed Y

    2004-01-01

    The present work studies Kelvin-Helmholtz waves propagating between two magnetic fluids. The system is composed of two semi-infinite magnetic fluids streaming throughout porous media. The system is influenced by an oblique magnetic field. The solution of the linearized equations of motion under the boundary conditions leads to deriving the Mathieu equation governing the interfacial displacement and having complex coefficients. The stability criteria are discussed theoretically and numerically, from which stability diagrams are obtained. Regions of stability and instability are identified for the magnetic fields versus the wavenumber. It is found that the increase of the fluid density ratio, the fluid velocity ratio, the upper viscosity, and the lower porous permeability play a stabilizing role in the stability behavior in the presence of an oscillating vertical magnetic field or in the presence of an oscillating tangential magnetic field. The increase of the fluid viscosity plays a stabilizing role and can be used to retard the destabilizing influence for the vertical magnetic field. Dual roles are observed for the fluid velocity in the stability criteria. It is found that the field frequency plays against the constant part for the magnetic field. PMID:14651916

  2. The effect of stress and incentive magnetic field on the average volume of magnetic Barkhausen jump in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Di; Guo, Lei; Yin, Liang; Chen, Zhaoyang; Chen, Juan; Qi, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The average volume of magnetic Barkhausen jump (AVMBJ) v bar generated by magnetic domain wall irreversible displacement under the effect of the incentive magnetic field H for ferromagnetic materials and the relationship between irreversible magnetic susceptibility χirr and stress σ are adopted in this paper to study the theoretical relationship among AVMBJ v bar(magneto-elasticity noise) and the incentive magnetic field H. Then the numerical relationship among AVMBJ v bar, stress σ and the incentive magnetic field H is deduced. Utilizing this numerical relationship, the displacement process of magnetic domain wall for single crystal is analyzed and the effect of the incentive magnetic field H and the stress σ on the AVMBJ v bar (magneto-elasticity noise) is explained from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The saturation velocity of Barkhausen jump characteristic value curve is different when tensile or compressive stress is applied on ferromagnetic materials, because the resistance of magnetic domain wall displacement is different. The idea of critical magnetic field in the process of magnetic domain wall displacement is introduced in this paper, which solves the supersaturated calibration problem of AVMBJ - σ calibration curve.

  3. A self-consistent study of magnetic field effects on hybrid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Dexheimer, V.; Schramm, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study the effects of strong magnetic fields on hybrid stars by using a full general-relativity approach, solving the coupled Maxwell-Einstein equation in a self-consistent way. The magnetic field is assumed to be axisymmetric and poloidal. We take into consideration the anisotropy of the energy-momentum tensor due to the magnetic field, magnetic field effects on equation of state (EoS), the interaction between matter and the magnetic field (magnetization), and the anomalous magnetic moment of the hadrons. The EoS used is an extended hadronic and quark SU(3) non-linear realization of the sigma model that describes magnetized hybrid stars containing nucleons, hyperons, and quarks. According to our results, the effects of the magnetization and the magnetic field on the EoS do not play an important role on global properties of these stars. On the other hand, the magnetic field causes the central density in these objects to be reduced, inducing major changes in the populated degrees of freedom and, potentially, converting a hybrid star into a hadronic star.

  4. Rapid rise time pulsed magnetic field circuit for pump-probe field effect studies.

    PubMed

    Salaoru, T A; Woodward, Jonathan R

    2007-03-01

    Here we describe an electronic circuit capable of producing rapidly switched dc magnetic fields of up to 20 mT with a rise time of 10 ns and a pulse length variable from 50 ns to more than 10 micros, suitable for use in the study of magnetic field effects on radical pair (RP) reactions. This corresponds to switching the field on a time scale short relative to the lifetime of typical RPs and maintaining it well beyond their lifetimes. Previous experiments have involved discharging a capacitor through a low inductance coil for a limited time using a switching circuit. These suffer from decaying field strength over the duration of the pulse given primarily by the ratio of the pulse width to the RC constant of the circuit. We describe here a simple yet elegant solution that completely eliminates this difficulty by employing a feedback loop. This allows a constant field to be maintained over the entire length of the pulse. PMID:17411229

  5. Effect of Magnetic Field on Thermal Instability of Oldroydian Viscoelastic Rotating Fluid in Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, R. C.; Rana, G. C.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of a vertical magnetic field on thermal instability of an Oldroydian visco-elastic rotating fluid in a porous medium. By applying the normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation governing the effects of rotation, magnetic field and medium permeability is derived and solved analytically and numerically. For the case of stationary convection, the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that rotation has a stabilizing effect while the magnetic field and medium permeability have a stabilizing/destabilizing effect under certain conditions on thermal instability of the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid in a porous medium. The oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of rotation, the magnetic field and gravity field. It is also observed that the `principle of exchange of stability' is invalid in the presence of rotation and the magnetic field.

  6. Solar Surface Anisotropy effect on the Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique

    2015-10-01

    Within the literature there are at least 15 references indicating that the horizontal magnetic flux does not exactly balance vertical flux in sunspots, leading to the surprising result that div B would depart from zero. Intuitively, this has to be related to the stratification at the surface of the star, due to which horizontal and vertical typical lengths are different. This surface anisotropy results from gravity, but how does gravity influence the magnetic field? To answer this question, a scenario has been proposed in two recent publications, based on anisotropic Debye shielding. The presentation reported in this paper was devoted to investigate the possibility and causes of a non-zero div B. A scaling law associated with the anisotropy is able to reestablish the nullity of div B, which would lead to a renewed MHD in the solar photosphere layer. An eventual observation in the laboratory is also reported.

  7. Effects of large-scale magnetic fields in the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Hartle, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical models of the ionosphere of Venus have been constructed in the past without due consideration of the fact that the ionosphere is sometimes magnetized. This paper examines some differences between the magnetized and unmagnetized dayside Venus ionosphere using the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Langmuir probe and magnetometer data. Particular attention is given to the evaluation of the altitude profiles of the thermal electron heating and comparison of the magnitude of the magnetic force with other forces in the ionosphere. Several examples illustrate how heating profiles are different in the magnetized ionosphere with effective heating below 200 km altitude reduced by orders of magnitude compared to the field-free ionosphere. The force associated with the magnetic field is comparable to other forces in the magnetized ionosphere. The measured plasma density, electron temperature and magnetic field thus suggest that large-scale magnetic fields should be included in future ionosphere models.

  8. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation in DMF under effect of external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Raid A.; Sulaiman, Ghassan M.; Abdulrahman, Safa A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the effect of applying an external magnetic field on the characteristics of iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in dimethylformamide (DMF). The NPs synthesized with and without applying of magnetic field were characterized by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis absorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM results confirmed that the particle size was decreased after applying magnetic field.

  9. Dynamic of the Dust Structures under Magnetic Field Effect in DC Glow Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, M. M.; D'yachkov, L. G.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work, we investigate dust structures in the striation of DC glow discharges under magnetic field actions. The dependence of rotation frequency of dusty plasma structures as a function of the magnetic field was investigated. For various magnetic fields kinetic temperatures of the dust particles, diffusion coefficients, and effective coupling coefficient {gamma}* have been determined. Obtained results are analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  10. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  11. Magnetic Pressure as a Scalar Representation of Field Effects in Magnetic Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Maciej; Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic microsphere suspensions undergo complex motion when exposed to finite sources of the magnetic field, such as small permanent magnets. The computational complexity is compounded by a difficulty in choosing a suitable choice of visualization tools because this often requires using the magnetic force vector field in three dimensions. Here we present a potentially simpler approach by using the magnetic pressure. It is a scalar quantity, pm = B (2)/2μ 0, and its usefulness has been already demonstrated in applications to magnetohydrodynamics and ferrohydrodynamics (where B is the applied field and μ 0 = 4π×10(-7) T.m/A). The equilibrium distribution of the magnetic bead plug in aqueous suspension is calculated as an isosurface of the magnitude of the magnetic pressure pm = const, in the field of two permanent magnet blocks calculated from closed formulas. The geometry was adapted from a publication on the magnetic bead suspensions in microsystems and the predicted bead plug distribution is shown to agree remarkably well with the experiment. PMID:25382882

  12. Nonlinear stability of surface waves in magnetic fluids: effect of a periodic tangential magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dib, Yusry O.

    1993-04-01

    Nonlinear wave propagation on the surface between two superposed magnetic fluids stressed by a tangential periodic magnetic field is investigated using the method of multiple scales. A stability analysis reveals the existence of both nonresonant and resonant cases. From the solvability conditions, three types of nonlinear Schrodinger equation are obtained. The necessary and sufficient conditions for stability are obtained in each case. Formulae for the surface elevation are also obtained in both the non-resonant and the resonant cases. It is found from the numerical calculation that the tangential periodic magnetic field plays a dual role in the stability criterion, while the field frequency has a destabilizing influence.

  13. Effects of hole doping by neutron irradiation of magnetic field induced electronic phase transitions in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Yaguchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated effects of hole doping by fast-neutron irradiation on the magnetic-field induced phase transitions in graphite using specimens irradiated with fast neutrons. Resistance measurements have been done in magnetic fields of up to above 50 T and at temperatures down to about 1.5 K. The neutron irradiation creates lattice defects acting as acceptors, affecting the imbalance of the electron and hole densities and the Fermi level. We have found that the reentrant field from the field induced state back to the normal state shifts towards a lower field with hole doping, suggestive of the participation of electron subbands in the magnetic-field induced state.

  14. The effect of a magnetic field gradient on anode double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, B.; Merlino, R. L.; D'Angelo, N.

    1992-01-01

    In experiments on anode (ionization) double layers in nonuniform magnetic fields it has been noted that the magnetic field gradient seems to stabilize the double layer position. This effect is further investigated in a Q machine in which the magnetic field geometry could be varied. It is found that the position of the double layers, along the axis of the device, could be controlled by changing the magnetic geometry. This effect is accounted for in a physical model which takes into account the effect of ion reflection by the magnetic mirror force in the region of magnetic field nonuniformity. This model is also able to account for variation of the double layer position when the neutral gas pressure is varied.

  15. Effects of sweep rates of external magnetic fields on the labyrinthine instabilities of miscible magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C.-Y.; Lin, J.-Z.; Chen, M.-Y.; Chen, L.-Q.; Liang, T.-K.

    2011-05-01

    The interfacial instability of miscible magnetic fluids in a Hele-Shaw Cell is studied experimentally, with different magnitudes and sweep rates of the external magnetic field. The initial circular oil-based magnetic fluid drop is surrounded by the miscible fluid, diesel. The external uniform magnetic fields induce small fingerings around the initial circular interface, so call labyrinthine fingering instability, and secondary waves. When the magnetic field is applied at a given sweep rate, the interfacial length grows significantly at the early stage. It then decreases when the magnetic field reaches the preset values, and finally approaches a certain asymptotic value. In addition, a dimensionless parameter, Pe, which includes the factors of diffusion and sweep rate of the external magnetic field, is found to correlate the experimental data. It is shown that the initial growth rate of the interfacial length is linearly proportional to Pe for the current experimental parameter range and is proportional to the square root of the sweep rate at the onset of labyrinthine instability.

  16. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C. P.; Zhou, Yan

    2014-03-15

    Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  17. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  18. Theory of light-induced effective magnetic field in Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Titov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on all-optical magnetization reversal in conductive ferromagnetic thin films we use nonequilibrium formalism to calculate the effective magnetic field induced in a Rashba ferromagnet by a short laser pulse. The main contribution to the effect originates in the direct optical transitions between spin-split subbands. The resulting effective magnetic field is inversely proportional to the impurity scattering rate and can reach the amplitude of a few Tesla in the systems like Co/Pt bilayers. We show that the total light-induced effective magnetic field in ferromagnetic systems is the sum of two contributions: a helicity dependent term, which is an even function of magnetization, and a helicity independent term, which is an odd function of magnetization. The primary role of the spin-orbit interaction is to widen the frequency range for direct optical transitions.

  19. Effects of interstellar particles upon the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Winter, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    The flow of interstellar neutral particles into the interplanetary medium and their subsequent ionization in the presence of the electromagnetic field of the solar wind can cause a loss of field angular momentum by the solar wind. One effect of this loss of field angular momentum is a significant unwinding of the spiral field. This effect is evaluated using simple models for neutral density and ion production. For a free-stream interstellar medium with a neutral hydrogen density of 1 per cubic centimeter and a velocity relative to the sun of 10 to 20 km per second, the spiral angle at the orbit of Jupiter will be less than its nominal value of 45 deg at the orbit of the earth.

  20. Magnetic field effects on viscous fingering of a ferrofluid in an anisotropic Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballou, R.; Molho, P.

    2005-12-01

    When a viscous fluid is pushed into a more viscous one in a Hele-Shaw cell, the interface between the two fluids may become unstable, leading to fingering and ramified patterns. Anisotropy can be introduced by engraving a grid in one plate of the cell, allowing one to obtain dendritic patterns. The use of a ferrofluid as one of the viscous fluid is a way to introduce magnetism in the problem, especially the magnetic field as a control parameter. Magnetic field effects on viscous fingering of ferrofluids have already been studied: in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell, a magnetic field applied in the cell plane is stabilizing when parallel to the interface between the two fluids and destabilizing when normal to the interface. A magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of a radial Hele-Shaw cell has the same destabilizing effect as the pressure. We have studied the effect of a magnetic field, normal to and in the plane of anisotropic radial Hele-Shaw cells te{5}, to characterize the competing effects of hydrodynamics, magnetic field and dipolar energy, and anisotropy. Here we study more precisely the effect of a magnetic field normal to a radial anisotropic Hele-Shaw cell. Figs 8, Refs 9.

  1. Magnetic fields and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Rajesh; Roychowdhury, Suparna E-mail: suparna.roychowdhury@gmail.com

    2010-06-01

    In this work we study the contribution of magnetic fields to the Sunyaev Zeldovich (SZ) effect in the intracluster medium. In particular we calculate the SZ angular power spectrum and the central temperature decrement. The effect of magnetic fields is included in the hydrostatic equilibrium equation by splitting the Lorentz force into two terms – one being the force due to magnetic pressure which acts outwards and the other being magnetic tension which acts inwards. A perturbative approach is adopted to solve for the gas density profile for weak magnetic fields (≤ 4μG). This leads to an enhancement of the gas density in the central regions for nearly radial magnetic field configurations. Previous works had considered the force due to magnetic pressure alone which is the case only for a special set of field configurations. However, we see that there exists possible sets of configurations of ICM magnetic fields where the force due to magnetic tension will dominate. Subsequently, this effect is extrapolated for typical field strengths (∼ 10μG) and scaling arguments are used to estimate the angular power due to secondary anisotropies at cluster scales. In particular we find that it is possible to explain the excess power reported by CMB experiments like CBI, BIMA, ACBAR at l > 2000 with σ{sub 8} ∼ 0.8 (WMAP 5 year data) for typical cluster magnetic fields. In addition we also see that the magnetic field effect on the SZ temperature decrement is more pronounced for low mass clusters ((T) ∼ 2 keV). Future SZ detections of low mass clusters at few arc second resolution will be able to probe this effect more precisely. Thus, it will be instructive to explore the implications of this model in greater detail in future works.

  2. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  3. The effect of the earth's and stray magnetic fields on mobile mass spectrometer systems.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan J; Davey, Nicholas G; Martinsen, Morten; Short, R Timothy; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-02-01

    Development of small, field-portable mass spectrometers has enabled a rapid growth of in-field measurements on mobile platforms. In such in-field measurements, unexpected signal variability has been observed by the authors in portable ion traps with internal electron ionization. The orientation of magnetic fields (such as the Earth's) relative to the ionization electron beam trajectory can significantly alter the electron flux into a quadrupole ion trap, resulting in significant changes in the instrumental sensitivity. Instrument simulations and experiments were performed relative to the earth's magnetic field to assess the importance of (1) nonpoint-source electron sources, (2) vertical versus horizontal electron beam orientation, and (3) secondary magnetic fields created by the instrument itself. Electron lens focus effects were explored by additional simulations, and were paralleled by experiments performed with a mass spectrometer mounted on a rotating platform. Additionally, magnetically permeable metals were used to shield (1) the entire instrument from the Earth's magnetic field, and (2) the electron beam from both the Earth's and instrument's magnetic fields. Both simulation and experimental results suggest the predominant influence on directionally dependent signal variability is the result of the summation of two magnetic vectors. As such, the most effective method for reducing this effect is the shielding of the electron beam from both magnetic vectors, thus improving electron beam alignment and removing any directional dependency. The improved ionizing electron beam alignment also allows for significant improvements in overall instrument sensitivity. PMID:25527328

  4. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  5. Effect of trapping in a degenerate plasma in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, H. A.; Iqbal, M. J.; Qureshi, M. N. S.; Tsintsadze, N.; Masood, W.

    2012-09-15

    Effect of trapping as a microscopic phenomenon in a degenerate plasma is investigated in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field. The plasma comprises degenerate electrons and non-degenerate ions. The presence of the quantizing magnetic field is discussed briefly and the effect of trapping is investigated by using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. The linear dispersion relation for ion acoustic wave is derived in the presence of the quantizing magnetic field and its influence on the propagation characteristics of the linear ion acoustic wave is discussed. Subsequently, fully nonlinear equations for ion acoustic waves are used to obtain the Sagdeev potential and the investigation of solitary structures. The formation of solitary structures is studied both for fully and partially degenerate plasmas in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons are obtained for different conditions of temperature and magnetic field.

  6. SU-E-T-368: Effect of a Strong Magnetic Field On Select Radiation Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, M; Wen, Z; Tailor, R; Sawakuchi, G; Flint, D; Beddar, S; Ibbott, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of a strong magnetic field on TLD-100, OSLD (Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}:C), and PRESAGE dosimetry devices. This study will help to determine which types of dosimeters can be used for quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry measurements in a magnetic resonance imaginglinear accelerator (MRI-linac) system. Methods: The dosimeters were separated into two categories which were either exposed or not exposed to a strong magnetic field. In each category a set of dosimeters was irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy. To expose the dosimeters to a magnetic field the samples in that category were place in a Bruker small animal magnetic resonance scanner at a field strength slightly greater than 2.5 T for at least 1 hour preirradiation and at least 1 hour post-irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian TrueBeam linac with 10×10 cm{sup 2} field at a 600 MU/min dose rate. The samples that received no radiation dose were used as control detectors. Results: The readouts of the dosimeters which were not exposed to a strong magnetic field were compared with the measurements of the dosimetry devices which were exposed to a magnetic field. No significant differences (less than 2% difference) in the performance of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE dosimeters due to exposure to a strong magnetic field were observed. Conclusion: Exposure to a strong magnetic field before and after irradiation does not appear to change the dosimetric properties of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE which indicates that these dosimeters have potential for use in quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry in a MRI-linac. We plan to further test the effect of magnetic fields on these devices by irradiating them in the presence of a magnetic fields similar to those produced by a MRI-linac system. Elekta-MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Agreement.

  7. Effects of high magnetic field annealing on the initial recrystallized texture in pure copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tong; Wang, Yan; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    The cold-rolled pure copper sheets were annealed with and without a high magnetic field of 12 T. The results showed that the magnetic annealing could promote the formation of the initial recrystallized cube texture. The magnetic annealing did not dramatically change the final annealing textures, but the intensity of the recrystallized cube texture is obviously different. The differences of the recrystallized cube orientation intensity between the specimens with and without the field annealing may be attributed to the effects of the magnetic field on the mobility of grain boundaries.

  8. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  9. Effects of magnetic field gradients on the aggregation dynamics of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, D; Goñi, A R; Osán, T M; Cerioni, L M C; Smessaert, A; Klapp, S H L; Faraudo, J; Pusiol, D J; Thomsen, C

    2015-10-14

    We have used low-field (1)H nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) to investigate the aggregation dynamics of magnetic particles in ionic ferrofluids (IFFs) in the presence of magnetic field gradients. At the beginning of the experiments, the measured NMR spectra were broad and asymmetric, exhibiting two features attributed to different dynamical environments of water protons, depending on the local strength of the field gradients. Hence, the spatial redistribution of the magnetic particles in the ferrofluid caused by the presence of an external magnetic field in a time scale of minutes can be monitored in real time, following the changes in the features of the NMR spectra during a period of about an hour. As previously reported [Heinrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2011, 106, 208301], in the homogeneous magnetic field of a NMR spectrometer, the aggregation of the particles of the IFF proceeds in two stages. The first stage corresponds to the gradual aggregation of monomers prior to and during the formation of chain-like structures. The second stage proceeds after the chains have reached a critical average length, favoring lateral association of the strings into hexagonal zipped-chain superstructures or bundles. In this work, we focus on the influence of a strongly inhomogeneous magnetic field on the aforementioned aggregation dynamics. The main observation is that, as the sample is immersed in a certain magnetic field gradient and kept there for a time τinh, magnetophoresis rapidly converts the ferrofluid into an aggregation state which finds its correspondence to a state on the evolution curve of the pristine sample in a homogeneous field. From the degree of aggregation reached at the time τinh, the IFF sample just evolves thereafter in the homogeneous field of the NMR spectrometer in exactly the same way as the pristine sample. The final equilibrium state always consists of a colloidal suspension of zipped-chain bundles with

  10. Effect of electron reflection on magnetized plasma sheath in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Ma, J. X. Wei, Zi-An

    2015-09-15

    Magnetized plasma sheaths in an oblique magnetic field were extensively investigated by conventionally assuming Boltzmann relation for electron density. This article presents the study of the magnetized sheath without using the Boltzmann relation but by considering the electron reflection along the magnetic field lines caused by the negative sheath potential. A generalized Bohm criterion is analytically derived, and sheath profiles are numerically obtained, which are compared with the results of the conventional model. The results show that the ion Mach number at the sheath edge normal to the wall has a strong dependence on the wall potential, which differs significantly from the conventional model in which the Mach number is independent of the wall potential. The floating wall potential is lower in the present model than that in the conventional model. Furthermore, the sheath profiles are appreciably narrower in the present model when the wall bias is low, but approach the result of the conventional model when the wall bias is high. The sheath thickness decreases with the increase of ion-to-electron temperature ratio and magnetic field strength but has a complex relationship with the angle of the magnetic field.

  11. The effect of magnetic field on electrochemically deposited calcium phosphate/collagen coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueni; He, Jianpeng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xudong; Wang, Wanying

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured calcium phosphate/collagen (CaP/COL) coatings were deposited on the carbon/carbon (C/C) composites through electrochemical deposition (ECD) under magnetic field. The effect of magnetic fields with different orientations on the morphology and composition was investigated. Both the morphology and composition of the coatings could be altered by superimposed magnetic field. Under zero magnetic field and magnetic field, three-dimensional network structure consisting of collagen fibers and CaP were formed on the C/C substrate. The applied magnetic field in the electric field helped to form nanostructured and plate-like CaP on collagen fibers. For the ECD under magnetic field, the Ca/P molar ratio of the coatings was lower than the one under B=0. This may be contributed to the decreased electrical resistance or the increased electrical conductivity of electrolyte solutions under magnetic field. The nanosized CaP/COL coatings exhibited the similar morphology to the human bone and could present excellent cell bioactivity and osteoblast functions. PMID:25201398

  12. Crossed-magnetic-field experiments on stacked second generation superconducting tapes: Reduction of the demagnetization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdadi, M.; Ruiz, H. S.; Coombs, T. A.

    2014-06-01

    The crossed-magnetic-field effect on the demagnetization factor of stacked second generation (2G) high temperature superconducting tapes is presented. The superconducting sample was initially magnetized along the c-axis by the field cooling magnetization method and after achieving the magnetic relaxation of the sample, an extensive set of experimental measurements for different amplitudes of an applied ac magnetic field parallel to the ab-plane was performed. On the one hand, a striking reduction of the demagnetization factor compared with the reported values for superconducting bulks is reported. On the other hand, the demagnetization factor increases linearly with the amplitude of the ac transverse magnetic field confirming the universal linear behavior for the magnetic susceptibility predicted by Brandt [Phys. Rev. B 54, 4246 (1996)]. The study has been also pursued at different frequencies of the ac transverse magnetic field in order to determine the influence of this parameter on the demagnetization factor measurements. We report an even lower demagnetization factor as long as the frequency of the transverse magnetic field increases. Thus, the significant reduction on the demagnetization factor that we have found by using stacked 2G-superconducting tapes, with higher mechanical strength compared with the one of superconducting bulks, makes to this configuration a highly attractive candidate for the future development of more efficient high-power density rotating machines and strong magnet applications.

  13. Magnetic-field effect on the photoactivation reaction of Escherichia coli DNA photolyase

    PubMed Central

    Henbest, Kevin B.; Maeda, Kiminori; Hore, P. J.; Joshi, Monika; Bacher, Adelbert; Bittl, Robert; Weber, Stefan; Timmel, Christiane R.; Schleicher, Erik

    2008-01-01

    One of the two principal hypotheses put forward to explain the primary magnetoreception event underlying the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds is based on a magnetically sensitive chemical reaction. It has been proposed that a spin-correlated radical pair is produced photochemically in a cryptochrome and that the rates and yields of the subsequent chemical reactions depend on the orientation of the protein in the Earth's magnetic field. The suitability of cryptochrome for this purpose has been argued, in part, by analogy with DNA photolyase, although no effects of applied magnetic fields have yet been reported for any member of the cryptochrome/photolyase family. Here, we demonstrate a magnetic-field effect on the photochemical yield of a flavin–tryptophan radical pair in Escherichia coli photolyase. This result provides a proof of principle that photolyases, and most likely by extension also cryptochromes, have the fundamental properties needed to form the basis of a magnetic compass. PMID:18799743

  14. Effect of a magnetic field in simulating the plume field of an anode layer Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongjun; Boyd, Iain D.; Keidar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present axisymmetric simulations of xenon plasma plume flow fields from a D55 anode layer Hall thruster. A hybrid particle-fluid method is used for the simulations. The magnetic field surrounding the Hall thruster exit is included in the calculation. The plasma properties obtained from a hydrodynamic model are used as boundary conditions for the simulations. The electron properties are calculated using the Boltzmann model and a detailed fluid model, collisions of heavy particle are modeled with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, and ion transport in the electric field uses the particle-in-cell technique. The accuracy of the simulation is assessed through comparison with various measured data. It is found that a magnetic field significantly affects the profile of the plasma in the detailed model. The plasma has a potential of 80 V at 10 mm from the thruster exit in the case of zero magnetic field, which decreases to 60 V when the magnetic field is included. Results predicted by the detailed model with the magnetic field are found to be in better agreement with experimental data.

  15. Magnetic field effects in RF magnetron sputtering of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compaan, A.D.; Shao, M.; Tabory, C.N.; Feng, Z.; Fischer, A.; Shen, F.; Narayanswami, C.; Bohn, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    We have studied effects of magnetic field strength and configuration on rf planar magnetron sputtering of CdS and CdTe. This study was carried out with one sputter gun having an unbalanced magnetic field and a second gun having an approximately balanced magnetic field. The unbalanced field gun produces significantly higher ion and electron bombardment of the film during growth and slightly higher electron kinetic energies. Films produced with the unbalanced gun show much stronger photoluminescence and cell performance is much better when the CdTe is deposited with the unbalanced gun. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Study of effect of AC and DC magnetic fields on growth of Pisum sativum seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Mahmood; Yasaie Mehrjardi, Yasaman; Sojoodi, Jaleh; Bayani, Hosien; Kazem Salem, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    This paper concentrates on the effect of the AC and DC magnetic fields on plant growth. The effect of AC magnetic field with intensities of 2.25, 1.66 and 1.49 mT and DC magnetic field with intensities of 3.6, 2.41 and 2.05 mT in exposure durations of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 min on two groups of dry and wet Pisum sativum seedlings was studied. In each experiment 10 seeds were used; the experiments were repeated three times for each group and there was a sham exposed group for comparison purposes. The light cycle was 12 h light/12 h darkness and the temperature was 25 ± 1° C. The index of growth is considered to be the root and stem elongation on the sixth day. It was observed that AC magnetic field has a positive effect on the growth in all durations and intensities. Moreover, it is highlighted that during the experiments, the mean growth of dry seedlings significantly increased by a factor of 11 in AC magnetic field with the lowest intensity of 1.49 mT (p < 0.05). It was also shown that AC magnetic fields had a more positive effect on the growth of plants in comparison to DC magnetic fields.

  17. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  18. Effect of the magnetic field direction on forced convection heat transfer enhancements in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherief, Wahid; Avenas, Yvan; Ferrouillat, Sébastien; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Jossic, Laurent; Berard, Jean; Petit, Mickael

    2015-07-01

    Applying a magnetic field on a ferrofluid flow induces a large increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of two commercial ferrofluids are compared. The variations of both the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient due to the magnetic field are measured in the following conditions: square duct, laminar flow and uniform wall heat flux. The square section with two insulated walls allows for the characterization of the effect of the magnetic field direction. The experimental results show that the heat transfer is better enhanced when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. In the best case, the local heat transfer coefficient increase is about 75%. On the contrary, another experimental setup shows no enhancement of thermal conductivity when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014) - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  19. Effect of a magnetic field on the adsorptive removal of methylene blue onto wheat straw biochar.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoting; Zhu, Weiyong; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Lili; Zhu, Lingfeng; Zhao, Weigao

    2016-04-01

    Biochar pyrolyzed from wheat straw was innovatively used for the adsorptive removal of cationic dye methylene blue through exposure to a magnetic field. The adsorption capability of the biochar pyrolyzed at 200 °C exceeded that of samples pyrolyzed at higher temperatures. The surface acidic functional groups of wheat straw biochar were deduced to be more sensitive to the effects of the external magnetic field. The enhancement of the magnetic field achieved by increases in the initial dye concentration, and a decrease in the biochar dosage and solution pH, were more significant compared with those caused by other conditions. Kinetic experiments indicated that chemisorption occurred during adsorption. The qmax values for dye adsorption without, and with, an external magnetic field were found to be 46.6 and 62.5mg/g, respectively. These demonstrated that wheat straw biochar could be used for the efficient adsorption of pollutants when assisted by an external magnetic field. PMID:26845216

  20. Hydraulic concentration of magnetic fields in the solar photosphere. II - Bernoulli effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic filaments in the solar photosphere are subject to vigorous kneading and massaging by the convective turbulence at, and beneath, the visible surface. It is shown that the Bernoulli effect of the consequent surging of fluid up and down along the filaments is a major factor in concentrating the magnetic pressure of the filament (the mean square field). The mean field is also increased if the phase velocity of the external massaging exceeds the Alfven speed within the filament. The net observational magnetic result of the surging, then, depends upon the response of the observing instrument, and whether it essentially observes the mean field, the rms field, or whether there are saturation effects. It is suggested that the chromospheric mottles (spicules) seen in H alpha are in fact the intense magnetic filaments that carry most of the magnetic flux across the photospheric boundary of the sun.

  1. Orbital effects of strong magnetic field on a two-dimensional Holstein polaron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Subhasree; Chakraborty, Monodeep; Taraphder, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the orbital effects of a strong external magnetic field on the ground-state properties of a two-dimensional (2D) Holstein polaron, employing variational approaches based on exact diagonalization. From the ground-state energy and the wave function, we calculate the electron-phonon correlation function, the average phonon number, and the Drude weight and investigate the evolution of a 2D Holstein polaron as a function of the magnetic flux. Although the external magnetic field affects the polaron throughout the parameter regime, we show that the magnetic field has a stronger effect on a loosely bound (spatially extended) polaron. We also find that the magnetic field can be used as a tuning parameter, particularly for a weakly coupled polaron, to reduce the spatial extent of a large polaron.

  2. Effects of high magnetic fields on thermal convection of conductive aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Hirota, Noriyuki; Okada, Hidehiko; Sakka, Yoshio

    2015-07-01

    Effects of magnetic fields on the thermal convection in conductive aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures have been studied through heat transport measurements combined with shadowgraph technique-based visualization. The suppression of thermal convection by magnetic field was in fact observed in conductive diamagnetic aqueous solutions of ammonium sulfate. The magnitude of the suppression was found to depend on the applied magnetic field and the electrical conductivity of the sample fluid. These effects are qualitatively understood by assuming that Lorentz force acting on the fluid is a main player. Based on these results, a control method of heat transfer process using high magnetic fields has been demonstrated. It seems feasible to understand the behaviors of liquid metals by using electrolytes aqueous solution combined with a superconducting magnet, since flow conditions thereby are regarded as similar to those for liquid metals in industrial electromagnets.

  3. Effects of strong magnetic fields on the electron distribution and magnetisability of rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagola, G. I.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2004-12-01

    Strong uniform static magnetic fields compress the electronic distribution of rare gas atoms and cause a 'spindle effect', which can be illustrated by plotting charge-density functions which depend quadratically on the flux density of the applied field. The fourth rank hypermagnetisabilities of He, Ne, Ar and Kr are predicted to have small positive values. Accordingly, the diamagnetism of rare gas atoms diminishes by a very little amount in the presence of intense magnetic field.

  4. Effect of different magnetic field distributions on laminar ferroconvection heat transfer in horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza; Saffar-avval, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The forced convection heat transfer of ferrofluid steady state laminar flow through a circular axisymmetric horizontal pipe under different magnetic field is the focus of this study. The pipe is under constant heat flux while different linear axial magnetic fields were applied on the ferrofluid with equal magnetic energy. In this scenario, viscosity of ferrofluid is temperature dependent, to capture ferrofluid real behavior a nonlinear Langevin equation was considered for equilibrium magnetization. For this purpose, the set of nonlinear governing PDEs was solved using proper CFD techniques: the finite volume method and SIMPLE algorithm were used to discretize and numerically solve the governing equation in order to obtain thermohydrodynamic flow characteristics. The numerical results show a promising enhancement of up to 135.7% in heat transfer as a consequence of the application of magnetic field. The magnetic field also increases pressure loss of up to 77% along the pipe; but effectiveness (favorable to unfavorable effect ratio) of the magnetic field as a performance index economically justifies its application such that higher magnetic field intensity causes higher effectiveness of up to 1.364.

  5. Cosmic ray pressure driven magnetic field amplification: dimensional, radiative and field orientation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, T. P.; Drury, L. O'C.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of non-thermal emission from several supernova remnants suggest that magnetic fields close to the blastwave are much stronger than would be naively expected from simple shock compression of the field permeating the interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate in some detail a simple model based on turbulence generation by cosmic ray pressure gradients. Previously, this model was investigated using 2D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Motivated by the well-known qualitative differences between 2D and 3D turbulence, we further our investigations of this model using both 2D and 3D simulations to study the influence of the dimensionality of the simulations on the field amplification achieved. Further, since the model implies the formation of shocks which can, in principle, be efficiently cooled by collisional cooling, we include such cooling in our simulations to ascertain whether it could increase the field amplification achieved. Finally, we examine the influence of different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the normal of the blastwave. We find that dimensionality has a slight influence on the overall amplification achieved, but a significant impact on the morphology of the amplified field. Collisional cooling has surprisingly little impact, primarily due to the short time which any element of the ISM resides in the precursor region for supernova blastwaves. Even allowing for a wide range of orientations of the magnetic field, we find that the magnetic field can be expected to be amplified by, on average, at least an order of magnitude in the precursors of supernova blastwaves.

  6. Numerical simulation of dielectric bubbles coalescence under the effects of uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidi, Amin; Jalali-Vahid, Davood

    2016-06-01

    In this research, the co-axial coalescence of a pair of gas bubbles rising in a viscous liquid column under the effects of an external uniform magnetic field is simulated numerically. Considered fluids are dielectric, and applied magnetic field is uniform. Effects of different strengths of magnetic field on the interaction of in-line rising bubbles and coalescence between them were investigated. For numerical modeling of the problem, a computer code was developed to solve the governing equations which are continuity, Navier-Stokes equation, magnetic field equation and level set and reinitialization of level set equations. The finite volume method is used for the discretization of the continuity and momentum equations using SIMPLE scheme where the finite difference method is used to discretization of the magnetic field equations. Also a level set method is used to capture the interface of two phases. The results are compared with available numerical and experimental results in the case of no-magnetic field effect which show a good agreement. It is found that uniform magnetic field accelerates the coalescence of the bubbles in dielectric fluids and enhances the rise velocity of the coalesced bubble.

  7. Effect of magnetic fields on cryptochrome-dependent responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sue-Re; Henbest, Kevin B; Maeda, Kiminori; Pannell, John R; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J; Okamoto, Haruko

    2009-12-01

    The scientific literature describing the effects of weak magnetic fields on living systems contains a plethora of contradictory reports, few successful independent replication studies and a dearth of plausible biophysical interaction mechanisms. Most such investigations have been unsystematic, devoid of testable theoretical predictions and, ultimately, unconvincing. A recent study, of magnetic responses in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, however, stands out; it has a clear hypothesis-that seedling growth is magnetically sensitive as a result of photoinduced radical-pair reactions in cryptochrome photoreceptors-tested by measuring several cryptochrome-dependent responses, all of which proved to be enhanced in a magnetic field of intensity 500 muT. The potential importance of this study in the debate on putative effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on human health prompted us to subject it to the 'gold standard' of independent replication. With experimental conditions chosen to match those of the original study, we have measured hypocotyl lengths and anthocyanin accumulation for Arabidopsis seedlings grown in a 500 microT magnetic field, with simultaneous control experiments at 50 microT. Additionally, we have determined hypocotyl lengths of plants grown in 50 microT, 1 mT and approximately 100 mT magnetic fields (with zero-field controls), measured gene (CHS, HY5 and GST) expression levels, investigated blue-light intensity effects and explored the influence of sucrose in the growth medium. In no case were consistent, statistically significant magnetic field responses detected. PMID:19324677

  8. On the effect of the martian crustal magnetic field on atmospheric erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohua; Liemohn, Michael W.; Nagy, Andrew F.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Ma, Yingjuan

    2010-03-01

    Without the shielding of a strong intrinsic magnetic field, the martian atmosphere directly interacts with the impacting solar wind. The neutral constituents of the atmospheric corona can be ionized, and then picked up and accelerated by the magnetic field and convection electric field in the solar wind. A significant fraction of pickup ions escape Mars' gravitational pull and are lost to space. This non-thermal escape process of heavy species is an important mechanism responsible for atmospheric erosion. While there is a perception that the martian magnetic anomalies are significant for the ionospheric density distribution and the bow shock standoff location, little is known about the quantitative influence of the martian crustal magnetic field on the global distribution of escaping pickup ions. In this paper, we apply a newly developed Monte Carlo ion transport model to resolve the crustal field effect on the pickup oxygen ion distribution around Mars. The background magnetic and electric fields, in which test particles are followed, are calculated using an independent three-dimensional multispecies MHD model. The effects of the crustal magnetic field on particle escape are quantified by varying the crustal field orientation in the model setup and comparing the corresponding test particle simulation results. The comparison is made by turning on or off the crustal field or changing the local time of the strongest field from the dayside to the dawnside. It is found that without the protection of the crustal magnetic field, the total amount of atmospheric escape through the tail region would be enhanced by more than a factor of two. It is shown that the crustal magnetic field not only regionally deflects the solar wind around the martian atmosphere, but also has an important global effect on atmospheric erosion and thus on long-term atmospheric evolution.

  9. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  10. Uniform synthetic magnetic field and effective mass for cold atoms in a shaken optical lattice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sols, Fernando; Creffield, Charles E.; Pieplow, Gregor; Goldman, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold atoms can be made to experience synthetic magnetic fields when placed in a suitably driven optical lattice. For coherent systems the switching protocol plays an essential role in determining the long time behavior. Relatively simple driving schemes may generate a uniform magnetic flux but an inhomogeneous effective mass. A two-stage split driving scheme can recover a uniform effective mass but at the price of rendering the magnetic field space dependent. We propose a four-stage split driving that generates uniform field and mass of arbitrary values for all driving amplitudes. Finally, we study a modified two-stage split driving approach that enables uniform field and mass for most of but not all values of the magnetic field. Work supported by MINECO (Spain) under Grant FIS2013-41716-P, by FRS-FNRS (Belgium), and by BSPO under PAI Project No. P7/18 DYGEST.

  11. Effect of vertical magnetic field on convection and segregation in vertical Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Adornato, Peter M.; Brown, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    A previous finite-element analysis of vertical Bridgman growth for dilute and nondilute alloys is extended to include the effect of a vertically-aligned magnetic field in the limit of zero magnetic Reynolds number. Calculations are presented for growth of a dilute gallium-germanium alloy in a vertically stabilized Bridgman-Stockbarger system and in a furnace with a uniform temperature gradient imposed along the ampoule. Steady cellular convection driven by radial temperature gradients causes good axial and radial mixing in both systems without a magnetic field. A weak magnetic field decreases the intensity of convection and the effectiveness of solute mixing. The radial nonuniformity is greatest for an intermediate field strength. Stronger fields suppress flow recirculation completely, and lead to uniform solute segregation across the crystal and to diffusion-controlled axial segregation.

  12. Magnetic field effects on THz radiation from rectangular shape Bi2212 IJJ’s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, Kazuhiro; Tsujimoto, Manabu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Minami, Hidetoshi; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    The effects of magnetic field on terahertz radiation emitted from the rectangular mesa of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ’s) made of Bi2212 single crystals were studied up to 150 Oe. Strong suppression of the radiation power was observed when magnetic field was applied to the c-axis of the sample, while in the case of H//ab-plane, the radiation power showed a weak and broad peak in the weak field region (˜50 Oe), then it decreased and diminished around 150 Oe. These magnetic field effects are interpreted by the strong influence of magnetic field on the I-V curve, which set up the condition for the THz radiation.

  13. VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD. II. HANLE EFFECT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Inhester, B.; Lin, H.; Davila, J. E-mail: Joseph.M.Davila@nasa.gov E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-09-20

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field.

  14. Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Högstedt, P

    1988-11-01

    Divers have for some years been complaining about a metallic taste in the mouth while electrically welding and cutting underwater. This paper reports on results from an assessment of this problem. It was hypothesized that the magnetic fields arising from the welding or cutting current could correlate with the reported symptoms. The intraoral magnetic flux density was calculated to 1.15 mT, at 650 ADC, in a normal cutting situation. This was verified in vivo. This magnetic field was shown to contain an AC component that is a candidate for inducing secondary currents in the oral tissues and restorative materials. Five submerged divers exposed to a magnetic field of 0.35 mT did not report any metallic taste. Magnetophosphenes were reported by 1 diver. (Magnetophosphenes are luminous impressions due to excitement of the retina by a magnetic field in addition to or in place of impingement of light rays.) Only a slight shielding effect to magnetic fields was observed due to a copper-brass helmet. An in vitro model for exposure of dental amalgams to magnetic fields was designed. Recommendations for decreasing the magnetic field surrounding the diver in practical work is given. PMID:3227576

  15. Effect of interplanetary magnetic field on ionosphere over the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Patel, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    Large and quick changes of the latitude of the interplanetary magnetic field from its southward to northward direction are shown to be associated with the disappearance of the Es-q layer (Knecht, 1959) at the equatorial ionosphere during the daytime or with the reversal of E region horizontal and F region vertical electron drifts during both night and day. This phenomenon is suggested as the imposition of an electric field in the ionosphere in a direction opposite to that of the Sq electric field. The resultant electrostatic field on the equatorial ionosphere would be decreased or even reversed from its normal direction, resulting in the reduction of electron drift velocity. When the normal Sq field is over-compensated by the magnetospheric electric field, the electron drifts are reversed and the irregularities in the E region due to the cross-field instabilities are inhibited, resulting in the sudden disappearance of the Es-q layers.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Effectiveness of Magnetic Field on Food Freezing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toru; Takeuchi, Yuri; Masuda, Kazunori; Watanabe, Manabu; Shirakashi, Ryo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Koga, Nobumitsu; Hiruma, Naoya; Ichioka, Jun; Takai, Kiyoshi

    Recently, several food refrigeration equipments that utilize magnetic field have attracted much attention from food production companies, consumers and mass media. However, the effectiveness of the freezers is not scientifically examined. Therefore, the effectiveness should be clarified by experiments or theoretical considerations. In this study, the effect of weak magnetic field (about 0.0005 T) on freezing process of several kinds of foods was investigated by using a specially designed freezer facilitated with magnetic field generator. The investigation included the comparison of freezing curves, drip amount, physicochemical evaluations on color and texture, observation of microstructure, and sensory evaluation. From the results of the control experiments, it can be concluded that weak magnetic field around 0.0005 T provided no significant difference on temperature history during freezing and on the qualities of frozen foods, within our experimental conditions.

  17. Effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Cordeiro, P.G.; Seckel, B.R.; Miller, C.D.; Gross, P.T.; Wise, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on peripheral nerve regeneration is evaluated in rat sciatic nerve. Forty-four rats underwent sciatic nerve repair using polyethylene nerve guides. Postoperatively, the animals were exposed to a 1-tesla magnetic field for 12 hours per day for 4 weeks with appropriate controls. Our results demonstrate that a 1-tesla static magnetic field has no statistically significant effect on nerve regeneration as determined by myelinated axon counts and electrophysiologic studies. Also, the specific orientation of the sciatic nerve with respect to the magnetic field has no influence on axonal growth or nerve conduction. Periods of restraint of 12 hours per day for 4 weeks significantly inhibit weight gain but have no effect on peripheral nerve regeneration.

  18. Effect of magnetic field fluctuation on ultra-low field MRI measurements in the unshielded laboratory environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Baolin; Qiu, Longqing; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations in our unshielded urban laboratory can reach hundreds of nT in the noisy daytime and is only a few nT in the quiet midnight. The field fluctuation causes the Larmor frequency fL to drift randomly for several Hz during the unshielded ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements, thus seriously spoiling the averaging effect and causing imaging artifacts. By using an active compensation (AC) technique based on the spatial correlation of the low-frequency magnetic field fluctuation, the field fluctuation can be suppressed to tens of nT, which is a moderate situation between the noisy daytime and the quiet midnight. In this paper, the effect of the field fluctuation on ULF MRI measurements was investigated. The 1D and 2D MRI signals of a water phantom were measured using a second-order low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in three fluctuation cases: severe fluctuation (noisy daytime), moderate fluctuation (daytime with AC) and minute fluctuation (quiet midnight) when different gradient fields were applied. When the active compensation is applied or when the frequency encoding gradient field Gx reaches a sufficiently strong value in our measurements, the image artifacts become invisible in all three fluctuation cases. Therefore it is feasible to perform ULF-MRI measurements in unshielded urban environment without imaging artifacts originating from magnetic fluctuations by using the active compensation technique and/or strong gradient fields.

  19. Effect of magnetic field fluctuation on ultra-low field MRI measurements in the unshielded laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Baolin; Qiu, Longqing; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations in our unshielded urban laboratory can reach hundreds of nT in the noisy daytime and is only a few nT in the quiet midnight. The field fluctuation causes the Larmor frequency fL to drift randomly for several Hz during the unshielded ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements, thus seriously spoiling the averaging effect and causing imaging artifacts. By using an active compensation (AC) technique based on the spatial correlation of the low-frequency magnetic field fluctuation, the field fluctuation can be suppressed to tens of nT, which is a moderate situation between the noisy daytime and the quiet midnight. In this paper, the effect of the field fluctuation on ULF MRI measurements was investigated. The 1D and 2D MRI signals of a water phantom were measured using a second-order low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in three fluctuation cases: severe fluctuation (noisy daytime), moderate fluctuation (daytime with AC) and minute fluctuation (quiet midnight) when different gradient fields were applied. When the active compensation is applied or when the frequency encoding gradient field Gx reaches a sufficiently strong value in our measurements, the image artifacts become invisible in all three fluctuation cases. Therefore it is feasible to perform ULF-MRI measurements in unshielded urban environment without imaging artifacts originating from magnetic fluctuations by using the active compensation technique and/or strong gradient fields. PMID:26037135

  20. Effects of an axial magnetic field on Z-pinch plasmas for extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, Sunao; Kimura, Akihiro; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Horita, Hiroyuki; Namihira, Takao; Sakugawa, Takashi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of an axial magnetic field (B{sub z}) on plasma pinch dynamics and on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission property of a compact Z-pinch device for EUV sources. The Z-pinch xenon plasma was driven by a pulse current with an amplitude of 27 kA and duration of 150 ns in an alumina tube with a diameter of 5 mm. A quasistatic magnetic field of up to 360 G is applied to the plasma. The EUV emission was evaluated for spectra, spatial distribution of the emission, and light energy at 13.5 nm with 2% bandwidth. A time-resolved interferogram provides the electron line density and pinch dynamics of the plasma. When a magnetic field of 160 G was applied to the plasma, the emission energy was approximately double that without the magnetic field. The spectroscopic measurement shows that the EUV spectrum drastically varies with magnetic-field strength. The time-resolved interferogram indicates that the axial magnetic field contributes by making the plasma compression smooth and by sustaining certain plasma conditions longer. From these experimental results, it was concluded that applying an axial magnetic field can be an effective method to improve EUV emission.

  1. Magnetoelectric effect in antiferromagnetic LiCoPO4 in pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrustalyov, V. M.; Savytsky, V. M.; Kharchenko, M. F.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetoelectric effect in single-crystal LiCoPO4 (TN = 21.8 K) is studied in strong pulsed magnetic fields which destroy the antiferromagnetic structure of the crystal spin ordering. The electric polarization along the crystallographic a axis induced by a magnetic field H||b is measured. New features of the electric polarization in a magnetic field are found, including a spike in the polarization near the field for the first magnetic transition at H1 = 123 kOe, a recovery of the electric polarization at the second magnetic transition H2 = 210 kOe, and a gradual reduction to zero on approaching the third transition at H3 = 263 kOe. Various possible magnetic structures in the high field phases are examined which are consistent with their magnetization and electric polarization. The observed linear dependence of the polarization on field strength in the initial antiferromagnetic phase and the vanishing of the polarization in the first high-field phase are in good agreement with previous studies of the magnetoelectric effect in LiCoPO4 [Wiegelmann et al., Ferroelectrics 161, 147 (1994); H. Wiegelman, Ph.D. thesis (University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 1995)].

  2. Static magnetic field effect on the arterial baroreflex-mediated control of microcirculation: implications for cardiovascular effects due to environmental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that time-varying and static magnetic fields in the environment might affect the cardiovascular system. To explore the underlying physiology, the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the carotid baroreflex control of microcirculation was studied. Twenty-four hemodynamic monitorings were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h) during experiments that lasted 120 min. Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after a 40 min exposure of the sinocarotid baroreceptors to Nd(2)-Fe(14)-B alloy magnets (n = 14) or sham magnets (n = 10, control series). The local SMF field was 350 mT, at the baroreceptors' site. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. A significant positive correlation was found between the SMF-induced increase in BRS (DeltaBRS = BRS(afterSMF) - BRS(priorSMF)) and the increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaMPPG = MPPG(afterSMF) - MPPG(priorSMF)) (r = 0.66, p < 0.009). The SMF probably modulated the arterial baroreflex-mediated microcirculatory control. This could represent one possible mechanism how environmental magnetic fields act on the cardiovascular system, and a method how to complexly adjust macro- and microcirculation with potential clinical implementation. PMID:17530271

  3. The induced magnetic and electric fields' paradox leading to multicaloric effects in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vopson, Melvin M.

    2016-04-01

    Magneto-electric effect in multiferroics implies that an applied magnetic field induces an electric polarization change in a multiferroic solid and vice versa, an applied electric field modifies its magnetization. The magneto-electric effect is a powerful feature of multiferroics and has attracted huge interest due to potential technological applications. One such possible application is the multicaloric effect in multiferroics. However, a closer examination of this effect and its derivation leads to a paradox, in which the predicted changes in one of the order phase at a constant applied field are due to the excitation by the same field. Here this apparent paradox is first explained in detail and then solved. Understanding how electric and magnetic fields can be induced in multiferroic materials is an essential tool enabling their theoretical modeling as well as facilitating the introduction of future applications.

  4. Magnetic field instability in a neutron star driven by the electroweak electron-nucleon interaction versus the chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B.

    2015-03-01

    We show that the Standard Model electroweak interaction of ultrarelativistic electrons with nucleons (the e N interaction) in a neutron star (NS) permeated by a seed large-scale helical magnetic field provides its growth up to ≳1 015 G during a time comparable with the ages of young magnetars ˜1 04 yr . The magnetic field instability originates from the parity violation in the e N interaction entering the generalized Dirac equation for right and left massless electrons in an external uniform magnetic field. We calculate the average electric current given by the solution of the modified Dirac equation containing an extra current for right and left electrons (positrons), which turns out to be directed along the magnetic field. Such a current includes both a changing chiral imbalance of electrons and the e N potential given by a constant neutron density in a NS. Then we derive the system of the kinetic equations for the chiral imbalance and the magnetic helicity which accounts for the e N interaction. By solving this system, we show that a sizable chiral imbalance arising in a neutron protostar due to the Urca process eL-+p →N +νeL diminishes very rapidly because of a huge chirality-flip rate. Thus the e N term prevails over the chiral effect, providing a huge growth of the magnetic helicity and the helical magnetic field.

  5. Preliminary Results of Performance Measurements on a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic configurations. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying a higher thrust efficiency. Preliminary thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 100-250 W. The thrust levels over this power range were 3.5-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 14-19% and 875- 1425 s, respectively. The magnetic field in the thruster was lower for the thrust measurements than the plasma probe measurements due to heating and weakening of the permanent magnets, reducing the maximum field strength from 2 kG to roughly 750-800 G. The discharge current levels observed during thrust stand testing were anomalously high compared to those levels measured in previous experiments with this thruster.

  6. Non-Temperature Induced Effects of Magnetized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Alternating Magnetic Field in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Ngen, Ethel J.; Smith, Barbara; Delannoy, Michael; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the damaging effects of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (MNP) on magnetically labeled cancer cells when subjected to oscillating gradients in a strong external magnetic field. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were labeled with MNP, placed in the high magnetic field, and subjected to oscillating gradients generated by an imaging gradient system of a 9.4T preclinical MRI system. Changes in cell morphology and a decrease in cell viability were detected in cells treated with oscillating gradients. The cytotoxicity was determined qualitatively and quantitatively by microscopic imaging and cell viability assays. An approximately 26.6% reduction in cell viability was detected in magnetically labeled cells subjected to the combined effect of a static magnetic field and oscillating gradients. No reduction in cell viability was observed in unlabeled cells subjected to gradients, or in MNP-labeled cells in the static magnetic field. As no increase in local temperature was observed, the cell damage was not a result of hyperthermia. Currently, we consider the coherent motion of internalized and aggregated nanoparticles that produce mechanical moments as a potential mechanism of cell destruction. The formation and dynamics of the intracellular aggregates of nanoparticles were visualized by optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The images revealed a rapid formation of elongated MNP aggregates in the cells, which were aligned with the external magnetic field. This strategy provides a new way to eradicate a specific population of MNP-labeled cells, potentially with magnetic resonance imaging guidance using standard MRI equipment, with minimal side effects for the host. PMID:27244470

  7. Properties of the resonant tunneling diode in external magnetic field with inclusion of the Rashba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niketić, Nemanja; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2014-07-01

    Influence of the Rashba effect on electronic properties of resonant tunneling diode in an external magnetic field is analyzed in this paper. Wave functions and energies, as well as expressions for currents densities, are determined for electrons of both spins. Appearances of many modes due to the external magnetic field induce irregularities in the current-voltage characteristics, which are observable in case when the thermal energy is lower than, or comparable to, the energy difference of two consecutive Landau levels. Current density through the heterostructure is investigated with emphasis on the degree of spin polarization; further, spin transfer is shown to depend on the direction of external magnetic field.

  8. Effect of a magnetic field on the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglitskii, N.N.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kul'skii, L.A.; Rubezhanskii, K.A.; Zhantalai, B.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper gives an account of an investigation into the effect of a magnetic field on the rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The CO/sub 2/ pressure in the system was maintained by a Hoffer valve. The method used for studying the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions is described. The specific rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in solutions exposed to a magnetic field is lower than in solutions not so exposed. There is a tendency for the equilibrium solubility of CO/sub 2/ to increase in solutions exposed to a magnetic field.

  9. Magnetic field effects and the role of spin states in singlet fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdett, Jonathan J.; Piland, Geoffrey B.; Bardeen, Christopher J.

    2013-10-01

    Singlet fission is a photophysical process that has promise for increasing the efficiency of solar cells. The dynamics depend on triplet spin states and can be influenced by external magnetic fields. In 4-electron systems, fission takes an initial singlet state into a superposition of triplet pair states. Direct evidence for this superposition state is provided by quantum beats in the delayed fluorescence of tetracene crystals. The beat frequencies depend on crystal orientation with respect to the magnetic field, consistent with predictions based on solving the full spin Hamiltonian. Magnetic field effects on the kinetics are analyzed in terms of a hybrid quantum-kinetic model. The magnetic field has no effect on the initial fluorescence decay rate but affects the decay after the triplet pair states begin to equilibrate with the singlets. The long-time behavior of the fluorescence decay reflects association and separation of triplet pairs and relaxation into different spin states.

  10. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  11. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Quorum Sensing-Regulated Luminescence of Vibrio fischeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Addie; Hagen, Steve; Son, Minjun

    2015-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism by which bacteria communicate through the secretion and detection of extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers. This research focuses on the quorum sensing regulated bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium that lives in symbiosis with certain fish and squid species. Previous studies of V. harveyi, a close relative of V. fisheri, indicate that a strong magnetic field has a positive effect on V.harveyi bioluminescence. However the effect of magnetic fields on quorum sensing-regulated luminescence is in general poorly understood. We grew V. fischeri in solid and liquid growth media, subject to strong static magnetic fields, and imaged the bioluminescence over a period of forty-eight hours. Luminescence patterns were analyzed in both the spatial and time dimensions. We find no indication that a magnetic field influences Vibrio fischeri luminescence either positively or negatively. This research was funded by the Grant Number NSF DMR-1156737.

  12. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2−10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  13. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  14. Magnetic field effect on charmonium formation in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingyu; Shi, Shuzhe; Xu, Nu; Xu, Zhe; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand the strong external magnetic field generated at the very beginning of heavy ion collisions. We study the effect of the magnetic field on the anisotropic charmonium formation in Pb + Pb collisions at the LHC energy. The time dependent Schrödinger equation is employed to describe the motion of c c bar pairs. We compare our model prediction of the non-collective anisotropic parameter v2 of J / ψ with CMS data at high transverse momentum.

  15. Effect of a High Magnetic Field on Microstructures of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Seed Melt-Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Liu, Huan; Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    The effects of a high magnetic field on microstructures during seed melt-back of superalloy were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the high magnetic field significantly modified the melt-back interface shape and the melt-back zone length. In addition, stray grain on the edge of sample was effectively suppressed in the high magnetic field. Based on experimental results and quantitative analysis, the above results should be attributed to the increasing temperature gradient in a high magnetic field.

  16. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  17. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q Y; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×10(9) A/m(2) under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  18. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only.

  19. Magnetic field corrections to the repulsive Casimir effect at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdas, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    I investigate the finite temperature Casimir effect for a charged and massless scalar field satisfying mixed (Dirichlet-Neumann) boundary conditions on a pair of plane parallel plates of infinite size. The effect of a uniform magnetic field, perpendicular to the plates, on the Helmholtz free energy and Casimir pressure is studied. The ζ-function regularization technique is used to obtain finite results. Simple analytic expressions are obtained for the zeta function and the free energy, in the limits of small plate distance, high temperature and strong magnetic field. The Casimir pressure is obtained in each of the three limits and the situation of a magnetic field present between and outside the plates, as well as that of a magnetic field present only between the plates is examined. It is discovered that, in the small plate distance and high temperature limits, the repulsive pressure is less when the magnetic field is present between the plates but not outside, than it is when the magnetic field is present between and outside the plates.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements. PMID:20365625

  1. Quantifying the motion of magnetic particles in excised tissue: Effect of particle properties and applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Sandip; Ramaswamy, Bharath; Horton, Emily; Gangapuram, Sruthi; Nacev, Alek; Depireux, Didier; Shimoji, Mika; Shapiro, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a method to investigate how magnetic particle characteristics affect their motion inside tissues under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Particles are placed on top of freshly excised tissue samples, a calibrated magnetic field is applied by a magnet underneath each tissue sample, and we image and quantify particle penetration depth by quantitative metrics to assess how particle sizes, their surface coatings, and tissue resistance affect particle motion. Using this method, we tested available fluorescent particles from Chemicell of four sizes (100 nm, 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm diameter) with four different coatings (starch, chitosan, lipid, and PEG/P) and quantified their motion through freshly excised rat liver, kidney, and brain tissues. In broad terms, we found that the applied magnetic field moved chitosan particles most effectively through all three tissue types (as compared to starch, lipid, and PEG/P coated particles). However, the relationship between particle properties and their resulting motion was found to be complex. Hence, it will likely require substantial further study to elucidate the nuances of transport mechanisms and to select and engineer optimal particle properties to enable the most effective transport through various tissue types under applied magnetic fields.

  2. Estimation of the effects of strong static magnetic fields on plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent studies we extensively used ponderomotive magnetic forces in high gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) for displacing organelles inside plant gravity receptor cells. Such displacement is a convenient tool both for investigating plant gravity perception mechanism and for physical characterization of the cell interior, and can have future practical applications in providing a directional stimulus for plants in microgravity. This method takes advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the receptor cells, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (? æ < 0). Such particles are repelled from the zones of stronger field in a non-uniform field. To exert a force on amyloplasts, which is comparable to the gravity force, the dynamic factor of the field grad(H2 /2) needs to be 109 - 1 01 0 Oe 2 /cm, and the field intensity in the experimental magnetic systems typically varies from 0 to 2.5-104 Oe, while the size of the area of non-uniformity is 10-2 to 1 cm. Possible effects of such static magnetic fields on plants other than magnetophoresis of amyloplasts were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5-104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are

  3. Effects of magnetic fields during high voltage live-line maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göcsei, Gábor; Kiss, István, Dr; Németh, Bálint

    2015-10-01

    In case of transmission and distribution networks, extra low frequency (typically 50 or 60 Hz) electric and magnetic fields have to be taken into consideration separately from each other. Health effects have been documented from exposures to both types of fields. Magnetic fields are qualified as possibly carcinogenic to humans (category “2B”) by WHO's cancer research institute, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), so it is essential to protect the workers against their harmful effects. During live-line maintenance (LLM) electric fields can be shielded effectively by different kinds of conductive clothing, which are enclosed metal surfaces acting as a Faraday-cage. In practice laboratory measurements also prove their efficiency, the required shielding ratio is above 99% by the related standard.. A set of measurements have proved that regular conductive clothing used against the electric fields cannot shield the magnetic fields effectively at all. This paper introduces the possible risks of LLM from the aspect of the health effects of magnetic fields. Although in this case the principle of shielding the electric fields cannot be applied, new considerations in equipment design and technology can be used as a possible solution. Calculations and simulations based on the data of the Hungarian transmission network - which represents the European grid as a part of ENTSO-E - and high-current laboratory measurement results also prove the importance of the topic.

  4. North-South Asymmetries in Earth's Magnetic Field - Effects on High-Latitude Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Cnossen, I.; Milan, S. E.; Haaland, S. E.; Coxon, J.; Pedatella, N. M.; Förster, M.; Reistad, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The solar-wind magnetosphere interaction primarily occurs at altitudes where the dipole component of Earth's magnetic field is dominating. The disturbances that are created in this interaction propagate along magnetic field lines and interact with the ionosphere-thermosphere system. At ionospheric altitudes, the Earth's field deviates significantly from a dipole. North-South asymmetries in the magnetic field imply that the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (M-I-T) coupling is different in the two hemispheres. In this paper we review the primary differences in the magnetic field at polar latitudes, and the consequences that these have for the M-I-T coupling. We focus on two interhemispheric differences which are thought to have the strongest effects: 1) A difference in the offset between magnetic and geographic poles in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and 2) differences in the magnetic field strength at magnetically conjugate regions. These asymmetries lead to differences in plasma convection, neutral winds, total electron content, ion outflow, ionospheric currents and auroral precipitation.

  5. Chain-induced effects in the Faraday instability on ferrofluids in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhonoshin, V. V.; Lange, Adrian

    2004-04-01

    The linear stability analysis of the Faraday instability on a viscous ferrofluid in a horizontal magnetic field is performed. Strong dipole-dipole interactions lead to the formation of chains elongated in the field direction. The formation of chains results in a qualitative new behavior of the ferrofluid. This new behavior is characterized by a neutral stability curve similar to that observed earlier for Maxwell viscoelastic liquids and causes a significant weakening of the energy dissipation at high frequencies. In the case of a ferrofluid with chains in a horizontal magnetic field, the effective viscosity is anisotropic and depends on the field strength as well as on the wave frequency.

  6. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  7. Experimental realization of strong effective magnetic fields in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Aidelsburger, M; Atala, M; Nascimbène, S; Trotzky, S; Chen, Y-A; Bloch, I

    2011-12-16

    We use Raman-assisted tunneling in an optical superlattice to generate large tunable effective magnetic fields for ultracold atoms. When hopping in the lattice, the accumulated phase shift by an atom is equivalent to the Aharonov-Bohm phase of a charged particle exposed to a staggered magnetic field of large magnitude, on the order of 1 flux quantum per plaquette. We study the ground state of this system and observe that the frustration induced by the magnetic field can lead to a degenerate ground state for noninteracting particles. We provide a measurement of the local phase acquired from Raman-induced tunneling, demonstrating time-reversal symmetry breaking of the underlying Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the quantum cyclotron orbit of single atoms in the lattice exposed to the magnetic field is directly revealed. PMID:22243087

  8. Effects of Magnetic Field Topology on Secondary Neutron Spectra in MagLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in Magneto-Inertial Fusion schemes requires both inertial and magnetic confinement of the fuel and charged fusion products. Recent theoretical and experimental work has demonstrated the confinement of charged fusion products by magnetic fields in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments. This confinement can be inferred from the ratio of secondary to primary neutron yields and the shape of secondary neutron spectra. In this work we investigate the effects of magnetic field topology on the shape of secondary neutron spectra. The MagLIF design has a cylindrical geometry and includes both axial and azimuthal magnetic fields. The azimuthal field is initially in the liner surrounding the fuel but instability growth may cause it to penetrate into the fuel. Charged fusion products (such as tritons or alpha particles) that are isotropically emitted and then confined by an axial field will flow parallel and anti-parallel to the field with equal intensities. In the case of tritons, this motion results in a secondary neutron spectrum emitted in the axial direction that is symmetric. However, in an azimuthal field such particles exhibit singular orbits and there is a net ion drift along the axis. This ion drift can cause the secondary neutron spectrum to be asymmetric. We examine the effects on the spectrum shape of confinement by a combination of axial and azimuthal fields.

  9. An investigation of magnetic field effects on plume density and temperature profiles of an applied-field MPD thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, S. Ray; Myers, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance is below levels required for primary propulsion missions. While MPD thruster performance has been found to increase with the magnitude of the applied-field strength, there is currently little understanding of the impact of applied-field shape on thruster performance. The results of a study in which a single applied-field thruster was operated using three solenoidal magnets with diameters of 12.7, 15.2, and 30.4-cm are presented. Thruster voltage and anode power deposition were measured for each applied field shape over a range of field strengths. Plume electron number density and temperature distributions were measured using a Langmuir probe in an effort to determine the effect of field shape on plume confinement by the diverging magnetic-field for each of the three magnetic field shapes. Results show that the dependence of the measured thruster characteristics on field shape were non-monotonic and that the field shape had a significant effect on the plume density and temperature profiles.

  10. Effect of normal and parallel magnetic fields on the stability of interfacial flows of magnetic fluids in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yecko, Philip

    2010-02-01

    The effect of an imposed magnetic field on the linear stability of immiscible two-fluid Poiseuille flow in a channel is examined for low Reynolds numbers. Surface tension acts on the interface, the fluids have different densities and viscosities, and one fluid is magnetic (ferrofluid). A Langevin function is used to model the fluid magnetization, resulting in a nonlinear permeability; the stability properties depend on this permeability relation both directly and indirectly, through the base state solution. Uniform magnetic fields applied normal or parallel to the interface both lead to an interfacial instability. Normal fields excite longer wavelength modes, generally having higher growth rates, but parallel fields can excite faster growing modes in high permeability fluids at large applied field strength. Whether or not the field stabilizes or destabilizes the flow depends on the viscosity and layer thickness ratios in a simple way, while the placement of the magnetic fluid layer does not play a major role. Growth rates predicted for realistic microchannel conditions are shown to be large enough to make ferrofluid manipulation a practical method of control.

  11. The effect of magnetic field on copper in various corrosive medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, L. Y.; Othman, N. K.; Jalar, A.; Ismail, I.

    2014-09-03

    The effect of applied magnetic field on the corrosion behaviour of copper within various corrosive medium is investigated. The copper coupon is immersed in 0.5 M HCl, 0.5 M NaCl and 0.5 M NaOH with or without applying up to 40 mT magnetic fields for 24 hours. The weight loss of copper coupon in HCl increased up to 96.56% with applied magnetic fields. However, in NaOH medium, only 33.33% more weight loss was observed and no difference were observed for coupons in NaCl when magnetic field is applied. This observation indicates that corrosion behaviour in HCl and NaOH is controlled by mass transport that can be influenced by the induced magneto hydrodynamics effect when magnetic field is applied. There was no change in weight loss of copper in NaCl when magnetic field is applied because the corrosion mechanism of copper in NaCl is governed by electron charge transfer.

  12. Two-level model and magnetic field effects on the hysteresis in n-GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Shwu-Yun Tsay; Tzeng, Yiharn

    2004-08-01

    Efforts are made in this work to interpret the experimentally observed magnetic effects on the hysteretic I-V curve for an n-GaAs semiconductor through a two-impurity-level model with the assumptions of spatial homogeneity in current flow direction and instantaneous energy balance. We construct the model by considering carefully the Landau level shifts for the electrons in the conduction band, the magnetoresistance property, and the modification on the cross sections of the impact ionization. With the inclusions of the effects from the carrier electron temperature variation and the field-dependent electron mobility, we are able to describe the hysteretic I-V characteristics satisfactorily for the case of applying either a longitudinal or a transverse magnetic field simultaneously within a single model. Our numerical results show that when the applied longitudinal magnetic field B increases, the holding voltage of the hysteresis shifts towards a higher value, while the breakdown voltage remains almost fixed and thus the width of the hysteresis decreases. Above a critical magnetic field intensity 86mT , the hysteresis vanishes. Under the transverse magnetic field, the breakdown voltage of the hysteresis shifts significantly towards the higher direction with a stronger magnetic field B , and therefore a considerably wider hysteresis width. The dynamic behavior of our model has displayed the same features of the experimental observations described by Aoki, Kondo, and Watanabe in Solid State Commun. 77, 91 (1991).

  13. On the effects of a weak magnetic field on turbulent transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattaneo, F.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the effects of a weak large-scale magnetic field on turbulent transport. We show by means of a series of two-dimensional numerical experiments that turbulent diffusion can be effectively suppressed by a (large scale) magnetic field whose energy is small compared to equipartition. The suppression mechanism is associated with a subtle modification of the Lagrangian energy spectrum, and it does not require any substantial reduction of the turbulent amplitude. We exploit the relation between diffusion and random walking to emphasize that the effect of a large-scale magnetic field is to induce a long-term memory in the field of turbulence. The implications of the general case of three-dimensional transport are briefly discussed.

  14. Exploiting time-resolved magnetic field effects for determining radical ion reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmertnykh, A. O.; Borovkov, V. I.; Bagryansky, V. A.; Molin, Yu N.

    2016-07-01

    The capabilities of the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in determining the rates of charge transfer reactions between radical ions and molecules on a nanosecond time scale have been investigated. The approach relies on the electron spin coherence in radical pair's partners generated by ionizing radiation. The spin evolution of the pair is sensitive to the reaction since the latter results in changing magnetic interactions of the unpaired electron. This process can be monitored by magnetic-field-sensitive fluorescence from an irradiated sample that is illustrated using reactions involving alkane radical cations. The accuracy and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  15. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  16. The effect of magnetic field on bistability in 1D photonic crystal doped by magnetized plasma and coupled nonlinear defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H.; Mohammadzahery, Z.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we study the defect mode and bistability behavior of 1-D photonic band gap structure with magnetized plasma and coupled nonlinear defects. The transfer matrix method has been employed to investigate the magnetic field effect on defect mode frequency and bistability threshold. The obtained results show that the frequency of defect mode and bistability threshold can be altered, without changing the structure of the photonic multilayer. Therefore, the bistability behavior of the subjected structure in the presence of magnetized plasma can be utilized in manufacturing wide frequency range devices.

  17. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  18. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  19. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emrys W; Kattnig, Daniel R; Henbest, Kevin B; Hore, P J; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R

    2016-08-28

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ∼500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes. PMID:27586950

  20. Effect of PEGylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) under magnetic field on amyloid beta fibrillation process.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-02-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with specific surface coatings have been shown appropriate potential in the diagnosis and treatment of various brain diseases such as Alzheimer's. Comprehensive understanding of SPIONs interactions with amyloid beta (Aβ) and other amyloidogenic proteins is essential for their clinical application. SPIONs could be delivered to the target tissue under the magnetic field, while they might be influenced by the applied field. In this work, we exhibit the effect of different SPIONs (magnetized or non-magnetized with different surface charges) on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillation in aqueous solution by the aid of ThT assay. The results showed that applying of magnetic field to the SPIONs influences on the Aβ fibrillation because of its effect on the size due to surface charge. It was found that under magnetic field and high concentrations of nanoparticles (SPIONs-PEG-NH2), the Aβ fibrillation process accelerates, while at lower concentrations the fibrillation is inhibited. Furthermore, the coating charge has a considerable role in fibrillation process and the positively charged SPIONs/magnetized, at lower particle concentrations, accelerate the fibrillation compared with the negatively charged or uncharged SPIONs. This hints that SPIONs with a positive charge have dual effects on the Aβ fibrillation process. They influence on the concentration of monomeric protein in solution and thereby the nucleation time. Also, SPIONs have an effect on binding during the protein conformation. PMID:26652388

  1. The Effects of Ion heating in Martian Magnetic Crustal Fields: Particle Tracing and Ion Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Ion heating is a process that may allow low energy ions within the Martian ionosphere to be accelerated and escape. Ion heating can be especially efficient if the ions stay in the heating region for long time durations. With this in mind, the magnetic crustal field regions on Mars are particularly interesting. We focus on ions present within these regions, where changes in magnetic field strength and direction can heat these ions. Since crustal magnetic fields can maintain a trapped particle population it is unclear how efficiently plasma can be built up that can later escape to space. We investigate here two drivers: rotation of the planet and the solar wind pressure. As crustal fields rotate from the wake of the planet to the sub solar point and back, they experience compression and expansion over time scales of ~24 hours. The solar wind pressure on the other hand can cause variations over much shorter time scales (minutes). The effect of these two drivers using a particle tracing simulation that solves the Lorentz force is presented. O+ ions are seeded within the simulation box. The magnetic environment is a linear sum of a dipole field and a solar wind magnetic field. The dipole field represents the magnetic crustal field and the dipole strength is chosen to be consistent with MGS magnetometer observations of Martian crustal field regions. By increasing the solar wind strength the magnetic dipole is compressed. Decreasing solar wind strength allows the dipole to expand. Small magnitude, short time scale variations can be imposed over the top of this larger variation to represent short time scale solar wind variations. Since the purpose of this analysis is to understand the changes of the ion distribution inside the crustal field, simplistic assumptions of the field outside the crustal field can be made. Initial results are presented, with the focus on two main questions: (a) can low energy ions be heated and escape the closed dipole field lines as a result of

  2. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterising the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  3. Spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Providencia, C.; Providencia, J. Da

    2009-01-15

    We study the effect of strong magnetic fields, of the order of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} G, on the instability region of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities. Relativistic nuclear models both with constant couplings and with density-dependent parameters are considered. It is shown that a strong magnetic field can have large effects on the instability regions giving rise to bands of instability and wider unstable regions. As a consequence, we predict larger transition densities at the inner edge of the crust of compact stars with strong magnetic fields. The direction of instability gives rise to a very strong distillation effect if the last Landau level is only partially filled. However, for almost completed Landau levels, an antidistillation effect may occur.

  4. Electric Field Effect on the Magnetic Order in Multiferroic LuMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chunruo; Yang, Junjie; Harriger, Leland; Louca, Despina

    LuMnO3 belongs to the family of hexagonal multiferroics in which ferroelectric and magnetic orders coexist and compete. The Mn3+ ions reside on a triangular lattice that is geometrically frustrated but undergoes a Neel transition at TN ~90 K. Neutron experiments under electric field were carried out on a single crystal of LuMnO3 at SPINS to investigate the coupling of the electric field to the magnetic order. The elastic and inelastic scattering around the commensurate (101) magnetic peak and the Mn trimerization induced (100) peak with and without electric field were investigated. When applying an E-field of 13.3 kV/cm along the (001) direction on an unpoled sample, an increase in (101) peak as well as a shift of the inelastic excitation near (100) to higher ΔE have been observed. Once the sample is polarized, these effects exist without the field. On the other hand, an E-field along (110) direction shows almost no effect. The spin arrangement of the magnetic order is within the ab-plane, thus the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction explains why a polarization perpendicular to the magnetic moment gives a larger effect. The implication will be discussed.

  5. Photopyroelectric Calorimetry of Magnetic Nanofluids: Effect of Type of Surfactant and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadarlat, D.; Longuemart, S.; Turcu, R.; Streza, M.; Vekas, L.; Hadj Sahraoui, A.

    2014-11-01

    Five types of magnetic nanofluids, based on nanoparticles with water as the carrier liquid, were investigated by using the two photopyroelectric (PPE) detection configurations (back (BPPE) and front (FPPE)), together with the thermal-wave resonator cavity (TWRC) technique as the scanning procedure. The difference between the nanofluids was the type of surfactant: double layers of lauric (LA-LA), oleic (OA-OA), and miristic (MA-MA) acids and also double layers of lauric-miristic (LA-MA) and palmitic-oleic (PA-OA) fatty acids were used. In both detection configurations, the information was contained in the phase of the PPE signal. The thermal diffusivity of nanofluids was obtained in the BPPE configuration, from the scan of the phase of the signal as a function of the liquid's thickness. Using the same scanning procedure in the FPPE configuration, the thermal effusivity was directly measured. The influence of a 0.12 kG magnetic field on the thermal effusivity and thermal diffusivity was also investigated. Because of different surfactants, the thermal effusivity of the investigated nanofluids ranges from to , and the thermal diffusivity, from to . The magnetic field has practically no influence on the thermal effusivity, and produces a maximum increase of the thermal diffusivity (LA-LA surfactant) of about 4 %.

  6. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  7. Magnetic-field-tunable Kondo effect in alkaline-earth cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, Leonid; Rey, Ana Maria

    We study quantum magnetism and emergent Kondo physics in strongly interacting fermionic alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice with two Bloch bands: one localized and one itinerant. For a fully filled narrow band (two atoms per lattice site) we demonstrate that an applied magnetic field provides an efficient control of the ground state degeneracy due to the field-induced crossing of singlet and triplet state of the localized atomic pairs. We exploit this singlet-triplet resonance, as well as magnetically tunable interactions of atoms in different electronic states via the recently-discovered inter-orbital Feshbach resonance, and demonstrate that the system exhibits a magnetic field-induced Kondo phase characterized by delocalization of local singlets and a large Fermi surface. We also determine the phase diagram of the system within an effective low-energy model that incorporates the above magnetic-field effect as well as atomic interactions in the two optical lattice bands. Our results can be tested with ultracold 173 Yb , and provide a model for the magnetic field-induced heavy-fermion state in filled skutterudites such as PrOs4Sb12 . This work was supported by the NSF (PIF-1211914 and PFC-1125844), AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, NIST and ARO individual investigator awards.

  8. Magneto-optical effects and the determination of vector magnetic fields from Stokes profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolfi, M.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    1982-06-01

    The influence of magnetooptical effects in analytical solutions of the radiative transfer equations for polarized radiation is studied in terms of the single approximations contained in Unno's (1956) solutions. It is shown that the procedures adopted by Auer et al. (1977) for finding the magnetic field vector from Stokes profile data results in large errors in the magnetic field azimuth due to neglect of the magnetooptical effects. The magnetooptical effects are demonstrated to have a larger influence on the linear polarization profiles than other Stokes parameters.

  9. Effect of an alternating nonuniform magnetic field on ferrofluid flow and heat transfer in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharkhah, Mohammad; Ashjaee, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Forced convective heat transfer of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in the presence of an alternating non-uniform magnetic field is investigated numerically. The geometry is a two-dimensional channel which is subjected to a uniform heat flux at the top and bottom surfaces. Nonuniform magnetic field produced by eight line source dipoles is imposed on several parts of the channel. Also, a rectangular wave function is applied to the dipoles in order to turn them on and off alternatingly. The effects of the alternating magnetic field strength and frequency on the convective heat transfer are investigated for four different Reynolds numbers (Re=100, 600, 1200 and 2000) in the laminar flow regime. Comparing the results with zero magnetic field case, show that the heat transfer enhancement increases with the Reynolds number and reaches a maximum of 13.9% at Re=2000 and f=20 Hz. Moreover, at a constant Reynolds number, it increases with the magnetic field intensity while an optimum value exists for the frequency. Also, the optimum frequency increases with the Reynolds number. On the other hand, the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. A maximum pressure drop increase of 6% is observed at Re=2000 and f=5 Hz which shows that the pressure drop increase is not as significant as the heat transfer enhancement.

  10. Magnetic field effects in a polymer/fullerene blend photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyuk-Jae; Basham, James I.; Gundlach, David J.; Richter, Curt A.

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) systems based on blends of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives have shown great promise for low-cost and efficient photovoltaic applications. Recent findings suggest that a weak external magnetic field can disturb the spin configuration of excited states and subsequently change properties of OPV cells such as photocurrent. These changes are referred to as magnetic field effects (MFEs). In order to have a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the MFEs in polymer/fullerene blend photovoltaic systems, we fabricated poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) cells and carried out photovoltaic device performance and impedance spectroscopy measurements with and without an externally applied magnetic field. A significant reduction in short circuit current (JSC) as well as open circuit voltage (VOC) was observed with an applied magnetic field of a 0.1 tesla compared to those measured without a magnetic field under the same intensity of illumination. Impedance spectroscopy data gives insights into the influence of an external magnetic field on charge generation and recombination near normal photovoltaic operating conditions.

  11. Effects of a static magnetic field of either polarity on skin microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Groseclose, Edye E

    2005-01-01

    Our specific aim was to investigate whether a local static magnetic field of a permanent magnet, of either pole, affects resting skin blood perfusion. This was done by measuring skin blood perfusion (SBF) by laser-Doppler in dorsum skin of 2nd and 4th fingers of the nondominant hands of 12 volunteers. Both fingers were first exposed to sham magnets, and then the 2nd finger was exposed alternately to north and south poles of a neodymium magnet that produced a field of 4024 G at the palmar part of the finger and a field of 879 +/- 52 G at the site of finger dorsum SBF measurement. Each of the three exposure intervals was 15 min. SBF values were analyzed by first computing the average SBF during the last 5 min of each of the three 15-min exposure intervals. These SBF averages were initially tested for magnet or magnet-pole effects by analysis of variance for repeated measures with finger as a factor, using SBF values for each finger as the test variable. Results of this analysis revealed a large variability in finger SBF among subjects and no significant difference in SBF between exposure conditions (P = 0.705) or any significant interaction between SBF and finger (P = 0.396). However, when intersubject variability was reduced by using the flow difference between treated and nontreated fingers in each exposure interval as the test variable, a statistically significant effect (P = 0.016) attributable to magnet exposure was uncovered. This effect was a reduction in resting SBF in the magnet-exposed fingers that was similar for north and south pole magnet exposure. The present findings are the first to demonstrate a direct effect of locally applied magnets on human skin blood perfusion. PMID:15797257

  12. Effects of weak environmental magnetic fields on the spontaneous bioelectrical activity of snail neurons.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Mehri Kaviani; Firoozabadi, Mohammad; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2011-03-01

    We examined the effects of 50-Hz magnetic fields in the range of flux densities relevant to our current environmental exposures on action potential (AP), after-hyperpolarization potential (AHP) and neuronal excitability in neurons of land snails, Helix aspersa. It was shown that when the neurons were exposed to magnetic field at the various flux densities, marked changes in neuronal excitability, AP firing frequency and AHP amplitude were seen. These effects seemed to be related to the intensity, type (single and continuous or repeated and cumulative) and length of exposure (18 or 20 min). The extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposures affect the excitability of F1 neuronal cells in a nonmonotonic manner, disrupting their normal characteristic and synchronized firing patterns by interfering with the cell membrane electrophysiological properties. Our results could explain one of the mechanisms and sites of action of ELF magnetic fields. A possible explanation of the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields could be a decrease in Ca(2+) influx through inhibition of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. The detailed mechanism of effect, however, needs to be further studied under voltage-clamp conditions. PMID:21249346

  13. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  14. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  15. Effects of interplanetary magnetic field azimuth on auroral zone and polar cap magnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    During relatively quiet times in the period 1964-1968, AE is found to be greater when the interplanetary magnetic field (b sub IMF) is directed toward the sun in Jan., Feb., and Apr., and when B sub IMF is directed away from the sun in Oct. to Dec. Using Murmansk hourly H values and the AE components, AU and AL, it is shown that this sector dependence is present only in the negative H deviations. This observation supports the idea that negative bay magnitudes are determined chiefly by particle-produced ionization, while positive bay magnitudes are rather insensitive to increases in particle precipitation. The ratio of DP2-type magnetic activity in the southern polar cap to that in the northern polar cap is found to be greater by a factor of about 1.75 for B sub IMF toward the sun.

  16. Effect of applied magnetic fields during directional solidification of eutectic Bi-Mn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. L.; Pirich, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of rod eutectics Bi/MnBi were directionally solidified in a growth-up Bridgman-Stockbarger configuration in the presence of a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kg to determine whether gravity-driven convective effects could be reduced or eliminated. The experiments were carried out over a range of furnace velocities, V, of 0.2 to 50 cm per hour with a thermal gradient at the liquid-solid interface of 100 C/cm and 150 C/cm. Morphological, thermal and magnetic analyses were carried out on samples grown with and without an applied magnetic field. For samples grown at V greater than 3 cm per hour in a transverse magnetic field, reduced mean rod diameter and interrod spacing occurred as well as undercooling and increased coercive strength. The data agreed with that obtained for low-g growth at 50 cm per hour and 30 cm per hour.

  17. Effect of magnetic fields on cryptochrome-dependent responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sue-Re; Henbest, Kevin B.; Maeda, Kiminori; Pannell, John R.; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P.J.; Okamoto, Haruko

    2009-01-01

    The scientific literature describing the effects of weak magnetic fields on living systems contains a plethora of contradictory reports, few successful independent replication studies and a dearth of plausible biophysical interaction mechanisms. Most such investigations have been unsystematic, devoid of testable theoretical predictions and, ultimately, unconvincing. A recent study, of magnetic responses in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, however, stands out; it has a clear hypothesis—that seedling growth is magnetically sensitive as a result of photoinduced radical-pair reactions in cryptochrome photoreceptors—tested by measuring several cryptochrome-dependent responses, all of which proved to be enhanced in a magnetic field of intensity 500 μT. The potential importance of this study in the debate on putative effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on human health prompted us to subject it to the ‘gold standard’ of independent replication. With experimental conditions chosen to match those of the original study, we have measured hypocotyl lengths and anthocyanin accumulation for Arabidopsis seedlings grown in a 500 μT magnetic field, with simultaneous control experiments at 50 μT. Additionally, we have determined hypocotyl lengths of plants grown in 50 μT, 1 mT and approximately 100 mT magnetic fields (with zero-field controls), measured gene (CHS, HY5 and GST) expression levels, investigated blue-light intensity effects and explored the influence of sucrose in the growth medium. In no case were consistent, statistically significant magnetic field responses detected. PMID:19324677

  18. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25438567

  19. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25508098

  20. No effect of exposure to static and sinusoidal magnetic fields on nitric oxide production by macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mnaimneh, S.; Bizri, M.; Veyret, B.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of exposure to static (1--100 mT) or sinusoidal (1 Hz, 1.6 mT) magnetic fields on the production of nitric oxide (NO) by murine BCG-activated macrophages were investigated. In these cells, the inducible isoform of NO synthase is present. No significant differences were observed in nitrite levels among exposed, sham-exposed, or control macrophages after exposure for 14 h to static fields of 1, 10, 50, and 100 mT and to sinusoidal 1.6 mT, 1 Hz magnetic fields.

  1. Effect of magnetic field on dynamic response function in Ising systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, A.; Erdem, R.

    2013-11-01

    As a continuation of our previously published work, we use the Nelson's method to study the effect of the magnetic field on the temperature-, frequency-, and momentum-dependent response function and dynamic correlation function in the Ising-type systems with relaxational dynamics. The scaling function is given within the renormalization group formalism at one-loop order for nonzero field. We show how the typical two-peak structure of the real part of response function changes with magnetic field. We discuss the deviations of the correlation function from the Gaussian expression. The Fisher-Langer maximum is also considered.

  2. Motional Stark Effect measurements of the local magnetic field in high temperature fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R. C.; Bock, A.; Ford, O. P.; Reimer, R.; Burckhart, A.; Dinklage, A.; Hobirk, J.; Howard, J.; Reich, M.; Stober, J.

    2015-10-01

    The utilization of the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) experienced by the neutral hydrogen or deuterium injected into magnetically confined high temperature plasmas is a well established technique to infer the internal magnetic field distribution of fusion experiments. In their rest frame, the neutral atoms experience a Lorentz electric field, EL = v × B, which results in a characteristic line splitting and polarized line emission. The different properties of the Stark multiplet allow inferring, both the magnetic field strength and the orientation of the magnetic field vector. Besides recording the full MSE spectrum, several types of polarimeters have been developed to measure the polarization direction of the Stark line emission. To test physics models of the magnetic field distribution and dynamics, the accuracy requirements are quite demanding. In view of these requirements, the capabilities and issues of the different techniques are discussed, including the influence of the Zeeman Effect and the sensitivity to radial electric fields. A newly developed Imaging MSE system, which has been tested on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, is presented. The sensitivity allows to resolve sawtooth oscillations. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  3. Effects of high magnetic fields on the microstructure and toughness of cryogenic /sup 9/Ni steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fior, G.O.; Fultz, B.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    Commercial 9Ni cryogenic steel was heat-treated to develop thermally unstable retained austenite. Some of this austenite was transformed to martensite by exposing the material to: (1) cryogenic temperatures, and (2) cryogenic temperatures plus 17 T magnetic fields. Those specimens exposed to the high magnetic fields consistently had the lower Charpy toughness. X-ray crystallography showed that the magnetic exposure caused additional ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' transformation. Scanning electron fractography indicated that this additional ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' transformation resulted in additional quasi-cleavage fracture, and therefore a lower toughness. It is shown that the equilibrium thermodynamics of the coexistence of magnetic phases in magnetic fields cannot account for the large increases in the amount of ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' transformation caused by the magnetic field. We therefore propose that our ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' transformation is a process with an activation barrier that may be overcome by magnetic exposure. The effect of the ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' transformation on the Charpy energy was mostly temperature-independent, however. This suggests that the mechanism of fracture associated with the ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' transformation is not thermally activated.

  4. Effect of steady and time-harmonic magnetic fields on macrosegragation in alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Incropera, F.P.; Prescott, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Buoyancy-induced convection during the solidification of alloys can contribute significantly to the redistribution of alloy constituents, thereby creating large composition gradients in the final ingot. Termed macrosegregation, the condition diminishes the quality of the casting and, in the extreme, may require that the casting be remelted. The deleterious effects of buoyancy-driven flows may be suppressed through application of an external magnetic field, and in this study the effects of both steady and time-harmonic fields have been considered. For a steady magnetic field, extremely large field strengths would be required to effectively dampen convection patterns that contribute to macrosegregation. However, by reducing spatial variations in temperature and composition, turbulent mixing induced by a time-harmonic field reduces the number and severity of segregates in the final casting.

  5. Effect of electric field and strain on the magnetic properties of phase separated manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Daniel M.

    Perovskite manganese oxide (manganites) have attracted research attention due to a wide variety of complex behaviors observed, including colossal responses to external perturbations. More recent work has focused on the competing ground states and the coexistence of magnetic and non-magnetic phases in manganites. Anisotropic resistance changes have been observed in high quality thin film manganites, possibly due to dielectrophoresis, upon application of an electric field. Dielectrophoresis is usually observed in fluid-like systems in an electric field but is surprisingly useful in explaining the transport properties of manganites due to the fluid-like behavior of competing phases. A main goal of this dissertation is to explore the role of magnetic interactions on the dielectrophoresis effects on ferromagnetic metallic regions in phase separated manganite thin films. The combined effect of electric and magnetic fields in these manganites could reveal a novel form of magnetoelectric effect. In one set of experiments, a magnetic field decreased the amount of time needed for the dielectrophoresis to lead to a large drop in the resistance along one direction, showing the importance of magnetic interactions in dielectrophoresis. In another set of experiments, breaking down the large resistance of a manganite sample produced a small change in coercive field, further confirming the relationship between electric and magnetic effects in manganites. However, the largest effect on the magnetic properties of the thin films was from confinement of the competing phases in micrometer scale structures fabricated on the thin films. Coercive field increases of about 100- 400% were observed in a certain range of film thicknesses. To analyze such behavior in manganites, high quality thin films of the phase-separated manganite (La1-xPrx)1-yCa yMnO3 (LPCMO) were grown on NdGaO3 (NGO) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Mangetotransport, magnetization, and scanning probe microscopy

  6. Experimental concept for examination of biological effects of magnetic field concealed by gravity.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Tomita-Yokotani, K; Hashimoto, H; Takai, M; Tsushima, M; Nakamura, T

    2004-01-01

    Space is not only a place to study biological effects of gravity, but also provides unique opportunities to examine other environmental factors, where the biological actions are masked by gravity on the ground. Even the earth's magnetic field is steadily acting on living systems, and is known to influence many biological processes. A systematic survey and assessment of its action are difficult to conduct in the presence of dominant factors, such as gravity. Investigation of responses of biological systems against the combined environment of zero-gravity and zero-magnetic field might establish the baseline for the analysis of biological effects of magnetic factors. We propose, in this paper, an experimental concept in this context, together with a practical approach of the experiments, both in orbit and on the ground, with a thin magnetic shielding film. Plant epicotyl growth was taken as an exemplar index to evaluate technical and scientific feasibility of the proposed system concept. PMID:15880894

  7. Biological effects of strong static magnetic fields on insulin-secreting cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, T.; Miyakoshi, J.

    2009-03-01

    The magnetic flux density of MRI for clinical diagnosis has been increasing. However, there remains very little biological data regarding the effect of strong static magnetic fields (SMFs) on human health. To evaluate the biological effects of strong SMFs, we cultured INS-1 cells under exposure to sham and SMF conditions for 1 or 2 h, and analyzed insulin secretion, mRNA expression, cell proliferation and cell number. Exposure to SMF with a high magnetic field gradient for 1 h significantly increased insulin secretion and insulin 1 mRNA expression. Exposure to SMF did not affect cell proliferation and cell number. Our results suggested that MRI systems with a higher magnetic flux density might not cause cell proliferative or functional damages on insulin-secreting cells.

  8. The effect of supernova rate on the magnetic field evolution in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa-Dybeł, K.; Nowak, N.; Otmianowska-Mazur, K.; Hanasz, M.; Siejkowski, H.; Kulesza-Żydzik, B.

    2015-03-01

    Context. For the first time, our magnetohydrodynamical numerical calculations provide results for a three-dimensional model of barred galaxies involving a cosmic-ray driven dynamo process that depends on star formation rates. Furthermore, we argue that the cosmic-ray driven dynamo can account for a number of magnetic features in barred galaxies, such as magnetic arms observed along the gaseous arms, magnetic arms in the inter-arm regions, polarized emission that is at the strongest in the central part of the galaxy, where the bar is situated, polarized emission that forms ridges coinciding with the dust lanes along the leading edges of the bar, as well as their very strong total radio intensity. Aims: Our numerical model probes what kind of physical processes could be responsible for the magnetic field topology observed in barred galaxies (modes, etc.). We compare our modelled results directly with observations, constructing models of high-frequency (Faraday rotation-free) polarized radio emission maps out of the simulated magnetic field and cosmic ray pattern in our modeled galaxy. We also take the effects of projection into account as well as the limited resolution. Methods: We applied global 3D numerical calculations of a cosmic-ray driven dynamo in barred galaxies with different physical input parameters such as the supernova (SN) rate. Results: Our simulation results lead to the modelled magnetic field structure similar to the one observed on the radio maps of barred galaxies. Moreover, they cast new light on a number of properties in barred and spiral galaxies, such as fast exponential growth of the total magnetic energy to the present values. The quadrupole modes of magnetic field are often identified in barred galaxies, but the dipole modes (e.g., in NGC 4631) are found very seldom. In our simulations the quadrupole configuration dominates and the dipole configuration only appears once in the case of model S100, apparently as a consequence of the choice of

  9. The Effect of an Electrically Conducting Lower Mantle on Dynamo Generated Planetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilim, R.; Stanley, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the lower mantles of Earth[1], Mercury[2], and large terrestrial exoplanets[3, 4] may be good conductors of electricity. This raises questions about the effect of an electrically conducting lower mantle on magnetic field generation in these planets. A core dynamo generated magnetic field can interact with an electrically conducting mantle in two ways. First, magnetic fields lines can be be frozen into the solid mantle. The flows in the core can then stretch the magnetic field lines at the core mantle boundary increasing their strength. Second, any field observed at the surface will be attenuated due to the screening effect, which preferentially attenuates the components of the magnetic field that vary quickest in time. We use a numerical dynamo model to investigate the effect of a conducting mantle on dynamo generated planetary magnetic fields. [1] Ohta, K., Cohen, R. E., Hirose, K., Haule, K., Shimizu, K., and Ohishi, Y. (2012). Experimental and Theoretical Evidence for Pressure-Induced Metallization in FeO with Rocksalt-Type Structure. PRL, 108, 026403 [2] Smith, D. E., Zuber, M. T., Phillips, R. J., Solomon, S. C., Hauck, S. A. II, Lemoine, F. G., Mazarico, E., Neumann, G.A., Peale, S.J., Margot, J.L., Johnson C.L., Torrence, M.H., Perry, M.E., Rowlands D.D., Goossens, S., Head, J.W., Taylor, A.H. (2012). Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER. Science [3] Nellis, W. J. (2011). Metallic liquid hydrogen and likely Al2O3 metallic glass. The European Physical Journal Special Topics, 196, 121-130 [4] Tsuchiya, T. (2011). Prediction of a hexagonal SiO2 phase affecting stabilities of MgSiO3 and CaSiO3 at multimegabar pressures. PNAS, 108, 1252-1255

  10. Study of magnetic field effects for accretions with highly magnetized neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Makoto; Enoto, Teruaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakurai, Soki

    Neutron stars (NSs) in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), namely those with massive privary stars, generally have strong magnetic fields (˜10 (12) G). In contrast, those in typical low mass binary systems (LMXBs) are weakly magnetized (˜10 (9-10) G). This clear difference in the magnetic field strength is considered to be primarily responsible for the systematic differences in X-ray properties between NSs in HMXBs and those in LMXBs. However, these can also be possible contributions from their accretion-scheme differences, i.e., wind capture in HMXBs and disk accretion in LMXBs. To separate these two effects, we may utilize a few highly-magnetized NSs in LMXBs, including Her X-1, GX 1+4, 4U 1626-67, and a recently recognized object 4U 1822-37 (Sasano et al. PASJ in press, arXiv:1311.4618). In this study, we compare spectral and timing properties of these exceptional strong-field NSs, with those of more typical objects in LMXBs an HMXBs. Their properties that are common with typical HMXBs can be regarded as a signature of strong magnetic fields while those shared by typical LMXBs can be attributed to the disk-fed accretion geometry.

  11. Direct numerical simulations of magnetic field effects on turbulent flow in a square duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, R.; Vanka, S. P.; Thomas, B. G.

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic fields are crucial in controlling flows in various physical processes of industrial significance. One such process is the continuous casting of steel, where different magnetic field configurations are used to control the turbulent flow of steel in the mold in order to minimize defects in the cast steel. The present study has been undertaken to understand the effects of a magnetic field on mean velocities and turbulence parameters in turbulent molten metal flow through a square duct. The coupled Navier-Stokes magnetohydrodynamic equations have been solved using a three-dimensional fractional-step numerical procedure. The Reynolds number was kept low in order to resolve all the scales in the flow without using a subgrid scale turbulence model. Computations were performed with three different grid resolutions, the finest grid having 8.4×106 cells. Because liquid metals have low magnetic Reynolds number, the induced magnetic field has been considered negligible and the electric potential method for magnetic field-flow coupling has been implemented. After validation of the computer code, computations of turbulent flow in a square duct with different Hartmann numbers were performed until complete laminarization of the flow. The time-dependent and time-averaged nature of the flow has been examined through distribution of mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations, vorticity, and turbulent kinetic energy budgets.

  12. Model for magnetic field effects on radical pair recombination in enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Eichwald, C; Walleczek, J

    1996-01-01

    A prototypical model for describing magnetic field effects on the reaction kinetics of enzymes that exhibit radical pair recombination steps in their reaction cycle is presented. The model is an extended Michaelis-Menten reaction scheme including an intermediate enzyme-substrate complex where a spin-correlated radical pair state exists. The simple structure of the scheme makes it possible to calculate the enzyme reaction rate explicitly by combining chemical kinetics with magnetic field-dependent spin kinetics (radical pair mechanism). Recombination probability is determined by using the exponential model. Simulations show that the size of the magnetic field effect depends on relations between different rate constants, such as 1) the ratio between radical pair-lifetime and the magnetic field-sensitive intersystem crossing induced by the hyperfine interaction and the delta g mechanisms and 2) the chemical rate constants of the enzyme reaction cycle. An amplification factor that is derived from the specific relations between the rate constants is defined. It accounts for the fact that although the magnetic field-induced change in radical pair recombination probability is very small, the effect on the enzyme reaction rate is considerably larger, for example, by a factor of 1 to 100. Model simulations enable a qualitative comparison with recent experimental studies reporting magnetic field effects on coenzyme B12-dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase in vitro activity that revealed a reduction in Vmax/KM at low flux densities and a return to the zero-field rate or an increase at high flux densities. PMID:8842202

  13. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  14. Effects of a conducting sphere moving through a gradient magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Richard B.; Kalra, Chiranjeev S.; Shneider, Mikhail; Giffin, Adom; Ames, Thomas L.

    2010-04-01

    We examine several conducting spheres moving through a magnetic field gradient. An analytical approximation is derived and an experiment is conducted to verify the analytical solution. The experiment is simulated as well to produce a numerical result. Both the low and high magnetic Reynolds number regimes are studied. Deformation of the sphere is noted in the high Reynolds number case. It is suggested that this deformation effect could be useful for designing or enhancing present protection systems against space debris.

  15. Competition between Abelian and Zeeman magnetic field effects in a two dimensional ultracold gas of fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Cichy, Agnieszka; Polak, Tomasz P.

    2015-03-15

    The ground state of ultracold fermions in the presence of effects of orbital and Zeeman magnetic fields is analyzed. Five different states are found: unpolarized superconducting state, partially and fully polarized normal states and phase separated regions, partially or fully polarized. The system, in the presence of orbital synthetic magnetic field effects, shows non-monotonous changes of the phase boundaries when electron concentration is varied. We observe not only reentrant phenomena, but also density dependent oscillations of different areas of the phase diagram. Moreover the chemical potential shows oscillatory behavior and discontinuities with respect to changes in the number of fermions.

  16. Hall current effect on tearing mode instability. [possible cause of magnetic field reconnection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terasawa, T.

    1983-01-01

    From a linear 2-D eigenmode analysis, it is found that the Hall current effect on collisional tearing mode instability becomes important for the thin magnetic reversal layer whose width is comparable to the ion inertia length; Hall currents produce a three-dimensional field structure and increase the reconnection (growth) rate. Since the magnetaic reversal layer widths both in the magnetopause and in the magnetotail are reported to become as thin as the ion inertial length (several hundred km) when the reconnection process is supposed to occur, the Hall current effect may explain the appearance of the dawn-dusk component of the magnetic field in the magnetotail reconnection region.

  17. The Effect of Extremely Low Frequency Alternating Magnetic Field on the Behavior of Animals in the Presence of the Geomagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Belova, Natalia A; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the geomagnetic field can influence animal migration and homing. The magnetic field detection by animals is known as magnetoreception and it is possible due to two different transduction mechanisms: the first one through magnetic nanoparticles able to respond to the geomagnetic field and the second one through chemical reactions influenced by magnetic fields. Another behavior is the magnetic alignment where animals align their bodies to the geomagnetic field. It has been observed that magnetic alignment of cattle can be disrupted near electric power lines around the world. Experimentally, it is known that alternating magnetic fields can influence living beings, but the exact mechanism is unknown. The parametric resonance model proposes a mechanism to explain that effect on living beings and establishes that, in the presence of a constant magnetic field, molecules associated with biochemical reactions inside cells can absorb resonantly alternating magnetic fields with specific frequencies. In the present paper, a review is made about animal magnetoreception and the effects of alternating magnetic fields in living beings. It is suggested how alternating magnetic fields can interfere in the magnetic alignment of animals and a general conclusion is obtained: alternating magnetic field pollution can affect the magnetic sensibility of animals. PMID:26823664

  18. The Effect of Extremely Low Frequency Alternating Magnetic Field on the Behavior of Animals in the Presence of the Geomagnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Belova, Natalia A.; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the geomagnetic field can influence animal migration and homing. The magnetic field detection by animals is known as magnetoreception and it is possible due to two different transduction mechanisms: the first one through magnetic nanoparticles able to respond to the geomagnetic field and the second one through chemical reactions influenced by magnetic fields. Another behavior is the magnetic alignment where animals align their bodies to the geomagnetic field. It has been observed that magnetic alignment of cattle can be disrupted near electric power lines around the world. Experimentally, it is known that alternating magnetic fields can influence living beings, but the exact mechanism is unknown. The parametric resonance model proposes a mechanism to explain that effect on living beings and establishes that, in the presence of a constant magnetic field, molecules associated with biochemical reactions inside cells can absorb resonantly alternating magnetic fields with specific frequencies. In the present paper, a review is made about animal magnetoreception and the effects of alternating magnetic fields in living beings. It is suggested how alternating magnetic fields can interfere in the magnetic alignment of animals and a general conclusion is obtained: alternating magnetic field pollution can affect the magnetic sensibility of animals. PMID:26823664

  19. Effect of axial magnetic field on axicon laser-induced electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Niti; Rajput, Jyoti; Giri, Pankaj; Singh, Arvinder

    2016-03-01

    Radially polarized axicon Gaussian laser-induced electron acceleration has been studied under the influence of axial magnetic field. Employing an axicon is a significant method to generate a focused and diffraction free radially polarized laser beam. We have investigated direct electron acceleration in vacuum by employing a relativistic single particle simulation. It is observed that the net electron energy gain from the axicon Gaussian radially polarized laser beam can be enhanced under the influence of time varying axial magnetic field. This additional effect of the magnetic field reveals the fact that multi GeV energy gain can be achieved without the use of petawatt power lasers. Effect of laser initial intensity, initial spot size, initial phase, pulse duration and initial energy are taken into consideration for efficient electron acceleration up to GeV energies.

  20. Findings point to complexity of health effects of electric, magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1994-07-18

    Significant findings on the physiological consequences of exposure to electric and magnetic fields (EMF) have been coming from current research in various areas: cell function, epidemiology, bone healing, health effects of video display terminals, and whole-animal studies. But as results presented to more than 500 attendees at the 16th annual meeting of the Bioelectromagnetics Society in Copenhagen in mid-June clearly showed, research on EMF is complicated. The most comprehensive results presented at the meeting were in the area of breast cancer. Taken together, data from epidemiological, cellular, hormonal, and animal studies give a multifaceted picture of how EMF might promote the disease. One theory linking EMF and breast cancer is that magnetic fields lower the amount of the hormone melatonin produced in humans. As a consequence, the natural suppressive effect of melatonin on breast cancer cell growth is reduced. Another theory is that magnetic fields may directly interfere with melatonin's suppressive action on breast cancer cell proliferation.

  1. A Model of Charge-Transfer Excitons: Diffusion, Spin Dynamics, and Magnetic Field Effects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chee Kong; Shi, Liang; Willard, Adam P

    2016-06-16

    In this Letter, we explore how the microscopic dynamics of charge-transfer (CT) excitons are influenced by the presence of an external magnetic field in disordered molecular semiconductors. This influence is driven by the dynamic interplay between the spin and spatial degrees of freedom of the electron-hole pair. To account for this interplay, we have developed a numerical framework that combines a traditional model of quantum spin dynamics with a stochastic coarse-grained model of charge transport. This combination provides a general and efficient methodology for simulating the effects of magnetic field on CT state dynamics, therefore providing a basis for revealing the microscopic origin of experimentally observed magnetic field effects. We demonstrate that simulations carried out on our model are capable of reproducing experimental results as well as generating theoretical predictions related to the efficiency of organic electronic materials. PMID:27237448

  2. The heating effect of iron-cobalt magnetic nanofluids in an alternating magnetic field: application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this research, FeCo alloy magnetic nanofluids were prepared by reducing iron(III) chloride hexahydrate and cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate with sodium borohydride in a water/CTAB/hexanol reverse micelle system for application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive analysis indicate the formation of bcc-structured iron-cobalt alloy. Magnetic property assessment of nanoparticles reveals that some samples are single-domain superparamagnetic, while others are single- or multi-domain ferromagnetic. The stability of the magnetic fluids was achieved by using a CTAB/1-butanol surfactant bilayer. Results of Gouy magnetic susceptibility balance experiments indicate good stability of FeCo nanoparticles even after dilution. The inductive properties of corresponding magnetic fluids including temperature rise and specific absorption rate were determined. Results show that with increasing of the nanoparticle size in the single-domain size regime, the generated heat increases, indicating the significant effect of the hysteresis loss. Finally, the central parameter controlling the specific absorption rate of nanoparticles was introduced, the experimental results were compared with those of the Stoner-Wohlfarth model and linear response theory, and the best sample for magnetic hyperthermia treatment was specified. PMID:24359163

  3. Effect of static magnetic fields and phloretin on antioxidant defense system of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Orchel, Joanna; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław

    2016-08-01

    The available evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies is deemed not sufficient to draw conclusions about the potential health effects of static magnetic field (SMF) exposure. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the influence of static magnetic fields and phloretin on the redox homeostasis of human dermal fibroblasts. Control fibroblasts and fibroblasts treated with phloretin were subjected to the influence of static magnetic fields. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.55, and 0.7 T) were used in the study. Quantification of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1), glutathione reductase (GSR), and catalase (CAT) messenger RNAs (mRNAs) was performed by means of real-time reverse transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) technique. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured using a commercially available kit. No significant differences were found in SOD1, SOD2, GPX1, MGST1, GSR, and CAT mRNA levels among the studied groups in comparison to the control culture without phloretin and without the magnet. There were also no changes in SOD, GPx, and CAT activities. In conclusion, our study indicated that static magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets do not exert a negative influence on the oxidative status of human dermal fibroblasts. Based on these studies, it may also be concluded that phloretin does not increase its antioxidant properties under the influence of static magnetic fields. However, SMF-induced modifications at the cellular and molecular level require further clarification. PMID:27080405

  4. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 ± 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  5. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields of transformers and possible biological and health effects.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Sezgin, Gaye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2014-12-01

    Physiological processes in organisms can be influenced by extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic energy. Biological effect studies have great importance; as well as measurement studies since they provide information on the real exposure situations. In this study, the leakage magnetic fields around a transformer were measured in an apartment building in Küçükçekmece, Istanbul, and the measurement results were evaluated with respect to the international exposure standards. The transformer station was on the bottom floor of a three-floor building. It was found that people living and working in the building were exposed to ELF magnetic fields higher than the threshold magnetic field value of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Many people living in this building reported health complaints such as immunological problems of their children. There were child-workers working in the textile factories located in the building. Safe distances or areas for these people should be recommended. Protective measures could be implemented to minimize these exposures. Further residential exposure studies are needed to demonstrate the exposure levels of ELF magnetic fields. Precautions should, therefore, be taken either to reduce leakage or minimize the exposed fields. Shielding techniques should be used to minimize the leakage magnetic fields in such cases. PMID:24131394

  6. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-08-21

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 +/- 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically. PMID:20679699

  7. Effects of the fractional order and magnetic field on the blood flow in cylindrical domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shah, Nehad; Vieru, Dumitru; Fetecau, Constantin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, based on the magnetohydrodynamics approach, the blood flow along with magnetic particles through a circular cylinder is studied. The fluid is acted by an oscillating pressure gradient and an external magnetic field. The study is based on a mathematical model with Caputo fractional derivatives. The model of ordinary fluid, corresponding to time-derivatives of integer order, is obtained as a particular case. Closed forms of the fluid velocity and magnetic particles velocity are obtained by means of the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. Effects of the order of Caputo's time-fractional derivatives and of the external magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles are studied. Numerical simulations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the influence of the fractional parameter α, Reynolds number and Hartmann number on the fluid and particles velocity. The results highlights that, models with fractional derivatives bring significant differences compared to the ordinary model. This fact can be an important advantage for some practical problems. It also results that the blood velocity, as well as that of magnetic particles, is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field.

  8. [Effects and molecular mechanisms of the biological action of weak and extremely weak magnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Ponomarev, V O; Novikov, G V; Kuvichkin, V V; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2010-01-01

    A number of effects of weak combined (static and alternating) magnetic fields with an alternating component of tens and hundreds nT at a collinear static field of 42 microT, which is equivalent to the geomagnetic field, have been found: the activation of fission and regeneration of planarians Dugesia tigrina, the inhibition of the growth of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mice, the stimulation of the production of the tumor necrosis factor by macrophages, a decrease in the protection of chromatin against the action of DNase 1, and the enhancement of protein hydrolysis in systems in vivo and in vitro. The frequency and amplitude ranges for the alternating component of weak combined magnetic fields have been determined at which it affects various biological systems. Thus, the optimal amplitude at a frequency of 4.4 Hz is 100 nT (effective value); at a frequency of 16.5 Hz, the range of effective amplitudes is broader, 150-300 nT; and at a frequency of 1 (0.5) Hz, it is 300 nT. The sum of close frequencies (e.g., 16 and 17 Hz) produces a similar biological effect as the product of the modulating (0.5 Hz) and carrying frequencies (16.5 Hz), which is explained by the ratio A = A0sin omega1t + A0sin omega2t = A0sin(omega1 + omega2)t/2cos(omega1 - omega2)t/2. The efficiency of magnetic signals with pulsations (the sum of close frequencies) is more pronounced than that of sinusoidal frequencies. These data may indicate the presence of several receptors of weak magnetic fields in biological systems and, as a consequence, a higher efficiency of the effect at the simultaneous adjustment to these frequencies by the field. Even with consideration of these facts, the mechanism of the biological action of weak combined magnetic fields remains still poorly understood. PMID:20968074

  9. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  10. Protective Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Molecular Behavior Changes of Hemoglobin Induced by Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Nahed S.; Abou Aiad, T. H. M.

    With the use of electricity and industrialization of societies, humans are commonly exposed to static magnetic field induced by electric currents. The putative mechanisms by which Static Magnetic Field (SMF) may affect biological systems is that of increasing free radical life span in organisms. To test this hypothesis, we investigate the effect of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) treatment on the changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin as a result of exposure of the animals to magnetic field in the occupation levels. By measuring the relative permittivity, dielectric loss, relaxation time, conductivity, radius and diffusion coefficient of aqueous solutions of hemoglobin. These measurements were calculated in the frequency range of (100 Hz-100 kHz) to give more information about molecular behavior. Twenty four male albino rats were equally divided into four groups 1, 2, 3 and 4. Animals of group 1, were used as control, animals of group 2, were exposed to (0.2T) magnetic field and that of group 3, 4, were treated with Ascorbic Acid by two doses group 3 (20 mg kg-1 body weight), group 4 (50 mg kg-1 body weight) orally half hour before exposure to magnetic field. The sub chronic exposure expanded (1 h day-1) for 30 consecutive days. The results indicated that exposure of animals to magnetic field resulted in changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin molecule while treatment with ascorbic acid afforded comparatively more significant amelioration in these molecular changes, via decreasing the radical pair interaction of magnetic field with biological molecules.

  11. The effects of magnetic field in plume region on the performance of multi-cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Peng Liu, Hui Yu, Daren; Gao, Yuanyuan; Mao, Wei

    2015-10-15

    The performance characteristics of a Multi-cusped Field Thruster depending on the magnetic field in the plume region were investigated. Five magnetic field shielding rings were separately mounted near the exit of discharge channel to decrease the strength of magnetic field in the plume region in different levels, while the magnetic field in the upstream was well maintained. The test results show that the electron current increases with the decrease of magnetic field strength in the plume region, which gives rise to higher propellant utilization and lower current utilization. On the other hand, the stronger magnetic field in the plume region improves the performance at low voltages (high current mode) while lower magnetic field improves the performance at high voltages (low current mode). This work can provide some optimal design ideas of the magnetic strength in the plume region to improve the performance of thruster.

  12. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brink, A.; Vermijs, G.; Solignac, A.; Koo, J.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-03-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  13. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, A; Vermijs, G; Solignac, A; Koo, J; Kohlhepp, J T; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-01-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface. PMID:26940861

  14. Electron Inertia Effects in Hall-Driven Magnetic Field Penetration in Electron-Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Angus, Justin; Swanekamp, Stephen; Schumer, Joseph; Ottinger, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic field penetration in electron-magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) can be driven by density gradients through the Hall term. Here we describe the effect of electron inertia on simplified one- and two- dimensional models of a magnetic front. Nonlinear effects due to inertia cause the 1D model to develop peaked solitary waves, while in 2D a shear-driven Kelvin-Helholtz like instability causes the front to break into a series of vortices which propagate into the plasma. The combination of these two effects means that in 2D, Hall driven magnetic field penetration will typically happen in the form of complex vortex-dominated penetration, rather than as a transversely-smooth shock front. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  15. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  16. THE EFFECT OF LOWER MANTLE METALLIZATION ON MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATION IN ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R.; Stanley, S.; Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2013-05-10

    Recent theoretical and experimental evidence indicates that many of the materials that are thought to exist in the mantles of terrestrial exoplanets will metallize and become good conductors of electricity at mantle pressures. This allows for strong electromagnetic coupling of the core and the mantle in these planets. We use a numerical dynamo model to study the effect of a metallized lower mantle on the dynamos of terrestrial exoplanets using several inner core sizes and mantle conductivities. We find that the addition of an electrically conducting mantle results in stronger core-mantle boundary fields because of the increase in magnetic field stretching. We also find that a metallized mantle destabilizes the dynamo resulting in less dipolar, less axisymmetric poloidal magnetic fields at the core-mantle boundary. The conducting mantle efficiently screens these fields to produce weaker surface fields. We conclude that a conducting mantle will make the detection of extrasolar terrestrial magnetic fields more difficult while making the magnetic fields in the dynamo region stronger.

  17. Geomagnetic and strong static magnetic field effects on growth and chlorophyll a fluorescence in Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Jan, Luka; Fefer, Dušan; Košmelj, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka; Jerman, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) varies over Earth's surface and changes over time, but it is generally not considered as a factor that could influence plant growth. The effects of reduced and enhanced GMFs and a strong static magnetic field on growth and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence of Lemna minor plants were investigated under controlled conditions. A standard 7 day test was conducted in extreme geomagnetic environments of 4 µT and 100 µT as well as in a strong static magnetic field environment of 150 mT. Specific growth rates as well as slow and fast Chl a fluorescence kinetics were measured after 7 days incubation. The results, compared to those of controls, showed that the reduced GMF significantly stimulated growth rate of the total frond area in the magnetically treated plants. However, the enhanced GMF pointed towards inhibition of growth rate in exposed plants in comparison to control, but the difference was not statistically significant. This trend was not observed in the case of treatments with strong static magnetic fields. Our measurements suggest that the efficiency of photosystem II is not affected by variations in GMF. In contrast, the strong static magnetic field seems to have the potential to increase initial Chl a fluorescence and energy dissipation in Lemna minor plants. PMID:25708622

  18. Effect of External Magnetic Fields on the Operation of RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Berg, J.; Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R. B.

    2010-12-01

    Recent experiments have shown severe surface damage and a reduction of the maximum accelerating gradient for an rf cavity that is operating under external magnetic fields. This implies that serious problems may occur in lattices where rf cavities and external magnetic fields coexist, such as those of the proposed neutrino factory and muon collider. Although existing data suggest that this magnetic field dependent breakdown is associated with the emission of electrons from locally enhanced field regions on the cavity surface, the mechanism that drives this effect is not yet well understood. Here, we show that such field emitted electrons are accelerated by the cavity and focused by the magnetic field to the other side of the cavity where they heat its surface. We show that if the magnetic field is strong, significant surface deformation can occur that eventually could limit the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Results of our model are compared to the existing experimental data from an 805 MHz cavity. The geometry of the pillbox cavity in our case is more complicated, and the analysis depends on the electron energies, focused dimensions, and angle of impact, but damage may reasonably be expected with similar cyclical heating above 40 C. However, it is not yet known what the mechanism is for such surface damage to cause a cavity to breakdown. One possibility is that if electrons are focused on a location with a high surface gradient, then the local damage will generate new asperities with higher FN enhancement factors, thus initiating breakdown. While our preliminary analysis offers some quantification on the effects of the magnetic fields on the cavity's operation, other theoretical issues were not addressed. For instance, emission from secondary electrons was disregarded, the asperity was placed on axis, the magnetic field was assumed as uniform, the thermal-diffusion calculation ignored the shape of the rise time, and adopted an approximate calculation. On the

  19. Topological invariants of magnetic fields, and the effect of reconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzmaikin, A. ); Akhmetiev, P. )

    1994-02-01

    Properties of the second-order topological invariant (the helicity) and the third-order topological invariant for the Borromean rings'' (three linked rings no two of which link each other) are discussed. A fourth-order topological invariant of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is constructed in an integral form. This invariant is determined by the properties of Seifert surfaces bounded by two coupled flux tubes. In particular, for the Whitehead link, it represents the fourth-order Sato--Levine invariant. The effect of reconnections on the topological invariants in the limit of small diffusivity is considered. In this limit the helicity is approximately conserved and the higher-order invariants decay rapidly under the action of diffusivity. The destruction of the higher-order invariants, however, creates helicity fluctuations.

  20. Electron impact ionization in the Martian atmosphere: Interplay between scattering and crustal magnetic field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, Robert J.; Fang, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Precipitating electrons are typically the dominant source of energy input into Mars' nighttime upper atmosphere, with consequences for atmospheric and ionospheric structure, composition, chemistry, and electrodynamics. Mars' spatially heterogeneous crustal magnetic fields affect the fluxes of precipitating electrons, via both the magnetic mirror force and Gauss' law of conservation of magnetic flux. We use a kinetic electron transport model to examine ionization rate profiles that result from the combination of these magnetic effects and elastic and inelastic scattering by atmospheric neutrals. Specifically, we calculate ionization rates as a function of altitude, crustal magnetic field strength, and the initial energy and pitch angle of the precipitating electrons, covering the relevant ranges of these parameters. Several complex behaviors are exhibited, including bifurcating ionization peaks with distinct characteristics and energy-dependent and crustal field strength-dependent increases in ionization with decreasing pitch angle. Elucidating such behavior is important for understanding the effect of Mars' unique crustal fields on the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere, both to predict the consequences of measured electron precipitation and to enable, for the first time, downward coupling of global plasma models with thermosphere-ionosphere models.

  1. The unique effect of in-plane anisotropic strain in the magnetization control by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Wang, J.; Hu, F. X.; Liu, Y.; Kuang, H.; Wu, R. R.; Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    The electric field control of magnetization in both (100)- and (011)-Pr0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PSMO/PMN-PT) heterostructures were investigated. It was found that the in-plane isotropic strain induced by electric field only slightly reduces the magnetization at low temperature in (100)-PSMO/PMN-PT film. On the other hand, for (011)-PSMO/PMN-PT film, the in-plane anisotropic strain results in in-plane anisotropic, nonvolatile change of magnetization at low-temperature. The magnetization, remanence and coercivity along in-plane [100] direction are suppressed by the electric field while the ones along [01-1] direction are enhanced, which is ascribed to the extra effective magnetic anisotropy induced by the electric field via anisotropic piezostrains. More interestingly, such anisotropic modulation behaviors are nonvolatile, demonstrating a memory effect.

  2. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  3. Rectifying properties of magnetite-based Schottky diode and the effects of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Sun, J. R.; Xie, Y. W.; Wang, D. J.; Lu, W. M.; Liang, S.; Shen, B. G.

    2007-04-01

    Rectifying properties, with and without magnetic field, of a high quality Fe3O4/SrTiO3:Nb Schottky diode have been experimentally studied. The junction exhibits an excellent rectifying behavior both below and above the Verwey temperature (TV) of Fe3O4. Magnetic field has a weak but visible effect on the transport process of the junction, producing a negative magnetoresistance for T TV. Based on an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics, the spin polarization of Fe3O4 has been deduced. It is a strong function of temperature, varying between -78% and 18%.

  4. Effect of magnetic field on breakdown voltage characteristics of a multigap pseudospark

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, D.; Jain, K.K.

    1997-06-01

    An experimental investigation of the effect of magnetic field on the breakdown voltage characteristics of a multigap pseudospark device, with hydrogen gas, in a hollow anode{endash}cathode, as well as a hollow cathode{endash}anode configuration, is presented. The breakdown pressure at a particular discharge voltage increases with the increase in the applied axial magnetic field, and the magnitude of the increase is more pronounced at lower discharge voltages causing a right shift to the characteristic discharge curve in both the configurations. Application of a transverse magnetic field also resulted in a shift of the characteristic discharge curve towards the right. The observed results are compared and discussed with that found for parallel electrode geometry. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. EFFECTS OF FOSSIL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON CONVECTIVE CORE DYNAMOS IN A-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Toomre, Juri; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2009-11-01

    The vigorous magnetic dynamo action achieved within the convective cores of A-type stars may be influenced by fossil magnetic fields within their radiative envelopes. We study such effects through three-dimensional simulations that model the inner 30% by radius of a 2 M {sub sun} A-type star, capturing the convective core and a portion of the overlying radiative envelope within our computational domain. We employ the three-dimensional anelastic spherical harmonic code to model turbulent dynamics within a deep rotating spherical shell. The interaction between a fossil field and the core dynamo is examined by introducing a large-scale magnetic field into the radiative envelope of a mature A star dynamo simulation. We find that the inclusion of a twisted toroidal fossil field can lead to a remarkable transition in the core dynamo behavior. Namely, a super-equipartition state can be realized in which the magnetic energy built by dynamo action is 10-fold greater than the kinetic energy of the convection itself. Such strong-field states may suggest that the resulting Lorentz forces should seek to quench the flows, yet we have achieved super-equipartition dynamo action that persists for multiple diffusion times. This is achieved by the relative co-alignment of the flows and magnetic fields in much of the domain, along with some lateral displacements of the fastest flows from the strongest fields. Convection in the presence of such strong magnetic fields typically manifests as 4-6 cylindrical rolls aligned with the rotation axis, each possessing central axial flows that imbue the rolls with a helical nature. The roll system also possesses core-crossing flows that couple distant regions of the core. We find that the magnetic fields exhibit a comparable global topology with broad, continuous swathes of magnetic field linking opposite sides of the convective core. We have explored several poloidal and toroidal fossil field geometries, finding that a poloidal component is

  6. Effect of a magnetic field on crack length measurement of 9NI steel by unloading compliance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, C.; Matsui, K.; Shibata, K.

    2002-05-01

    In the fracture toughness measurement of ferro-magnetic materials in high magnetic fields, it has not been clarified whether we can use the same formulas as ones used in a non-magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the magnetic effect in the fracture toughness measurement of ferro-magnetic materials. As the first step, crack length was measured at 4 K by unloading compliance method in the testing of CT specimen of 9% nickel steel. The same formula was used in the magnetic field of 0 and 8 Tesla. They were compared with the length measured by optical fractography. The magnetic field had little effect on the crack length measurement by the unloading compliance method. The small amount of retained austenite in Q T heat-treated specimen did not exhibit a magnetic effect on the crack length measurement by the unloading compliance method.

  7. Effects of anisotropies in turbulent magnetic diffusion in mean-field solar dynamo models

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-04-10

    We study how anisotropies of turbulent diffusion affect the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields and the dynamo process on the Sun. The effect of anisotropy is calculated in a mean-field magnetohydrodynamics framework assuming that triple correlations provide relaxation to the turbulent electromotive force (so-called the 'minimal τ-approximation'). We examine two types of mean-field dynamo models: the well-known benchmark flux-transport model and a distributed-dynamo model with a subsurface rotational shear layer. For both models, we investigate effects of the double- and triple-cell meridional circulation, recently suggested by helioseismology and numerical simulations. To characterize the anisotropy effects, we introduce a parameter of anisotropy as a ratio of the radial and horizontal intensities of turbulent mixing. It is found that the anisotropy affects the distribution of magnetic fields inside the convection zone. The concentration of the magnetic flux near the bottom and top boundaries of the convection zone is greater when the anisotropy is stronger. It is shown that the critical dynamo number and the dynamo period approach to constant values for large values of the anisotropy parameter. The anisotropy reduces the overlap of toroidal magnetic fields generated in subsequent dynamo cycles, in the time-latitude 'butterfly' diagram. If we assume that sunspots are formed in the vicinity of the subsurface shear layer, then the distributed dynamo model with the anisotropic diffusivity satisfies the observational constraints from helioseismology and is consistent with the value of effective turbulent diffusion estimated from the dynamics of surface magnetic fields.

  8. Magnetoelectric effect and phase transitions in CuO in external magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaosheng; Qureshi, Navid; Yasin, Shadi; Mukhin, Alexander; Ressouche, Eric; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Skourski, Yurii; Geshev, Julian; Ivanov, Vsevolod; Gospodinov, Marin; Skumryev, Vassil

    2016-01-01

    Apart from being so far the only known binary multiferroic compound, CuO has a much higher transition temperature into the multiferroic state, 230 K, than any other known material in which the electric polarization is induced by spontaneous magnetic order, typically lower than 100 K. Although the magnetically induced ferroelectricity of CuO is firmly established, no magnetoelectric effect has been observed so far as direct crosstalk between bulk magnetization and electric polarization counterparts. Here we demonstrate that high magnetic fields of ≈50 T are able to suppress the helical modulation of the spins in the multiferroic phase and dramatically affect the electric polarization. Furthermore, just below the spontaneous transition from commensurate (paraelectric) to incommensurate (ferroelectric) structures at 213 K, even modest magnetic fields induce a transition into the incommensurate structure and then suppress it at higher field. Thus, remarkable hidden magnetoelectric features are uncovered, establishing CuO as prototype multiferroic with abundance of competitive magnetic interactions. PMID:26776921

  9. Magnetoelectric effect and phase transitions in CuO in external magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaosheng; Qureshi, Navid; Yasin, Shadi; Mukhin, Alexander; Ressouche, Eric; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Skourski, Yurii; Geshev, Julian; Ivanov, Vsevolod; Gospodinov, Marin; Skumryev, Vassil

    2016-01-01

    Apart from being so far the only known binary multiferroic compound, CuO has a much higher transition temperature into the multiferroic state, 230 K, than any other known material in which the electric polarization is induced by spontaneous magnetic order, typically lower than 100 K. Although the magnetically induced ferroelectricity of CuO is firmly established, no magnetoelectric effect has been observed so far as direct crosstalk between bulk magnetization and electric polarization counterparts. Here we demonstrate that high magnetic fields of ≈ 50 T are able to suppress the helical modulation of the spins in the multiferroic phase and dramatically affect the electric polarization. Furthermore, just below the spontaneous transition from commensurate (paraelectric) to incommensurate (ferroelectric) structures at 213 K, even modest magnetic fields induce a transition into the incommensurate structure and then suppress it at higher field. Thus, remarkable hidden magnetoelectric features are uncovered, establishing CuO as prototype multiferroic with abundance of competitive magnetic interactions. PMID:26776921

  10. The effect of small variations in the magnetization curves of shielding material upon shielded fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, A.; Jacobs, R. T.; Hahn, A.

    2007-08-01

    The shielding of strong electromagnetic fields at power frequency, performed by ferromagnetic plates, is often successfully modelled by the effective reluctivity. This method delivers good results for the RMSvalue of the shielded field. The following paper shows that a small variation of the magnetization curve (e.g.by taking another material charge) can strongly influence the shielded field. The field calculation is performed by the Finite Element Method (FEM), where for the interior plate region a)finite elements and b)non-linear Impedance Boundary Conditions (IBC) are used which circumvents the need to discretize the shielding plate.

  11. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  12. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mance, Deni; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Baldus, Marc; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between "bulk" and "core" nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  13. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  14. Effect of variation of magnetic field on laser ablation depth of copper and aluminum targets in air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Khwairakpam Shantakumar; Sharma, Ashwini Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We report on the effect of transverse magnetic field on laser ablation of copper and aluminum targets both experimentally and numerically. The ablation depth is found to increase with magnetic field from 0 to 0.3 T and decreases at a higher magnetic field (0.5 T). It is demonstrated that the nanosecond laser ablation is mainly due to melt ejection and it solely depends on the thermo-physical parameters of the material. The increase in ablation depth with magnetic field is attributed to the increase in heat transfer from the plasma to the target, vapor pressure, and shock pressure. The ablation due to melt ejection is also calculated using vapor pressure through simulation and compared with the experimentally measured depth. In the presence of magnetic field, we introduce the magnetic pressure in Clausius-Clapeyron vapor pressure equation to account for the combined effect of magnetic field and atmospheric pressure on the vapor pressure of plasma. The ratio of calculated ablation depth at 0.3 T with respect to the absence of magnetic field is close to the corresponding experimental depth ratios indicating that the laser ablation modeling in the present work is validated. As the magnetic field increases, we observed the scattered mass at the center and around the crater. The size of deposited mass at the center is found to decrease at higher magnetic field which is attributed to breaking of large droplets into smaller ones due to increase in instability at higher magnetic field.

  15. Macroscopic orientation effects in broadline NMR-spectra of model membranes at high magnetic field strength

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, T.; Möps, A.; Dolainsky, C.; Brückner, S.; Bayerl, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The partial orientation of multilamellar vesicles (MLV) in high magnetic fields has been studied and a method to prevent such effects is herewith proposed. The orientation effect was measured with 2H-, 31P-NMR and electron microscopy on MLVs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine with 30 mol% cholesterol. We present the first freeze—etch electron microscopy data obtained from MLV samples that were frozen directly in the NMR magnet at a field strength of 9.4 Tesla. These experiments clearly show that the MLVs adopt an ellipsoidal (but not a cylindrical) shape in the magnetic field. Best fit 31P-NMR lineshape calculations assuming an ellipsoidal distribution of molecular director axes to the experimentally obtained spectra provide a quantitative measure of the average semiaxis ratio of the ellipsoidal MLVs and its change with temperature. The application of so-called spherical supported vesicles (SSV) is found to prevent any partial orientation effects so that undistorted NMR powder pattern of the bilayer can be measured independently of magnetic field strength and temperature. The usefulness of SSVs is further demonstrated by a direct comparison of spectral data such as 31P-and 2H-NMR lineshapes and relaxation times as well as 2H-NMR dePaked spectra obtained for both model systems. These experiments show that spectral data obtained from partially oriented MLVs are not unambiguous to interpret, in particular, if an external parameter such as temperature is varied. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:19431822

  16. Effects of electronic correlations and magnetic field on a molecular ring out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuss, Martin; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    We study the effects of electron-electron interactions on the steady-state characteristics of a hexagonal molecular ring in a magnetic field as a model for a benzene molecular junction. The system is driven out of equilibrium by applying a bias voltage across two metallic leads. We employ a model Hamiltonian approach to evaluate the effects of on-site as well as nearest-neighbor density-density-type interactions in a physically relevant parameter regime. Results for the steady-state current, charge density, and magnetization in three different junction setups (para, meta, and ortho) are presented. Our findings indicate that interactions beyond the mean-field level renormalize voltage thresholds as well as current plateaus. Electron-electron interactions lead to substantial charge redistribution as compared to the mean-field results. We identify a strong response of the circular current on the electronic structure of the metallic leads. Our results are obtained by steady-state cluster perturbation theory, a systematically improvable approximation to study interacting molecular junctions out of equilibrium, even in magnetic fields. Within this framework, general expressions for the current, charge density, and magnetization in the steady state are derived. The method is flexible and fast and can straightforwardly be applied to effective models as obtained from ab initio calculations.

  17. Effective tight-binding model for MX2 under electric and magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shanavas, Kavungal Veedu; Satpathy, S.

    2015-06-15

    We present a systematic method for developing a five band Hamiltonian for the metal d orbitals that can be used to study the effect of electric and magnetic fields on multilayer MX2 (M=Mo,W and X=S,Se) systems. On a hexagonal lattice of d orbitals, the broken inversion symmetry of the monolayers is incorporated via fictitious s orbitals at the chalcogenide sites. A tight-binding Hamiltonian is constructed and then downfolded to get effective d orbital overlap parameters using quasidegenerate perturbation theory. The steps to incorporate the effects of multiple layers, external electric and magnetic fields are also detailed. We find that anmore » electric field produces a linear-k Rashba splitting around the Γ point, while a magnetic field removes the valley pseudospin degeneracy at the ±K points. Lastly, our model provides a simple tool to understand the recent experiments on electric and magnetic control of valley pseudospin in monolayer dichalcogendies.« less

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic counter-rotating vortices and synergetic stabilizing effects of magnetic field and plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Tasso, H.

    2010-03-15

    A nonlinear two-dimensional steady state solution in the framework of hydrodynamics describing a row of periodic counter-rotating vortices is extended to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium equation with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction. The extended solution covers a variety of equilibria because four surface quantities remain free. Similar to the case of the MHD cat-eyes equilibrium [Throumoulopoulos et al., J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 335501 (2009)] and unlike linear equilibria, the flow has a strong impact on isobaric surfaces by forming pressure islands located within the counter-rotating vortices even for values of beta (defined as the ratio of the thermal pressure over the external axial magnetic-field pressure) on the order of 0.01. Also, the axial current density is appreciably modified by the flow. Furthermore, a magnetic-field-aligned flow of experimental fusion relevance, i.e., for Alfven Mach numbers of the order of 0.01, and the flow shear in combination with the variation of the magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetic surfaces have significant stabilizing effects potentially related to the equilibrium nonlinearity. The stable region is enhanced by an external axial magnetic field.

  19. Direct MRI detection of the neuronal magnetic field: the effect of the dendrite branch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ling; Xiong, Hong-Chuan; Yao, De-Zhong

    2010-09-21

    In recent years, neuronal current MRI (nc-MRI) was proposed as a new imaging method to directly map the magnetic field change caused by neuronal activity. Nc-MRI could offer improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to blood hemodynamics-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this paper, with a finite current dipole as the model of dendrite or dendrite branch, we investigated the spatial distribution of the magnetic field generated by synchronously activated neurons to evaluate the possibility of nc-MRI. Our simulations imply that the existence of a dendrite branch may not only increase the strength of the neuronal magnetic field (NMF), but also raise the non-uniform and unsymmetry of the NMF; therefore, it can enhance the detectability of the neuronal current magnetic field by MRI directly. The results show that the signal phase shift is enlarged, but it is unstable and is still very small, <1 radian, while the magnitude signal may be strong enough for a typical MRI voxel to be detected. We suggest making further efforts to measure the magnitude signal which may induce a large effect in an nc-MRI experiment. PMID:20808026

  20. Effect of a transverse magnetic field on solidification structure in directionally solidified Al-Cu-Ag ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Guang; Du, Dafan; Fautrelle, Yves; Moreau, Rene; Ren, Zhongming; Li, Xi

    2015-07-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on solidification structure in directionally solidified Al-Cu-Ag ternary alloys was investigated experimentally. The results show that the application of the transverse magnetic field significantly modified the solidification structures. Indeed, the magnetic field caused the formation of macrosegregation and the transformation of the liquid/solid interface from cellular to planar. Moreover, it was found that the magnetic field refined the eutectic cell and decreased the mushy zone length. This may be attributed to the thermoelectric magnetic convection between eutectic cells.

  1. Development of Active Regions: Flows, Magnetic-Field Patterns and Bordering Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getling, A. V.; Ishikawa, R.; Buchnev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    A qualitative analysis is given of the data on the full magnetic and velocity vector fields in a growing sunspot group, recorded nearly simultaneously with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite. Observations of a young bipolar subregion developing within AR 11313 were carried out on 9 - 10 October 2011. Our aim was to form an idea about the consistency of the observed pattern with the well-known rising-tube model of the formation of bipolar active regions and sunspot groups. We find from our magnetograms that the distributions of the vertical [Bv] and the horizontal [Bh] component of the magnetic field over the area of the magnetic subregion are spatially well correlated; in contrast, the rise of a flux-tube loop would result in a qualitatively different pattern, with the maxima of the two magnetic-field components spatially separated: the vertical field would be the strongest where either spot emerges, while the maximum horizontal-field strengths would be reached in between them. A specific feature, which we call the bordering effect, is revealed: some local extrema of Bv are bordered with areas of locally enhanced Bh. This effect suggests a fountainlike spatial structure of the magnetic field near the Bv extrema, which is also hardly compatible with the emergence of a flux-tube loop. The vertical-velocity field in the area of the developing active subregion does not exhibit any upflow on the scale of the whole subregion, which should be related to the rising-tube process. Thus, our observational data can hardly be interpreted in the framework of the rising-tube model.

  2. Effects of a High Magnetic Field at Different Osmotic Pressures and Temperatures on Multiplication of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Van Nostran, F. E.; Reynolds, R. J.; Hedrick, H. G.

    1967-01-01

    The application of a yeast as a biosystem for determining the effects of a high magnetic field and other physical phenomena was studied. Multiplication of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed during exposure to a magnetic field of 4,600 gauss. Cell populations were determined at 24-, 48-, and 72-hr intervals, and possible interactions between the magnetic field and other environmental parameters, such as time, temperature, and osmotic pressure, were considered statistically. The main effect of the high magnetic field was a significant reduction of cell multiplication during each time interval. Significant interactions were found to occur between temperature and the magnetic field at 24 hr, and between temperature and osmotic pressure at each sampling interval. Synergistic effects of the magnetic field and osmotic pressure at both 28 and 38 C were nonsignificant. PMID:6035047

  3. Magnetic fields and stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the principles governing the use of far-infrared and submillimeter polarimetry to investigate magnetic fields and dust in interstellar clouds. Particular topics of discussion are the alignment of dust grains in dense clouds, the dependence on wavelength of polarization due to emission or to partial absorption by aligned grains, the nature of that dependence for mixtures of grains with different properties, and the problem of distinguishing between (1) the effects of the shapes and dielectric functions of the grains and (2) the degree and direction of their alignment.

  4. Effects of a traveling magnetic field on vertical gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2011-09-01

    The effects of a traveling magnetic field (TMF) on vertical gradient freeze (VGF) growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are studied using a coupled model of magnetic induction, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. Simulations are performed to determine the influences of current and frequency on melt flow and growth interface shape. A downward traveling electromagnetic wave drives flow downward at the wall, which tends to flatten the interface, whereas an upward traveling wave has the opposite effect. TMF makes a significant impact on interface shape in the absence of thermal buoyancy, but is ineffectual under realistic conditions in a 4 inch diameter ampoule, for which buoyancy dominates Lorentz force throughout the melt.

  5. Magnetization switching in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction by combining spin-transfer torque and electric field-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, S.; Nakatani, Y.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-26

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, in which two successive voltage pulses are applied to utilize both spin-transfer torque and electric field effect. Under this switching scheme, a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic easy axis is shown to switch faster than by spin-transfer torque alone and more reliably than that by electric fields alone.

  6. Magnetic field effects on shear and normal stresses in magnetorheological finishing.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, John C; Miao, Chunlin; Jacobs, Stephen D

    2010-09-13

    We use a recent experimental technique to measure in situ shear and normal stresses during magnetorheological finishing (MRF) of a borosilicate glass over a range of magnetic fields. At low fields shear stresses increase with magnetic field, but become field-independent at higher magnetic fields. Micromechanical models of formation of magnetic particle chains suggest a complex behavior of magnetorheological (MR) fluids that combines fluid- and solid-like responses. We discuss the hypothesis that, at higher fields, slip occurs between magnetic particle chains and the immersed glass part, while the normal stress is governed by the MRF ribbon elasticity. PMID:20940866

  7. Measurements of field decay and snapback effect on Tevatron dipole and quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Annala, G.; Bauer, P.; Carcagno, R.; DiMarco, J.; Glass, H.; Hanft, R.; Kephart, R.; Lamm, M.; Martens, M.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Since the beginning of 2002 an intensive measurement program has been performed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF) to understand dynamic effects in Tevatron magnets. Based on the results of this program a new correction algorithm was proposed to compensate for the decay of the sextupole field during the dwell at injection and for the subsequent field ''snapback'' during the first few seconds of the energy ramp. Beam studies showed that the new correction algorithm works better than the original one, and improves the Tevatron efficiency by at least 3%. The beam studies also indicated insufficient correction during the first 6s of the injection plateau where an unexpected discrepancy of 0.15 sextupole units of extra drift was observed. This paper reports on the most recent measurements of the Tevatron dipoles field at the beginning of the injection plateau. Results on the field decay and snapback in the Tevatron quadrupoles are also presented.

  8. Ponderomotive effects on magnetic fields and electron transport under ignitor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Glinsky, M.; Tabak, M.

    1994-12-31

    The Fast Ignitor ICF concept will use bright source lasers to induce thermonuclear ignition. The absorption of ultra-intense laser pulses at target surfaces has been predicted to generate relativistic electrons and self-magnetic fields exceeding 100 MG. The authors have used the implicit multi-fluid code ANTHEM to track the emitted hot electrons from the corona, where they drive a fast expansion of the ions, to the dense target interior where they are slowed and absorbed into the background by collisions. In the absence of ponderomotive effects, the external magnetic field has the usual thermoelectric polarity, while a weaker field with reversed polarity is produced below critical. The authors will discuss field and transport changes associated with the inclusion of ponderomotive influences.

  9. Exposure chamber for determining the biological effects of electric and magnetic fields on dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Hai; Richard, Louis; Burchard, Javier F

    2005-02-01

    An exposure chamber was designed to study the effects of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) on oestrous cycles, hormonal profile during gestation, pineal function, quantity and quality of milk production, feed intake, and central nervous system of dairy cattle. The chamber was 15 x 10 x 3 m; and the control system was fully computerized so that the field intensities can be varied and monitored continuously, on site or remotely. During exposure to EMF, milk production, feed consumption, and health were monitored closely and blood and cerebral spinal fluid were continuously sampled. The chamber characteristics allow use of a wide range of exposure such as electric fields (0-30 kV/m) and magnetic fields (0-100 microT) at frequencies ranging from 45 to 3000 Hz. PMID:15672371

  10. Passive shielding effect on space profile of magnetic field emissions for wireless power transfer to vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side. Surrounding magnetic field plots in the vertical direction show that maxima's of the two coils for the no shielding geometry are centered at the respective coils and for the remaining three are displaced closer to each other. This closeness would lead to more effective addition of the two coil fields and an increase in the resultant field from space point of view. This closeness varies with distance in the horizontal direction and vertical gap between the coils and is explained in the paper. This paper provides a better understanding of effect of the passive shielding materials on the space nature of magnetic fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications.

  11. Passive shielding effect on space profile of magnetic field emissions for wireless power transfer to vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, T. Schaltz, E.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side. Surrounding magnetic field plots in the vertical direction show that maxima's of the two coils for the no shielding geometry are centered at the respective coils and for the remaining three are displaced closer to each other. This closeness would lead to more effective addition of the two coil fields and an increase in the resultant field from space point of view. This closeness varies with distance in the horizontal direction and vertical gap between the coils and is explained in the paper. This paper provides a better understanding of effect of the passive shielding materials on the space nature of magnetic fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications.

  12. Cold equation of state in a strong magnetic field - Effects of inverse beta-decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Dong; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of a high magnetic field (B is greater than 10 exp 12 G) on the degenerate matter equation of state appropriate to a neutron star is studied. The regime dominated by relativistic electrons up to the neutron drip density is highlighted. The equilibrium matter composition and equation of state, allowing for inverse beta-decay. Two different equilibrium models are determined: an ideal neutron-proton-electron (npe) gas and the more realistic model of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland (1971) consisting of a Coulomb lattice of heavy nuclei embedded in an electron gas. For a sufficiently high field strength, the magnetic field has an appreciable effect, changing the adiabatic index of the matter and the nuclear transition densities. The influence of a strong field on some simple nonequilibrium processes, including beta-decay and inverse beta-decay (electron capture) is also considered. The effects produced by the magnetic field are mainly due to the changes in the transverse electron quantum orbits and the allowed electron phase space induced by the field.

  13. On the magnetic quenching of mean-field effects in supersonic interstellar turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressel, Oliver; Bendre, Abhijit; Elstner, Detlef

    2013-02-01

    The emergence of large-scale magnetic fields observed in the diffuse interstellar medium is explained by a turbulent dynamo. The underlying transport coefficients have previously been extracted from numerical simulations. So far, this was restricted to the kinematic regime, but we aim to extend our analysis into the realm of dynamically important fields. This marks an important step on which derived mean-field models rely to explain observed equipartition-strength fields. As in previous work, we diagnose turbulent transport coefficients by means of the test-field method. We derive quenching functions for the dynamo α effect, diamagnetic pumping and turbulent diffusivity, which are compared with theoretical expectations. At late times, we observe the suppression of the vertical wind. Because this potentially affects the removal of small-scale magnetic helicity, new concerns arise about circumventing constraints imposed by the conservation of magnetic helicity at high magnetic Reynolds numbers. While present results cannot safely rule out this possibility, the issue only becomes important at late stages and is absent when the dynamo is quenched by the wind itself.

  14. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  15. [Synergistic inhibitory effect of static magnetic field and antitumor drugs on Hepa1-6 cells].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingling; Guo, Wei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xueqing; Yu, Juntao; Wu, Wencai; Zhao, Tiejun

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy as a routine method for clinical treatment of cancer has disadvantages such as significant toxicity and strong resistance. In order to improve the efficacy of the drugs and reduce the by-effects, we tried to combine static magnetic field (SMF) with cisplatin or adriamycin. The growth of Hepa1-6 cells treated with the static magnetic field (SMF) combined with cisplatin or adriamycin was significantly inhibited, as detected with MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) test. Combined treatment group cells underwent significant morphological changes as observed by HE (Hematoxylin and eosin) staining under optical microscope. Cell cycle analysis indicated that SMF increased the ratio of cells arrested in G2/M phase caused by cisplatin, and when treated with SMF combined with adriamycin, cells were almost arrested in G1 and G2/M phase. SCGE test showed that SMF can enhance the ability of cisplatin or adriamycin to promote cell DNA damage. Atomic force microscope observation found that the combination of antitumor drugs and magnetic field treatment induced larger and deeper holes on the cell membrane, and surface structure damage is serious. The combination of antitumor drugs and magnetic field technology effectively inhibits the growth of tumor cells, and reduces drug doses. The results implicate this method as potential cancer therapy. PMID:26955714

  16. The effect of magnetic field on chiral transmission in p-n-p graphene junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Wan, Qi; Peng, Yingzi; Wang, Guanqing; Qian, Zhenghong; Zhou, Guanghui; Jalil, Mansoor B A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate Klein tunneling in graphene heterojunctions under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field via the non-equilibrium Green's function method. We find that the angular dependence of electron transmission is deflected sideways, resulting in the suppression of normally incident electrons and overall decrease in conductance. The off-normal symmetry axis of the transmission profile was analytically derived. Overall tunneling conductance decreases to almost zero regardless of the potential barrier height V0 when the magnetic field (B-field) exceeds a critical value, thus achieving effective confinement of Dirac fermions. The critical field occurs when the width of the magnetic field region matches the diameter of the cyclotron orbit. The potential barrier also induces distinct Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns, with a "constriction region" of low transmission when V0 is close to the Fermi energy. Application of B-field deflects the Fabry-Pérot interference pattern to an off-normal angle. Thus, the conductance of the graphene heterojunctions can be sharply modulated by adjusting the B-field strength and the potential barrier height relative to the Fermi energy. PMID:26679991

  17. The effect of magnetic field on chiral transmission in p-n-p graphene junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Wan, Qi; Peng, Yingzi; Wang, Guanqing; Qian, Zhenghong; Zhou, Guanghui; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate Klein tunneling in graphene heterojunctions under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field via the non-equilibrium Green’s function method. We find that the angular dependence of electron transmission is deflected sideways, resulting in the suppression of normally incident electrons and overall decrease in conductance. The off-normal symmetry axis of the transmission profile was analytically derived. Overall tunneling conductance decreases to almost zero regardless of the potential barrier height when the magnetic field (B-field) exceeds a critical value, thus achieving effective confinement of Dirac fermions. The critical field occurs when the width of the magnetic field region matches the diameter of the cyclotron orbit. The potential barrier also induces distinct Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns, with a “constriction region” of low transmission when is close to the Fermi energy. Application of B-field deflects the Fabry-Pérot interference pattern to an off-normal angle. Thus, the conductance of the graphene heterojunctions can be sharply modulated by adjusting the B-field strength and the potential barrier height relative to the Fermi energy. PMID:26679991

  18. Self-consistent, three-dimensional equilibrium effects on tokamak magnetic field ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.; Reiman, A.H.

    1987-10-01

    Self-consistent equilibrium effects on tokamak magnetic field ripple have been calculated using a three-dimensional equilibrium code. The effects are found to be large enough that they should be included in tokamak ignition experiment designs. Even the modification of the well depth associated with the flow of force-free plasma current along rippled field lines is substantial. An analysis of the results separates the contribution of the Shafranov shift to the ripple modification from the contributions of other finite-pressure effects. 5 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Spin superconductivity and ac-Josephson effect in Graphene system under strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X. C.; Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, China Collaboration

    We study the spin superconductivity in Graphene system under strong magnetic field. From the microscopically Gor'kov method combined with the Aharonov-Casher effect, we derive the effective Landau-Ginzburg free energy and analyze the time evolution of order parameter, which is confirmed to be the off-diagonal long range order. Meanwhile, we compare the ground state of spin superconductivity to the canted-antiferromagnetic state, and demonstrate the equivalence between these two states. Moreover, we give out the pseudo-field flux quantization condition of spin supercurrent, and propose an experimental measurable ac-Josephson effect of spin superconductivity in this system.

  20. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. In vitro effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on oxidatively damaged rabbit red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorani, M.; Biagiarelli, B.; Vetrano, F.; Guidi, G.; Dacha, M.; Stocchi, V.

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on rabbit red blood cells (RBCs) that were exposed simultaneously to the action of an oxygen radical-generating system, Fe(II)/ascorbate. Previous data obtained in the authors` laboratory showed that the exposure of rabbit erythrocytes or reticulocytes to Fe(II)/ascorbate induces hexokinase inactivation, whereas the other glycolytic enzymes do not show any decay. The authors also observed depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) content with a concomitant intracellular and extracellular increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and a decrease in energy charge. In this work, they investigated whether 50 Hz magnetic fields could influence the intracellular impairments that occur when erythrocytes or reticulocytes are exposed to this oxidant system, namely, inactivation of hexokinase activity, GSH depletion, a change in energy charge, and hemoglobin oxidation. The results obtained indicate that a 0.5 mT magnetic field had no effect on intact RBCs, whereas it increased the damage in an oxidatively stressed erythrocyte system. In fact, exposure of intact erythrocytes incubated with Fe(II)/ascorbate to a 0.5 mT magnetic field induced a significant further decay in hexokinase activity as well as a twofold increase in methemoglobin production compared with RBCs that were exposed to the oxidant system alone. Although further studies will be needed to determine the physiological implications of these data, the results reported in this study demonstrate that the effects of the magnetic fields investigated are able to potentiate the cellular damage induced in vitro by oxidizing agents.

  2. Cryptochrome-dependent magnetic field effect on seizure response in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Marley, Richard; Giachello, Carlo N G; Scrutton, Nigel S; Baines, Richard A; Jones, Alex R

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that facilitate animal magnetoreception have both fascinated and confounded scientists for decades, and its precise biophysical origin remains unclear. Among the proposed primary magnetic sensors is the flavoprotein, cryptochrome, which is thought to provide geomagnetic information via a quantum effect in a light-initiated radical pair reaction. Despite recent advances in the radical pair model of magnetoreception from theoretical, molecular and animal behaviour studies, very little is known of a possible signal transduction mechanism. We report a substantial effect of magnetic field exposure on seizure response in Drosophila larvae. The effect is dependent on cryptochrome, the presence and wavelength of light and is blocked by prior ingestion of typical antiepileptic drugs. These data are consistent with a magnetically-sensitive, photochemical radical pair reaction in cryptochrome that alters levels of neuronal excitation, and represent a vital step forward in our understanding of the signal transduction mechanism involved in animal magnetoreception. PMID:25052424

  3. Magnetic field effects in singlet-polaron quenching in molecularly doped fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Ma, Dongge

    2014-08-01

    The magnetic field effects of electroluminescence (MEL) in 4-[dicyanomethylene]-2-t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran(DCJTB) doped tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq3) based organic light-emitting diodes were investigated. A linear decrease in MEL with the increase of magnetic field was observed at high magnetic field (>20 mT) in this doping devices, which has been attributed to the singlet-polaron quenching effect. It was found that the singlet-polaron quenching is magnetic field dependent. Our results showed that singlet-polaron quenching commonly exists in fluorescence OLEDs and induces the linear decrease in MEL.

  4. Magnetic-field-tunable Kondo effect in alkaline-earth cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, Leonid; Rey, Ana Maria

    2015-05-01

    We study quantum magnetism in strongly interacting fermionic alkaline-earth atoms (AEAs). Due to the decoupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, AEAs in two lowest electronic states (1S0 and 3P0) obey an accurate SU(N 2 I + 1) symmetry in their two-body collisions (I is the nuclear spin). We consider a system that realizes the simplest SU(2) case (for atoms prepared in two nuclear-spin states) in an optical lattice with two bands: one localized and one itinerant. For the fully filled narrow band (two atoms per lattice site) we demonstrate that an applied magnetic field provides an efficient control of the local ground state degeneracy due to mixing of spin and orbital two-body states. We derive an effective low-energy model that includes this magnetic-field effect as well as atomic interactions in the two optical lattice bands, and show that it exhibits a peculiar phenomenon of a magnetic field-induced Kondo effect, so far observed only in Coulomb blockaded quantum dots. We expect that our results can be tested with ultracold 173 Yb or 87 Sr atoms. Supported by JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF-1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  5. Extremely Large Magnetoresistance at Low Magnetic Field by Coupling the Nonlinear Transport Effect and the Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhaochu; Xiong, Chengyue; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zhen-Gang; Cai, Jianwang; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of a magnetic material is coupled to the nonlinear transport effect of a semiconductor material in a simple structure to achieve a large geometric magnetoresistance (MR) based on a diode-assisted mechanism. An extremely large MR (>10(4) %) at low magnetic fields (1 mT) is observed at room temperature. This MR device shows potential for use as a logic gate for the four basic Boolean logic operations. PMID:26857904

  6. Superposition of DC magnetic fields by cascading multiple magnets in magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-09-01

    A novel method that can effectively collect the DC magnetic field produced by multiple separated magnets is proposed. With the proposed idea of a magnetic loop, the DC magnetic field produced by these separated magnets can be effectively superimposed together. The separated magnets can be cascaded in series or in parallel. A novel nested magnetic loop is also proposed to achieve a higher DC magnetic field in the common air region without increasing the DC magnetic field in each magnetic loop. The magnetic loop can be made by a magnetic hose, which is designed by transformation optics and can be realized by the combination of super-conductors and ferromagnetic materials.

  7. Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in γ-Fe temperature region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Duan, Guosheng; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region were investigated using carburizing technology. The carbon penetration profiles from the iron surface to interior were measured by field emission electron probe microanalyzer. The carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron carburized with different magnetic field intensities was calculated according to the Fick's second law. It was found that the magnetic field intensity could obviously affect the carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region, and the carbon diffusion coefficient decreased obviously with the enhancement of magnetic field intensity, when the magnetic field intensity was higher than 1 T, the carbon diffusion coefficient in field annealed specimen was less than half of that of the nonfield annealed specimen, further enhancing the magnetic field intensity, the carbon diffusion coefficient basically remains unchanged. The stiffening of lattice due to field-induced magnetic ordering was responsible for an increase in activation barrier for jumping carbon atoms. The greater the magnetic field intensity, the stronger the inhibiting effect of magnetic field on carbon diffusion.

  8. The suppression effect of external magnetic field on the high-power microwave window multipactor phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xue Wang, Yong; Fan, Junjie

    2015-02-15

    To suppress the surface multipactor phenomenon and improve the transmitting power of the high-power microwave window, the application of external magnetic fields is theoretically analyzed and simulated. A Monte Carlo algorithm is used to track the secondary electron trajectories and study the multipactor scenario on the surface of a cylinder window. It is confirmed that over-resonant magnetic fields (an external magnetic field whose magnitude is slightly greater than that of a resonant magnetic field) will generate a compensating trajectory and collision, which can suppress the secondary electron avalanche. The optimal value of this external magnetic field that will avoid the multipactor phenomenon on cylinder windows is discussed.

  9. Effect of the {delta} meson on the instabilities of nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Providencia, C.; Da Providencia, J.

    2009-08-15

    We study the influence of the isovector-scalar meson on the spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in asymmetric nonhomogenous nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} G. Relativistic nuclear models both with constant couplings (NLW) and with density-dependent parameters (DDRH) are considered. A strong magnetic field can have large effects on the instability regions giving rise to bands of instability and wider unstable regions. It is shown that for neutron-rich matter the inclusion of the {delta} meson increases the size of the instability region for NLW models and decreases it for the DDRH models. The effect of the {delta} meson on the transition density to homogeneous {beta}-equilibrium matter is discussed. The DDRH{delta} model predicts the smallest transition pressures, about half the values obtained for NL{delta}.

  10. Effects function analysis of ELF magnetic field exposure in the electric utility work environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nair, I; Sahl, J

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete understanding of the relation between power-frequency fields and biological responses raises problems in defining an appropriate metric for exposure assessment and epidemiological studies. Based on evidence from biological experiments, one can define alternative metrics or effects functions that embody the relationship between field exposure patterns and hypothetical health effects. In this paper, we explore the application of the "effects function" approach to occupational exposure data. Our analysis provides examples of exposure assessments based on a range of plausible effects functions. An EMDEX time series data set of ELF frequency (40-800 Hz) magnetic field exposure measurements for electric utility workers was analyzed with several statistical measures and effects functions: average field strength, combination of threshold and exposure duration, and field strength changes. Results were compared for eight job categories: electrician, substation operator, machinist, welder, plant operator, lineman/splicer, meter reader, and clerical. Average field strength yields a different ranking for these job categories than the ranks obtained using other biologically plausible effects functions. Whereas the group of electricians has the highest exposure by average field strength, the group of substation operators has the highest ranking for most of the other effects functions. Plant operators rank highest in the total number of field strength changes greater than 1 microT per hour. The clerical group remains at the lowest end for all of these effects functions. Our analysis suggests that, although average field strength could be used as a surrogate of field exposure for simply classifying exposure into "low" and "high," this summary measure may be misleading in the relative ranking of job categories in which workers are in "high" fields. These results indicate the relevance of metrics other than average field strength in occupational exposure assessment and

  11. Magnetic field effects on the accuracy of ionospheric mirror models for geolocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Eugene V.; McNamara, Leo F.; Colman, Jonah J.

    2016-04-01

    The geolocation of an uncooperative HF emitter is based on observations of the azimuth and elevation (angle of arrival; AoA) of its signals as they arrive at a surveillance site, along with a model of the propagation medium. The simplest propagation model that provides an estimate of the location of the emitter is based on the use of a horizontal mirror placed at the appropriate altitude. If there are large-scale horizontal ionospheric gradients or traveling ionospheric disturbances present, tilts derived from a suitable ionosonde or from the AoA of convenient known emitters (check targets) may be applied to the mirror before geolocation is performed. However, the methodology of this approach to geolocation completely ignores the Earth's magnetic field, producing errors that can reach 25% of range for a short range (less than 100 km) low-latitude target. The errors are generally smaller at midlatitudes. This paper investigates and characterizes these errors in terms of wave polarization, magnetic dip, circuit length, and azimuth relative to the direction of the magnetic field. The magnetic field also affects the procedure of using tilts derived from check-target AoA because the field effects can masquerade as tilts of unknown magnitude.

  12. Water Complexes Take Part in Biological Effect Created by Weak Combined Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadiia

    2016-07-01

    It was revealed experimentally that at small level of magnetic field's noise (less than 4µT/Hz0.5) the dependence of gravitropc reaction of cress roots on frequency had a fine structure/ The peak that corresponded to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions for the static component of combined magnetic field that was equal to 40µT became split up into three peaks ( f1 = 31/3Hz, f2 = 32.5Hz i f3 = 34 Hz./ . The frequency f1 corresponded to the Ca2+ ion (theoretical value 31.6 Hz), the frequency f2 corresponded to the hydronium ion H3O+ (theoretical value 32.9 Hz), the frequency f3 corresponded to OH- ion (theoretical value 35 Hz). Taking into account the influence of combined magnetic field on hydronium ions and Del Giudice' hypothesis one may throw away doubts about the possibility of ion cyclotron resonance. The hydronium ions are unusual because they have a long free path length. It was revealed that pH of the distillated water changed under the treatment in combined magnetic field tuned to cyclotron frequency of hydronium ion. Such changes in pH had to lead to the biological effects on the molecular ,cell and organism levels.

  13. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  14. Separating Effect of a Novel Combined Magnetic Field on Inclusions in Molten Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yanjie; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2012-10-01

    The feasibility and effectiveness of a novel combined magnetic field (CMF) on the removal of inclusions with a density smaller than the surrounding melt were investigated. The experiment of the separating effect of CMF was conducted on a laboratory-scale apparatus by the simultaneous application of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) and a downward traveling magnetic field (TMF). Primary silicon particles precipitating from the solidification process of Al-Si-Cu alloy were regarded as the inclusions in a molten aluminum alloy. It was found that a CMF consisting of both a RMF and a downward TMF was able to separate silicon particles from the molten Al-Si-Cu alloy by making these particles migrate vertically toward the upper part of the samples. Compared with downward TMF or RMF, CMF improved the separating effectiveness substantially. It was proposed that this type of CMF was approved to be highly effective at eliminating the inclusions with a density smaller than the surrounding molten alloy. A tentative mechanism for the high separating effect of CMF was discussed.

  15. CMOS Compatible 3-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor using Hall Effect Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Joshua R.

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and test a CMOS compatible 3-axis Hall effect sensor capable of detecting the earth's magnetic field, with strength's of ˜50 muT. Preliminary testing of N-well Van Der Pauw structures using strong neodymium magnets showed proof of concept for hall voltage sensing, however, poor geometry of the structures led to a high offset voltage. A 1-axis Hall effect sensor was designed, fabricated and tested with a sensitivity of 1.12x10-3 mV/Gauss using the RIT metal gate PMOS process. Poor geometry and insufficient design produced an offset voltage of 0.1238 volts in the 1-axis design; prevented sensing of the earth's magnetic field. The new design features improved geometry for sensing application, improved sensitivity and use the RIT sub-CMOS process. The completed 2-axis device showed an average sensitivity to large magnetic fields of 0.0258 muV/Gauss at 10 mA supply current.

  16. Experimental study of the magnetic field enhanced Payne effect in magnetorheological elastomers.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Vladislav V; Ecker, Eva; Stepanov, Gennady V; Shamonin, Mikhail; Monkman, Gareth J; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-11-21

    The dynamic modulus and the loss factor of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) of various compositions and anisotropies are studied by dynamic torsion oscillations performed in the absence and in the presence of an external magnetic field. The emphasis is on the Payne effect, i.e. the dependence of the elastomer magnetorheological characteristics on the strain amplitude and their evolution with cyclically increasing and decreasing strain amplitudes. MREs are based on two silicone matrices differing in storage modulus (soft, G' ∼ 10(3) Pa, and hard, G' ∼ 10(4) Pa, matrices). For each matrix, the concentration of carbonyl iron particles with diameters of 3-5 μm was equal to 70 and 82 mass% (22 and 35 vol%, respectively) in the composite material. Samples for each filler content, isotropic and aligned-particles, are investigated. It is found that the Payne effect significantly increases in the presence of an external magnetic field and varies with the cyclical loading which reaches saturation after several cycles. The results are interpreted as the processes of formation-destruction-reformation of the internal filler structure under the simultaneously applied mechanical force and magnetic field. Impacts of matrix elasticity and magnetic interactions on the filler alignment are elucidated. PMID:25278263

  17. Some effects of high- gradient magnetic field on tropism of roots of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A.; Belyavskaya, N.

    The perception of gravity in living organisms is mostly based on the response of the gravisensing system to displacement of some specific mass caused by gravitational force. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis the amyloplasts play the role of specific mass in gravisensing cells of higher plants. Kuznetsov & Hasenstein (1996) have demonstrated that the high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) exerts a directional ponderomotive force on diamagnetic substances, in particular, statoliths. This effect of the HGMF causes root response similar to that produced by the change in gravity vector. Their studies supported the starch-statolith hypothesis and showed that ponderomotive force can be used to modify force acting on statoliths by manipulating statolith locations within gravisensing cells. We have designed the HGMF facility that allows for generating the HGMF and analyzing its effects on higher plants' roots. It records by videosystem and measures with the help of image analysis software the parameters of kinetics of root bending under both the HGMF action and gravistimulation. Two species of plants (pea and cress) have been examined. The main results of the work are the following: 1) The magnetotropic effect of HGMF on root growth was found for both species. 2) The critical value of ponderomotive force that caused the magnetotropic effect was estimated by modeling the magnetic field spatial distribution in the region of root apex. 3) The electron-microscopic analysis of statocytes after the HGMF treatment was carried out. The displacement of amyloplasts in root statocytes of two species of plants in HGMF was firstly demonstrated at the ultrastructural level. 4) Spatial distribution of exogenous proton fluxes (pH) along the roots was studied. The changes in pH distribution along curvature zone and apices of roots were revealed in the HGMF. It is known that application of HGMFs or strong uniform magnetic fields may influence ion transport due to Ampere force. It

  18. Effect of magnetic field on quasiparticle branches of intrinsic Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyuzer, L.; Ozdemir, M.; Kurter, C.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E.

    2007-01-01

    The interlayer tunneling spectroscopy has been performed on micron-sized mesa arrays of HgBr{sub 2} intercalated superconducting Bi2212 single crystals. A ferromagnetic multilayer (Au/Co/Au) is deposited on top of the mesas. The spin-polarized current is driven along the c-axis of the mesas through a ferromagnetic Co layer and the hysteretic quasiparticle branches are observed at 4.2 K. Magnetic field evolution of hysteretic quasiparticle branches is obtained to examine the effect of injected spin-polarized current on intrinsic Josephson junction characteristics. It is observed that there is a gradual distribution in quasiparticle branches with the application of magnetic field and increasing field reduces the switching current progressively.

  19. The effect of external magnetic field on plasma acceleration in electromagnetic railgun channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the effect of an external magnetic field on the dynamics of a free plasma piston (PP) accelerated without solid striker armature in an electromagnetic railgun channel filled with various gases (argon or helium). It is established that, as the applied magnetic field grows, the velocity of a shock wave generated by PP in the channel increases. The experimental results are compared to a theoretical model that takes into account the gas pressure force behind the shock wave and the drag force that arises when erosion mass entering the channel is partly entrained by the accelerated plasma. The results of model calculations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The discrepancy somewhat increases with the applied field, but the maximum deviation still does not exceed 20%.

  20. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  1. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  2. Effect of magnetic field on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of graphite plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Atiqa; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Akram, Mahreen; Khalid, Ayesha; Yaseen, Nazish; Ahmad, Qazi Salman

    2016-03-01

    The effect of transverse magnetic field on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of graphite plasma as a function of fluence has been investigated. Graphite targets were exposed to Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 10 ns) laser pulses at various laser fluences ranging from 0.4 to 2.9 J cm-2 under two different environment of air and Ar at a pressure of 150 and 760 torr. A transverse magnetic field of strength 0.5 tesla was employed by using permanent magnets. It is revealed that due to the presence of the magnetic field the emission intensity, electron temperature and number density of graphite plasma have been increased at all fluences and for all environmental conditions. The enhancement in plasma parameters is attributed to magnetic confinement effect and Joule heating effect. Initially by increasing the fluence from 0.4 to 1.5 J cm-2 (in air) and 0.4 to 1.8 J cm-2 (in Ar), the emission intensity, electron temperature and number density have been increased and have attained their maximum values. Further increase in fluence was responsible for the decreasing trend in all plasma parameters. More increase in fluence (beyond 1.8 J cm-2 in case of air and 2.2 J cm-2 in case of Ar) up to a maximum value of 2.9 J cm-2, the saturation or self-sustained regime was achieved, which is responsible for insignificant changes in plasma parameters. The value of plasma parameter " β" was also evaluated analytically, and it was less than one for all conditions (fluences as well as environments), which confirmed the existence of confinement effect.

  3. Numerical analysis of the effects of a high gradient magnetic field on flowing erythrocytes in a membrane oxygenator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the effect of a high gradient magnetic field on pressure characteristics of blood in a hollow fiber membrane oxygenator in a solenoid coil by means of numerical analysis. Deoxygenated erythrocytes are paramagnetic, and oxygenated erythrocytes are diamagnetic. Blood changes its magnetic susceptibility depending on whether it is carrying oxygen or not. Motion of blood was analyzed by solving the continuous equation and the Navier-Stokes equation. It was confirmed that oxygenation of deoxygenated blood in the downstream side of the applied magnetic field was effective for pressure rise in a non-uniform magnetic field. The pressure rise was enhanced greatly by an increase in magnetic field intensity. The results suggest that a membrane oxygenator works as an actuator and there is a possibility of self-circulation of blood through an oxygenator in a non-uniform magnetic field.

  4. Large magnetic field effects in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Reenen, S.; Kersten, S. P.; Wouters, S. H. W.; Cox, M.; Janssen, P.; Koopmans, B.; Bobbert, P. A.; Kemerink, M.

    2013-09-01

    Large negative magnetoconductance (MC) of ˜12% is observed in electrochemically doped polymer light-emitting diodes at sub-band-gap bias voltages (Vbias). Simultaneously, a positive magnetoefficiency (Mη) of 9% is observed at Vbias = 2 V. At higher bias voltages, both the MC and Mη diminish while a negative magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL) appears. The negative MEL effect is rationalized by triplet-triplet annihilation that leads to delayed fluorescence, whereas the positive Mη effect is related to competition between spin mixing and exciton formation leading to an enhanced singlet:triplet ratio at nonzero magnetic field. The resultant reduction in triplet exciton density is argued to reduce detrapping of polarons in the recombination zone at low-bias voltages, explaining the observed negative MC. Regarding organic magnetoresistance, this study provides experimental data to verify existing models describing magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors, which contribute to better understanding hereof. Furthermore, we present indications of strong magnetic field effects related to interactions between trapped carriers and excitons, which specifically can be studied in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Regarding light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs), this work shows that delayed fluorescence from triplet-triplet annihilation substantially contributes to the electroluminescence and the device efficiency.

  5. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  6. Effect of static magnetic fields on osteoblasts and fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    McDonald, F

    1993-01-01

    In vitro assays were made of the effect of a static magnetic field of a neodymium magnet on cellular behavior. The cell turnover rate was examined by the incorporation of radioactive thymidine, and anabolic processes were measured by the incorporation of radioactive proline. Cell cultures of fibroblast- and osteoblast-like cells of the neonatal rat calvarium were assayed to determine uptakes of radioactive thymidine and proline; these assays were performed in conjunction with examination of an explant of the rat calvarium. The cells were assayed after exposure to a field for 1-, 3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-day periods. Cells were exposed to north and south poles with a pole-face flux density of 0.61 T; control cultures were exposed to an unmagnetised piece of neodymium. After sham exposure or exposure to the magnetic field, 50 microCuries/ml of culture media of isotope were added to the culture medium. The cultures were returned to an incubator for 6 h. Then, following centrifugation, the supernatant was assayed for radioactivity in a scintillation counter after addition of 3 ml of scintillation fluid. A statistically significant magnetic stimulation of turnover rate and synthesis of fibroblasts was found, but stimulation of osteoblasts did not occur. Conversely, the explants, which represent the osteoblasts and fibroblasts in an organised system, showed a statistically significant inhibition in uptake of the radioactive label. The data indicate both variability and diversity of cellular behaviour, and they accentuate the need for caution in the interpretation of effects of static magnetic fields. PMID:8323569

  7. Effects of magnetic field and Hall current to the blood velocity and LDL transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, I.; Naser, N.; Talib, A. H.; Mahali, S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field and Hall current effects have been considered on blood velocity and concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It is important to observe those effects to the flowing blood in a stenosed artery. The analysis from the obtained results may be useful to some clinical procedures, such as MRI, where the radiologists may have more information in the investigations before cardiac operations could be done. In this study, the uniform magnetic field and Hall current are applied to the Newtonian blood flow through an artery having a cosine-shaped stenosis. The governing equations are coupled with mass transfer and solved employing a finite difference Marker and Cell (MAC) method with an appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The graphical results of velocity profiles and LDL concentration are presented in this paper and the results show that the velocity increases and concentration decreases as Hall parameter increased.

  8. The effect of external magnetic field on the Raman peaks in manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, A. K.; Rout, G. C.

    2014-04-24

    We report here a microscopic theoretical model study exhibiting the effect of external magnetic field on the Raman excitation peaks in the CMR manganite system. The Hamiltonian consists of Jahn-Teller (J-T) distortion in e{sub g} band, the double exchange interaction and the Heisenberg spin-spin interaction. Further the phonons are coupled to e{sub g} band electrons, J-T distorted e{sub g} band and the double exchange interaction. The Raman spectral intensity is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon Green function. The spectra exhibits three peaks besides a very weak high energy peak. The magnetic field effect on these peaks are reported.

  9. Color change in organic light-emitting diodes using the magnetic field effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Ehrenfreund, Eitan; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2013-03-01

    The magnetic field effect has been widely used to generate magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). We have used the MEL effect to change the emission color from OLED in which the active layer is composed of a host polymer with fluorescence (FL) emission and a guest, heavy atom-based molecule with phosphorescence (PH) emission. The color change has been studied as a function of the guest/host weight ratio, and the optimal ratio was determined. The underlying mechanism of the magnetic-field induced color change is the difference that exists between the MEL intensity of the FL emission band respect to that of the PH emission band. The MEL difference between the two types of emission bands will be thoroughly discussed within models used to explain the MEL in organic devices. Research sponsored by National Science Foundation-Material Science & Engineering Center (NSF-MRSEC), University of Utah.

  10. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  11. Effects of magnetic fields produced by simulated and real geomagnetic storms on rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report experiments of arterial pressure (AP) measurements of ten Wistar rats subjected to geomagnetic field changes and to artificially stimulated magnetic field variations. Environmental electromagnetic effects were screened using a semianechoic chamber, which allowed us to discern the effects associated with geomagnetic storms. We stimulated the subjects with a linear magnetic profile constructed from the average changes of sudden storm commencement (SSC) and principal phases of geomagnetic storms measured between 1996 and 2008 with Dst ⩽ -100 nT. Although we found no statistically significant AP variations, statistically significant AP changes were found when a geomagnetic storm occurred during the experimental period. Using the observed geomagnetic storm variations to construct a geomagnetic profile to stimulate the rats, we found that the geomagnetic field variations associated to the SSC day were capable of increasing the subjects AP between 7% and 9% from the reference value. Under this magnetic variation, the subjects presented a notably restless behavior not seen under other conditions. We conclude that even very small changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm can produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response.

  12. The magnetic flux excess effect as a consequence of non-Parker radial evolution of interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The “magnetic flux excess” effect is exceeding of magnetic flux Fs=4π|Br|r2 measured by distant spacecraft over the values obtained through measurements at the Earth’s orbit (Owens et al., JGR, 2008). Theoretically, its conservation should take place at any heliocentric distance r further than 10 solar radii, which means that the difference between the flux measured at 1 AU and Fs observed in another point in the heliosphere should be zero. However, the difference is negative closer to the Sun and increasingly positive at larger heliocentric distances. Possible explanations of this effect are continuously discussed, but the consensus is yet not reached.It is shown that a possible source of this effect is the solar wind expansion not accordingly with the Parker solution at least at low heliolatitudes. The difference between the experimentally found (r-5/3) and commonly used (r-2) radial dependence of the radial component of the IMF Br may lead to mistakes in the IMF point-to-point recalculations (Khabarova & Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). Using the observed Br (r) dependence, it is easy to find the variation of difference between the magnetic flux Fs(r) at certain heliocentric distance r and Fs_1AU at 1 AU, which can be calculated as Fs(r)-Fs_1AU =4π·(B1AU /[1AU]-5/3) (r2-5/3 -[1AU]2-5/3) (Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013).The possible influence of presence of the heliospheric current sheet near the ecliptic plane on the picture of magnetic field lines and consequent deviation from the Parker's model is discussed.- Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf- Olga V. Khabarova, The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013, Vol. 57, No. 11, pp. 844-859, http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1305/1305.1204.pdf

  13. Magnetic field and particle concentration competitive effects on ferrofluid based silicone elastomer microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Balasoiu, M.; Lebedev, V. T.; Orlova, D. N.; Bica, I.

    2011-12-15

    Structural peculiarities of ferroelastomers composed of polydimetylsiloxane with embedded magnetite particles during polymerization have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The effects of ferroparticles' concentration in the range of C = 0-6 wt %, and external magnetic fields of induction B = 0-1 kG applied during the polymerization on the structure of polymeric matrix and particles distribution in polymer were analyzed.

  14. The effects of direct-current magnetic fields on turtle retinas vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Raybourn, M.S.

    1983-05-13

    Direct-current magnetic fields of 10 to 100 gauss cause a significant short-term reduction of the in vitro electroretinographic b-wave response in turtle retina. This response compression is not accompanied by the usual reduction in retinal sensitivity that occurs with background illumination. Furthermore, this effect is obtained only briefly after the offset of ambient lighting in the diurnal light-dark cycle of nonhibernating animals.

  15. Magnetic Field Effects on Convection and Solidification in Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    It has been well understood that convective flows induced by g-jitter forces associated with spacecraft are responsible for defects formation and irregularity in product quality during melt growth of single crystals in microgravity. This research is concerned about numerical simulations and experimental measurements for the purpose of developing a fundamental understanding of the g-jitter induced fluid flows and their effects on solidification in microgravity with and without the presence of additional damping forces that are derived from the applied DC magnetic fields. The numerical models include both 2-D and 3-D transient fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer and solidification under the combined action of g-jitter and magnetic fields. Numerical simulations using both the 2-D and 3-D models are conducted for both idealized, synthesized and real g-jitter forces, and 2-D simulations are tested against the experimental measurements taken on the thermal oscillator. 2-D solidification models have also been developed and simulations are conducted. Results show that the numerical model predictions compare well with the measurements. Analysis of these results illustrates that an applied magnetic field can have a drastic influence on the convective flows induced by g-jitter and can be particularly useful to suppress the effects resulting from the spiking of g-jitter signatures, which are considered the most detrimental effects on quality of crystals grown in space. Work in progress includes developing 3-D numerical models for solidification phenomena with the presence of both g-jitter and magnetic fields and measurements of flow fluid and its effect on solidification in both transparent fluid and low melting point melts to verify numerical predictions.

  16. Effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in a quantum well: strong to weak coupling conversion.

    PubMed

    Pervishko, A A; Kibis, O V; Shelykh, I A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in an asymmetric quantum well placed inside an optical resonator. It is demonstrated that the field-induced diamagnetic shift of electron subbands in the well increases the broadening of optical lines corresponding to intersubband electron transitions. As a consequence, the magnetic field can switch the polariton system from the regime of strong light-matter coupling to the regime of a weak one. This effect paves a way for the effective control of polaritonic devices with a magnetic field. PMID:27472627

  17. Effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in a quantum well: strong to weak coupling conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervishko, A. A.; Kibis, O. V.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in an asymmetric quantum well placed inside an optical resonator. It is demonstrated that the field-induced diamagnetic shift of electron subbands in the well increases the broadening of optical lines corresponding to intersubband electron transitions. As a consequence, the magnetic field can switch the polariton system from the regime of strong light-matter coupling to the regime of weak one. This effect paves a way to the effective control of polaritonic devices with a magnetic field.

  18. Determination of effective field induced by spin-orbit torque using magnetic domain wall creep in Pt/Co structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Chiba, D.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effect of electric current on the magnetic-field-driven magnetic domain wall (DW) creep velocity in ultrathin Co with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy deposited on a Pt underlayer. The DW velocity was considerably modulated by the current, and its field dependence deviated from the scaling law with the critical exponent of 1/4, which is generally valid in ferromagnetic metals. This characteristic feature of the DW motion can be explained by considering the perpendicular effective field generated by spin-orbit torque at the Pt/Co interface. From the relation between the injected current and the modified creep velocity, the determination of the effective field was demonstrated.

  19. Solar wind interaction effects on the magnetic fields around Mars: Consequences for interplanetary and crustal field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.-J.; Brain, D. A.; Ulusen, D.; Lillis, R. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Espley, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The first unambiguous detections of the crustal remanent magnetic fields of Mars were obtained by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) during its initial orbits around Mars, which probed altitudes to within ∼110 km of the surface. However, the majority of its measurements were carried out around 400 km altitude, fixed 2 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time, mapping orbit. While the general character and planetary origins of the localized crustal fields were clearly revealed by the mapping survey data, their effects on the solar wind interaction could not be investigated in much detail because of the limited mapping orbit sampling. Previous analyses (Brain et al., 2006) of the field measurements on the dayside nevertheless provided an idea of the extent to which the interaction of the solar wind and planetary fields leads to non-ideal field draping at the mapping altitude. In this study we use numerical simulations of the global solar wind interaction with Mars as an aid to interpreting that observed non-ideal behavior. In addition, motivated by models for different interplanetary field orientations, we investigate the effects of induced and reconnected (planetary and external) fields on the Martian field's properties derived at the MGS mapping orbit altitude. The results suggest that inference of the planetary low order moments is compromised by their influence. In particular, the intrinsic dipole contribution may differ from that in the current models because the induced component is so dominant.

  20. Nuclear-spin-induced cotton-mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-Juan; Vaara, Juha

    2014-08-01

    Novel, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic methods can provide site-specific nuclear information by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic properties. We present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of the recently proposed nuclear-spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field (NSCM-B). In NSCM-B, ellipticity is induced in a linearly polarized light beam, which can be attributed to both the dependence of the symmetric dynamic polarizability on the external magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moment, as well as the temperature-dependent partial alignment of the molecules due to the magnetic fields. Quantum-chemical calculations of NSCM-B were conducted for a series of molecular liquids. The overall order of magnitude of the induced ellipticities is predicted to be 10(-11) -10(-6) rad T(-1)  M(-1)  cm(-1) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. In particular, liquid-state heavy-atom systems should be promising for experiments in the Voigt setup. PMID:24862946

  1. Phase modulated magnetoelectric delta-E effect sensor for sub-nano tesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, S.; Kirchhof, C.; Yarar, E.; Meyners, D.; Quandt, E.; Faupel, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a resonant micromechanical magnetic field sensor, which utilizes the magnetically induced change in elastic modulus, i.e., the delta-E effect. The sensor is based on magnetoelectric thin film composites, resulting in high sensitivity at room temperature and at low frequencies. The cantilever is electrically excited and read out by a 2 μm AlN piezoelectric layer. Depending on its magnetization, the 2 μm thin film of amorphous (Fe90Co10)78Si12B10 changes its elasticity, which results in a shift of the cantilever's resonance frequency. The sensor is operated in the first or second transversal bending mode at 7.6 kHz or 47.4 kHz. With a limit of detection of 140 pTHz-0.5 at 20 Hz under a magnetic bias field and 1 nTHz-0.5 without external bias field, this sensor exceeds all comparable designs by one order of magnitude.

  2. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  3. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  4. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  5. Effects of seed magnetic fields on magnetohydrodynamic implosion structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.; Pullin, D. I.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of various seed magnetic fields on the dynamics of cylindrical and spherical implosions in ideal magnetohydrodynamics are investigated. Here, we present a fundamental investigation of this problem utilizing cylindrical and spherical Riemann problems under three seed field configurations to initialize the implosions. The resulting flows are simulated numerically, revealing rich flow structures, including multiple families of magnetohydrodynamic shocks and rarefactions that interact non-linearly. We fully characterize these flow structures, examine their axi- and spherisymmetry-breaking behaviour, and provide data on asymmetry evolution for different field strengths and driving pressures for each seed field configuration. We find that out of the configurations investigated, a seed field for which the implosion centre is a saddle point in at least one plane exhibits the least degree of asymmetry during implosion.

  6. Experimental study on the effect of applying a crossed magnetic field on the insulator flashover behavior in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Elabass, K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a possible method of reducing the flashover stress is achieved by the effect of an additional magnetic field in the transverse direction on the main applied electric field. The degree of vacuum used in this study was 5×10-5 Pa. The magnetic flux density B employed in this study extends from 4×10-3 to 24×10-3 T. From the results obtained throughout this work, the transverse magnetic field increases the flashover voltage and decreases the leakage current. The effect of the transverse magnetic field on the surface flashover of the dielectric solid in vacuum shows a marked dependence on the material and the thickness of the test specimen, the vacuum degree, the type of electric field (AC or DC) as well as the type of magnetic field (AC or DC).

  7. Effect of 0.25 T static magnetic field on microcirculation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj; Ohkubo, Chiyoji; Okano, Hideyuki

    2002-04-01

    We showed previously in rabbits that 0.2 and 0.35 T static magnetic field (SMF) modulated systemic hemodynamics by arterial baroreceptors. We now have measured the effect of 0.25 T SMF on microcirculation within cutaneous tissue of the rabbit ear lobe by the rabbit ear chamber (REC) method. Forty experimental runs (20 controls and 20 SMF) were carried out in eight different rabbits with an equal number of control and SMF experiments on each individual. Rabbits were sedated by pentobarbital sodium (5 mg/kg/h, i.v.) during the entire 80 min experiment. SMF was generated by four neodium-iron-boron alloy (Nd2-Fe14-B) magnets (15 x 25 x 30 mm, Neomax, PIP - Tokyo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan), positioned around the REC on the observing stage of an optical microscope. The direct intravital microscopic observation of the rabbit's ear microvascular net, along with simultaneous blood flow measurement by microphotoelectric plethysmography (MPPG), were performed PRE (20 min, baseline), DURING (40 min), and POST (20 min) magnetic field exposure. The control experiments were performed under the same conditions and according to the same time course, but without magnetic field. Data were analyzed comparing MPPG values and percent change from baseline in the same series, and between corresponding sections of control and SMF runs. In contrast to control series (100+/-0.0%-90.0+/-5.4%-87.7+/-7.1%, PRE-EXPOSURE-POST), after magnetic field exposure we observed increased blood flow (100+/-0.0%-117.8+/-9.6%*-113.8+/-14.0%, *P<0.05) which gradually decreased after exposure cessation. We propose that long exposure of a high level nonuniform SMF probably modifies microcirculatory homeostasis through modulation of the local release of endothelial neurohumoral and paracrine factors that act directly on the smooth muscle of the vascular wall, presumably by affecting ion channels or second messenger systems. PMID:11891752

  8. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  9. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  10. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  11. Experimental investigation of the effect of magnetic field on temperature and temperature profile of diffusion flame using circular grating Talbot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Kumar, Manoj; Shakher, Chandra

    2015-05-01

    The effect of magnetic field on temperature and temperature profile of diffusion flame is investigated by using circular grating Talbot interferometer. Talbot interferometric fringes are recorded for diffusion flame generated by butane torch burner, in the absence of magnetic field, in the presence of uniform magnetic field, upward-decreasing and upward-increasing magnetic field. Analysis of recorded interferogram reveals that the temperature of the flame is increased under the influence of the upward-decreasing magnetic field and flame temperature is decreased under the influence of upward-increasing magnetic field. Uniform magnetic field has a negligible effect on temperature of the flame.

  12. Magnetic fields at neptune.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1989-12-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the supersonic solar wind flow was detected upstream at 34.9 Neptune radii (R(N)), and the magnetopause boundary was tentatively identified at 26.5 R(N) near the planet-sun line (1 R(N) = 24,765 kilometers). A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10(-5) gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R(N). The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R(N) can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R(N) and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. The OTD dipole moment is 0.133 gauss-R(N)(3). Within 4 R(N), the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. The obliquity of Neptune and the phase of its rotation at encounter combined serendipitously so that the spacecraft entered the magnetosphere at a time when the polar cusp region was directed almost precisely sunward. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes

  13. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  14. Optical coherence-based techniques for motional Stark effect measurements of magnetic field pitch angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, John

    1999-02-01

    The motional Stark effect measurement of magnetic field pitch angle in tokamaks is a mature and powerful technique for estimating plasma current density in tokamaks. However, its range of applicability is limited by the requirement that 0741-3335/41/2/012/img3 and 0741-3335/41/2/012/img4 manifolds are spectrally sufficiently well separated (high magnetic fields, high beam energies) to ensure adequate net polarization for a successful measurement. This paper proposes alternative schemes based on the optical coherence properties of the Stark multiplet that are somewhat more versatile than the standard method and better suited to measurements on low-field toroidal confinement devices. An interference filter is used to transmit the Stark multiplet to a polarimeter (which uses a single photoelastic plate) that modulates the light temporal coherence and/or its first spectral moment. This light is subsequently processed using a novel electro-optically modulated solid-state interferometer that is sensitive to low-order spectral moments. The modulation of these quantities conveys information about the orientation of the light polarization and hence the magnetic field pitch angle.

  15. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  16. Effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability in rotamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Goss, J.; Kalaria, D.; Huang, T. S.

    2011-08-15

    To study the effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability, a series of experiments with linearly ramping the axial current I{sub z}, which makes field-reversed configuration (FRC) to spherical tokamak (ST) transition, have been conducted in rotamak. Results clearly demonstrate that the tilt mode can be completely suppressed by small I{sub z} around 0.4 kA (in comparison with 2.0 kA plasma current). An unknown new mode with larger magnetic perturbations is triggered when I{sub z} reaches 0.5 kA. This instability mode keeps saturation while plasma current is boosted when I{sub z} is in the range of 0.6-1.4 kA. When I{sub z} exceeds 1.6 kA, the new mode suddenly disappears and discharge is free from instability modes.

  17. Giant effective mass deviations near the magnetic field-induced minigap in double quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Harff, N.E. |; Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Klem, J.F.; Goodnick, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The authors report major deviations in the electron effective mass m* near the partial energy gap, or minigap, formed in strongly coupled double quantum wells (QWs) by an anticrossing of the two QW dispersion curves. The anticrossing and minigap are induced by an in-plane magnetic field B{sub {parallel}} and give rise to large distortions in the Fermi surface and density of states, including a Van Hove singularity. Sweeping B{sub {parallel}} moves the minigap through the Fermi level, with the upper and lower gap edges producing a sharp maximum and minimum in the low-temperature in-plane conductance, in agreement with theoretical calculations. The temperature dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations appearing in a tilted magnetic field yield a decreased m* {le} 1/3 m*{sub GaAs} near the upper gap edge, and indicate an increase in m* near the lower gap edge.

  18. Inverse parabolic quantum dot: The transition energy under magnetic field effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safwan, S. A.; El Meshed, Nagwa

    2016-08-01

    We present here, the evolution of the transition energy with a static magnetic field, when the electron and the hole are confined in inverse parabolic quantum dot (IPQD). The unexpected behavior is found, at the weak confinement regime the conduction band minimum and the top of valance band change from s-state to p-state or d-state for confined electron and hole inside IPQD, respectively. The strength of the inverse parabolic potential (potential hump) inside a quantum dot has the upper hand in tuning the ground state momentum for both electron and hole, and consequently their interband transition energy is changed. Knowing that this is not the case for the other types of potentials. The quantum size, the magnetic field and inverse potential hump effects on electron and hole ground and excited states are discussed.

  19. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-01-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism. PMID:27440452

  20. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-07-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism.

  1. Entropy generation during fluid flow in a channel under the effect of transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damseh, R. A.; Al-Odat, M. Q.; Al-Nimr, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    Entropy generation due to fluid flow and heat transfer inside a horizontal channel made of two parallel plates under the effect of transverse magnetic field is numerically investigated. The flow is assumed to be steady, laminar, hydro-dynamically and thermally fully developed of electrically conducting fluid. Both horizontal walls are maintained at constant temperatures higher than that of the fluid. The governing equations in Cartesian coordinate are solved by an implicit finite difference technique. After the flow field and the temperature distributions are obtained, the entropy generation profiles are computed and presented graphically. The factors, which were found to affect the problem under consideration are the magnetic parameter, Eckert number, Prandtl number, and the temperature parameter (θ∞). It was found that, entropy generation increased as all parameters involved in the present problem increased.

  2. [Biological and health effects on electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies].

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, M V

    2005-01-01

    While the enormous benefits of using electricity in everyday life and health care are unquestioned, during the past 20 years the general public has become increasingly concerned about potential adverse health effects of exposure to electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies (ELF). Such exposures arise mainly from the transmission and use of electrical energy at the power frequencies of 50/60 Hz. The international scientific community is addressing the associated health issues through in vitro, in vivo and epidemiological studies, although present research results are often contradictory. The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the possible impacts of exposure to electric and magnetic field at ELF frequencies on health within the community and the workplace. Information comes from recent research studies on this subject and from epidemiological pooled studies recently reviewed by eminent authorities. PMID:16353681

  3. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture.

    PubMed

    Klein, M; Pankiewicz, R; Zalas, M; Stampor, W

    2016-01-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism. PMID:27440452

  4. Hydrogenation-induced edge magnetization in armchair MoS2 nanoribbon and electric field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Fangping; Yang, Zhixiong; Ni, Xiang; Wu, Nannan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xiang

    2014-02-01

    We performed density functional theory study on the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS2 nanoribbons (AMoS2NR) with different edge hydrogenation. Although bare and fully passivated AMoS2NRs are nonmagnetic semiconductors, it was found that hydrogenation in certain patterns can induce localized ferromagnetic edge state in AMoS2NRs and make AMoS2NRs become antiferromagnetic semiconductors or ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electric field effects on the bandgap and magnetic moment of AMoS2NRs were investigated. Partial edge hydrogenation can change a small-sized AMoS2NR from semiconductor to metal or semimetal under a moderate transverse electric field. Since the rate of edge hydrogenation can be controlled experimentally via the temperature, pressure and concentration of H2, our results suggest edge hydrogenation is a useful method to engineer the band structure of AMoS2NRs.

  5. Effects of a switched weak magnetic field on lecithin liposomes, investigated by nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pazur, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Three types of liposomes in aqueous solution were subjected to a low frequency switched weak magnetic field. A differential non-linear dielectric spectroscopy (DNLDS) was performed at 40 degrees C with two planar orthogonal electrodes, positioned parallel and vertical to the earth surface. The difference of the free voltage release (FVR) signals for the two orthogonal directions following electric pulses with an amplitude of 1.0 V and a duration of 25 ms, were Fourier-transformed. An additional magnetic field was switched with a period of 400 ms and a variable amplitude from 0 to 100 G, whose direction was parallel to the vertical electrode plane. With two of the liposomes (egg yolk lecithin (EY), asolectin doped with cholesterol (ASCO)) a decrease of the signal amplitude with increasing magnetic fields could be seen in most of the 25 observed harmonic frequencies (relative to the electric pulse frequency f(0) = 40 Hz). For EY liposomes this decrease was highly significant and not linear for the 1.-5., and above the 20. harmonic frequency, ASCO liposomes showed a similar effect. Asolectin liposomes showed the reverse response. Quantum mechanical conditions of charges on the liposome surface are discussed as a possible origin of these effects PMID:12872934

  6. In-situ SAXS observation of magnetic field effects on block copolymer ordering and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuji, Chinedum; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Majewksi, Pawel

    2012-02-01

    The use of external fields to direct block copolymer self-assembly is well documented. Magnetic fields offer particular promise due to their space-pervasive nature and the ability to produce arbitrary alignments over truly macroscopic length scales in appropriate systems. We present here the results of in-situ SAXS studies of side-chain liquid crystalline diblock copolymers ordering under high magnetic fields and ex-situ GISAXS data on thin films. Despite the coincidence of the block copolymer order-disorder transition (ODT) and the LC clearing temperature in these weakly segregated materials, there is no measurable effect of the field on the ODT of the system, up to 6 T. This is in line with rough estimates based simply on the magnitudes of the relevant energy scales - the free energy of field interaction and the enthalpy of the isotropic-LC transition. We show that the alignment of the system is critically limited by the viscosity of the mesophase such that alignment can only be advanced by residence in a small temperature window near TODT. This residence produces a weakly aligned system which thereafter transitions to a strongly aligned state on cooling even in the absence of the field.

  7. A magnetic field-dependent modulation effect tends to stabilize light transmission through binary ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Lin, Yueqiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qingmei; Miao, Hua; Fu, Jun; Lin, Lihua

    2012-06-01

    In binary ferrofluids composed of ferromagnetic γ-Fe2O3/Ni2O3 composite nanoparticles (A particles) and noncrystalline Fe2O3 nanoparticles (B particles), the A particles alone will form chain-like aggregates upon application of a magnetic field. Due to both the long-range 'magnetic convergent force' (FC) and the short-range 'magnetic divergent force' (FD), the A-particle chains immersed in the B-particle 'sea' will move in a manner similar to the process of vibrational damping. The apparent damping of the ferrofluids will vary from weak to overdamping according to the motion of the chains, so that the intensity of light transmitted through a ferrofluid film along the direction of the field would tend to stabilize after a period of rapid decrements and increments. In binary ferrofluids, the B-particle system can produce a modulation effect on both the damping and the driving force, further stabilizing the behavior of the transmitted light. At low fields (e.g., 500 Gs, 900 Gs) only the modulation of the viscosity drag force (Fv) is considerable, so that overdamping increases linearly with B-particle volume fraction (ФB), and the variation in the transmitted light is much slower during the process tending towards stability as ФB increases. However, at high fields (e.g., 1300 Gs) the polarization of the B-particle 'sea' is enhanced, so that FD is modulated as well as Fv (i.e., both the practical damping and driving forces are modulated simultaneously). Thus, the apparent overdamping of the binary ferrofluids system will vary non-linearly as ФB increases, and the transmitted light will tend to stabilize faster for ferrofluids with high ΦB than for those with low ФB at an applied magnetic field of 1300 Gs.

  8. Stability of rotating self-gravitating filaments: effects of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Shubhadeep; Mondal, Surajit; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    We have performed systematic local linear stability analysis on a radially stratified infinite self-gravitating cylinder of rotating plasma under the influence of magnetic field. In order to render the system analytically tractable, we have focused solely on the axisymmetric modes of perturbations. Using cylindrical coordinate system, we have derived the critical linear mass density of a non-rotating filament required for gravitational collapse to ensue in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field. Moreover, for such filaments threaded by axial magnetic field, we show that the growth rates of the modes having non-zero radial wavenumber are reduced more strongly by the magnetic field than that of the modes having zero radial wavenumber. More importantly, our study contributes to the understanding of the stability property of rotating astrophysical filaments that are more often than not influenced by magnetic fields. In addition to complementing many relevant numerical studies reported the literature, our results on filaments under the influence of magnetic field generalize some of the very recent analytical works. For example, here we prove that even a weak magnetic field can play a dominant role in determining stability of the filament when the rotation time-scale is larger than the free-fall time-scale. A filamentary structure with faster rotation is, however, comparatively more stable for the same magnetic field. The results reported herein, due to strong locality assumption, are strictly valid for the modes for which one can ignore the radial variations in the density and the magnetic field profiles.

  9. Approaching magnetic field effects in biology using the radical pair mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jeffrey Michael

    1997-11-01

    The overall goal of this thesis has been to explain any of the reported magnetic field effects in biology (magnetic orientation of many species and/or health effects, such as cancer, due to man-made electromagnetic fields) using the radical pair mechanism, a quantum mechanical mechanism known for over 20 years that lets singlet-to-triplet yields (which can be related to reaction rates) of radical pair reactions depend on applied magnetic fields. This goal seems reasonable considering the known roles of many biological free radicals in cancer, disease, aging, development, and cellular signaling, the constant reminders in the media to take anti-oxidant vitamins to protect against certain deleterious free radicals, and the success of the radical pair mechanism in explaining magnetic field effects in photosynthetic reaction centers. To approach the above goal, this thesis develops several methods (using perturbation theory and other techniques in the Schrodinger and Liouville formalisms) for calculating singlet-to-triplet yields in combinations of steady and oscillating fields (some of these algorithms are more versatile or efficient while others give more insight, and all serve as cross-checks on each other) and uses these tools to explore and explain a number of interesting phenomena such as yields sensitive to the magnitude and orientation of earth-strength (0.5 G) steady fields as well as the magnitude, orientation, and frequency of very weak (7 mG or less) oscillating fields. In particular, this thesis examines such effects in several coenzyme B12 systems, systems long studied by EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, the chief method for determining the spin Hamiltonians, spin relaxation rates, and other parameters needed for calculations) in which organometallic cobalt-carbon bonds are often cleaved homolytically to form radical pairs. Among the B12-dependent enzymes are ribonucleotide reductase (which converts RNA to DNA nucleotides), methyl malonyl CoA mutase

  10. Effect of alternating magnetic field on the removal of metal impurities in silicon ingot by directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengting; Ren, Shiqiang; Jiang, Dachuan; Li, Jiayan; Zhang, Lei; Tan, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Multicrystalline silicon ingots without and with alternating magnetic field during directional solidification process under industrial system were obtained from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si). The concentrations and normalized concentrations of metal impurities in the two silicon ingots were studied. The result shows that the concentrations and normalized concentrations in high-purity area of the silicon with alternating magnetic field are lower than those of the ingot without alternating magnetic field. The transport mechanism for metal atoms in the diffusion layer area has been changed due to the alternating magnetic field. Alternating magnetic field introduces a convection to reduce the thickness of diffusion layer in the molten silicon, which results in a decreased effective segregation coefficients. Enhancing transport driving force of metal atoms in molten silicon is the effective way to improve the removal rate of metal impurities.

  11. Effects of an applied magnetic field on directional solidification of off-eutectic Bi-Mn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. L.; Pirich, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Off-eutectic compositions of Bi-Mn were directionally solidified in applied transverse magnetic fields up to 3 kG to determine the effects on thermal and solutal convection. For Bi-rich compositions, the magnetic field appeared to increase mixing as determined from thermal, morphological, chemical and magnetic analyses. For Mn-rich compositions morphological and chemical analyses suggest some reduction in mixing due to application of the magnetic field. Conductivity gradients in the melt are suggested as a possible mechanism for the observed results.

  12. Effect of a Weakly Tilted Magnetic Field on the Equilibrium of Nonneutral Plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rome, M.; Kotelnikov, I.

    2009-03-30

    The effect of a weakly tilted magnetic field perturbations on the equilibrium of a nonneutral plasma confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap is analyzed. A constraint (''condition of current closure'') is introduced, that in combination with the Poisson equation allows to select admissible plasma equilibria in the trap in the presence of a non-uniform and a non-axisymmetric magnetic field. Longitudinal plasma currents (analogous to the Pfirsch-Schlueter currents in Tokamaks) appearing in a nonneutral plasma even in the absence of magnetic drifts are explicitly computed in the case of a uniformly tilted magnetic field.

  13. Intrinsic surface magnetic anisotropy in Y3Fe5O12 as the origin of low-magnetic-field behavior of the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Kikkawa, Takashi; Daimon, Shunsuke; Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in a Pt /Y3Fe5O12 (YIG)-slab junction system was found to deviate from a bulk magnetization curve of the YIG slab in a low field range. In this paper, we show that the deviation originates from the difference between surface and bulk magnetization processes in the YIG slab and that it appears even when removing possible extrinsic magnetic anisotropy due to surface roughness and replacing the Pt layer with different materials. This result indicates that the anomalous field dependence of the LSSE is due to an intrinsic magnetic property of the YIG surface. Our numerical calculation based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation shows that the deviation between the LSSE and bulk magnetization curves is qualitatively explained by introducing easy-axis perpendicular magnetic anisotropy near the surface of YIG.

  14. Effects of magnetic fields on lithium evolution in F and G stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. D.; Bi, S. L.; Yang, W. M.; Liu, K.; Tian, Z. J.; Ge, Z. S. E-mail: bisl@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-02-01

    To study the effects of magnetic fields on lithium depletion and to explain the characteristics of lithium evolution in F- and G-type stars in open clusters, we construct a stellar model that includes a Tayler-Spruit dynamo-type field. Through examining the features of extra-mixing caused by magnetic fields in stellar interiors and the relationship between lithium depletion and the input parameters (i.e., mass, metallicity, and the initial rotational condition), we find that the magnetic model produces extra-mixing processes different from other models. During pre-main sequence, the model exhibits very efficient extra-mixing, resulting in strong lithium depletion. As a star evolves, the efficiency of extra-mixing rapidly decreases and lithium depletion slows down at old ages. By setting up different initial rotating conditions, the model predicts dispersions of lithium abundance in both main sequence and pre-main sequence stages. The dispersion begins when a radiative core forms in the interior. The number sees a rapid growth afterward, reaching 0.1-0.5 dex at zero age main sequence in G and late-F stars. The increase of dispersion continues in the main sequence, which is slight in G and late-F stars while significant in mid-F stars. Finally, a comparison is carried out between the theoretical results and the observed data in four open clusters. Good agreements are obtained.

  15. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AND AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION ON CORE MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2013-03-20

    Linear analysis of the formation of protostellar cores in planar magnetic interstellar clouds yields information about length scales involved in star formation. Combining these length scales with various distributions of other environmental variables (i.e., column density and mass-to-flux ratio) and applying Monte Carlo methods allow us to produce synthetic core mass functions (CMFs) for different environmental conditions. Our analysis shows that the shape of the CMF is directly dependent on the physical conditions of the cloud. Specifically, magnetic fields act to broaden the mass function and develop a high-mass tail while ambipolar diffusion will truncate this high-mass tail. In addition, we analyze the effect of small number statistics on the shape and high-mass slope of the synthetic CMFs. We find that observed CMFs are severely statistically limited, which has a profound effect on the derived slope for the high-mass tail.

  16. The transverse magnetic field effect on steady-state solutions of the Bursian diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Sourav; Ender, A. Ya.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-04-01

    A study of steady-states of a planar vacuum diode driven by a cold electron beam (the Bursian diode) under an external transverse magnetic field is presented. The regime of no electrons turned around by a magnetic field only is under the consideration. The emitter electric field is evaluated as a characteristic function for the existence of solutions depending on the diode length, the applied voltage, and the magnetic field strength. At certain conditions, it is shown that a region of non-unique solutions exists in the Bursian diode when the magnetic field is absent. An expression for the maximum current transmitted through the diode is derived. The external magnetic field is put forth to control fast electronic switches based on the Bursian diode.

  17. The transverse magnetic field effect on steady-state solutions of the Bursian diode

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-04-15

    A study of steady-states of a planar vacuum diode driven by a cold electron beam (the Bursian diode) under an external transverse magnetic field is presented. The regime of no electrons turned around by a magnetic field only is under the consideration. The emitter electric field is evaluated as a characteristic function for the existence of solutions depending on the diode length, the applied voltage, and the magnetic field strength. At certain conditions, it is shown that a region of non-unique solutions exists in the Bursian diode when the magnetic field is absent. An expression for the maximum current transmitted through the diode is derived. The external magnetic field is put forth to control fast electronic switches based on the Bursian diode.

  18. Effect of Transverse Magnetic Fields on Cold-Atom Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David; Kunz, Paul; Fatemi, Fredrik; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    We investigate nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) in cold atoms in the presence of a transverse magnetic field where alignment-to-orientation conversion (AOC) dominates. The AOC mechanism, which relies on AC-Stark shifts generated by a strong, off-resonant probe beam, significantly alters the NMOR resonance. When an additional magnetic field is present, parallel to the electric field of the light, a nested feature within this NMOR resonance manifests. Unlike similar features observed with lower optical power in warm vapors, attributed to optical pumping through nearby hyperfine levels, this feature is due solely to the AOC mechanism. Using numerical simulations, a perturbative solution, and experimental observations we characterize the feature with respect to optical power, optical polarization, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction. These results shed further light on the AOC mechanism common to NMOR-based experiments and we demonstrate a potential application to measure transverse DC magnetic fields and spatial gradients.

  19. Effect of Interface Shape and Magnetic Field on the Microstructure of Bulk Ge:Ga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal and compositional gradients induced during the growth process contribute significantly to the development of defects in the solidified boule. Thermal gradients and the solid-liquid interface shape can be greatly effected by ampoule material. Compositional gradients are strongly influenced by interface curvature and convective flow in the liquid. Results of this investigation illustrate the combined influences of interface shape and convective fluid flow. An applied magnetic field was used to reduce the effects of convective fluid flow in the electrically conductive melt during directional solidification. Several 8 mm diameter boules of Ga-doped Ge were grown at different field strengths, up to 5 Tesla, in four different ampoule materials. Compositional profiles indicate mass transfer conditions ranged from completely mixed to diffusion controlled. The influence of convection in the melt on the developing crystal microstructure and defect density was investigated as a function of field strength and ampoule material. Chemical etching and electron backscattered electron diffraction were used to map the crystal structure of each boule along the center plane. Dislocation etch pit densities were measured for each boule. Results show the influence of magnetic field strength and ampoule material on overall crystal quality.

  20. Magnetic fields and childhood cancer: an epidemiological investigation of the effects of high-voltage underground cables.

    PubMed

    Bunch, K J; Swanson, J; Vincent, T J; Murphy, M F G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence of increased risks for childhood leukaemia from magnetic fields has implicated, as one source of such fields, high-voltage overhead lines. Magnetic fields are not the only factor that varies in their vicinity, complicating interpretation of any associations. Underground cables (UGCs), however, produce magnetic fields but have no other discernible effects in their vicinity. We report here the largest ever epidemiological study of high voltage UGCs, based on 52,525 cases occurring from 1962-2008, with matched birth controls. We calculated the distance of the mother's address at child's birth to the closest 275 or 400 kV ac or high-voltage dc UGC in England and Wales and the resulting magnetic fields. Few people are exposed to magnetic fields from UGCs limiting the statistical power. We found no indications of an association of risk with distance or of trend in risk with increasing magnetic field for leukaemia, and no convincing pattern of risks for any other cancer. Trend estimates for leukaemia as shown by the odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval) per unit increase in exposure were: reciprocal of distance 0.99 (0.95-1.03), magnetic field 1.01 (0.76-1.33). The absence of risk detected in relation to UGCs tends to add to the argument that any risks from overhead lines may not be caused by magnetic fields. PMID:26344172

  1. Structural and magnetic field effects on spin fluctuations in Sr3Ru2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shantanu; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of magnetic excitations in Sr3Ru2O7 in the paramagnetic metallic phase using a three-band tight-binding model. The effect of Mn or Ti dopant ions on the Sr3Ru2O7 band structure has been included by taking into account the dopant-induced suppression of the oxygen octahedral rotation in the tight-binding band structure. We find that the low-energy spin fluctuations are dominated by three wave vectors around q ⃗=( (0 ,0 ) ,(π /2 ,π /2 ) ) and (π ,0 ) , which compete with each other. As the octahedral rotation is suppressed with increasing doping, the three wave vectors evolve differently. In particular, the undoped compound has dominant wave vectors at q ⃗=( (0 ,0 ) ,(π /2 ,π /2 ) ) , but doping Sr3Ru2O7 leads to a significant enhancement in the spin susceptibility at the q ⃗=(π ,0 ) wave vector, bringing the system closer to a magnetic instability. All the features calculated from our model are in agreement with neutron scattering experiments. We have also studied the effect of a c -axis Zeeman field on the low-energy spin fluctuations. We find that an increasing magnetic field suppresses the antiferromagnetic (AFM) fluctuations and leads to stronger competition between the AFM and ferromagnetic spin fluctuations. The magnetic field dependence observed in our calculations therefore supports the scenario that the observed nematic phase in the metamagnetic region in Sr3Ru2O7 is intimately related to the presence of a competing ferromagnetic instability.

  2. Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Pandey, Kanhaiya; Ratra, Bharat

    2010-10-15

    We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

  3. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Turbulent Wake of a Cylinder in MHD Channel Flow

    SciTech Connect

    John Rhoads; Edlundd, Eric; Ji, Hantao

    2013-04-01

    Results from a free-surface MHD flow experiment are presented detailing the modi cation of vortices in the wake of a circular cylinder with its axis parallel to the applied magnetic fi eld. Experiments were performed with a Reynolds number near Re ~ 104 as the interaction parameter, N = |j x B| / |ρ (υ • ∇), was increased through unity. By concurrently sampling the downstream fluid velocity at sixteen cross-stream locations in the wake, it was possible to extract an ensemble of azimuthal velocity profi les as a function of radius for vortices shed by the cylinder at varying strengths of magnetic field. Results indicate a signi cant change in vortex radius and rotation as N is increased. The lack of deviations from the vortex velocity pro file at high magnetic fi elds suggests the absence of small-scale turbulent features. By sampling the wake at three locations downstream in subsequent experiments, the decay of the vortices was examined and the effective viscosity was found to decrease as N-049±0.4. This reduction in effective viscosity is due to the modi cation of the small-scale eddies by the magnetic fi eld. The slope of the energy spectrum was observed to change from a k-1.8 power-law at low N to a k-3.5 power-law for N > 1. Together, these results suggest the flow smoothly transitioned to a quasi-two-dimensional state in the range 0 < N < 1.

  4. Effect of high magnetic fields on the charge density wave properties of KMo 6O 17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rötger, A.; Dumas, J.; Marcus, J.; Schlenker, C.; Ulmet, J. P.; Audouard, A.; Askenazy, S.

    1992-03-01

    The electrical resistivity of the purple bronze KMo 6O 17 has been studied between 2 and 88 K with pulsed magnetic fields up to 35 T. Several anomalies are found on the curves Δρ/ρ(B) at different temperatures. The low field results are compared with previous measurements of susceptibility and magnetization. A phase diagram which may show a field displaced charge density wave instability and field induced transitions is proposed.

  5. Prediction of the shielding effectiveness at low frequency in near magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frikha, Amin; Bensetti, Mohamed; Duval, Fabrice; Lafon, Frédéric; Pichon, Lionel

    2014-04-01

    Equipment used in hybrid or electric vehicles (HEVs) must meet certain requirements. Beyond issues of electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC), it's necessary to assess the risks related to the exposure of the passengers to electromagnetic field inside an HEV. At low frequencies, using the electromagnetic shielding as protection is inefficient. The compliance can be achieved done by defining the harness's architecture or by the use of permeable materials. In this paper, we will focus on the prediction of the shielding effectiveness of materials subjected to a near magnetic field source at low frequency (9 kHz-10 MHz).We will focus our study on two cases. In the first case, we will work on the numerical modeling of an enclosure with and without opening. The result from the model is compared to the measurement's results obtained with a test bench developed in our laboratory. In the second case, the impact of the slot in the enclosure will be studied. An analytical method based on magnetic moments approximation is developed to predict the shielding effectiveness for infinite plane with slot. The results obtained with the latter are compared with the numerical results.

  6. Effects of reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy boundary measurements on localization of active neural source.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-min; Lee, Kok-Meng; Hu, Liang; Foong, Shaohui; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Localization of active neural source (ANS) from measurements on head surface is vital in magnetoencephalography. As neuron-generated magnetic fields are extremely weak, significant uncertainties caused by stochastic measurement interference complicate its localization. This paper presents a novel computational method based on reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy measurements for enhanced ANS localization by suppressing effects of unrelated noise. In this approach, the magnetic flux density (MFD) in the nearby current-free space outside the head is reconstructed from measurements through formulating the infinite series solution of the Laplace's equation, where boundary condition (BC) integrals over the entire measurements provide "smooth" reconstructed MFD with the decrease in unrelated noise. Using a gradient-based method, reconstructed MFDs with good fidelity are selected for enhanced ANS localization. The reconstruction model, spatial interpolation of BC, parametric equivalent current dipole-based inverse estimation algorithm using reconstruction, and gradient-based selection are detailed and validated. The influences of various source depths and measurement signal-to-noise ratio levels on the estimated ANS location are analyzed numerically and compared with a traditional method (where measurements are directly used), and it was demonstrated that gradient-selected high-fidelity reconstructed data can effectively improve the accuracy of ANS localization. PMID:26358243

  7. Reexamination of magnetic isotope and field effects on adenosine triphosphate production by creatine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Darragh; Silkstone, Gary; Poddar, Soumya; Ranson, Richard; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Wilson, Michael T.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of isotopically enriched magnesium on the creatine kinase catalyzed phosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate is examined in two independent series of experiments where adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were determined by a luciferase-linked luminescence end-point assay or a real-time spectrophotometric assay. No increase was observed between the rates of ATP production with natural Mg, 24Mg, and 25Mg, nor was any significant magnetic field effect observed in magnetic fields from 3 to 1,000 mT. Our results are in conflict with those reported by Buchachenko et al. [J Am Chem Soc 130:12868–12869 (2008)], and they challenge these authors’ general claims that a large (two- to threefold) magnetic isotope effect is “universally observable” for ATP-producing enzymes [Her Russ Acad Sci 80:22–28 (2010)] and that “enzymatic phosphorylation is an ion-radical, electron-spin-selective process” [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:10793–10796 (2005)]. PMID:22198842

  8. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  9. The Effects of a Magnetic Field on the Crystallization of a Fluorozirconate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Lapointe, Michael R.; Jia, Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    An axial magnetic field of 0.1T was applied to ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fibers during heating to the glass crystallization temperature. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to identify crystal phases. It was shown that fibers exposed to the magnetic field did not crystallize while fibers not exposed to the field did crystallize. A hypothesis based on magnetic work was proposed to explain the results and tested by measuring the magnetic susceptibilities of the glass and crystal.

  10. Effects of magnetic field on grain growth of non-ferromagnetic metals: A Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, H. C.; Zhu, X. B.; Sun, Y. P.; Hu, L.; Song, W. H.

    2009-02-01

    The grain growth kinetics, texture and misorientation distribution function (MDF) evolutions of a non-ferromagnetic metal sheet with isotropic and anisotropic grain boundary under magnetic field are studied using a modified two-dimensions (2D) Potts model, in which the grain boundary migration is driven by the grain boundary energy and the difference in magnetic free energy between grains and their neighbors. Monte Carlo simulation results show that the texture and MDF evolutions of materials intensively depend on the magnetic field and grain boundary anisotropy, whereas the grain boundary growth kinetics is insensitive to the magnetic field.

  11. Transient magneto-optic effects in ferrofluid-filled microstructured fibers in pulsed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agruzov, Petr M.; Pleshakov, Ivan V.; Bibik, Efim E.; Stepanov, Serguei I.; Shamrai, Alexander V.

    2015-09-01

    Transient magneto-optic effects in ferrofluid-filled microstructured optical fibers are considered. Magneto-optic responses of two types, i.e., an even and an odd one, were observed in the longitudinal geometry of an applied pulsed magnetic field for the kerosene-based Fe3O4 ferrofluid with ∼8 \\text{nm} nanoparticles. For the first time a submicrosecond response time limited by the rise time of the applied field pulse (∼0.35 μ \\text{s}) was demonstrated for the odd magneto-optic effect in an all-fiber system, and responses of the even and odd magneto-optic effects were separated. A strong influence of the pulse width on the relaxation time of the even response is attributed to the formation of particle aggregates.

  12. Effects of rf magnetic field and wave reflection on multipactor discharge on a dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Sazontov, A. G.; Nevchaev, V. E.

    2010-03-15

    This paper analyzes the effects of the rf magnetic field and partial reflection of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave on multipactor discharge on a dielectric. A statistical theory (taking into account the velocity spread of injected electrons) is constructed to evaluate the multipactor induced breakdown and saturation level. It is concluded that the spread of initial velocities considerably changes the condition for multipactor initiation in comparison with the dynamic approach. This effect is especially strong for the case of relatively low rf electric field amplitude (when the transit time essentially exceeds the rf period) and leads to the oscillation suppression of effective electron yield and to an increase in the threshold of multipactor growth. It is established that the rf magnetic field eliminates the upper boundary of the susceptibility diagram, while the low boundary almost remains unchanged. It is also found that the presence of partial reflection causes degradation of the saturation level (in comparison with the nonreflecting case) and results in decreasing of the characteristic time required to achieve the steady state.

  13. Biological Effects of Static Magnetic Fields: Ideal Experiments for Introductory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendler, Barry S.; Grove, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    A serendipitous finding involving static magnetic fields can be used to design experiments suitable for both science and nonscience majors. It has been reported that organisms respond differently to high-gauss magnetic fields generated by north poles than they do to those generated by south poles. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are ideal…

  14. Pulsed high-magnetic-field experiments: New insights into the magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar Mejía, C. Nayak, A. K.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.; Ghorbani Zavareh, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Skourski, Y.

    2015-05-07

    The present pulsed high-magnetic-field study on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} gives an extra insight into the thermodynamics of the martensitic transformation in Heusler shape-memory alloys. The transformation-entropy change, ΔS, was estimated from field-dependent magnetization experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields and by heat-capacity measurements in static fields. We found a decrease of ΔS with decreasing temperature. This behavior can be understood by considering the different signs of the lattice and magnetic contributions to the total entropy. Our results further imply that the magnetocaloric effect will decrease with decreasing temperature and, furthermore, the martensitic transition is not induced anymore by changing the temperature in high magnetic fields.

  15. Effects of strong magnetic fields on cell growth and radiation response of human T-lymphocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Norimura, T; Imada, H; Kunugita, N; Yoshida, N; Nikaido, M

    1993-06-01

    Experiments were undertaken in order to verify whether or not a strong magnetic field would have any biological effects on the cell growth, viability and radiation response of mammalian cells. Magnetic field exposures were conducted using a superconducting magnet with freshly-isolated human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes maintained at their normal growing temperature of 37 degrees C. The static magnetic fields with intensities up to 6.3-tesla (T) exerted little influence on the cell growth and viability of actively-growing T-lymphocytes under normal cell-culture conditions. On the other hand, the T cells exposed to the magnetic fields (4 T-6.3 T) during PHA stimulation were inhibited in their cell growth when compared to controls. The effects of the magnetic fields with intensities up to 2 T on cell growth properties, however, were minimal in this system. Also, the radiosensitivity of T-lymphocytes previously exposed to the strong magnetic fields was more sensitive than that of control cells. These results suggest that exposure to a static magnetic field of 4 T or stronger might lead to physiological and growth abnormalities at the cellular level. PMID:8316709

  16. Magneto-absorption effects in magnetic-field assisted laser ablation of silicon by UV nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhi, H.; Gruzdev, V.; Zheng, H. Y.; Rawat, R. S.; Zhou, W.

    2016-06-01

    A constant magnetic field can significantly improve the quality and speed of ablation by nanosecond laser pulses. These improvements are usually attributed to the confinement of laser-produced plasma by the magnetic field and specific propagation effects in the magnetized plasma. Here we report a strong influence of constant axial magnetic field on the ablation of silicon by 20-ns laser pulses at wavelength 355 nm, which results in an increase of ablation depth by a factor of 1.3 to 69 depending on laser parameters and magnitude of the magnetic field. The traditional plasma effects do not explain this result, and magneto-absorption of silicon is proposed as one of the major mechanisms of the significant enhancement of ablation.

  17. Biological effects of electrical- or magnetic-field application. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of electrical or magnetic fields to organisms. Changes in cell structure, cell shape, metabolism, mitosis, cell orientation, neuron response, germination response, and growth rates are discussed. The citations also examine the effects of electrical or magnetic field exposure from transmission lines. Biological applications of electric field cited include genetic transfer, plant cell fusion, and seed disinfection. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  19. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  20. Experimental and theoretical study on effects of magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Li Hong; Ning Zhongxi; Yan Guojun; Wu Zhiwen

    2009-10-15

    An experiment has been made to investigate the effect of curved magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in the ion acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The experimental results show that the electron current due to near wall conductivity is of the minimum in the case of focused topology and increases in the cases of both less-focus and over-focus topologies. This finding cannot be explained properly by the magnetic mirror effect, which is the one and only reported effect related to the magnetic field curvature so far. Based on the analysis of interaction between the plasma and the wall, a new physical effect is proposed. The difference of magnetic field topology causes different electric potential distribution, leads to different ion flux to the wall, results in the change of sheath property and secondary electron emission, and finally affects the electron current due to near wall conductivity. This effect is further justified by the agreement between the experiment and simulation which is performed with a particle-in-cell model. Therefore, we conclude that the ion flow injection is a significant effect to near wall conductivity in the scope of curved magnetic field topology besides the magnetic mirror effect. Moreover, we find that the focus topology of magnetic field is favorable to obtain a high thruster performance from both the ion acceleration aspect and the electron conduction aspect and so is useful practically for thruster optimization.

  1. Effect of an electric field on the magnetization of a SmFe3(BO3)4 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidman, A. L.; Balaev, A. D.; Dubrovskii, A. A.; Eremin, E. V.; Shaikhutdinov, K. A.; Temerov, V. L.; Gudim, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    A change in the magnetization of a SmFe3(BO3)4 single crystal in response to an applied alternating electric field has been experimentally observed for the first time. The measurements have demonstrated that the magnetization oscillates not only at a frequency of the applied electric field but also at twice the frequency. The dependences of the magnetoelectric effect on the magnetic and electric fields and temperature have been measured. It has been assumed that the existence of the second harmonic of the magnetoelectric effect is due to the electrostriction.

  2. Dynamic effects of restoring footpoint symmetry on closed magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Østgaard, N.; Tenfjord, P.; Laundal, K. M.; Snekvik, K.; Haaland, S.; Milan, S. E.; Oksavik, K.; Frey, H. U.; Grocott, A.

    2016-05-01

    Here we present an event where simultaneous global imaging of the aurora from both hemispheres reveals a large longitudinal shift of the nightside aurora of about 3 h, being the largest relative shift reported on from conjugate auroral imaging. This is interpreted as evidence of closed field lines having very asymmetric footpoints associated with the persistent positive y component of the interplanetary magnetic field before and during the event. At the same time, the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network observes the ionospheric nightside convection throat region in both hemispheres. The radar data indicate faster convection toward the dayside in the dusk cell in the Southern Hemisphere compared to its conjugate region. We interpret this as a signature of a process acting to restore symmetry of the displaced closed magnetic field lines resulting in flux tubes moving faster along the banana cell than the conjugate orange cell. The event is analyzed with emphasis on Birkeland currents (BC) associated with this restoring process, as recently described by Tenfjord et al. (2015). Using data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) during the same conditions as the presented event, the large-scale BC pattern associated with the event is presented. It shows the expected influence of the process of restoring symmetry on BCs. We therefore suggest that these observations should be recognized as being a result of the dynamic effects of restoring footpoint symmetry on closed field lines in the nightside.

  3. Effects of intrinsic magnetostriction on tube-topology magnetoelectric sensors with high magnetic field sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Scott M.; Fitchorov, Trifon; Obi, Ogheneyunume; Chen, Yajie Harris, Vincent G.; Jiang, Liping; Hao, Hongbo; Wu, Shuangxia

    2014-05-07

    Three quasi-one-dimensional magnetoelectric (ME) magnetic field sensors, each with a different magnetostrictive wire material, were investigated in terms of sensitivity and noise floor. Magnetostrictive Galfenol, iron-cobalt-vanadium, and iron-nickel wires were examined. Sensitivity profiles, hysteresis effects, and noise floor measurements for both optimally biased and zero-biased conditions are presented. The FeNi wire (FN) exhibits high sensitivity (5.36 mV/Oe) at bias fields below 22 Oe and an optimal bias of 10 Oe, whereas FeGa wire (FG) exhibits higher sensitivity (6.89 mW/Oe) at bias fields >22 Oe. The sensor of FeCoV wire (FC) presents relatively low sensitivity (2.12 mV/Oe), due to low magnetostrictive coefficient. Each ME tube-topology sensor demonstrates relatively high sensitivity at zero bias field, which results from a magnetic shape anisotropy and internal strain of the thin magnetostrictive wire.

  4. The effect of electron inertia in Hall-driven magnetic field penetration in electron-magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field penetration in electron-magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) can be driven by density gradients through the Hall term [Kingsep et al., Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 10, 495 (1984)]. Particle-in-cell simulations have shown that a magnetic front can go unstable and break into vortices in the Hall-driven EMHD regime. In order to understand these results, a new fluid model had been derived from the Ly/Ln≪1 limit of EMHD, where Ly is the length scale along the front and Ln is the density gradient length scale. This model is periodic in the direction along the magnetic front, which allows the dynamics of the front to be studied independently of electrode boundary effects that could otherwise dominate the dynamics. Numerical solutions of this fluid model are presented that show for the first time the relation between Hall-driven EMHD, electron inertia, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and the formation of magnetic vortices. These solutions show that a propagating magnetic front is unstable to the same KH mode predicted for a uniform plasma. This instability causes the electron flow to break up into vortices that are then driven into the plasma with a speed that is proportional to the Hall speed. This demonstrates that, in two-dimensional geometry with sufficiently low collisionality [collision rate ν ≲ vHall/(4 δe) ], Hall-driven magnetic penetration occurs not as a uniform shock front but rather as vortex-dominated penetration. Once the vortices form, the penetration speed is found to be nearly a factor of two larger than the redicted speed ( vHall/2 ) obtained from Burgers' equation in the one-dimensional limit.

  5. Gamma radiation and magnetic field mediated delay in effect of accelerated ageing of soybean.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Bhupinder; Ahuja, Sumedha; Dahuja, Anil; Anand, Anjali

    2015-08-01

    Soybean seeds were exposed to gamma radiation (0.5, 1, 3 and 5 kGy), static magnetic field (50, 100 and 200 mT) and a combination of gamma radiation and magnetic energy (0.5 kGy + 200 mT and 5 kGy + 50 mT) and stored at room temperature for six months. These seeds were later subjected to accelerated ageing treatment at 42 °C temperature and 95-100 % relative humidity and were compared for various physical and biochemical characteristics between the untreated and the energized treatments. Energy treatment protected the quality of stored seeds in terms of its protein and oil content . Accelerated aging conditions, however, affected the oil and protein quantity and quality of seed negatively. Antioxidant enzymes exhibited a decline in their activity during aging while the LOX activity, which reflects the rate of lipid peroxidation, in general, increased during the aging. Gamma irradiated (3 and 5 kGy) and magnetic field treated seeds (100 and 200 mT) maintained a higher catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity which may help in efficient scavenging of deleterious free radical produced during the aging. Aging caused peroxidative changes to lipids, which could be contributed to the loss of oil quality. Among the electromagnetic energy treatments, a dose of 1-5 kGy of gamma and 100 mT, 200 mT magnetic field effectively slowed the rate of biochemical degradation and loss of cellular integrity in seeds stored under conditions of accelerated aging and thus, protected the deterioration of seed quality. Energy combination treatments did not yield any additional protection advantage. PMID:26243899

  6. Effect of steel metallurgy on it magneto-mechanical behavior in weak magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, I.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The magneto-mechanical behavior of five steels, mild steel, HSLA 80, HY100 and a quenched alloy steel, has been investigated. Magnetic fields of the order of the Earth's field and compressive stresses up to 200 MPa were applied to the steels. The increase in magnetization due to stress cycling in a constant applied field and to field cycling at constant stress was measured. The results show that the differential permeability of the steel largely determines the magnetization increase and that steels with similar microstructures have similar microstructures have similar magneto-mechanical response. The strength or hardness of the steel is a less reliable indicator of magneto-mechanical response.

  7. On the effects of magnetic field line topology on the energy propagation in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelaresi, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Using the MHD approximation, we study the propagation of energy from photospheric footpoint motions into the corona. Our model consists of a magnetic carpet with closed and open magnetic field lines. Magnetic null points are present close at the surface. The applied photospheric driver twists the field into a topologically non-trivial configuration which leads to reconnection and a change in field line topology. Prior to this event, the energy propagation into the corona is largely inhibited due to closed field lines. After such events the energy is free to propagate into the corona.

  8. The effect of external magnetic fields on the pore structure of polyurethane foams loaded with magnetic microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schümann, M.; Seelig, N.; Odenbach, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elastic matrices loaded with magnetic microparticles are a new kind of magnetic hybrid material gaining a lot of scientific interest during the last few years. The central advantage of those materials is given by the possibility to control the mechanical properties by external stimuli, in this case external magnetic fields. Due to their extraordinary elastic properties, polyurethane foams are a promising matrix material for a new approach to synthesize such magnetic hybrid materials. A key to a deeper understanding of this new material is the investigation on how the inner structure of the hybrid material is controllable by the application of an external magnetic field during the polymerization. This paper presents a convenient method for analysis of structural changes of magnetically influenced particle loaded polyurethane foams. The geometry and size of up to 40 000 individual pores was evaluated by means of x-ray microtomography and digital image processing. A modest impact of the magnetic field on the pore structure was found with the utilized foam material, proving the convenient applicability of this method for future investigation with magnetic hybrid foams.

  9. Anisotropic Magnetism in Field-Structured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert A.; Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy; Venturini, Eugene

    1999-06-24

    Magnetic field-structured-composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g. rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chain-like particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheet-like particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCS of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material.

  10. Magnetocaloric effect and magnetic cooling near a field-induced quantum-critical point

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Bernd; Tsui, Yeekin; Jaiswal-Nagar, Deepshikha; Tutsch, Ulrich; Honecker, Andreas; Remović-Langer, Katarina; Hofmann, Georg; Prokofiev, Andrey; Assmus, Wolf; Donath, Guido; Lang, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a quantum-critical point (QCP) can significantly affect the thermodynamic properties of a material at finite temperatures T. This is reflected, e.g., in the entropy landscape S(T,r) in the vicinity of a QCP, yielding particularly strong variations for varying the tuning parameter r such as pressure or magnetic field B. Here we report on the determination of the critical enhancement of ∂S/∂B near a B-induced QCP via absolute measurements of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), (∂T/∂B)S and demonstrate that the accumulation of entropy around the QCP can be used for efficient low-temperature magnetic cooling. Our proof of principle is based on measurements and theoretical calculations of the MCE and the cooling performance for a Cu2+-containing coordination polymer, which is a very good realization of a spin-½ antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain—one of the simplest quantum-critical systems.

  11. Multimode delta-E effect magnetic field sensors with adapted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, Sebastian; Reermann, Jens; Fichtner, Simon; Kirchhof, Christine; Quandt, Eckhard; Wagner, Bernhard; Schmidt, Gerhard; Faupel, Franz

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical and experimental study on low-noise piezoelectric thin film resonators that utilize the delta-E effect of a magnetostrictive layer to measure magnetic fields at low frequencies. Calculations from a physical model of the electromechanical resonator enable electrode designs to efficiently operate in the first and second transversal bending modes. As predicted by our calculations, the adapted electrode design improves the sensitivity by a factor of 6 and reduces the dynamic range of the sensor output by 16 dB, which significantly eases the requirements on readout electronics. Magnetic measurements show a bandwidth of 100 Hz at a noise level of about 100 pTHz-0.5.

  12. Dipole-fiber systems: radiation field patterns, effective magnetic dipoles, and induced cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakaramians, Shaghik; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Monro, Tanya M.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Afshar, Shahraam V.

    2015-12-01

    We study the radiation patterns produced by a dipole placed at the surface of a nanofiber and oriented perpendicular to it, either along the radial (r-oriented) or azimuthal (Φ-oriented) directions. We find that the dipole induces an effective circular cavity-like leaky mode in the nanofiber. The first radiation peak of the Φ-oriented dipole contributes only to TE radiation modes, while the radiation of the r-oriented dipole is composed of both TE and TM radiation modes, with relative contribution depending on the refractive index of the nanofiber. We reveal that the field pattern of the first resonance of a Φ-oriented dipole is associated with a magnetic dipole mode and strong magnetic response of an optical nanofiber.

  13. Ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in strong magnetic field with allowance for pressure effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, P.; Pavlov, G. ); Potekhin, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization equilibrium in highly magnetized (B = 10[sup 10] to 10[sup 12]G) hydrogen is investigated at temperatures from 5 eV to 50 keV and densities in the range 10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 3] g/cm[sup 3]. We have used the occupation probability formalism in order to take into account the pressure and density effects. The occupation probabilities used are slightly modified as compared to those derived by Hummer and Mihalas. We find that pressure ionization degree varies with the form of microfield distribution function. The non-ionized fraction is increased by the magnetic field in most of the parameter space. It is large enough so that the bound-free absorption must be taken into account in realistic models of neutron star atmospheres.

  14. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  15. Effect of the plasma-generated magnetic field on relativistic electron transport.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Ph; Feugeas, J-L; Regan, C; Olazabal-Loumé, M; Breil, J; Dubroca, B; Morreeuw, J-P; Tikhonchuk, V

    2011-07-01

    In the fast-ignition scheme, relativistic electrons transport energy from the laser deposition zone to the dense part of the target where the fusion reactions can be ignited. The magnetic fields and electron collisions play an important role in the collimation or defocusing of this electron beam. Detailed description of these effects requires large-scale kinetic calculations and is limited to short time intervals. In this paper, a reduced kinetic model of fast electron transport coupled to the radiation hydrodynamic code is presented. It opens the possibility to carry on hybrid simulations in a time scale of tens of picoseconds or more. It is shown with this code that plasma-generated magnetic fields induced by noncollinear temperature and density gradients may strongly modify electron transport in a time scale of a few picoseconds. These fields tend to defocus the electron beam, reducing the coupling efficiency to the target. This effect, that was not seen before in shorter time simulations, has to be accounted for in any ignition design using electrons as a driver. PMID:21867317

  16. Bioeffects of Static Magnetic Fields: Oxidative Stress, Genotoxic Effects, and Cancer Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghodbane, Soumaya; Lahbib, Aida; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of static magnetic fields (SMFs) with living organisms is a rapidly growing field of investigation. The magnetic fields (MFs) effect observed with radical pair recombination is one of the well-known mechanisms by which MFs interact with biological systems. Exposure to SMF can increase the activity, concentration, and life time of paramagnetic free radicals, which might cause oxidative stress, genetic mutation, and/or apoptosis. Current evidence suggests that cell proliferation can be influenced by a treatment with both SMFs and anticancer drugs. It has been recently found that SMFs can enhance the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic drugs; this may provide a new strategy for cancer therapy. This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of SMFs bioeffects. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: free radical generation and oxidative stress, apoptosis and genotoxicity, and cancer. After an introduction on SMF classification and medical applications, the basic phenomena to understand the bioeffects are described. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts; international safety guidelines are also cited. PMID:24027759

  17. Superconducting proximity effect in three-dimensional topological insulators in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burset, Pablo; Lu, Bo; Tkachov, Grigory; Tanaka, Yukio; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.; Trauzettel, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The proximity-induced pair potential in a topological insulator-superconductor hybrid features an interesting superposition of a conventional spin-singlet component from the superconductor and a spin-triplet one induced by the surface state of the topological insulator. This singlet-triplet superposition can be altered by the presence of a magnetic field. We study the interplay between topological order and superconducting correlations performing a symmetry analysis of the induced pair potential, using Green functions techniques to theoretically describe ballistic junctions between superconductors and topological insulators under magnetic fields. We relate a change in the conductance from a gapped profile into one with a zero-energy peak with the transition into a topologically nontrivial regime where the odd-frequency triplet pairing becomes the dominant component in the pair potential. The nontrivial regime, which provides a signature of odd-frequency triplet superconductivity, is reached for an out-of-plane effective magnetization with strength comparable to the chemical potential of the superconductor or for an in-plane one, parallel to the normal-superconductor interface, with strength of the order of the superconducting gap. Strikingly, in the latter case, a misalignment with the interface yields an asymmetry with the energy in the conductance unless the total contribution of the topological surface state is considered.

  18. New measurements of sextupole field decay and snapback effect on Tevatron dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Bauer, P.; Carcagno, R.; DiMarco, J.; Lamm, M.; Orris, D.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    To perform detailed studies of the dynamic effects in superconducting accelerator magnets, a fast continuous harmonics measurement system based on the application of a digital signal processor (DSP) has been built at Fermilab. Using this new system, the dynamic effects in the sextupole field, such as the field decay during the dwell at injection and the rapid subsequent ''snapback'' during the first few seconds of the energy ramp, are evaluated for more than ten Tevatron dipoles from the spare pool. The results confirm the previously observed fast drift in the first several seconds of the sextupole decay and provide additional information on a scaling law for predicting snapback duration. The information presented here can be used for an optimization of the Tevatron and for future LHC operations.

  19. Effects of Strong Static Magnetic Fields on Amphibian Development and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Satomi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Furuno, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-07-01

    This investigation attempts to clarify the effects of strong vertical and static magnetic fields (SMFs) of 11-15 T on Xenopus laevis development and on Xotx2 (an important regulator of fore- and midbrain morphogenesis) and Xag1 (essential for cement gland formation) gene expression. Results showed that (1) a strong SMF significantly retarded normal development and induced microcephaly, two heads, abnormal cement glands and multiple malformations, indicating that SMF inhibits normal embryonic development, (2) a strong SMF suppressed Xotx2 and Xag1 expression.

  20. In vitro investigation of eddy current effect on pacemaker operation generated by low frequency magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Babouri, A; Hedjeidj, A

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents in vitro investigation of the eddy current induction effects to the cardiac pacemaker exposed to low frequency magnetic fields. The method used in this study is based to the interaction by inductive coupling through the loop formed by the pacemaker and its leads and the surrounding medium. This interaction results in an induced electromotive force between the terminals of the pacemaker which can potentially disturb the operation of this last. In this article we present experimental results, analytical calculations and numerical simulations using the finite element method. PMID:18003302

  1. Mathematical modeling of the nonlinear electrodynamics effect of signal delay in the magnetic field of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapochka, M. G.; Denisov, M. M.; Denisova, I. P.; Kalenova, N. V.; Korolev, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    The paper is devoted to mathematical modeling of the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics effect: the action of the strong magnetic field of a pulsar on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that, due to the birefringence of the vacuum, for one normal wave, it takes more time to travel from a pulsar to a detector installed on astrophysical satellites than for the other normal wave. The delay of the pulse carried by the second normal wave relative to pulse carried by the first normal wave from the common point of origin to the satellite is calculated.

  2. Geometric Hall Effect of ^{23}Na Condensate in a Time- and Space-Dependent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gong-Ping; Yang, Ling-Ling; Chang, Gao-Zhan; Wu, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    We simulate numerically the dynamics of ^{23}Na condensate in a time- and space-dependent magnetic field with a variational approach. It is shown to be an efficient method to describe the complex dynamics of the system, which may excite the breather mode, the scissor mode, and the dipole mode simultaneously. Our results agree with the experimental observations of Choi et al. (Phys Rev Lett 111:245301, 2013). We reproduce qualitatively the geometric Hall effect and resonance behavior. We also find that the condensate shows a scissor-mode-like motion, which may play the shearing force to deform the condensate and consequently leads to the dynamical nucleation of quantized vortices.

  3. Polarization effect of a Gaussian laser pulse on magnetic field influenced electron acceleration in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2016-04-01

    Electron acceleration by a laser pulse in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field in vacuum has been analyzed. The azimuthal magnetic field influences the trajectory of an accelerated electron during the laser electron interaction in vacuum. The electron trajectory in the absence and presence of azimuthal magnetic field with a linearly polarized (LP) and circularly polarized (CP) laser pulses is analyzed. Due to the presence of azimuthal magnetic field, a confined trajectory of accelerated electron is observed in the direction of propagation of laser pulse. Resonance between the electron and the laser field occurs at optimum values of magnetic field, electron gains high energy from the laser and gets accelerated in the direction of propagation of laser pulse. The azimuthal magnetic field keeps the electron motion close to the axis parallel to the direction of propagation due to which the electron gains and retains high energy for longer distances. The electron energy gain is relatively higher with a CP laser pulse than that with LP laser pulse. The high energy gain of about 2   GeV is observed with a CP laser pulse of peak intensity 2.74 ×1020   W /cm2 in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field of 534   kG .

  4. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  5. Electric-field-induced spin resonance in antiferromagnetic insulators: Inverse process of the dynamical chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Akihiko; Chiba, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    We propose a realization of the electric-field-induced antiferromagnetic resonance. We consider three-dimensional antiferromagnetic insulators with spin-orbit coupling characterized by the existence of a topological term called the θ term. By solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in the presence of the θ term, we show that, in contrast to conventional methods using ac magnetic fields, the antiferromagnetic resonance state is realized by ac electric fields along with static magnetic fields. This mechanism can be understood as the inverse process of the dynamical chiral magnetic effect, an alternating current generation by magnetic fields. In other words, we propose a way to electrically induce the dynamical axion field in condensed matter. We discuss a possible experiment to observe our proposal, which utilizes the spin pumping from the antiferromagnetic insulator into a heavy metal contact.

  6. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  7. The effect of magnetic field near the anode on cylindrical Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hui; Hu, Peng; Huang, Hongyan; Yu, Daren

    2016-06-01

    The performance characteristics of a cylindrical Hall thruster depending on the magnetic field near the anode were investigated. The magnetic shielding rings were designed to adjust the magnetic field near the anode in different levels. The experiment results show that decreasing the magnetic field near the anode contributes to the enhancement of propellant utilization and the narrowing of ion energy distribution. It is suggested that the ionization region extends towards the anode, meanwhile, the angular distribution of ion beam is narrower, which could be attributed to the growing azimuthal current. As a result, the thrust and efficiency are enhanced significantly. This work can provide some optimal design ideas of the magnetic field to improve the performance of the thruster.

  8. GENERATION OF SEED MAGNETIC FIELD AROUND FIRST STARS: EFFECTS OF RADIATION FORCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Masashi; Doi, Kentaro; Susa, Hajime E-mail: mn921009@center.konan-u.ac.j

    2010-06-20

    We investigate seed magnetic field generation in the early universe by the radiation force of first stars. In a previous study with the steady assumption, large amplitudes ({approx}10{sup -15} G for first stars, {approx}10{sup -11} G for QSOs) are predicted. In this study, we formulate this issue in an unsteady framework. Then, we consider a specific model of magnetic field generation around a very massive first star. Consequently, we (1) find that the steady assumption is not valid in realistic situations and (2) obtain a much smaller magnetic field strength than that predicted by Langer et al. In addition, we find that the momentum transfer process during photoionization is more important than Thomson scattering. The resultant magnetic flux density around the first star is {approx_lt}10{sup -19} G. This seed magnetic field will not affect subsequent star formation in the neighborhood of first stars.

  9. Generation of Seed Magnetic Field Around First Stars: Effects of Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masashi; Doi, Kentaro; Susa, Hajime

    2010-06-01

    We investigate seed magnetic field generation in the early universe by the radiation force of first stars. In a previous study with the steady assumption, large amplitudes (~10-15 G for first stars, ~10-11 G for QSOs) are predicted. In this study, we formulate this issue in an unsteady framework. Then, we consider a specific model of magnetic field generation around a very massive first star. Consequently, we (1) find that the steady assumption is not valid in realistic situations and (2) obtain a much smaller magnetic field strength than that predicted by Langer et al. In addition, we find that the momentum transfer process during photoionization is more important than Thomson scattering. The resultant magnetic flux density around the first star is lsim10-19 G. This seed magnetic field will not affect subsequent star formation in the neighborhood of first stars.

  10. Magnetic Fields in Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Frank, Adam; Varniére, Peggy; Blackman, Eric G.

    2007-06-01

    Although several lines of evidence suggest that jets from young stars are driven magnetically from accretion disks, existing observations of field strengths in the bow shocks of these flows imply that magnetic fields play only a minor role in the dynamics at these locations. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we performed numerical simulations of expanding magnetized jets with stochastically variable input velocities with the AstroBEAR MHD code. Because the magnetic field B is proportional to the density n within compression and rarefaction regions, the magnetic signal speed drops in rarefactions and increases in the compressed areas of velocity-variable flows. In contrast, B~n0.5 for a steady state conical flow with a toroidal field, so the Alfvén speed in that case is constant along the entire jet. The simulations show that the combined effects of shocks, rarefactions, and divergent flow cause magnetic fields to scale with density as an intermediate power 1>p>0.5. Because p>0.5, the Alfvén speed in rarefactions decreases on average as the jet propagates away from the star. Hence, a typical Alfvén velocity in the jet close to the star is significantly larger than it is in the rarefactions ahead of bow shocks at larger distances. We find that the observed values of weak fields at large distances are consistent with strong fields required to drive the observed mass loss close to the star. Typical velocity perturbations, which form shocks at large distances, will produce only magnetic waves close to the star. For a typical stellar jet the crossover point inside which velocity perturbations of 30-40 km s-1 no longer produce shocks is ~300 AU from the source.

  11. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  12. Effect of weak, interrupted sinusoidal low frequency magnetic field on neural regeneration in rats: functional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bervar, Marijan

    2005-07-01

    A study of the effect of weak, interrupted sinusoidal low frequency magnetic field (ISMF) stimulation on regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve was carried out. In the experiment, 60 Wistar rats were used: 24 rats underwent unilateral sciatic nerve transection injury and immediate surgical nerve repair, 24 rats underwent unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, and the remaining 12 rats underwent a sham surgery. Half of the animals (n = 12) with either sciatic nerve lesion were randomly chosen and exposed between a pair of Helmholtz coils for 3 weeks post-injury, 4 h/day, to an interrupted (active period to pause ratio = 1.4 s/0.8 s) sinusoidal 50 Hz magnetic field of 0.5 mT. The other half of the animals (n = 12) and six rats with sham surgery were used for two separate controls. Functional recovery was followed for 6 weeks for the crush injuries and 7(1/2) months for the transection injuries by video assisted footprint analysis in static conditions and quantified using a recently revised static sciatic index (SSI) formula. We ascertained that the magnetic field influence was weak, but certainly detectable in both injury models. The accuracy of ISMF influence detection, determined by the one-way repeated measures ANOVA test, was better for the crush injury model: F(1, 198) = 9.0144, P = .003, than for the transection injury model: F(1, 198) = 6.4826, P = .012. The Student-Newman-Keuls range test for each response day yielded significant differences (P < .05) between the exposed and control groups early in the beginning of functional recovery and later on from the points adjacent to the beginning of the plateau, or 95% of functional recovery, and the end of observation. These differences probably reflect the ISMF systemic effect on the neuron cell bodies and increased and more efficient reinnervation of the periphery. PMID:15887258

  13. The effect of giant impactors on the magnetic field energy of an early Martian dynamo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, McGregor; Thieulot, Cedric; Monteux, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Through the cratering record embedded on its surface, Mars is one of the key planets required for investigating the formation and impact frequency in the early history of our Solar System. This record also holds clues to the events that may have caused the observed hemispheric dichotomy and cessation of the magnetic field that was present within the first 500 Myr of the planets' formation. We investigate the influence of giant impacts on the early Martian dynamo using the numerical dynamo modelling code PARODY-JA [1]. We hypothesize that the input heat from a giant impact will decrease the total heat flux at the CMB through mantle heating which leads to a decrease in the Rayleigh number of the core. As boundary conditions for the heat flux anomaly size, we use numerical results of a 750 km diameter impactor from the Monteux and Arkani-Hamed, 2014 [2] study which investigated impact heating and core merging of giant impacts in early Mars. We also determine the decrease in Rayleigh number from the change in total heat flux at the CMB using these results, where the decrease after impact is due to shock heating at the CMB. We calculate the time-averaged total magnetic field energy for an initial homogeneous heat flux model using a range of Rayleigh numbers (5 x 103 - 1 x 10^5). The Rayleigh number is then decreased for three new models - homogeneous, north pole impact and equatorial impact - and the time-averaged energy again determined. We find that the energy decreases more in our impact models, compared with the homogeneous, along with a variation in energy between the north pole and equatorial impact models. We conclude that giant impacts in Mars' early history would have decreased the total magnetic energy of the field and the decrease in energy is also dependent on the location of the impact. The magnetic field could have been disrupted beyond recovery from a planetesimal-sized collision; such as the suggested Borealis basin forming impact, or through the

  14. Magnetic fields end-face effect investigation of HTS bulk over PMG with 3D-modeling numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujie; Lu, Yiyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the magnetic fields end-face effect of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) is researched with 3D-modeling numerical method. The electromagnetic behavior of the bulk is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The framework is formulated by the magnetic field vector method (H-method). A superconducting levitation system composed of one rectangular HTS bulk and one infinite long PMG is successfully investigated using the proposed method. The simulation results show that for finite geometrical HTS bulk, even the applied magnetic field is only distributed in x-y plane, the magnetic field component Hz which is along the z-axis can be observed interior the HTS bulk.

  15. Magnetic field effects on the energy deposition spectra of MV photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Stanescu, T; Fallone, B G

    2009-01-21

    Several groups worldwide have proposed various concepts for improving megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy that involve irradiating patients in the presence of a magnetic field-either for image guidance in the case of hybrid radiotherapy-MRI machines or for purposes of introducing tighter control over dose distributions. The presence of a magnetic field alters the trajectory of charged particles between interactions with the medium and thus has the potential to alter energy deposition patterns within a sub-cellular target volume. In this work, we use the MC radiation transport code PENELOPE with appropriate algorithms invoked to incorporate magnetic field deflections to investigate electron energy fluence in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and the energy deposition spectra within a 10 microm water sphere as a function of magnetic field strength. The simulations suggest only very minor changes to the electron fluence even for extremely strong magnetic fields. Further, calculations of the dose-averaged lineal energy indicate that a magnetic field strength of at least 70 T is required before beam quality will change by more than 2%. PMID:19088391

  16. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Nie, Yi-Hang; Chen, Jingzhe; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD.

  17. Magnetic ordering and crystal field effects in quasi-caged structure compound PrFe2Al8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Ghosh, Sarit K.; Ramesh Kumar, K.; Strydom, André M.

    2016-04-01

    The compound PrFe2Al8 possesses a three-dimensional network structure resulting from the packing of Al polyhedra centered at the transition metal element Fe and the rare earth Pr. Along the c-axis, Fe and Pr form chains which are separated from each other by the Al-network. In this paper, the magnetism and crystalline electric field effects in PrFe2Al8 are investigated through the analysis of magnetization and specific heat data. A magnetic phase transition in the Pr lattice is identified at TNPr ≈ 4 K in dc magnetization and ac susceptibility data. At 2 K, the magnetization isotherm presents a ferromagnetic saturation, however, failing to reach full spin-only ferromagnetic moment of Pr3+. Metamagnetic step-like low-field features are present in the magnetization curve at 2 K which is shown to shift upon field-cooling the material. Arrott plots centered around TPrN display "S"-like features suggestive of an inhomogeneous magnetic state. The magnetic entropy, Sm, estimated from specific heat outputs a value of R ln(2) at TN2 suggesting a doublet state for Pr3+. The magnetic specific heat is modeled by using a 9-level Schottky equation pertinent to the Pr3+ ion with J=4. Given the crystalline electric field situation of Pr3+, the inference of a doublet state from specific heat and consequent long-range magnetic order is an unexpected result.

  18. Gravitational instability of a rotating partially-ionized plasma carrying a uniform magnetic field with Hall effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Nagendra; Srivastava, Krishna M.; Mittal, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of gravitational instability of an infinite homogeneous self-gravitating medium carrying a uniform magnetic field in the presence of Hall effect has been investigated to include the effect due to rotation. The dispersion relation has been obtained. It has been found that the Jeans's criterion for the instability remains unaffected even when the effect due to rotation is considered in the presence of Hall effect carrying a uniform magnetic.

  19. Effect of high solenoidal magnetic fields on breakdown voltages of high vacuum 805 MHz cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Qian, Z.; Norem, J.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Errede, D.; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-10-01

    There is an on going international collaboration studying the feasibility and cost of building a muon collider or neutrino factory [1,2]. An important aspect of this study is the full understanding of ionization cooling of muons by many orders of magnitude for the collider case. An important muon ionization cooling experiment, MICE [3], has been proposed to demonstrate and validate the technology that could be used for cooling. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF Cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal field. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generation of dark current, x-rays and on the breakdown voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station and a large warm bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type cavity with thin removable window apertures. This system allows dark current and breakdown studies of different window configurations and materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievable accelerating gradient is reduced by a factor greater than 2 when solenoidal field of greater than 2 T are applied to the cavity.

  20. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E. E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  1. A Comparison Between Magnetic Field Effects in Excitonic and Exciplex Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin Tiras, Kevser; Wang, Yifei; Harmon, Nicholas J.; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Flatte, Michael E.

    In flat-panel displays and lighting applications, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been widely used because of their efficient light emission, low-cost manufacturing and flexibility. The electrons and holes injected from the anode and cathode, respectively, form a tightly bound exciton as they meet at a molecule in organic layer. Excitons occur as spin singlets or triplets and the ratio between singlet and triplet excitons formed is 1:3 based on spin degeneracy. The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of fluorescent-based OLEDs is limited 25% because only singlet excitons contribute the light emission. To overcome this limitation, thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) materials have been introduced in the field of OLEDs. The exchange splitting between the singlet and triplet states of two-component exciplex systems is comparable to the thermal energy in TADF materials, whereas it is usually much larger in excitons. Reverse intersystem crossing occurs from triplet to singlet exciplex state, and this improves the IQE. An applied small magnetic field can change the spin dynamics of recombination in TADF blends. In this study, magnetic field effects on both excitonic and exciplex OLEDs will be presented and comparison similarities and differences will be made.

  2. Non-Fermi-liquid magic angle effects in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a theoretical problem of electron-electron interactions in an inclined magnetic field in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) conductor. We show that they result in strong non-Fermi-liquid corrections to a specific heat, provided that the direction of the magnetic field is far from the so-called Lebed's magic angles (LMAs). If magnetic field is directed close to one of the LMAs, the specific heat corrections become small and the Fermi-liquid picture restores. As a result, we predict Fermi-liquid-non-Fermi-liquid angular crossovers in the vicinities of the LMA directions of the field. We suggest to perform the corresponding experiment in the Q1D conductor (Per) 2Au (mnt) 2 under pressure in magnetic fields of the order of H ≃25 T .

  3. Pairing of Fermions with Unequal Effective Charges in an Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial magnetic fields (AMFs) created for ultracold systems depend sensitively on the internal structure of the atoms. In a mixture, each component experiences a different AMF depending on its internal state. This enables the study of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of fermions with unequal effective charges. In this Letter, we investigate the superconducting (SC) transition of a system formed by such pairs as a function of field strength. We consider a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas of unequal effective charges but equal densities with attractive interactions. We find that the phase diagram is altered drastically compared to the usual balanced charge case. First, for some AMFs there is no SC transition and isolated SC phases are formed, reflecting the discrete Landau level (LL) structure. SC phases become reentrant both in AMF and temperature. For extremely high fields where both components are confined to their lowest LLs, the effect of the charge imbalance is suppressed. Charge asymmetry reduces the critical temperature even in the low-field semiclassical regime. We discuss a pair breaking mechanism due to the unequal Lorentz forces acting on the components of the Cooper pairs to identify the underlying physics.

  4. Pairing of Fermions with Unequal Effective Charges in an Artificial Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Ünal, F Nur; Oktel, M Ö

    2016-01-29

    Artificial magnetic fields (AMFs) created for ultracold systems depend sensitively on the internal structure of the atoms. In a mixture, each component experiences a different AMF depending on its internal state. This enables the study of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of fermions with unequal effective charges. In this Letter, we investigate the superconducting (SC) transition of a system formed by such pairs as a function of field strength. We consider a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas of unequal effective charges but equal densities with attractive interactions. We find that the phase diagram is altered drastically compared to the usual balanced charge case. First, for some AMFs there is no SC transition and isolated SC phases are formed, reflecting the discrete Landau level (LL) structure. SC phases become reentrant both in AMF and temperature. For extremely high fields where both components are confined to their lowest LLs, the effect of the charge imbalance is suppressed. Charge asymmetry reduces the critical temperature even in the low-field semiclassical regime. We discuss a pair breaking mechanism due to the unequal Lorentz forces acting on the components of the Cooper pairs to identify the underlying physics. PMID:26871343

  5. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, K. J.; Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J.; Pepper, M.

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  6. Solitary waves in two-dimensional dusty plasma crystal: Effects of weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Gupta, M. R.

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that in the presence of weak magnetic field, the dust lattice solitary wave in two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal dusty plasma crystal is governed by a gyration-modified 2D Korteweg-de Vries equation due to the action of Lorentz force on the dust particles. Numerical solutions reveal that only for weak magnetic field an apparently single hump solitary wave solution exist. But, for strong magnetic field dust lattice solitary wave becomes unstable showing repetitive solitary hump of increasing magnitude with time.

  7. Investigating the magnetic field effect on electron-hole pair in organic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W.; Gao, K.; Yin, S.; Xie, S. J.

    2013-05-01

    By constructing dynamic equations including electrons, holes and their pair densities, we calculate the magnetoconductance (MC) and the magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL) separately. It is indicated that MC and MEL may result from different response on the applied magnetic field. MC is from the scattering of polarons by magnetic field related triplet excitons, while MEL is mainly from magnetic field related conversion between singlet and triplet electron-hole pairs. Furthermore, we discuss the relation between MC and MEL. The theoretical calculations are well consistent with the experimental results.

  8. Effects of magnetic fields from underwater electrical cutting on in vitro corrosion of dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Högstedt, P; Odelius, H; Norén, J G

    1988-11-01

    Metallic taste has been reported from divers working with underwater electric welding and cutting. An in vitro model was designed to simulate the intraoral situation of the divers with respect to the magnetic field. Potentiostatic analyses were performed on amalgam samples exposed to AC and DC magnetic fields. Morphologic changes were analyzed using differential interference light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical changes on the surface of the amalgam samples were analyzed with secondary ion mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated that dental amalgams exposed to a specific AC magnetic field underwent morphologic and chemical changes in the superficial amalgam layers. PMID:3227577

  9. Effect of adiabatic trapping on vortices and solitons in degenerate plasma in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, S.; Shah, H. A.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of adiabatic trapping as a microscopic phenomenon in an inhomogeneous degenerate plasma is investigated in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field, and a modified Hasegawa Mima equation for the drift ion-acoustic wave is obtained. The linear dispersion relation in the presence of the quantizing magnetic field is investigated. The modified Hasegawa Mima equation is investigated to obtain bounce frequencies of the trapped particles. The Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for the two-dimensional case and finally the Sagdeev potential approach is used to obtain solitary structures. The theoretically obtained results have been analyzed numerically for different astrophysical plasma and quantizing magnetic field values.

  10. The effects of axial magnetic fields on the operating characteristics and downstream plasma parameters of DC plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, Y.; Ono, S.; Teii, S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma torch is used in many industrial processes for high temperature sources. In the past, an application of magnetic field is experientially known to stabilize plasma torch operations. However, there is a little discussion regarding to magnetic field effects on plasma torch operating characteristics and plasma parameters. In this work, the influences of magnetic field and plasma gas flow rate on plasma torch current-voltage characteristics and downstream plasma parameters have been experimentally studied, and results are qualitatively analyzed based on the charged particle transport equation.

  11. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  12. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  13. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  14. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, I. V.; Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-10-01

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8-12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ˜0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa).

  15. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, I V; Akhmadeev, Yu H; Koval, N N

    2015-10-01

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8-12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ∼0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa). PMID:26520947

  16. Convective Effects During Diffusivity Measurements in Liquids with An Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khine, Yu Yu; Banish, R. Michael; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    2003-01-01

    Convective contamination of self-diffusion experiments with an applied magnetic field is considered using a two-dimensional axisymmetric model. Constant, uniform, and an additional non-uniform heat fluxes are imposed along the sidewall of the cylinder while constant heat loss occurs through the top and bottom. In this model, due to a very small thermal Peclet number, convective heat transfer is neglected, and the flow is steady and inertialess. Time-dependent concentration is solved for various values of the mass Peclet number, Pe(sub m), (the ratio between the convective transport rate and the diffusive transport rate) and different magnetic field strengths represented by the Hartmann number Ha. Normalized values of these diffusivities vs. effective Pe(sub m) are presented for different imposed temperature profiles. In all cases, the diffusivity value obtained through the simulated measurement increases as the effective Pe(sub m) increases. The numerical results suggest that an additional periodic flux, or hot and cold spots, can significantly decrease the convective contamination in our geometry.

  17. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, I. V. Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-10-15

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8–12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ∼0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa)

  18. Heat current characteristics in nanojunctions: The effect of external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, D. Melisa; Restrepo, Juliana; Rodriguez, Boris A.; Chitra, R.

    We study the heat current in the simplest hybrid device of a two level system weakly coupled to two heat baths. We consider both metallic and semiconducting baths with external magnetic fields applied on the central spin and the baths. By using a reduced density matrix approach together with a simple Born-Markov approximation we calculate the heat current. Our goal is to investigate the effect of the applied fields in the transient and steady state heat current, the ensuing rectification and the possibility of using our setup as a building block for a quantum thermal diode. 1This work was supported by the Vicerrectoria de Investigacion of the Universidad Antonio Narino, Colombia under Project Number 20141031 and by COLCIENCIAS under Grant Number 111556934912.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulation for different magnetic mirror effects on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Peng-Bo; Zhao, Yin-Jian; Yu, Da-Ren

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic mirror used as an efficient tool to confine plasma has been widely adopted in many different areas especially in recent cusped field thrusters. In order to check the influence of magnetic mirror effect on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster, three different radii of the discharge channel (6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm) in a cusped field thruster are investigated by using Particle-in-Cell Plus Monte Carlo (PIC-MCC) simulated method, under the condition of a fixed axial length of the discharge channel and the same operating parameters. It is found that magnetic cusps inside the small radius discharge channel cannot confine electrons very well. Thus, the electric field is hard to establish. With the reduction of the discharge channel’s diameter, more electrons will escape from cusps to the centerline area near the anode due to a lower magnetic mirror ratio. Meanwhile, the leak width of the cusped magnetic field will increase at the cusp. By increasing the magnetic field strength in a small radius model of a cusped field thruster, the negative effect caused by the weak magnetic mirror effect can be partially compensated. Therefore, according to engineering design, the increase of magnetic field strength can contribute to obtaining a good performance, when the radial distance between the magnets and the inner surface of the discharge channel is relatively big. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51006028) and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  20. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators. PMID:23214706

  1. The effect of the disk magnetic element profile on the saturation field and noise of a magneto-modulation magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetoshko, P. M.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Skidanov, V. A.; Syvorotka, I. I.; Syvorotka, I. M.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Using the finite element method, it was shown by simulations that the approximation of a semielliptic thickness profile of magnetic disk by a stepped profile reduces the saturation field. Reducing the saturation field improves the sensitivity of magneto-modulation sensors, which is confirmed by experiments in the measurements of noise using magnetic field sensors that have a core with a stepped profile. The obtained level of magnetic sensor noise with a four-stage-core profile (1.5 × 10-9 Oe/Hz1/2) is more than an order of magnitude lower than in the known modern counterparts.

  2. Combined effect of demagnetizing field and induced magnetic anisotropy on the magnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, V.; Kazantseva, N. E.; Moučka, R.; Sapurina, I.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of factors responsible for the high-frequency shift of the complex permeability (μ*) dispersion region in polymer composites of manganese-zinc (MnZn) ferrite, as well as to the increase in their thermomagnetic stability. The magnetic spectra of the ferrite and its composites with polyurethane (MnZn-PU) and polyaniline (MnZn-PANI) are measured in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 3 GHz in a longitudinal magnetization field of up to 700 Ое and in the temperature interval from -20 °С to +150 °С. The approximation of the magnetic spectra by a model, which takes into account the role of domain wall motion and magnetization rotation, allows one to determine the specific contribution of resonance processes associated with domain wall motion and the natural ferromagnetic resonance to the μ*. It is established that, at high frequencies, the μ* of the MnZn ferrite is determined solely by magnetization rotation, which occurs in the region of natural ferromagnetic resonance when the ferrite is in the “single domain” state. In the polymer composites of the MnZn ferrite, the high-frequency permeability is also determined mainly by the magnetization rotation; however, up to high values of magnetizing fields, there is a contribution of domain wall motion, thus the “single domain” state in ferrite is not reached. The frequency and temperature dependence of μ* in polymer composites are governed by demagnetizing field and the induced magnetic anisotropy. The contribution of the induced magnetic anisotropy is crucial for MnZn-PANI. It is attributed to the elastic stresses that arise due to the domain wall pinning by a polyaniline film adsorbed on the surface of the ferrite during in-situ polymerization.

  3. Development and evaluation of intermediate frequency magnetic field exposure system for studies of in vitro biological effects.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Hirota, Izuo; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Omori, Hideki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed an intermediate frequency (IF) magnetic field exposure system for in vitro studies. Since there are no previous studies on exposure to heating-frequency magnetic fields generated from an induction heating (IH) cook top, there is a strong need for such an exposure system and for biological studies of IF magnetic fields. This system mainly consists of a magnetic-field-generating coil housed inside an incubator, inside which cultured cells can be exposed to magnetic field. Two systems were prepared to allow the experiment to be conducted in a double-blind manner. The level of the generated magnetic field was set to 532 microT rms in the exposure space, 23 kHz, 80 times the value in the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines, with a spatial field uniformity better than 3.8%. The waveforms were nearly sinusoidal. It was also confirmed that the parasitic electric field was 157 V/m rms and the induced electric field was 1.9 V/m rms. The temperature was maintained at 36.5 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 2 h. Furthermore, leaked magnetic flux density was 0.7 microT rms or lower at extremely low frequency (ELF) and IF in the stopped system when the other system was being operated, and the environmental magnetic flux density was 0.1 microT rms or lower at the center of the coils. As a result, it was confirmed that this system could be successfully used to evaluate the biological effects of exposure to IF magnetic fields. PMID:17570495

  4. Self-Magnetic Field Effects on Electron Emission as the Critical Current is Approached

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P. F.; Cooperstein, G.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.

    2001-09-28

    The self-magnetic field associated with the current in a planar diode is shown to reduce electron emission below the Child-Langmuir current density. As the magnetic field increases, the diode current is limited to the critical current. Here, a ID analysis is carried out to calculate the suppressed current density in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The problem is shown to be similar to that of the limiting current (i.e., Hull current) calculated in a crossed field gap, in which a constant transverse magnetic field is applied across the gap to insulate the electron flow. In the case considered here, the magnetic field is produced by the diode current itself and this self-magnetic field decreases with distance along the gap. It is shown that the emitted current density is only modestly reduced from the Child-Langmuir current density. The 1-D analysis remains valid until critical current is approached, at which point orbit crossing occurs and a 2-D kinetic analysis is required. The minimum diode length required to reach critical current is also derived.

  5. Effects of static magnetic fields on light scattering in red chromatophore of goldfish scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.

    2010-05-01

    Light scattering in a guanine crystal plate of goldfish scales was observed with and without static magnetic field exposure. Under a microscopic image with dark-field-illumination, the structural color of the scale by guanine plates was observed, and isolated chromatophores showed a twinkling which was the intermittent light scattering of the light from the side. The light scattering was quenched by static magnetic fields of more than 0.26 tesla (T). The quenching was reversibly occurred when the applied external magnetic fields were changed between ambient fields and 5 T. The quenched light scattering did not improve when the magnetic field was decreased from 5 to 0.3 T. It recovered to the original twinkling state about one minute after reaching an ambient geomagnetic field level. The mechanism of the quenched light scattering was speculated to be concerned with the possible magnetic orientation of guanine crystal plates, which were sustained by protein fibers in the red chromatophore. The diamagnetic complex of guanine crystal plates and protein fibers are the candidates for the nanosized light scattering controller based on the magnetic orientation mechanism.

  6. Pairing of Fermions with Unequal Effective Charges in an Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, Nur; Oktel, M. O.

    2016-05-01

    Artificial magnetic fields (AMFs) created for ultracold systems depend sensitively on the internal structure of the atoms. In a mixture, each component couples to the AMF with a different charge. This enables the study of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of fermions with unequal effective charges. We investigate the superconducting (SC) transition of a system formed by such pairs as a function of the field strength. We consider a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas of unequal charges but equal densities with attractive interactions. We find that the phase diagram is altered drastically compared to the usual equal charge case. First, for some AMFs there is no SC transition and isolated SC phases are formed, reflecting the discrete Landau level (LL) structure. SC phases become reentrant both in AMF and temperature. For extremely high fields where both components are confined to their lowest LLs, the effect of the charge imbalance is suppressed. Charge asymmetry reduces the critical temperature even in the low-field semiclassical regime. We discuss a pair breaking mechanism due to the unequal Lorentz forces acting on the components of the Cooper pairs to identify the underlying physics.

  7. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  8. Effect of 10-T magnetic fields on structural colors in guanine crystals of fish scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Kudo, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    This work reports the magnetically modulated structural colors in the chromatophore of goldfish scales under static magnetic fields up to 10 T. A fiber optic system for spectroscopy measurements and a CCD microscope were set in the horizontal bore of a 10-T superconducting magnet. One leaf of a fish scale was set in a glass chamber, exposed to visible light from its side direction, and then static magnetic fields were applied perpendicular to the surface of the scale. In addition, an optical fiber for spectroscopy was directed perpendicular to the surface. During the magnetic field sweep-up, the aggregate of guanine thin plates partially showed a rapid light quenching under 0.26 to 2 T; however, most of the thin plates continued to scatter the side-light and showed changing iridescence, which was displayed individually by each guanine plate. For example, an aggregate in the chromatophore exhibited a dynamic change in structural color from white-green to dark blue when the magnetic fields changed from 2 to 10 T. The spectrum profile, which was obtained by the fiber optic system, confirmed the image color changes under magnetic field exposure. Also, a linearly polarized light transmission was measured on fish scales by utilizing an optical polarizer and analyzer. The transmitted polarized light intensities increased in the range of 500-550 nm compared to the intensity at 700 nm during the magnetic field sweep-up. These results indicate that the multi-lamella structure of nano-mirror plates in guanine hexagonal micro-plates exhibit diamagnetically modulated structure changes, and its light interference is affected by strong magnetic fields.

  9. ENHANCED DISSIPATION RATE OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN STRIPED PULSAR WINDS BY THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, Makoto; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, we report on turbulent acceleration of the dissipation of the magnetic field in the post-shock region of a Poynting flux-dominated flow, such as the Crab pulsar wind nebula. We have performed two-dimensional resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of subsonic turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the shock fronts of the Poynting flux-dominated flows in pulsar winds. We find that turbulence stretches current sheets which substantially enhances the dissipation of the magnetic field, and that most of the initial magnetic field energy is dissipated within a few eddy-turnover times. We also develop a simple analytical model for turbulent dissipation of the magnetic field that agrees well with our simulations. The analytical model indicates that the dissipation rate does not depend on resistivity even in the small resistivity limit. Our findings can possibly alleviate the {sigma}-problem in the Crab pulsar wind nebulae.

  10. A study: Effect of Students Peer Assisted Learning on Magnetic Field Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueanploy, Wannapa

    2016-04-01

    This study is the case study of Physic II Course for students of Pathumwan Institute of Technology. The purpose of this study is: 1) to develop cooperative learning method of peer assisted learning (PAL), 2) to compare the learning achievement before and after studied magnetic field lesson by cooperative learning method of peer assisted learning. The population was engineering students of Pathumwan Institute of Technology (PIT’s students) who registered Physic II Course during year 2014. The sample used in this study was selected from the 72 students who passed in Physic I Course. The control groups learning magnetic fields by Traditional Method (TM) and experimental groups learning magnetic field by method of peers assisted learning. The students do pretest before the lesson and do post-test after the lesson by 20 items achievement tests of magnetic field. The post-test higher than pretest achievement significantly at 0.01 level.

  11. The effect of magnetic fields on the products of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaev, O. R.; Sutter, E. A.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Structures of gold nanoparticles were formed by laser ablation of bulk gold immersed in water. An excimer laser with a wavelength of 351 nm and a pulse energy of 7 mJ was used. Ablation was performed in two configurations: without and with an external 0.2 T magnetic field parallel to the ablation plume. Both configurations result in structures that include chains of aggregated nanoparticles, but to different degrees. Ablation in a magnetic field results in a higher fraction of spherical nanoparticles and shorter nanowires, compared to the nanowire networks formed in the absence of the field. This can be explained by magnetic confinement of the plasma during plume expansion. A model explaining nanowire formation and dependence on fluence and magnetic field is proposed.

  12. Weak Ligand-Field Effect from Ancillary Ligands on Enhancing Single-Ion Magnet Performance.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yin-Shan; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Wang, Bing-Wu; Gao, Song

    2016-08-26

    A series of bis-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-supported Dy complexes containing different ancillary ligands were synthesized and characterized. Magnetic studies showed that 1 Dy [Cp*2 DyCl(THF)], 1 Dy' [Cp*2 DyCl2 K(THF)]n , 2 Dy [Cp*2 DyBr(THF)], 3 Dy [Cp*2 DyI(THF)] and 4 Dy [Cp*2 DyTp] (Tp=hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate) were single-ion magnets (SIMs). The 1D dysprosium chain 1 Dy' exhibited a hysteresis at up to 5 K. Furthermore, 3 Dy featured the highest energy barrier (419 cm(-1) ) among the complexes. The effects of ancillary ligands on single-ion magnetic properties were studied by experimental, ab initio calculations and electrostatic analysis methods in detail. These results demonstrated that the QTM rate was strongly dependent on the ancillary ligands and that a weak equatorial ligand field could be beneficial for constructing Dy-SIMs. PMID:27417884

  13. Cryptochromes and Hormone Signal Transduction under Near-Zero Magnetic Fields: New Clues to Magnetic Field Effects in a Rice Planthopper

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gui-Jun; Wang, Wen-Jing; Xu, Jing-Jing; Yang, Quan-Feng; Dai, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Feng-Jiao; Sword, Gregory A.; Pan, Wei-Dong; Chen, Fa-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although there are considerable reports of magnetic field effects (MFE) on organisms, very little is known so far about the MFE-related signal transduction pathways. Here we establish a manipulative near-zero magnetic field (NZMF) to investigate the potential signal transduction pathways involved in MFE. We show that exposure of migratory white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera, to the NZMF results in delayed egg and nymphal development, increased frequency of brachypterous females, and reduced longevity of macropterous female adults. To understand the changes in gene expression underlying these phenotypes, we examined the temporal patterns of gene expression of (i) CRY1 and CRY2 as putative magnetosensors, (ii) JHAMT, FAMeT and JHEH in the juvenile hormone pathway, (iii) CYP307A1 in the ecdysone pathway, and (iv) reproduction-related Vitellogenin (Vg). The significantly altered gene expression of CRY1 and CRY2 under the NZMF suggest their developmental stage-specific patterns and potential upstream location in magnetic response. Gene expression patterns of JHAMT, JHEH and CYP307A1 were consistent with the NZMF-triggered delay in nymphal development, higher proportion of brachypterous female adults, and the shortened longevity of macropterous female adults, which show feasible links between hormone signal transduction and phenotypic MFE. By conducting manipulative NZMF experiments, our study suggests an important role of the geomagnetic field (GMF) in modulating development and physiology of insects, provides new insights into the complexity of MFE-magnetosensitivity interactions, and represents an initial but crucial step forward in understanding the molecular basis of cryptochromes and hormone signal transduction involved in MFE. PMID:26173003

  14. Cryptochromes and Hormone Signal Transduction under Near-Zero Magnetic Fields: New Clues to Magnetic Field Effects in a Rice Planthopper.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gui-Jun; Wang, Wen-Jing; Xu, Jing-Jing; Yang, Quan-Feng; Dai, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Feng-Jiao; Sword, Gregory A; Pan, Wei-Dong; Chen, Fa-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although there are considerable reports of magnetic field effects (MFE) on organisms, very little is known so far about the MFE-related signal transduction pathways. Here we establish a manipulative near-zero magnetic field (NZMF) to investigate the potential signal transduction pathways involved in MFE. We show that exposure of migratory white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera, to the NZMF results in delayed egg and nymphal development, increased frequency of brachypterous females, and reduced longevity of macropterous female adults. To understand the changes in gene expression underlying these phenotypes, we examined the temporal patterns of gene expression of (i) CRY1 and CRY2 as putative magnetosensors, (ii) JHAMT, FAMeT and JHEH in the juvenile hormone pathway, (iii) CYP307A1 in the ecdysone pathway, and (iv) reproduction-related Vitellogenin (Vg). The significantly altered gene expression of CRY1 and CRY2 under the NZMF suggest their developmental stage-specific patterns and potential upstream location in magnetic response. Gene expression patterns of JHAMT, JHEH and CYP307A1 were consistent with the NZMF-triggered delay in nymphal development, higher proportion of brachypterous female adults, and the shortened longevity of macropterous female adults, which show feasible links between hormone signal transduction and phenotypic MFE. By conducting manipulative NZMF experiments, our study suggests an important role of the geomagnetic field (GMF) in modulating development and physiology of insects, provides new insights into the complexity of MFE-magnetosensitivity interactions, and represents an initial but crucial step forward in understanding the molecular basis of cryptochromes and hormone signal transduction involved in MFE. PMID:26173003

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar