Science.gov

Sample records for effective mass approximation

  1. Rational approximations of effectiveness factor and general diagnostic criteria for heat and mass transport limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzo, E.E.; Gottifredi, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Many efforts have been made to predict the effect of diffusion on the observed rate of reaction and its role in modifying the activity and selectivity of porous catalysts. The discussion of rational approximation predicts the effect of diffusional phenomena on the overall rate of reaction under a great variety of circumstances and shows how some part of the theoretical development can be used to deduce two general criteria to establish the conditions where diffusional phenomena can be safely neglected. The reviewed approximations give accurate results with minimal computational effort as long as multiplicity is absent. The expression is given that accurately predicts effectiveness factor values under isothermal conditions provided the apparent reaction order is greater than 0.5. Expressions have been previously reported that are applicable under nonisothermal conditions. The review of the 54 references was devoted to the single reaction case because not much work has been done on complex reaction systems. (BLM)

  2. Two-loop QCD corrections to the MSSM Higgs masses beyond the effective-potential approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrassi, G.; Di Vita, S.; Slavich, P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, including the effect of non-vanishing external momenta in the self-energies. We obtain corrections of and , i.e., all two-loop corrections that involve the strong gauge coupling when the only non-vanishing Yukawa coupling is the top one. We adopt either the renormalization scheme or a mixed on-shell (OS)- scheme where the top/stop parameters are renormalized on-shell. We compare our results with those of earlier calculations, pointing out an inconsistency in a recent result obtained in the mixed OS- scheme. The numerical impact of the new corrections on the prediction for the lightest-scalar mass is moderate, but already comparable to the accuracy of the Higgs-mass measurement at the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Study of Odor Approximation by Using Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Masashi; Nihei, Yasunori; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2011-09-01

    Since a set of odor components to cover wide range of smells has not been revealed yet, we studied the selection of odor components using essential-oil mass spectrum database. Basis vectors were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization method1 and then non-negative least squares method was used to determine the recipe. The odor approximations of three typical essential oils were confirmed by the sensory test. It was found that the mass spectrum data were correlated with the sensory test result. Moreover, this correlation was remarkable in the high m/z region.

  4. Approximate methods for building extreme mass ratio inspiral waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott

    2007-04-01

    The ``extreme mass ratio inspiral'' (or EMRI) problem has captured much attention in recent years. This is due to its relevance at describing a potentially important gravitational-wave source, and to the elegance of techniques which are being developed to solve it. A complete, self-consistent solution to this problem will require detailed knowledge of the self-interaction of a small body orbiting a Kerr black hole, taken (at least in part) to second order. This challenge will consume much time and effort. In the meantime, there is an exigent need for waveforms which, though not correct in all details, are sufficiently reliable that they can be used to understand how to measure these waves with space-based gravitational-wave antennae. I will describe in this talk results from a crude but surprisingly effective ``kludge'' approximation. The kludge produces waves which match well with available strong-field results, requiring only a fraction of the computational effort. Motivated by how the kludge operates, I will argue that a good medium between the kludge and the full solution is a ``hybrid'' approach to waveform generation. This hybrid combines the best features of both time and frequency domain approaches to black hole perturbation theory, using them to make EMRI waves that are as accurate as is possible without incorporating self-force information.

  5. Very extended shpaes in the A {approximately} 150 mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    There was a report of a rotational band in {sup 152}Dy or {sup 153}Dy that is characterized by a dynamic moment of inertia of 130h{sup 2} MeV{sup -1}. For purposes of orientation, it should be noted that the well known superdeformed bands in this region are characterized by moments of inertia of {approximately}90. Some calculations were carried out in two- and three-dimensional shape spaces, in order to understand this experimental observation. These calculations show either very shallow minima and/or minima that do not become yrast below I = 90 at the very large deformations that would seem to be required to explain such a large moment of inertia. We extended our four-dimensional deformation space Strutinsky calculations to a study of this mass region, with the hope of gaining some insight into the nature of this band. We are also analyzing the other nuclides of this mass region with the hope of finding other instances of such very extended shapes. This analysis is almost complete.

  6. QCD Phase Diagram and the Constant Mass Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Ayala, A.; Bashir, A.; Gutiérrez, E.; Raya, A.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical generation of quark masses in the infrared region of QCD plays an important role to understand the peculiar nature of the physics of hadrons. As it is known, the solution of QCD gap equation for the quark mass function is flat for low momentum, but smoothly evolves to the perturbative behavior at high momentum. In this work, we use an effective truncation of QCD gap equation valid up to 1 GeV, and implement it at finite temperature and chemical potential to understand the QCD phase diagram for chiral symmetry breaking-chiral symmetry restoration, and confinement-deconfinement phase transitions from the Schwinger-Dysin equations point of view. Our effective kernel contains a gluon dressing function with two light quark flavors Nf = 2, with current quark mass 0.0035 GeV. An effective coupling, adjusted to reproduce the behavior of the chiral condensate at finite T complements our truncation. We find the critical end point of the phase diagram located at the temperature TE = 0.1245 GeV and the baryonic chemical potential μEB = 0.211 GeV.

  7. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Hydrodynamic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Valentin I.

    We review derivations of the chiral magnetic effect (ChME) in hydrodynamic approximation. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the basics of the effect. The main challenge now is to account for the strong interactions between the constituents of the fluid. The main result is that the ChME is not renormalized: in the hydrodynamic approximation it remains the same as for non-interacting chiral fermions moving in an external magnetic field. The key ingredients in the proof are general laws of thermodynamics and the Adler-Bardeen theorem for the chiral anomaly in external electromagnetic fields. The chiral magnetic effect in hydrodynamics represents a macroscopic manifestation of a quantum phenomenon (chiral anomaly). Moreover, one can argue that the current induced by the magnetic field is dissipation free and talk about a kind of "chiral superconductivity". More precise description is a quantum ballistic transport along magnetic field taking place in equilibrium and in absence of a driving force. The basic limitation is the exact chiral limit while temperature—excitingly enough—does not seemingly matter. What is still lacking, is a detailed quantum microscopic picture for the ChME in hydrodynamics. Probably, the chiral currents propagate through lower-dimensional defects, like vortices in superfluid. In case of superfluid, the prediction for the chiral magnetic effect remains unmodified although the emerging dynamical picture differs from the standard one.

  8. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  9. Improved effective vector boson approximation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernreuther, Werner; Chen, Long

    2016-03-01

    We reexamine the improved effective vector boson approximation which is based on two-vector-boson luminosities Lpol for the computation of weak gauge-boson hard scattering subprocesses V1V2→W in high-energy hadron-hadron or e-e+ collisions. We calculate these luminosities for the nine combinations of the transverse and longitudinal polarizations of V1 and V2 in the unitary and axial gauge. For these two gauge choices the quality of this approach is investigated for the reactions e-e+→W-W+νeν¯ e and e-e+→t t ¯ νeν¯ e using appropriate phase-space cuts.

  10. Quark mass effect on axial charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of the axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in the axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of the axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and an external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a nonmonotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of the axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and a magnetic field.

  11. Missing mass approximations for the partition function of stimulus driven Ising models

    PubMed Central

    Haslinger, Robert; Ba, Demba; Galuske, Ralf; Williams, Ziv; Pipa, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Ising models are routinely used to quantify the second order, functional structure of neural populations. With some recent exceptions, they generally do not include the influence of time varying stimulus drive. Yet if the dynamics of network function are to be understood, time varying stimuli must be taken into account. Inclusion of stimulus drive carries a heavy computational burden because the partition function becomes stimulus dependent and must be separately calculated for all unique stimuli observed. This potentially increases computation time by the length of the data set. Here we present an extremely fast, yet simply implemented, method for approximating the stimulus dependent partition function in minutes or seconds. Noting that the most probable spike patterns (which are few) occur in the training data, we sum partition function terms corresponding to those patterns explicitly. We then approximate the sum over the remaining patterns (which are improbable, but many) by casting it in terms of the stimulus modulated missing mass (total stimulus dependent probability of all patterns not observed in the training data). We use a product of conditioned logistic regression models to approximate the stimulus modulated missing mass. This method has complexity of roughly O(LNNpat) where is L the data length, N the number of neurons and Npat the number of unique patterns in the data, contrasting with the O(L2N) complexity of alternate methods. Using multiple unit recordings from rat hippocampus, macaque DLPFC and cat Area 18 we demonstrate our method requires orders of magnitude less computation time than Monte Carlo methods and can approximate the stimulus driven partition function more accurately than either Monte Carlo methods or deterministic approximations. This advance allows stimuli to be easily included in Ising models making them suitable for studying population based stimulus encoding. PMID:23898262

  12. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  13. Born-Oppenheimer approximation for mass scaling of cold-collision properties

    SciTech Connect

    Falke, Stephan; Tiemann, Eberhard; Lisdat, Christian

    2007-07-15

    Asymptotic levels of the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} state of the two isotopomers {sup 39}K{sub 2} and {sup 39}K{sup 41}K up to the dissociation limit are investigated with a Doppler-free high resolution laser-spectroscopic experiment in a molecular beam. The observed level structure can be reproduced correctly only if a mass dependent correction term is introduced for the interaction potential. The applied relative correction in the depth of the potential is 10{sup -6}, which is in the order of magnitude expected for corrections of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A similar change in ground state potentials might lead to significant changes of mass-scaled properties describing cold collisions like the s-wave scattering length.

  14. Effective medium approximations for anisotropic composites with arbitrary component orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ohad; Cherkaev, Elena

    2013-10-01

    A Maxwell Garnett approximation (MGA) and a symmetric effective medium approximation (SEMA) are derived for anisotropic composites of host-inclusion and symmetric-grains morphologies, respectively, with ellipsoidal grains of arbitrary intrinsic, shape and orientation anisotropies. The effect of anisotropy on the effective dielectric tensor is illustrated in both cases. The MGA shows negative and non-monotonic off-diagonal elements for geometries where the host and inclusions are not mutually aligned. The SEMA leads to an anisotropy-dependent nonlinear behaviour of the conductivity as a function of volume fraction above a percolation threshold of conductor-insulator composites, in contrast to the well-known linear behaviour of the isotropic effective medium model. The percolation threshold obtained for composites of aligned ellipsoids is isotropic and independent of the ellipsoids aspect ratio. Thus, the common identification of the percolation threshold with the depolarization factors of the grains is unjustified and a description of anisotropic percolation requires explicit anisotropic geometric characteristics.

  15. Approximations for column effect in airplane wing spars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P; Short, Mac

    1927-01-01

    The significance attaching to "column effect" in airplane wing spars has been increasingly realized with the passage of time, but exact computations of the corrections to bending moment curves resulting from the existence of end loads are frequently omitted because of the additional labor involved in an analysis by rigorously correct methods. The present report represents an attempt to provide for approximate column effect corrections that can be graphically or otherwise expressed so as to be applied with a minimum of labor. Curves are plotted giving approximate values of the correction factors for single and two bay trusses of varying proportions and with various relationships between axial and lateral loads. It is further shown from an analysis of those curves that rough but useful approximations can be obtained from Perry's formula for corrected bending moment, with the assumed distance between points of inflection arbitrarily modified in accordance with rules given in the report. The discussion of general rules of variation of bending stress with axial load is accompanied by a study of the best distribution of the points of support along a spar for various conditions of loading.

  16. Damping effects in doped graphene: The relaxation-time approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupčić, I.

    2014-11-01

    The dynamical conductivity of interacting multiband electronic systems derived by Kupčić et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 90, 145602 (2013), 10.1088/0953-8984/25/14/145602] is shown to be consistent with the general form of the Ward identity. Using the semiphenomenological form of this conductivity formula, we have demonstrated that the relaxation-time approximation can be used to describe the damping effects in weakly interacting multiband systems only if local charge conservation in the system and gauge invariance of the response theory are properly treated. Such a gauge-invariant response theory is illustrated on the common tight-binding model for conduction electrons in doped graphene. The model predicts two distinctly resolved maxima in the energy-loss-function spectra. The first one corresponds to the intraband plasmons (usually called the Dirac plasmons). On the other hand, the second maximum (π plasmon structure) is simply a consequence of the Van Hove singularity in the single-electron density of states. The dc resistivity and the real part of the dynamical conductivity are found to be well described by the relaxation-time approximation, but only in the parametric space in which the damping is dominated by the direct scattering processes. The ballistic transport and the damping of Dirac plasmons are thus the problems that require abandoning the relaxation-time approximation.

  17. Quantum anti-Zeno effect without rotating wave approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Ai Qing; Sun, C. P.; Li Yong; Zheng Hang

    2010-04-15

    In this article, we systematically study the spontaneous decay phenomenon of a two-level system under the influences of both its environment and repetitive measurements. In order to clarify some well-established conclusions about the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) and the quantum anti-Zeno effect (QAZE), we do not use the rotating wave approximation (RWA) in obtaining an effective Hamiltonian. We examine various spectral distributions by making use of our present approach in comparison with other approaches. It is found that with respect to a bare excited state even without the RWA, the QAZE can still happen for some cases, for example, the interacting spectra of hydrogen. However, for a physical excited state, which is a renormalized dressed state of the atomic state, the QAZE disappears and only the QZE remains. These discoveries inevitably show a transition from the QZE to the QAZE as the measurement interval changes.

  18. Double Photoionization of Beryllium atoms using Effective Charge approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Haripada

    2016-05-01

    We plan to report the results of our investigation on double photoionization K-shell electrons from Beryllium atoms. We will present the results of triple differential cross sections at excess energy of 20 eV using our recently extended MCHF method. We will use multiconfiguration Hartree Fock method to calculate the wave functions for the initial state. The final state wave functions will be obtained in the angle depended Effective Charge approximation which accounts for electron correlation between the two final state continuum electrons. We will discuss the effect of core correlation and the valence shell electrons in the triple differential cross section. The results will be compared with the available accurate theoretical calculations and experimental findings.

  19. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions. PMID:23301791

  20. Nuclear energy surfaces at high-spin in the A{approximately}180 mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.; Egido, J.L.; Robledo, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    We are studying nuclear energy surfaces at high spin, with an emphasis on very deformed shapes using two complementary methods: (1) the Strutinsky method for making surveys of mass regions and (2) Hartree-Fock calculations using a Gogny interaction to study specific nuclei that appear to be particularly interesting from the Strutinsky method calculations. The great advantage of the Strutinsky method is that one can study the energy surfaces of many nuclides ({approximately}300) with a single set of calculations. Although the Hartree-Fock calculations are quite time-consuming relative to the Strutinsky calculations, they determine the shape at a minimum without being limited to a few deformation modes. We completed a study of {sup 182}Os using both approaches. In our cranked Strutinsky calculations, which incorporate a necking mode deformation in addition to quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations, we found three well-separated, deep, strongly deformed minima. The first is characterized by nuclear shapes with axis ratios of 1.5:1; the second by axis ratios of 2.2:1 and the third by axis ratios of 2.9:1. We also studied this nuclide with the density-dependent Gogny interaction at I = 60 using the Hartree-Fock method and found minima characterized by shapes with axis ratios of 1.5:1 and 2.2:1. A comparison of the shapes at these minima, generated in the two calculations, shows that the necking mode of deformation is extremely useful for generating nuclear shapes at large deformation that minimize the energy. The Hartree-Fock calculations are being extended to larger deformations in order to further explore the energy surface in the region of the 2.9:1 minimum.

  1. The Cauchy convergence of T and P-approximant templates for test-mass Kerr binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Edward K.

    2006-06-01

    In this work, we examine the Cauchy convergence of both post-Newtonian (T-approximant) and re-summed post-Newtonian (P-approximant) templates for the case of a test-mass orbiting a Kerr black hole along a circular equatorial orbit. The Cauchy criterion demands that the inner product between the n and n + 1 order approximation approaches unity, as we increase the order of approximation. In previous works, it has been shown that we achieve greater fitting factors and better parameter estimation using the P-approximant templates for both Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes. In this work, we show that the P-approximant templates also display a faster Cauchy convergence making them a superior template to the standard post-Newtonian templates.

  2. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric determination of the molecular mass of the approximately 200-kDa globin dodecamer subassemblies in hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Green, B N; Bordoli, R S; Hanin, L G; Lallier, F H; Toulmond, A; Vinogradov, S N

    1999-10-01

    Hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins (Hbs) are approximately 3.6-MDa complexes of approximately 17-kDa globin chains and 24-32-kDa, nonglobin linker chains in a approximately 2:1 mass ratio found in annelids and related species. Studies of the dissociation and reassembly of Lumbricus terrestris Hb have provided ample evidence for the presence of a approximately 200-kDa linker-free subassembly consisting of monomer (M) and disulfide-bonded trimer (T) subunits. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) of the subassemblies obtained by gel filtration of partially dissociated L. terrestris and Arenicola marina Hbs showed the presence of noncovalent complexes of M and T subunits with masses in the 213. 3-215.4 and 204.6-205.6 kDa ranges, respectively. The observed mass of the L. terrestris subassembly decreased linearly with an increase in de-clustering voltage from approximately 215,400 Da at 60 V to approximately 213,300 Da at 200 V. In contrast, the mass of the A. marina complex decreased linearly from 60 to 120 V and reached an asymptote at approximately 204,600 Da (180-200 V). The decrease in mass was probably due to the progressive removal of complexed water and alkali metal cations. ESI-MS at an acidic pH showed both subassemblies to consist of only M and T subunits, and the experimental masses demonstrated them to have the composition M(3)T(3). Because there are three isoforms of M and four isoforms of T in Lumbricus and two isoforms of M and 5 isoforms of T in Arenicola, the masses of the M(3)T(3) subassemblies are not unique. A random assembly model was used to calculate the mass distributions of the subassemblies, using the known ESI-MS masses and relative intensities of the M and T subunit isforms. The expected mass of randomly assembled subassemblies was 213,436 Da for Lumbricus Hb and 204,342 Da for Arenicola Hb, in good agreement with the experimental values. PMID:10497174

  3. Detecting gravitational waves from test-mass bodies orbiting a Kerr black hole with P-approximant templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Edward K.

    2005-09-01

    In this study, we apply post-Newtonian (T-approximants) and resummed post-Newtonian (P-approximants) to the case of a test particle in equatorial orbit around a Kerr black hole. We compare the two approximants by measuring their effectualness (i.e., larger overlaps with the exact signal) and faithfulness (i.e., smaller biases while measuring the parameters of the signal) with the exact (numerical) waveforms. We find that in the case of prograde orbits, T-approximant templates obtain an effectualness of ~0.99 for spins q <= 0.75. For 0.75 < q < 0.95, the effectualness drops to about 0.82. The P-approximants achieve effectualness of >0.99 for all spins up to q = 0.95. The bias in the estimation of parameters is much lower in the case of P-approximants than T-approximants. We find that P-approximants are both effectual and faithful and should be more effective than T-approximants as a detection template family when q > 0. For q < 0, both T- and P-approximants perform equally well so that either of them could be used as a detection template family. However, for parameter estimation, the P-approximant templates still outperform the T-approximants.

  4. Accuracy of the Michaelis-Menten approximation when analysing effects of molecular noise.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Michael J; Petzold, Linda; Hellander, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative biology relies on the construction of accurate mathematical models, yet the effectiveness of these models is often predicated on making simplifying approximations that allow for direct comparisons with available experimental data. The Michaelis-Menten (MM) approximation is widely used in both deterministic and discrete stochastic models of intracellular reaction networks, owing to the ubiquity of enzymatic activity in cellular processes and the clear biochemical interpretation of its parameters. However, it is not well understood how the approximation applies to the discrete stochastic case or how it extends to spatially inhomogeneous systems. We study the behaviour of the discrete stochastic MM approximation as a function of system size and show that significant errors can occur for small volumes, in comparison with a corresponding mass-action system. We then explore some consequences of these results for quantitative modelling. One consequence is that fluctuation-induced sensitivity, or stochastic focusing, can become highly exaggerated in models that make use of MM kinetics even if the approximations are excellent in a deterministic model. Another consequence is that spatial stochastic simulations based on the reaction-diffusion master equation can become highly inaccurate if the model contains MM terms. PMID:25833240

  5. Vibration energy harvesting from a nonlinear standing beam-mass system using a two-mode approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajimi, S. A. M.; Friswell, M. I.

    2015-04-01

    For a nonlinear beam-mass system used to harvest vibratory energy, the two-mode approximation of the response is computed and compared to the single-mode approximation of the response. To this end, the discretized equations of generalized coordinates are developed and studied using a computational method. By obtaining phase-portraits and time-histories of the displacement and voltage, it is shown that the strong nonlinearity of the system affects the system dynamics considerably. By comparing the results of single- and two-mode approximations, it is shown that the number of mode shapes affects the dynamics of the response. Varying the tip-mass results in different structural configurations namely linear, pre-buckled nonlinear, and post-buckled nonlinear configurations. The nonlinear dynamics of the system response are investigated for vibrations about static equilibrium points arising from the buckling of the beam. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the harvested power is affected by the system configuration.

  6. Thermal effects and sudden decay approximation in the curvaton scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Kitajima, Naoya; Takesako, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Langlois, David; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: langlois@apc.univ-paris7.fr E-mail: takesako@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    We study the impact of a temperature-dependent curvaton decay rate on the primordial curvature perturbation generated in the curvaton scenario. Using the familiar sudden decay approximation, we obtain an analytical expression for the curvature perturbation after the decay of the curvaton. We then investigate numerically the evolution of the background and of the perturbations during the decay. We first show that the instantaneous transfer coefficient, related to the curvaton energy fraction at the decay, can be extended into a more general parameter, which depends on the net transfer of the curvaton energy into radiation energy or, equivalently, on the total entropy ratio after the complete curvaton decay. We then compute the curvature perturbation and compare this result with the sudden decay approximation prediction.

  7. Mass-selective neutron spectroscopy of lithium hydride and deuteride: Experimental assessment of the harmonic and impulse approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, Maciej; Richards, Selena E.; Seel, Andrew G.; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix

    2013-11-01

    Neutron Compton scattering experiments on crystalline lithium hydride and deuteride are presented and compared with existing experimental data and first-principles predictions. With currently available instrumentation, these measurements demonstrate sufficient mass selectivity for studies of nuclear-momentum distributions of protons, deuterons, and lithium using forward and backscattering geometries. In both materials, spectral discrimination of lithium-recoil features is highest in backscattering geometry, although mass isolation is also possible in the forward-scattering direction. These results evince the possibility of performing simultaneous mass-selective neutron spectroscopic studies for nuclei with m>4 amu. We also provide an in-depth analysis and assessment of departures from the harmonic and impulse approximations as described by the celebrated Sears expansion of the dynamic structure factor, as well as how these can manifest themselves in the experimental data. We close by outlining the potential of our experimental strategy for mass-selective spectroscopic studies of materials containing protons and other light nuclides.

  8. Analytical mass formula and nuclear surface properties in the ETF approximation. Part II: asymmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    We have recently addressed the problem of the determination of the nuclear surface energy for symmetric nuclei in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) approximation using Skyrme functionals. We presently extend this formalism to the case of asymmetric nuclei and the question of the surface symmetry energy. We propose an approximate expression for the diffuseness and the surface energy. These quantities are analytically related to the parameters of the energy functional. In particular, the influence of the different equation of state parameters can be explicitly quantified. Detailed analyses of the different energy components (local/non-local, isoscalar/isovector, surface/curvature and higher order) are also performed. Our analytical solution of the ETF integral improves previous models and leads to a precision of better than 200 keV per nucleon in the determination of the nuclear binding energy for dripline nuclei.

  9. The Two-Body Problem in the Point Mass Approximation Field. II. Escape and Near-Escape Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile; Stavinschi, Magda

    The study of the two-body problem in the point mass approximation field (featured by the potential A/r+Br2, with r=distance between particles, and A, B=real nonzero constants) is continued by tackling the situation r→∞. The infinity singularity is blown up via McGehee-type transformations, and the infinity manifold is pasted on the phase space. The fictitious flow on this manifold is described, and the local flow near infinity, too.

  10. Analytical mass formula and nuclear surface properties in the ETF approximation. Part I: symmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    The problem of determination of nuclear surface energy is addressed within the framework of the extended Thomas Fermi (ETF) approximation using Skyrme functionals. We propose an analytical model for the density profiles with variationally determined diffuseness parameters. In this first paper, we consider the case of symmetric nuclei. In this situation, the ETF functional can be exactly integrated, leading to an analytical formula expressing the surface energy as a function of the couplings of the energy functional. The importance of non-local terms is stressed and it is shown that they cannot be deduced simply from the local part of the functional, as it was suggested in previous works.

  11. Low-energy parameters of neutron-neutron interaction in the effective-range approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2013-06-15

    The effect of the mass difference between the charged and neutral pions on the low-energy parameters of nucleon-nucleon interaction in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state is studied in the effective-range approximation. On the basis of experimental values of the singlet parameters of neutron-proton scattering and the experimental value of the virtual-state energy for the neutron-neutron systemin the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state, the following values were obtained for the neutron-neutron scattering length and effective range: a{sub nn} = -16.59(117) fm and r{sub nn} = 2.83(11) fm. The calculated values agree well with present-day experimental results.

  12. Electron correlation effects beyond the random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. D.; Malozovsky, Y. M.

    2016-04-01

    The methods that have been used to deal with a many-particle system can be basically sorted into three types: Hamiltonian, field theory and phenomenological method. The first two methods are more popular. Traditionally, the Hamiltonian method has been widely adopted in the conventional electronic theory for metals, alloys and semiconductors. Basically, the mean-field approximation (MFA) that has been working well for a weakly coupled system like a metal is employed to simplify a Hamiltonian corresponding to a particular electron system. However, for a strongly coupled many-particle system like a cuprate superconductor MFA should in principle not apply. Therefore, the field theory on the basis of Green’s function and the Feynman diagrams must be invoked. In this method, one is however more familiar with the random phase approximation (RPA) that gives rise to the same results as MFA because of being short of the information for higher-order terms of interaction. For a strongly coupled electron system, it is obvious that one has to deal with higher-order terms of a pair interaction to get a correct solution. Any ignorance of the higher-order terms implies that the more sophisticated information contained in those terms is discarded. However, to date one has not reached a consensus on how to deal with the higher-order terms beyond RPA. We preset here a method that is termed the diagrammatic iteration approach (DIA) and able to derive higher-order terms of the interaction from the information of lower-order ones on the basis of Feynman diagram, with which one is able to go beyond RPA step by step. It is in principle possible that all of higher-order terms can be obtained, and then sorted to groups of diagrams. It turns out that each of the groups can be replaced by an equivalent one, forming a diagrammatic Dyson-equation-like relation. The diagrammatic solution is eventually “translated” to a four-dimensional integral equation. The method can be applied to a

  13. Effective Masses of Vector Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles; Clougherty, Dennis

    2006-03-01

    We consider the vector polarons of a one-dimensional model of an electron in a doubly (or nearly) degenerate band that couples to two elastic distortions, as described previously by Clougherty and Foell [1]. A variational approach is used to analytically and numerically calculate effective masses of the three types of vector polarons. [1] D. P. Clougherty and C. A. Foell, Phys. Rev. B 70, 052301 (2004).

  14. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  15. Analytical approximation of the neutrino oscillation matter effects at large θ 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Kao, Yee; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2014-04-01

    We argue that the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter are best understood by allowing the mixing angles and mass-squared differences in the standard parametrization to `run' with the matter effect parameter a = , where N e is the electron density in matter and E is the neutrino energy. We present simple analytical approximations to these `running' parameters. We show that for the moderately large value of θ 13, as discovered by the reactor experiments, the running of the mixing angle θ 23 and the CP violating phase δ can be neglected. It simplifies the analysis of the resulting expressions for the oscillation probabilities considerably. Approaches which attempt to directly provide approximate analytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities in matter suffer in accuracy due to their reliance on expansion in θ 13, or in simplicity when higher order terms in θ 13 are included. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method by comparing it to the exact numerical result, as well as the direct approximations of Cervera et al., Akhmedov et al., Asano and Minakata, and Freund. We also discuss the utility of our approach in figuring out the required baseline lengths and neutrino energies for the oscillation probabilities to exhibit certain desirable features.

  16. Effective-range approximations for resonant scattering of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackley, Caroline L.; Julienne, Paul S.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-04-01

    Studies of cold atom collisions and few-body interactions often require the energy dependence of the scattering phase shift, which is usually expressed in terms of an effective-range expansion. We use accurate coupled-channel calculations on 6Li, 39K, and 133Cs to explore the behavior of the effective range in the vicinity of both broad and narrow Feshbach resonances. We show that commonly used expressions for the effective range break down dramatically for narrow resonances and near the zero crossings of broad resonances. We present an alternative parametrization of the effective range that is accurate through both the pole and the zero crossing for both broad and narrow resonances. However, the effective-range expansion can still fail at quite low collision energies, particularly around narrow resonances. We demonstrate that an analytical form of an energy and magnetic-field-dependent phase shift, based on multichannel quantum defect theory, gives accurate results for the energy-dependent scattering length.

  17. Model of neutrino effective masses

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh Nguyen Dinh; Nguyen Thi Hong Van; Nguyen Anh Ky; Phi Quang Van

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that an effective (nonrenormalizable) coupling of lepton multiplets to scalar triplets in the 331 model with sterile/exotic neutrinos, can be a good way for generating neutrino masses of different types. The method is simple and avoids radiative/loop calculations which, sometimes, are long and complicated. Basing on some astrophysical arguments it is also stated that the scale of SU(3){sub L} symmetry breaking is at TeV scale, in agreement with earlier investigations. Or equivalently, starting from this symmetry breaking scale we could have sterile/exotic neutrinos with mass of a few keV's which could be used to explain several astrophysical and cosmological puzzles, such as the dark matter, the fast motion of the observed pulsars, the re-ionization of the Universe, etc.

  18. The Two-Body Problem in the Point Mass Approximation Field. I. Collision and Near-Collision Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile; Stavinschi, Magda

    Newton's theorem about the point mass approximation is fully correct only in fields with potentials of the form A/r+Br2. Here r is the distance between particles, and A, B are real parameters. A systematic qualitative study of the two-body problem in such a field is being started here. The equations of motion are written in Hamiltonian formalism, and the first integrals of energy and angular momentum are pointed out. Using McGehee's transformation, the motion equations are regularized, and the collision singularity is replaced by the collision manifold. The flow on this manifold and in its neighbourhood is depicted.

  19. Accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation for extreme mass ratio inspirals from a black-hole perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sago, Norichika; Fujita, Ryuichi; Nakano, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the accuracy of the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation and its region of validity for quasicircular orbits of a point particle in the Kerr spacetime, by using an analytically known highest post-Newtonian order gravitational energy flux and accurate numerical results in the black hole perturbation approach. It is found that regions of validity become larger for higher PN order results although there are several local maximums in regions of validity for relatively low-PN order results. This might imply that higher PN order calculations are also encouraged for comparable-mass binaries.

  20. Coriolis-effect in mass flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszillier, H.; Durst, F.

    The physical background for the so-called Coriolis mass flow meter is described. The vibration modes of a fluid conveying straight pipe segment are analyzed. These modes deviate in shape from those appearing in the absence of fluid motion. The effect of fluid inertia may be exploited for the purpose of flow measurement. The analysis is performed under a simplifying approximation: the pipe is considered as a beam, the fluid as a moving string. The equations describing the vibrations are derived variationally, with the constraint of a common vibration amplitude of both fluid and pipe. The Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint gives the interaction force between pipe and fluid. The modes are determined by a perturbation procedure. The analysis shows how the time delay between the vibrations of two appropriately chosen points of the pipe may serve to determine the mass flow rate of the fluid. The precise role of the Coriolis force is considered. The improvements of the used approximation are discussed.

  1. Gravitational mass-shift effect in the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2012-02-01

    The gravitational mass-shift effect is investigated in the framework of the standard model with the energy cutoff regularization both for stationary and nonstationary backgrounds at the one-loop level. The problem of singularity of the effective potential of the Higgs field on the horizon of a black hole, which was reported earlier, is resolved. The equations characterizing the properties of a vacuum state are derived and solved in a certain approximation for the Schwarzschild black hole. The gravitational mass-shift effect is completely described in this case. The behavior of masses of the massive particles of the standard model depends on the value of the Higgs boson mass in a flat spacetime. If the Higgs boson mass in a flat spacetime is less than 263.6 GeV then a mass of any massive particle approaching a gravitating object grows. If the Higgs boson mass in a flat spacetime is greater than or equal to 278.2 GeV, the masses of all the massive particles decrease in a strong gravitational field. The Higgs boson masses lying between these two values prove to lead to instability, at least at the one-loop level, and so they are excluded. It turns out that the vacuum possesses the same properties as an ultrarelativistic fluid in a certain approximation. The expression for the entropy and enthalpy densities and the pressure of this fluid are obtained. The sound speed in this fluid is also derived.

  2. Sub-luminous type Ia supernovae from the mergers of equal-mass white dwarfs with mass approximately 0.9M[symbol: see text].

    PubMed

    Pakmor, Rüdiger; Kromer, Markus; Röpke, Friedrich K; Sim, Stuart A; Ruiter, Ashley J; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to result from thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars. Existing models generally explain the observed properties, with the exception of the sub-luminous 1991bg-like supernovae. It has long been suspected that the merger of two white dwarfs could give rise to a type Ia event, but hitherto simulations have failed to produce an explosion. Here we report a simulation of the merger of two equal-mass white dwarfs that leads to a sub-luminous explosion, although at the expense of requiring a single common-envelope phase, and component masses of approximately 0.9M[symbol: see text]. The light curve is too broad, but the synthesized spectra, red colour and low expansion velocities are all close to what is observed for sub-luminous 1991bg-like events. Although the mass ratios can be slightly less than one and still produce a sub-luminous event, the masses have to be in the range 0.83M[symbol: see text] to 0.9M[symbol: see text]. PMID:20054390

  3. Virtual mass effect in dynamic micromechanical mass sensing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiker, P.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-06-01

    Weighing individual micro- or nanoscale particles in solution using dynamic micromechanical sensors is quite challenging: viscous losses dramatically degrade the sensor's performance by both broadening the resonance peak and increasing the effective total mass of the resonator by the dragged liquid. While the virtual mass of the resonator was discussed frequently, little attention has been paid to the virtual mass of particles attached to the resonator's surface and its impact on the accuracy of mass sensing. By means of the in situ detection of a polystyrene microbead in water using a bridge-based microresonator, we demonstrate that the virtual mass of the bead significantly affects the observed frequency shift. In fact, 55 % of the frequency shift was caused by the virtual mass of the adsorbed bead, predicted by Stoke's theory. Based on the observed shift in the resonator's quality factor during particle adsorption, we confirm this significant effect of the virtual mass. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the mass of a single adsorbed particle is strongly diminished if dynamic micromechanical sensors are operated in a liquid environment.

  4. Surface term effects on mass estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We propose a way of estimating the mass contained in the volume occupied by a sample of galaxies in a virialized system. Aims: We analyze the influence of surface effects and the contribution of the cosmological constant terms on our mass estimations of galaxy systems. Methods: We propose two equations that contain surface terms to estimate galaxy sample masses. When the surface terms are neglected, these equations provide the so-called virial and projected masses. Both equations lead to a single equation that allows sample masses to be estimated without the need for calculating surface terms. Sample masses for some nearest galaxy groups are estimated and compared with virialized masses determined from turn-around radii and results of a spherical infall model. Results: Surface effects have a considerable effect on the mass estimations of the studied galaxy groups. According to our results, they lead sample masses of some groups to being less than half the virial mass estimations and even less than 10% of projected mass estimations. However, the contributions of cosmological constant terms to mass estimations are smaller than 2% for the majority of the virialized groups studied. Our estimations are in agreement with virialized masses calculated from turn-around radii. Virialized masses for complexes were found to be: (8.9 ± 2.8) × 1011 M⊙ for the Milky Way - M 31; (12.5 ± 2.5) × 1011 M⊙ for M 81 - NGC 2403; (21.5 ± 7.7) × 1011 M⊙. for Cantaurs A - M 83; and (7.9 ± 2.6) × 1011 M⊙. for IC 324 - Maffei. Conclusions: The nearest galaxy groups located inside a sphere of 5 Mpc have been addressed to explore the performance of our mass estimator. We have seen that surface effects make mass estimations of galaxy groups rather smaller than both virial and projected masses. In mass calculations, cosmological constant terms can be neglected; nevertheless, the collapse of cold dark matter leading to virialized structures is strongly affected by the

  5. Mass Fractionation Laws, Mass-Independent Effects, and Isotopic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic variations usually follow mass-dependent fractionation, meaning that the relative variations in isotopic ratios scale with the difference in mass of the isotopes involved (e.g., δ17O ≈ 0.5×δ18O). In detail, however, the mass dependence of isotopic variations is not always the same, and different natural processes can define distinct slopes in three-isotope diagrams. These variations are subtle, but improvements in analytical capabilities now allow precise measurement of these effects and make it possible to draw inferences about the natural processes that caused them (e.g., reaction kinetics versus equilibrium isotope exchange). Some elements, in some sample types, do not conform to the regularities of mass-dependent fractionation. Oxygen and sulfur display a rich phenomenology of mass-independent fractionation, documented in the laboratory, in the rock record, and in the modern atmosphere. Oxygen in meteorites shows isotopic variations that follow a slope-one line (δ17O ≈ δ18O) whose origin may be associated with CO photodissociation. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in ancient sediments provides the tightest constraint on the oxygen partial pressure in the Archean and the timing of Earth's surface oxygenation. Heavier elements also show departures from mass fractionation that can be ascribed to exotic effects associated with chemical reactions such as magnetic effects (e.g., Hg) or the nuclear field shift effect (e.g., U or Tl). Some isotopic variations in meteorites and their constituents cannot be related to the terrestrial composition by any known process, including radiogenic, nucleogenic, and cosmogenic effects. Those variations have a nucleosynthetic origin, reflecting the fact that the products of stellar nucleosynthesis were not fully homogenized when the Solar System formed. Those anomalies are found at all scales, from nanometer-sized presolar grains to bulk terrestrial planets. They can be used to learn about stellar

  6. Effective Mass of an Oscillating Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Eduardo E.; Gesnouin, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain the effective mass of an unloaded oscillating spring. We measure the period "T"("n") of the partial springs that result when hanging "n" of the total "N" coils of a given spring. Data are correlated with the expectation of a simple model for "T"("n") that takes into account the effective mass of the…

  7. An analytical effective tensor and its approximation properties for upscaling flows through generalized composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviercoski, R. F.

    2010-07-01

    The direct numerical simulation of flows through composites is difficult due to the fine-scale heterogeneity in the media and also due to the complexity of the dynamic systems. Thus, flow based on upscaling of the effective diffusion has become an important step in practical simulations of flow through composites. In this paper, an analytical form for computing the effective diffusion tensor is proposed when the variable coefficient is locally isotropic, K( x) = k( x) I, where k(x) is a scalar function, not necessarily periodic, and may be defined as a step function. Currently, similar results are obtained by numerical means and require a special (re)design of a numerical code and may be computationally demanding. The proposed analytical upscaled tensor approximates the one obtained from the periodic cell-problem in the context of classical homogenization theory. The diagonal values are computed by an averaging procedure of the well known Cardwell and Parsons bounds. The off-diagonals are derived from the rotation of an angle related to the center of mass of the unit cell or representative elementary volume (REV). When comparing the proposed form with various known analytical and numerical results, it shows to be accurate within less than 3% on average. The comparisons include realistic reservoirs description and analytical results, such as the concentric spheres of Hashin-Shtrikman and the two and four-phase checkerboard geometries. Moreover, convergence results corroborate theoretical ones from classical homogenization literature. Convergence is obtained by performing successive refinement from an initial coarse description of a given heterogeneous medium, which include the SPE10 comparative solution project.

  8. Effects of the Mass Media of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Walter

    The mass media are considered to be television, radio, movies, and newspapers. They may generate changes in cognition and comprehension. They do effect emotional arousal, sex and behavior identification, and changes in allocation of time, consumer purchase, and voting behavior. The only data which show a clear relationship between the mass media…

  9. Relativistic effects on electric properties of many-electron systems in spin-averaged Douglas-Kroll and Pauli approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellö, Vladimir; Sadlej, Andrzej J.; Hess, Bernd A.

    1996-08-01

    Relativistic effects and electron correlation effects on the dipole moments of the coinage metal hydrides are investigated and compared employing one-component (scalar) relativistic approximations based on the mass-velocity and Darwin operator and, alternatively, the Douglas-Kroll-transformed spin-averaged no-pair Hamiltonian. The former of the two operators is found to perform quite accurately for CuH and AgH. For AuH the limits of the Pauli approximation seem to be reached, as can be inferred from a comparison with the values obtained within the spin-averaged Douglas-Kroll no-pair formalism. The coupled cluster calculations in the Douglas-Kroll no-pair approximation for relativistic effects establish the dipole moment values of the coinage metal hydrides as equal to 1.05 a.u. for CuH, 1.14 a.u. for AgH and 0.52 for AuH. The corresponding non-relativistic results are 1.14 a.u., 1.36 a.u., and 1.22 a.u., respectively. Some formal problems arising in applications of the Douglas-Kroll no-pair approximation are discussed. It is shown that the Hellmann-Feynman theorem leads to a rather complicated form of the first-order energy change due to external perturbation. The usual expectation value formula is, however, valid through terms proportional to 1/c4 and can be used in most applications. The invariance property with respect to a shift in the external potential is addressed for the Douglas-Kroll no-pair approximation in a finite basis set.

  10. Measuring the Mass Distribution in Z is Approximately 0.2 Cluster Lenses with XMM, HST and CFHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Being the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the Universe, clusters of galaxies are prime targets for studies of structure formation and evolution. Specifically the comoving space density of virialized clusters of a given mass (or X-ray temperature), but also the frequency and degree of substructure, as well as the shape of the cluster mass profile are quantities whose current values and evolution as a function of lookback time can provide important constraints on the cosmological and physical parameters of structure formation theories. The project funded by NASA grant NAG 5-10041 intended to take such studies to a new level by combining observations of a well-selected cluster sample by three state-of-the-art telescopes: HST, to accurately measure the mass distribution in the cluster core (approx. 0.5 h(sup -1)(sub 50) Mpc) via strong gravitational lensing; CFHT, to measure the large scale mass distribution out to approx. 3 Mpc via weak lensing; and XMM, to measure the gas density and temperature distribution accurately on intermediate scales < 1.5 Mpc. XMM plays a pivotal role in this context as the calibration of X-ray mass measurements through accurate, spatially resolved X-ray temperature measurements (particularly in the cosmologically most sensitive range of kT> 5 keV) is central to the questions outlined above. This set of observations promised to yield the best cluster mass measurements obtained so far for a representative sample, thus allowing us to: 1) Measure the high-mass end of the local cluster mass function; 2) Test predictions of a universal cluster mass profile; 3) calibrate the mass-temperature and temperature-luminosity relations for clusters and the scatter around these relations, which is vital for studies of cluster evolution using the X-ray temperature and X-ray luminosity functions.

  11. An Extension of the Krieger-Li-Iafrate Approximation to the Optimized-Effective-Potential Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.G.

    1999-11-11

    The Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation can be expressed as the zeroth order result of an unstable iterative method for solving the integral equation form of the optimized-effective-potential method. By pre-conditioning the iterate a first order correction can be obtained which recovers the bulk of quantal oscillations missing in the zeroth order approximation. A comparison of calculated total energies are given with Krieger-Li-Iafrate, Local Density Functional, and Hyper-Hartree-Fock results for non-relativistic atoms and ions.

  12. Bias in Dobson total ozone measurements at high latitudes due to approximations in calculations of ozone absorption coefficients and air mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, G.; Evans, R. D.; Labow, G. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Dobson spectrophotometer is the primary standard instrument for ground-based measurements of total column ozone. The accuracy of its data depends on the knowledge of ozone absorption coefficients used for data reduction. We document an error in the calculations that led to the set of absorption coefficients currently recommended by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). This error has little effect because an empirical adjustment was applied to the original calculations before the coefficients were adopted by WMO. We provide evidence that this adjustment was physically sound. The coefficients recommended by WMO are applied in the Dobson network without correction for the temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross sections. On the basis of data measured by Dobson numbers 80 and 82, which were operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory at the South Pole, we find that omission of temperature corrections may lead to systematic errors in Dobson ozone data of up to 4%. The standard Dobson ozone retrieval method further assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height. This approximation leads to errors in air mass calculations, which are particularly relevant at high latitudes where ozone measurements are performed at large solar zenith angles (SZA). At the South Pole, systematic errors caused by this approximation may exceed 2% for SZAs larger than 80°. The bias is largest when the vertical ozone distribution is distorted by the "ozone hole" and may lead to underestimation of total ozone by 4% at SZA = 85° (air mass 9). Dobson measurements at the South Pole were compared with ozone data from a collocated SUV-100 UV spectroradiometer and Version 8 overpass data from NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Uncorrected Dobson ozone values tend to be lower than data from the two other instruments when total ozone is below 170 Dobson units or SZAs are larger than

  13. Mass partitioning effects in diffusion transport.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milos; Milosevic, Miljan; Wu, Suhong; Blanco, Elvin; Ferrari, Mauro; Ziemys, Arturas

    2015-08-28

    Frequent mass exchange takes place in a heterogeneous environment among several phases, where mass partitioning may occur at the interface of phases. Analytical and computational methods for diffusion do not usually incorporate molecule partitioning masking the true picture of mass transport. Here we present a computational finite element methodology to calculate diffusion mass transport with a partitioning phenomenon included and the analysis of the effects of partitioning. Our numerical results showed that partitioning controls equilibrated mass distribution as expected from analytical solutions. The experimental validation of mass release from drug-loaded nanoparticles showed that partitioning might even dominate in some cases with respect to diffusion itself. The analysis of diffusion kinetics in the parameter space of partitioning and diffusivity showed that partitioning is an extremely important parameter in systems, where mass diffusivity is fast and that the concentration of nanoparticles can control payload retention inside nanoparticles. The computational and experimental results suggest that partitioning and physiochemical properties of phases play an important, if not crucial, role in diffusion transport and should be included in the studies of mass transport processes. PMID:26204522

  14. Comparisons of interacting-boson-fermion approximation and triaxial calculations for odd-mass N =80 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Aryaeinejad, R.; Chou, W.; McHarris, W.C. )

    1989-09-01

    The interacting-boson-fermion-approximation and triaxial models were used to calculate excitation energies and mixing ratios for the {ital N}=80 nuclei, {sup 139}Pr, {sup 141}Pm, and {sup 143}Eu. For low-lying negative- and positive-parity states both models yield roughly the same numbers, in good agreement with experimental results. For high-lying states we find that the interacting-boson-fermion-approximation model describes the level structure considerably better than the triaxial model. On the other hand, the triaxial model gives more satisfactory results in predicting the mixing ratios.

  15. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  16. Dynamical equation of the effective gluon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2011-10-15

    In this article, we derive the integral equation that controls the momentum dependence of the effective gluon mass in the Landau gauge. This is accomplished by means of a well-defined separation of the corresponding ''one-loop dressed'' Schwinger-Dyson equation into two distinct contributions, one associated with the mass and one with the standard kinetic part of the gluon. The entire construction relies on the existence of a longitudinally coupled vertex of nonperturbative origin, which enforces gauge invariance in the presence of a dynamical mass. The specific structure of the resulting mass equation, supplemented by the additional requirement of a positive-definite gluon mass, imposes a rather stringent constraint on the derivative of the gluonic dressing function, which is comfortably satisfied by the large-volume lattice data for the gluon propagator, both for SU(2) and SU(3). The numerical treatment of the mass equation, under some simplifying assumptions, is presented for the aforementioned gauge groups, giving rise to a gluon mass that is a nonmonotonic function of the momentum. Various theoretical improvements and possible future directions are briefly discussed.

  17. Phonon effects on the double mass differences in magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Baldo, M.; Gnezdilov, N. V.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Odd-even double mass differences (DMDs) of magic nuclei are found within an approach starting from the free N N interaction, accounting for particle-phonon coupling (PC) effects. We consider three PC effects: the phonon-induced effective interaction, the renormalization of the "ends" due to the pole PC contribution to the nucleon mass operator, and the change of the single-particle energies. The perturbation theory in gL2, where gL is the vertex of the creation of the L -multipole phonon, is used for PC calculations. PC corrections to single-particle energies are found with an approximate accounting for the tadpole diagram. Results for magic Ca,4840, Ni,7856, Sn,132100, and 208Pb nuclei are presented. For the lighter part of this set of nuclei, from 40Ca to 56Ni, the cases divide approximately in half, between those where the PC corrections to DMD values are in good agreement with the data and the ones with the opposite result. In the major part of the cases of worsening description of DMD, a poor applicability of the perturbation theory for the induced interaction is the most probable reason of the phenomenon. For intermediate nuclei, 78Ni and 100Sn, there are no sufficiently accurate data on masses of nuclei necessary for finding DMD values. Finally, for heavier nuclei, 132Sn and 208Pb, PC corrections always result in better agreement with experiment.

  18. Spatial averaging effects of hydrophone on field characterization of planar transducer using Fresnel approximation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Guangzhen; Yang, Ping; He, Longbiao; Feng, Xiujuan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the existing models that allow spatial averaging effects of piezoelectric hydrophones to be accounted for. The model derived in the present study is valid for a planar source and was verified using transducers operating at 5 and 20MHz. It is based on Fresnel approximation and enables corrections for both on-axis and off-axis measurements. A single-integral approximate formula for the axial acoustic pressure was derived, and the validity of the Fresnel approximation in the near field of the planar transducer was examined. The numerical results obtained using 5 and 20MHz planar transmitters with an effective diameter of 12.7mm showed that the derived model could account for spatial averaging effects to within 0.2% with Beissner's exact integral (Beissner, 1981), for k(a+b)2≫π (where k is the circular wavenumber, and a and b are the effective radii of the transmitter and hydrophone, respectively). The field distributions along the acoustic axis and the beam directivity patterns are also included in the model. The spatial averaging effects of the hydrophone were generally observed to cause underestimation of the absolute pressure amplitudes of the acoustic beam, and overestimation of the cross-sectional size of the beam directivity pattern. However, the cross-sectional size of the directivity pattern was also found to be underestimated in the "far zone" (beyond Y0=a(2)/λ) of the transmitter. The results of this study indicate that the spatial averaging effect on the beam directivity pattern is negligible for π(γ(2)+4γ)s≪1 (where γ=b/a, and s is the normalized distance to the planar transducer). PMID:27268164

  19. Dielectric Matrix Formulation of Correlation Energies in the Random Phase Approximation: Inclusion of Exchange Effects.

    PubMed

    Mussard, Bastien; Rocca, Dario; Jansen, Georg; Ángyán, János G

    2016-05-10

    Starting from the general expression for the ground state correlation energy in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (ACFDT) framework, it is shown that the dielectric matrix formulation, which is usually applied to calculate the direct random phase approximation (dRPA) correlation energy, can be used for alternative RPA expressions including exchange effects. Within this famework, the ACFDT analog of the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) approximation leads to a logarithmic formula for the correlation energy similar to the direct RPA expression. Alternatively, the contribution of the exchange can be included in the kernel used to evaluate the response functions. In this case, the use of an approximate kernel is crucial to simplify the formalism and to obtain a correlation energy in logarithmic form. Technical details of the implementation of these methods are discussed, and it is shown that one can take advantage of density fitting or Cholesky decomposition techniques to improve the computational efficiency; a discussion on the numerical quadrature made on the frequency variable is also provided. A series of test calculations on atomic correlation energies and molecular reaction energies shows that exchange effects are instrumental for improvement over direct RPA results. PMID:26986444

  20. The Effect of Area Averaging on the Approximated Profile of the H α Spectral Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnárová, M.; Utz, D.; Rybák, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Hα line is massively used as a diagnostics of the chromosphere. Often one needs to average the line profile over some area to increase the signal to noise ratio. Thus it is important to understand how derived parameters vary with changing approximations. In this study we investigate the effect of spatial averaging of a selected area on the temporal variations of the width, the intensity and the Dopplershift of the Hα spectral line profile. The approximated profile was deduced from co-temporal observations in five points throughout the Hα line profile obtained by the tunable Lyot filter installed on the Dutch Open Telescope. We found variations of the intensity and the Doppler velocities, which were independent of the size of the area used for the computation of the area averaged Hα spectral line profile.

  1. On the two-point approximation to the effective chiral action for large solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Zuk, J.A. ); Adjali, I. )

    1992-06-20

    In this paper the two-point approximation to the effective chiral action with finite cut-off - as used to provide a low-energy soliton description of the nucleon - is studied in the limit of large soliton sizes, R. For some soliton profiles, the expectation that, in the large-R limit, the Casimir energy approaches a term linear in R with leading correction of order R{sup {minus}1} is not fulfilled. The authors classify these profiles and show that the two-point approximation can be used to elucidate the true behavior in such cases. For the linear profile, the asymptotic curve is found to run parallel to the linear kinetic energy, but displaced by an analytically computable negative constant.

  2. The effects of hyper-spherical approximation of Yukawa potential to diffusion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Gee; Murillo, Michael S.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Yukawa potential to the diffusion properties of binary ionic mixtures are investigated in terms of both the classical molecular dynamics and the kinetic theory. The Yukawa interatomic potential is treated by means of the hyper-spherical approximation, which replaces the Ewald summation by a multiple of the hyperbolic trigonometric functions and the lattice summation of screening. The influence of the hyper-spherical approximation of the Yukawa potential is able to be understood through the calculations of transport coefficients with the relationship to Coulomb logarithm. Numerical studies over a various range of the Debye-Hückel screening parameter and of the plasma coupling parameter to binary ionic mixtures will be provided. We consider primarily the interdiffusion coefficients and then discuss about the mixing properties of self-diffusion coefficients.

  3. Validity of approximate methods in molecular scattering. III - Effective potential and coupled states approximations for differential and gas kinetic cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monchick, L.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    Two dimensionality-reducing approximations, the j sub z-conserving coupled states (sometimes called the centrifugal decoupling) method and the effective potential method, were applied to collision calculations of He with CO and with HCl. The coupled states method was found to be sensitive to the interpretation of the centrifugal angular momentum quantum number in the body-fixed frame, but the choice leading to the original McGuire-Kouri expression for the scattering amplitude - and to the simplest formulas - proved to be quite successful in reproducing differential and gas kinetic cross sections. The computationally cheaper effective potential method was much less accurate.

  4. Effective medium approximation for deeply subwavelength all-dielectric multilayers: when does it break down?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei V.; Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Andryieuski, Andrei; Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Malureanu, Radu; Jensen, Flemming

    2016-04-01

    We report on theoretical analysis and experimental validation of the applicability of the effective medium approximation to deeply subwavelength (period ⩽λ/30) all-dielectric multilayer structures. Following the theoretical prediction of the anomalous breakdown of the effective medium approximation [H. H. Sheinfux et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 243901 (2014)] we thoroughly elaborate on regimes, when an actual multilayer stack exhibits significantly different properties compared to its homogenized model. Our findings are fully confirmed in the first direct experimental demonstration of the breakdown effect. Multilayer stacks are composed of alternating alumina and titania layers fabricated using atomic layer deposition. For light incident on such multilayers at angles near the total internal reflection, we observe pronounced differences in the reflectance spectra (up to 0.5) for structures with different layers ordering and different but still deeply subwavelength thicknesses. Such big reflectance difference values resulted from the special geometrical configuration with an additional resonator layer underneath the multilayers employed for the enhancement of the effect. Our results are important for the development of new homogenization approaches for metamaterials, high-precision multilayer ellipsometry methods and in a broad range of sensing applications.

  5. On The Effectiveness Of The Negative Binomial Approximation In A Multi-Echelon Inventory Model: A Mathematical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Adriano O.; Schmidt, Charles P.; Conerly, Michael D.

    2007-09-01

    Graves (1996) developed a multi-echelon inventory model and used a negative binomial distribution to approximate the distribution of a random variable in the model. Two earlier multi-echelon inventory studies (Graves, 1985; Lee and Moinzadeh, 1987) have similarly used negative binomial approximations. Only computational evidence has been offered in support of the approximations. We provide, for the latest model (Graves, 1996), a mathematical analysis of the effectiveness of such an approximation.

  6. Degeneracy effects of neutrino mass ejection in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A neutrino mechanism is discussed in order to explain supernovae in massive stars. An argument is presented for supernova mass ejection through leptonic neutrino transport characteristics suppressed by the arbitrary zero chemical potential condition. Results show that lepton conservation effects may be important in supernova neutrino transport. At low temperature and density the diffusion approximation becomes less precise because of the long mean free paths of low energy neutrinos. The amount of equilibrium neutrino spectrum affected here is small over most of the collapsing supernova structure.

  7. Rough-surface effects on incoherent scattering from random volumetric scatterers: Approximate analytic series solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bilgen, M.; Rose, J.H. )

    1994-11-01

    An approximate analytic series solution is obtained for the effects of randomly rough surfaces on the time-dependent ultrasonic backscatter that are due to beam-microstructure interactions. The transmission of sound through the rough surface is modeled by scalar waves by use of the phase-screen and Fresnel approximations, whereas the transducer is assumed to produce a focused normally oriented Gaussian beam. The beam-microstructure interaction is described by a simple, generic model that attributes backscattering to inhomogeneities in the elastic constants of the sample; density variations are ignored. Key predictions of the approximate series solution are that (a) acoustic backscatter is relatively insensitive to surface roughness for unfocused probes, (b) roughness can dramatically reduce the backscatter noise seen by focused probes, (c) backscatter is increased at early times because of weak localization, and (d) backscatter is reduced at late times because of increased diffraction. The predictions of the series solution are briefly compared with available experiment. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Ronald W; Li, Tingwen; Nicoletti, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  9. Gravitational and mass distribution effects on stationary superwinds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Añorve-Zeferino, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we model the effect of non-uniform dynamical mass distributions and their associated gravitational fields on the stationary galactic superwind solution. We do this by considering an analogue injection of mass and energy from stellar winds and SNe. We consider both compact dark-matter and baryonic haloes that does not extend further from the galaxies optical radii Ropt as well as extended gravitationally-interacting ones. We consider halo profiles that emulate the results of recent cosmological simulations and coincide also with observational estimations from galaxy surveys. This allows to compare the analytical superwind solution with outflows from different kinds of galaxies. We give analytical formulae that establish when an outflow is possible and also characterize distinct flow regimes and enrichment scenarios. We also constraint the parameter space by giving approximate limits above which gravitation, self-gravitation and radiative cooling can inhibit the stationary flow. We obtain analytical expressions for the free superwind hydrodynamical profiles. We find that the existence or inhibition of the superwind solution highly depends on the steepness and concentration of the dynamical mass and the mass and energy injection rates. We compare our results with observational data and a recent numerical work. We put our results in the context of the mass-metallicity relationship to discuss observational evidence related to the selective loss of metals from the least massive galaxies and also discuss the case of massive galaxies.

  10. The effects of body mass on cremation weight.

    PubMed

    May, Shannon E

    2011-01-01

    Cremains have become increasingly frequent in forensic contexts, while higher body mass in the general population has simultaneously made cremation a more cost-effective mortuary practice. This study analyzed the relationship between body mass and bone mass, as reflected through cremation weight. Antemortem data were recorded for samples used in the multi-regional data set. Each was rendered through commercial crematoriums and reweighed postincineration. Pearson's correlation demonstrates clear association between body mass and cremation weight (r=0.56; p<0.0001). However, multiple linear regression revealed sex and age variables also have a significant relationship (t=7.198; t=-2.5, respectively). Regressed in conjunction, body mass, sex, and age contribute approximately 67% of all variation observed in cremation weight (r=0.668). Analysis of covariance indicates significant regional variation in body and cremation weight. Explanations include bone modification resulting from increased loading stress, as well as glucose intolerance and altered metabolic pathways related to obesity. PMID:20735701

  11. p-barp-Annihilation processes in the tree approximation of SU(3) chiral effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, V. E.; Kudryavtsev, A. E. Romanov, A. I.; Weinberg, V. M.

    2012-12-15

    The p-barp-annihilation reactions p-barp {yields} {eta}{eta} {eta} and p-barp {yields} {eta}KK-bar at rest are considered in the tree approximation in the framework of SU(3) chiral effective theory at leading order. The calculated branchings are compared with the data. The results for neutral ({eta}{eta}{eta}, K{sup 0}K-bar{sup 0}{sub {eta}}) and charged (K{sup +}K{sup -}{sub {eta}}) channels are essentially different.

  12. Improving the In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group via approximate inclusion of three-body effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Titus; Bogner, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group (IM-SRG) has been applied successfully not only to several closed shell finite nuclei, but has recently been used to produce effective shell model interactions that are competitive with phenomenological interactions in the SD shell. A recent alternative method for solving of the IM-SRG equations, called the Magnus expansion, not only provides a computationally feasible route to producing observables, but also allows for approximate handling of induced three-body forces. Promising results for several systems, including finite nuclei, will be presented and discussed.

  13. Effects beyond the random-phase approximation in calculating the interaction between metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; García-González, P.; Dobson, J. F.; Godby, R. W.

    2004-11-01

    The performance of the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem is discussed through the implementation of a non-local energy optimized exchange-correlation kernel to account for short-range correlation effects. We evaluate the jellium surface energy, through a painstaking extrapolation of single slab calculations, as well as the binding and interaction energies between two and three jellium slabs. Whereas total electron correlation energies are rather sensitive to the details of the kernel, any physically well-motivated approximation within our framework describes binding energies (including surface energies) within the same level of accuracy.

  14. Diffusive superconductors beyond the Usadel approximation: Electron-hole asymmetry and large photoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenkov, Mikhail S.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2015-07-01

    We extend the quasiclassical formalism for diffusive superconductors by deriving anisotropic (gradient) corrections to the Usadel equation. We demonstrate that in a number of physical situations such corrections may play a crucial role, being responsible for the effects which cannot be recovered within the standard Usadel approximation. One of them is the so-called photoelectric effect in superconductors and superconducting-normal (SN) hybrid structures. Provided a superconducting part of the system is irradiated by an external ac electromagnetic field, the charge imbalance develops and a nonvanishing dc voltage is induced across the SN interface. In the presence of magnetic impurities in a superconductor the magnitude of this effect becomes large and can easily be detected in modern experiments.

  15. Effective-medium approximation for lattice random walks with long-range jumps.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Felix; Sokolov, Igor M

    2016-07-01

    We consider the random walk on a lattice with random transition rates and arbitrarily long-range jumps. We employ Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (EMA) to find the disorder-averaged (coarse-grained) dynamics. The EMA procedure replaces the disordered system with a cleverly guessed reference system in a self-consistent manner. We give necessary conditions on the reference system and discuss possible physical mechanisms of anomalous diffusion. In the case of a power-law scaling between transition rates and distance, lattice variants of Lévy-flights emerge as the effective medium, and the problem is solved analytically, bearing the effective anomalous diffusivity. Finally, we discuss several example distributions and demonstrate very good agreement with numerical simulations. PMID:27575104

  16. Effective-medium approximation for lattice random walks with long-range jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Felix; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the random walk on a lattice with random transition rates and arbitrarily long-range jumps. We employ Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (EMA) to find the disorder-averaged (coarse-grained) dynamics. The EMA procedure replaces the disordered system with a cleverly guessed reference system in a self-consistent manner. We give necessary conditions on the reference system and discuss possible physical mechanisms of anomalous diffusion. In the case of a power-law scaling between transition rates and distance, lattice variants of Lévy-flights emerge as the effective medium, and the problem is solved analytically, bearing the effective anomalous diffusivity. Finally, we discuss several example distributions and demonstrate very good agreement with numerical simulations.

  17. Isotopic mass and alpha heating effects in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Sets of similar TFTR discharges with varying amounts of D and T are compared. The T content is altered by varying the mix of D and T NBI at approximately constant total NBI power. The total plasma current, toroidal field, central Z{sub eff}, and wall conditions are very similar in each set. The electron density profiles are approximately similar. The sets contain pairs of discharges with D-only and DT-NBI. Several sets also contain discharges with T-only NBI. The discharges are analyzed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Good agreement with measured parameters is achieved. Profiles are computed for the isotopic mass of the hydrogenic thermal species A, and for the hydrogenic thermal plus beam species A{sub tot}. Their volume averages increase approximately linearly as the fraction of T-NBI power increases, and they are slightly peaked for DT and T-only NBI discharges. The total energy and the total energy confinement time increase approximately linearly with A{sub tot} up to 30%. The beam fraction of the total energy at 0.5 sec of NBI remains relatively constant, {approx} 40--50% as A{sub tot} varies. The thermal ion fraction increases slightly, and the electron fraction decreases. The isotopic and alpha heating effects contribute in roughly equal amounts to the increase in central T{sub e}.

  18. The Ill-Effects of Traditional Approximation in Exoplanet Atmospheric Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. Y.-K.; Polichtchouk, I.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the effects of imposing the traditional approximation restriction in large-scale atmospheric flow models of exoplanets. In the traditional hydrostatic primitive equations, solved by general circulation and global climate models, terms associated with the horizontal components of the Coriolis acceleration and the metric terms are omitted. However, scale analysis suggests that the neglected terms may be up to ˜20% of the included terms in the traditional equations. In this work, we enhance a well-tested general circulation model to include the omitted terms consistently. In direct comparisons of simulations appropriate for hot extrasolar giant planets, we demonstrate a significant difference when the terms normally neglected in the approximation are retained; for example, large warm/cool regions (of up to ˜300K) persist and large-scale jets disappear. The effect is most prominent when rotation does not strongly suppress vertical motion, as in most close-in exoplanets. It is also prominent during the early stages of any planet simulation, in which the atmosphere/climate is spun up from rest.

  19. Slope-dependent nuclear-symmetry energy within the effective-surface approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blocki, J. P.; Magner, A. G.; Ring, P.

    2015-12-01

    The effective-surface approximation is extended taking into account derivatives of the symmetry-energy density per particle with respect to the mean particle density. The isoscalar and isovector particle densities in this extended effective-surface approximation are derived. The improved expressions of the surface symmetry energy, in particular, its surface tension coefficients in the sharp-edged proton-neutron asymmetric nuclei take into account important gradient terms of the energy density functional. For most Skyrme forces the surface symmetry-energy constants and the corresponding neutron skins and isovector stiffnesses are calculated as functions of the Swiatecki derivative of the nongradient term of the symmetry-energy density per particle with respect to the isoscalar density. Using the analytical isovector surface-energy constants in the framework of the Fermi-liquid droplet model we find energies and sum rules of the isovector giant dipole-resonance structure in a reasonable agreement with the experimental data, and they are compared with other theoretical approaches.

  20. Approximate techniques for predicting size effects on cleavage fracture toughness (J{sub c})

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.T.; Dodds, R.H. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    This investigation examines the ability of an elastic T-stress analysis coupled with modified boundary layer (MBL) solution to predict stresses ahead of a crack tip in a variety of planar geometries. The approximate stresses are used as input to estimate the effective driving force for cleavage fracture (J{sub 0}) using the micromechanically based approach introduced by Dodds and Anderson. Finite element analyses for a wide variety of planar cracked geometries are conducted which have elastic biaxiality parameters ({beta}) ranging from {minus}0.99 (very low constraint) to +2.96 (very high constraint). The magnitude and sign of {beta} indicate the rate at which crack-tip constraint changes with increasing applied load. All results pertain to a moderately strain hardening material (strain hardening exponent ({eta}) of 10). These analyses suggest that {beta} is an effective indicator of both the accuracy of T-MBL estimates of J{sub 0} and of applicability limits on evolving fracture analysis methodologies (i.e. T-MBL, J-Q, and J/J{sub 0}). Specifically, when 1{beta}1>0.4 these analyses show that the T-MBL approximation of J{sub 0} is accurate to within 20% of a detailed finite-element analysis. As ``structural type`` configurations, i.e. shallow cracks in tension, generally have 1{beta}1>0.4, it appears that only an elastic analysis may be needed to determine reasonably accurate J{sub 0} values for structural conditions.

  1. Observation of large, non-covalent globin subassemblies in the approximately 3600 kDa hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Green, B N; Gotoh, T; Suzuki, T; Zal, F; Lallier, F H; Toulmond, A; Vinogradov, S N

    2001-06-01

    A non-covalent globin subassembly comprising 12 globin chains (204 to 214 kDa) was observed directly by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the native hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins from the oligochaetes Lumbricus terrestris and Tubifex tubifex, the polychaetes Tylorrhynchus heterochaetus, Arenicola marina, Amphitrite ornata and Alvinella pompejana, the leeches Macrobdella decora, Haemopis grandis and Nephelopsis oscura and the chlorocruorin from the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum, over the pH range 3.5-7.0. The Hb from the deep-sea polychaete Alvinella exhibited in addition, peaks at approximately 107 kDa and at approximately 285 kDa, which were assigned to subassemblies of six globin chains and of 12 globin chains with three non-globin linker chains, respectively. The experimental masses decreased slightly with increased de-clustering potential (60 to 160 V) and were generally 0.1 to 0.2 % higher than the calculated masses, due probably to complexation with cations and water molecules. PMID:11397079

  2. Phase velocity and attenuation predictions of waves in cancellous bone using an iterative effective medium approximation.

    PubMed

    Potsika, Vassiliki T; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Vavva, Maria G; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative determination of wave dispersion and attenuation in bone is an open research area as the factors responsible for ultrasound absorption and scattering in composite biological tissues have not been completely explained. In this study, we use the iterative effective medium approximation (IEMA) proposed in [1] so as to calculate phase velocity and attenuation in media with properties similar to those of cancellous bones. Calculations are performed for a frequency range of 0.4-0.8 MHz and for different inclusions' volume concentrations and sizes. Our numerical results are compared with previous experimental findings so as to assess the effectiveness of IEMA. It was made clear that attenuation and phase velocity estimations could provide supplementary information for cancellous bone characterization. PMID:24111396

  3. On the unreasonable effectiveness of the post-Newtonian approximation in gravitational physics

    PubMed Central

    Will, Clifford M.

    2011-01-01

    The post-Newtonian approximation is a method for solving Einstein’s field equations for physical systems in which motions are slow compared to the speed of light and where gravitational fields are weak. Yet it has proven to be remarkably effective in describing certain strong-field, fast-motion systems, including binary pulsars containing dense neutron stars and binary black hole systems inspiraling toward a final merger. The reasons for this effectiveness are largely unknown. When carried to high orders in the post-Newtonian sequence, predictions for the gravitational-wave signal from inspiraling compact binaries will play a key role in gravitational-wave detection by laser-interferometric observatories. PMID:21447714

  4. Effects of different wave free surface approximations on the response of a TLP in deep water

    SciTech Connect

    Mekha, B.B.; Johnson, C.P.; Roesset, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper is based on work conducted at the Offshore Technology Research Center to investigate the relative importance of different types of nonlinearities on the dynamic response of tension leg platforms. A time domain solution using Morison`s equation with several modifications and allowing to include or neglect various sources of nonlinearities was implemented and used in the dynamic analysis. This paper focuses on the non-linear effect of evaluating the wave forces up to the free surface using different approximate methods. A TLP hull model with time varying tendon forces is subjected to regular and irregular waves with and without current. The effects on calculating the wave kinematics up to the mean water level or up to the actual free surface, making use of various extrapolation or stretching techniques are then discussed.

  5. Missing mass effect in biosensor's QCM applications.

    PubMed

    Voinova, M V; Jonson, M; Kasemo, B

    2002-10-01

    Nowadays, liquid applications of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) opened a way for in situ studies of proteins, vesicles and cells adsorbed from the solution onto the QCM surface. The sensitivity of QCM to the viscoelasticity of the adsorbed biomaterial can be a reason of the experimentally observed deviation from a linear dependence of QCM resonant frequency on mass deposition (the so-called Sauerbrey relation) and can limit its application for biosensoring. Presented here rigorous theoretical analysis explains the deviation from ideal mass response of soft overlayers in the contact with liquid. The fundamental result of the theory is the analog of Sauerbrey relation for layered viscous/viscoelastic medium which can be exploited for the correct physical interpretation of QCM experimental data in biofluids, in particular for measurements of the 'true' surface mass of adsorbed biomolecular films. We predict a new physical effect 'missing mass' of the sample in liquid phase measurements and compare the results given by our theory with QCM measurements on supported membranes. PMID:12243901

  6. Systematic approximations to the optimized effective potential: Application to orbital-density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, J. B.; Li, Yan; Iafrate, G. J.

    1992-11-01

    The integral equation originally derived by Sharp and Horton for the optimized effective potential (OEP) is exactly transformed into an equivalent form from which it is manifestly clear that the OEP, V0xσ(r), is an implicit functional of only \\{niσ\\}, the orbital densities of the occupied states \\{ψiσ\\}, and the corresponding single-particle exchange potentials \\{viσ\\}. Furthermore, the transformed OEP has exactly the same form as one recently developed by the authors [Phys. Rev. A 45, 101 (1992)] from a more heuristic approach, the only difference being that in the present work a term proportional to the gradient of niσ is added to each viσ whose average value when taken over the iσ state is zero. This result leads to the natural development of an iterative approximation for V0xσ, with the zeroth approximation being given by our previous result. The application of this technique to the calculation of the total energy and highest-energy single-particle eigenvalue for selected atoms is presented. In addition, we note that our results are applicable to the calculation of the OEP for any assumed exchange-correlation functional Exc[\\{ψiσ\\}], where viσ is taken as the appropriate functional derivative of Exc. In the case that Exc is a functional of \\{niσ\\} only, as in the case of the local-density approximation with self-interaction correction, the resulting V0xcσ is a functional of the \\{niσ\\} only.

  7. Thermal conductivity in porous media: Percolation-based effective-medium approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Daigle, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of porosity and saturation-dependent thermal conductivities is necessary to investigate heat and water transfer in natural porous media such as rocks and soils. Thermal conductivity in a porous medium is affected by the complicated relationship between the topology and geometry of the pore space and the solid matrix. However, as water content increases from completely dry to fully saturated, the effect of the liquid phase on thermal conductivity may increase substantially. Although various methods have been proposed to model the porosity and saturation dependence of thermal conductivity, most are empirical or quasiphysical. In this study, we present a theoretical upscaling framework from percolation theory and the effective-medium approximation, which is called percolation-based effective-medium approximation (P-EMA). The proposed model predicts the thermal conductivity in porous media from endmember properties (e.g., air, solid matrix, and saturating fluid thermal conductivities), a scaling exponent, and a percolation threshold. In order to evaluate our porosity and saturation-dependent models, we compare our theory with 193 porosity-dependent thermal conductivity measurements and 25 saturation-dependent thermal conductivity data sets and find excellent match. We also find values for the scaling exponent different than the universal value of 2, in insulator-conductor systems, and also different from 0.76, the exponent in conductor-superconductor mixtures, in three dimensions. These results indicate that the thermal conductivity under fully and partially saturated conditions conforms to nonuniversal behavior. This means the value of the scaling exponent changes from medium to medium and depends not only on structural and geometrical properties of the medium but also characteristics (e.g., wetting or nonwetting) of the saturating fluid.

  8. Effects of Approximate Filtering on the Appearance of Bidirectional Texture Functions.

    PubMed

    Jarabo, Adrian; Wu, Hongzhi; Dorsey, Julie; Rushmeier, Holly; Gutierrez, Diego

    2014-06-01

    The BTF data structure was a breakthrough for appearance modeling in computer graphics. More research is needed though to make BTFs practical in rendering applications. We present the first systematic study of the effects of Approximate filtering on the appearance of BTFs, by exploring the spatial, angular and temporal domains over a varied set of stimuli. We perform our initial experiments on simple geometry and lighting, and verify our observations on more complex settings. We consider multi-dimensional filtering versus conventional mipmapping, and find that multi-dimensional filtering produces superior results. We examine the tradeoff between under- and oversampling, and find that different filtering strategies can be applied in each domain, while maintaining visual equivalence with respect to a ground truth. For example, we find that preserving contrast is more important in static than dynamic images, indicating greater levels of spatial filtering are possible for animations. We find that filtering can be performed more aggressively in the angular domain than in the spatial. Additionally, we find that high-level visual descriptors of the BTF are linked to the perceptual performance of pre-filtered approximations. In turn, some of these high-level descriptors correlate with low level statistics of the BTF. We show six different practical applications of applying our findings to improving filtering, rendering and compression strategies. PMID:26357305

  9. The optimized effective potential of meta-generalized gradient approximations in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zenghui; Perdew, John

    Unlike the local density approximation(LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation(GGA), calculations with meta-GGAs are usually done according to the generalized Kohn-Sham(gKS) formalism. The exchange-correlation potential of the gKS equation is non-multiplicative, which prevents systematic comparison of meta-GGA bandstructures to those of the LDA and the GGA. We implement the optimized effective potential(OEP) of the meta-GGA for periodic systems, which allows us to carry out meta-GGA calculations in the same KS manner as for the LDA and the GGA. We apply the OEP to several popular meta-GGAs, including the new SCAN functional[Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 036402 (2015)]. We find that the KS gaps of meta-GGAs are close to those of GGAs, and they are smaller than the gKS gaps of meta-GGAs. The well-known grid sensitivity of meta-GGAs is much more severe in OEP calculations. The authors are supported by the National Science Foundation(Grant No. DMR-1305135).

  10. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝ δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant. PMID:26651785

  11. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Kostenko, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝δ (t -t') k4 -d -y , where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y . The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y . The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant.

  12. Spin contamination for Hartree-Fock, optimized effective potential, and density functional approximations.

    PubMed

    Theophilou, Iris; Thanos, S; Theophilou, A K

    2007-12-21

    In an earlier paper [S. Thanos and A. K. Theophilou J. Chem. Phys. 124, 204109 (2006)], we found an explicit formula for the expansion of a Slater determinant |Phi(M)> in terms of eigenstates of S(2). In this paper, we use the same formula to determine the spin contamination S(con) of the unrestricted single determinant approximations, i.e., Hartree-Fock, optimized effective potential, and density functional theory. We derived an expression which gives S(con) in terms of the overlap of the spatial parts of the spin up and spin down "corresponding" orbitals. It was found that S(con) does not depend on M, the eigenvalue of S(z), at least for the lower order approximations, i.e., when || is large. In this case, the predominant coefficient of the expansion assumes its maximum value when S=M. However, for the class of solutions that || is small, the spin L of the largest coefficient increases with the number of unpaired electrons. We also derived the explicit form of the expansion states. PMID:18154371

  13. Fluctuations of spherical waves in a turbulent atmosphere: effect of the axisymmetric approximation in computational methods.

    PubMed

    Salomons, E M

    2000-10-01

    The validity of the axisymmetric parabolic-equation (PE) method for line-of-sight sound propagation in a turbulent atmosphere is investigated. The axisymmetric PE method is a finite-difference method for solving a 2D parabolic wave equation, which follows from the 3D wave equation by the assumption of axial symmetry around the vertical axis through the source. It is found that this axisymmetric approximation has a considerable spurious effect on the fluctuations of the sound field. This is concluded from analytical expressions for the log-amplitude and phase variances, derived both for isotropic turbulence and for axisymmetric turbulence. The expressions for axisymmetric turbulence are compared with the results of numerical computations with the PE method. PMID:11051480

  14. Parametric effects of CFL number and artificial smoothing on numerical solutions using implicit approximate factorization algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An implicit approximate factorization algorithm is employed to quantify the parametric effects of Courant number and artificial smoothing on numerical solutions of the unsteady 3-D Euler equations for a windmilling propeller (low speed) flow field. The results show that propeller global or performance chracteristics vary strongly with Courant number and artificial dissipation parameters, though the variation is such less severe at high Courant numbers. Candidate sets of Courant number and dissipation parameters could result in parameter-dependent solutions. Parameter-independent numerical solutions can be obtained if low values of the dissipation parameter-time step ratio are used in the computations. Furthermore, it is realized that too much artificial damping can degrade numerical stability. Finally, it is demonstrated that highly resolved meshes may, in some cases, delay convergence, thereby suggesting some optimum cell size for a given flow solution. It is suspected that improper boundary treatment may account for the cell size constraint.

  15. Casimir effect for curved geometries: proximity-force-approximation validity limits.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Klingmüller, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    We compute Casimir interaction energies for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configuration induced by scalar-field fluctuations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Based on a high-precision calculation using world-line numerics, we quantitatively determine the validity bounds of the proximity-force approximation (PFA) on which the comparison between all corresponding experiments and theory are based. We observe the quantitative failure of the PFA on the 1% level for a curvature parameter a/R>0.00755. Even qualitatively, the PFA fails to predict reliably the correct sign of genuine Casimir curvature effects. We conclude that data analysis of future experiments aiming at a precision of 0.1% must no longer be based on the PFA. PMID:16803290

  16. Feasibility study of using a two-plate model to approximate the TDRSS solar pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, F. K.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the feasibility of using a two plate model to approximate the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) in orbit propagation, taking into account the effects of solar radiation pressure. The two plate model comprises one plate which always points to the Earth, and the other which is hinged to an axis normal to the orbital plane and is always rotated so that its normal makes a minimum angle with the direction of the sun. The results indicate that it is sufficient to take three parameters, the areas of the two plates and the reflectivity of the Earth pointing plate, to achieve an accuracy of one meter during a 24 hour orbit propagation.

  17. Applicability of the effective-medium approximation to heterogeneous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and/or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  18. Approximation to the Distribution of Fitness Effects across Functional Categories in Human Segregating Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Racimo, Fernando; Schraiber, Joshua G.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the proportion of polymorphic mutations that are deleterious or neutral is of fundamental importance to our understanding of evolution, disease genetics and the maintenance of variation genome-wide. Here, we develop an approximation to the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of segregating single-nucleotide mutations in humans. Unlike previous methods, we do not assume that synonymous mutations are neutral or not strongly selected, and we do not rely on fitting the DFE of all new nonsynonymous mutations to a single probability distribution, which is poorly motivated on a biological level. We rely on a previously developed method that utilizes a variety of published annotations (including conservation scores, protein deleteriousness estimates and regulatory data) to score all mutations in the human genome based on how likely they are to be affected by negative selection, controlling for mutation rate. We map this and other conservation scores to a scale of fitness coefficients via maximum likelihood using diffusion theory and a Poisson random field model on SNP data. Our method serves to approximate the deleterious DFE of mutations that are segregating, regardless of their genomic consequence. We can then compare the proportion of mutations that are negatively selected or neutral across various categories, including different types of regulatory sites. We observe that the distribution of intergenic polymorphisms is highly peaked at neutrality, while the distribution of nonsynonymous polymorphisms has a second peak at . Other types of polymorphisms have shapes that fall roughly in between these two. We find that transcriptional start sites, strong CTCF-enriched elements and enhancers are the regulatory categories with the largest proportion of deleterious polymorphisms. PMID:25375159

  19. Perturbative approximation to hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster/effective fragment potential method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debashree

    2014-03-07

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods provide an attractive way to closely retain the accuracy of the QM method with the favorable computational scaling of the MM method. Therefore, it is not surprising that QM/MM methods are being increasingly used for large chemical/biological systems. Hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster singles doubles/effective fragment potential (EOM-CCSD/EFP) methods have been developed over the last few years to understand the effect of solvents and other condensed phases on the electronic spectra of chromophores. However, the computational cost of this approach is still dominated by the steep scaling of the EOM-CCSD method. In this work, we propose and implement perturbative approximations to the EOM-CCSD method in this hybrid scheme to reduce the cost of EOM-CCSD/EFP. The timings and accuracy of this hybrid approach is tested for calculation of ionization energies, excitation energies, and electron affinities of microsolvated nucleic acid bases (thymine and cytosine), phenol, and phenolate.

  20. Perturbative approximation to hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster/effective fragment potential method.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashree

    2014-03-01

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods provide an attractive way to closely retain the accuracy of the QM method with the favorable computational scaling of the MM method. Therefore, it is not surprising that QM/MM methods are being increasingly used for large chemical/biological systems. Hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster singles doubles/effective fragment potential (EOM-CCSD/EFP) methods have been developed over the last few years to understand the effect of solvents and other condensed phases on the electronic spectra of chromophores. However, the computational cost of this approach is still dominated by the steep scaling of the EOM-CCSD method. In this work, we propose and implement perturbative approximations to the EOM-CCSD method in this hybrid scheme to reduce the cost of EOM-CCSD/EFP. The timings and accuracy of this hybrid approach is tested for calculation of ionization energies, excitation energies, and electron affinities of microsolvated nucleic acid bases (thymine and cytosine), phenol, and phenolate. PMID:24606347

  1. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F.; Thomas, K. B.

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors' laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane (approximately Ph(CH2)3Ph, or approximately DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  2. An Approximate Formulation of the Effective Indentation Modulus of Elastically Anisotropic Film-on-Substrate Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianlei; Lee, Jinhaeng; Gao, Yanfei

    2009-01-01

    Frictionless contact between an arbitrarily-shaped rigid indenter and an elastically anisotropic film-on-substrate system can be regarded as being superposed incrementally by a flat-ended punch contact, the shape and size of which are determined by the indenter shape, indentation depth (or applied load) and elastic properties of film and substrate. For typical nanoindentation applications, the indentation modulus can thus be approximated from the response of a circular contact with pressure of the form of [1 - (r/a){sup 2}]{sup -1/2}, where r is the radial coordinate and a is the contact radius. The surface-displacement Green's function for elastically anisotropic film-on-substrate system is derived in closed-form by using the Stroh formalism and the two-dimensional Fourier transform. The predicted dependence of the effective modulus on the ratio of film thickness to contact radius agrees well with detailed finite element simulations. Implications in evaluating film modulus by nanoindentation technique are also discussed.

  3. Porosity measurements of interstellar ice mixtures using optical laser interference and extended effective medium approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Paardekooper, D. M.; Bonnin, M.; van der Linden, E. P.; Triemstra, T.; Cazaux, S.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This article aims to provide an alternative method of measuring the porosity of multi-phase composite ices from their refractive indices and of characterising how the abundance of a premixed contaminant (e.g., CO2) affects the porosity of water-rich ice mixtures during omni-directional deposition. Methods: We combine optical laser interference and extended effective medium approximations (EMAs) to measure the porosity of three astrophysically relevant ice mixtures: H2O:CO2 = 10:1, 4:1, and 2:1. Infrared spectroscopy is used as a benchmarking test of this new laboratory-based method. Results: By independently monitoring the O-H dangling modes of the different water-rich ice mixtures, we confirm the porosities predicted by the extended EMAs. We also demonstrate that CO2 premixed with water in the gas phase does not significantly affect the ice morphology during omni-directional deposition, as long as the physical conditions favourable to segregation are not reached. We propose a mechanism in which CO2 molecules diffuse on the surface of the growing ice sample prior to being incorporated into the bulk and then fill the pores partly or completely, depending on the relative abundance and the growth temperature.

  4. Electrical transport anisotropy of uniaxial polycrystalline samples and the effective medium approximation: An application to HTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-García, A.; Muné, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we have applied the effective medium approximation (EMA) to a polycrystalline sample made up of uniaxial crystallites with similar behavior to the high critical temperature superconductors (HTS) at the normal state (σab ≫ σc). As a result the dependence of the anisotropy parameter at the level of the sample, μ =σx /σz , on orientation probability of the grains' a-axes along a certain preferential direction, γxa is obtained. The intrinsic and shape anisotropy parameters of the crystallites constitute input data. In addition, the dependence of the orientation factor, f, which has been introduced in current models on the transport properties of HTS, is calculated as a function of γxa. These results offer a tool to interpret electrical transport measurements at normal state in granular uniaxial superconducting materials with certain texture degree, by means of the correlation between microstructure and electrical transport properties. Moreover, the comparison between the model and some experimental data suggests the presence of intragranular planar defects in the polycrystalline superconductors. They may affect the measurement of paracoherent resistivity and consequently the determination of f mainly in Bi based samples.

  5. Beyond the born approximation: Measuring the two-photon exchange effect at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Robert Paul

    2012-04-01

    Recent results from experiments at Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News VA, which measured the ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton, G{sub E}/G{sub M}, have forced us to reexamine the single photon exchange approximation in lepton-proton elastic scattering. Discrepancies between the ratio obtained via the time-tested Rosenbluth separation method and newer polarization transfer measurements, which differ by as much as a factor of three, may be resolved by considering the effect of two photon exchange (TPE) processes. The CLAS TPE experiment at Jefferson Laboratory, will determine the effect of two-photon exchange in elastic lepton-proton scattering by precisely measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross sections over a large kinematic range (0.1 < {xi} < 0.96, 0.2 {ge} Q{sup 2} {le} 2.0 GeV{sup 2}). We accomplish this by directing the 5.5 GeV primary electron beam, provided by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), onto a set of radiators and converters to produce simultaneous and identical beams of electron and positrons which collide with our proton target. Acceptance and efficiency concerns are minimized by only considering the ratios of the elastic cross sections and by switching polarity of magnets in the beamline and the spectrometer. Guided by the results of a short 2006 test run and extensive GEANT based modeling, new shielding and beamline components were designed to maximize luminosity. We took data from November 2010 - February 2011. The unique experimental design and challenges of the TPE experiment and the current analysis status will be presented.

  6. Beyond the born approximation: Measuring the two-photon exchange effect at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Robert Paul

    2012-09-01

    Recent results from experiments at Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News VA, which measured the ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton, GE/GM, have forced us to reexamine the single photon exchange approximation in lepton-proton elastic scattering. Discrepancies between the ratio obtained via the time-tested Rosenbluth separation method and newer polarization transfer measurements, which differ by as much as a factor of three, may be resolved by considering the effect of two photon exchange (TPE) processes. The CLAS TPE experiment at Jefferson Laboratory, will determine the effect of two-photon exchange in elastic lepton-proton scattering by precisely measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross sections over a large kinematic range (0.1 < ɛ < 0.96,0.2 ≥ Q2 ≤ 2.0GeV2). We accomplish this by directing the 5.5 GeV primary electron beam, provided by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), onto a set of radiators and converters to produce simultaneous and identical beams of electron and positrons which collide with our proton target. Acceptance and efficiency concerns are minimized by only considering the ratios of the elastic cross sections and by switching polarity of magnets in the beamline and the spectrometer. Guided by the results of a short 2006 test run and extensive GEANT based modeling, new shielding and beamline components were designed to maximize luminosity. We took data from November 2010 - February 2011. The unique experimental design and challenges of the TPE experiment and the current analysis status will be presented.

  7. Cancellation of environmental effects in resonant mass sensors based on resonance mode and effective mass

    SciTech Connect

    Naeli, Kianoush; Brand, Oliver

    2009-06-15

    A novel technique is developed to cancel the effect of environmental parameters, e.g., temperature and humidity, in resonant mass sensing. Utilizing a single resonator, the environmental cancellation is achieved by monitoring a pair of resonant overtones and the effective sensed mass in those overtones. As an eminent advantage, especially compared to dual-mode temperature compensation techniques, the presented technique eliminates any need for previously measured look-up tables or fitting the measurement data. We show that a resonant cantilever beam is an appropriate platform for applying this technique, and derive an analytical expression to relate the actual and effective sensed masses on a cantilever beam. Thereby, it is shown that in applying the presented technique successfully, the effective sensed masses must not be the same in the investigated pair of resonance overtones. To prove the feasibility of the proposed technique, flexural resonance frequencies of a silicon cantilever are measured before and after loading with a strip of photoresist. Applying the presented technique shows significant reductions in influence of environmental parameters, with the temperature and humidity coefficients of frequency being improved from -19.5 to 0.2 ppm deg. C{sup -1} and from 0.7 to -0.03 ppm %RH{sup -1}, respectively.

  8. Approximations used in calculating many-body effects in resonant ((dt. mu. )dee) formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.

    1989-02-01

    The approximations needed to treat the resonant formation of the compound molecule ((dt..mu..)dee)/sup */ as a line-broadening process are examined. The necessary criteria for applying the impact (Lorentzian) approximation are shown to be seriously violated under the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion. Neither the condition for binary collisions nor the requirement that the detuning not be too large holds. A much more appropriate description is the many-body quasistatic approximation, which is valid for large detunings at any density and for practically the whole profile at high densities. The convenient factorization of the three-body rate into a convolution of a two-body rate with a broadening factor is shown to hold within some approximations, but the broadening factor itself depends on the transition being considered.

  9. β -decay rates of odd-mass neutron-rich isotopes in the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2015-09-01

    The deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions is extended for the β- decay of odd-mass neutron-rich Kr, Sr, Zr, and Mo isotopes, from their longest-lived isotopes to the experimentally unknown nuclei. The particle-particle and particle-hole channels of residual interactions are handled in large single-particle model spaces, based on the Brückner G matrix with charge-dependent Bonn nucleon-nucleon forces. Both allowed Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions are considered and different treatments for odd-mass systems are emphasized. The sensitivity of the calculated results to the single-particle level scheme and the particle-particle strength is discussed. The calculated Gamow-Teller strengths are analyzed, together with the contributions from first-forbidden transitions. The calculated half-lives are found to agree well with the experimental data over the orders of magnitude from 10-2 to 103 s.

  10. Effective continuum approximation for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous tuff: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Wang, J.S.Y.; Tsang, Y.W.

    1988-05-01

    Fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media can be of great complexity, and a quantitative description requires the development of simplified mathematical and numerical methods. This report presents a detailed formulation, and partial evaluation, of an ``effective continuum approximation`` for non-isothermal multi-phase flow, which had been introduced previously only in a heuristic fashion. The key concept on which the effective continuum approach must rely is (approximate) local thermodynamic equilibrium between fractures and rock matrix. The applicability of this approximation is discussed and studied by means of numerical simulations for emplacement of high-level waste packages in partially saturated fractured tuff. The simulations demonstrate that the validity of the effective continuum approximation cannot be ascertained in general terms. The approximation will break down for rapid transients in flow systems with low matrix permeability and/or large fracture spacing, so that its applicability needs to be carefully evaluated for the specific processes and conditions under study. The effective continuum approximation has been applied for a preliminary study of fluid and heat flow near a high-level nuclear waste repository on a regional scale, employing a highly simplified strtatigraphic description. It was found that substantial gas phase convection was taking place, with convection velocities being sensitive to permeability, porosity, and tortuosity of the fracture network. 18 refs., 27 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. One-dimensional model of a liquid metal in the effective-medium approximation in the random limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbun, Javier E.

    1989-08-01

    In this paper it is shown that the effective-medium approximation (EMA) of Roth [Phys. Rev. B 9, 2476 (1974)] corresponds to the approximation No. 5 of Klauder [Ann. Phys. 14, 43 (1961)] in the random limit for the one-dimensional delta-function model of a liquid metal. The random EMA results are compared with the exact results obtained by Frisch and Lloyd [Phys. Rev. 120, 1175 (1960)] for this model.

  12. Quantum Transport in Crystals: Effective Mass Theorem and K·P Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletti, Luigi; Ben Abdallah, Naoufel

    2011-11-01

    In this paper the effective mass approximation and the k·p multi-band models, describing quantum evolution of electrons in a crystal lattice, are discussed. Electrons are assumed to move in both a periodic potential and a macroscopic one. The typical period {ɛ} of the periodic potential is assumed to be very small, while the macroscopic potential acts on a much bigger length scale. Such homogenization asymptotic is investigated by using the envelope-function decomposition of the electron wave function. If the external potential is smooth enough, the k·p and effective mass models, well known in solid-state physics, are proved to be close (in the strong sense) to the exact dynamics. Moreover, the position density of the electrons is proved to converge weakly to its effective mass approximation.

  13. The lens effect of a big spherical inhomogeneity in the linear approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Portilla, M. )

    1990-04-01

    The paper addresses a large gravitational lens, of dimensions comparable with observer-lens-source distances, for arbitrary lens-observer-source angles. The lens is approximated by a small, pressureless, spsherically symmetric perturbation in a Einstein-de Sitter universe. The deflection angle contains essential terms which do not appear when the lens is approximated by an isolated body in a Minkowskian space. These terms should be considered to study the optical appearance of the inhomogeneity. The lens equation explicitly conserves brightness over the whole celestial sphere of the observer. 8 refs.

  14. Effective Utilization of the Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Norma Haston

    The question of whether or not the mass media can successfully be used as a vehicle for creative social and individual change is discussed and brief descriptions are given of successful and unsuccessful campaigns that attempted to improve public attitudes toward certain health problems. Ten recommendations are made for using the mass media…

  15. Mass and Isospin Effects in Multifragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfienti, C.; Adrich, P.; Aumann, T.; Bacri, C. O.; Barczyk, T.; Bassini, R.; Boiano, C.; Botvina, A. S.; Boudard, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Chbihi, A.; Cibor, J.; Czech, B.; De Napoli, M.; Ducret, J.-E.; Emling, H.; Frankland, J.; Hellström, M.; Henzlova, D.; Kezzar, K.; Immé, G.; Iori, I.; Johansson, H.; Lafriakh, A.; Le Fèvre, A.; Le Gentil, E.; Leifels, Y.; Lynch, W. G.; Lühning, J.; Łukasik, J.; Lynen, U.; Majka, Z.; Mocko, M.; Müller, W. F. J.; Mykulyak, A.; Orth, H.; Otte, A. N.; Palit, R.; Pullia, A.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Sann, H.; Schwarz, C.; Simon, H.; Sokolov, A.; Sümmerer, K.; Trautmann, W.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Volant, C.; Wallace, M.; Weick, H.; Wiechula, J.; Wieloch, A.; Zwieglinski, B.

    2005-03-01

    A systematic study of isospin effects in the breakup of projectile spectators at relativistic energies has been performed with the ALADiN spectrometer at the GSI laboratory (Darmstadt). Four different projectiles 197Au, 124La, 124Sn and 107Sn, all with an incident energy of 600 AMeV, have been used, thus allowing a study of various combinations of masses and N/Z ratios in the entrance channel. The measurement of the momentum vector and of the charge of all projectile fragments with Z > 1 entering the acceptance of the ALADiN magnet has been performed with the high efficiency and resolution achieved with the TP-MUSIC IV detector. The Rise and Fall behavior of the mean multiplicity of IMFs as a function of Zbound and its dependence on the isotopic composition has been determined for the studied systems. Other observables investigated so far include mean N/Z values of the emitted light fragments and neutron multiplicities. Qualitative agreement has been obtained between the observed gross properties and the predictions of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model.

  16. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to epsilon-prime / epsilon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N.H.; Dawson, C.; Laiho, J.W.; Noaki, J.; Li, S.; Soni, A.; /Brookhaven

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q8 contribution to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReAP{sub 2} and thus, the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  17. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N. H.; Li, S.; Dawson, C.; Noaki, J.; Laiho, J. W.; Soni, A.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q{sub 8} contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReA{sub 2} and thus, the {delta}I=1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  18. Challenges within the linear response approximation when studying enzyme catalysis and effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharir-Ivry, Avital; Varatharaj, Rajapandian; Shurki, Avital

    2015-01-13

    Various aspects of the linear response approximation (LRA) approach were examined when calculating reaction barriers within an enzyme and its different mutants. Scaling the electrostatic interactions is shown to slightly affect the absolute values of the barriers but not the overall trend when comparing wild-type and mutants. Convergence of the overall energetics was shown to depend on the sampling. Finally, the contribution of particular residues was shown to be significant, despite its small value. PMID:26574227

  19. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert P.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-10-01

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this communication, the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born-Oppenheimer surface. The analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologue thermodynamics.

  20. Mass loss from warm giants: Magnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Among warm giant stars, rapid mass loss sets in along a well defined velocity dividing line (VDL). Hot corona also disappear close to the VDL and thermal pressure cannot drive the observed rapid mass loss in these stars. The VDL may be associated with magnetic fields changing from closed to open. Such a change is consistent with the lack of X-rays from late-type giants. A magnetic transition locus based on Pneuman's work on helmet streamer stability agrees well with the empirical VDL. The change from closed to open fields not only makes rapid mass loss possible, but also contributes to energizing the mass loss in the form of discrete bubbles.

  1. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  2. Decoherence effects in the quantum qubit flip game using Markovian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawron, Piotr; Kurzyk, Dariusz; Pawela, Łukasz

    2013-11-01

    We are considering a quantum version of the penny flip game, whose implementation is influenced by the environment that causes decoherence of the system. In order to model the decoherence, we assume Markovian approximation of open quantum system dynamics. We focus our attention on the phase damping, amplitude damping and amplitude raising channels. Our results show that the Pauli strategy is no longer a Nash equilibrium under decoherence. We attempt to optimize the players' control pulses in the aforementioned setup to allow them to achieve higher probability of winning the game compared with the Pauli strategy.

  3. Charts and approximate formulas for the estimation of aeroelastic effects on the loading of swept and unswept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diederich, Franklin W; Foss, Kenneth A

    1953-01-01

    Charts and approximate formulas are presented for the estimation of aeroelastic effects on the spanwise lift distribution, lift-curve slope, aerodynamic center, and damping in roll of swept and unswept wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Some design considerations brought out by the results of this report are discussed.

  4. Space inhomogeneity and detuning effects in a laser with a saturable absorber: a first-order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fernandez, P.; Velarde, M.G.

    1988-05-01

    To a first approximation the effects of detuning and/or space inhomogeneity on the stability domain of a model for a laser with a saturable absorber are presented. It appears that the space dependence increases the domain of the emissionless state, thus delaying the laser action.

  5. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part II. Comparison of approximate calculation with the analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, N. A.; Simankin, F. A.; Manabaev, K. K.

    2016-04-01

    A new approximate algorithm for calculating a stress-strain state of viscoelastic bodies is used. The algorithm is based on the derivation of the expressions of time-effective modules. These modules are obtained by iterative changes, compressing the fork of Voigt-Reuss. As an example the analytic solution about the action of a concentrated force on the viscoelastic half-space is compared with the approximate solution. Numerical calculations are performed for a wide range of relaxation characteristics of a viscoelastic half-space. Results of the comparison of stresses and displacements with the analytic solution give coincidence within 3... 15%.

  6. Mass Media Effects and Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroman, Carolyn A.

    1984-01-01

    Black Americans' use of and belief in the credibility of the mass media is no less extensive than that of the general population. In fact, television and radio use by blacks exceeds that of whites and research shows the broadcast media to be particularly important sources of information for blacks on consumer and political affairs. But many…

  7. Effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation for a focused laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.

    2015-09-14

    We have investigated the effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation to study electron acceleration by a focused laser pulse in vacuum using a three dimensional test-particle simulation code. The error is obtained by comparing the energy of the electron for paraxial approximation and seventh-order correction description of the fields of Gaussian laser. The paraxial approximation predicts wrong laser divergence and wrong electron escape time from the pulse which leads to prediction of higher energy. The error shows strong phase dependence for the electrons lying along the axis of the laser for linearly polarized laser pulse. The relative error may be significant for some specific values of initial phase even at moderate values of laser spot sizes. The error does not show initial phase dependence for a circularly laser pulse.

  8. Intrinsic Carrier Concentration and Electron Effective Mass in Hg(1-x) Zn(x) Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sha, Yi-Gao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    In this work, the intrinsic carrier concentration and electron effective mass in Hg(l-x)Zn(x)Te were numerically calculated. We adopt the procedures similar to those used by Su et. al. for calculating intrinsic carrier concentrations in Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te which solve the exact dispersion relation in Kane model for the calculation of the conduction band electron concentrations and the corresponding electron effective masses. No approximation beyond those inherent in the k centered dot p model was used here.

  9. Influence of the superposition approximation on calculated effective dose rates from galactic cosmic rays at aerospace-related altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Kyle

    2015-07-01

    The superposition approximation was commonly employed in atmospheric nuclear transport modeling until recent years and is incorporated into flight dose calculation codes such as CARI-6 and EPCARD. The useful altitude range for this approximation is investigated using Monte Carlo transport techniques. CARI-7A simulates atmospheric radiation transport of elements H-Fe using a database of precalculated galactic cosmic radiation showers calculated with MCNPX 2.7.0 and is employed here to investigate the influence of the superposition approximation on effective dose rates, relative to full nuclear transport of galactic cosmic ray primary ions. Superposition is found to produce results less than 10% different from nuclear transport at current commercial and business aviation altitudes while underestimating dose rates at higher altitudes. The underestimate sometimes exceeds 20% at approximately 23 km and exceeds 40% at 50 km. Thus, programs employing this approximation should not be used to estimate doses or dose rates for high-altitude portions of the commercial space and near-space manned flights that are expected to begin soon.

  10. Finite volume effects for nucleon and heavy meson masses

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Fuhrer, Andreas; Lanz, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    We apply the resummed version of the Luescher formula to analyze finite volume corrections to the mass of the nucleon and of heavy mesons. We show that by applying the subthreshold expansion of the scattering amplitudes one can express the finite volume corrections in terms of only a few physical observables and the size of the box. In the case of the nucleon, the available information about the quark mass dependence of these physical quantities is discussed and used to assess the finite volume corrections to the nucleon mass as a function of the quark mass including a detailed analysis of the remaining uncertainties. For heavy mesons, the Luescher formula is derived both fully relativistically and in a nonrelativistic approximation and a first attempt at a numerical analysis is made.

  11. Minimization of the effect of errors in approximate radiation view factors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.; Solbrig, C.

    1993-09-01

    The maximum temperature of irradiated fuel rods in storage containers was investigated taking credit only for radiation heat transfer. Estimating view factors is often easy but in many references the emphasis is placed on calculating the quadruple integrals exactly. Selecting different view factors in the view factor matrix as independent, yield somewhat different view factor matrices. In this study ten to twenty percent error in view factors produced small errors in the temperature which are well within the uncertainty due to the surface emissivities uncertainty. However, the enclosure and reciprocity principles must be strictly observed or large errors in the temperatures and wall heat flux were observed (up to a factor of 3). More than just being an aid for calculating the dependent view factors, satisfying these principles, particularly reciprocity, is more important than the calculation accuracy of the view factors. Comparison to experiment showed that the result of the radiation calculation was definitely conservative as desired in spite of the approximations to the view factors.

  12. THE ZEEMAN EFFECT IN THE SOBOLEV APPROXIMATION: SPLIT MONOPOLE FIELDS AND THE 'HEARTBEAT' STOKES V PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Gayley, K. G.; Ignace, R.

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the circularly polarized Stokes V(lambda) profile for emission lines, formed in hot-star winds threaded with a weak radial magnetic field. For simplicity, the field is treated as a split monopole under the assumptions that it has been radially combed by the wind, and rotation is not playing a central role. Invoking the weak-field approximation, we find that the V(lambda) profile has a characteristic 'heartbeat' shape exhibiting multiple sign inversions, which might be mistaken for noise in the absence of theoretical guidance. We also conclude that there is a tendency for the V(lambda) profile to integrate to zero on each side of the line separately. The overall scale of V(lambda)/I(lambda) is set by the ratio of the field strength to the flow speed, B/v, characteristic of the line-forming region, and is of the order of 0.1% for a wind magnetic field B approx = 100G at depths where the wind speed is v approx = 100 km s{sup -1}.

  13. Analytical approximations for matter effects on CP violation in the accelerator-based neutrino oscillations with E ≲ 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhu, Jing-yu

    2016-07-01

    Given an accelerator-based neutrino experiment with the beam energy E ≲ 1 GeV, we expand the probabilities of ν μ → ν e and {overline{ν}}_{μ}to {overline{ν}}_e oscillations in matter in terms of two small quantities Δ21 /Δ31 and A/Δ31, where Δ 21≡ m 2 2 - m 1 2 and Δ 31≡ m 3 2 - m 1 2 are the neutrino mass-squared differences, and A measures the strength of terrestrial matter effects. Our analytical approximations are numerically more accurate than those made by Freund in this energy region, and thus they are particularly applicable for the study of leptonic CP violation in the low-energy MOMENT, ESS νSM and T2K oscillation experiments. As a by-product, the new analytical approximations help us to easily understand why the matter-corrected Jarlskog parameter tilde{J} peaks at the resonance energy E ∗ ≃ 0 .14GeV (or 0 .12 GeV) for the normal (or inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, and how the three Dirac unitarity triangles are deformed due to the terrestrial matter contamination. We also affirm that a medium-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with the beam energy E lying in the E ∗ ≲ E ≲ 2 E ∗ range is capable of exploring leptonic CP violation with little matter-induced suppression.

  14. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrikanth, V.; Bobji, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  15. Many-Body Effects on Bandgap Shrinkage, Effective Masses, and Alpha Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many-body Coulomb effects influence the operation of quantum-well (QW) laser diode (LD) strongly. In the present work, we study a two-band electron-hole plasma (EHP) within the Hatree-Fock approximation and the single plasmon pole approximation for static screening. Full inclusion of momentum dependence in the many-body effects is considered. An empirical expression for carrier density dependence of the bandgap renormalization (BGR) in an 8 nm GaAs/Al(0.3)G(4.7)As single QW will be given, which demonstrates a non-universal scaling behavior for quasi-two-dimension structures, due to size-dependent efficiency of screening. In addition, effective mass renormalization (EMR) due to momentum-dependent self-energy many-body correction, for both electrons and holes is studied and serves as another manifestation of the many-body effects. Finally, the effects on carrier density dependence of the alpha factor is evaluated to assess the sensitivity of the full inclusion of momentum dependence.

  16. Direct Demonstration of the Concept of Unrestricted Effective-Medium Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Zhanna M.; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2014-01-01

    The modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is defined as one that yields accurate values of a representative set of far-field scattering characteristics (including the scattering matrix) for an object made of randomly heterogeneous materials. We validate the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index by comparing numerically exact superposition T-matrix results for a spherical host randomly filled with a large number of identical small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie results for a homogeneous spherical counterpart. A remarkable quantitative agreement between the superposition T-matrix and Lorenz-Mie scattering matrices over the entire range of scattering angles demonstrates unequivocally that the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is a sound (albeit still phenomenological) concept provided that the size parameter of the inclusions is sufficiently small and their number is sufficiently large. Furthermore, it appears that in cases when the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index works, its actual value is close to that predicted by the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule.

  17. Assessment of density-functional approximations: Long-range correlations and self-interaction effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Godby, R.W.

    2004-05-01

    The complex nature of electron-electron correlations is made manifest in the very simple but nontrivial problem of two electrons confined within a sphere. The description of highly nonlocal correlation and self-interaction effects by widely used local and semilocal exchange-correlation energy density functionals is shown to be unsatisfactory in most cases. Even the best such functionals exhibit significant errors in the Kohn-Sham potentials and density profiles.

  18. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  19. High resonant mass sensor evaluation: An effective method

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, Yakov M.

    2005-11-15

    Micro- and nanocantilever mass sensors in higher resonant oscillation modes are very sensitive to an additional mass, which is positioned along their length except for the nodal points. However, the known evaluation methods of this sensitivity are usually complicated, which is not effective in applications for atomic force microscopy. Our solution is simple, unified, and based on the superposition force method, which allows us to estimate effective spring constants, effective mass factors, and correct prediction of sensitivity for nano- and microcantilevers along their length in higher resonant modes. Simple analytical and computer aided calculation algorithms are developed. Calculation results are close to the experimental and computer simulation data within a few percent.

  20. Effect of various approximations on predicted progressive failure in plain weave composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John; Srirengan, Kanthikannan

    1995-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to simulate progressive failure of a plain weave composite subjected to in-plane extension. The loading was parallel to one of the tow directions. The effects of various characteristics of the finite element model on predicted behavior were examined. The predicted behavior was found to be sensitive to quadrature order, mesh refinement, and the material degradation model. Also the sensitivity of the predictions to the tow waviness was studied. The predicted strength decreased considerably with increased waviness. More numerical studies and comparisons with experimental data are needed to establish reliable guidelines for accurate progressive failure prediction.

  1. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. Lastly, the presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  2. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose-Einstein condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    We study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose-Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. The presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  3. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  4. A 30-month longitudinal study of the effects of some oral hygiene measures on Streptococcus mutans and approximal dental caries.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, P; Kristoffersson, K; Karlsson, R; Bratthall, D

    1987-03-01

    The effects of some oral hygiene measures on Streptococcus mutants and approximal dental caries were evaluated. One hundred and eighty-seven 13-year-old individuals with high levels of salivary S. mutans (greater than 10(6)/mL) were selected. They were randomly distributed into three groups. Group I initially received professional mechanical tooth-cleaning, tongue-scraping, chlorhexidine treatment, and oral hygiene instructions concentrated on the approximal surfaces most colonized by S. mutans. The treatment was given four times with intervals of two days, followed by one single treatment every six months throughout the experimental period. The initial treatment period for group II, also consisting of four visits, included the same oral hygiene instructions as for group I. The instructions were repeated every six months. Group III was maintained in the preventive program provided by the local Dental Health Office, based on mechanical plaque control and topical use of fluorides and chlorhexidine at individualized intervals. Group I showed a significant immediate reduction of S. mutans in saliva as well as an approximal tooth surfaces. After six months, there were no differences among the three groups regarding these variables. Compared with baseline, there was a significant reduction of S. mutans in all groups. There was no significant difference in caries progression among the three groups. However, the selected "high-risk" individuals in group I developed 0.25 new manifest caries lesions approximally/year, compared with 0.27 for all children of the same age group in the area. Seventeen individuals had approximal surfaces with consistently high or consistently low S. mutans levels. Forty-six percent of the surfaces with high values developed new or progressive caries, compared with 2% of the surfaces with low values. PMID:3475309

  5. Natural Higgs mass in supersymmetry from nondecoupling effects.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Murayama, Hitoshi; Ruderman, Joshua T; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2014-05-16

    The Higgs mass implies fine-tuning for minimal theories of weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Nondecoupling effects can boost the Higgs mass when new states interact with the Higgs boson, but new sources of SUSY breaking that accompany such extensions threaten naturalness. We show that two singlets with a Dirac mass can increase the Higgs mass while maintaining naturalness in the presence of large SUSY breaking in the singlet sector. We explore the modified Higgs phenomenology of this scenario, which we call the "Dirac next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model." PMID:24877931

  6. Molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites in the effective core potential approximation.

    PubMed

    Lesiuk, Michał; Zachara, Janusz

    2013-02-21

    Considering calculations of the molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites (MEP@AS) in the presence of effective core potentials (ECP), we found that the consequent use of the definition of MEP@AS based on the energy derivative with respect to nuclear charge leads to a formula that differs by one term from the result of simple application of Coulomb's law. We have developed a general method to analytically treat derivatives of ECP with respect to nuclear charge. Benchmarking calculations performed on a set of simple molecules show that our formula leads to a systematic decrease in the error connected with the introduction of ECP when compared to all-electron results. Because of a straightforward implementation and relatively low costs of the developed procedure we suggest to use it by default. PMID:23444997

  7. Molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites in the effective core potential approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesiuk, Michał; Zachara, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    Considering calculations of the molecular electrostatic potential at the atomic sites (MEP@AS) in the presence of effective core potentials (ECP), we found that the consequent use of the definition of MEP@AS based on the energy derivative with respect to nuclear charge leads to a formula that differs by one term from the result of simple application of Coulomb's law. We have developed a general method to analytically treat derivatives of ECP with respect to nuclear charge. Benchmarking calculations performed on a set of simple molecules show that our formula leads to a systematic decrease in the error connected with the introduction of ECP when compared to all-electron results. Because of a straightforward implementation and relatively low costs of the developed procedure we suggest to use it by default.

  8. Investigating the Effectiveness of Wavelet Approximations in Resizing Images for Ultrasound Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Umar; Nefti, Samia; Ferdinando, Milella

    2016-10-01

    Images are difficult to classify and annotate but the availability of digital image databases creates a constant demand for tools that automatically analyze image content and describe it with either a category or a set of variables. Ultrasound Imaging is very popular and is widely used to see the internal organ(s) condition of the patient. The main target of this research is to develop a robust image processing techniques for a better and more accurate medical image retrieval and categorization. This paper looks at an alternative to feature extraction for image classification such as image resizing technique. A new mean for image resizing using wavelet transform is proposed. Results, using real medical images, have shown the effectiveness of the proposed technique for classification task comparing to bi-cubic interpolation and feature extraction. PMID:27586590

  9. Total Ionizing Dose Effects in 12-Bit Successive-Approximation Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. I.; Rax, B. G.; Johnston, A. H.

    1993-01-01

    Analog-to-digital (A/D) converters are critical components in many space and military systems, and there have been numerous advances in A/D converter technology that have increased the resolution and conversion time. The increased performance is due to two factors: (1) advances in circuit design and complexity, which have increased the number of components and the integration density; and (2) new process technologies, such as BiCMOS, which provide better performance, cost, and smaller size in mixed-signal circuits. High-speed A/D converters, with conversion rates above 1 MHz, present a challenge to circuit designers and test engineers. Their complex architectures and high-performance specifications result in numerous possible failure modes when they are subjected to ionizing radiation. The dominant failure mode may depend on the specific application because the fundamental effects on MOS and bipolar transistors are strongly affected by bias conditions.

  10. Space Weather Effects of Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, K. N.; Jadav, R. M.; Jadeja, A. K.; Manoharan, P. K.; Sharma, Som; Vats, Hari Om

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the space weather effects of a major CME which was accompanied by extremely violent events on the Sun. The signatures of the event in the interplanetary medium (IPM) sensed by Ooty Radio Telescope, the solar observations by LASCO coronagraph onboard SOHO, GOES X-ray measurements, satellite measurements of the interplanetary parameters, GPS based ionospheric measurements, the geomagnetic storm parameter Dst and ground based ionosonde data are used in the study to understand the space weather effects in the different regions of the solar-terrestrial environment. The effects of this event are compared and possible explanations attempted.

  11. Effective Stress Approximation using Geomechanical Formulation of Fracturing Technology (GFFT) in Petroleum Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, A.; Asef, M.; Kharrat, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, rock mechanics and geophysics contribution in petroleum industry has been significantly increased. Wellbore stability analysis in horizontal wells, sand production problem while extracting hydrocarbon from sandstone reservoirs, land subsidence due to production induced reservoir compaction, reservoir management, casing shearing are samples of these contributions. In this context, determination of the magnitude and orientation of the in-situ stresses is an essential parameter. This paper is presenting new method to estimate the magnitude of in-situ stresses based on fracturing technology data. Accordingly, kirsch equations for the circular cavities and fracturing technology models in permeable formations have been used to develop an innovative Geomechanical Formulation (GFFT). GFFT introduces a direct reasonable relation between the reservoir stresses and the breakdown pressure of fracture, while the concept of effective stress was employed. Thus, this complex formula contains functions of some rock mechanic parameters such as poison ratio, Biot’s coefficient, Young’s modulus, rock tensile strength, depth of reservoir and breakdown/reservoir pressure difference. Hence, this approach yields a direct method to estimate maximum and minimum effective/insitu stresses in an oil field and improves minimum in-situ stress estimation compared to previous studies. In case of hydraulic fracturing; a new stress analysis method is developed based on well known Darcy equations for fluid flow in porous media which improves in-situ stress estimation using reservoir parameters such as permeability, and injection flow rate. The accuracy of the method would be verified using reservoir data of a case history. The concepts discussed in this research would eventually suggest an alternative methodology with sufficient accuracy to derive in-situ stresses in hydrocarbon reservoirs, while no extra experimental work is accomplished for this purpose.

  12. SEASONALITY AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MASS VACCINATION

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Dennis L.; Dimitrov, Dobromir T.

    2016-01-01

    Many infectious diseases have seasonal outbreaks, which may be driven by cyclical environmental conditions (e.g., an annual rainy season) or human behavior (e.g., school calendars or seasonal migration). If a pathogen is only transmissible for a limited period of time each year, then seasonal outbreaks could infect fewer individuals than expected given the pathogen’s in-season transmissibility. Influenza, with its short serial interval and long season, probably spreads throughout a population until a substantial fraction of susceptible individuals are infected. Dengue, with a long serial interval and shorter season, may be constrained by its short transmission season rather than the depletion of susceptibles. Using mathematical modeling, we show that mass vaccination is most efficient, in terms of infections prevented per vaccine administered, at high levels of coverage for pathogens that have relatively long epidemic seasons, like influenza, and at low levels of coverage for pathogens with short epidemic seasons, like dengue. Therefore, the length of a pathogen’s epidemic season may need to be considered when evaluating the costs and benefits of vaccination programs. PMID:27105983

  13. Effective medium approximation of the optical properties of electrochromic cerium-titanium oxide compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rottkay, K. von; Richardson, T.; Rubin, M.; Slack, J.

    1997-07-01

    Cerium titanium oxide samples derived from a solution have been compared against sputtered films over a wide range of different compositions. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the structural properties of the compound material existing in a two-phase mixture M{sub A}O{sub 2}-M{sub B}O{sub 2}. The optical properties were evaluated over the whole solar spectrum by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry combined with spectrophotometry. The spectral complex refractive index was determined for CeO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}, as well as for their compounds. To reduce the large number of permutations in composition of multi-component oxides it would be useful to be able to predict the properties of the mixtures from the pure oxide components. Therefore these results were compared to those obtained by effective medium theory utilizing the optical constants of CeO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}. In order to investigate the performance as passive counter-electrode in Li{sup +} based electrochromic devices the films were tested by cyclic voltammetry with in-situ transmission control. Chemical composition was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Surface morphology was analyzed by atomic force microscopy.

  14. Effective medium approximation of the optical properties of electrochromic cerium-titanium oxide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rottkay, Nik; Richardson, Terry J.; Rubin, Michael; Slack, J.; Masetti, Enrico; Dautzenberg, G.

    1997-10-01

    Cerium titanium oxide samples produced by sol-gel have been compared against sputtered and pulsed laser deposited films over a wide range of different compositions. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the structural properties of the compound material existing in a two-phase mixture MAO2-MBO2. The optical properties were evaluated over the whole solar spectrum by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry combined with spectrophotometry. The spectral complex refractive index was determined for CeO2 and TiO2, as well as for their compounds. To reduce the large number of permutations in composition of multi-component oxides it would be useful to be able to predict the properties of the mixtures from the pure oxide components. Therefore these results were compared to those obtained by effective medium theory utilizing the optical constants of CeO2 and TiO2. In order to investigate the performance as passive counter-electrode in Li+ based electrochromic devices the films were tested by cyclic voltammetry with in-situ transmission control. Chemical composition was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Surface morphology was analyzed by atomic force microscopy.

  15. Alternative approximation concepts for space frame synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, R. V.; Schmit, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method for space frame synthesis based on the application of a full gamut of approximation concepts is presented. It is found that with the thoughtful selection of design space, objective function approximation, constraint approximation and mathematical programming problem formulation options it is possible to obtain near minimum mass designs for a significant class of space frame structural systems while requiring fewer than 10 structural analyses. Example problems are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the method for frame structures subjected to multiple static loading conditions with limits on structural stiffness and strength.

  16. Effects of BMI, Fat Mass, and Lean Mass on Asthma in Childhood: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Evans, David M.; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R.; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001) and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38–4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003). The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16–2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19–3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89–2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11–1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23–4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Conclusions Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see

  17. Predicting Mass Media Effects: A Cognitive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Thomas F.

    In this theoretical working paper, an attempt is made to pull together the two areas of cognitive information processing and emotional arousal, in order to provide a fuller framework for examining media effects. The development of a cognitive-behavioral index is proposed as a research tool resulting from this merger of areas, as are a number of…

  18. Search for effects beyond the Born approximation in polarization transfer observables in e(pol)p elastic scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, M.; Brash, E. J.; Jones, M. K.; Luo, W.; Pentchev, L.; Arrington, J.; Hafidi, K.; Reimer, P.; Solvignon, P.; Gep2 Collaboration

    2011-03-29

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub E}/G{sub M}, obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic H({rvec e}, e' {rvec p}) reaction for three different beam energies at a Q{sup 2} = 2.5 GeV{sup 2}, spanning a wide range of the kinematic parameter {epsilon}. The ratio R, which equals {mu}{sub p}G{sub E}/G{sub M} in the Born approximation, is found to be independent of {epsilon} at the 1.5% level. The {epsilon} dependence of the longitudinal polarization transfer component P{sub {ell}} shows an enhancement of (2.3 {+-} 0.6)% relative to the Born approximation at large {epsilon}.

  19. Search for effects beyond the Born approximation in polarization transfer observables in $\\vec{e}p$ elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, M; Brash, E J; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A J.R.; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbothan, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnick, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman,; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Vanderhaeghen, M; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2011-04-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, $G_{E}/G_{M}$, obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange (TPEX) contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic $H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{p})$ reaction for three different beam energies at a fixed squared momentum transfer $Q^2 = 2.5$ GeV$^2$, spanning a wide range of the virtual photon polarization parameter, $\\epsilon$. From these measured polarization observables, we have obtained separately the ratio $R$, which equals $\\mu_p G_{E}/G_{M}$ in the Born approximation, and the longitudinal polarization transfer component $P_\\ell$, with statistical and systematic uncertainties of $\\Delta R \\approx \\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(stat)} \\pm 0.013 \\mbox{(syst)}$ and $\\Delta P_\\ell/P^{Born}_{\\ell} \\approx \\pm 0.006 \\mbox{(stat)}\\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(syst)}$. The ratio $R$ is found to be independent of $\\epsilon$ at the 1.5% level, while the $\\epsilon$ dependence of $P_\\ell$ shows an enhancement of $(2.3 \\pm 0.6) %$ relative to the Born approximation at large $\\epsilon$.

  20. Search for effects beyond the born approximation in polarization transfer observables in e(over→)p elastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Meziane, M; Brash, E J; Gilman, R; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Širca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Vanderhaeghen, M; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2011-04-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G(E)/G(M), obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic H(e[over →],e(')p[over →]) reaction for three different beam energies at a Q(2)=2.5  GeV(2), spanning a wide range of the kinematic parameter ε. The ratio R, which equals μ(p)G(E)/G(M) in the Born approximation, is found to be independent of ε at the 1.5% level. The ε dependence of the longitudinal polarization transfer component P(ℓ) shows an enhancement of (2.3±0.6)% relative to the Born approximation at large ε. PMID:21520982

  1. The Effect of Approximating Some Molecular Integrals in Coupled-Cluster Calculations: Fundamental Frequencies and Rovibrational Spectroscopic Constants of Cyclopropenylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T), has been used, in conjunction with approximate integral techniques, to compute highly accurate rovibrational spectroscopic constants of cyclopropenylidene, C3H2. The approximate integral technique was proposed in 1994 by Rendell and Lee in order to avoid disk storage and input/output bottlenecks, and today it will also significantly aid in the development of algorithms for distributed memory, massively parallel computer architectures. It is shown in this study that use of approximate integrals does not impact the accuracy of CCSD(T) calculations. In addition, the most accurate spectroscopic data yet for C3H2 is presented based on a CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ quartic force field that is modified to include the effects of core-valence electron correlation. Cyclopropenylidene is of great astronomical and astrobiological interest because it is the smallest aromatic ringed compound to be positively identified in the interstellar medium, and is thus involved in the prebiotic processing of carbon and hydrogen. The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of

  2. Gas and solute diffusion in partially saturated porous media: Percolation theory and Effective Medium Approximation compared with lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Daigle, Hugh; Hunt, Allen G.; Ewing, Robert P.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and accurate prediction of gas or liquid phase (solute) diffusion are essential to accurate prediction of contaminant transport in partially saturated porous media. In this study, we propose analytical equations, using concepts from percolation theory and the Effective Medium Approximation (EMA) to model the saturation dependence of both gas and solute diffusion in porous media. The predictions of our theoretical approach agree well with the results of nine lattice Boltzmann simulations. We find that the universal quadratic scaling predicted by percolation theory, combined with the universal linear scaling predicted by the EMA, describes diffusion in porous media with both relatively broad and extremely narrow pore size distributions.

  3. Charts and approximate formulas for the estimation of aeroelastic effects of the lateral control of swept and unswept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, Kenneth A; Diederich, Franklin W

    1953-01-01

    Charts and approximate formulas are presented for the estimation of static aeroelastic effects on the spanwise lift distribution, rolling-moment coefficient, and rate of roll due to the deflection of ailerons on swept and unswept wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Some design considerations brought out by the results of this report are discussed. This report treats the lateral-control case in a manner similar to that employed in NACA Report 1140 for the symmetric-flight case, and is intended to be used in conjunction with NACA Report 1140 and the charts and formulas presented therein.

  4. Spin-current Seebeck effect in an interacting quantum dot: Atomic approximation for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, E.; Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Siqueira, E. C.; Figueira, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study the spin-current Seebeck effect through an immersed gate defined quantum dot, employing the U-finite atomic method for the single impurity Anderson model. Our description qualitatively confirms some of the results obtained by an earlier Hartree-Fock work, but as our calculation includes the Kondo effect, some new features will appear in the spin-current Seebeck effect S, which as a function of the gate voltage present an oscillatory shape. At intermediate temperatures, our results show a three zero structure and at low temperatures, our results are governed by the emergence of the Kondo peak in the transmittance, which defines the behavior of the shape of the S coefficient as a function of the parameters of the model. The oscillatory behavior obtained by the Hartree-Fock approximation reproduces the shape obtained by us in a non-interacting system (U=0). The S sign is sensitive to different polarization of the quantum dot, and as a consequence the device could be employed to experimentally detect the polarization states of the system. Our results also confirm that the large increase of S upon increasing U, obtained by the mean field approximation, is correct only for low temperatures. We also discuss the role of the Kondo peak in defining the behavior of the spin thermopower at low temperatures.

  5. Terrestrial Planet Formation around Low-Mass Stars: Effect of the Mass of Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshino, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has detected several thousand planets and candidates.Their central stars are mainly FGK-type stars.It is difficult to observe M-stars by using visible light since M-stars have their peak radiation in the infrared region.However, recently there are several survey projects for planets around M-stars such as the InfraRed Doppler (IRD) survey of the Subaru telescope.Therefore it is expected that the number of planets around M-stars will increase in the near future.The habitable zone of M-stars is closer to the stars than that of G-stars.For this reason, the possibility of finding habitable planets is expected to be higher.Here we study the formation of close-in terrestrial planets by giant impacts of protoplanets around low-mass stars by using N-body simulations.An important parameter that controls formation processes is the ratio between the physical radius of a planet and its Hill radius, which decreases with the stellar mass.We systematically change the mass of the central stars and investigate its effects on terrestrial planet formation.We find that the mass of the maximum planet decreases with the mass of central stars, while the number of planets in the system increases.We also find that the orbital separation of adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radius increases with the stellar mass.

  6. Covariant approximation averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Eigo; Arthur, Rudy; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in Nf=2 +1 lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  7. Is effective mass in combat sports punching above its weight?

    PubMed

    Lenetsky, Seth; Nates, Roy J; Brughelli, Matt; Harris, Nigel K

    2015-04-01

    The segmental and muscular complexity of the human body can result in challenges when examining the kinetics of impacts. To better understand this complexity, combat sports literature has selected effective mass as a measure of an athlete's inertial contribution to the momentum transfer during the impact of strikes. This measure helps to clarify the analysis of striking kinetics in combat sports. This paper will review: (1) effective mass as a concept and its usage as a measure of impact intensity in combat sports, (2) the neuromuscular pattern known as "double peak muscle activation" which has been theorized to help enhance initial hand velocity upon impact and joint stiffening during impact, (3) the methods and equations used to calculate effective mass, and (4) practitioner recommendations based on the literature. We will argue in this manuscript that the act of punching presents unique challenges to the current understanding of effective mass due to additional force application during impact. This review will improve the understanding of effective mass and its roles in effective striking serving to underpin future research into performance enhancement in striking based combat sports. PMID:25544341

  8. Effective kaon masses in dense nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waas, T.; Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    1996-02-01

    The effective mass and decay width of kaonic modes in baryonic matter are studied within a coupled-channel approach based on the Chiral SU(3) Effective Lagrangian which describes all available low energy data of the coupled overlineKN, π∑, πΛ system. Including Pauli blocking and Fermi motion in the kaon dispersion relation, we find a strong non-linear density dependence of the K - effective mass and decay width in symmetric nuclear matter at densities around 0.1 times normal nuclear matter density ϱ0 due to the in-medium dynamics of the Λ(1405) resonance. At higher densities the K - effective mass decreases slowly but stays above 0.5 mK at least up to densities below 3 ϱ0. In neutron matter the K - effective mass decreases almost linearly with increasing density but remains relatively large ( m K∗ > 0.65 m K) for ϱn ≲ 3 ϱ0. The K + effective mass turns out to increase very slowly with rising density.

  9. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  10. The effect of rheological approximations on the dynamics and topography in 3D subduction-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. Moreover, they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. These differences arise for several reasons, such as different rheological properties, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergent plates. Previous 3D geodynamic models of subduction/collision processes have used various rheological approximations, making numerical results difficult to compare, since there is no clear image on the extent of these approximations on the dynamics. Here, we employ the code LaMEM to perform high-resolution long-term 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. We test the effect of rheological approximations on mantle and lithosphere dynamics in a geometrically simplified model setup that resembles a tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone. We use the "sticky-air" approach to allow for the development of topography and the dynamics of subduction and collision is entirely driven by slab-pull (i.e. "free subduction"). The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow following a viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, inducing strong mantle flow in the slab window. We also examine the stress states in the subducting and overriding plates and topography evolution in the upper plate, and we discuss the implications on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins

  11. Anisotropy of effective electron masses in highly doped nonpolar GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Feneberg, Martin Lange, Karsten; Lidig, Christian; Wieneke, Matthias; Witte, Hartmut; Bläsing, Jürgen; Dadgar, Armin; Krost, Alois; Goldhahn, Rüdiger

    2013-12-02

    The anisotropic effective electron masses in wurtzite GaN are determined by generalized infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. Nonpolar (112{sup ¯}0) oriented thin films allow accessing both effective masses, m{sub ⊥}{sup *} and m{sub ∥}{sup *}, by determining the screened plasma frequencies. A n-type doping range up to 1.7 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} is investigated. The effective mass ratio m{sub ⊥}{sup *}/m{sub ∥}{sup *} is obtained with highest accuracy and is found to be 1.11 independent on electron concentration up to 1.2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. For higher electron concentrations, the conduction band non-parabolicity is mirrored in changes. Absolute values for effective electron masses depend on additional input of carrier concentrations determined by Hall effect measurements. We obtain m{sub ⊥}{sup *}=(0.239±0.004)m{sub 0} and m{sub ∥}{sup *}=(0.216±0.003)m{sub 0} for the parabolic range of the GaN conduction band. Our data are indication of a parabolic GaN conduction band up to an energy of approximately 400 meV above the conduction band minimum.

  12. Active and sterile neutrino mass effects on beta decay spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Boillos, Juan Manuel; Moya de Guerra, Elvira

    2013-06-10

    We study the spectra of the emitted charged leptons in charge current weak nuclear processes to analyze the effect of neutrino masses. Standard active neutrinos are studied here, with masses of the order of 1 eV or lower, as well as sterile neutrinos with masses of a few keV. The latter are warm dark matter (WDM) candidates hypothetically produced or captured as small mixtures with the active neutrinos. We compute differential decay or capture rates spectra in weak charged processes of different nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 187}Re, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 163}Ho, etc) using different masses of both active and sterile neutrinos and different values of the mixing parameter.

  13. Higgs mechanism and the added-mass effect

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Govind S.; Phatak, Sachin S.

    2015-01-01

    In the Higgs mechanism, mediators of the weak force acquire masses by interacting with the Higgs condensate, leading to a vector boson mass matrix. On the other hand, a rigid body accelerated through an inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid feels an opposing force linearly related to its acceleration, via an added-mass tensor. We uncover a striking physical analogy between the two effects and propose a dictionary relating them. The correspondence turns the gauge Lie algebra into the space of directions in which the body can move, encodes the pattern of gauge symmetry breaking in the shape of an associated body and relates symmetries of the body to those of the scalar vacuum manifold. The new viewpoint is illustrated with numerous examples, and raises interesting questions, notably on the fluid analogues of the broken symmetry and Higgs particle, and the field-theoretic analogue of the added mass of a composite body.

  14. Probing effective nucleon masses with heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, D. D. S.; Youngs, M.; Chajecki, Z.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Y. X.; Famiano, M. A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Giacherio, B.; Kilburn, M. A.; Lee, Jenny; Liu, H.; Lu, F.; Morfouace, P.; Russotto, P.; Sanetullaev, A.; Showalter, R. H.; Verde, G.; Winkelbauer, J.

    2016-07-01

    It has been generally accepted that momentum-dependent potentials for neutrons and protons at energies well away from the Fermi surface cause both to behave as if their inertial masses are effectively 70% of the vacuum values. This similarity in effective masses may no longer hold in dense neutron-rich regions within neutron stars, core-collapse supernovas, and nuclear collisions. There differences in the momentum-dependent symmetry potentials may cause neutron and proton effective masses to differ significantly. We investigate this effect by measuring the energy spectra of neutrons, protons, and charged particles emitted in 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn collisions at Ebeam/A =50 and 120 MeV with precision sufficient to distinguish, in principle, between effective interactions with very different values of the neutron and proton effective masses. These data and model comparisons point the way towards future advances in our capabilities to understand the density and momentum dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy.

  15. An Approach to Rapid Calculation of Temperature Change in Tissue Using Spatial Filters to Approximate Effects of Thermal Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Carluccio, Giuseppe; Erricolo, Danilo; Oh, Sukhoon

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to performing rapid calculations of temperature within tissue by interleaving, at regular time intervals, 1) an analytical solution to the Pennes (or other desired) bioheat equation excluding the term for thermal conduction and 2) application of a spatial filter to approximate the effects of thermal conduction. Here, the basic approach is presented with attention to filter design. The method is applied to a few different cases relevant to magnetic resonance imaging, and results are compared to those from a full finite-difference (FD) implementation of the Pennes bio-heat equation. It is seen that results of the proposed method are in reasonable agreement with those of the FD approach, with about 15% difference in the calculated maximum temperature increase, but are calculated in a fraction of the time, requiring less than 2% of the calculation time for the FD approach in the cases evaluated. PMID:23358947

  16. Effect of Gauge Boson Mass on the Phase Structure of QED3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Feng, Hong-Tao; Sun, Wei-Min; Zong, Hong-Shi

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) in QED3 with finite gauge boson mass is studied in the framework of the rainbow approximation of Dyson-Schwinger equations. By adopting a simple gauge boson propagator ansatz at finite temperature, we first numerically solve the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the fermion self-energy to determine the chiral phase diagram of QED3 with finite gauge boson mass at finite chemical potential and finite temperature, then we study the effect of the finite gauge mass on the phase diagram of QED3. It is found that the gauge boson mass ma suppresses the occurrence of DCSB. The area of the region in the chiral phase diagram corresponding to DCSB phase decreases as the gauge boson mass ma increases. In particular, chiral symmetry gets restored when ma is above a certain critical value. In this paper, we use DCSB to describe the antiferromagnetic order and use the gauge boson mass to describe the superconducting order. Our results give qualitatively a physical picture on the competition and coexistence between antiferromagnetic order and superconducting orders in high temperature cuprate superconductors.

  17. Nuclear induces effects and mass correlations in low and multiply charged helium-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Zh K.; Pavlov, R. L.; Mihailov, L. M.; Velchev, Ch J.; Mutafchieva, Y. D.; Tonev, D.; Chamel, N.

    2016-06-01

    The ground-state electron energies, the mass correction and mass polarization of low and multiply charged helium-like ions are analytically and numerically calculated. Approximately 3500 different kinds of ions with charge Z = 2 ÷ 118 are considered. The two-electron Schrodinger equation was solved using a discrete variational-perturbation approach developed by the authors and based on explicitly correlated wave functions. This approach takes into account the motion of the nucleus and yields accurate values for the electron characteristics. The results are presented with and without the inclusion of the mass polarization in the minimization procedure. The relative importance of mass correlations and relativistic effects in the formation of the electron energy characteristics of the helium-like ions are studied for different values of Z. The role of the inclusion of the mass polarization in the minimization procedure as an instrument to present and take into account the effects induced by the nuclear properties, structure and characteristics has been shown.

  18. Visual stimulus parameters seriously compromise the measurement of approximate number system acuity and comparative effects between adults and children.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Dénes; Nobes, Alison; Devine, Amy; Gabriel, Florence C; Gebuis, Titia

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that a simple non-symbolic magnitude comparison task is sufficient to measure the acuity of a putative Approximate Number System (ANS). A proposed measure of the ANS, the so-called "internal Weber fraction" (w), would provide a clear measure of ANS acuity. However, ANS studies have never presented adequate evidence that visual stimulus parameters did not compromise measurements of w to such extent that w is actually driven by visual instead of numerical processes. We therefore investigated this question by testing non-symbolic magnitude discrimination in seven-year-old children and adults. We manipulated/controlled visual parameters in a more stringent manner than usual. As a consequence of these controls, in some trials numerical cues correlated positively with number while in others they correlated negatively with number. This congruency effect strongly correlated with w, which means that congruency effects were probably driving effects in w. Consequently, in both adults and children congruency had a major impact on the fit of the model underlying the computation of w. Furthermore, children showed larger congruency effects than adults. This suggests that ANS tasks are seriously compromised by the visual stimulus parameters, which cannot be controlled. Hence, they are not pure measures of the ANS and some putative w or ratio effect differences between children and adults in previous ANS studies may be due to the differential influence of the visual stimulus parameters in children and adults. In addition, because the resolution of congruency effects relies on inhibitory (interference suppression) function, some previous ANS findings were probably influenced by the developmental state of inhibitory processes especially when comparing children with developmental dyscalculia and typically developing children. PMID:23882245

  19. Vibration of a carbyne nanomechanical mass sensor with surface effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agwa, M. A.; Eltaher, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive model to investigate the influence of surface elasticity and residual surface tension on the natural frequency of flexural vibrations of nanomechanical mass sensor using a carbyne resonator. Carbyne is modeled as an equivalent continuum circular cross-section Timoshenko nanobeam including rotary inertia and shear deformation effects. Surface stress and surface elasticity are presented via the Young-Laplace equation. The analytical solution is presented and verified with molecular dynamics solution. The results show that the carbyne resonator can measure a very small mass with weight below 10-3 zg. The effects of surface elasticity, residual surface tension, carbyne length, and mass position on the fundamental frequencies are illustrated. This study is helpful for characterizing the mechanical behavior of high-precision measurement devices such as chemical and biological sensor.

  20. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Mass Media Ethics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Byung; Padgett, George

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of an ethics education component in a media law and ethics course. Suggests that a short-term mass media ethics study could not develop values considered essential for ethical behavior. Argues that students developed more complexity in their reasoning not measurable by the scale. Suggests a course or module on ethics…

  1. Resonance Effects in Magnetically Driven Mass-Spring Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Resonance effects are among the most intriguing phenomena in physics and engineering. The classical case of a mass-spring oscillator driven at its resonant frequency is one of the earliest examples that students encounter. Perhaps the most commonly depicted method of driving the vibrating system is mechanical. An alternative approach presented in…

  2. Inhomogeneities and Effective Mass in Doped Mg2Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanaki, E. C.; Polymeris, G. S.; Ioannou, M.; Pavlidou, E.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Kyratsi, Th.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium silicide (Mg2Si)-based materials are promising candidates as thermoelectric components for mid-temperature range (500-900 K) energy conversion. Many different approaches for determining the parabolicity of the conduction band have been suggested in the literature, while the values of the effective mass m* dL reported, lie between 0.46 and 1.1 m0. The aim of this work is to contribute in elucidating the discrepancy observed in the effective mass values of the lower conduction band of highly doped Mg2Si and examine whether this discrepancy could be attributed to the method of determination or to the sample's characteristics. We present the results of effective mass calculations at room temperature (RT) by applying different experimental methods and models (parabolic and non-parabolic) in two different groups of samples; one yielding profound inhomogeneities (Sb-doped) and one yielding homogeneous (Bi-doped) samples. Concluding this analysis, it seems that the lower conduction band of Mg2Si is more likely described as non-parabolic. Comparing the two groups of samples, our analysis indicated that the effective mass may be significantly underestimated for samples with dopant and content-modulated composition.

  3. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. PMID:27283387

  4. Evaluation of theoretical critical angle including mass effects for channeling by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2011-06-01

    The calculated critical angles using the theory included mass effects of Zheng et al. for the axial channeling of ion have been investigated by the computer simulations, making comparisons with the theory of Lindhard and the precise formula of Barrett's numerical simulations. The computer simulations employing the ACOCT program code, which treats the atomic collisions three-dimensionally and is based on the binary collision approximation (BCA), were carried out for the channeling of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe and Rn ions incident along the <1 0 0> axis in Al, Cu, Ag and Pt crystals. A slight dependence of the channeling critical angle on the atomic number of incident ion in the ACOCT results is in agreement with that in the calculated ones using the theory of mass effects. The average critical angles in the ACOCT results for the channeling of six rare gas ions are approximately 5.0/ Z2 times the magnitude of the theoretical critical angles with mass effects, where Z2 is the atomic number of crystal atom. Besides, the results show that the calculated critical angles using the theory with mass effects are substantially larger than those using the theory of Lindhard, the Barrett's formula and the formula by the ACOCT simulations for He ions impinging on Al, Cu, Ag and Pt crystals, and that the channeling critical angles in the ACOCT results agree well with those in the calculated ones using Barrett's formula for 0.6-50 MeV He ions incident on Cu and Ag crystals and 5-50 MeV He ions impinging on Al and Pt crystals.

  5. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches. PMID:25528318

  6. Estimation of a 2p2h effect on Gamow-Teller transitions within the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-particle two-hole (2p2h) effect on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition for neutron-rich nuclei is studied by the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation (STDA) with the Skyrme interaction. Unstable 24O and 34Si and stable 48Ca nuclei are chosen to study the quenching and fragmentation of the GT strengths. Correlation of the 2p2h configurations causes about 20 % quenching and downward shift of GT giant resonances (GTGRs). The residual interaction changing relative angular momentum that appeared in the tensor force part gives a meaningful effect to the GT strength distributions. In this work, 17 - 26 % of the total GT strengths are brought to high-energy region above GTGRs. In particular, the tensor force brings strengths to high energy more than 50 MeV. STDA calculation within a small model space for 2p2h configuration is also performed and experimental data of 48Ca is reproduced reasonably.

  7. Approximate entropy detects the effect of a secondary cognitive task on postural control in healthy young adults: a methodological report

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, James T; Mercer, Vicki S; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Background Biomechanical measures of postural stability, while generally useful in neuroscience and physical rehabilitation research, may be limited in their ability to detect more subtle influences of attention on postural control. Approximate entropy (ApEn), a regularity statistic from nonlinear dynamics, recently has demonstrated relatively good measurement precision and shown promise for detecting subtle change in postural control after cerebral concussion. Our purpose was to further explore the responsiveness of ApEn by using it to evaluate the immediate, short-term effect of secondary cognitive task performance on postural control in healthy, young adults. Methods Thirty healthy, young adults performed a modified version of the Sensory Organization Test featuring single (posture only) and dual (posture plus cognitive) task trials. ApEn values, root mean square (RMS) displacement, and equilibrium scores (ES) were calculated from anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) center of pressure (COP) component time series. For each sensory condition, we compared the ability of the postural control parameters to detect an effect of cognitive task performance. Results COP AP time series generally became more random (higher ApEn value) during dual task performance, resulting in a main effect of cognitive task (p = 0.004). In contrast, there was no significant effect of cognitive task for ApEn values of COP ML time series, RMS displacement (AP or ML) or ES. Conclusion During dual task performance, ApEn revealed a change in the randomness of COP oscillations that occurred in a variety of sensory conditions, independent of changes in the amplitude of COP oscillations. The finding expands current support for the potential of ApEn to detect subtle changes in postural control. Implications for future studies of attention in neuroscience and physical rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:17971209

  8. Precise effective masses from density functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gillet, Y.; Poncé, S.; Martin, A.; Torrent, M.; Gonze, X.

    2016-05-01

    The knowledge of effective masses is a key ingredient to analyze numerous properties of semiconductors, like carrier mobilities, (magneto)transport properties, or band extrema characteristics yielding carrier densities and density of states. Currently, these masses are usually calculated using finite-difference estimation of density functional theory (DFT) electronic band curvatures. However, finite differences require an additional convergence study and are prone to numerical noise. Moreover, the concept of effective mass breaks down at degenerate band extrema. We assess the former limitation by developing a method that allows to obtain the Hessian of DFT bands directly, using density functional perturbation theory. Then, we solve the latter issue by adapting the concept of "transport equivalent effective mass" to the k .p ̂ framework. The numerical noise inherent to finite-difference methods is thus eliminated, along with the associated convergence study. The resulting method is therefore more general, more robust, and simpler to use, which makes it especially appropriate for high-throughput computing. After validating the developed techniques, we apply them to the study of silicon, graphane, and arsenic. The formalism is implemented into the abinit software and supports the norm-conserving pseudopotential approach, the projector augmented-wave method, and the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The derived expressions also apply to the ultrasoft pseudopotential method.

  9. Gravity effects on neutrino masses in split supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Koch, Benjamin; Panes, Boris

    2009-06-01

    The mass differences and mixing angles of neutrinos can neither be explained by R-parity violating split supersymmetry nor by flavor blind quantum gravity alone. It is shown that combining both effects leads, within the allowed parameter range, to good agreement with the experimental results. The atmospheric mass is generated by supersymmetry through mixing between neutrinos and neutralinos, while the solar mass is generated by gravity through flavor blind dimension five operators. Maximal atmospheric mixing forces the tangent squared of the solar angle to be equal to 1/2. The scale of the quantum gravity operator is predicted within a 5% error, implying that the reduced Planck scale should lie around the grand unified theory scale. In this way, the model is very predictive and can be tested at future experiments.

  10. Approximate convective heating equations for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.; Sutton, K.

    1979-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate equations appropriate for engineering predictions of the convective heating rates about blunt reentry spacecraft at hypersonic conditions are developed. The approximate methods are applicable to both nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures for either constant or variable-entropy edge conditions. A procedure which accounts for variable-entropy effects and is not based on mass balancing is presented. Results of the approximate heating methods are in good agreement with existing experimental results as well as boundary-layer and viscous-shock-layer solutions.

  11. Effect of body mass and clothing on carrion entomofauna.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Szymon; Frątczak, Katarzyna; Konwerski, Szymon; Bajerlein, Daria; Szpila, Krzysztof; Jarmusz, Mateusz; Szafałowicz, Michał; Grzywacz, Andrzej; Mądra, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Carcass mass largely affects pattern and rate of carrion decomposition. Supposedly, it is similarly important for carrion entomofauna; however, most of its likely effects have not been tested experimentally. Here, simultaneous effects of carcass mass and clothing are analyzed. A factorial block experiment with four levels of carcass mass (small carcasses 5-15 kg, medium carcasses 15.1-30 kg, medium/large carcasses 35-50 kg, large carcasses 55-70 kg) and two levels of carcass clothing (clothed and unclothed) was made in a grassland habitat of Western Poland. Pig carcasses (N = 24) were grouped into spring, early summer, and late summer blocks. Insects were sampled manually and with pitfall traps. Results demonstrate that insect assemblages are more complex, abundant, and long-lasting on larger carcasses, whereas clothing is of minor importance in this respect. Only large or medium/large carcasses were colonized by all guilds of carrion insects, while small or medium carcasses revealed high underrepresentation of late-colonizing insects (e.g., Cleridae or Nitidulidae). This finding indicates that carcasses weighing about 23 kg-a standard in forensic decomposition studies-give an incomplete picture of carrion entomofauna. Residencies of all forensically relevant insects were distinctly prolonged on larger carcasses, indicating that cadaver mass is a factor of great importance in this respect. The pre-appearance interval of most taxa was found to be unrelated to mass or clothing of a carcass. Moreover, current results suggest that rate of larval development is higher on smaller carcasses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that carcass mass is a factor of crucial importance for carrion entomofauna, whereas the importance of clothing is small. PMID:25874664

  12. Homogenization limit for a multiband effective mass model in heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, O.

    2014-06-15

    We study the homogenization limit of a multiband model that describes the quantum mechanical motion of an electron in a quasi-periodic crystal. In this approach, the distance among the atoms that constitute the material (lattice parameter) is considered a small quantity. Our model include the description of materials with variable chemical composition, intergrowth compounds, and heterostructures. We derive the effective multiband evolution system in the framework of the kp approach. We study the well posedness of the mathematical problem. We compare the effective mass model with the standard kp models for uniform and non-uniforms crystals. We show that in the limit of vanishing lattice parameter, the particle density obtained by the effective mass model, converges to the exact probability density of the particle.

  13. Probing the hydrophobic effect of noncovalent complexes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Baer, Samuel; Jecklin, Matthias C; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-02-01

    The study of noncovalent interactions by mass spectrometry has become an active field of research in recent years. The role of the different noncovalent intermolecular forces is not yet fully understood since they tend to be modulated upon transfer into the gas phase. The hydrophobic effect, which plays a major role in protein folding, adhesion of lipid bilayers, etc., is absent in the gas phase. Here, noncovalent complexes with different types of interaction forces were investigated by mass spectrometry and compared with the complex present in solution. Creatine kinase (CK), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ribonuclease S (RNase S), and leucine zipper (LZ), which have dissociation constants in the nM range, were studied by native nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) combined with chemical cross-linking (XL). Complexes interacting with hydrogen bonds survived the transfer into gas phase intact and were observed by nanoESI-MS. Complexes that are bound largely by the hydrophobic effect in solution were not detected or only at very low intensity. Complexes with mixed polar and hydrophobic interactions were detected by nanoESI-MS, most likely due to the contribution from polar interactions. All noncovalent complexes could easily be studied by XL MALDI-MS, which demonstrates that the noncovalently bound complexes are conserved, and a real "snap-shot" of the situation in solution can be obtained. PMID:19931466

  14. On the validity of the effective density fluid model as an approximation of a poroelastic sediment layer.

    PubMed

    Bonomo, Anthony L; Chotiros, Nicholas P; Isakson, Marcia J

    2015-08-01

    The effective density fluid model (EDFM) was developed to approximate the behavior of sediments governed by Biots theory of poroelasticity. Previously, it has been shown that the EDFM predicts reflection coefficients and backscattering strengths that are in close agreement with those of the full Biot model for the case of a homogeneous poroelastic half-space. However, it has not yet been determined to what extent the EDFM can be used in place of the full Biot-Stoll model for other cases. Using the finite element method, the flat-interface reflection and rough-interface backscattering predictions of the Biot-Stoll model and the EDFM are compared for the case of a poroelastic layer overlying an elastic substrate. It is shown that considerable differences between the predictions of the two models can exist when the layer is very thin and has a thickness comparable to the wavelength of the shear wave supported by the layer, with a particularly strong disparity under the conditions of a shear wave resonance. For thicker layers, the predictions of the two models are found to be in closer agreement, approaching nearly exact agreement as the layer thickness increases. PMID:26328691

  15. Normalizing the thermal effects of radiofrequency radiation: body mass versus total body surface area

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The current guideline for exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) was developed through assessment of the biological effects data collected primarily from the rat. The consensus that a lack of hazardous biological effects occurred below a whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4.0 W/kg led to the proposition of a 0.4 W/kg guideline with a built-in safety factor of 10. This paper demonstrates that if the RFR absorption rate in the rat had been normalized with respect to total body surface area rather than body mass, the exposure guideline would be 2.3 W/m2, which translates to an SAR of approximately 0.06 W/kg for an adult human. It is further shown that a given RFR absorption rate, normalized as a fraction of a species' heat loss per unit of surface area, is independent of body mass over a range of 0.03-100 kg; however, a normalization of the RFR absorption rate to heat loss per unit of body mass is highly dependent on the species' mass. Normalizing the rate of RFR absorption to the surface area of the rat indicates that the current RFR exposure guideline of 0.4 W/kg may be too high.

  16. Interactions effectives, théories de champ moyen masses et rayons nucléaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.

    2003-05-01

    Effective interactions, mean field theories, masses and nuclear radii A review of effective interactions used in mean field theories for the description of properties of atomic nuclei is presented. Relativistic as well as non relativistic theories are discussed with a special attention to the cases where their results are very different. We will concentrate on the effective forces built up to investigate the nuclear medium in extreme conditions. Masses and r.m.s. radii along long chain of isotopes will be discussed. Large deformations, as observed in the fission of heavy nuclei, and exotic neutron rich nuclei will be taken as examples of these extreme conditions. Le principal propos de cet ouvrage est : (i) de passer en revue les outils théoriques utilisés sous le sigle ”théories microscopiques de champ moyen ”. Sans entrer dans le détail des formalismes (le lecteur sera systématiquement renvoyé ”pour en savoir plus ” à des cours plus complets qui ont déjà été donnés dans le passé à l'École Joliot-Curie) il s'agira surtout de préciser le contexte, les hypothèses et les approximations qui se cachent sous les sigles : Hartree-Fock (HF), Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB), Approximation BCS (HFBCS), Champ Moyen Relativiste (RMF), Approximations Hartree (RH), Hartree-Fock (RHF) et Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) Relativistes, ... ; (ii) de présenter la procédure générale et les ingrédients qui entrent dans la construction d'une interaction effective, élément de base de ces théories dont l'intérêt majeur est de livrer des résultats comparables à l'expérience sans paramètre ajustable ; (iii) de discuter des effets des différentes approximations ou interactions effectives sur des résultats expérimentaux pris dans diverses zones de noyaux. Ces discussions seront surtout centrées sur les masses et les rayons des noyaux mais aussi sur certaines quantités plus significatives que l'on peut en extraire : énergies de séparation de deux neutrons

  17. Convective heat and mass transfer on MHD peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid with the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the peristaltic MHD flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting Williamson fluid in a symmetric planar channel with heat and mass transfer under the effect of inclined magnetic field. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into consideration. Mathematical model is presented by using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The differential equations governing the flow are highly nonlinear and thus perturbation solution for small Weissenberg number (We < 1) is presented. Effects of the heat and mass transfer on the longitudinal velocity, temperature and concentration are studied in detail. Main observations are presented in the concluding section. The streamlines pattern is also given due attention.

  18. Effective Power-Law Dependence of Lyapunov Exponents on the Central Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Kalapotharakos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Using both numerical and analytical approaches, we demonstrate the existence of an effective power-law relation L alpha m(sup p) between themean Lyapunov exponent L of stellar orbits chaotically scattered by a supermassive black hole (BH) in the centre of a galaxy and the mass parameter m, i.e. ratio of the mass of the BH over the mass of the galaxy. The exponent p is found numerically to obtain values in the range p approximately equals 0.3-0.5. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these exponents, based on estimates of local 'stretching numbers', i.e. local Lyapunov exponents at successive transits of the orbits through the BH's sphere of influence. We thus predict p = 2/3 - q with q approximately equaling 0.1-0.2. Our basic model refers to elliptical galaxy models with a central core. However, we find numerically that an effective power-law scaling of L with m holds also in models with central cusp, beyond a mass scale up to which chaos is dominated by the influence of the cusp itself. We finally show numerically that an analogous law exists also in disc galaxies with rotating bars. In the latter case, chaotic scattering by the BH affects mainly populations of thick tube-like orbits surrounding some low-order branches of the x(sub 1) family of periodic orbits, as well as its bifurcations at low-order resonances, mainly the inner Lindblad resonance and the 4/1 resonance. Implications of the correlations between L and m to determining the rate of secular evolution of galaxies are discussed.

  19. Galaxy Cluster Gas Mass Fractions From Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Measurements: Constraints on Omega(M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Holzapfel, William L.; Joy, Marshall K.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Patel, Sandeep

    2001-01-01

    Using sensitive centimeter-wave receivers mounted on the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association millimeter arrays, we have obtained interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich(SZ) effect toward massive galaxy clusters. We use the SZ data to determine the pressure distribution of the cluster gas and, in combination with published X-ray temperatures, to infer the gas mass and total gravitational mass of 18 clusters. The gas mass fraction, f(g), is calculated for each cluster and is extrapolated to the fiducial radius r(500) using the results of numerical simulations. The mean f(g) within r(500) is 0.081(+ 0.009 / - 0.011) per h(100) (statistical uncertainty at 68% confidence level, assuming Omega(M) = 0.3, Omega(Lambda) = 0.7). We discuss possible sources of systematic errors in the mean f(sub g) measurement. We derive an upper limit for Omega(M) from this sample under the assumption that the mass composition of clusters within r(500) reflects the universal mass composition: Omega(M)h is less than or equal to Omega(B)/f(g). The gas mass fractions depend on cosmology through the angular diameter distance and the r(500) correction factors. For a flat universe (Omega(Lambda) is identical with 1 - Omega(M)) and h = 0.7, we find the measured gas mass fractions are consistent with Omega(M) is less than 0.40, at 68% confidence. Including estimates of the baryons contained in galaxies and the baryons which failed to become bound during the cluster formation process, we find Omega(M) is approximately equal to 0.25.

  20. Mass and isotopic effects in the Li-Li+ collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouledroua, Moncef; Bouchelaghem, Fouzia

    2011-10-01

    We suggest in this work to deal with the ion-atom collision. More precisely, the transport coefficients, the temperature-dependant mobilities, and the charge-transfer phenomena are examined quatum-mechanically. Also is examined the mass and isotopic effects and their behaviour with temperature. To do so, the interatomic potentials are constructed and then injected in the radial wave equation to determine the phase shifts.

  1. Mass Effect of Pulmonary Sequestration: Multiloculated–Multiseptated Pneumomediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Sezin; Türkyılmaz, Canan; Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Aktaş, Selma; Ergenekon, Ebru; Boyunağa, Öznur; Atalay, Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestration (PS) and pneumomediastinum are two rare clinical diseases. Pneumomediastinum was generally observed in infants either with diseased lungs or who were performed assisted ventilation or resuscitation following birth. It was reported in patients with existing ectopic thoracic kidney and laryngeal cysts however, no coexisting congenital lung anomalies were reported. Here, we report the pneumomediastinum occurred due the extralobar PS because of the mass effect of the lesion. PMID:27123402

  2. Mass Effect of Pulmonary Sequestration: Multiloculated-Multiseptated Pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sezin; Türkyılmaz, Canan; Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Aktaş, Selma; Ergenekon, Ebru; Boyunağa, Öznur; Atalay, Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestration (PS) and pneumomediastinum are two rare clinical diseases. Pneumomediastinum was generally observed in infants either with diseased lungs or who were performed assisted ventilation or resuscitation following birth. It was reported in patients with existing ectopic thoracic kidney and laryngeal cysts however, no coexisting congenital lung anomalies were reported. Here, we report the pneumomediastinum occurred due the extralobar PS because of the mass effect of the lesion. PMID:27123402

  3. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Mass-Metallicity-SFR Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. G.; Dalcanton, J.; Skillman, E.; Conroy, C.

    2016-06-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of the correlation between metallicity and SFR may be used along with chemical evolution models to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows), but the observed strength of this correlation varies widely among studies using both single-fiber and IFU spectroscopy. We analyze possible sources of systematic error that could affect the observed strength of this correlation, including choice of metallicity calibration. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity and SFR using a new set of theoretically calibrated abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013) for ~150,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using any of these new strong emission line abundance diagnostics yields a relatively weak correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass, in contrast to the stronger correlation found by some previous studies using other metallicity diagnostics. We also consider other possible sources of bias that can affect the metallicity correlation with SFR, including uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. Finally, we present preliminary results from current work investigating the effect of the choice of binning technique on derivations of direct method metallicities for stacked galaxy spectra and the subsequent impact on the correlation between metallicity and SFR. The large uncertainty in the true strength of the relation between mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  4. Isotope mass and charge effects in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Candy, J.; Gohil, P.

    2011-12-15

    The effect of primary ion species of differing charge and mass - specifically, deuterium, hydrogen, and helium - on instabilities and transport is studied in DIII-D plasmas through gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Technical Report No. GA-A26818, 2010]. In linear simulations under imposed similarity of the profiles, there is an isomorphism between the linear growth rates of hydrogen isotopes, but the growth rates are higher for Z > 1 main ions due to the appearance of the charge in the Poisson equation. On ion scales the most significant effect of the different electron-to-ion mass ratio appears through collisions stabilizing trapped electron modes. In nonlinear simulations, significant favorable deviations from pure gyro-Bohm scaling are found due to electron-to-ion mass ratio effects and collisions. The presence of any non-trace impurity species cannot be neglected in a comprehensive simulation of the transport; including carbon impurity in the simulations caused a dramatic reduction of energy fluxes. The transport in the analyzed deuterium and helium discharges could be well reproduced in gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations while the significant hydrogen discrepancy is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  5. Improving approximate-optimized effective potentials by imposing exact conditions: Theory and applications to electronic statics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Yair; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2009-07-01

    We develop a method that can constrain any local exchange-correlation potential to preserve basic exact conditions. Using the method of Lagrange multipliers, we calculate for each set of given Kohn-Sham orbitals a constraint-preserving potential which is closest to the given exchange-correlation potential. The method is applicable to both the time-dependent (TD) and independent cases. The exact conditions that are enforced for the time-independent case are Galilean covariance, zero net force and torque, and Levy-Perdew virial theorem. For the time-dependent case we enforce translational covariance, zero net force, Levy-Perdew virial theorem, and energy balance. We test our method on the exchange (only) Krieger-Li-Iafrate (xKLI) approximate-optimized effective potential for both cases. For the time-independent case, we calculated the ground state properties of some hydrogen chains and small sodium clusters for some constrained xKLI potentials and Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange. The results (total energy, Kohn-Sham eigenvalues, polarizability, and hyperpolarizability) indicate that enforcing the exact conditions is not important for these cases. On the other hand, in the time-dependent case, constraining both energy balance and zero net force yields improved results relative to TDHF calculations. We explored the electron dynamics in small sodium clusters driven by cw laser pulses. For each laser pulse we compared calculations from TD constrained xKLI, TD partially constrained xKLI, and TDHF. We found that electron dynamics such as electron ionization and moment of inertia dynamics for the constrained xKLI are most similar to the TDHF results. Also, energy conservation is better by at least one order of magnitude with respect to the unconstrained xKLI. We also discuss the problems that arise in satisfying constraints in the TD case with a non-cw driving force.

  6. Improving approximate-optimized effective potentials by imposing exact conditions: Theory and applications to electronic statics and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzweil, Yair; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2009-07-15

    We develop a method that can constrain any local exchange-correlation potential to preserve basic exact conditions. Using the method of Lagrange multipliers, we calculate for each set of given Kohn-Sham orbitals a constraint-preserving potential which is closest to the given exchange-correlation potential. The method is applicable to both the time-dependent (TD) and independent cases. The exact conditions that are enforced for the time-independent case are Galilean covariance, zero net force and torque, and Levy-Perdew virial theorem. For the time-dependent case we enforce translational covariance, zero net force, Levy-Perdew virial theorem, and energy balance. We test our method on the exchange (only) Krieger-Li-Iafrate (xKLI) approximate-optimized effective potential for both cases. For the time-independent case, we calculated the ground state properties of some hydrogen chains and small sodium clusters for some constrained xKLI potentials and Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange. The results (total energy, Kohn-Sham eigenvalues, polarizability, and hyperpolarizability) indicate that enforcing the exact conditions is not important for these cases. On the other hand, in the time-dependent case, constraining both energy balance and zero net force yields improved results relative to TDHF calculations. We explored the electron dynamics in small sodium clusters driven by cw laser pulses. For each laser pulse we compared calculations from TD constrained xKLI, TD partially constrained xKLI, and TDHF. We found that electron dynamics such as electron ionization and moment of inertia dynamics for the constrained xKLI are most similar to the TDHF results. Also, energy conservation is better by at least one order of magnitude with respect to the unconstrained xKLI. We also discuss the problems that arise in satisfying constraints in the TD case with a non-cw driving force.

  7. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury is long known as a common environmental contaminant. In methylated form it is even more toxic and the methylation process is facilitated by microbial activities. Methyl mercury easily crosses cell membrane and accumulates in soft tissues of fishes and finally biomagnifies with increasing trophic levels. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of mercury have been reported and such variations have emphasized mass dependent fractionations, while theory and laboratory experiments indicate that mass-independent isotopic fractionation (MIF) effects are likely to be found as well. This study focuses on the MIF of mercury isotopes in the soft tissues of fishes. Samples include both fresh water and marine fish, from different continents and oceans. Approximately 1 gm of fish soft tissue was dissolved in 5 ml of conc. aqua regia for 24 hrs and filtered through a ¬¬¬100 μm filter paper and diluted with DI water. Hg is measured as a gaseous phase generated by reduction of the sample with SnCl2 in a continuous- flow cold-vapor generator connected to a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune MC-ICPMS. To minimize instrumental fractionation isotope ratios were measured by sample standard bracketing and reported as δ‰ relative to NIST SRM 3133 Hg standard where δAHg = [(A Hg/202Hg)sample/(A Hg/202Hg)NIST313] -1 ×1000‰. In this study we have measured the isotope ratios 198Hg/202Hg, 199Hg/202Hg, 200Hg/202Hg, 201Hg/202Hg and 204Hg/202Hg. In all the fish samples δ198Hg, δ200Hg, δ202Hg, δ204Hg define a mass- dependent fractionation sequence, where as the δ199Hg and δ201Hg depart from the mass- dependent fractionation line and indicate an excess of the odd-N isotopes. The magnitude of the deviation (ΔAHg where A=199 or 201) as obtained by difference between the measured δ199Hg and δ201Hg of the samples and the value obtained by linear scaling defined by the even-N isotopes ranges from approximately 0.2 ‰ to 3‰. The ratios of Δ199Hg /Δ201Hg range from 0.8 to 1

  8. Effective-mass theory of collapsed carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Takeshi; Ando, Tsuneya

    2015-04-01

    Band structure is theoretically studied in partially flattened carbon nanotubes within an effective-mass scheme. Effects of interwall interactions are shown to be important in nonchiral nanotubes such as zigzag and armchair and can essentially be neglected in chiral nanotubes except in the close vicinity of nonchiral tubes. In fact, interwall interactions significantly modify states depending on relative displacement in the flattened region in nonchiral tubes and can convert semiconducting tubes into metallic and vice versa. They diminish rapidly when the chiral angle deviates from that of the zigzag or armchair tube, although the decay is slower in the vicinity of armchair tubes.

  9. Effects of a mass mortality event on gorgonian reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, C.; Coma, R.; Zabala, M.

    2008-03-01

    The impact of a disturbance is normally measured in terms of its effects on adult mortality, whilst the less obvious impact on reproductive biology is generally ignored. Although previous studies have contributed to understanding the effects of a mass mortality of gorgonians in 1999 at NW Mediterranean Sea, none of them have considered its impact on reproduction. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of mass mortality events on the reproduction of the gorgonian Paramuricea clavata, and examine the effect of the damage 1 year (June 2000) and 2 years (June 2001) after the event. The reproductive parameters of female colonies were more affected than those of males. In female colonies that were moderately or severely damaged, the proportion of fertile polyps decreased by about 22-35%, whilst in the worst affected males there was only a 12% decrease. Female colonies showed a progressive decrease in gonadal biomass with increasing damage to a maximum reduction of 73-75% of oocyte production observed in colonies with >33% injury. In contrast, in males, the gonadal biomass decreased rapidly for colonies with 5% of injured surface, with a reduction in spermary production of 49-64%. The same pattern of decrease in gonadal output compared to the extent of the injury was observed in 2001, two years after the mass mortality event. This indicated that the observed pattern was a response to the extent of the injury rather than a direct effect of the event. These severe effects on the reproduction of the red gorgonian species have implications for the recovery of affected populations in the long-term. This study demonstrated that an evaluation of the impact over different demographic parameters is needed to understand all the consequences of these disturbances.

  10. Effects of Distortion on Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Davis, David O.; Barnhart, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical, and experimental investigation to study the effects of flow distortion on a Mass Flow Plug (MFP) used to control and measure mass-flow during an inlet test has been conducted. The MFP was first calibrated using the WIND-US flow solver for uniform (undistorted) inflow conditions. These results are shown to compare favorably with an experimental calibration under similar conditions. The effects of distortion were investigated by imposing distorted flow conditions taken from an actual inlet test to the inflow plane of the numerical simulation. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) based distortion study only showed the general trend in mass flow rate. The study used only total pressure as the upstream boundary condition, which was not enough to define the flow. A better simulation requires knowledge of the turbulence structure and a specific distortion pattern over a range of plug positions. It is recommended that future distortion studies utilize a rake with at least the same amount of pitot tubes as the AIP rake.

  11. The Effective Temperatures, Radii and Masses of Dwarf Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhee

    1996-02-01

    Using the flux values determined with the infrared flux method (IRFM) developed by Blackwell and Lynas-Gray (1993), we derived the empirical relationship between flux (F v ) and (V — K) colour appropriate to Dwarf Cepheids. For three Dwarf Cepheids CY Aqr, YZ Boo and SZ Lyn where both VK photometry and radial velocities were available from the literature, effective temperatures were determined using the intrinsic Strömgren indices, model atmosphere grids for (V — K) and the relation between temperature and (V — K) colour. Then, by applying the infrared surface brightness method, radii and distances and hence masses and absolute magnitudes were estimated with effective temperatures determined by three different methods. It was found that the average mass of these variables is about 0.5 solar mass and this result supports the hypothesis that Dwarf Cepheids are pre-white dwarf objects. It was also confirmed that the temperatures determined with the IRFM are most successful in the application of the surface brightness method to the radius estimation of Dwarf Cepheids.

  12. Mass and size effects in three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krouskop, Peter E.; Talbot, Julian

    2003-08-01

    We examine the steady state properties of binary systems of driven inelastic hard spheres. The spheres, which move under the influence of gravity, are contained in a vertical cylinder with a vibrating base. We computed the trajectories of the spheres using an event-driven molecular dynamics algorithm. In the first part of the study, we chose simulation parameters that match those of experiments published by Wildman and Parker. Various properties computed from the simulation including the density profile, granular temperature, and circulation pattern are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments. We then studied the effect of varying the mass ratio and the size ratio independently while holding the other parameters constant. The mass and size ratio are shown to affect the distribution of the energy. The changes in the energy distributions affect the packing fraction and temperature of each component. The temperature of the heavier component has a nonlinear dependence on the mass of the lighter component, while the temperature of the lighter component is approximately proportional to its mass. The temperature of both components is inversely dependent on the size of the smaller component.

  13. Heavy-quark mass effects in Higgs plus jets production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Vryonidou, E.; Wiesemann, M.

    2016-08-01

    We study the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in the gluon-fusion channel at the 13 TeV LHC. Our results are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, bar for the lack of some two-loop amplitudes, for up to two extra jets and are matched to the P ythia8 Monte Carlo. We address the impact, at the level of inclusive rates and of differential distributions, of the merging of samples characterised by different final-state multiplicities, and of the effects induced by top and bottom masses through heavy-quark loop diagrams. We find that both the merging and the heavy-quark masses must be included in the calculation in order to realistically predict observables of experimental interest.

  14. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, C. D.; Davis, G. B.; Bastow, T. P.; Woodbury, R. J.; Rao, P. S. C.; Annable, M. D.; Rhodes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L3/L2/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L2/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104 g day- 1 to 24-31 g day- 1 (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions also

  15. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Davis, G B; Bastow, T P; Woodbury, R J; Rao, P S C; Annable, M D; Rhodes, S

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L(3)/L(2)/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L(2)/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104gday(-1) to 24-31gday(-1) (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions

  16. Effects of anions on the positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Mirza, U A; Chait, B T

    1994-09-15

    Positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of polypeptides are usually obtained from solutions that are acidified and therefore contain relatively high concentrations of anions. The present study describes an investigation of the effects of these ubiquitous anions on the positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of peptides and proteins. Certain anionic species in the spray solutions were observed to cause a marked decrease in the net average charge of peptide and protein ions in the mass spectra compared to the average charge measured in the absence of these anions. This charge neutralization effect was found to depend solely on the nature of the anionic species and was independent of the source of the anion (acid or salt), with the propensity for neutralization following the order: CCl3COO- > CF3COO- > CH3COO- approximately Cl-. A mechanism for the observed charge reduction effect is proposed that involves two steps. The first step occurs in solution, where an anion pairs with a positively charged basic group on the peptide. The second step occurs during the process of desolvation or in the gas phase, where the ion pair dissociates to yield the neutral acid and the peptide with reduced charge state. The different propensities for charge neutralization of the different anionic species is presumed to reflect the avidity of the anion-peptide interaction. These findings demonstrate that any attempt to correlate the distribution of charge states observed on proteins in the gas phase (by positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry) with the net charge residing on the protein in solution will require that the described anion effect be taken into account. In addition, it appears that some control over the distribution of charge states on peptides and protein ions can be exercised by an appropriate choice of anion in the electrospray solution. PMID:7978296

  17. Nucleon effective E-mass in neutron-rich matter from the Migdal-Luttinger jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Bao-Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2016-06-01

    The well-known Migdal-Luttinger theorem states that the jump of the single-nucleon momentum distribution at the Fermi surface is equal to the inverse of the nucleon effective E-mass. Recent experiments studying short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei using electron-nucleus scatterings at the Jefferson National Laboratory (JLAB) together with model calculations constrained significantly the Migdal-Luttinger jump at saturation density of nuclear matter. We show that the corresponding nucleon effective E-mass is consequently constrained to M0*,E / M ≈ 2.22 ± 0.35 in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) and the E-mass of neutrons is smaller than that of protons in neutron-rich matter. Moreover, the average depletion of the nucleon Fermi sea increases (decreases) approximately linearly with the isospin asymmetry δ according to κp/n ≈ 0.21 ± 0.06 ± (0.19 ± 0.08) δ for protons (neutrons). These results will help improve our knowledge about the space-time non-locality of the single-nucleon potential in neutron-rich nucleonic matter useful in both nuclear physics and astrophysics.

  18. Isotope mass and charge effects in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, I.; Candy, J.; Gohil, P.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of primary ion species of differing charge and mass—specifically, deuterium, hydrogen, and helium—on instabilities and transport is studied in DIII-D plasmas through gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Technical Report No. GA-A26818, 2010]. In linear simulations under imposed similarity of the profiles, there is an isomorphism between the linear growth rates of hydrogen isotopes, but the growth rates are higher for Z > 1 main ions due to the appearance of the charge in the Poisson equation. On ion scales the most significant effect of the different electron-to-ion mass ratio appears through collisions stabilizing trapped electron modes. In nonlinear simulations, significant favorable deviations from pure gyro-Bohm scaling are found due to electron-to-ion mass ratio effects and collisions. The presence of any non-trace impurity species cannot be neglected in a comprehensive simulation of the transport; including carbon impurity in the simulations caused a dramatic reduction of energy fluxes. The transport in the analyzed deuterium and helium discharges could be well reproduced in gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations while the significant hydrogen discrepancy is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  19. Holographic lattices give the graviton an effective mass.

    PubMed

    Blake, Mike; Tong, David; Vegh, David

    2014-02-21

    We discuss the dc conductivity of holographic theories with translational invariance broken by a background lattice. We show that the presence of the lattice induces an effective mass for the graviton via a gravitational version of the Higgs mechanism. This allows us to obtain, at leading order in the lattice strength, an analytic expression for the dc conductivity in terms of the size of the lattice at the horizon. In locally critical theories this leads to a power law resistivity that is in agreement with an earlier field theory analysis of Hartnoll and Hofman. PMID:24579588

  20. Isospin effects on the mass dependence of the balance energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Sakshi; Sood, Aman D.

    2010-07-15

    We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on balance energy throughout the mass range between 50 and 350 for two sets of isotopic systems with N/A= 0.54 and 0.57 as well as isobaric systems with N/A= 0.5 and 0.58. Our findings indicate that different values of balance energy for two isobaric systems may be mainly due to the Coulomb repulsion. We also demonstrate clearly the dominance of Coulomb repulsion over symmetry energy.

  1. Violence and mass media: are laws and regulations effective?

    PubMed

    Wulff, Christian

    2007-10-01

    In Germany, there are several laws and legal and administrative regulations restricting presentation and propagation of violence in mass media. They have proven to be partly effective. Whilst control and supervision of public media is feasible, the containment of what is distributed over the internet proves to be very difficult. It is well recognized that laws and regulations can be only one part of protection for children and youngsters; school, kindergarten and above all the parents must be educated and held responsible for creating media competence in children and adolescents. PMID:17890154

  2. The Effects of Partial Ionization on Prominence Mass Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Olson, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Martinez Gomez, D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-12-01

    The origin of the prominence mass has been an open question since this cool plasma suspended in the hot corona was first discovered. We have known for a long time that the mass must come from the chromosphere, but it is unclear whether this mass is lifted bodily through magnetic levitation, injected by reconnection-driven upflows, or driven from the chromosphere by evaporation and then condensed. One evaporation-condensation scenario, the thermal nonequilibrium (TNE) model, is the most fully developed, quantitative model for the prominence plasma to date. In the TNE scenario, localized heating concentrated at the coronal loop footpoints produces chromospheric evaporation, filling the flux tube with hot, dense plasma that subsequently collapses radiatively to form cool condensations. Thus far this model has been successful in explaining the key properties of the long, persistent threads and small, highly dynamic, transient blobs in prominences, the damping of large-amplitude field-aligned prominence oscillations, the appearance of horn-shaped features above the cool prominence in EUV images of coronal cavities, and coronal rain in the ambient corona. To date, all studies of TNE have assumed that the plasma is fully ionized, which is appropriate for the hot coronal gas but unrealistic for the cool plasma below ~30,000 K. The energetics, dynamics, and evolutionary time scales of the TNE process are expected to be altered when the effects of ionization and recombination are considered. We have modified ARGOS, our 1D hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, to include an equation of state that accounts for the effects of partial ionization of the plasma over a wide range of temperatures and densities. We will discuss the results of these simulations and their comparison with our previous studies of TNE in typical filament-supporting flux tubes. This work was partially supported by NASA's LWS Strategic Capability program.

  3. Effects of vertex corrections on diagrammatic approximations applied to the study of transport through a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Leandro; Roura-Bas, Pablo; Llois, Ana María; Manuel, Luis O.

    2011-02-01

    In the present work, we calculate the conductance through a single quantum dot weakly coupled to metallic contacts. We use the spin-1/2 Anderson model to describe the quantum dot, while considering a finite Coulomb repulsion. We solve the interacting system using the noncrossing approximation (NCA) and the one-crossing approximation (OCA). We obtain the linear response conductance as a function of temperature and energy position of the localized level. From the comparison of both approximations we extract the role of the vertex corrections, which are introduced in the OCA calculations and neglected in the NCA scheme. As a function of the energy position, we observe that the diagrams omitted within the NCA are really important for appropriately describing transport phenomena in Kondo systems as well as in the mixed valence regime. On the other hand, as a function of temperature, the corrections introduced by the OCA partly recover the universal scaling properties known from numerical approaches such as the numerical renormalization group.

  4. Strong washout approximation to resonant leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Gautier, Florian; Klaric, Juraj

    2014-09-01

    We show that the effective decay asymmetry for resonant Leptogenesis in the strong washout regime with two sterile neutrinos and a single active flavour can in wide regions of parameter space be approximated by its late-time limit ɛ=Xsin(2varphi)/(X2+sin2varphi), where X=8πΔ/(|Y1|2+|Y2|2), Δ=4(M1-M2)/(M1+M2), varphi=arg(Y2/Y1), and M1,2, Y1,2 are the masses and Yukawa couplings of the sterile neutrinos. This approximation in particular extends to parametric regions where |Y1,2|2gg Δ, i.e. where the width dominates the mass splitting. We generalise the formula for the effective decay asymmetry to the case of several flavours of active leptons and demonstrate how this quantity can be used to calculate the lepton asymmetry for phenomenological scenarios that are in agreement with the observed neutrino oscillations. We establish analytic criteria for the validity of the late-time approximation for the decay asymmetry and compare these with numerical results that are obtained by solving for the mixing and the oscillations of the sterile neutrinos. For phenomenologically viable models with two sterile neutrinos, we find that the flavoured effective late-time decay asymmetry can be applied throughout parameter space.

  5. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  6. Approximate analysis of effects of large deflections and initial twist on torsional stiffness of a cantilever plate subjected to thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenfels, Richard R; Vosteen, Louis F

    1958-01-01

    An approximate analysis of the nonlinear effects of initial twist and large deflections on the torsional stiffness of a cantilever plate subjected to a nonuniform temperature distribution is presented. The Von Karman large-deflection equations are satisfied through the use of a variational principle. The results show that initial twist and applied moments can have significant effects on the changes in stiffness produced by nonuniform heating, particularly in the region of the buckling temperature difference. Results calculated by this approximate analysis are in satisfactory agreement with measured torsional deformations and changes in natural frequency. (author)

  7. The Effect of Mergers on Galaxy Cluster Mass Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ryan E.; Zuhone, John A.; Thorsen, Tessa; Hinds, Andre

    2015-08-01

    At vertices within the filamentary structure that describes the universal matter distribution, clusters of galaxies grow hierarchically through merging with other clusters. As such, the most massive galaxy clusters should have experienced many such mergers in their histories. Though we cannot see them evolve over time, these mergers leave lasting, measurable effects in the cluster galaxies' phase space. By simulating several different galaxy cluster mergers here, we examine how the cluster galaxies kinematics are altered as a result of these mergers. Further, we also examine the effect of our line of sight viewing angle with respect to the merger axis. In projecting the 6-dimensional galaxy phase space onto a 3-dimensional plane, we are able to simulate how these clusters might actually appear to optical redshift surveys. We find that for those optical cluster statistics which are most often used as a proxy for the cluster mass (variants of σv), the uncertainty due to an inprecise or unknown line of sight may alter the derived cluster masses moreso than the kinematic disturbance of the merger itself. Finally, by examining these, and several other clustering statistics, we find that significant events (such as pericentric crossings) are identifiable over a range of merger initial conditions and from many different lines of sight.

  8. Stellar evolution at high mass including the effect of a stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a stellar wind on the evolution of stars in the mass range from 15 to 120 solar masses is investigated. All the stellar models are constructed with the use of Cox-Stewart opacities. Four possible cases of mass loss are considered: (1) no mass loss at all; (2) substantial mass loss from stars in all stages of evolution; (3) heavy mass loss from red supergiants only; and (4) sudden and very heavy mass loss from luminous yellow supergiants. The assumption of mass loss during the main-sequence phase of evolution is found to lead to a lowering of the luminosity and, unless the mass loss is extremely heavy, of the effective temperature as well. A comparison of the adopted mass-loss rates with observed rates suggests that stellar winds are probably not an important factor in the evolution of main-sequence stars and supergiants unless the initial masses are greater than about 30 solar masses.

  9. The Effect of QBO on the Total Mass Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saǧır, Selçuk; Atıcı, Ramazan

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) measured at 10 hPa altitude and total mass density (TMD) values obtained from NRLMSIS-00 model for 90 km altitude of ionosphere known as Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region is statistically investigated. For this study, multiple-regression model is used. To see the effect on TMD of QBO directions, Dummy variables are also added to model. In the result of calculations, it is observed that QBO is effected on TMD. It is determined that 69% of variations at TMD can be explainable by QBO. It is determined that the explainable ratio is at the rate of 5%. Also, it is seen that an increase/a decrease of 1 meter per second at QBO give rise to an increase/a decrease of 7,2x10-4 g/cm3 at TMD.

  10. Effect of the pair-structure factor of a particulate medium on scalar wave scattering in the first Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan; Korotkova, Olga

    2009-06-15

    Using scattering matrices and the angular spectrum representation of waves, we develop the analytical theory of scattering of random scalar waves from random collections of particles, valid under the first Born approximation. We demonstrate that in the calculation of far-field statistics, such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence, the knowledge of the pair-structure factor of the collection is crucial. We illustrate our analytical approach by considering a numerical example involving scattering of two partially correlated plane waves from a random distribution of spheres. PMID:19529695

  11. Drying temperature effects on fish dry mass measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of tissue composition in fish often requires dry samples. Time needed to dry fish decreases as temperature is increased, but additional volatile material may be lost. Effects of 10??C temperature increases on percentage dry mass (%DM) were tested against 60??C controls for groups of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus, and alewife Alosa pseudoharengus. Lake trout %DMs were lower at greater temperatures, but not significantly different from 60??C controls. Rainbow smelt and slimy sculpin %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and differences were significant when test temperatures reached 90??C. Significant differences were not found in tests using alewives because variability in %DM was high between fish. To avoid inter-fish variability, 30 alewives were each dried successively at 60, 70, 80, and then 90??C and for all fish %DM declined at each higher temperature. In general, %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and after reaching a stable dry weight, fish did not lose additional mass if temperature remained constant. Results indicate that caution should be used when comparing dry mass related indices from fish dried at different temperatures because %DM was negatively related to temperature. The differences in %DM observed with rising temperature could account for substantial portions of the variability in reported energy values for the species tested. Differences in %DM means for the 60 vs. 80??C and 60 vs. 90??C tests for rainbow smelt and alewife could represent of from 8 to 38% of observed annual energy cycles for Lakes Ontario and Michigan.

  12. Osteocalcin Effect on Human β-Cells Mass and Function.

    PubMed

    Sabek, Omaima M; Nishimoto, Satoru Ken; Fraga, Daniel; Tejpal, Neelam; Ricordi, Camillo; Gaber, A O

    2015-09-01

    The osteoblast-specific hormone osteocalcin (OC) was found to regulate glucose metabolism, fat mass, and β-cell proliferation in mice. Here, we investigate the effect of decarboxylated OC (D-OC) on human β-cell function and mass in culture and in vivo using a Nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model. We found that D-OC at dose ranges from 1.0 to 15 ng/mL significantly augmented insulin content and enhanced human β-cell proliferation of cultured human islets. This was paralleled by increased expression of sulfonylurea receptor protein; a marker of β-cell differentiation and a component of the insulin-secretory apparatus. Moreover, in a Nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model, systemic administration of D-OC at 4.5-ng/h significantly augmented production of human insulin and C-peptide from the grafted human islets. Finally, histological staining of the human islet grafts showed that the improvement in the β-cell function was attributable to an increase in β-cell mass as a result of β-cell proliferation indicated by MKI67 staining together with the increased β-cell number and decreased α-cell number data obtained using laser scanning cytometry. Our data for the first time show D-OC-enhanced β-cell function in human islets and support future exploitation of D-OC-mediated β-cell regulation for developing useful clinical treatments for patients with diabetes. PMID:26151356

  13. Diffuse supernova neutrinos: oscillation effects, stellar cooling and progenitor mass dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Tamborra, Irene E-mail: tamborra@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) using the recent progenitor-dependent, long-term supernova simulations from the Basel group and including neutrino oscillations at several post-bounce times. Assuming multi-angle matter suppression of collective effects during the accretion phase, we find that oscillation effects are dominated by the matter-driven MSW resonances, while neutrino-neutrino collective effects contribute at the 5–10% level. The impact of the neutrino mass hierarchy, of the time-dependent neutrino spectra and of the diverse progenitor star population is 10% or less, small compared to the uncertainty of at least 25% of the normalization of the supernova rate. Therefore, assuming that the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy will be determined within the next decade, the future detection of the DSNB will deliver approximate information on the MSW-oscillated neutrino spectra. With a reliable model for neutrino emission, its detection will be a powerful instrument to provide complementary information on the star formation rate and for learning about stellar physics.

  14. Effect of body mass index on outcome of labour induction.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Farheen; Naru, Tahira; Sheikh, Sana

    2016-05-01

    The retrospective study to explore the adverse effect of obesity on pregnancy and labour was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, and comprised data of all patients booked between 12-14 weeks and required induction of labour from January 1 to December 31, 2012. Women were grouped into two body mass index categories: normal weight (<22.9 kg/ m2) as controls and exposed group (>23 kg/m2). Obesity increased the risk of development of gestational hypertension and diabetes. Therefore obese women were more likely to be induced due to medical indication whether primiparous or multiparous adjusted odds ratio =2.89(95% confidence interval 1.29-6.48) and 2.77 (95% confidence interval 1.07-7.19) respectively. There was increased chance of having caesarean section in primigravida adjusted odds ratio = 1.45 (95% confidence interval 0.72-2.92), duration of caesarean section and blood loss during the procedure were not significantly associated with high body mass index (p>0.05). Obesity may lead to a lot of problems in primigravida, but it did not have major impact. PMID:27183944

  15. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  16. Analysis of the spin Hall effect in CuIr alloys: Combined approach of density functional theory and Hartree-Fock approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhuo Gu, Bo; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Ziman, Timothy

    2015-05-07

    We analyze the spin Hall effect in CuIr alloys in theory by the combined approach of the density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The spin Hall angle (SHA) is obtained to be negative without the local correlation effects. After including the local correlation effects of the 5d orbitals of Ir impurities, the SHA becomes positive with realistic correlation parameters and consistent with experiment [Niimi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 126601 (2011)]. Moreover, our analysis shows that the DFT + HF approach is a convenient and general method to study the influence of local correlation effects on the spin Hall effect.

  17. Mass effects on angular distribution of sputtered atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R. R.; King, M. E.; Wehner, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Sputtering metal targets at low ion energies (Hg or Ar at less than 300 eV) under normal ion incidence causes the lighter atoms (lighter isotopes or lighter elements of alloys) to be preferentially ejected in a direction normal to the target surface. Experimental results are shown for several elements and alloys at various bombardment energies. The amount of enrichment of the lighter species normal to the target surface decreases quite rapidly with increasing ion energy. The phenomenon is a result of reflective collisions because lighter atoms can be backscattered from heavier ones underneath but not vice versa. The effect provides an explanation of why solar-wind-exposed lunar material is enriched in the heavier isotopes, since sputtered lower-mass elements have a higher chance of achieving the lunar escape velocity.

  18. Mass Loss: Its Effect on the Evolution and Fate of High-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2014-08-01

    Our understanding of massive star evolution is in flux due to recent upheavals in our view of mass loss and observations of a high binary fraction among O-type stars. Mass-loss rates for standard metallicity-dependent winds of hot stars are lower by a factor of 2-3 compared with rates adopted in modern stellar evolution codes, due to the influence of clumping on observed diagnostics. Weaker hot star winds shift the burden of H-envelope removal to the winds, pulsations, and eruptions of evolved supergiants, as well as binary mass transfer. Studies of stripped-envelope supernovae, in particular, require binary mass transfer. Dramatic examples of eruptive mass loss are seen in Type IIn supernovae, which have massive shells ejected just a few years earlier. These eruptions are a prelude to core collapse, and may signify severe instabilities in the latest nuclear burning phases. We encounter the predicament that the most important modes of mass loss are also the most uncertain, undermining the predictive power of single-star evolution models. Moreover, the influence of winds and rotation has been evaluated by testing single-star models against observed statistics that, it turns out, are heavily influenced by binary evolution. Altogether, this may alter our view about the most basic outcomes of massive-star mass loss—are Wolf-Rayet stars and Type Ibc supernovae the products of winds, or are they mostly the result of binary evolution and eruptive mass loss? This is not fully settled, but mounting evidence points toward the latter. This paradigm shift impacts other areas of astronomy, because it changes predictions for ionizing radiation and wind feedback from stellar populations, it may alter conclusions about star-formation rates and initial mass functions, it affects the origin of compact stellar remnants, and it influences how we use supernovae as probes of stellar evolution across cosmic time.

  19. Bounds on the overlap of the Hartree-Fock, optimized effective potential, and density functional approximations with the exact energy eigenstates.

    PubMed

    Thanos, S; Theophilou, A K

    2006-05-28

    In this paper, we examine the limits of accuracy of the single determinant approximations (Hartree-Fock, optimized effective potential, and density functional theory) to the exact energy eigenstates of many electron systems. We show that an approximate Slater determinant of S(z)=M gives maximum accuracy for states with S=M, provided that perturbation theory for the spin up minus spin down potential is applicable. The overlap with the exact energy eigenstates with S not equal M is much smaller. Therefore, for the case that the emphasis is on wave functions, one must use symmetry preserving theories, although this is at the expense of accuracy in energy. PMID:16774321

  20. The Effective Mass of a Ball in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…

  1. The effect of local approximations in the ground-state coupled cluster wave function on electron affinities of large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korona, Tatiana

    2012-02-01

    A possibility to calculate electron affinities (EAs) by a software devised for electron excitations is exploited to examine the accuracy of a partly local EA-EOM-CCSD method. In the proposed approach local approximations are applied to the ground-state coupled cluster wave function, while the EAs themselves are obtained in a full configurational space. The results of a numerical test for 14 molecules show that already with standard local settings the method reproduces the nonlocal EAs with the average error of 0.009 eV. Since the EA-EOM step of the calculation requires less computational resources than the computation of the CCSD ground state, the proposed hybrid approach can become a valuable tool for obtaining the EAs for molecules, which are too large for a canonical CCSD calculation, but still small enough for the EA-EOM step to be performed in a nonlocal way.

  2. Mass-dependent and non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone photolysis: Resolving theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Amanda S.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2006-11-14

    In addition to the anomalous {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O isotope effects in the three-body ozone formation reaction O+O{sub 2}+M, isotope effects in the destruction of ozone by photolysis may also play a role in determining the isotopic composition of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. While previous experiments on ozone photolysis at 254 nm were interpreted as evidence for preferential loss of light ozone that is anomalous (or 'non-mass-dependent'), recent semiempirical theoretical calculations predicted a preferential loss of heavy ozone at that wavelength that is mass dependent. Through photochemical modeling results presented here, we resolve this apparent contradiction between experiment and theory. Specifically, we show that the formation of ozone during the UV photolysis experiments is not negligible, as had been assumed, and that the well-known non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation can account for the non-mass-dependent enrichment of the heavy isotopologs of ozone observed in the experiment. Thus, no unusual non-mass-dependent fractionation in ozone photolysis must be invoked to explain the experimental results. Furthermore, we show that theoretical predictions of a mass-dependent preferential loss of the heavy isotopologs of ozone during UV photolysis are not inconsistent with the experimental data, particularly if mass-dependent isotope effects in the chemical loss reactions of ozone during the photolysis experiments or experimental artifacts enrich the remaining ozone in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O. Before the calculated fractionation factors can be quantitatively evaluated, however, further investigation of possible mass-dependent isotope effects in the reactions of ozone with O({sup 1}D), O({sup 3}P), O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}), and O{sub 2}({sup 1}{sigma}) is needed through experiments we suggest here.

  3. Effect of semi-annual applications of a chlorhexidine/fluoride varnish mixture on approximal caries incidence in schoolchildren. A three-year radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Petersson, L G; Magnusson, K; Andersson, H; Deierborg, G; Twetman, S

    1998-04-01

    Development and progression of approximal caries is still difficult to prevent and control even in societies with declining caries prevalence. In this study, a test group of 115 12-yr old children were treated semi-annually with a mixture (1:1) of a varnish containing 0.1% F (Fluor Protector) and 1.0% chlorhexidine (Cervitec). A reference group of 104 children received fluoride varnish treatment (Fluor Protector) semi-annually. Approximal caries was recorded from bitewing radiographs at baseline and after 3 yr. At baseline, total decayed and filled surfaces (DFS) including enamel caries were 1.79+/-2.36 in the reference group and 2.0+/-2.77 in the test group. After 3 yr, the mean approximal caries incidence including enamel caries was 3.01+/-3.74 and 3.78+/-4.32, respectively. The differences at baseline as well as after 3 yr were not statistically significant. The results showed that both groups had a comparatively low incidence of approximal caries during the experimental period, and suggest that a mixture of fluoride and antibacterial varnish had no additional preventive effect on approximal caries incidence compared with fluoride varnish treatments alone. PMID:9584908

  4. Changes in Kicking Pattern: Effect of Experience, Speed, Accuracy, and Effective Striking Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the effect of experience and goal constraints (speed, accuracy) on kicking patterns; (b) determine if effective striking mass was independent of ankle velocity at impact; and (c) determine the accuracy of kicks relative to independent factors. Method: Twenty participants were recruited to…

  5. Mass transfer effects on the unsteady mhd radiative- convective flow of a micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate with variable heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2013-03-01

    The problem of unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation with variable heat and mass fluxes is considered. The free stream velocity is subjected to exponentially increasing or decreasing small perturbations. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to a porous surface where a micropolar fluid is absorbed with a suction velocity varying with time. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer in the limit of optically thick fluids. The effects of the flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are given graphically, and the values of the skin friction and couple stress coefficients are presented.

  6. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-21

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because "each-atom-counts" toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well-defined surfaces may be explored using ion soft landing (SL) in a custom

  7. The effect of measurement errors and computational approximations on a perspective ILM radar image. [airport runways and the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect was examined of aircraft position and attitude, of measurement errors, and of computational approximations on the size, shape, and position of a perspective radar image of an airport runway as might be displayed by an independent landing monitor in transport aircraft. The effect on runway image geometry was examined for different aircraft attitudes and different aircraft positions relative to a standard three degree glide slope. Measurement errors investigated were errors in radar azimuth angle and range, and errors in those aircraft parameters supplied to the radar for use in converting the radar image into a perspective format (namely pitch, roll, and altitude). Also investigated were the effects of using certain mathematical approximations, such as small angle, in the coordinate transformation which converts the image to a perspective format.

  8. On the evaluation of effective density for plate- and membrane-type acoustic metamaterials without mass attached.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tai-Yun; Shen, Chen; Jing, Yun

    2016-08-01

    The effective densities of plate- and membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) without mass attached are studied theoretically and numerically. Three models, including the analytic model (based on the plate flexural wave equation and the membrane wave equation), approximate model (under the low frequency approximation), and the finite element method (FEM) model, are first used to calculate the acoustic impedance of square and clamped plates or membranes. The effective density is then obtained using the resulting acoustic impedance and a lumped model. Pressure transmission coefficients of the AMMs are computed using the obtained densities. The effect of the loss from the plate is also taken into account. Results from different models are compared and good agreement is found, particularly between the analytic model and the FEM model. The approximate model is less accurate when the frequency of interest is above the first resonance frequency of the plate or membrane. The approximate model, however, provides simple formulae to predict the effective densities of plate- or membrane-type AMMs and is accurate for the negative density frequency region. The methods presented in this paper are useful in designing AMMs for manipulating acoustic waves. PMID:27586723

  9. Strain effects on the optical conductivity of gapped graphene in the presence of Holstein phonons beyond the Dirac cone approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the optical conductivity and density of states (DOS) of doped gapped graphene beyond the Dirac cone approximation in the presence of electron-phonon (e-ph) interaction under strain, i.e., within the framework of a full π-band Holstein model, by using the Kubo linear response formalism that is established upon the retarded self-energy. A new peak in the optical conductivity for a large enough e-ph interaction strength is found which is associated to transitions between the midgap states and the Van Hove singularities of the main π-band. Optical conductivity decreases with strain and at large strains, the system has a zero optical conductivity at low energies due to optically inter-band excitations through the limit of zero doping. As a result, the Drude weight changes with e-ph interaction, temperature and strain. Consequently, DOS and optical conductivity remains stable with temperature at low e-ph coupling strengths.

  10. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.