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1

Educating Patient Educators: Enhancing Instructional Effectiveness in Physical Therapy for Low Back Pain Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the effectiveness of a training program designed for physical therapists (N=19) to aid them in the enhancement of patient education. Five therapist-skills were tested. After the training only a minority of the trained skills appeared to have improved. Results show that the training program was not very effective. (Author/MKA)

Kerssens, Jan J.; Sluijs, Emmy M.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Knibbe, Hanneke J.; Hermans, Irma M. J.

1999-01-01

2

The effect of an educational patient compliance program on serum phosphate levels in patients receiving hemodialysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study sought to determine the effectiveness of a recently developed educational patient compliance program (A Taste for Life [1995]; Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) on improving serum phosphate levels in patients receiving hemodialysis.Design: An ABA time series design was used.Participants\\/setting: Eighty-one patients receiving hemodialysis participated. The experimental group consisted of 50 participants (mean [M] = 57.9 years of

Naomi J Shaw-Stuart; Andrew Stuart

2000-01-01

3

Patient education about cough: effect on the consulting behaviour of general practice patients.  

PubMed Central

The aim of this general practice study was to examine how the consulting behaviour of patients with a cough was affected when the tasks and responsibilities of patients, practice nurses and general practitioners were reorganized. In four 'average' single-handed general practices the effects on the consulting behaviour of patients of a rational practice policy on cough and the provision of systematic patient education on cough were compared with patient behaviour in four matched control practices. Changes of behaviour were measured in 548 patients who consulted for cough at least twice, in two successive autumn-winter periods. Significantly more patients in the experimental practice changed their behaviour to follow the practice guidelines than did patients in the control practices (56% versus 30%, P less than 0.001). The proportion of patients who continued to consult in the approved manner was greater among patients receiving intervention (66% versus 29%, P less than 0.001). This was equally true for patients who had suffered less than four episodes of cough or more than four episodes. The more often the patients received the education, the more effective it was. All patients who consulted the general practitioner for cough during the first autumn-winter period filled in a cough diary during the second period. From this it appeared that the intervention did not result in patients delaying consultation when they had a cough lasting longer than three weeks or one with 'serious' symptoms. It would appear that a rational practice policy and the provision of patient education can stimulate patients to modify their consulting behaviour. This could result in a reduction in the costs of health care. PMID:1747268

Rutten, G; Van Eijk, J; Beek, M; Van der Velden, H

1991-01-01

4

Effectiveness of a sex education and counseling program for spinal cord injured patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

While there has been an increase in research and clinical interest in the sexual functioning of spinal cord injured persons and their partners, little has been reported of the effectiveness of sexual education and counseling procedures with this group of patients. The present study reported on a sex education and counseling program for spinal cord patients, an instrument used to

Jo Ann Brockway; Jeffrey C. Steger; Rosemarian Berni; Vione V. Ost; Thomas E. Williamson-Kirkland; Connie L. Peck

1978-01-01

5

Patient Education Patient and Family Education  

E-print Network

Patient Education Patient and Family Education Resources to Quit Smoking or Using Tobacco Washington Tobacco Quit Line 877-270-STOP (877-270-7867) Spanish: 877-2NOFUME (877-266-3863) TTY: 877 for good. #12;Page 2 Patient and Family Education Resources to Quit Smoking or Using Tobacco Each person

Hochberg, Michael

6

Patient Education Strategies in Dermatology  

PubMed Central

Patient education is an important aspect of patient care in dermatology. Successful education increases patient satisfaction and results in improved outcomes and adherence. This article discusses the role of patient education in dermatology. Specifically, Part I of the review examines evidence demonstrating the benefits of patient education and recognizes the challenges that limit effective patient education. These challenges can be summarized as barriers to understanding, poor patient recall, conflicting information, and barriers to physician delivery. Further descriptions and an assessment of these limitations along with methods to combat them are included in the review. PMID:20725581

Holder, Jessica L.

2009-01-01

7

Asthma Patient Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient education is an integral component of effective asthma management that is necessary for all age groups. It can be\\u000a viewed as a two-staged process, which involves not only the acquisition of knowledge, but also the integration of skills and\\u000a attitudes that leads to a change in behaviour. Effectively this is asthma self management education (SME). People with asthma\\u000a often

Vanessa M. McDonald; Peter G. Gibson

8

Mail Education Is as Effective as In-Class Education in Hypertensive Korean Patients  

PubMed Central

Many Korean American persons have hypertension, but competing life priorities often prevent them from attending health-promotion educational activities. Using principles of community-based participatory research, the authors conducted a prospective clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of a mailed vs an in-class culturally tailored education intervention. A total of 380 hypertensive Korean American persons from the Baltimore/Washington area were assigned to a more intense in-class education group or a less intensive mail education group. Evaluation of postintervention blood pressure (BP) outcomes revealed that significant reductions in systolic BP (13.3 mm Hg and 16.1 mm Hg, respectively) and diastolic BP (9.5 mm Hg and 10.9 mm Hg) and increases in BP control rates (42.3% and 54.3%) were achieved in both groups. No significant differences in BP outcomes between groups, however, were found. In conclusion, education by mail was an effective strategy for improving BP control and may be a viable approach for other immigrant groups if the education materials address their cultural needs. PMID:18326962

Kim, Miyong T.; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Hae-Ra; Jeong, Seonghee; Lee, Jong Eun; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kim B.; Hill, Martha N.

2010-01-01

9

Effect of Self - Care Education on Quality of Life in Patients With Primary Hypertension: Comparing Lecture and Educational Package  

PubMed Central

Background: Hypertension is a dangerous risk factor for public health. It profoundly affects the patients’ quality of life. However, there is lack of agreement on the best method for self-care management in patients with hypertension. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare the effect of lecture and educational pamphlets on quality of life (QOL) in patients with primary hypertension. Patients and Methods: A quasi-experimental study was performed on 90 patients with chronic primary hypertension referred to two outpatient clinics in Kashan city. Patients were randomly divided into three groups including lecture group, educational package group, and control group. The participants’ quality of life was measured using the SF-36 questionnaire at the beginning of the study, and two months later. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Chi-Square tests. Results: No significant differences were observed between the three groups for demographics characteristics and QOL before the intervention except for marital status. Mean scores of QOL dimensions of the intervention groups were increased at the end of the study, except for the dimension of bodily pain. Tukey post-Hoc test showed that except for general health, the two intervention groups were not significantly different in other dimensions, and significant differences were observed between the control group and the two intervention groups (P < 0.05). At start and the end of the study, the mean differences in the general health dimension in three groups were 2.25 ± 0.1, 0.07 ± 0.01, and -1.70 ± 0.01 respectively. There were significant differences among groups (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Lecture and educational package can both improve some dimensions of the QOL in patients with hypertension. However, as pamphlets are cheap and easy to use, this method may be used as an effective method for self-care education in health care settings in Iran, where the system is faced with nursing shortage.

Aghajani, Mohamad; Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Kafaei Atrian, Mahbube; Raofi, Zahra; Abedi, Fatemeh; Naeimi Vartoni, Sajad; Soleimani, Akbar

2013-01-01

10

Patient perception of understanding health education and instructions has moderating effect on glycemic control  

PubMed Central

Background Whether health literacy is independently associated with processes or outcomes of diabetes-related care is controversial. We tried to demonstrate the interaction of health literacy and understanding of health education and instructions in achieving glycemic control. Methods Five hundred and one consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in the outpatient clinic of the metabolism department were recruited into this pilot study. The demographic data were collected from patients’ self-reports. The clinical background information was collected through electronic medical records. A questionnaire derived from part of the Mandarin Health Literacy Scale was used to measure numeracy and functional health literacy of people with diabetes. Health literacy levels were categorized into inadequate, marginal and adequate. Patient self-ratings of their perceived understanding of the health education information and instructions provided by their case manager in the past were categorized into two subgroups: better and poor. Patients with an HbA1c level equal to or below 7% were considered to have good glycemic control. Multivariate logistic regression was used to find associated factors of health literacy and understanding of health education and instructions. GENMOD procedures were used to analyze repeated outcome measurements of glycemic control. Results Higher educational attainment and higher household income (odds ratios were 2.23 and 2.22, respectively) were significantly associated with patients who had adequate health literacy. Higher educational attainment and patients with a family history of DM (odds ratios were 4.99 and 1.85, respectively) were significantly associated with better understanding of health education and instructions. Adequate health literacy is not the only factor associated with good glycemic control. The effect of adequate health literacy in achieving good glycemic control might be masked by patients with better understanding of health education and instructions. Conclusions Our results revealed that not only were patients with adequate health literacy associated with good glycemic control but patients with marginal health literacy were also able to achieve good glycemic control. Adequate health literacy and better understanding of health education is highly correlated. The role of adequate health literacy on glycemic control could be suppressed if variables are over-controlled during analysis. PMID:24996669

2014-01-01

11

Sex Education for Patients  

PubMed Central

Sex education evokes a wide variety of responses in the community and from teachers. Consequently, physicians have a responsibility to present sex education material in a factual, objective way. Many people are misinformed about sexual behavior. Physicians can help patients and the community by being aware of appropriate sex education for each age group. A curriculum for sex education, and opportunities to provide sex information for patients of different ages and stages in the lifecycle, are described. PMID:21274069

Zitner, David

1985-01-01

12

Effect of an educational video on emergency department patient stroke knowledge.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore whether passive watching of a stroke videotape in the Emergency Department waiting room could be an effective method for patient education. The setting was an urban, inner city teaching hospital. After providing informed consent, subjects were randomized into two arms: those watching a 12-min educational video on stroke developed by the American Stroke Association (video group) and those not undergoing an intervention (control group). Both groups were administered a 13-question quiz covering different stroke-related issues, but only the video group received this same test again after the completion of the educational program. Those enrolled were contacted after 1 month to determine knowledge retention via the same test. Immediately after watching the educational program, participants demonstrated improved knowledge of stroke-related questions, with an increase of test scores from 6.7 +/- 2.5 to 9.5 +/- 2.6 (p < 0.01). Even at the 1-month follow-up, the video group had significantly higher test scores than the control group. A stroke educational videotape improves the knowledge of this dangerous disease and may be a valuable and relatively low-cost tool for focused patient education in the Emergency Department waiting room. PMID:17976815

Chan, Yu-Feng; Lavery, Robert; Fox, Nicole; Kwon, Robert; Zinzuwadia, Shreni; Massone, Richard; Livingston, David

2008-02-01

13

Effect of an education programme for patients with osteoarthritis in primary care - a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease, considered to be one of the major public health problems. Research suggests that patient education is feasible and valuable for achieving improvements in quality of life, in function, well-being and improved coping. Since 1994, Primary Health Care in Malmö has used a patient education programme directed towards OA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of this education programme for patients with OA in primary health care in terms of self-efficacy, function and self-perceived health. Method The study was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the EuroQol-5D and Arthritis self-efficacy scale were used to measure self-perceived health and self-efficacy and function was measured with Grip Ability Test for the upper extremity and five different functional tests for the lower extremity. Results We found differences between the intervention group and the control group, comparing the results at baseline and after 6 months in EuroQol-5D (p < 0.001) and in standing one leg eyes closed (p = 0.02) in favour of the intervention group. No other differences between the groups were found. Conclusion This study has shown that patient education for patients with osteoarthritis is feasible in a primary health care setting and can improve self-perceived health as well as function in some degree, but not self-efficacy. Further research to investigate the effect of exercise performance on function, as well as self-efficacy is warranted. Trial registration The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov. Registration number: NCT00979914 PMID:20969809

2010-01-01

14

Long-term effectiveness of a patient and family pain education program on overcoming barriers to management of cancer pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a patient and family pain education program on reducing cancer patients’ and their families’ barriers to (i.e., concerns or misconceptions about) cancer pain management, on increasing patients’ adherence to a prescribed analgesic regimen, and on decreasing pain intensity and pain interference with daily life. An experimental and longitudinal design

Chia-Chin Lin; Pi-Ling Chou; Shang-Liang Wu; Yue-Cune Chang; Yuen-Liang Lai

2006-01-01

15

Patient education in The Netherlands.  

PubMed

This article presents the development of patient education (PE) in The Netherlands from a historical perspective. A description is given of the first pioneering years from the 70s till the late 80s, in which early topics like the organization of PE, the orchestration of PE between different disciplines, the role of the social environment, the provision of PE in difficult patient groups and--most of all--the technical development of educational materials took the time and attention of the growing group of professionals that were engaged in patient education. Recent developments concern the legal aspects of PE, national policy, the role of health insurance, the position of patient organizations and the development of patient education in specific professional groups, e.g. general practitioners, nurses, physiotherapists, pharmacists, and dentists. There is no doubt that patient education has been professionalized considerably during the last decades. Nevertheless, new issues emerge and some old issues still need to be solved. The effective use of information material, the need for counseling as part of PE, and the relevance of coordination of care are longtime, but still actual problems in PE. More recent issues are the pressures on PE because of capacity restraints, the influence of the media and perhaps most of all: the apparent need for a patient-centered attitude and a more two-sided way of communication. Finally, the future policy topics in the Dutch patient education are discussed. PMID:11390152

Bensing, J M; Visser, A; Saan, H

2001-07-01

16

Comparing the Effect of Two Educational Programs on the Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients in Iran  

PubMed Central

Background: Various researchers have shown that the health level, performance status, and quality of life (QOL) are often less than expected especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of the two methods of educational programs on health- related QOL (HRQOL) in Iranian HD patients. Patients and Methods: In this quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest interventional study, we employed each subject as his/her own control. The study was conducted at the dialysis units in three major general hospitals affiliated with Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. A total of 90 HD patients were randomly allocated to two 45-patient groups of oral and video education programs, respectively. The educational programs included dietary and fluid regimens, the care of fistula and skin, and stress management. HRQOL was assessed in both groups using a Farsi version of the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) before and after the educational programs. Repeated measures analysis of variance and ANOVA were used for data analysis through SPSS. Results: SF-36 domains of physical functioning (P < 0.021), role physical (P < 0.031), social functioning (P < 0.001) and mental health (P < 0.001) were significantly increased in both oral and vide education groups after the interventions. There was no difference in the effectiveness of the two educational programs. Conclusions: Appropriate interventions may potentially lead to improvement in the HRQOL of these patients. Therefore, video education as an effective, inexpensive, simple, and attractive method is recommended for HD patients.

Baraz, Shahram; Zarea, Kourosh; Dashtbozorgi, Bahman

2014-01-01

17

The Effects of Health Education on Patients with Hypertension in China: A Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study collected on from all research relating to health education and hypertension in China and, with the aid of meta-analysis tools, assessed the outcomes of such health education. The analysis provides a basis for the further development of health-education programmes for patients with hypertension. Methods: Literature searches…

Xu, L. J.; Meng, Q.; He, S. W.; Yin, X. L.; Tang, Z. L.; Bo, H. Y.; Lan, X. Y.

2014-01-01

18

Randomized trial of self-management education in asthmatic patients and effects of depressive symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Self-management education is a cornerstone of routine asthma care. Objectives To improve asthma knowledge and self-efficacy and to assess effects in patients with depressive symptoms. Methods In a randomized trial, controls received asthma brochures and social support through frequent follow-up visits. Intervention patients made a contract to adopt a behavior to improve asthma and received a workbook, weekly reinforcements for 12 weeks, and frequent follow-up visits. Outcomes were Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores and emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for asthma. Results Ninety patients were randomized to each group. Mean age was 43 years, 84% were women, and mean study time was 27 months. Intervention patients had more improvement in AQLQ scores at 5 months, but this difference was not sustained. For the entire period, AQLQ scores improved by a clinically important difference from 4.1 to a mean of 5.1 in both groups (P < .001) with no difference between groups (P = .91). In multivariate analysis, younger age, more education, better enrollment AQLQ score, more asthma self-efficacy and knowledge, and fewer depressive symptoms were associated with more improvement (P < .05 for all). Similar results were found for the SF-36. Thirty-one percent of patients had an ED visit, and 9% were hospitalized, with no differences between groups. In multivariate analysis, female sex, expecting to be cured of asthma, less asthma knowledge, and more depressive symptoms were associated with ED visits. Being in the intervention group attenuated the effects of depressive symptoms for all outcomes. Conclusions Quality of life improved in both groups, with particular benefit in intervention patients with depressive symptoms. PMID:20642198

Mancuso, Carol A.; Sayles, Wendy; Allegrante, John P.

2010-01-01

19

Developing patient education in community pharmacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians? patient education behavior\\u000aand the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities\\u000ain the pharmacy. This summary reports about the research methodology and the results.\\u000aResearch methodology\\u000aThe studied patient education behavior concerned

A. T. G. Blom

1996-01-01

20

Patient Education Thesaurus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood and…

Cooper, Lynn

21

Microcomputer as patient educator.  

PubMed

A computer-assisted lesson on general drug knowledge as a patient education tool is described. A drug I.Q. quiz is one of seven microcomputer lessons available to patients in the waiting room of an ambulatory-care clinic. The drug quiz consists of 19 multiple-choice and six true or false questions. After each question, the computer responds with a brief paragraph keyed to the answer selected by the user. If the answer for a multiple-choice question is incorrect, the user can reanswer the question before proceeding. At the end of the lesson, a score is graphically displayed and the user is asked to evaluate the lesson. The computer stores the total number of lessons completed, total scores, number of times each question was answered incorrectly on first and second attempts, number of times each question was answered a second time, and each user's responses to the quiz and evaluation questions. Based on 313 completions of the drug quiz from September 1981 through May 1982, 86% of the users stated that they learned at least something useful, and 72% liked the quiz. The mean (+/- S.D.) number of correct answers on the first attempt was 16 +/- 5; scores improved by an average of 2.5 +/- 2 by reanswering questions. Of 2421 multiple-choice questions answered incorrectly, 62% were reanswered. Of these second attempts, 52% were correct. Item validity scores indicated that the drug quiz serves as a realistic appraisal of drug knowledge. The microcomputer can be an effective medium for patient education. PMID:7180860

Beck, R J; Ellis, L B; Scott, D M; Raines, J R; Hakanson, N

1982-12-01

22

The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

2012-01-01

23

Comparison of Patient Education Methods: Effects on Knowledge of Cardiac Rehabilitation Principles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patient education programs for persons undergoing cardiac surgery related to knowledge of cardiac rehabilitation principles were conducted with either traditional (n=49) or collaborative (n=47) educational interventions. The two methods produced similar levels of knowledge, but significant differences appeared depending on whether subjects had…

Thomas, Julie Jepsen

1996-01-01

24

A supportive-educational intervention for heart failure patients in iran: the effect on self-care behaviours.  

PubMed

Background. Chronic heart failure is a major health and social problem. The promotion of self-care behaviours can potentially assist patients to effectively manage this chronic condition and prevent worsening of the disease. Formal personalized educational interventions that provide support and take into consideration the cultural context are needed. Objective. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of a supportive-educational intervention on self-care behaviours of heart failure patients in Iran. Methods. This research was a prospective, randomized trial of a supportive-educational intervention. Eighty heart failure patients were randomly assigned to receive the supportive-educational intervention or usual care. The intervention consisted of a one-hour, nurse-led, in-person education session and postdischarge followup by telephone over three months. Data were collected at baseline, one, two, and three months. Results. The control and intervention groups did not differ in self-care scores at baseline (P > 0.05). Each of the self-care scores was significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group at 1, 2, and 3 months (P < 0.001). There were significant differences in self-care behaviours over the three months, among participants in the intervention group. Conclusion. This study provides support for the effectiveness of a supportive-educational intervention to increase self-care behaviours among Iranian patients suffering from chronic heart failure. PMID:24175091

Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Howard, A Fuchsia; Jamshidi, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

25

[DGRW-update: patient education].  

PubMed

Patient education programmes, i.?e. standardized, manualized, interactive group programmes aiming to increase self-management and empowerment, are a core element of medical rehabilitation for chronic conditions. In an update of the evidence of the effectiveness of patient education, its effectiveness was proven for a broad spectrum of chronic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic low back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, bronchial asthma, COPD, and cancer, as well as for the modification of health behaviours, such as diet and exercise. To sustain effects, aftercare interventions, such as support provided by phone, were found to be successful. Interventions targeted to particular patient groups according to gender, age, or migration background are also being developed more frequently. When evaluating educational interventions not only distal outcomes, such as quality of life and participation, should be used but also proximal outcomes such as self-management skills. A recent survey of patient education practice in medical rehabilitation revealed a continuing potential for optimization relative to manualization, evaluation and didactics. However, the dissemination of innovative programmes into rehabilitation routine presents a major challenge. PMID:21976261

Faller, H; Reusch, A; Meng, K

2011-10-01

26

A controlled trial on the effects of patient education in the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes.  

PubMed

The effect of patient education on diabetic control in insulin-treated diabetic adults was studied in 77 subjects randomized into two groups: intensive patient education (group A) and control (group B). The subjects in group A received intensive patient instruction, both individually and in small groups, from a team of physicians, teaching nurses, and a dietitian. The patients in group B received a short instruction course consisting mainly of printed material. A highly significant improvement in diabetic control was observed in both groups immediately after the education programs, with gradual return to the original level during the following 3-6 mo. No difference was observed between the two groups in any of the measured parameters during the 18-mo investigation. Factors related to good control during the study included the length of school education, the quality of the control at the beginning of the study, and the high degree of self-confidence and lack of signs of anxiety in the psychological tests. The results demonstrate that the effects of educational programs are of limited value if they do not lead to permanent changes in attitudes and motivation, which are critical factors affecting long-term diabetic control. PMID:6347578

Korhonen, T; Huttunen, J K; Aro, A; Hentinen, M; Ihalainen, O; Majander, H; Siitonen, O; Uusitupa, M; Pyörälä, K

1983-01-01

27

Vocal Hygiene Education, Voice Production Therapy, and the Role of Patient Adherence: A Treatment Effectiveness Study in Women with Phonotrauma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of vocal hygiene education (VHE) and voice production therapy (VP) in altering patient perception of vocal handicap in adult women with benign, bilateral phonotraumatic vocal fold lesions and the role of adherence in that perception. Method: Sixty-two women were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of VP (n = 31) or…

Behrman, Alison; Rutledge, John; Hembree, Amanda; Sheridan, Sarah

2008-01-01

28

Patient education model for increasing handwashing compliance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A review of the literature on handwashing has documented the absence of research on the education of the patient as an intervention model for changing staff behavior regarding handwashing compliance. The primary objective of this project was to conduct a prospective control study of the effect of patient handwashing education on staff compliance with handwashing. Method: A prospective, controlled,

Maryanne McGuckin; Richard Waterman; Lois Porten; Sandra Bello; Mary Caruso; Barbara Juzaitis; Elyse Krug; Sherry Mazer

1999-01-01

29

The effectiveness of a nutrition education device for patients who undergo kidney transplantation  

E-print Network

; the glucocorticoid steroid prednisone has been noted to be associated with the highest incidence and type of side effects [5]. Side effects of corticosteroids A degree of carbohydrate intolerance was found in patients given prednisone [5]. Steroid...; the glucocorticoid steroid prednisone has been noted to be associated with the highest incidence and type of side effects [5]. Side effects of corticosteroids A degree of carbohydrate intolerance was found in patients given prednisone [5]. Steroid...

Cobos, Maria Cecilia

2012-06-07

30

A Conceptual Model for Evaluation of Patient Education for Cancer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Procedures for the evaluation of patient education programs have been slow to evolve; the majority of programs, in fact, remain unevaluated. Patient education efforts, particularly with cancer patients, are effective in enhancing recovery, alleviating anxiety, and facilitating compliance. Patient education should minimize patient dependence on…

Newby, Larry G.; And Others

31

Gender Modifies the Effects of Education and Income on Sleep Quality of the Patients with Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Background: This study aimed to investigate the interaction between gender and other socio-economic characteristics on sleep quality of the patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 717 patients with CAD. The socio- economic status (education level, income, marital status, and place of residence) was considered as the independent variable. Besides, the study outcome was the quality of sleep which was measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Gender was considered as a possible effect modifier. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the interaction between gender and socio-economic factors on sleep quality. As defined by Baron and Kenny, moderator was defined as a variable that affected the direction or magnitude of the association of interest. Results: Female gender, low education level, and low income were predictive of poor sleep quality. Among female (10.0 ± 4.3 vs. 7.6 ± 5.0, P < 0.05), but not male patients (6.7 ± 4.2 vs. 7.0 ± 4.2, P > 0.05), low education was associated with poor sleep quality. Also, among female (10.0 ± 4.3 vs. 5.7 ± 2.5, P < 0.05), but not male patients (7.0 ± 4.2 vs. 6.0 ± 3.8, P > 0.05), low income was predictive of poor sleep quality. Gender did not modify the effect of other socio-economic factors on sleep quality. Conclusions: Among female but not male patients with CAD, low education and income were associated with poor sleep quality. This information helps us better understand the mechanisms behind the poor sleep quality of the female patients with CAD. This is important because poor sleep is a prognostic factor among the CAD patients. PMID:24757639

Assari, Shervin; Moghani Lankarani, Maryam; Kazemi Saleh, Davoud; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh

2013-01-01

32

Patient satisfaction with healthcare in asthmatics and patients with COPD before and after patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient satisfaction with general practitioners (GP) and pulmonary outpatient clinics has not been previously compared in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in addition to the effect of patient education on this satisfaction.We randomly allocated 78 asthmatics and 62 patients with COPD after ordinary outpatient management to a control or an intervention group. Intervention consisted of educational

F. GALLEFOSS; P. S. BAKKE

2000-01-01

33

The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients

Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

2012-01-01

34

Educating patients with limited literacy skills: the effectiveness of printed and videotaped materials about colon cancer.  

PubMed Central

We investigated whether printed or videotaped information is more effective in enhancing colon cancer knowledge. Subjects (n = 1100) were randomized into three groups: to receive a booklet, view a videotape, or receive no intervention. Subjects receiving the intervention showed increased knowledge compared with control subjects (booklet = 23% and videotape = 26% vs no intervention = 3%). Findings suggest that personalized educational materials are effective in enhancing colon cancer knowledge. PMID:8279598

Meade, C D; McKinney, W P; Barnas, G P

1994-01-01

35

Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators

Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

2010-01-01

36

Patient education in Europe: united differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This issue of Patient Education and Counseling presents the state of the art of patient education in several European countries. It is based on papers presented at a meeting in Paris on the evolution and development of patient education in western, central and eastern Europe (May 1999). Also patient education in the US is presented in this issue. Patient education

ALAIN DECCACHE; JOZIEN BENSING

37

Patient education in Europe: united differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This issue of Patient Education and Counseling presents the state of the art of patient education in several European countries. It is based on papers presented at a meeting in Paris on the evolution and development of patient education in western, central and eastern Europe (May 1999). Also patient education in the US is presented in this issue. Patient education

Adriaan Visser; Alain Deccache; Jozien Bensing

2001-01-01

38

Educating future leaders in patient safety  

PubMed Central

Education of health care professionals has given little attention to patient safety, resulting in limited understanding of the nature of risk in health care and the importance of strengthening systems. The World Health Organization developed the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multiprofessional Edition to accelerate the incorporation of patient safety teaching into higher educational curricula. The World Health Organization Curriculum Guide uses a health system-focused, team-dependent approach, which impacts all health care professionals and students learning in an integrated way about how to operate within a culture of safety. The guide is pertinent in the context of global educational reforms and growing recognition of the need to introduce patient safety into health care professionals’ curricula. The guide helps to advance patient safety education worldwide in five ways. First, it addresses the variety of opportunities and contexts in which health care educators teach, and provides practical recommendations to learning. Second, it recommends shared learning by students of different professions, thus enhancing student capacity to work together effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Third, it provides guidance on a range of teaching methods and pedagogical activities to ensure that students understand that patient safety is a practical science teaching them to act in evidence-based ways to reduce patient risk. Fourth, it encourages supportive teaching and learning, emphasizing the need to establishing teaching environments in which students feel comfortable to learn and practice patient safety. Finally, it helps educators incorporate patient safety topics across all areas of clinical practice. PMID:25285012

Leotsakos, Agnes; Ardolino, Antonella; Cheung, Ronny; Zheng, Hao; Barraclough, Bruce; Walton, Merrilyn

2014-01-01

39

The effect of group psycho-educational program on quality of life in families of patients with mood disorders  

PubMed Central

Background: Mood disorders related behaviors are imposed on family members and influence the family's mental atmosphere and level of quality of life. Therefore, the researchers decided to study the effect of group psycho-educational program on the quality of life in families of patients with mood disorders. Materials and Methods: This is a two-group interventional study conducted on 32 members of families of the patients with mood disorders selected through random sampling. A group psycho-educational program was conducted in ten 90-min sessions (twice a week) for the study group. (World Health Organization's Quality of Life-BREF WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire was adopted in the study and was filled before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the scores of quality of life in the domains of mental health, social communications, and environmental health, immediately after and 1 month after intervention in the study group compared to the control group. Repeated measure analysis of variance showed a significant increase in the mean scores of quality of life in the study group. Conclusions: The results showed that the impact of group psycho-educational program is observed in the prevention of reduction in quality of life and its promotion in the families of patients with mood disorders. PMID:24554960

Ghazavi, Zahra; Dehkhoda, Fateme; Yazdani, Mohsen

2014-01-01

40

Effect that an educational program for cystic fibrosis patients and caregivers has on the contamination of home nebulizers*  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To describe the pathogens found in home nebulizers and in respiratory samples of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and to evaluate the effect that a standardized instruction regarding cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers has on the frequency of nebulizer contamination. METHODS: We included 40 CF patients (22 males), all of whom used the same model of nebulizer. The median patient age was 11.2 ± 3.74 years. We collected samples from the nebulizer mouthpiece and cup, using a sterile swab moistened with sterile saline. Respiratory samples were collected by asking patients to expectorate into a sterile container or with oropharyngeal swabs after cough stimulation. Cultures were performed on selective media, and bacteria were identified by classical biochemical tests. Patients received oral and written instructions regarding the cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers. All determinations were repeated an average of two months later. RESULTS: Contamination of the nebulizer (any part) was detected in 23 cases (57.5%). The nebulizer mouthpiece and cup were found to be contaminated in 16 (40.0%) and 19 (47.5%), respectively. After the standardized instruction had been given, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of contaminated nebulizers (43.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In our sample of CF patients, nebulizer contamination was common, indicating the need for improvement in patient practices regarding the cleaning and disinfection of their nebulizers. A one-time educational intervention could have a significant positive impact. PMID:24831395

Zuana, Adriana Della; Garcia, Doroti de Oliveira; Juliani, Regina Célia Turola Passos; da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira

2014-01-01

41

Patient education in the contemporary management of coronary heart disease  

PubMed Central

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of patient education compared with usual care on mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD.To explore the potential study level predictors of the effects of patient education in patients with CHD.

Brown, James PR; Clark, Alexander M; Dalal, Hayes; Welch, Karen; Taylor, Rod S

2014-01-01

42

Evidence-based development of interactive patient education programs: a guide for achieving optimal computer-based patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

In daily plastic surgery practise, patient education is of great importance. Computer-based patient education can be a helpful tool, as we described in this journal in 2004. In this paper, we describe the key elements of building effective computer-based patient education programs, based on the existing literature. We hope that plastic surgeons will use this paper as a guide in

Bram J. Keulers; Miel J. Keulers; Marc R. M. Scheltinga; Paul H. M. Spauwen

2006-01-01

43

Medical and educational malpractice issues in patient education.  

PubMed

This paper discusses the concept of educational malpractice as a cause of prolonged patient morbidity equal in magnitude to medical malpractice. Statements by national groups sanctioning and urging increased patient education efforts are reviewed. An example of specially designed problem-oriented patient education materials development, the concept of an "Educational Prescription," the place for the "Educational Prescription" in problem-oriented medical records, and the value of hospital-based patient education as a cost-containment activity. PMID:300096

Easton, R E; Easton, M C; Levy, M

1977-02-01

44

Effect of Educational Program on Quality of Life of Patients with Heart Failure: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Heart failure is one of the most common cardiovascular diseases which decrease the quality of life. Most of the factors influencing the quality of life can be modified with educational interventions. Therefore, this study examined the impact of a continuous training program on quality of life of patients with heart failure. Methods: This randomized clinical trial study was conducted during May to August 2011. Forty four participants with heart failure referred to Shahid Madani's polyclinics of Tabriz were selected through convenient sampling method and were randomly allocated to two groups. The intervention group (n = 22) received ongoing training including one-to-one teaching, counseling sessions and phone calls over 3 months. The control group (n = 22) received routine care program. Data on quality of life was collected using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire at baseline as well as three months later. Results: The statistical tests showed significant differences in the physical, emotional dimensions and total quality of life in intervention group. But in control group, no significant differences were obtained. There was not any significant association in demographic characteristics and quality of life. Conclusion: Ongoing training programs can be effective in improving quality of life of patients with heart failure. Hence applying ongoing educational program as a non-pharmacological intervention can help to improve the quality of life of these patients.

Lakdizaji, Sima; Hassankhni, Hadi; Mohajjel Agdam, Alireza; Khajegodary, Mohammad; Salehi, Rezvanieh

2013-01-01

45

Effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education: a systematic review and practice guideline recommendations.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education (PE). A systematic review was conducted and reviews with or without meta-analyses, which examined teaching strategies and methods of delivery for PE, were included. Teaching strategies identified are traditional lectures, discussions, simulated games, computer technology, written material, audiovisual sources, verbal recall, demonstration, and role playing. Methods of delivery focused on how to deliver the teaching strategies. Teaching strategies that increased knowledge, decreased anxiety, and increased satisfaction included computer technology, audio and videotapes, written materials, and demonstrations. Various teaching strategies used in combination were similarly successful. Moreover, structured-, culturally appropriate- and patient-specific teachings were found to be better than ad hoc teaching or generalized teaching. Findings provide guidance for establishing provincial standards for the delivery of PE. Recommendations concerning the efficacy of the teaching strategies and delivery methods are provided. PMID:21161465

Friedman, Audrey Jusko; Cosby, Roxanne; Boyko, Susan; Hatton-Bauer, Jane; Turnbull, Gale

2011-03-01

46

Association between patient education and health-related quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Providing patients with disease- and treatment-related information is an important role of medical staff and is now reimbursed in Japan by the national health insurance system under the rubric ‘patient education’. Evaluation of the effectiveness of patient education programs is necessary to ensure that limited health care resources are used efficiently. Objective: The objective is to determine whether educating

T. Shimbo; M. Goto; T. Morimoto; K. Hira; M. Takemura; K. Matsui; A. Yoshida; T. Fukui

2004-01-01

47

Effects of SBIRT Education and Training on Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward Working with Patients Who Use Alcohol and Drugs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) can reduce alcohol use and negative outcomes in patients with risky substance use. However, negative attitudes that some healthcare professionals have toward patients who use substances are a barrier to implementing SBIRT. The University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, in partnership with the Institute for Research, Education, and Training in Addictions (IRETA),

Kathryn Puskar; Heather J. Gotham; Lauren Terhorst; Holly Hagle; Ann Mitchell; Betty Braxter; Marie Fioravanti; Irene Kane; Kimberly S. Talcott; Gail R. Woomer; Helen K. Burns

2013-01-01

48

Effectiveness of an educational intervention on the management of type 2 diabetic patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine: results from the FADOI-DIAMOND study.  

PubMed

Appropriate management of hyperglycemia is crucial for patients with type 2 diabetes. Aim of the FADOI-DIAMOND study was to evaluate real-world management of type 2 diabetic patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine wards (IMW) and the effects of a standardized educational intervention for IMW staff. DIAMOND has been carried out in 53 Italian IMW, with two cross-sectional surveys interspersed with an educational program (PRE phase and POST phase). In PRE phase, each center reviewed the charts of the last 30 hospitalized patients with known type 2 diabetes. An educational program was conducted in each center by means of the "outreach visit," a face-to-face meeting between IMW staff and a trained external expert. Six months after, each center repeated the data collection (POST phase), specular to the PRE. A total of 3,167 patients were enrolled (1,588 PRE and 1,579 POST). From PRE phase to POST, patients with registered anthropometric data (54.1 vs. 74.9 %, p < 0.001) and in-hospital/recent measurement of glycated hemoglobin (48.2 vs. 61.4 %, p < 0.005) increased significantly. After educational program, more patients received insulin during hospitalization (68.3 vs. 63.6 %, p = 0.005). A more relevant variation in glycemia during hospitalization was observed in POST phase than PRE (-22.2 vs. -15.5 mg/dL, p < 0.001), without differences as for occurrence of hypoglycemia (12.3 vs. 11.9 %). A one-shot educational intervention led to persistent improvement in the management of hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes and to significant better glycemic control. Further studies might evaluate the effectiveness of a more aggressive educational program, on both management and outcomes. PMID:24722913

Gulli, Giovanni; Frasson, Stefania; Borzì, Vito; Fontanella, Andrea; Grandi, Marco; Marengo, Claudio; Nicolucci, Antonio; Pastorelli, Ruggero; Solerte, Bruno; Gatti, Adriano; Raimondo, Francesco Cristiano; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Gussoni, Gualberto; Mazzone, Antonino; Ceriello, Antonio

2014-10-01

49

Effects of lifestyle education program for type 2 diabetes patients in clinics: a cluster randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising worldwide, as has been the global mean fasting plasma glucose level. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured individual-based lifestyle education (SILE) program to reduce the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level in type 2 diabetes patients delivered by registered dietitians in primary care clinical settings. Methods This was a 6-month prospective cluster randomized controlled trial in a primary care setting with randomization at the practice level. Twenty general practitioners in 20 clinics in Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, were involved. 193 adults (51% men, mean age 61.3 years) with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c ?6.5% who received treatment in medical clinics were the participants. A SILE program was implemented through 4 sessions with trained registered dietitians during the 6-month study period. Results were compared with those of a control group who received usual care. The primary endpoint was the change in HbA1c levels at 6 months from baseline. Secondary endpoints were the changes at 6 months from baseline in fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, BMI, energy, and nutrient intakes (whole day and each meal). Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. Mixed-effects linear models were used to examine the effects of the treatment. Results The mean change at 6 months from baseline in HbA1c was a 0.7% decrease in the intervention group (n?=?100) and a 0.2% decrease in the control group (n?=?93) (difference ?0.5%, 95%CI: -0.2% to ?0.8%, p?=?0.004). After adjusting for baseline values and other factors, the difference was still significant (p?=?0.003?~?0.011). The intervention group had a significantly greater decrease in mean energy intake at dinner compared with the control group and a greater increase in mean vegetable intake for the whole day, breakfast, and lunch as shown in crude and adjusted models. A tendency toward improvement was observed in the other secondary endpoints but the improvement was not statistically significant. These results were confirmed by several sensitivity analyses. Conclusions The SILE program that was provided in primary care settings for patients with type 2 diabetes resulted in greater improvement in HbA1c levels than usual diabetes care and education. Trial registration http://UMIN000004049 PMID:23672733

2013-01-01

50

The Effect of Detailed, Video-Assisted Anesthesia Risk Education on Patient Anxiety and the Duration of the Preanesthetic Interview: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Video-assisted patient education during the preanesthetic clinic visit is a new intervention to increase knowledge transfer to the patient regarding anesthesia procedure and risks. However, little is known about whether video- based patient education influences patient anxiety and the duration of the preanesthetic visit. METHODS: Two hundred nine consecutive patients, who visited the anesthesia clinic before major operations, were

Cornelie Salzwedel; Corinna Petersen; Irmgard Blanc; Uwe Koch; Alwin E. Goetz; Martin Schuster

2008-01-01

51

Effects of educational intervention on nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions toward supplying artificial nutrition and hydration to terminal cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  This study aimed to investigate the effects of educational intervention on nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions\\u000a regarding supplying artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) to terminal cancer patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A quasi-experimental design was adopted. A structured questionnaire evaluated the effects of educational intervention. From\\u000a April to June 2005, 88 nurses were enrolled in the gastroenterology, general surgery, and intensive

Li-Shan Ke; Tai-Yuan Chiu; Wen-Yu Hu; Su-Shun Lo

2008-01-01

52

Preparing patients for threatening medical treatments: effects of a chemotherapy educational DVD on anxiety, unmet needs, and self-efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals of work  Based on meta-analyses regarding the preparation of patients for potentially threatening medical procedures, a DVD, incorporating\\u000a behavioral role modelling, was developed to prepare patients for chemotherapy and assist them to self-manage side effects.\\u000a It was hypothesized that patients who watched the DVD (vs those who did not) would report (1) lower anxiety; (2) higher self-efficacy\\u000a related to coping

Penelope Schofield; Michael Jefford; Mariko Carey; Kathryn Thomson; Melanie Evans; Carl Baravelli; Sanchia Aranda

2008-01-01

53

A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

Fleming, Jean E.

2014-01-01

54

Effective Fall 2011 HIGHER EDUCATION  

E-print Network

1 Effective Fall 2011 HIGHER EDUCATION DOCTORATE PROGRAMS INTERNSHIP HANDBOOK.D.) Doctorate of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Higher Education Administration College of Education Program of Higher Education Texas Tech University Box 41071 Lubbock, TX 794091071 (806) 7421997 Fax (806

Rock, Chris

55

The Effect of Diabetes Self-Management Education on Body Weight, Glycemic Control, and Other Metabolic Markers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Aims. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of a short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME) on metabolic markers and atherosclerotic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. 76 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited in this study. They were divided into the intervention group (n = 36) and control group (n = 40). The patients in the intervention group received a 3-month intervention, including an 8-week education on self-management of diabetes mellitus and subsequent 4 weeks of practice of the self-management guidelines. The patients in the control group received standard advice on medical nutrition therapy. Metabolic markers, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and carotid arterial stiffness (CAS) of the patients in both groups were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention. Results. There was a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, ?0.2 ± 0.56% versus 0.08 ± 0.741%; P < 0.05) and body weight (?1.19 ± 1.39?kg versus ?0.61 ± 2.04?kg; P < 0.05) in the intervention group as compared to the control group. However, no significant improvements were found in other metabolic markers, CIMT and CAS (P > 0.05). Conclusions. DSME can improve HbA1c and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25136645

Lai, Christopher W. K.; Chan, Lawrence W. C.; Law, Helen K. W.; Ying, Michael

2014-01-01

56

Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.  

PubMed

Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used. PMID:23394924

Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

2013-03-01

57

Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

2014-01-01

58

Effect of an education and activation programme on functional limitations and patient-perceived recovery in acute and sub-acute shoulder complaints - a randomised clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background The education and activation programme (EAP) aims at coping with psychosocial determinants to prevent the development of chronic shoulder complaints (SCs). The effect of the EAP on functional limitations and patient-perceived recovery after 6 and 26 weeks is evaluated in a randomised clinical trial. Methods Patients with SCs present at rest or elicited by movement and lasting no longer than 3 months were allocated at random to either EAP as an addition to usual care (UC), or to UC only. Measurements were taken at baseline and after 6 and 26 weeks and were analysed by means of multilevel analysis for the group effect. EAP was administered by GPs or by an ambulant therapist (CDB). Patients in the UC group were given UC by their own GP. Results Multilevel analysis failed to show a significant effect of the EAP on either functional limitations or patient-perceived recovery. Analysis showed coincidentally a relation between catastrophising at baseline and functional limitations. Conclusion The EAP has no significant effect on the outcome of SCs after 6 and 26 weeks. The relation between catastrophising at baseline and functional limitations suggests that an intervention focusing specifically on catastrophising may be more successful in reducing functional limitations in the long term. Further research is however needed to evaluate the effect of catastrophising at baseline on the course of SCs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71777817 PMID:18005423

De Bruijn, Camiel; de Bie, Rob; Geraets, Jacques; Goossens, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Wim; van der Heijden, Geert; Candel, Math; Dinant, Geert-Jan

2007-01-01

59

NCI Cancer Patient Educators Listserv Unsubscribe Form  

Cancer.gov

NCI Cancer Patient Educators Listserv Unsubscribe Form Name: * Email: Reason for leaving listserv: (please select one option below or describe your reason in the comments field if none of the options are appropriate) No longer involved in cancer

60

Effects of educational intervention on joint angles of the trunk and lower extremity and on muscle activities during patient-handling tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The objective of this study was to examine the effects of educational intervention on joint angles of the trunk and lower\\u000a extremity and on muscle activities during patient-handling task.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Thirty-two subjects (17 males and 15 females) volunteered for the study. They were classified into three groups: intervention\\u000a group 1, comprised of first grade physical therapist students; control group, which included

Toru Akebi; Masaiwa Inoue; Noriaki Harada

2009-01-01

61

The effect of an educational intervention on coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients' participation rate in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a controlled health care trial  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiac rehabilitation has a beneficial effect on the prognosis and quality of life of cardiac patients, and has been found to be cost-effective. This report describes a comprehensive and low cost educational intervention designed to increase the attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs of patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods/Design A controlled prospective intervention trial. The control arm comprised 520 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery between January 2004 and May 2005 in five medical centers across Israel. This group received no additional treatment beyond usual care. The intervention arm comprised 504 patients recruited from the same cardiothoracic departments between June 2005 and November 2006. This group received oral and written explanations about the advantages of participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs and a telephone call two weeks after hospital discharge intended to further encourage their enrollment. The medical staff attended a one-hour seminar on cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, it was recommended that referral to cardiac rehabilitation be added to the letter of discharge from the hospital. Both study groups were interviewed before surgery and one-year post surgery. A one-year post-operative interview assessed factors affecting patient attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs, as well as the structure and content of the cardiac rehabilitation programs attended. Anthropometric parameters were measured at pre- and post-operative interviews;- and medical information was obtained from patient medical records. The effect of cardiac rehabilitation on one- and three-year mortality was assessed. Discussion We report a low cost yet comprehensive intervention designed to increase cardiac rehabilitation participation by raising both patient and medical staff awareness to the potential benefits of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00356863 PMID:21982052

2011-01-01

62

The Effect of Educating Health Promotion Strategies on Self-Care Self-Efficacy in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplantation: A Double Blind Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

Background: Self-care self-efficacy in patients with end stage renal disease, waiting for kidney transplantation, probably decreases due to facing new conditions and side effects of treatment. Objectives: The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of educating health promotion strategies on self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: A double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 52 patients undergoing kidney transplantation in Baqiyatallah Hospital in 2012. Patients were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. The questionnaire of Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH) was employed to measure self-care self-efficacy. At first, the two groups filled the questionnaire. Then, the intervention group was trained regarding health promotion strategies within 4 sessions before the transplantation. The control group was trained according to routine protocol of the transplantation unit. Then, the two groups were followed up for two months, and reassessed at the end of the first and second months after the transplantation. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics including independent samples T test, Chi square and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In the intervention group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 106.96 ± 25.1 at first, and changed to 135.81 ± 9.65 and 111.19 ± 12.45 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). In the control group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 112.73 ± 14.33 at first, and changed to 118.58 ± 17.59 and 108.73 ± 15.93 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the first post-test regarding total score of self-care self-efficacy (P = 0.001) and dimensions of reduction of stress (P = 0.001), enjoying life (P = 0.01), and coping (P = 0.001). The mean scores of the intervention group were higher than those of the controls in all domains of self-care self-efficacy in the second post-test. However, the difference was only significant in decision-making dimension (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Educating health promotion strategies was effective in improving self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Establishment of a holistic caring program is suggested to integrate the pre-transplantation educations with a continual post discharge follow-up.

Soltannezhad, Fateme; Farsi, Zahra; Jabari Moroei, Masoud

2013-01-01

63

The effect of patient care order sets on medical resident education: a prospective before-after study  

PubMed Central

Background Patient care order sets are increasingly being used to optimize care. While studies have evaluated the impact of order sets on provider performance and patient outcomes, their impact on postgraduate medical trainee knowledge remains unknown. We sought to evaluate the impact of order sets on respirology knowledge, order-writing skills, and self-reported learning. Methods We conducted a prospective before-after study. Postgraduate trainees completing a Respirology rotation at a quaternary-care hospital 6 months before (no order set period) and 12 months after (order set period) order set introduction. Guideline-based admission order sets with educational prompts detailing recommended management of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were implemented on the respirology ward. Each resident completed a test before and after the rotation assessing knowledge and order-writing. Residents in the order set period additionally completed a questionnaire regarding the impact of order set use on their learning. Analysis: The primary outcome, the difference between pre and post rotation scores was compared between residents in the no order set period and residents in the order set period, using univariate linear regression. Test validity was assessed with a 2-sample t-test, analysis of variance and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Self-reported impact of order set use were descriptively analyzed, and written responses were collated and coded. Results Investigators consecutively recruited 11 subjects before and 28 subjects after order set implementation. Residents in the order set period had a greater improvement in post-rotation test scores than residents in the no order set period (p?=?0.04); after adjustment for baseline scores, this was not significant (p?=?0.3). The questionnaire demonstrated excellent convergent, discriminant and construct validity. Residents reported that order sets improved their knowledge and skills and provided a systematic approach to care. Conclusions Order sets do not appear to impair resident education, and may impart a benefit. This will require validation in larger studies and across diseases. PMID:24195667

2013-01-01

64

Patient education preferences in ophthalmic care  

PubMed Central

Background The learning preferences of ophthalmology patients were examined. Methods Results from a voluntary survey of ophthalmology patients were analyzed for education preferences and for correlation with race, age, and ophthalmic topic. Results To learn about eye disease, patients preferred one-on-one sessions with providers as well as printed materials and websites recommended by providers. Patients currently learning from the provider were older (average age 59 years), and patients learning from the Internet (average age 49 years) and family and friends (average age 51 years) were younger. Patients interested in cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eye were older; patients interested in double vision and glasses were younger. There were racial differences regarding topic preferences, with Black patients most interested in glaucoma (46%), diabetic retinopathy (31%), and cataracts (28%) and White patients most interested in cataracts (22%), glaucoma (22%), and macular degeneration (19%). Conclusion Most ophthalmology patients preferred personalized education: one-on-one with their provider or a health educator and materials (printed and electronic) recommended by their provider. Age-related topics were more popular with older patients, and diseases with racial risk factors were more popular with high risk racial groups. PMID:24812493

Rosdahl, Jullia A; Swamy, Lakshmi; Stinnett, Sandra; Muir, Kelly W

2014-01-01

65

Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a…

Rosenberg, Stanley G.

66

Patient educational needs of patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer.  

PubMed

There often exists a discrepancy between the information health care professionals (HCPs) provide to patients in preoperative teaching sessions and the information patients perceive as important. This study's purpose was to determine what information patients undergoing a lung cancer surgical resection wanted to learn before and after their surgery and also to uncover the information HCPs currently provide to these patients. Ten patients were interviewed preoperatively and postoperatively, and eleven HCPs involved in both their preoperative and postoperative care were interviewed. Emerging themes were noted. Patients reported that the most helpful aspects of the preoperative education included surgical details and the importance of physiotherapy, including exercises. Postoperatively, patients wished they had known more about postoperative pain. HCPs provided information that they felt prepared, informed and empowered their patients. Overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the information they received; they felt prepared for their surgery but not for postoperative pain control. PMID:24756546

King, Judy; Chamberland, Paul; Rawji, Anissa; Ager, Amanda; Léger, Renée; Michaels, Robin; Poitras, Renée; Skelton, Deborah; Warren, Michelle

2014-12-01

67

Virtual Patients in Pharmacy Education  

PubMed Central

A review of the literature relating to the use of virtual patients in teaching pharmaceutical care to pharmacy students was conducted. Only 7 articles met the inclusion criteria for the review and 4 of the studies were conducted in North America. Few articles identified by the review used virtual patient technology that was true-to-life and/or validated. PMID:22761533

Jabbur-Lopes, Monique O.; Mesquita, Alessandra R.; Silva, Leila M. A.; De Almeida Neto, Abilio

2012-01-01

68

The Effect of Physicians' Country of Education-Domestic versus Foreign-on Patients' Satisfaction from Clinic Interviews  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite their undeniable significance, communication skills have not been included in the medical curriculum in Iran yet, while they have already secured their position in the medical education of the West. Bearing in mind the presence or absence of such instructions in various medical curricula, the current study was carried out to find out whether physicians with medical education from

S. Sajjadi; E. Amal-Saleh

69

Comparing Effectiveness of High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation vs Case-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education  

PubMed Central

Objective. To determine whether human patient simulation (HPS) is superior to case-based learning (CBL) in teaching diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and thyroid storm (TS) to pharmacy students. Design. In this cross-over, open-label, single center, randomized control trial, final-year undergraduate pharmacy students enrolled in an applied therapeutics course were randomized to HPS or CBL groups. Pretest, posttest, knowledge retention tests, and satisfaction survey were administered to students. Assessment. One hundred seventy-four students participated in this study. The effect sizes attributable to HPS were larger than CBL in both cases. HPS groups performed significantly better in posttest and knowledge retention test compared to CBL groups pertaining to TS case (p<0.05). Students expressed high levels of satisfaction with HPS sessions. Conclusion. HPS was superior to CBL in teaching DKA and TS to final-year undergraduate pharmacy students. PMID:25386018

Ling Yap, Yen; Leng Lee, Wee; Chang Soh, Yee

2014-01-01

70

Comparing Effectiveness of High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation vs Case-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education.  

PubMed

Objective. To determine whether human patient simulation (HPS) is superior to case-based learning (CBL) in teaching diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and thyroid storm (TS) to pharmacy students. Design. In this cross-over, open-label, single center, randomized control trial, final-year undergraduate pharmacy students enrolled in an applied therapeutics course were randomized to HPS or CBL groups. Pretest, posttest, knowledge retention tests, and satisfaction survey were administered to students. Assessment. One hundred seventy-four students participated in this study. The effect sizes attributable to HPS were larger than CBL in both cases. HPS groups performed significantly better in posttest and knowledge retention test compared to CBL groups pertaining to TS case (p<0.05). Students expressed high levels of satisfaction with HPS sessions. Conclusion. HPS was superior to CBL in teaching DKA and TS to final-year undergraduate pharmacy students. PMID:25386018

Lee Chin, Ken; Ling Yap, Yen; Leng Lee, Wee; Chang Soh, Yee

2014-10-15

71

Students learning from patients: let's get real in medical education.  

PubMed

Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of communication skills and empathy within a broad 'professionalism' framework. Paradoxically, while aiming to strengthen patient-student interactions, this approach tends to refocus on the role modelling of the physician, and opportunities for potentially deep collaborative working relationships between students and patients are missed. A radical overhaul of conventional doctor-led medical education may be necessary, that also challenges the orthodoxies of individualistic student-centred approaches, leading to an authentic patient-centred model that shifts the locus of learning from the relationship between doctor as educator and student to the relationship between patient and student, with expert doctor as resource. Drawing on contemporary poststructuralist theory of text and identity construction, and on innovative models of work-based learning, the potential quality of relationship between student and patient is articulated in terms of collaborative knowledge production, involving close reading with the patient as text, through dialogue. Here, a medical 'education' displaces traditional forms of medical 'training' that typically involve individual information reproduction. Students may, paradoxically, improve clinical acumen through consideration of silences, gaps, and contradictions in patients as texts, rather than treating communication as transparent. Such paradoxical effects have been systematically occluded or denied in traditional medical education. PMID:17075690

Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

2008-03-01

72

Effective Educational Practices. Educational Practices Series--3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet focuses on aspects of effective education that appear to be universal in formal schooling. The practices, which are generally for use in elementary and secondary classrooms, show large, positive learning effects for students in widely varying conditions. Information in the booklet is based on research spanning half a century. Each…

Walberg, Herbert J.; Paik, Susan J.

73

Foot health education for people with rheumatoid arthritis -- some patient perspectives  

PubMed Central

Background Patient education is an important component of foot health management for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The content and strategies for delivery require investigation in relation to the patients’ needs. This study explores patients’ experiences of foot health education, to inform how the patients’ needs could be identified in clinical practice and inform effective education delivery. Method A focus group was used to collect data. The dialogue was recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a structured thematic approach. Member checking and peer review added to credibility of the data. Six themes emerged; (i) content and purpose of patient education – what it should be, (ii) content of patient education – what it should not be, (iii) timing of information on foot health, (iv) method of delivery, (v) ability to engage with foot health education and (vi) the patient/practitioner relationship. Conclusions This study identified aspects of patient education considered important by this group of patients in relation to content, timing and delivery, forming the basis for further research on clinical and patient focussed outcomes of patient education. Identifying health education needs and provision of supportive verbal and written information can foster an effective therapeutic relationship, supporting effective foot health education for people with RA. PMID:22937987

2012-01-01

74

Health Literacy and Ophthalmic Patient Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1997, Ebrahimzadeh, Davalos, and Lee wrote in this journal that only 32% of the ophthalmic patient educational materials reviewed were written at or below the recommended eighth-grade reading level. Since that time, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy found that more than one-third of adult Americans possess only basic or below basic health literacy skills, defined as the ability

Kelly W. Muir; Paul P. Lee

2010-01-01

75

Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance…

Bell, Edith E.

2009-01-01

76

Impact of physician asthma care education on patient outcomes.  

PubMed

Objective. We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods. We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers were recruited and randomly assigned by site to receive the program provided by local faculty. The program included 2 interactive seminar sessions (2.5 hours each) that reviewed national asthma guidelines, communication skills, and key educational messages. Format included short lectures, case discussions, and a video modeling communication techniques. We collected information on parent perceptions of physicians' communication, the child's asthma symptoms, and patients' asthma health care utilization. We used multivariate regression models to determine differences between control and intervention groups. Results. A total of 101 primary care providers and a random sample of 870 of their asthma patients participated. After 1 year, we completed follow-up telephone interviews with the parents of 731 of the 870 patients. Compared to control subjects, parents reported that physicians in the intervention group were more likely to inquire about patients' concerns about asthma, encourage patients to be physically active, and set goals for successful treatment. Patients of physicians that attended the program had a greater decrease in days limited by asthma symptoms (8.5 vs 15.6 days), as well as decreased emergency department asthma visits (0.30 vs 0.55 visits per year). Conclusions. The Physician Asthma Care Education program was used in a range of locations and was effective in improving parent-reported provider communication skills, the number of days affected by asthma symptoms, and asthma health care use. Patients with more frequent asthma symptoms and higher health care utilization at baseline were more likely to benefit from their physician's participation in the program. PMID:25270176

Cabana, Michael D; Slish, Kathryn K; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B; Brown, Randall W; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M

2014-10-01

77

Tender Beginnings program: an educational continuum for the maternity patient.  

PubMed

The Tender Beginnings program demonstrates a comprehensive educational plan for maternity patients that can be extended throughout pregnancy, the birth process, and into the postpartum period. In today's healthcare environment, where the maternity patient continues to experience a shortened stay structure, the hurried learning process that is absorbed over a 48-hour stay is often ineffectual. This program provides a strategy and framework for effective teaching that can be successfully implemented all through the peripartum period. Budgetary constraints have given way to an innovative approach and opportunity for the healthcare specialist to explore an entrepreneurial relationship within the structure of the program. The Tender Beginnings program has proven to be a true integration of community educational outreach, nurse entrepreneurship, hospital-based education, and postpartum/neonatal follow-up. PMID:16915052

Brown, Susan E H

2006-01-01

78

Effectiveness of PRECEDE model for health education on changes and level of control of HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background Individual health education is considered to be essential in the overall care of patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), although there is some uncertainty regarding its metabolic control benefits. There have been very few randomized studies on the effects of individual education on normal care in DM2 patients with a control group, and none of these have assessed the long-term results. Therefore, this study aims to use this design to assess the effectiveness of the PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, Enabling, Causes in Educational Diagnosis, and Evaluation) education model in the metabolic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods An open community effectiveness study was carried out in 8 urban community health centers in the North-East Madrid Urban Area (Spain). Six hundred patients with DM2 were randomized in two groups: PRECEDE or conventional model for health promotion education. The main outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin A1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids and control criteria during the 2-year follow-up period. Results Glycated hemoglobin A1c and systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels decreased significantly in the PRECEDE group (multivariate analysis of covariance, with baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c, SBP, and variables showing statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visits). The decrease levels in diastolic blood pressure (DBP), triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were nonsignificant. PRECEDE increased compliance in all control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. BMI did not change during the study in either of the two models analyzed. Conclusions PRECEDE health education model is a useful method in the overall treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, which contributes to decrease glycated hemoglobin A1c and SBP levels and increase the compliance in all the control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01316367 PMID:21524316

2011-01-01

79

Residents' intentions and actions after patient safety education  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Medical residents are key figures in delivering care and an important target group for patient safety education. The objective of this study was to assess residents' intentions and actions concerning patient safety improvement after patient safety education. METHODS: Four multi-specialty 2-day patient safety courses were organized, in which residents from five Dutch hospitals participated. At the end of these

José D Jansma; Cordula Wagner; Arnold B Bijnen

2010-01-01

80

Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education  

PubMed Central

A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual’s competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been promoted as one such potential approach. PMID:22312219

Adams, Robert John

2010-01-01

81

Accelerated clinical decline in well-educated patients with frontotemporal lobar degenerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Education seems to protect against symptoms of neurodegeneration, but highly educated individuals experience faster cognitive\\u000a decline after the onset of dementia. No studies on the effects of education on the clinical course in frontotemporal lobar\\u000a degenerations (FTLD) exist. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of education on the rate of clinical deterioration\\u000a in patients with FTLD.

Robert Perneczky; Corina Pohl; Susanne Bornschein; Hans Förstl; Alexander Kurz; Janine Diehl-Schmid

2009-01-01

82

A personal perspective: at the crossroads of heart attack care: designing an effective nationwide public education program to hasten patient hospital arrival.  

PubMed

This report presents a field-tested approach to the greatest health care problem facing our country, the fact that two-thirds of the deaths from acute myocardial infarction occur before hospital admission. Scores of fundraising appearances for the Missouri Heart Association during the 1950s and 1960s throughout the 1,000,000 population rural/urban Southwest Missouri region gave an ideal setting for teaching the public the early symptoms of heart attack. Audiences were advised that if any of these appeared they should immediately call their doctor or quickly get to the nearest hospital emergency room. These presentations led to a steady increase in hospital admissions. The Missouri Heart Association responded by launching the Early Warning Signs of Heart Attack Public and Professional Education Program in July 1971, incorporating these messages in radio, TV, and newspaper Public Service Announcements. In less than 6 months, analysis of consecutive admissions to the cardiovascular intensive care unit of the base hospital showed that the median time from the onset of symptoms to starting to the hospital was reduced from 4 to 2.2 hours; 64% of those patients called their doctor as their first step in seeking help and 58% went to the hospital by car. This message content was carried through the 1980s and 1990s under other auspices. The methods of the successful Missouri program are contrasted with others that have failed, establishing essential features in designing a nationwide program effective in hastening acute myocardial infarction patient hospital arrival. PMID:19952554

Turner, Glenn O

2009-12-01

83

Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

Pazirandeh, Mahmood

2002-01-01

84

Creating Patient and Family Education Web Sites  

PubMed Central

This article gives details about the methods and processes used to ensure that usability and accessibility were achieved during development of the Home Parenteral Nutrition Family Caregivers Web site, an evidence-based health education Web site for the family members and caregivers of chronically ill patients. This article addresses comprehensive definitions of usability and accessibility and illustrates Web site development according to Section 508 standards and the national Health and Human Services’ Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines requirements. PMID:22024970

YADRICH, DONNA MACAN; FITZGERALD, SHARON A.; WERKOWITCH, MARILYN; SMITH, CAROL E.

2013-01-01

85

Educational Technology for Effective Distance Teacher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the concepts of distance education and educational technology and describes the major objectives of teacher education. Discusses the teacher education programs of Indira Gandhi National Open University (India) and describes print materials, audio-video programs, assignments, project work, academic counseling, the extended contact…

Dash, N. K.; Menon, M. B.

1997-01-01

86

Cancer patient education in Iran: a descriptive study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was carried out to examine the status of cancer patient education in Iran. Using the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer's (MASCC) patient education questionnaire, 310 individuals - a sample of heterogeneous cancer patients (n=167) and their relatives (n=143) - were enrolled in the study. The pooled results indicated that only 15% of respondents believed more than

Ali Montazeri; Mariam Vahdani; Mehregan Haji-Mahmoodi; Soghra Jarvandi; Mandana Ebrahimi

2002-01-01

87

Patient Education Level As a Predictor of Survival In Lung Cancer Clinical Trials  

PubMed Central

Purpose To investigate the effect of socioeconomic status, as measured by education, on the survival of 1,577 lung cancer patients treated on 11 studies conducted by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B. Patients and Methods Sociodemographic data, including education, was reported by the patient at the time of clinical trial accrual. Cox proportional hazards model stratified by treatment arm/study was used to examine the effect of education on survival after adjustment for known prognostic factors. Results The patient population included 1,177 patients diagnosed with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; stage III or IV) and 400 patients diagnosed with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC; extensive or limited). Patients with less than an eighth grade education (13% of patients) were significantly more likely to be male, nonwhite, and older; have a performance status (PS) of 1 or 2; and have chest pain. Significant predictors of poor survival in the final model included male sex, PS of 1 or 2, dyspnea, weight loss, liver or bone metastases, unmarried, presence of adrenal metastases and high alkaline phosphatase levels among patients with NSCLC, and high WBC levels among patients with advanced disease. Education was not predictive of survival. Conclusion The physical condition of patients with low education who enroll onto clinical trials is worse than patients with higher education. Once enrolled onto a clinical trial, education does not affect the survival of patients with SCLC or stage III or IV NSCLC. The standardization of treatment and follow-up within a clinical trial, regardless of education, is one possible explanation for this lack of effect. PMID:18757325

Herndon, James E.; Kornblith, Alice B.; Holland, Jimmie C.; Paskett, Electra D.

2008-01-01

88

Patient education to enhance contact dermatitis evaluation and testing.  

PubMed

Patient education plays an important role in empowering patients who have allergic contact dermatitis. Having the knowledge about a disease process does not guarantee healthy behaviors. Through careful assessment of educational needs, awareness of stages of change that adults go through, and use of resources available to members of the American Contact Dermatology Society, nurses can provide patient education that completes the patch testing process. PMID:19580926

Smith, Mary C

2009-07-01

89

Health Literacy Education Initiative (HLEI): improving patient health literacy while enhancing physician assistant education skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Title: Health Literacy Education Initiative (HLEI): improving patient health literacy while enhancing physician assistant patient education skills\\u000aAuthors: Lisa Smith, MLS and Patti Pagels, MPAS, PA-C\\u000aSummary \\/ Objective The Health Science Library in conjunction with the University Physician Assistant Studies program sought to increase the health literacy of caregivers of pediatric patients while increasing Physician Assistant student patient education

Lisa Smith; Patti Pagels

2008-01-01

90

A Comparative Evaluation of the Traditional Versus a Systems Approach for Hypertensive Patient Education. Final Report, October 1975-March 1977.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to evaluate the traditional method (physician, nurse) versus a systems approach method of providing health education. The objectives included the following: identify cost-effective and feasible ways of delivering patient education; guarantee an important resource for the professional in fulfilling his/her patient education

Kucha, Deloros H.

91

Personal resources, motives and patient education leading to changes in cardiovascular risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of patients' abilities and motivation to reduce their excess morbidity by benefiting from patient education designed to effect such change. The course consisted of a 4 week full-time program and 4 day refresher course 1 year later. The 295 consecutive patients (60%) who returned for the refresher had substantially reduced

Sofia Eriksson; Gunnar Kaati; Lars Olov Bygren

1998-01-01

92

Improving Medical Education: Improving Patient Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Is medical education unique among all other educational disciplines? Why does it not seem to conform to the rules laid down by universities for every other faculty? We explore the ways in which particular elements pertaining to medical education have been perceived historically and consider the ways in which medical educators and students have…

Pugsley, Lesley; McCrorie, Peter

2007-01-01

93

Implementation of an evidence-based education practice change for patients with cancer.  

PubMed

As oncology care continues to move toward delivery in the outpatient setting, oncology nurses must find ways to effectively educate patients about diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management. A cancer diagnosis induces high levels of anxiety, often affecting a patient's ability to retain information about his or her disease, treatment, and symptom management. Based on results from the ONS Foundation-supported Breast Cancer Care Quality Measures Set and Breast Cancer Survivorship Quality Measures Set, a community-based, multisite cancer center located in the midwestern United States embarked on a quality project in patient education. The purpose of this article is to describe a quality project that evolved from a review of the patient education process for patients with cancer in three medical oncology clinics to a pilot of a new model for patient education. The pilot identified gaps, developed and implemented evidence-based improvement strategies, and planned for evaluation of process and patient outcomes of this practice change. A pilot study to assess processes and workflows associated with a one-hour separate patient education visit was designed and initiated. Patients and oncology nurses have expressed satisfaction with standardized patient education. Although processes and workflows continue to be evaluated, a proposal was developed, submitted, and accepted by the institutional review board to evaluate patient-centered outcomes. PMID:25252991

Portz, Denise; Johnston, Mary Pat

2014-10-01

94

Students Learning from Patients: Let's Get Real in Medical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of…

Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

2008-01-01

95

Effective educators are culturally competent communicators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective formal education or schooling is not simply a matter of teaching and learning curriculum content. It is also about values, assumptions, feelings, perceptions and relationships. No education can take place without interpersonal communication. Effective teaching can thus be qualié ed in terms of relating effectively in the classroom. Effective education thus also presupposes effective communication skills. Communication as the

Johann le Roux

2002-01-01

96

Development and validation of the Patient Opioid Education Measure  

PubMed Central

Background Although there are screening tools to aid clinicians in assessing the risk of opioid misuse, an instrument to assess opioid-related knowledge is not currently available. The purpose of this study was to develop a content-valid, understandable, readable, and reliable Patient Opioid Education Measure (POEM). Methods Using concept mapping, clinicians caring for patients with chronic pain participated in brainstorming, sorting, and rating need-to-know information for patients prescribed opioids. Concept mapping analyses identified seven clusters addressing knowledge and expectations associated with opioid use, including medicolegal issues, prescribing policies, safe use and handling, expected outcomes, side effects, pharmacology, and warnings. Results The 49-item POEM was verbally administered to 83 patients (average age 51.3 ± 9.8 years, 77.1% female, 47.1% African American) taking opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. Patients averaged in total 63.9% ± 14.3% (range 23%–91%) correct responses on the POEM. The POEM demonstrated substantial test-retest reliability (interclass correlation coefficient 0.87). The POEM had a mean readability Lexile (L) score of 805.9 ± 257.3 L (equivalent to approximately a US fifth grade reading level), with individual items ranging from 280 L to 1370 L. Conclusion The POEM shows promise for rapidly identifying patients’ opioid-related knowledge gaps and expectations. Correcting misunderstandings and gaps could result in safer use of opioids in a clinical care setting. PMID:24049456

Wallace, Lorraine S; Wexler, Randell K; Miser, W Frederick; McDougle, Leon; Haddox, J David

2013-01-01

97

Graduate School of Education Assessing Our Effectiveness  

E-print Network

Graduate School of Education Assessing Our Effectiveness . #12;Graduate School of Education effectiveness To identify areas for program improvement #12;Graduate School of Education Assessment Task Force Thieman Cheryl Livneh Steve Isaacson #12;Graduate School of Education What did we accomplish in 2007

98

The Patient Handoff: A Comprehensive Curricular Blueprint for Resident Education to Improve Continuity of Care  

PubMed Central

In 2010, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education released its resident duty hours restrictions, requiring that faculty monitor their residents’ patient handoffs to ensure that residents are competent in handoff communications. Although studies have reported the need to improve the effectiveness of the handoff and a variety of curricula have been suggested and implemented, a common method for teaching and evaluating handoff skills has not been developed. Also in 2010, engineers, informaticians, and physicians interested in patient handoffs attended a symposium in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery, entitled Handovers and Handoffs: Collaborating in Turns. As a result of this symposium, a workgroup formed to develop practical and readily implementable educational materials for medical educators involved in teaching patient handoffs to residents. In this article, the result of that yearlong collaboration, the authors aim to provide clarity on the definition of the patient handoff, to review the barriers to performing effective handoffs in academic health centers, to identify available solutions to improve handoffs, and to provide a structured approach to educating residents on handoffs via a curricular blueprint. The authors’ blueprint was developed to guide educators in customizing handoff education programs to fit their specific, local needs. Hopefully, it also will provide a starting point for future research into improving the patient handoff. Increasingly complex patient care environments require both innovations in handoff education and improvements in patient care systems to improve continuity of care. PMID:22361791

Wohlauer, Max V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Horwitz, Leora I.; Bass, Ellen J.; Mahar, Sean E.; Philibert, Ingrid

2012-01-01

99

Dental patient education: self-care to healthy human development.  

PubMed

Credited with a long history of providing preventive care, dentists are challenged by increasing demands from better educated consumers interested in improving their health and caring for themselves. The task of administering patient education services, identifying patients at risk, targeting specific behaviors for change, and managing costs is the subject of this case study. The Self-Care Motivation Model described here, is used to develop a patient education/smoking cessation/lifestyle change program for a patient with numerous dental and general health disturbances. Time and cost saving methods for administering such total patient care are discussed. Suggestions for reframing the context of dental patient education and health behavior change initiatives to include general healthy human development competencies are provided. PMID:2290742

Horowitz, L G

1990-02-01

100

The effects of preoperative, video-assisted anesthesia education in Spanish on Spanish-speaking patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction: a pilot study.  

PubMed

We studied the effect of an instructional video in Spanish on self-reported anxiety, knowledge about general anesthesia procedures, and satisfaction with the preoperative anesthesia process in patients requiring a Spanish interpreter. This prospective, randomized, nonblinded pilot study took place at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a university-affiliated tertiary-care hospital. Twenty adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, scheduled for elective surgery (gynecological, orthopedic, and intrabdominal surgery) during general anesthesia were studied. Anxiety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). There was a significant reduction in anxiety score in patients who viewed the video compared with those who did not (median reduction 2 vs 0; P = 0.020). There was an increase in satisfaction score in the video group (median increase 2 vs 0; P = 0.046). There was no difference in reported knowledge-improvement scores between the two groups (3.5 vs 4; P = 0.908). In Spanish-speaking patients, the addition of an instructional video in Spanish to a preanesthesia interview decreased anxiety and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:24882604

West, Amy M; Bittner, Edward A; Ortiz, Vilma E

2014-06-01

101

Interprofessional Education Among Student Health Professionals Using Human Patient Simulation  

PubMed Central

Objective. To describe the planning, implementation, and outcomes of an interprofessional education clinical laboratory facilitated through human patient simulation. Design. An interprofessional education clinical laboratory was developed with a patient-care scenario of acute exacerbation of heart failure that incorporated the use of a high-fidelity patient simulator. Pharmacy and nursing students assumed clinical roles in this realistic scenario and collaborated to diagnose and treat the patient. Assessment. Student attitudes toward and readiness to participate in interprofessional education improved following participation in the laboratory. Students reported that the greatest benefit of the experience was in their communication skills. Conclusion. Students’ ability to participate in interprofessional education experiences and their attitudes toward them improved following participation in this curricular initiative. Further evaluation of the impact of interprofessional education on student learning outcomes and changes in practice is warranted. PMID:24954934

Chmil, Joyce V.

2014-01-01

102

Community Engagement in New Mexico: Patient Care, Education & Research Sites, 2009  

E-print Network

Library Distance Ed Education Sites, College of Nursing Behavioral Health Education Sites Education SitesCommunity Engagement in New Mexico: Patient Care, Education & Research Sites, 2009 5 2 5 A C T I V) EDUCATION SITES EDUCATION & PATIENT CARE SITES HEALTH EXTENSION RURAL OFFICES PATIENT CARE SITES COMMUNITY

New Mexico, University of

103

Educational inequalities in patient-centred care: patients' preferences and experiences  

PubMed Central

Background Educational attainment is strongly related to specific health outcomes. The pathway in which individual patient-provider interactions contribute to (re)producing these inequalities has yet to be studied. In this article, the focus is on differences between less and more highly educated patients in their preferences for and experiences with patient-centred care., e.g. shared decision making, receiving understandable explanations and being able to ask questions. Methods Data are derived from several Consumer Quality-index (CQ-index) studies. The CQ-index is a family of standardized instruments which are used in the Netherlands to measure quality of care from the patient’s perspective. Results The educational level of patients is directly related to the degree of importance patients attribute to specific aspects of patient-centred care. It has a minor influence on the experienced level of shared decision making, but not on experiences regarding other aspects of patient-centred care. Conclusions All patients regard patient-centred care as important and report positive experiences. However, there is a discrepancy between patient preferences for patient-centred care on one hand and the care received on the other. Less educated patients might receive ‘too much’, and more highly educated patients ‘too little’ in the domains of communication, information and shared decision making. PMID:22900589

2012-01-01

104

Were Educational and Instructional Television Effective?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of the effectiveness of mediated education in distance education focuses on the effectiveness of educational television. Topics include mass media research; greater preparation by teachers using television that led to its effectiveness; research needs; attitudes of students and teachers; and aptitude treatment interaction analysis. (LRW)

Saba, Farhad

2000-01-01

105

Residents' intentions and actions after patient safety education  

PubMed Central

Background Medical residents are key figures in delivering care and an important target group for patient safety education. The objective of this study was to assess residents' intentions and actions concerning patient safety improvement after patient safety education. Methods Four multi-specialty 2-day patient safety courses were organized, in which residents from five Dutch hospitals participated. At the end of these courses participants were asked to formulate an action point to improve patient safety. Three months later semi-structured interviews were conducted to reveal actions that were taken, factors that had influenced their behaviour and reactions concerning the education. An inductive theory approach was used to analyze transcriptions. Results Out of 71 participants, sixty-nine (97%) residents were interviewed. In total they had formulated 91 action points, which mainly focused on: 'Improving organization of own work/Follow policies' and 'Improving culture/Educating colleagues about patient safety'. Sixty-two (90%) residents declared to have taken action, and 50 (55%) action points were fully carried out. Most actions taken were at the level of the individual professional, rather than at the level of their social or organizational context. Results of actions included adjusting the structure of their own work, organizing patient safety education for colleagues, communicating more efficiently and in a more structured way with colleagues, and reporting incidents. Promoters for action included: 'Awareness of the importance of the action to be taken', 'Supportive attitude of colleagues' and 'Having received patient safety education'. Barriers included: 'Impeding attitude of colleagues', 'High work-pressure', 'Hierarchy' and 'Switching of work stations'. Conclusions After patient safety training, residents reported various intentions to contribute to patient safety improvement. Numerous actions were taken, but there still is a discrepancy between intentions and actual behaviour. To increase residents' participation in patient safety improvement, educational efforts should be supplemented with actions to remove experienced barriers, most of which are related to the residents' social and organizational context. PMID:21194435

2010-01-01

106

Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on improving clinical diagnosis and treatment of the traumatized refugee patient. PMID:23957962

2013-01-01

107

Research priorities for burn nursing: patient, nurse, and burn prevention education.  

PubMed

Fifteen of the 101 research questions that were assigned priorities in the Burn Nursing Delphi study by Marvin et al. (Marvin JA, Carrougher GJ, Bayley EW, Weber B, Knighton J, Rutan RL. Burn nursing Delphi study: setting research priorities. J BURN CARE REHABIL 1991;12:190-7) addressed education from the perspectives of patients, their families, and burn nurses; the study also addressed the issue of burn prevention education. Questions concerning patient education were assigned the highest priority in this education subgroup with respect to the potential for research that would have an impact on patient welfare. The question that rated highest as a priority for its potential impact on the profession of burn nursing addressed the core competencies needed for safe and effective burn nursing practice. Prevention education was generally found to be a low priority in the Delphi study. Many of the questions in the education subgroup can best be answered by comparative or experimental studies designed to explain and predict the effects of various teaching strategies on behavioral outcomes. Research on patient, nurse, and burn prevention education provides a fertile ground for nurse researchers and an opportunity to contribute knowledge of vital importance to clinicians, educators, managers, and the public. PMID:1939311

Bayley, E W; Carrougher, G J; Marvin, J A; Knighton, J; Rutan, R L; Weber, B

1991-01-01

108

Educating Patients About Anesthesia: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Media-Based Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this systematic review, we compared the effectiveness of media-based patient education about anesthesia. Fif- teen randomized controlled trials (n 1506) were identi- fied after a systematic search of electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO, The Co- chrane Controlled Trials Registry), published articles, and contact with authors. Outcomes assessed were anx- iety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction. Anxiety lev- els before

Anna Lee; Po Tong Chui; Tony Gin

2003-01-01

109

Decreasing pediatric patient anxiety about radiology imaging tests: prospective evaluation of an educational intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

This trial investigated anxiety levels and effect of an educational coloring book (CB) among pediatric patients about to undergo radiology imaging tests. Control group (N = 101) and intervention group (N = 175) children ages 3—10 years and their parents were surveyed to determine anxiety levels before the imaging test, with the intervention group being surveyed after patient and parental

Annette J. Johnson; Jennifer Steele; Gregory B. Russell; Rhonda Moran; Kirsten P. Fredericks; S. Gregory Jennings

2009-01-01

110

Is Patient Education About Adhesions a Requirement in Abdominopelvic Surgery?  

PubMed Central

Background: Over the past decades, our knowledge and understanding of adhesions and adhesion-related complications has increasingly grown and it has become evident that adhesions have significant implications for patients, physicians and the healthcare system. The question arises whether this has resulted in greater awareness of adhesion-related problems among practicing physicians and appropriate patient education on this topic in daily practice. The following article provides a brief overview of the important subject of adhesions, discusses current awareness of adhesions among patients and doctors and addresses the consequences of failure to provide patient education and consent from a medical perspective. Methods: Selective literature searches were conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library. A patient information and consent form was developed based on several years? experience and expertise in the field of adhesions. Results: Adhesions are the most common type of complication in abdominopelvic surgery today, with devastating consequences for some patients. Surveys investigating the awareness of adhesions among physicians and patients clearly showed that even well-informed physicians fail to educate their patients adequately. Such failure could potentially lead to successful medical malpractice lawsuits against doctors. Conclusion: Considering their clear clinical impact, adhesions and related consequences should always be discussed with patients preoperatively. A newly developed consent form that specifically addresses adhesion formation may serve to thoroughly educate patients preoperatively and to adequately document the process of doing so.

Hirschelmann, A.; Wallwiener, C. W.; Wallwiener, M.; Weyhe, D.; Tchartchian, G.; Hackethal, A.; De Wilde, R. L.

2012-01-01

111

Patient Education Video Series | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

The free patient education website (Cancer.net) offers information about cancer and clinical trials in patient-friendly videos. The videos are produced by ASCO and posted regularly on their YouTube channel. The series includes a variety of cancer topics that patients will find helpful, including clinical trials. Information is presented by physicians and advocates and helps patients accumulate accurate information and formulate questions for their physician as they consider a clinical trial.

112

Uses and Limitations of Simulated Patients in Psychiatric Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The use of standardized patients (SPs) is becoming prominent as a learning and evaluation tool in both undergraduate and graduate medical education. As increasing attempts are made to extend this tool to psychiatric training and education, it has been suggested that SPs can be useful not only to expose students to the variety of…

Brenner, Adam M.

2009-01-01

113

Facilitating Behavior Change with Low-Literacy Patient Education Materials  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods: We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder…

Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

2007-01-01

114

Identifying Features of Effective Open Education Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To relate the design of open education programs to their outcomes, the authors surveyed 72 research studies on the effects of open education and examined the methods and findings of three previous literature surveys on this topic. The 72 studies were divided by an objective statistical test into those showing large effects of open education and…

Giaconia, Rose M.; Hedges, Larry V.

115

Predischarge education improves adherence to a healthy lifestyle among Jordanian patients with acute coronary syndrome.  

PubMed

Risk factor reduction and modification of patient lifestyle have become the focus of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation programs. Considering the scarcity of resources in developing countries, nurses can potentially provide great benefit to acute coronary syndrome patients by utilizing hospital time to teach the patients how to lower their risk for recurrence and adopt healthier lifestyles after discharge. The purpose of this study was to identify the effectiveness of a predischarge education on acute coronary syndrome patients' lifestyles. Quasi-experimental pretest-post-test design was used. The patients assigned to the experimental group were offered predischarge education that stimulates lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthier lifestyle. The experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group in three lifestyle components - health responsibilities, nutrition, and interpersonal relations. In conclusion, predischarge education helps motivate acute coronary syndrome patients to adhere to a healthy lifestyle postdischarge. Therefore, nurses must be educated and prepared to be qualified health educators, and health education should continue as one of the most important daily nursing practices, thus it is invested in the preparation of acute coronary patients' discharge plan. PMID:23302042

Eshah, Nidal F

2013-09-01

116

A new approach for patient education: beyond constructivism.  

PubMed

Over the last ten years, research developed in science education, especially at the University of Geneva, has demonstrated that education must be centered on interactions between the learner's conceptions and a systemic educational environment. Transposed to a medical knowledge, this new model, originally conceived by the authors and called the 'allosteric learning model', offers new ways of considering patient education. After criticizing the 'grand theories' of learning, mainly the latest ones called constructivist models, the authors suggest a new set of micromodels designed to explain thoroughly the functioning of the patient's thought process (questions, frame of references, semantic network,...) and his understanding of medical information on his own disease. For health care providers, these models also offer a series of new pedagogical approaches both efficient and original to regulate the act of education based on confrontation, mobilisation, integration, etc. PMID:14528572

Giordan, A; Jacquemet, S; Golay, A

1999-09-01

117

Creating Competitive Advantage through Effective Management Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Managers trained in executive education programs (n=203) identified ways in which management education can increase an organization's competitive advantage: exposure to new ideas and practices, skill development, and motivation. Characteristics of effective management education included experience-based learning orientation, credible instructors,…

Longenecker, Clinton O.; Ariss, Sonny S.

2002-01-01

118

WASC EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS REVIEW GRADUATE GROWTH  

E-print Network

on investing now in graduate education. California's economy depends upon it." Commission on the GrowthWASC EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS REVIEW GRADUATE GROWTH "California's future strength depends and Support of Graduate Education, September 2001 C Santa Cruz, in the words of the February 2004 WASC

California at Santa Cruz, University of

119

CEP's Eleven Principles of Effective Character Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is no single script for effective character education, but there are some important basic principles. This document presents eleven principles that schools and other groups can use to plan a character education effort and to evaluate available character education programs: (1) Promotes core ethical values and supportive performance values as…

Lickona, Tom; Schaps, Eric; Lewis, Catherine

2007-01-01

120

Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported…

Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

2012-01-01

121

Education Research: Patient telephone calls in a movement disorders center: Lessons in physician-trainee education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Telephone medicine is part of clinical practice, but there are no published data on the volume, nature, and time allocation of patient-related telephone calls received in a movement disorders center. Such data might provide insights which augment patient care, and may be instructive regarding medical education, since patient-related telephone calls are often addressed by physicians-in-training. Methods: Characteristics of patient-related

O. R. Adam; J. M. Ferrara; L. G. Aguilar Tabora; M. M. Nashatizadeh; M. Negoita; J. Jankovic

2009-01-01

122

Expanding patient involvement in care. Effects on patient outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

An intervention was developed to increase patient involvement in care. Using a treatment algorithm as a guide, patients were helped to read their medical record and coached to ask questions and negotiate medical decisions with their physicians during a 20-minute session before their regularly scheduled visit. In a randomized controlled trial we compared this intervention with a standard educational session

Sheldon Greenfield; Sherrie H. Kaplan; Ware John E. Jr

1985-01-01

123

Improving Cost-Effectiveness of Radio Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Radio is recognized as a powerful but underutilized educational medium, and ways of improving the cost-effectiveness of the educational use of radio are discussed. Topics include the meaning of and need for cost effectiveness analysis, building an information system for cost effectiveness analysis, and five factors affecting cost…

Ahmed, Manzoor

124

Effectiveness of sex education provided to adolescents.  

PubMed

A literature review was conducted to investigate the effects of sexuality and birth control education on knowledge and attitude with regard to contraception use by adolescents in Western countries. The findings showed that sex education increased knowledge about sexuality and birth control. In many cases there was also a change in attitude with adolescents assuming a more liberal and tolerant attitude towards sexuality. Virtually no educational programme showed any influence on communication skills, assertiveness or skills with regard to contraception use. The sex education courses appeared to have no impact on sexual behaviour, such as intercourse. A few studies demonstrated that adolescents' intention to use contraception in the future was strengthened. Most studies found the education provided had a positive effect on contraception use, especially those programmes which explicitly integrated the desired behaviour into the educational course. A number of factors are discussed that influence the effect of sex and birth control education. PMID:7971544

Visser, A P; van Bilsen, P

1994-07-01

125

Best strategies for patient education about anticoagulation with warfarin: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Patient education is an essential component in quality management of the anticoagulated patient. Because it is time consuming for clinicians and overwhelming for patients, education of the anticoagulated patient is often neglected. We surveyed the medical literature in order to identify the best patient education strategies. METHODS: Study Selection: Two reviewers independently searched the MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases

James L Wofford; Megan D Wells; Sonal Singh

2008-01-01

126

Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

127

Collaborative Education To Ensure Patient Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a joint meeting between national advisory councils in medicine and nursing on physician-nurse collaboration to enhance patient safety are reported. Recommendations on which participants reached consensus are organized by these Institute of Medicine (IOM) themes: establish a national focus to create leadership through research and…

National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

128

Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing

Hans-Christoph Pape; Roman Pfeifer

2009-01-01

129

Health Related Quality of Life May Increase when Patients with a Stoma Attend Patient Education - A Case-Control Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Adaptation to living with a stoma is complex, and studies have shown that stoma creation has a great impact on patients' health related quality of life. The objective was to explore the effect of a structured patient education program on health related quality of life. Therefore, we implemented interventions aimed at increasing health related quality of life during and after hospital admission. Materials and Methods We designed a case/control study aimed at adult patients admitted to the surgical ward for stoma creation, irrespective of type of stoma or reason for creation of stoma. We included 50 patients in the study. Health related quality of life was measured before hospital discharge, three months and six months after stoma creation. The program included educational interventions involving lay-teachers, alongside health professional teachers. Results We found a significant rise in health related quality of life in the intervention group (P<0.001) and no significant change in the control group (P?=?0.144). However, we found no significant differences when comparing between groups at 3 and 6 months (p?=?0.12 and p?=? 0.63, respective). Additionally, there were differences in scores in health related quality of life baseline (p?=?0.045) with lower scores in the intervention group compared with the intervention group. However, there were no significant differences in the demographic variables at baseline Conclusions Educational activities aimed at increase in knowledge and focusing on patients' psychosocial needs may lead to a rise in patients' health related quality of life. When patients with a stoma attend a structured patient education program it is possible to improve their health related quality of life compared with patients with a stoma, who do not attend the program. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01154725 PMID:24609004

Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

2014-01-01

130

Effectiveness of E-learning in pharmacy education.  

PubMed

Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

Salter, Sandra M; Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Clifford, Rhonda M

2014-05-15

131

Effectiveness of E-learning in Pharmacy Education  

PubMed Central

Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M.; Clifford, Rhonda M.

2014-01-01

132

Profile of an Effective Urban Music Educator  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of an effective urban music educator in an effort to provide strategies for university teacher training programs to prepare students to teach in urban schools. The study examined urban music teachers' (N = 158) educational background, effective and ineffective characteristics, perceived…

Baker, Vicki D.

2012-01-01

133

Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

Rink, Judith E.

2013-01-01

134

Patient Education to Prevent Falls Among Older Hospital Inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Falls are a common adverse event during hospitalization of older adults, and few interventions have been shown to prevent hem.\\u000aMethods: This study was a 3-group randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of 2 forms of multimedia patient education compared with usual care for the prevention of in-hospital falls. Older hospital patients (n = 1206) admitted to a mixture

Terry P Haines; Anne-Marie Hill; Keith D Hill; Steven McPhail; David Oliver; Sandra Brauer; Tammy Hoffmann; Christopher Beer

2011-01-01

135

'Changing Minds': determining the effectiveness and key ingredients of an educational intervention to enhance healthcare professionals' intentions to prescribe physical activity to patients with physical disabilities  

PubMed Central

Background Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are vital conduits of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) information; however, few discuss LTPA with their patients with disabilities. ‘Changing Minds, Changing Lives’ (CMCL) is a nationwide, theory- and evidence-based seminar aimed at increasing LTPA-discussion among HCPs by enhancing their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control (PBC), and intentions. The purposes of the current study were to: examine the effectiveness and short- and long-term maintenance of a CMCL seminar on HCPs’ social cognitions to discuss LTPA; and explore key implementation variables that predict changes in HCPs’ social cognitions. Methods Prior-to, as well as immediately, one, and six months following a CMCL seminar, 97 HCPs (Mage ± SD = 36.23 ± 10.42; 69.0% female; 97.9% Caucasian; 38.1% rehabilitation therapists; years in profession = 11.56 ± 9.94) from five Canadian provinces completed questionnaires that assessed the Theory of Planned Behaviour constructs with regard to discussing LTPA with their patients with a physical disability. Key presenter characteristics and intervention delivery components were extracted from presenter demographic questionnaires and seminar checklists, respectively. Separate repeated-measures ANOVAs and post-hoc t-tests evaluated changes in HCPs’ social cognitions. Hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to predict intentions and to understand which implementation variables may help explain significant changes in social cognitions. Results Significant increases in HCPs’ social cognitions for discussing LTPA were reported from pre- to post-seminar (ps <0.002); however, increases were not maintained at follow-up. PBC emerged as the strongest predictor of participants’ post-CMCL intentions (? = 0.45, p <0.001). Although several implementation characteristics were related to changes in perceptions, the number of seminars the presenter delivered was the only significant negative predictor of post-seminar PBC (? = -0.18, p <0.05). Conclusions Future iterations of the CMCL intervention should include additional strategies to sustain improvements in HCPs’ social cognitions over time. Future CMCL evaluations should measure additional implementation variables so that the key ingredients for ‘Changing Minds’ can continue to be investigated. PMID:24581329

2014-01-01

136

The Development of Kidney Stone Dietary Plans for Patient Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Currently patient education programs and urology practices provide individuals with "lists of foods to avoid" for dietary management of kidney stones. However, "planned diets" that include daily meal plans and recipes provide structure and specificity for diet management and are preferred by many individuals. This article describes the development…

Dennison, Darwin; Mayo, M. Leah; Abraham, Victor E.

2011-01-01

137

Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee  

E-print Network

Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Reviewed 10/09/2013 Page 1 of 2 Most people take their eyes and eyesight for granted--that is, until they encounter eye problems. Whether it is an eye infection, accidental injury, allergic reaction, or a small blood vessel breaking, it is important

138

Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee  

E-print Network

Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Reviewed 09/14/2011 Page 1 of 2 Most people take their eyes and eyesight for granted--that is, until they encounter eye problems. Whether it is an eye infection, accidental injury, allergic reaction, or a small blood vessel breaking, it is important

Yener, Aylin

139

Adaptive Patient Education Framework Featuring Personalized Cardiovascular Risk Management  

E-print Network

Adaptive Patient Education Framework Featuring Personalized Cardiovascular Risk Management Interventions Selena Davis and Syed Sibte Raza Abidi Health Informatics Laboratory, Faculty of Computer Science of cardiovascular risk. We present a web-based adaptive hypermedia system to create and deliver the personalized

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

140

Knee Injuries Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee  

E-print Network

Knee Injuries Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Revised 4/11/12 Page 1 of 2 Common Causes of Knee Pain Joint Effusion: after injury, fluid can accumulate in the joint. This may be treated region and often presents as anterior knee pain. PFPS is the most common cause of knee pain seen

141

The Use of Readability Formulas in Patient Education Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to determine the SMOG readability formula scores of currently available patient education materials. It was hypothesized that the reading level of the materials would be higher than 7.5, the reading level of the average American citizen; and that there would be a significant reduction in the measured document reading levels…

Mathews, Paul J.; And Others

142

Standardized Patients in Art Therapy Education: A Phenomenological Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Simulation is used widely in medical and health professions educational programs. Standardized patients (SPs) are individuals who are trained to simulate specific symptoms or conditions as part of a structured learning experience with students. In this qualitative, phenomenological study the researcher interviewed 8 first-year graduate art therapy…

Johnson, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Helen; Deaver, Sarah; Johansson, Mark; Calisch, Abby

2013-01-01

143

Evaluating Workplace Education Program Effectiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff involved in developing and delivering workplace education programs, explains the workplace education evaluation process, the main approaches to evaluation, and considerations in selecting appropriate evaluation instruments. Discussed first are the…

Burkhart, Jennifer

144

Effectiveness of Supplemental Educational Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the modifications of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (known as the No Child Left Behind Act) gave parents of low-income students in low-performing schools a choice of Supplemental Educational Services (SEdS). SEdS include tutoring or other academic support services offered outside the regular school day, at no charge to students…

Deke, John; Gill, Brian; Dragoset, Lisa; Bogen, Karen

2014-01-01

145

Clinical Outcomes Associated with Attempts to Educate Patients about Lower Endoscopy: A Narrative Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient knowledge about lower endoscopy might have beneficial effects on satisfaction outcomes, pre-procedure anxiety, and\\u000a adherence, although this is poorly understood. Methods Searching the national and international literature, we reviewed 20 years of observational studies and randomized trials\\u000a that examine possible relationships between educating patients about lower endoscopy and clinical outcomes. Twenty-three publications\\u000a were included but their heterogeneity precluded meta-analyses. Standard

John M. Coombes; John F. Steiner; David B. Bekelman; Allan V. Prochazka; Thomas D. Denberg

2008-01-01

146

Personal resources, motives and patient education leading to changes in cardiovascular risk factors.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of patients' abilities and motivation to reduce their excess morbidity by benefiting from patient education designed to effect such change. The course consisted of a 4 week full-time program and 4 day refresher course 1 year later. The 295 consecutive patients (60%) who returned for the refresher had substantially reduced their overrisk for stroke or coronary heart disease. Personal ability to accomplish the desired change, such as standard of education, was found to be unimportant, whereas motives like having other people dependent on one were deemed important. One reason why resources such as education were found not to be important could be that the course was lengthy, requiring nearly 5 weeks, and practically oriented. PMID:9731175

Eriksson, S; Kaati, G; Bygren, L O

1998-06-01

147

What happens when patients know more than their doctors? Experiences of health interactions after diabetes patient education: a qualitative patient-led study  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore the impact of patient education on the lives of people with diabetes, including the effect on interactions with doctors and other healthcare professionals. Design Qualitative user-led study using longitudinal interviews and 146?h of participant observation. Data were analysed using a narrative approach. Participants 21 patients with type 1 diabetes, those either about to attend a patient education course or those who had completed the course in the previous 10?years. Setting Established patient education centres in three UK teaching hospitals teaching the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) course. Results Both postcourse and several years later, most participants spoke of the experience of taking part in education as life-changingly positive. It helped them understand how to gain control over a very complex disease and freed them from dependence on medical advice and restrictive regimes. However, interactions within the health system following patient education could be fraught. Participants emerged from the course with greater condition-specific knowledge than many of the healthcare professionals they encountered. When these professionals did not understand what their patients were trying to do and were uncomfortable trusting their expertise, there could be serious consequences for these patients' ability to continue effective self-management. Conclusions Patients who have in-depth knowledge of their condition encounter problems when their expertise is seen as inappropriate in standard healthcare interactions, and expertise taught to patients in one branch of medicine can be considered non-compliant by those who are not specialists in that field. Although patient education can give people confidence in their own self-management skills, it cannot solve the power imbalance that remains when a generalist healthcare professional, however well meaning, blocks access to medication and supplies needed to manage chronic diseases successfully. There is a role for those involved in primary and hospital care, including those supporting and training healthcare professionals, to recognise these problems and find ways to acknowledge and respect chronic patients' biomedical and practical expertise. PMID:24231459

Snow, Rosamund; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

2013-01-01

148

Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: patient education, information and ethical issues.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) are implanted increasingly frequently. CIEDs are indicated for the treatment of bradycardia, tachycardia and heart failure and therefore improve quality of life and life expectancy. CIED can treat ventricular arrhythmias that would be fatal without immediate care. However, CIEDs raise several patient education, medico-legal, and ethical questions that will be addressed in this article. Information is a patient's right, and necessary for informed consent. When implanting a CIED, the patient must be educated about the need for the device, the function of the device, any restrictions that apply postimplant, and postimplant follow-up methods and schedules. This transfer of information to the patient makes the patient responsible. The occupational physician can determine whether a patient wearing a CIED is able to work. Under current French law, patients are not prohibited from working while wearing a CIED. However, access to certain job categories remains limited, such as jobs involving mechanical stress to the chest, exposure to electromagnetic fields, or jobs requiring permanent vigilance. Pacemakers and defibrillators are medical treatments and are subject to the same ethical and clinical considerations as any other treatment. However, stopping a pacemaker or a defibrillator raises different ethical issues. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator shocks can be considered to be equivalent to resuscitation efforts and can be interpreted as being unreasonable in an end-of-life patient. Pacing is painless and it is unlikely to unnecessarily prolong the life of a patient with a terminal disease. Patients with a CIED should live as normally as possible, but must also be informed about the constraints related to the device and must inform each caregiver about the presence of the device. The forensic and ethical implications must be assessed in relation to current legislation. PMID:23248837

Manaouil, Cécile; Gignon, Maxime; Traulle, Sarah

2012-09-01

149

How Effective Are Outdoor Education Centres?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve classes of students in grades 4 through 6 studied beaver ecology, either at an outdoor-education center near Toronto or in the classroom. Results indicate that outdoor education was more effective in promoting students' cognitive achievement than classroom study, but did not confirm the popular belief that outdoor programs influence…

Eaton, Dennis

1999-01-01

150

Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy (NEMO) trial: Design and patient characteristics, Lebanon  

PubMed Central

This study aims to determine the effect of a trained dedicated dietitian on clinical outcomes among Lebanese hemodialysis (HD) patients: and thus demonstrate a viable developing country model. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline data. The study was a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel-group design involving 12 HD units: assigned to cluster A (n = 6) or B (n = 6). A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in cluster A were randomly assigned as per dialysis shift to the following: Dedicated Dietitian (DD) (n = 133) and Existing Practice (EP) (n = 138) protocols. Cluster B patients (n = 299) received Trained Hospital Dietitian (THD) protocol. Dietitians of the DD and THD groups were trained by the research team on Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. DD protocol included: individualized nutrition education for 2 hours/month/HD patient for 6 months focusing on renal osteodystrophy and using the Trans-theoretical theory for behavioral change. EP protocol included nutrition education given to patients by hospital dietitians who were blinded to the study. The THD protocol included nutrition education to patients given by hospital dietitian as per the training received but within hospital responsibilities, with no set educational protocol or tools. Baseline data revealed that 40% of patients were hyperphosphatemics (> 5.5 mg/dl) with low dietary adherence and knowledge of dietary P restriction in addition to inadequate daily protein intake (58.86%± 33.87% of needs) yet adequate dietary P intake (795.52 ± 366.94 mg/day). Quality of life (QOL) ranged from 48-75% of full health. Baseline differences between the 3 groups revealed significant differences in serum P, malnutrition status, adherence to diet and P chelators and in 2 factors of the QOL: physical and social functioning. The data show room for improvement in the nutritional status of the patients. The NEMO trial may be able to demonstrate a better nutritional management of HD patients. PMID:24611112

Abboud, Saade; Elzein, Hafez; Haydar, Sarah; de Vries, Nanne

2014-01-01

151

Educating deinstitutionalized patients about fiscal realities.  

PubMed

Because of a previous misinterpretation of Social Security regulations, deinstitutionalized clients in a mental health clinic's rehabilitation center were faced with a decrease in Supplemental Security Income benefits, which meant that the adult home in which they lived did not receive full room-and-board fees. The home threatened to remove clients from the center. In the process of resolving the dilemma, the mental health clinic and the state hospital established a training program to enable clients to make their own financial decisions; it covered such topics as fees at the home and the center and what clients should expect from those facilities, the effect of sheltered workshop earnings on other benefits, and other options for housing and employment. The group leaders encountered problems in trying to get accurage information about benefits and restrictions and with the sometimes conflicting goals of the group home as a business interest. However, clients' interest in and comprehension of the material was high, and by the end of the course they were manifesting more independent behavior. PMID:7380421

Mueller, A; Posternak, B; Handler, E

1980-07-01

152

Designing Educationally Effective Algorithm Visualizations Steven Hansen  

E-print Network

; visualization. #12;Educationally effective algorithm visualizations 2 1. Introduction Computer science students* Intelligent & Interactive Systems Laboratory Department of Computer Science & Software Engineering Auburn notion that using computer animations to illustrate the dynamic behavior of an algorithm will prove

Narayanan, N. Hari

153

Pressure sore guidelines: patient/carer involvement and education.  

PubMed

The important issue of patient/carer involvement in relation to pressure sore prevention and management is referred to in the NHS Executive's (1994) draft document on the prevention and management of pressure sores, commonly known as the 'Pressure sore consensus guidelines'. It states that: 'A multidisciplinary plan of care should be negotiated with individual patients and/or carers taking into consideration their knowledge and experience.' This article explores some of the specific aspects of patient/carer involvement in various settings. Key factors identified during the course of the consensus guidelines development in relation to patient/carer involvement are the assessment of risk, the educational strategy adopted, what information should be included and individual freedom of choice to accept or refuse advice or care. PMID:8696130

Benbow, M

154

Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of the tool. Time in various prenatal visit activities was

Jennifer M. Griffith; James R. Sorenson; J. Michael Bowling; Tracey Jennings-Grant

2005-01-01

155

Feasibility of diabetes peer education for Turkish type 2 diabetes patients in Dutch general practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of a 9-month educational diabetes programme (tailored to Turkish patients, provided by Turkish bicultural female educators) was assessed in terms of dropout rate, patient and GP satisfaction, and GP’s perceived workload. Of the 54 Turkish patients (39% males) that signed informed consent, 45 actually started the education. Dropout rate during the programme was 41% (main reason: going abroad

Paulus Uitewaal; Marc Bruijnzeels; Tine de Hoop; Arno Hoes; Siep Thomas

2004-01-01

156

Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of…

Griffith, Jennifer M.; Sorenson, James R.; Bowling, J. Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

2005-01-01

157

Quality of Life Assessment after Patient Education in a Randomized Controlled Study on Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of patient education in patients with asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is not previously investigated using the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). We randomly allocated at our out-patient clinic 78 asthmatics and 62 patients with COPD to either a control or an intervention group. Intervention consisted of two 2-h group

FRODE GALLEFOSS; PER SIGVALD BAKKE; PÅL KJÆRSGAARD

1999-01-01

158

[Video-assisted patient education in anaesthesiology: possibilities and limits of a new procedure for improvement of patient information].  

PubMed

In video-assisted patient education (ViPa), patients watch an educational video about the process and the risks of anaesthesia in addition to the preanaesthetic interview with the anaesthesiologist. Used as a supplement to the preanaesthetic visit, the videos can increase patients' knowledge and satisfaction without having any negative effect on perioperative anxiety. Because the video graphically depicts the basic information, the preanaesthetic visit can then focus on specific aspects of the individual patient, i.e. high anxiety or specific questions. The redundant and monotonous explanations about the procedures and risks of anaesthesia by the interviewing anaesthesiologist are partly replaced by the video, but for medico-legal reasons the ViPa cannot totally replace the preanesthetic interview. It can be used in pediatric anaesthesia and reduces parental anxiety. Because of the lack of studies, the effects of the ViPa on perioperative patient compliance, especially for outpatient surgery, and on the economics of anaesthesia clinics are unclear. PMID:18509609

Salzwedel, C; Marz, S; Bauer, M; Schuster, M

2008-06-01

159

Informing Men about Prostate Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Patient Education Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Patient education materials can assist patient decision making on prostate cancer screening.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To explore the effectiveness of presenting health information on prostate cancer screening using video, internet, and written\\u000a interventions on patient decision making, attitudes, knowledge, and screening interest.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design  Randomized controlled trial.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Participants  A total of 161 men aged over 45, who had never been screened for prostate cancer, were randomized

Dragan Ilic; Kristine Egberts; Joanne E. McKenzie; Gail Risbridger; Sally Green

2008-01-01

160

Is patient education helpful in providing care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A qualitative study involving French nurses.  

PubMed

This French study explored nurses' involvement in patient education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study design was qualitative. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital nurses. Data analysis was performed according to Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method, and supported by specific qualitative analysis software (Sphinx). The results showed the important role of hospital nurses in rheumatoid arthritis care. Patient education is a core part of nurses' work, allowing them to give patients information and emotional support. The interviewees displayed skills in helping patients learn to care for themselves. However, patient education mostly concerned patients who are already committed to their health care. Non-adherent patients warrant special attention; their acceptance of their disease, perceptions about disease and treatment, motivation, and autonomy should be specifically addressed. French nurses could benefit from more training, and could be aided by psychologists. Ambulatory services could also be developed for patient education in France, based on examples from other countries. PMID:23480278

Fall, Estelle; Chakroun, Nadia; Dalle, Nathalie; Izaute, Marie

2013-09-01

161

Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

2012-01-01

162

Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

2012-01-01

163

Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.  

PubMed

In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula. PMID:19745439

Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

2009-01-01

164

A process evaluation model for patient education programs for pregnant smokers  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo describe and apply a process evaluation model (PEM) for patient education programs for pregnant smokers.METHODSThe preparation of a process evaluation plan required each program to define its essential “new” patient assessment and intervention procedures for each episode (visit) of patient–staff contact. Following specification of these core implementation procedures (p) by each patient education program, the PEM, developed by the

Richard A Windsor; H Pennington Whiteside; Laura J Solomon; Susan L Prows; Rebecca J Donatelle; Paul M Cinciripini; Helen E McIlvain

2000-01-01

165

Effects and side effects of inspections and accountability in education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of studies into effects and side effects of control mechanisms in education. We focus on effects and side effects of inspection visits and public performance indicators. A first conclusion is that the studies do not provide us with a clear answer to the question of whether inspection visits have positive causal effects on quality of

Wolff de I; F. Janssens

2005-01-01

166

Minnesota Educational Effectiveness. 1987 Evaluation Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conceived by the Minnesota State Legislature, the Minnesota Educational Effectiveness Program is a school improvement and staff development program. Its participants perceive the program as a method for identifying areas of concern and for providing staff with the processes to effect change. As of September 1987, 328 Minnesota schools are in…

Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

167

The development of an interactive education program for heart failure patients: the Kodak Photo CD Portfolio concept.  

PubMed

Written information, as well as movie and video film, and computer programs have been used for information and education of patients. CD-ROM is now about to be used for the same purpose. The CD has several advantages over computer programs, such as high capacity and low production, duplication and distribution costs. It is unerasable and insensitive to electromagnetic forces. Heart failure (HF) is a common disease with poor prognosis. Due to diagnostic and treatment improvements new guidelines on evaluation and care of patients with HF have been published. Some advocate educational programs as a routine part of the care. Patients with HF (mostly elderly persons) use many drugs and need considerable education for effective self-care. To improve HF patients' knowledge of the disease and the drug treatment of the disease we have made an interactive, computer generated education program which is presented on a Kodak Photo CD Portfolio disc. The major steps and efforts in the development of the program, which uses a new principle, are explained, including some hardware and software issues. The program can be viewed on an ordinary TV set and run by the patients themselves. Unlike many educational products for health care professionals and patients, this product has now been included in a randomised patient education trial. PMID:9006236

Liedholm, H; Linné, A B; Agélii, L

1996-11-01

168

Mixed messages? A comparison between the perceptions of radiation therapy patients and radiation therapists regarding patients' educational needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to discover and compare radiation therapy patients' and radiation therapists' perceptions of patients' educational topics of interest and methods of information delivery during a course of radiation therapy.

Amanda Bolderston

2008-01-01

169

Efficacy of DVD Technology in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Self- Management Education of Rural Patients  

E-print Network

patients, such as those living in rural communities. Because of this, patients are encouraged to actively self-manage COPD. Unfortunately, COPD patients have reported dissatisfaction with the self-management education they are provided. This mixed methods...

Stellefson, Michael L.

2010-01-14

170

Learning Styles, Subject Matter, and Effectiveness in Undergraduate Distance Education.  

E-print Network

??Are potential relationships among students' learning styles and effectiveness in online education moderated by subject matter for undergraduate students at a private higher education institution?… (more)

Wu, Darren

2014-01-01

171

The effect of motivational interviewing on glycaemic control and perceived competence of diabetes self-management in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus after attending a group education programme: a randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims\\/hypothesis  The aim of this study was to measure the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) compared with usual care on changes in\\u000a glycaemic control and competence of diabetes self-management in patients with diabetes mellitus.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Patients were eligible if they had type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, were over 18 years of age and had participated in a 4 day\\u000a group education programme offered

L. K. Rosenbek Minet; L. Wagner; E. M. Lønvig; J. Hjelmborg; J. E. Henriksen

2011-01-01

172

Adolescent cancer patients' perspectives on their educational experiences: Ten case studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this study was to explore the educational experiences of adolescent cancer patients in treatment for cancer and enrolled in hospital, homebound, or community schools. The incidence of students who have or had cancer is becoming more prevalent in schools today because of increases in the population, the incidence rate of cancer, and the survival rate of cancer. The number of students surviving cancer has increased over 41% in the past ten years and underscores the importance of assuring an excellent education to children and adolescents with cancer so that they may enjoy a good quality of life as long-term survivors. This study explored the educational experiences of students who were adolescent cancer patients and identified educational and psychosocial issues important to their success. The goal of this research effort was to provide educators and medical staff with a deeper understanding of the unique psychoeducational needs of this population and to provide a foundation for developing ideas for improving the educational programs and support available to students who continue their middle and high school education while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants included ten cancer patient whose mean age at onset of disease was 13.8 +/- 1.7 years, and mean age at interview was 15.2 +/- 1.8 years. The researcher conducted individual, in-depth, ethnographic interviews of students, and one parent and one teacher of each student. Case studies of the students included extensive dialogue of each of the contributing participants. An analysis of the case studies was conducted by coding emerging themes so that topics could be fully explored and compared between individuals, groups of individuals, and educational settings to identify the meaning that these students placed on the educational and psychosocial issues that they voiced as important. Advantages and disadvantages of each educational situation, homebound, hospital school, and community school, were compared. Psychosocial issues related to education were discussed. Additional findings included information about student computer use and information gathering, and the effects of cancer treatment on student interest in science and future occupational plans.

Searle, Nancy Smith

173

Lessons for Continuing Medical Education From Simulation Research in Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Education: Effectiveness of Continuing Medical Education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Simulation technology is widely used in undergraduate and graduate medical education as well as for personnel training and evaluation in other healthcare professions. Simulation provides safe and effective opportunities for learners at all levels to practice and acquire clinical skills needed for patient care. A growing body of research evidence documents the utility of simulation technology for educating healthcare

William C. McGaghie; Viva J. Siddall; Paul E. Mazmanian; Janet Myers

2009-01-01

174

Disabled patients and oral health in Rome, Italy: long-term evaluation of educational initiatives  

PubMed Central

Summary This study is concerned with the educational intervention layout proposed as a possible answer for the disparities in healthcare services for disabled persons. Material and methods The data sampling was performed on individuals in Rome, affected by psychophysical disabilities, living in residential care facilities. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: Study and Control Group, consisting of patients who did or did not participate in the Educational Phase. All the caregivers participated in an educational course. Screening period: September 2008 – March 2009. Examinations were performed using Visible Plaque Index (VPI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) and Microbiological Analysis. Results The total number of patients utilized for the study was 36 (18 in each group). The final sample amounted to 70% (14/20) in the Study Group and to 75% (15/20) in the Control Group. In both examined groups Oral Hygiene, Gingival Health State and Microbiological Analysis show an overall improvement of the indices, compared with the initial status, mostly at a follow-up after 4 weeks. However, Study Group show a significantly better improvement. Conversely, after 6 months the overall clinical indices worsened again. Conclusion The difference in the significant improvements of the groups, even if only over a short-time evaluation, endorses that the participation of the patients as well as tutors in the educational phase is an effective strategy for the short-term. PMID:22545186

Avenali, Laura; Guerra, Fabrizio; Cipriano, Luigi; Corridore, Denise; Ottolenghi, Livia

2012-01-01

175

Effective primate conservation education: gaps and opportunities.  

PubMed

Conservation education goals generally include influencing people's conservation awareness, attitudes, and behaviors. Effective programs can help foster sustainable behavior, improve public support for conservation, reduce vandalism and poaching in protected areas, improve compliance with conservation regulations, increase recreation carrying capacities, and influence policies and decisions that affect the environment. Primate conservation problems cut across many disciplines, and primate conservation education must likewise address cross-disciplinary issues. Conservation educators must incorporate both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to develop effective programs, and the skill set must stretch beyond pedagogy. Expertise needed comes from the areas of planning, collaboration, psychology, entertainment, and evaluation. Integration of these elements can lead to greater program success. PMID:20041471

Jacobson, Susan K

2010-05-01

176

Translational educational research: a necessity for effective health-care improvement.  

PubMed

Medical education research contributes to translational science (TS) when its outcomes not only impact educational settings, but also downstream results, including better patient-care practices and improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has demonstrated its role in achieving such distal results. Effective TS also encompasses implementation science, the science of health-care delivery. Educational, clinical, quality, and safety goals can only be achieved by thematic, sustained, and cumulative research programs, not isolated studies. Components of an SBME TS research program include motivated learners, curriculum grounded in evidence-based learning theory, educational resources, evaluation of downstream results, a productive research team, rigorous research methods, research resources, and health-care system acceptance and implementation. National research priorities are served from translational educational research. National funding priorities should endorse the contribution and value of translational education research. PMID:23138127

McGaghie, William C; Issenberg, S Barry; Cohen, Elaine R; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Wayne, Diane B

2012-11-01

177

Effects of an irritable bowel syndrome educational class on health-promoting behaviors and symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The degree to which patient education in the areas of diet, exercise, and stress management can improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) through healthier lifestyle behaviors is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of outpatient education on the short and long term outcomes, and the association between health-promoting behaviors and symptoms. Methods: Pender’s

L. J. Colwell; C. M. Prather; S. F. Phillips; A. R. Zinsmeister

1998-01-01

178

Educational or Organizational Approach: Which Is More Effective in Changing Blood-Sampling Habits?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diagnostic blood loss is a recognized issue during the delivery of intensive care services. We designed this study to compare the effects of educational versus orga- nizational approaches to reduce daily diagnostic blood loss in intensive care patients. First, as an educational approach, physicians on two wards were repeatedly in- formed about the importance of diagnostic blood loss and that

Christopher Gonano; Christian Sitzwohl; Franz Pusch; Stephan C. Kettner; Christian Weinstabl; Michael Zimpfer

2003-01-01

179

An educational and behavioral approach toward increasing patient activation in hypertension management.  

PubMed

The shift in patterns of disease toward chronic illness necessitates greater patient participation in its management and their own rehabilitation, and they require greater social support over longer periods. Patient activation, or the enhancement of patient and support group involvement in personal health care through teaching management techniques and problem-solving skills, has emerged in healthy education in response to this need. This paper will examine combined educational and behavioral approaches to increasing social support and patient activation in hypertension management. Activation in this study involves increased feelings of personal control over the contingencies surrounding the management of medical regimens. Both family support intervention and small group sessions oriented to changing compliance behavior by changing expectancy frames were offered to a randomized sample of 200 inner city, black, hypertensive patients who were part of a larger study. Patients were examined within a pretest-posttest randomized factorial design on measures of locus of control, belief in seriousness, efficacy of treatment, medication compliance, and blood pressure control. This combined approach showed small differences on the attitude and behavioral measures but displayed a significant effect on the program outcome variable blood pressure control (62% in control among intervention groups versus 46% in nonintervention groups). PMID:7076881

Morisky, D E; Bowler, M H; Finlay, J S

1982-01-01

180

Educational Innovation, Quality, and Effects: An Exploration of Innovations and Their Effects in Secondary Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the extensive literature on educational innovations, there is only limited empirical research available into the impact of innovations on student achievement. In this article, the following research questions will be answered: What form do innovations in secondary education take, are there types of innovative schools, and what effect do…

Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

2013-01-01

181

Preparing Health Educators to Be Effective Speakers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes procedures used to develop effective speaking skills for health education majors at the University of Lowell, emphasizing the positive, stepwise approach of the three-year program. Includes a detailed evaluation form that lets students know what is expected in oral presentations and enables professors to be consistent in their…

Lorentzen, Karen M.; Neal, Robert B.

1984-01-01

182

Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education--Consensus?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article synthesizes the series of manuscripts on teacher effectiveness in physical education recently published by the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport" and highlights both the consensus and points of disagreement. Although there is much agreement as to the mission to develop a physically active lifestyle, there is a great…

Rink, Judith

2014-01-01

183

Models of Effective Migrant Education Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to encourage both migrant and non-migrant educators to explore the possibilities of adopting and/or adapting the cited programs or appropriate components into their own units, this volume updates the 1974 description of some of the many programs that have proven effective in serving migrant students. Chapter I summarizes seven programs…

Mattera, Gloria

184

An educational video to increase clinical trials enrollment among lung cancer patients. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

An educational video increased patients’ self-assessed likelihood to enroll in a clinical trial. This format of patient education has potential for universal applicability because of its low cost of administration and the low demands on patient and staff time.

185

Combining Software Games with Education: Evaluation of its Educational Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer games are very popular among children and adolescents. In this respect, they could be exploited by educational software designers to render educational software more attractive and motivating. However, it remains to be explored what the educational scope of educational software games is. In this paper, we explore several issues concerning…

Virvou, Maria; Katsionis, George; Manos, Konstantinos

2005-01-01

186

Building an effective doctor-patient relationship: From patient satisfaction to patient participation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the authors argue that patient satisfaction is an insufficient measure of the quality of the doctor-patient relationship. While shown to have a salutary effect on patient anxiety concerning illness and treatment, the only other significant outcome associated with levels of satisfaction is utilization behavior. This is not surprising, the authors argue, since prevailing conceptualizations of patient satisfaction

Edward J. Speedling; David N. Rose

1985-01-01

187

A Study of the Effectiveness on Parental Sexuality Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to understand the effectiveness of sexuality education training on the parents in the group regarding their sex knowledge, awareness of sexuality education, attitude towards sexuality education, self-efficacy in sexuality education, communication effectiveness and communication behavior in the hope that they would be…

Lin, Yen-Chin; Chu, Yuan-Hsiang; Lin, Helene H.

2006-01-01

188

Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly.\\u000a Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered\\u000a cardiovascular health education is likely to improve shortcomings in adherence. This paper describes a study that aims to\\u000a develop a cardiovascular health education program for patients participating in

Aina Olufemi Odusola; Marleen Hendriks; Constance Schultsz; Karien Stronks; Joep Lange; Akin Osibogun; Tanimola Akande; Shade Alli; Peju Adenusi; Kayode Agbede; Joke Haafkens

2011-01-01

189

[Vocational preparation and education of adolescent patients with epilepsy].  

PubMed

Often young epileptics cannot begin a regular apprenticeship immediately after leaving school. Many cases show some somatic and psychointellectual retardation and delayed social development and maturation. Impairment of learning and concentration due to drug-side effects aggravates gaps in basic knowledge which result from frequent school absences due to epileptic illness. Attendance of a vocational training scheme for one year ensures that educational and social deficiencies can be reduced and the practice of daily work can be obtained. The epileptologist should pay particular attention to good compliance. The large variety of psycho-social and behavioural problems can be improved by event-orientated group psychotherapy. A vocational testing period can follow. Time and type of seizures have to be respected in vocational counselling. The vocational training centre for handicapped adolescents offers a comprehensive education by vocational instructors, epileptologists and psychologists. PMID:2343588

Lipinski, C G

1990-04-13

190

Improving the quality of pain treatment by a tailored pain education programme for cancer patients in chronic pain.  

PubMed

Educational interventions, aiming to increase patients' knowledge and attitude regarding pain, can affect pain treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a Pain Education Programme (PEP), on adequacy of pain treatment, and to describe characteristics predicting change in adequacy. The PEP consists of a multi-method approach in which patients are educated about the basic principles regarding pain, instructed how to report pain in a pain diary, how to communicate about pain, and how to contact healthcare providers. The effects of the PEP were evaluated taking into consideration the lack of well-established outcome measures to evaluate adequacy of pain treatment, the lack of long-term follow-up, and the influence of missing data.A prospective, randomized study was utilized in which 313 chronic cancer patients were followed-up until 8 weeks postdischarge. Adequacy of pain treatment was evaluated by means of the Amsterdam Pain Management Index (APMI), consisting of an integrated score of patients' Present Pain Intensity, Average Pain Intensity, and Worst Pain Intensity, corrected for patients' Tolerable Present Pain, with the analgesics used by the patient. At pretest, 60% of the patients in the hospital were treated inadequately for their pain. Postdischarge, the control group patients were significantly more inadequately treated at 2 weeks after discharge (56% vs 41%), at 4 weeks after discharge (62% vs 42%) and at 8 weeks after discharge (57% vs 51%) than the intervention group patients. While the level of inadequacy in the control groups remained relatively stable at all assessment points, a slight increase in the percentage of patients being treated inadequately was found in the intervention group patients over time. A beneficial effect of the PEP was found for patients both with and without district nursing. Variables predicting an improvement in adequacy of pain treatment consisted of the PEP, the APMI score at baseline, patients' level of physical functioning, patients' level of social functioning, the extent of adherence to pain medication, patients' pain knowledge, and the amount of analgesics used. These findings suggest that quality of pain treatment in cancer patients with chronic pain can be enhanced by educating patients about pain and improving active participation in their own pain treatment. The benefit from the PEP, however, decreases slightly over time, pointing at a need for ongoing education. PMID:11558980

de Wit, R; van Dam, F; Loonstra, S; Zandbelt, L; van Buuren, A; van der Heijden, K; Leenhouts, G; Duivenvoorden, H; Huijer Abu-Saad, H

2001-01-01

191

In Sickness and in Health--Till Education Do Us Part: Education Effects on Hospitalization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides the first estimates of the causal impact of education on hospitalization. It improves upon existing studies on health and education by using a larger data set and more efficient estimation methods. Using a Danish school reform to identify a causal effect of education on hospitalization, we find that education has a substantial…

Arendt, Jacob Nielsen

2008-01-01

192

Higher Education Perspective of Classroom Management and School Effectiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many activities are currently going on to improve the quality of teacher education, which ultimately will improve the quality of elementary secondary education. Studies on school effectiveness have led to programs encouraging collaboration and cooperation among educators, redefinition of educational policies, planning for declining enrollment,…

Monahan, William G.

193

Pairing Physician Education With Patient Activation to Improve Shared Decisions in Prostate Cancer Screening: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Most expert groups recommend shared decision making for prostate cancer screening. Most primary care physicians, however, routinely order a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test with little or no discussion about whether they believe the potential benefits justify the risk of harm. We sought to assess whether educating primary care physicians and activating their patients to ask about prostate cancer screening had a synergistic effect on shared decision making, rates and types of discussions about prostate cancer screening, and the physician’s final recommendations. METHODS Our study was a cluster randomized controlled trial among primary care physicians and their patients, comparing usual education (control), with physician education alone (MD-Ed), and with physician education and patient activation (MD-Ed+A). Participants included 120 physicians in 5 group practices, and 712 male patients aged 50 to 75 years. The interventions comprised a Web-based educational program for all intervention physicians and MD-Ed+A patients compared with usual education (brochures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). The primary outcome measure was patients’ reported postvisit shared decision making regarding prostate cancer screening; secondary measures included unannounced standardized patients’ reported shared decision making and the physician’s recommendation for prostate cancer screening. RESULTS Patients’ ratings of shared decision making were moderate and did not differ between groups. MD-Ed+A patients reported that physicians had higher prostate cancer screening discussion rates (MD-Ed+A = 65%, MD-Ed = 41%, control=38%; P <.01). Standardized patients reported that physicians seeing MD-Ed+A patients were more neutral during prostate cancer screening recommendations (MD-Ed+A=50%, MD-Ed=33%, control=15%; P <.05). Of the male patients, 80% had had previous PSA tests. CONCLUSIONS Although activating physicians and patients did not lead to significant changes in all aspects of physician attitudes and behaviors that we studied, interventions that involved physicians did have a large effect on their attitudes toward screening and in the discussions they had with patients, including their being more likely than control physicians to engage in prostate cancer screening discussions and more likely to be neutral in their final recommendations. PMID:23835818

Wilkes, Michael S.; Day, Frank C.; Srinivasan, Malathi; Griffin, Erin; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Rainwater, Julie A.; Kravitz, Richard L.; Bell, Douglas S.; Hoffman, Jerome R.

2013-01-01

194

Improving nurses' therapeutic attitude to patients who use illicit drugs: workplace drug and alcohol education is not enough.  

PubMed

This study examines the impact of workplace drug and alcohol education on nurses' therapeutic attitude to patients who use illicit drugs. It builds on a study of the generalist nursing workforce in the Australian Capital Territory in 2003, which showed that the interaction of role support with workplace drug and alcohol education facilitated nurses' therapeutic attitude. This paper explores this interaction in detail, showing that workplace education has no independent association with therapeutic attitude and that an effect from education only occurs when nurses have at least a moderate level of role support. Nursing workforce development needs to focus on strategies that provide role support for nurses as they work with this clinically challenging patient group. Without the ready availability of someone in the nurse's clinical field to advise and assist them, efforts to increase nurses' knowledge and skills are wasted. PMID:19335529

Ford, Rosemary; Bammer, Gabriele; Becker, Niels

2009-04-01

195

The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program as an Educational Tool and Service.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program provides early clinical education for pharmacy students and clinical services for patients. Six students were assigned to visit 12-15 hemodialysis patients monthly under preceptor supervision. Topics covered include approach to patient, medical information retrieval, pharmaceutical care philosophy,…

Grabe, Darren W.; Bailie, George R.; Manley, Harold J.; Yeaw, Barbara F.

1998-01-01

196

The Diffusion Process of Patient Education in Dutch Community Pharmacy: An Exploration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and classifies these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers'"Innovations in Organizations" model. Discusses the implementation of patient education activities that require individual and organizational change in…

Pronk, M. C. M.; Blom, A. Th. G.; Van Burg, A.; Jonkers, R.

2001-01-01

197

A Patient Education Program to Improve Adherence Rates with Antituberculosis Drug Regimens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design, logic, and results of a two-year health education study directed at im proving rates of patient adherence to antituberculosis medical regimens are presented. An incentive scheme to reward positive health behaviors plus targeted educational coun seling sessions was implemented in a randomized clinical controlled trial. The 205 subjects who participated in the study are categorized according to patients

Donald E. Morisky; C. Kevin Malotte; Portia Choi; Paul Davidson; Sara Rigler; Barbara Sugland; Michael Langer

1990-01-01

198

Decentering resources: a phenomenological study of interpretive pedagogies in patient education.  

PubMed

The purpose of this interpretive phenomenological study was to document an innovative approach to teaching patient education where RN-Bachelor of Science in Nursing students, through an online course, learned and applied the interpretive pedagogies in patient education. The online course was the educational intervention which laid the groundwork of the study. Data were then collected from 9 of 18 students who took the course and agreed to participate. Interviews were audiotaped face to face or by telephone and transcribed and interpreted for meanings. Two themes that emerged for teaching patient education included "Decentering Resources: Listening Through Questioning" and "Decentering Resources: Empowering Through Questioning." This study revealed that, as students learned the interpretive pedagogies, resources (brochures, handouts, videos, etc.) took on less importance in their patient education practice. They recognized how resources frequently impeded patient-nurse interactions in teaching and learning encounters. Once students understood that they were perhaps depending too much on resources, they began engaging in questioning practices where significant meanings of listening and empowering in patient education unfolded. This study encourages nurse educators to teach students interpretive pedagogies in patient education to promote pedagogical literacy, which preserves the time-honored tradition of working together with patients during teaching and learning encounters. PMID:19161964

Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer

2009-01-01

199

Education, reregistration, and recommendation effect of iPhone Poomsae education app in Taekwondo academy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzed the effect of a smartphone application in Taekwondo Academy. The iPhone app was self-developed to display Taekwondo education contents for Poomsae training. From the viewpoint of education, reregistration and recommendation effect, it showed statistically significant difference in 196 trainee sample survey. Therefore, the research suggest that the use of smartphone technology in Poomsae education would be a

In Sook Ha; Seung Il Lee; Eun Jong Cha; Tae Soo Lee

2011-01-01

200

The Educational Effectiveness of a Simulation/Game in Sex Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the educational effectiveness of a game named POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE for sex education in a Japanese high school. Compares the effectiveness of educational videos with game conditions and discusses results that show the value of playing the game in the role of the opposite sex. (Author/LRW)

Kashibuchi, Megumi; Sakamoto, Akira

2001-01-01

201

Education's Effect on Income Inequality: An Economic Globalisation Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Utilising a globalisation framework this study contributes to discussions concerning inequality, education, and development by re-examining the effects of educational and economic variables on income inequality. This research shows that the effects of education on income inequality are affected by the level of economic freedom in a country, and…

Wells, Ryan

2006-01-01

202

Disentangling the effect of education on emergency department utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since Grossman’s seminal paper in 1972, there have been a number of studies concerning the effect of education on health and health care demand. Though several studies have distinguished between preventive and curative care, no study has investigated the effects of general education on the utilization of unnecessary emergency department use. We test whether general education reduces “potentially unnecessary” emergency

Clara E. Dismuke; F. Michael Kunz

2004-01-01

203

Psychosocial, educational and communicative interventions for patients with cachexia and their family carers  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Cancer cachexia has a substantial impact on both patients and their family carers. It has been acknowledged as one of the two most frequent and devastating problems of advanced cancer. The impact of cachexia spans biopsychosocial realms. Symptom management in cachexia is fraught with difficulties and globally, there remains no agreed standard care or treatment for this client group. There is a need to address the psychosocial impact of cachexia for both patients and their family carers. Recent findings Patients living at home and their family carers are often left to manage the distressing psychosocial impacts of cancer cachexia themselves. Successful symptom management requires healthcare professionals to address the holistic impact of cancer cachexia. High quality and rigorous research details the existential impact of cachexia on patients and their family carers. This information needs to inform psychosocial, educational and communicative supportive healthcare interventions to help both patients and their family carers better cope with the effects of cachexia. Summary Supportive interventions need to inform both patients and their family carers of the expected impacts of cachexia, and address how to cope with them to retain a functional, supported family unit who are informed about and equipped to care for a loved one with cachexia. PMID:25144837

Reid, Joanne

2014-01-01

204

Use of on-demand video to provide patient education on spinal cord injury  

PubMed Central

Background/objective Persons with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) have a high lifetime need for ongoing patient education to reduce the risk of serious and costly medical conditions. We have addressed this need through monthly in-person public education programs called SCI Forums. More recently, we began videotaping these programs for streaming on our website to reach a geographically diverse audience of patients, caregivers, and providers. Design/methods We compared information from the in-person forums to that of the same forums shown streaming on our website during a 1-year period. Results Both the in-person and Internet versions of the forums received high overall ratings from individuals who completed evaluation forms. Eighty-eight percent of online evaluators and 96% of in-person evaluators reported that they gained new information from the forum; 52 and 64% said they changed their attitude, and 61 and 68% said they would probably change their behavior or take some kind of action based on information they learned. Ninety-one percent of online evaluators reported that video is better than text for presenting this kind of information. Conclusion Online video is an accessible, effective, and well-accepted way to present ongoing SCI education and can reach a wider geographical audience than in-person presentations. PMID:21903014

Hoffman, Jeanne; Salzman, Cynthia; Garbaccio, Chris; Burns, Stephen P.; Crane, Deborah; Bombardier, Charles

2011-01-01

205

Impact of structured personal on-site patient education on low posaconazole plasma concentrations in patients with haematological malignancies.  

PubMed

Low posaconazole plasma concentrations (PPCs) are associated with breakthrough invasive mould infections among patients with haematological malignancies. This study evaluated the influence of structured personal on-site patient education on low PPCs. The study was conducted from July 2012 to May 2013 at the Division of Hematology, Medical University Hospital of Graz (Graz, Austria). PPCs were measured in all patients with haematological malignancies receiving the drug prophylactically. Concentrations above the target of 0.5 mg/L were defined as satisfactory and those below this concentration as low. In patients with low PPCs, structured personal on-site education regarding the intake of posaconazole (e.g. intake with fatty/acid food, prevention of nausea and vomiting) was performed. In total, 258 steady-state PPCs were measured in 65 patients [median PPC 0.59 mg/L, interquartile range 0.25-0.92 mg/L; 141/258 (54.7%) satisfactory]. Diarrhoea was the strongest predictor of low PPCs in the multivariate analysis. Initial steady-state PPCs were sufficient in 29 patients and low in 36 patients. Of the 36 patients with low initial steady-state PPCs, 8 were either discharged or antifungal therapy was modified before a follow-up PPC was obtained; in the remaining 28 patients, personal on-site education was performed. In 12/28 patients (43%) the personal on-site education led to sufficient levels, whilst in 16 (57%) PPCs stayed below the target, although increasing from <0.2 mg/L to >0.3 mg/L in 6 of these patients. In conclusion, personal education appears to be a promising tool to increase low PPCs. PMID:25059446

Hoenigl, Martin; Duettmann, Wiebke; Raggam, Reinhard B; Huber-Krassnitzer, Bianca; Theiler, Georg; Seeber, Katharina; Prueller, Florian; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Prattes, Jürgen; Wagner, Jasmin; Wölfler, Albert; Krause, Robert

2014-08-01

206

Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education. Teacher Education Yearbook VIII.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This yearbook addresses the nation's need to train and retain good teachers, exploring exemplary practices in teacher education. There are four sections divided into 12 chapters. The book begins with a forward, "Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education: Powerful Teacher Education Programs" (E.M. Guyton). Section 1, "Models for Enhancing…

McIntyre, D. John, Ed.; Byrd, David M., Ed.

207

Special considerations in the care of the physician-patient: a lesson for medical education.  

PubMed

In the field of medicine, there is strong emphasis on the healing of others, but not as much on the healing of self. It is therefore not surprising that physicians may be ill-equipped to not only care for other physicians, but to be treated as patients. Multiple studies indicate that relatively few physicians have their own primary physicians and often rely on self-treatment, rather than obtaining comprehensive care from other physicians. Through the lens of a personal struggle with serious illness, the author develops a discussion about potential barriers physicians face in seeking care, the downstream effects of physicians' perceptions of health care, and ways to make changes to prevailing physician health attitudes. Potential changes at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education levels are considered, in order to help physicians both to embrace their roles as patients and also better serve their colleagues who are under their care. PMID:24823487

Lam, Sherrell T

2014-10-01

208

An educational and behavioral approach toward increasing patient activation in hypertension management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shift in patterns of disease toward chronic illness necessitates greater patient participation in its management and in their own rehabilitation, and they require greater social support over longer peiods. Patient activation, or the enhancement of patient and support group involvement in personal health care through teaching management techniques and problem-solving skills, has emerged in health education in response to

Donald E. Morisky; Michael H. Bowler; Jack S. Finlay

1982-01-01

209

Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

2008-01-01

210

Promoting Early Literacy Skills: Effects of In-Service Education for Early Childhood Educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of in-service education on educators' use of story comprehension utterances, narrative models, and print\\/sound references during interactive book reading. Participants included sixteen early childhood educators with groups of four typically-developing children, aged 18 to 67 months. Eight educators in the experimental group were taught to engage in story-related discussion to promote children's early literacy skills.

Heather Flowers; Luigi Girolametto; Elaine Weitzman; Janice Greenberg

211

Unobserved heterogeneity can confound the effect of education on mortality  

PubMed Central

Two opposing hypotheses were proposed to explain the lifecourse pattern in the effect of education on mortality: “cumulative advantage,” where the education effect becomes stronger with age, and “age-as-leveler,” where the effect becomes weaker in old age. Most empirical studies bring evidence for the latter hypothesis but the observed convergence of mortality patterns could be an artifact of selective mortality due to unobserved heterogeneity. A simulation shows that unobserved heterogeneity can bias the estimated effect of education downward so that the cohort-average effect of education decreases in old age regardless of the shape of the underlying subject-specific trajectory. PMID:23393410

Zajacova, Anna; Goldman, Noreen; Rodríguez, Germán

2013-01-01

212

Effective peer education in HIV: defining factors that maximise success.  

PubMed

Background Peer education is considered an effective health promotion and education strategy, particularly to populations traditionally resistant to conventional forms of health information dissemination. This has made it very applicable to HIV education and prevention, where those who are affected or at risk are often amongst the most vulnerable in society. However, there still remains uncertainty as to the reasons for its effectiveness, what constitutes an effective methodology and why a consistent methodology can often result in widely variable outcomes. Method: Between 2008 and 2010, three separate reviews of peer education were undertaken across more than 30 countries in three distinct geographical regions across the globe. The reviews sought to identify determinants of the strengths and weaknesses inherent in approaches to peer education, particularly targeting young people and the most at-risk populations. Results: By assessing the implementation of peer education programs across a variety of social environments, it was possible to develop a contextual understanding for peer education's effectiveness and provide a picture of the social, cultural, political, legal and geographic enablers and disablers to effective peer education. Several factors were significant contributors to program success, not as strategies of methodology, but as elements of the social, cultural, political and organisational context in which peer education was situated. Conclusion: Contextual elements create environments supportive of peer education. Consequently, adherence to a methodology or strategy without proper regard to its situational context rarely contributes to effective peer education. PMID:23725575

Lambert, Steven M; Debattista, Joseph; Bodiroza, Aleksandar; Martin, Jack; Staunton, Shaun; Walker, Rebecca

2013-08-01

213

Effects of an irritable bowel syndrome educational class on health-promoting behaviors and symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:The degree to which patient education in the areas of diet, exercise, and stress management can improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) through healthier lifestyle behaviors is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of outpatient education on the short and long term outcomes, and the association between health-promoting behaviors and symptoms.Methods:Pender's Health Promotion Model

L. J. Colwell; C. M. Prather; S. F. Phillips; A. R. Zinsmeister

1998-01-01

214

Comparative Study of Peace Education Approaches and Their Effectiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated the effectiveness of peace education efforts in eight classrooms in four urban elementary schools, comparing the Montessori and Second Step approaches to peace education. Found that the Montessori approach produced the most peaceful classroom due to the democratic, student-centered, holistic nature of Montessori education. (MDM)

Harris, Ian; Callender, Aaron

1995-01-01

215

Personal Finance Education: Effective Practice Guide for Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides guidance on effective practice in delivering personal finance education in secondary schools. It is based on the findings from research carried out by NFER (the National Foundation for Educational Research) on behalf of pfeg (Personal Finance Education Group) as part of an evaluation of Learning Money Matters (LMM). This…

Spielhofer, Thomas; Kerr, David; Gardiner, Clare

2010-01-01

216

The Associations between the Family Education and Mortality of Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis  

PubMed Central

Aims To investigate whether education level of family members predicts all-cause and cardiovascular death and initial-episode peritonitis in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods A total of 2264 patients on chronic PD were collected from seven centers affiliated with the Socioeconomic Status on the Outcome of Peritoneal Dialysis (SSOP) Study. All demographic, socioeconomic and laboratory data of patients and the education level of all family members were recorded at baseline. Multivariate Cox regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and initial-episode peritonitis with adjustments for recognized traditional factors. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between patients with (n?=?1752) and without (n?=?512) complete education information. According to the highest education level of patients' family, included 1752 patients were divided into four groups, i.e. elementary or lower (15%), middle (27%), high (24%) and more than high school (34%). The family highest education (using elementary school or lower group as reference, hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval of middle school group, high school group and more than high school group was 0.68[0.48–0.96], 0.64[0.45–0.91], 0.66[0.48–0.91], respectively) rather than their average education level or patients' or spouse's education was significantly associated with the higher mortality. Neither patients' nor family education level did correlate to the risk for cardiovascular death or initial-episode peritonitis. Conclusions Family members' education level was found to be a novel predictor of PD outcome. Family, as the main source of health care providers, should be paid more attention in our practice. PMID:24797080

Yang, Zhi-Kai; Han, Qing-Feng; Zhu, Tong-Ying; Ren, Ye-Ping; Chen, Jiang-Hua; Zhao, Hui-Ping; Chen, Meng-Hua; Dong, Jie; Wang, Yue; Hao, Chuan- Ming; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Mei; Tian, Na; Wang, Hai-Yan

2014-01-01

217

Applying health education theory to patient safety programs: three case studies.  

PubMed

Program planning for patient safety is challenging because intervention-oriented surveillance data are not yet widely available to those working in this nascent field. Even so, health educators are uniquely positioned to contribute to patient safety intervention efforts because their theoretical training provides them with a guide for designing and implementing prevention programs. This article demonstrates the utility of applying health education concepts from three prominent patient safety campaigns, including the concepts of risk perception, community participation, and social marketing. The application of these theoretical concepts to patient safety programs suggests that health educators possess a knowledge base and skill set highly relevant to patient safety and that their perspective should be increasingly brought to bear on the design and evaluation of interventions that aim to protect patients from preventable medical error. PMID:18340087

Gilkey, Melissa B; Earp, Jo Anne L; French, Elizabeth A

2008-04-01

218

Media therapy: Educational change planning for psychiatric patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes a systematic video program in behavior change for psychiatric patients. Patients engage in short videotaped interactions with a consultant-facilitator. These interactions then are viewed, and the patient, with consultant help, identifies specific behavior that he would like to change. Further practice in these behaviors helps them to become part of the the patient's behavioral repertoire. Case illustrations are presented

Allen E. Ivey

1973-01-01

219

Educational Connoisseurship and Educational Criticism: Pushing beyond Information and Effectiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dominant model of schooling is a technical-rational management model based on behavioral, positivistic, quasi-scientific language, which has shifted attention from the art and craft of teaching to the "science and technology" of teaching. However, this model and the language which it uses limit educational thinking. Emphasis on…

Koetting, J. Randall

220

The perioperative educational program for improving upper arm dysfunction in patients with breast cancer: a controlled trial.  

PubMed

Most patients who undergo breast cancer surgery suffer from impairment of upper extremity function. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a perioperative educational program for improving upper arm dysfunction in patients with breast cancer. This longitudinal controlled study was conducted between January 2010 and July 2012. Participants comprised 149 patients with primary breast cancer before operation, allocated to intervention and control groups. Intervention comprised a 3-month educational program on monitoring arm function and exercises for preventing shoulder dysfunction and lymphedema. The control group received routine care from on-site staffs. Of the 149 patients analyzed, 69 underwent axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and 80 underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). The intervention group included 39 patients with ALND and 51 patients with SLNB, while the control group included 30 patients with ALND and 29 patients with SLNB. Arm girth, shoulder range of motion (ROM), and grip strength were measured before surgery and at 1 week, 1 month and 3 months postoperatively. Self-reported questionnaires, the Subjective Perception of Post-Operative Functional Impairment of the Arm (SPOFIA) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), were administered at the same time points. Among the variables examined, only SPOFIA and grip strength were significantly improved in the intervention group with ALND. In contrast, the perioperative educational program caused no significant improvement for the patients who underwent the surgery with SLNB. Thus, the present program improves the postoperative upper arm function and discomfort in breast cancer patients who undergo surgery with ALND. PMID:24561542

Sato, Fumiko; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

2014-01-01

221

Study of Relationships between the Laryngectomee's Body Image and Patient Education Outcomes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A methodology is discussed for determining the relationships between a laryngectomy patient's body image, knowledge of the treatment process, and adherence to a post-operation self-care regimen. Information is presented on nurse education in this area pri...

I. K. Blues

1982-01-01

222

The Social Effectiveness of Internet Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A system of education is a unique social institution, the purpose of which is to develop and multiply human capital. Based on the education system it is possible to judge the situation in the country and society not only at the present time but also in the future. A system of education also should be seen as an ideological institution: it produces…

Ovsiannikov, A. A.; Monakhov, S. V.

2007-01-01

223

Primary Care Providers Need a Variety of Nutrition and Wellness Patient Education Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To assess and document the need for nutrition and wellness patient education materials.Design The results of open-ended interviews and focus groups were used to develop a mail-type survey. The 46-item survey addressed barriers to using nutrition and wellness education materials as well as format, education\\/ reading level, foreign languages, and topics needed. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service (NCCES) family

MARSHA MOORE KENNER; MARTHA L TAYLOR; P. CAROLYN DUNN; HARVEY W GRUCHOW; KATHY KOLASA

1999-01-01

224

A Qualitative Evaluation of the Avon Foundation Community Education and Outreach Initiative Patient Navigation Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents a qualitative evaluation of the Avon Foundation Community Education and Outreach Initiative (CEOI) Patient\\u000a Navigation Program. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with breast cancer patients (N?=?18) of the CEOI Patient Navigation Program. Primary strengths of the program include the nature of the relationship between\\u000a the patient and navigator, the availability of navigators to attend appointments, and the

Dara Ford Schlueter; Winifred Wilkins Thompson; Tamara A. Mason; Makeeta Rayton; Kimberly Jacob Arriola

2010-01-01

225

Canadian Chiropractors' Perception of Educational Preparation to Counsel Patients on Immunization  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study describes the prevalence and correlates of perceptions of Canadian doctors of chiropractic regarding the adequacy of their undergraduate (UG) and postgraduate (PG) educational preparation to counsel patients about immunization\\/vaccination and explores their preferences for continuing education (CE) in this area.

H. Stephen Injeyan; Margaret L. Russell; Marja J. Verhoef; Donatus Mutasingwa

2006-01-01

226

Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional…

Saksena, Anuraag

2010-01-01

227

Five-Year Blood Pressure Control and Mortality Following Health Education for Hypertensive Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three health education interventions for urban poor hypertensive patients were introduced in a randomized factorial design. Two-year data on compliance with therapy and five-year mortality data indicate the success of such educational programs in the long-term management and control of high blood pressure. (Author/GC)

Morisky, Donald E.; And Others

1983-01-01

228

Students Learning from Patients: Let’s Get Real in Medical Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient’s\\u000a care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little\\u000a attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of communication skills and empathy within\\u000a a broad ‚professionalism’ framework. Paradoxically, while

Alan Bleakley; John Bligh

2008-01-01

229

Virtual patient care: an interprofessional education approach for physician assistant, physical therapy and occupational therapy students.  

PubMed

The purpose of this retrospective qualitative case report is to describe how a case-based, virtual patient interprofessional education (IPE) simulation activity was utilized to achieve physician assistant (PA), physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) student IPE learning outcomes. Following completion of a virtual patient case, 30 PA, 46 PT and 24 OT students were required to develop a comprehensive, written treatment plan and respond to reflective questions. A qualitative analysis of the submitted written assignment was used to determine whether IPE learning objectives were met. Student responses revealed three themes that supported the learning objectives of the IPE experience: benefits of collaborative care, role clarification and relevance of the IPE experience for future practice. A case-based, IPE simulation activity for physician assistant and rehabilitation students using a computerized virtual patient software program effectively facilitated achievement of the IPE learning objectives, including development of greater student awareness of other professions and ways in which collaborative patient care can be provided. PMID:24593330

Shoemaker, Michael J; Platko, Christina M; Cleghorn, Susan M; Booth, Andrew

2014-07-01

230

Manual on Cost-Effectiveness of Training Modalities in Population Education. Population Education Programme Service Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual is the result of a regional training workshop on the cost-effectiveness of different training strategies in population education by Unesco in Kathmandu, Nepal, June 1-8, 1987. The purpose of the manual is to enable project staff to initiate studies to determine cost-effective training strategies in population growth control education.…

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

231

Diabetes management and self-care education for hospitalized patients with cancer.  

PubMed

Managing diabetes can be a daunting task for patients with cancer. Empowerment-based diabetes education and motivational interviewing are complementary approaches. Oncology nurses may feel unprepared to teach patients and their families about self-care for diabetes, but they provide individualized information on symptom management of cancer throughout hospitalization and at discharge. The essential self-care issues include food, exercise, medication, blood glucose monitoring, prevention, recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and when and how to get additional medical and educational support. This patient-centered model of diabetes education differs from the older "compliance" model that covers many universal rules for all patients, which are predetermined by the nurse. Informing nurses about their role in care of patients with cancer and diabetes is critical. PMID:19349267

Leak, Ashley; Davis, Ellen D; Houchin, Laura B; Mabrey, Melanie

2009-04-01

232

Diabetes Management and Self-Care Education for Hospitalized Patients With Cancer  

PubMed Central

Managing diabetes can be a daunting task for patients with cancer. Empowerment-based diabetes education and motivational interviewing are complementary approaches. Oncology nurses may feel unprepared to teach patients and their families about self-care for diabetes, but they provide individualized information on symptom management of cancer throughout hospitalization and at discharge. The essential self-care issues include food, exercise, medication, blood glucose monitoring, prevention, recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and when and how to get additional medical and educational support. This patient-centered model of diabetes education differs from the older “compliance” model that covers many universal rules for all patients, which are predetermined by the nurse. Informing nurses about their role in care of patients with cancer and diabetes is critical. PMID:19349267

Leak, Ashley; Davis, Ellen D.; Houchin, Laura B.; Mabrey, Melanie

2009-01-01

233

The Importance of Health Literacy in Patient Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low health literacy has a negative impact on a patient's health status and use of the health care system. Patients with low health literacy levels cannot make decisions regarding their health care or follow instructions on medications and health maintenance behaviors. It is the health care provider's responsibility to ensure that patients with low health literacy levels are identified and

Joanna DeMarco; Meg Nystrom

2010-01-01

234

Computerized Patient Care Data: An Educational Program for Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the five-year educational program at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health that teaches utilization of a computerized Medical Information System for documenting the nursing process. (CT)

Butters, Shirley; And Others

1982-01-01

235

Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

2013-01-01

236

The effect of cardiac education on knowledge and adherence to healthy lifestyle.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to test the effect of cardiac educational program on the level of knowledge and adherence to healthy lifestyle among patients with coronary artery disease in the north of Jordan. Pretest-posttest design was used. Eighty-four patients completed the posttest questionnaire. Knowledge and adherence to healthy lifestyle were measured at baseline and at 1 month after the application of the program. Paired t-test was used to analyze the data. The results showed that the change in the mean knowledge scores (10.50), p < .01 was statistically significant 1 month after the application of the program. In addition, the change in the mean adherence to healthy lifestyle scores (33.30), p < .01 was statistically significant 1 month after the application of the cardiac educational program. Implementing cardiac educational programs help enhance knowledge and adherence to healthy lifestyle among patients with coronary artery disease in north of Jordan. PMID:23666931

Tawalbeh, Loai I; Ahmad, Muayyad M

2014-06-01

237

Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As adult learners and educators pioneer the use of technology in the new century, attention has been focused on developing strategic approaches to effectively integrate adult learning and technology in different learning environments. "Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches" provides innovative…

Wang, Victor C. X.

2010-01-01

238

Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issue of teacher effectiveness has risen rapidly to the top of the education policy agenda, and the federal government and states are considering bold steps to improve teacher and leader effectiveness. One place to look for ideas is the experiences of high-performing education systems around the world. Finland, Ontario, and Singapore all have…

Darling-Hammond, Linda, Ed.; Rothman, Robert, Ed.

2011-01-01

239

Educational Effects of Alternative Secondary School Tracking Regimes in Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines educational outcomes of pupils selected to secondary school types by different tracking regimes in a German state: Pupils are alternatively streamed after fourth grade or after sixth grade. Regression results indicate that, estimated on the mean, there are no negative effects of later tracking on educational outcomes in the middle of secondary school. Positive effects are observed

Andrea M. Mühlenweg

2008-01-01

240

Effecting change in elementary school science education  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Merck Institute for Science Education is to improve the quality of science education during the formative years of kindergarten through eighth grade. To accomplish this mission, the Institute has three primary goals: Transform the teaching of science to communicate the excitement and relevance of science; Reform the education of teachers to instill in tomorrow`s teachers an understanding and appreciation of science; and Create a consensus on the importance of elementary science education among leaders in education, business, and science. Merck has made a minimum ten year commitment of funding and resources to the Institute. The Institute will work very closely with faculty, administration, and community leaders in target school districts to enhance science education in the elementary grades of their schools. Once the Institute`s goals have been achieved in these initial partner districts, the Institute will replicate its programs in other districts.

Parravano, C.

1994-12-31

241

Civic Returns to Higher Education: A Note on Heterogeneous Effects  

PubMed Central

American educational leaders and philosophers have long valued schooling for its role in preparing the nation’s youth to be civically engaged citizens. Numerous studies have found a positive relationship between education and subsequent civic participation. However, little is known about possible variation in effects by selection into higher education, a critical omission considering education’s expressed role as a key mechanism for integrating disadvantaged individuals into civic life. I disaggregate effects and examine whether civic returns to higher education are largest for disadvantaged low likelihood or advantaged high likelihood college goers. I find evidence for significant effect heterogeneity: civic returns to college are greatest among individuals who have a low likelihood for college completion. Returns decrease as the propensity for college increases. PMID:22223924

Brand, Jennie E.

2011-01-01

242

Potentials of Web 2.0 for Diabetes Education of Adolescent Patients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diabetes is a very common chronic disease which produces compli-cations in almost all body organs and consumes a huge amount of the health budget. Although education has proved to be useful in diabetes management, there is a great need to improve the availability of these courses for the increasing number of diabetic patients. E-learning can facilitate this service, but the current education system should be tailored towards e-learning standards. Amongst diabetic patients, adolescents as computer natives are suggested as the best target to e-learning diabetes education. With regards to its features, Web 2.0 can be a very good technology to build a framework for diabetes education and consequent evaluation of this education.

Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

243

Can small group education and peer review improve care for patients with asthma\\/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To study the effectiveness of an intensive small group education and peer review programme aimed at implementing national guidelines on asthma\\/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on care provision by general practitioners (GPs) and on patient outcomes. DESIGN: A randomised experimental study with pre-measurement and post-measurement (after one year) in an experimental group and a control group in Dutch general

I. J. Smeele; R. P. Grol; C. P. van Schayck; W. J. van den Bosch; H. J. van den Hoogen; J. W. Muris

1999-01-01

244

Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

2010-01-01

245

Continuing Education Meets the Learning Organization: The Challenge of a Systems Approach to Patient Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increased attention to medical errors and patient safety highlights the importance of quality improvement in continuing medical education. Ways to enhance quality include informatics, clinical practice guidelines, learning from opinion leaders and patients, learning organizations, and just-in-time and point-of-care delivery of continuing…

Eisenberg, John M.

2000-01-01

246

Patient Education and Counseling 53 (2004) 147155 Motivational interviewing in health settings: a review  

E-print Network

Patient Education and Counseling 53 (2004) 147­155 Motivational interviewing in health settings lifestyle change is involved. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centred approach that is gathering Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Motivational interviewing; Motivational enhancement

Meagher, Mary

247

Epilepsy patients' perceptions about stigma, education, and awareness: Preliminary responses based on a community participatory approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

As individuals directly impacted by their experience of epilepsy and others' responses to it, epilepsy patients' opinions about education and awareness issues are needed. A community-based participatory approach was used to develop a survey of public and patient atti- tudes and perceptions about epilepsy, which was administered to persons with epilepsy. The majority of the 165 respondents (34% response rate)

Angelia M. Paschal; Suzanne R. Hawley; Kore Liow; Craig A. Molgaard; Jamilia Sly; Toni L. Sadler

248

Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D scale) and the problem areas in diabetes (PAID) questionnaire were used to assess depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress in 1200 newly diagnosed male adult patients with type 2 diabetes before and after a two-week diabetes education by professionally trained nurses. Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to analyze the factors related to depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results: The incidence of depression in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes was 28%, and the rate of diabetes-specific emotional distress was 65.5%. High education levels, low income were correlated to depression in individuals with diabetes. After two weeks of diabetes education, the incidence of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress decreased significantly to 20.5% (P < 0.05) and 11% (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The incidence of depression, especially diabetes-specific emotional distress, was relatively high in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. The depression state could be improved by diabetes education. PMID:24353709

Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

2013-01-01

249

Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan.  

PubMed

To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as "attached offices" and others as "independent offices". More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients' homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years, with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education. PMID:24814769

Ikeda, Yukihiro

2014-07-01

250

Cultural Diversity and Its Effect on Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though the existence of a culturally pluralistic society has long been recognized in the United States, demographic trends will force new attitudes toward coping with a larger minority school population. Unless U.S. educators prepare to understand culturally pluralistic student bodies, the result will be an economy dependent on an under-educated

Nimer, Kamal

251

Effectiveness of Mobile Learning in Distance Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main aim of this research is to better understand and measure students' attitudes and perceptions towards the importance of mobile learning in distance education. Results of this survey clearly indicate that facilitating mobile learning can improve the entire distance education by enhancing ways of communication among distance learners, tutors…

Yousuf, Muhammad Imran

2007-01-01

252

Bringing Effective Professional Development to Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Career and technical education (CTE) teachers, through ongoing professional development, gain a deeper understanding of the content they teach, stay informed of the latest research, and ensure that the skills they teach are aligned to the most current workplace standards. Professional development has long been a part of educators' lives, but the…

Reese, Susan

2010-01-01

253

BETTER EDUCATION THROUGH EFFECTIVE INTERMEDIATE UNITS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

AN INTERMEDIATE EDUCATION UNIT, ORGANIZED AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL AND COVERING SUFFICIENT AREA TO WARRANT EMPLOYMENT OF A STAFF OF SPECIALISTS, IS CAPABLE OF OFFERING A WIDE VARIETY OF ESSENTIAL SERVICES, AND THUS OCCUPIES A UNIQUE NICHE IN THE EDUCATIONAL SETTING. THE ACTIVITIES OF AN INTERMEDIATE UNIT MAY BE CATEGORIZED INTO (1) ARTICULATIVE, OR…

RHODES, ALVIN E.

254

The Educational Software/Website Effectiveness Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In today's growing technological age of educational software and interactive Internet teaching/learning websites, it is important to note that educators must take the time to see that the interactive electronic experiences their students are involved meet the appropriate standards, hence been evaluated. This article provides the readers with an…

Furner, Joseph M.; Daigle, Debra

2004-01-01

255

Fishing and Vygotsky's Concept of Effective Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relates Vygotsky's concept of zone of proximal development to a fishing story, thereby providing a scaffold allowing preservice students to better understand the educational concept. Concludes that educators should use the right bait (determined by how engaged children are), technique, and progress at the right pace (evidenced by children's…

Vinson, Beth McCulloch

2001-01-01

256

Clinical placements for medical students: factors affecting patients' involvement in medical education.  

PubMed

Many medical students now have contact with patients from the very beginning of their course and the increasing numbers of medical students means that more and more patients will be exposed to students during their medical treatment. This paper presents the attitudes of 281 patients towards medical students encountered in a primary or secondary care setting. Particular attention is paid to consent, types of procedures undertaken and the title given to the medical student. The study showed that the likelihood of patients agreeing to be involved in medical education depended on the patient, the student and the procedure being undertaken. Recommendations have been made to the university on the basis of the results with the aim of maximizing patient involvement and satisfaction in order to further medical student education. PMID:15203518

Chipp, Elizabeth; Stoneley, Sarah; Cooper, Kate

2004-03-01

257

Evaluation of quality of life and anxiety and depression levels in patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: impact of patient education before treatment initiation  

PubMed Central

Background As a consequence of the improved survival due to the availability of several treatment option cost-effectiveness and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) issues have gained increasing attention in colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate quality of life, level of anxiety and depression before and after a 6-month follow-up period in chemotherapy receiving patients with CRC. Methods The study was conducted in 50 patients with colon or rectal cancer. All patients were informed and educated about their disease and treatment before getting the treatment and were followed for 6 months, during which they received chemotherapy. A “Questionnaire Form” to collect patient demographic characteristics; the “EORTC QLQ-C30 Scale” and “EQ-5D Scale” to evaluate patient’s quality of life; and the “Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale” to evaluate the level of anxiety and depression status of patients, were used as data collecting tools. Results Quality of life scores in all functional fields were high in the sixth course when compared to the first according to EORTC QLQ-C30 Scale, reaching to statistically significant level in emotional function score compared to the initial ones (P<0.05). Moreover quality of life score measured in the sixth month with EQ-5D was statistically significantly higher than the initial. Conclusions These data, shows that with proper patient management, quality of life score, and the anxiety and depression levels improve during the course of treatment. PMID:25083300

Polat, Ulku; Arpac?, Afey; Demir, Sat?; Erdal, Sevgi; Yalcin, Suayib

2014-01-01

258

Using Medical Error Cases for Patient Safety Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To draw attention to patient safety and increase its awareness among medical students, we developed a program that teaches patient safety based on common medical error cases. The aim of this study is to introduce this program and improve student receptivity to it. Methods: As part of the \\

Hye Rin Roh; Ho Jun Seol; Seong-Sik Kang; In Bum Suh; Se Min Ryu

2008-01-01

259

Knowing the ABCs: A Comparative Effectiveness Study of Two Methods of Diabetes Education  

PubMed Central

Objective To test an active-learning, empowerment approach to teaching patients about the “diabetes ABCs” (hemoglobin A1C, systolic blood pressure, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol). Methods 84 (97%) diabetic patients who participated in a randomized effectiveness trial of two clinic-based group educational methods and completed a post-intervention assessment. The empowerment arm participated in a group session that incorporated two educational innovations (a conceptual metaphor to foster understanding, and team-based learning methods to foster active learning). The traditional diabetes education arm received a didactic group session focused on self-management and educational materials about the diabetes ABCs. Participants in both arms received individual review of their current ABC values. Results A questionnaire evaluated knowledge, understanding, and recall of the diabetes ABCs was administered three months after enrollment in the study. At three months, participants in the empowerment group demonstrated greater understanding of the diabetes ABCs (P<.0001), greater knowledge of their own values (P<.0001), and greater knowledge of guideline-derived target goals for the ABCs compared with participants in the traditional arm (P<.0001). Conclusion An active-learning, empowerment-based approach applied to diabetes education can lead to greater understanding and knowledge retention. Practice Implications An empowerment approach to education can facilitate informed, activated patients and increase performance of self-management behaviors. PMID:21300516

Naik, Aanand D.; Teal, Cayla R.; Rodriguez, Elisa; Haidet, Paul

2011-01-01

260

[A patient education program after breast cancer surgery].  

PubMed

In France, one woman in eight is treated for breast cancer before the age of 75. The 2009-2013 cancer plan recommends providing support for women after cancer. A therapeutic education programme helps them reintegrate into their daily life. PMID:23878886

Pfeil-Thiriet, Francine

2013-06-01

261

Effect of Salvia officinalis on diabetic patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Herbs are rich sources of natural antioxidants, and are used in traditional medicine for the control and treatment of many diseases. The reducing effect of a large number of these plants on blood glucose has been approved in animal models and clinical studies. Objectives: This study was therefore, performed to investigate the hypoglycemic effect of Salvia officinalis on blood glucose, Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profile, liver and kidney function tests.Patients and Methods: A double-blind clinical trial was carried out on 80 type II diabetic patients who had not reached the ideal control of the disease. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of case and control. The case group received Salvia officinalis and the control group received placebo tablets three times a day for three months. The fasting blood sugar (FBS) and 2 hours postprandial (2hpp) glucose were checked at the beginning and every 2 weeks, for three months Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profile, liver and kidney function tests were also measured at the beginning and at the end of trial and compared in two mentioned groups. Results: The 2hpp blood sugar and cholesterol levels were significantly decreased in Salvia officinalis treated patients compared to control group (p<0.05). There were no significant changes in glycosylated hemoglobin and FBS between the two groups. Conclusion: Results showed that Salvia officinalis might be beneficial in diabetic patients to reduce 2hpp and cholesterol. However higher doses might be needed to decrease fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin. PMID:25340127

Behradmanesh, Saeed; Derees, Fatemeh; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud

2013-01-01

262

Arts Education Advocacy: The Relative Effects of School-Level Influences on Resources for Arts Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate advocacy influences that may impact school arts programs using data from the 2009-10 National Center for Education Statistics elementary and secondary school surveys on arts education. Regression models were employed to assess the relative effectiveness of variables representing community support,…

Miksza, Peter

2013-01-01

263

Effective Teacher Education: From Student-Teacher Candidates to Novice Teachers Prepared for Urban Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine to what extent a teacher education program prepares teacher candidates to be effective urban educators who are reflective, innovative, and committed to diversity based on the perceptions and insight from students. As the nation grapples with an extreme range of outputs from our public schools, an…

Jackson, Chavon L.

2011-01-01

264

Assessing the Effectiveness of Distance Education versus Traditional On-Campus Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the effectiveness of distance education versus on-campus education, as measured by pre- and post-tests, differences in final exam scores and final course grades, age, and preferred learning styles. Learning style preferences were determined by the Canfield Learning Styles Inventory. Participants included 47 undergraduate…

Tucker, Shelia Y.

265

The Perceptions of Developmental Education Faculty regarding the Effectiveness of Developmental Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of developmental faculty regarding the effectiveness of developmental education. Today, many individuals believe developmental education programs should not be a part of the college curriculum. They believe that developmental courses should be taught in high school or some other program…

Edwards, Diondrea R.

2008-01-01

266

Patient perceptions of professionalism: implications for residency education.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was three-fold: to identify which behavioural, communicative and personal presentation characteristics most closely represent patients' views of professionalism; to determine whether patients perceive resident doctors as displaying these characteristics, and to explore whether or not resident doctor professional behaviour creates an impression of clinical competence to the degree where patients perceive a decreased need for Attending Physician involvement. METHODS We carried out a descriptive, cross-sectional study at an academic centre. An anonymous, voluntary four-question survey with multiple items was administered to all adult patients or the parents of paediatric patients attending an ophthalmology clinic who were seen by a resident doctor followed by an Attending Physician. RESULTS A total of 133 of 148 (90%) surveys were returned. All the itemised characteristics of professionalism were reported to be important or very important to the majority of participants.The most important were: 'Pays attention to my concerns' (90%); 'Is compassionate' (83%), and 'Speaks in terms that I can understand' (83%). Although 85% of respondents reported that resident doctors demonstrated all the characteristics of professionalism listed on the survey, 83% of participants stated that it was important or very important that residents have Attending Physician involvement. CONCLUSIONS Patient-centred components of professionalism, such as communication skills and compassion, are more important to patients than social behaviours, such as appearance and acknowledgement of family members. Resident doctors are perceived to display a high level of professionalism during patient care. Patients clearly desire direct resident doctor PMID:19148978

Wiggins, Michael N; Coker, Karen; Hicks, Elizabeth K

2009-01-01

267

The Educational Kanban: promoting effective self-directed adult learning in medical education.  

PubMed

The author reviews the many forces that have driven contemporary medical education approaches to evaluation and places them in an adult learning theory context. After noting their strengths and limitations, the author looks to lessons learned from manufacturing on both efficacy and efficiency and explores how these can be applied to the process of trainee assessment in medical education.Building on this, the author describes the rationale for and development of the Educational Kanban (EK) at Children's Hospital Boston--specifically, how it was designed to integrate adult learning theory, Japanese manufacturing models, and educator observations into a unique form of teacher-student collaboration that allows for continuous improvement. It is a formative tool, built on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies, that guides educational efforts to optimize teaching and learning, promotes adult learner responsibility and efficacy, and takes advantage of the labor-intensive clinical educational setting. The author discusses how this model, which will be implemented in July 2009, will lead to training that is highly individualized, optimizes faculty and student educational efforts, and ultimately conserves faculty resources. A model EK is provided for general reference.The EK represents a novel approach to adult learning that will enhance educational effectiveness and efficiency and complement existing evaluative models. Described here in a specific graduate medical setting, it can readily be adapted and integrated into a wide range of undergraduate and graduate clinical educational environments. PMID:19550191

Goldman, Stuart

2009-07-01

268

Individual and social concerns in American surgical education: paying patients, prepaid health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid.  

PubMed

The education of the U.S. surgeon was traditionally based on a system in which surgeons-in-training cared for a population of largely indigent patients in a setting of graded responsibility. To ensure an ethically appropriate bargain, senior surgeons served as mentors, assumed ultimate responsibility for the patient, and supervised the surgical care of the ward patient by the surgical trainee. During the 20th century, changes in health care financing challenged this comfortable accommodation between charity care and medical education. As others have also written, the introduction of prepaid health insurance plans such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield in the early third of the century, the rapid expansion of employment-based health benefits during World War II, and the enactment of the Medicare and Medicaid legislation under Titles XVIII and XIX of the Social Security Act all contributed to a dramatic reduction in hospital ward (i.e., service) populations. The tension between education and patient care remains incompletely resolved; the proper balance between supervision and graded responsibility for the resident is ultimately worked out on an individual basis. Newer issues facing U.S. surgical education, including the justifiable demand for greater transparency, are likely to upset this suspended truce and lead to renewed discussions about such fundamental concepts as the definition of the resident and the role of the patient in the education of future surgeons. PMID:20520042

O'Shea, John S

2010-05-01

269

From theory to pamphlet: the 3Ws and an H process for the development of meaningful patient education resources.  

PubMed

There is growing recognition of the importance of patient education given the prevalence and consequences of low health literacy in Canada and the USA. Research has shown that in addition to plain language, the use of theories of learning can contribute to the effectiveness of patient education resources, and as such, various guidelines and toolkits have been put together to help healthcare providers utilize these theories. Despite these efforts, this knowledge is not consistently applied in practice. To address this gap, we describe a new theory-based protocol, the "3Ws and an H," that is designed to guide healthcare providers in the production of effective patient education resources. Adult learning theory underpins each step of the process, and by using the "3Ws and an H," relevant theories are applied as the steps of the protocol are followed. To facilitate the adoption of this process, we describe it using a resource development project for survivors of endometrial cancer as an example. PMID:24420003

Papadakos, Christine Tina; Papadakos, Janet; Catton, Pamela; Houston, Patricia; McKernan, Patricia; Jusko Friedman, Audrey

2014-06-01

270

The effect of educational intervention on intercultural communication: results of a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Due to worldwide migration to Western countries, physicians are increasingly encountering patients with different ethnic backgrounds. Communication problems can arise as a result of differences in cultural backgrounds and poor language proficiency. Aims To assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on intercultural communication aimed to decrease inequalities in care provided between Western and non-Western patients. Design of study A randomised controlled trial with randomisation at the GP level and outcome measurements at the patient level. Setting General practice in Rotterdam. Method Thirty-eight Dutch GPs in the Rotterdam region, with at least 25% of inhabitants of non-Western origin, and 2407 visiting patients were invited to participate in the study. A total of 986 consultations were finally included. The GPs were educated about cultural differences and trained in intercultural communication. Patients received a videotaped instruction focusing on how to communicate with their GP in a direct way. The primary outcome measure was mutual understanding and the secondary outcomes were patient's satisfaction and perceived quality of care. The intervention effect was assessed for all patients together, for the ‘Western’ and ‘non-Western’ patients, and for patients with different cultural backgrounds separately. Results An intervention effect was seen 6 months after the intervention, as improvement in mutual understanding (and some improvement in perceived quality of care) in consultations with ‘non-Western’ patients. Conclusions A double intervention on intercultural communication given to both physician and patient decreases the gap in quality of care between ‘Western’ and ‘non-Western’ patients. PMID:15904552

Harmsen, Hans; Bernsen, Roos; Meeuwesen, Ludwien; Thomas, Siep; Dorrenboom, Govert; Pinto, David; Bruijnzeels, Marc

2005-01-01

271

Effects and Effectiveness of Life Skills Education for HIV Prevention in Young People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For 20 years, "life skills" education has been advocated as a key component of HIV and AIDS education for young people. But what do terms such as life skills imply, and what evidence is there that a life skills-based approach really works? This article reviews the literature on the effects and effectiveness of life skills-based education for HIV…

Yankah, Ekua; Aggleton, Peter

2008-01-01

272

Sheepskin or Prozac: The causal effect of education on depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low achievers tend to be more depressed individuals. This correlation may be the consequences of childhood characteristics and some unobservable characteristics explaining both educational attainment and mental health. We rely on a rich data set that allows us to control for depression at a young age and several estimation strategies to identify the causal effect of educational attainment on adult

ARNAUD CHEVALIER; LEON FEINSTEIN

273

The Keys to Effective Schools: Educational Reform as Continuous Improvement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational researchers and policy analysts concur increasingly that the organizational design and culture of schools can either enhance or hinder the effectiveness of school reform efforts. This book offers a series of essays that may help parents, educators, and policymakers understand and solve school organizational problems that get in the way…

Hawley, Willis D., Ed.

274

Vision Effects: A Critical Gap in Educational Leadership Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Although leaders are widely believed to employ visions, little is known about what constitutes an "effective" vision, particularly in the higher education sector. This paper seeks to proposes a research model for examining relationships between vision components and performance of higher education institutions, as measured by financial…

Kantabutra, Sooksan

2010-01-01

275

Cost-Effects Analysis of Year-Round Education Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This feasibility study was designed to gather and analyze data to determine the potential cost-effectiveness of year-round education (YRE) compared to traditional-schedule education in California. An expanded version of the Stanford Research Institute's cost model was used to fit a broad conceptualization that enabled school districts with…

Hough, David; And Others

276

ICT as an Effective Tool for Internationalization of Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Globalization and new technologies have opened up a global market for education pressuring many institutions to be internationalized. Within mainly descriptive mode of analysis, this study investigates how internationalization of higher education can be facilitated by the effective use of information and communication technologies. Reporting…

Magzan, Masha; Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela

2009-01-01

277

Effect of Geographic Distance on Distance Education: An Empirical Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the effect of geographic distance on students' distance learning experience with the aim to provide tentative answers to a fundamental question--does geographic distance matter in distance education? Using educational outcome data collected from an online master's program in Geographic Information Systems, this…

Luo, Heng; Robinson, Anthony C.; Detwiler, Jim

2014-01-01

278

Classroom Behaviour Management: Educational Psychologists' Views on Effective Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The behaviour of children and young people in schools is a perennial concern to educators and the wider public alike. It also represents a significant focus for the work of educational psychologists (EPs). Research evidence has identified a number of strategies that teachers, students and school inspectors believe contribute to effective classroom…

Hart, Robert

2010-01-01

279

The Sports Participation Effect on Educational Attainment of Black Males  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to explore the direct, indirect, and total effects of high school sports participation on educational attainment for Black males using the Educational Longitudinal Study (2002/2006), a large, nationally representative, database. A path analysis procedure for determining underlying causal relationships between variables…

Harris, Paul C.

2014-01-01

280

The Learning Effects of Computer Simulations in Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews the (quasi)experimental research of the past decade on the learning effects of computer simulations in science education. The focus is on two questions: how use of computer simulations can enhance traditional education, and how computer simulations are best used in order to improve learning processes and outcomes. We report on…

Rutten, Nico; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van der Veen, Jan T.

2012-01-01

281

Effective Schools: Critical Issues in the Education of Black Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of essays focuses on how Ronald Edmond's work on effective schools and school improvement can affect the education of black children. The book represents a cooperative effort of the Charles D. Moody Research Institute, established as a vehicle for the program services of the National Alliance of Black School Educators (NABSE), and…

Bates, Percy, Ed.; Wilson, Ted, Ed.

282

Orchestrating Effective Change: How Youth Organizing Influences Education Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although research demonstrating the effectiveness of youth organizing for educational reform has expanded rapidly in the last two decades, the field remains substantially undertheorized. This article outlines a theoretical framework, based on 30 interviews with leading figures in education reform, that illuminates how a youth organizing group has…

Conner, Jerusha; Zaino, Karen

2014-01-01

283

The Effects of Educational Intervention on Perceptions of Sexual Harassment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the effects of educational intervention upon perceptions of sexual harassment. Results from 96 subjects reveal that educational intervention impacted perception of sexual harassment, with literature interventions showing superiority over video. Gender differences in sensitivity to sexual harassment in favor of females prior to…

Bonate, Diana L.; Jessell, John C.

1996-01-01

284

The (Adverse) Effects of Expanding Higher Education: Evidence from Italy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the period 1995-1998 Italy experienced an expansion of its higher education supply with the aim of reducing regional differences in educational attainment. This paper evaluates the effects of this policy on enrolment, drop out and academic performance. The paper combines differences across provinces in the number of campuses constructed with…

Oppedisano, Veruska

2011-01-01

285

Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education: Profession Vs Discipline.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to determine if a professional course of study during teacher preparation in physical education had more influence on teaching effectiveness than a discipline-oriented course of study. The subjects were 41 undergraduates involved in two different physical education programs. The discipline-oriented course contained such subjects…

Paese, Paul C.

286

Incorporating Hypertensive Patient Education on Salt Intake Into an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience  

PubMed Central

Objective. To evaluate the impact of the Salt Education Program for hypertensive adults on student pharmacists' knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes regarding sodium consumption. Design. As part of the introductory pharmacy practice experience program in community pharmacies, student pharmacists assessed patients' sodium intake knowledge and behaviors, taught them how to read nutrition labels, and obtained information about their hypertensive conditions. Students completed pre-and post-intervention questionnaires in April and August 2012, respectively. Assessment. One hundred thirty student pharmacists (70% female, 78% white) completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. Students demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge scores (p<0.001) and perceived benefit of a low-salt diet (p=0.004). Further, there were significant improvements in the self-reported frequency of looking at sodium content of foods when shopping (p<0.001) and purchasing low-salt foods (p=0.004). Conclusion. Changes in students' knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes after participating in the Salt Education program suggested that the program was effective in improving student knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes. PMID:24249861

Westrick, Salisa C.; Teeter, Benjamin S.; Stevenson, T. Lynn

2013-01-01

287

Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis – Patients' Experiences, Information Interests and Responses to an Education Programme  

PubMed Central

Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key diagnostic and monitoring tool in multiple sclerosis (MS) management. However, many scientific uncertainties, especially concerning correlates to impairment and prognosis remain. Little is known about MS patients' experiences, knowledge, attitudes, and unmet information needs concerning MRI. Methods We performed qualitative interviews (n?=?5) and a survey (n?=?104) with MS patients regarding MRI patient information, and basic MRI knowledge. Based on these findings an interactive training program of 2 hours was developed and piloted in n?=?26 patients. Results Interview analyses showed that patients often feel lost in the MRI scanner and left alone with MRI results and images while 90% of patients in the survey expressed a high interest in MRI education. Knowledge on MRI issues was fair with some important knowledge gaps. Major information interests were relevance of lesions as well as the prognostic and diagnostic value of MRI results. The education program was highly appreciated and resulted in a substantial knowledge increase. Patients reported that, based on the program, they felt more competent to engage in encounters with their physicians. Conclusion This work strongly supports the further development of an evidence-based MRI education program for MS patients to enhance participation in health-care. PMID:25415501

Brand, Judith; Köpke, Sascha; Kasper, Jürgen; Rahn, Anne; Backhus, Imke; Poettgen, Jana; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Siemonsen, Susanne; Heesen, Christoph

2014-01-01

288

Readability of Patient Education Materials on the American Association for Surgery of Trauma Website  

PubMed Central

Background: Because the quality of information on the Internet is of dubious worth, many patients seek out reliable expert sources. As per the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommendations, readability of patient education materials should not exceed a sixth-grade reading level. The average reading skill of U.S. adults is at the eighth-grade level. Objectives: This study evaluates whether a recognized source of expert content, the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) website’s patient education materials, recommended readability guidelines for medical information. Materials and Methods: Using the well-validated Flesch-Kincaid formula to analyze grade level readability, we evaluated the readability of all 16 of the publicly-accessible entries within the patient education section of the AAST website. Results: Mean ± SD grade level readability was 10.9 ± 1.8 for all the articles. All but one of the articles had a readability score above the sixth-grade level. Readability of the articles exceeded the maximum recommended level by an average of 4.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 4.0-5.8; P < 0.0001). Readability of the articles exceeded the eighth-grade level by an average of 2.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 2.0-3.8; P < 0.0001). Only one of the articles had a readability score below the eighth-grade level. Conclusions: The AAST’s online patient education materials may be of limited utility to many patients, as the readability of the information exceeds the average reading skill level of adults in the U.S. Lack of patient comprehension represents a discrepancy that is not in accordance with the goals of the AAST’s objectives for its patient education efforts. PMID:25147778

Eltorai, Adam E. M.; Ghanian, Soha; Adams, Charles A.; Born, Christopher T.; Daniels, Alan H.

2014-01-01

289

Pilot project "Patient-Safety" in Medical Education.  

PubMed

Since the summer term 2009 the study project "Patientensicherheit - Der klinische Umgang mit Patienten- und Eingriffsverwechslungen sowie Medikationsfehlern" (Patient Safety - the clinical handling of patients - and mistaking of procedures as well as medication errors) is offered within the Modellstudiengang Medizin. Seminars on patient safety in Germany so far mainly address trained doctors and health economists. In contrast, this study project on patient safety should at an early stage contribute to a "culture of discussing and preventing mistakes" - an aspect that is little established in clinical medicine, but also in medical training. For this purpose, a broad variety of courses was developed, which - relying on problem-oriented learning - enables the students to analyse so-called adverse events (AE) and develop adequate prevention measures on the basis of the insights gained by this analysis. Therefore, theoretical lessons are complemented by discussing prototypical clinical cases. These discussions are moderated by experienced clinicians. After completing the seminar, students showed a significant increase (comparison of means) in the self-assessed qualifications "Wissen zu Patientensicherheit" (Knowledge of Patient Safety) and "Wahrnehmung von Risikosituationen" (Appreciation of Risk Situations). All in all, the students rated their training success with a grade of 1.5 (good). PMID:21818227

Rosentreter, Michael; Groß, Dominik; Schäfer, Gereon

2011-01-01

290

Education, reregistration, and recommendation effect of iPhone Poomsae education app in Taekwondo academy.  

PubMed

This paper analyzed the effect of a smartphone application in Taekwondo Academy. The iPhone app was self-developed to display Taekwondo education contents for Poomsae training. From the viewpoint of education, reregistration and recommendation effect, it showed statistically significant difference in 196 trainee sample survey. Therefore, the research suggest that the use of smartphone technology in Poomsae education would be a great help to the trainee for the acquisition of Taekwondo knowledge and make a great contribution to the growth of Taekwondo. PMID:22255527

Ha, In Sook; Lee, Seung Il; Cha, Eun Jong; Lee, Tae Soo

2011-01-01

291

The effect of a state education reform act on environmental education and interpretive facilities in Texas  

E-print Network

schools that potentially limit field trips. This may effect Temm environmental education and interpretive (EE/I) facilities, such as nature center, museum, and zoos. 'Ihe purposes of this study were to: 1) analyze the effects of H. B. 72 on use... and ~ of EE/I Facility Maptation to H. B. 72 68 Environmental education and interpretive (EE/I) facilities, such as nature amdt, mussom, parks, and zoos, play a vital role in educating chi1dren about the importance of cultural and natural 'Ihese facilities...

Andereck, Kathleen Lucille

2012-06-07

292

Revising Selected Written Patient Education Materials Through Readability and Concreteness  

E-print Network

and increased concrete language is beneficial. The writing of WPEMs in a way that patients can understand should be supported by a theory, and infusing Dual Coding Theory in the writing of selected WPEMs may be beneficial for patients. v DEDICATION..., was also a woman who believed in me. I also dedicate this dissertation to my family. The sacrifices they have made, the support they have provided and the love they have given is what has made this possible. vi ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank...

Goolsby, Rhonda Denise

2011-10-21

293

The protective effect of education on cognition in professional fighters.  

PubMed

Education has a protective effect against cognitive deficits following various forms of brain insult. Professional fighting (boxing and mixed martial arts) provides a model for assessing the impact of cumulative brain injuries on cognition and brain health. In the current cross-sectional observational study, we explore whether education would be protective against cognitive loss in fighters. We tested 141 professional fighters using a computerized neurocognitive battery, in addition to structural MRI. We used automated segmentation software to compute the volumes of various brain structures. We found fighters with high school education or less to show more associations between fight exposure and cognitive test scores. The relationship between brain structure volume and exposure did not differ based on education. These results are interpreted as putatively showing a protective effect of education on functional integrity in fighters, although longitudinal data and a larger sample size are required to further understand this relationship. PMID:24191967

Banks, Sarah J; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

2014-02-01

294

An Experience with Patient Role-Playing in Psychiatric Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A seminar is described that was designed to improve the interpersonal skills of psychiatric residents at New York State Psychiatric Institute. Participating residents gained a new perspective on the troubled individuals with whom they interact by role-playing psychiatric patients. Participant reactions and outcomes of the seminar are discussed.…

Siris, Samuel G.; And Others

1980-01-01

295

A meta-analysis on the impact of disease-specific education programs on health outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Disease-specific education programs have become an important factor in the treatment and care of chronic conditions, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. However, the effectiveness of these educational methods on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains unclear. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate whether disease-specific education programs were beneficial to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) variables and other long-term health outcomes in patients with COPD. Using electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Science Direct, Chinese Biomedical Data System, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Database) and individual searches (published and unpublished Chinese studies), we identified 12 randomized controlled trials (RCTs; English and/or Chinese) from 1991 to 2011. A meta-analysis on these studies revealed a positive relationship between disease-specific education programs and HRQoL scores (as measured by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire). Moreover, educational programs were associated with increased knowledge about COPD, improved disease management skills, inhaler adherence, and decreased COPD-related emergency department visits and hospital admissions, as well as long-term effects on improving COPD patients' health outcomes. Although significant effects were not detected across all HRQoL variables and health measures, our findings suggest that education programs have the potential to be a valuable intervention for COPD patients. Our results provide a foundation for future research in this area, which we recommend as including more rigorously designed, large, randomized studies. PMID:22595334

Tan, Jing-Yu; Chen, Jin-Xiu; Liu, Xian-Liang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Min; Mei, Li-Juan; Lin, Run

2012-01-01

296

Physical Therapists' Level of McKenzie Education, Functional Outcomes, and Utilization in Patients With Low Back Pain.  

PubMed

Study Design Longitudinal, prospective, observational cohort. Objective To examine associations between McKenzie training, functional status (FS) at discharge, and number of physical therapy visits (utilization) in patients receiving physical therapy for low back pain. Background The McKenzie method is commonly used in treating patients with low back pain. Methods A McKenzie postgraduate educational program was initiated in a large outpatient physical therapy service. Functional status data were collected at intake and at discharge. Separate hierarchical linear mixed models were used to examine associations between physical therapists' McKenzie training level (none; Parts A, B, C, and D; and credentialed), FS score at discharge, and utilization, controlling for patient risk factors. Results The final data set included 20 882 patients (mean ± SD age, 51 ± 16 years; 57% women) who completed FS surveys at both admission and discharge. Patients treated by physical therapists with any McKenzie training had better outcomes (additional 0.7 to 1.3 FS points; P<.05 to <.001) and fewer visits (0.6 to 0.9, P<.001) compared to patients treated by physical therapists with no training. For patients treated by therapists with no versus some McKenzie education, 65% versus 70% achieved at least the minimal clinically important improvement, respectively. There were no significant differences in outcomes or utilization by level of McKenzie training. Conclusion There was a slightly greater improvement of 0.7 to 1.3 points in FS at discharge in patients receiving physical therapy for low back pain by physical therapists who underwent McKenzie training. This difference was clinically important for an additional 5% of patients who achieved the minimal clinically important improvement when treated by therapists with some McKenzie training. Reduction in physical therapy utilization was 0.6 to 0.9 visits, with the fewest visits utilized by patients of physical therapists at the McKenzie Part D and credentialed levels. Together, these findings suggest improved cost-effectiveness at advanced McKenzie training levels. Ways to improve ongoing education and patient outcomes were proposed. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2014;44(12):925-936. Epub 29 October 2014. doi:10.2519/jospt.2014.5272. PMID:25353260

Deutscher, Daniel; Werneke, Mark W; Gottlieb, Ditza; Fritz, Julie M; Resnik, Linda

2014-12-01

297

Patient safety education at Japanese medical schools: results of a nationwide survey  

PubMed Central

Background Patient safety education, including error prevention strategies and management of adverse events, has become a topic of worldwide concern. The importance of the patient safety is also recognized in Japan following two serious medical accidents in 1999. Furthermore, educational curriculum guideline revisions in 2008 by relevant the Ministry of Education includes patient safety as part of the core medical curriculum. However, little is known about the patient safety education in Japanese medical schools partly because a comprehensive study has not yet been conducted in this field. Therefore, we have conducted a nationwide survey in order to clarify the current status of patient safety education at medical schools in Japan. Results Response rate was 60.0% (n?=?48/80). Ninety-eight-percent of respondents (n?=?47/48) reported integration of patient safety education into their curricula. Thirty-nine percent reported devoting less than five hours to the topic. All schools that teach patient safety reported use of lecture based teaching methods while few used alternative methods, such as role-playing or in-hospital training. Topics related to medical error theory and legal ramifications of error are widely taught while practical topics related to error analysis such as root cause analysis are less often covered. Conclusions Based on responses to our survey, most Japanese medical schools have incorporated the topic of patient safety into their curricula. However, the number of hours devoted to the patient safety education is far from the sufficient level with forty percent of medical schools that devote five hours or less to it. In addition, most medical schools employ only the lecture based learning, lacking diversity in teaching methods. Although most medical schools cover basic error theory, error analysis is taught at fewer schools. We still need to make improvements to our medical safety curricula. We believe that this study has the implications for the rest of the world as a model of what is possible and a sounding board for what topics might be important. PMID:22574712

2012-01-01

298

Outcome of Patients Attending a Specialist Educational and Mental Health Service for Social Anxiety Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of adolescents with anxiety-based school attendance problems enrolled in a specialist adolescent educational and mental health program that provides educational assistance and social skills development, and to suggest key elements that may account for its apparent effectiveness. Young people attending the Sulman Program in Sydney, Australia, between March 2003 and

Gerard Mcshane; Cheryl Bazzano; Garry Walter; Giles Barton

2007-01-01

299

Digit Span: Effect of education and culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Digit Span test is one of the most commonly used measures of immediate verbal recall, attentional capacity, and working memory in neuropsychological research and clinical evaluations. This test comprises two modalities, digits forward and digits backward. It has been established that age, education, and culture are important variables that affect performance on this test. The purposes of this study

Asucena Lozano

2006-01-01

300

Gender Effects in Children's Development and Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper attempts to clarify several lines of research on gender in development and education, inter-relating findings from studies on intuitive/informal knowledge with those from research on achievements and attitudes in science. It acknowledges the declining proportions of male teachers world-wide and examination successes which indicate a…

Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

2007-01-01

301

Patient safety education for undergraduate medical students: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  To reduce harm caused by health care is a global priority. Medical students should be able to recognize unsafe conditions,\\u000a systematically report errors and near misses, investigate and improve such systems with a thorough understanding of human\\u000a fallibility, and disclose errors to patients. Incorporating the knowledge of how to do this into the medical student curriculum\\u000a is an urgent necessity.

Yanli Nie; Lin Li; Yurong Duan; Peixian Chen; Bruce H Barraclough; Mingming Zhang; Jing Li

2011-01-01

302

Readability of Educational Materials for Patients with Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article, jointly created by authors Mary E. Cooley, Helene Moriarty and Thomas H. Short, describes a dataset on the readability of American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute pamphlets about cancer. This tests are designed to test whether the reading levels of these patients are high enough to comprehend this literature. Students should be familiar with scales of measurement, data reduction, measuring center, constructing and interpreting displays, and reaching conclusions in real problems.

Cooley, Mary E.; Moriarty, Helene; Short, Thomas H.

2009-02-10

303

Readability and Content of Patient Education Material Related to Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators  

PubMed Central

Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are increasingly offered to patients for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Candidates for ICD receive ICD-related patient education material when they make decisions to consent or decline a primary prevention ICD. Printed patient education material directed at ICD candidates has not been the focus of direct appraisal. Objective We evaluated the readability and content of ICD-related print education materials made available to patients who were enrolled in a study involving patient decision making for ICD from 3 ICD sites in southern Ontario, Canada. Methods All ICD print materials referred to during interviews and/or that were available in ICD site waiting rooms were collected for analysis. Readability testing was conducted using the SMOG (“simple measurement of gobbledygook”) and Fry methods. The material was evaluated according to selected plain-language criteria, thematic content analysis, and rhetoric analysis. Results Twenty-one print materials were identified and analyzed. Documents were authored by device manufacturers, tertiary care hospitals, and cardiac support organizations. Although many documents adhered to plain-language recommendations, text-reading levels were higher than recommended. Twelve major content themes were identified. Content focused heavily on the positive aspects of living with the device to the exclusion of other possible information that could be relevant to the decisions that patients made. Conclusions Print-based patient education materials for ICD candidates are geared to a highly literate population. The focus on positive information to the exclusion of potentially negative aspects of the ICD, or alternatives to accepting 1, could influence and/or confuse patients about the purpose and implications of this medical device. Development of print materials is indicated that includes information about possible problems and that would be relevant for the multicultural and debilitated population who may require ICDs. The findings are highly relevant for nurses who care for primary prevention ICD candidates. PMID:21926915

Strachan, Patricia H.; de Laat, Sonya; Carroll, Sandra L.; Schwartz, Lisa; Vaandering, Katie; Toor, Gurjit K.; Arthur, Heather M.

2012-01-01

304

Implementation of Patient's Rights Charter: a Report from Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Iran.  

PubMed

At the aim of explaining the rights of health care recipients and upgrading ethical observance in the field of treatment-the most important field of health care-, the Patient's Rights Charter was declared by Ministry of Health and Medical Education to all medical universities in September 2009. This paper provides a report of strategic planning for implementation of Patient's Rights Charter and a summary of other projects. PMID:23865009

Parsapoor, A R; Salari, P; Larijani, B

2013-01-01

305

Patient Education Level Affects Functionality and Long Term Mortality After Major Lower Extremity Amputation  

PubMed Central

Background In this study, we examine the relationship between level of education of patients and five year mortality following major lower extremity amputation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who underwent above- or below-knee amputation at the Nashville VA by the vascular surgery service between January 2000 and August 2006. Formal level of education of the study patients was recorded. Outcomes were compared between those patients who had completed high school and those who had not. Bivariate analysis using chi-square and student's t-test, and multivariable logistic regression were performed. Results Five year mortality for patients who completed high school was lower than those who had not completed high school (62.6% vs. 84.3%; p = 0.001), even after adjusting for important clinical factors (Odds Ratio of death = 0.377, 95% CI 0.164 – 0.868 p=0.022). Conclusions Patients with less education have increased long term mortality following lower extremity amputation. PMID:22906244

Corey, Michael R.; Julien, Jamii St; Miller, Carly; Fisher, Bryan; Cederstrand, Sara L.; Nylander, William A.; Guzman, Raul J.; Dattilo, Jeffery B.

2014-01-01

306

Development of Smartphone Educational Application for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study was conducted to develop a smartphone application (app) as an educational learning instrument for coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and to assess the users' level of satisfaction. Methods This methodological research involves elicited learning content for CAD patients to develop a learning instrument using the smartphone app. The app was developed according to the steps of Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation, which is a systematic instructional design model. The levels of satisfaction with the developed smartphone app among 30 outpatients with CAD were assessed via a questionnaire during their visits to a cardiology outpatient department. Results A smartphone app 'Strong Heart' was developed through reviewing the literature associated with education for CAD patients under professional supervision and searching for medical smartphone apps that are already available. The learning contents include six main sections containing essential learning issues in managing CAD and additional information to attract the user's attention, such as patient cases and quizzes. After modification with feedback from experts, the app was finally developed and evaluated by patients who reported that they were satisfied with the usefulness of the app. Conclusions The developed smartphone app is available on both the iPhone App Store and the Android Play Store. Patients with CAD may utilize the app for supporting educational material without limitations of time and space. PMID:24872910

Cho, Min Jung; Sim, Jae Lan

2014-01-01

307

A Picture of Health and Education. Higher Education in Focus: Professors and Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our universities are an indispensible part of the UK's healthcare system. This publication is the first in a series of Universities UK reports depicting the vital connections between higher education and healthcare. It illustrates the virtuous partnership between health providers and universities in supplying and developing the healthcare…

Universities UK, 2012

2012-01-01

308

Supporting Patients Treated for Prostate Cancer: A Video Vignette Study With an Email-Based Educational Program in General Practice  

PubMed Central

Background Men who have been treated for prostate cancer in Australia can consult their general practitioner (GP) for advice about symptoms or side effects at any time following treatment. However, there is no evidence that such men are consistently advised by GPs and patients experience substantial unmet need for reassurance and advice. Objective The intent of the study was to evaluate a brief, email-based educational program for GPs to manage standardized patients presenting with symptoms or side effects months or years after prostate cancer treatment. Methods GPs viewed six pairs of video vignettes of actor-patients depicting men who had been treated for prostate cancer. The actor-patients presented problems that were attributable to the treatment of cancer. In Phase 1, GPs indicated their diagnosis and stated if they would prescribe, refer, or order tests based on that diagnosis. These responses were compared to the management decisions for those vignettes as recommended by a team of experts in prostate cancer. After Phase 1, all the GPs were invited to participate in an email-based education program (Spaced Education) focused on prostate cancer. Participants received feedback and could compare their progress and their performance with other participants in the study. In Phase 2, all GPs, regardless of whether they had completed the program, were invited to view another set of six video vignettes with men presenting similar problems to Phase 1. They again offered a diagnosis and stated if they would prescribe, refer, or order tests based on that diagnosis. Results In total, 64 general practitioners participated in the project, 57 GPs participated in Phase 1, and 45 in Phase 2. The Phase 1 education program was completed by 38 of the 57 (59%) participants. There were no significant differences in demographics between those who completed the program and those who did not. Factors determining whether management of cases was consistent with expert opinion were number of sessions worked per week (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.67-0.90), site of clinical practice (remote practice, OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.01-5.03), number of patients seen per week (150 patients or more per week, OR 10.66, 95% CI 3.40-33.48), and type of case viewed. Completion of the Spaced Education did impact whether patient management was consistent with expert opinion (not completed, OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.5-1.56). Conclusions The management of standardized patients by GPs was particularly unlikely to be consistent with expert opinion in the management of impotence and bony metastasis. There was no evidence from this standardized patient study that Spaced Education had an impact on the management of patients in this context. However, the program was not completed by all participants. Practitioners with a greater clinical load were more likely to manage cases as per expert opinion. PMID:24571952

Halkett, Georgia; Meng, Xingqiong; Pillai, Vinita; Berg, Melissa; Shaw, Tim

2014-01-01

309

Factors Increasing Physical Activity Levels in Diabetes Mellitus: A Survey of Patients after an Inpatient Diabetes Education Program  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to understand the factors involved in increasing physical activity levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients for improved glycemic control. [Subjects] The subjects were 101 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who had completed an inpatient diabetes education program. [Methods] The survey evaluated physical activity levels on the basis of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and a questionnaire listing physical and psychosocial factors. [Results] Four variables—participation or non-participation in farm work, presence or absence of a job, stage of change in attitude toward exercise behavior, and social support—accounted for 34% of physical activity levels in these diabetes mellitus patients. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient between physical activity level and HbA1c was ?0.31. [Conclusion] Intervention in terms of practical use of living environments, promotion of exercise behavior, and social support may be effective in helping to improve glycemic control. PMID:24926134

Murano, Isamu; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Mizukami, Masafumi; Takihara, Jun; Shimizu, Kaoru; Imai, Taihei

2014-01-01

310

Decision Support for Patient Preference-based Care Planning : Effects on Nursing Care and Patient Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveWhile preference elicitation techniques have been effective in helping patients make decisions consistent with their preferences, little is known about whether information about patient preferences affects clinicians in clinical decision making and improves patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a decision support system for eliciting elderly patients' preferences for self-care capability and providing this information to

Cornelia M Ruland

1999-01-01

311

Designing Effective K-12 Educational Initiatives for Grant Proposals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Science Foundation requires that grantees make an effort to extend the reach of academic research to communities beyond the laboratory and address the work's possible ``Broader Impacts'' to society. NSF CAREER awards and many of the NSF Research Center grant solicitations are even more explicit, requiring that grantees craft educational initiatives that are based in best practices, bring the academic research to the broader community, and positively impact the pipeline of students pursuing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. For new faculty, and even veteran faculty, these requirements for creative educational initiatives that significantly affect a community outside the confines of the laboratory can be very daunting. This presentation addresses how to design an effective educational plan that incorporates K-12 educational outreach, that will have a real impact on the target audience, and that can realistically be accomplished by a science faculty member.

Usselman, Marion

2009-11-01

312

The effect of embedded Adventure Education in physical education at Far East University  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to investigate the effect of embedded AE(Adventure Education) course in physical education at Fat East University. The participants were 1418 first-year students at Far East University. 1418 surveys were distributed after two-week implementation of AE course. 1395 surveys were considered valid after 23 surveys were discarded for incompletion. This represented a 98% return rate. 923 male (66.2%),

Hsiao-Man Liu; Chih-Hao Chen; Chun-Ling Wang

2010-01-01

313

Towards Effective Technology Education in New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: This paper examines the historical concept of technical education in NewZealand as it developed from the British model. It examines how England andWales designed and introduced a new technology curriculum, and how, ofnecessity, a New Zealand technology curriculum has been developed which ismore suited to New Zealand's developing culture. The paper focuses on the____________________________Maxwell S. Reid (maxwell.reid@aut.ac.nz) is on

Maxwell S. Reid

2000-01-01

314

Longitudinal Study of Online Remedial Education Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a An increasing number of students are choosing to follow a bachelor or master program at a foreign university. As the transparency\\u000a in higher education is still limited, a student might make an inefficient decision when selecting a program. Several studies\\u000a have found that lack of knowledge, skills, or academic integration lead to higher drop-out rates. Although remedial programs\\u000a might mitigate

Bart Rienties; Dirk Tempelaar; Joost Dijkstra; Martin Rehm; Wim Gijselaers

315

Designing effective conversational interfaces for educational software  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conversational interfaces that incorporate animated characters potentially are well suited for educational software, since they can engage children as active learners and support question asking skills. In the present research, a simulation study was conducted in which twenty-four 7-to-10-year-old children used speech and pen input to converse directly with animated fish as they learned about marine biology. The animated fish

Courtney Darves; Sharon Oviatt

316

Sleep Hygiene Rules for Insomnia Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1  

E-print Network

Sleep Hygiene Rules for Insomnia Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1 Revised 04/11/12 Sleep hygiene refers to "cleaning up" sleep habits that interfere with good sleep. These habits often develop in response to insomnia, but are counterproductive. Practicing good sleep hygiene

Yener, Aylin

317

Tuberculosis and Latent TB Treatment Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee  

E-print Network

Tuberculosis and Latent TB Treatment Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Revised 02/13/2013 Page 1 of 3 TB (tuberculosis) is a serious illness that most commonly affects the lungs, but can involve any major organ system. The cause is a bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Symptoms Symptoms

Yener, Aylin

318

Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate how Canadian adults living with limited literacy and chronic illness made meaning of their patient education experiences. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological research design and employed three data sources over a nine-month period. Data was interpreted and analyzed as it was collected,…

King, Judy; Taylor, Maurice C.

2010-01-01

319

Cinemeducation in Psychiatry: A Seminar in Undergraduate Medical Education Combining a Movie, Lecture, and Patient Interview  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Psychiatric educators are often faced with students' negative attitudes toward psychiatry. A new type of seminar has been established in order to enable students to gain a deeper understanding of psychiatric illness. Method: A "cinemeducation seminar," combining a movie, a lecture, and a patient interview, has been established as part…

Kuhnigk, Olaf; Schreiner, Julia; Reimer, Jens; Emami, Roya; Naber, Dieter; Harendza, Sigrid

2012-01-01

320

(Mis)Perceptions of Continuing Education: Insights from Knowledge Translation, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Minimal attention has been given to the intersection and potential collaboration among the domains of continuing education (CE), knowledge translation (KT), quality improvement (QI), and patient safety (PS), despite their overlapping objectives. A study was undertaken to examine leaders' perspectives of these 4 domains and their…

Kitto, Simon C.; Bell, Mary; Goldman, Joanne; Peller, Jennifer; Silver, Ivan; Sargeant, Joan; Reeves, Scott

2013-01-01

321

The pedagogical requirements of patient E-health education to increase health literacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence shows that increasing patients' health literacy can significantly improve their quality of life. This paper explains through education theory how health literacy is linked to the way that a person learns, and how this affects the accuracy and long term retention of information. Special attention is paid to the measurement of learning, and how reducing the literacy requirement of

Kevin Butterworth; Omnia Allam; Alex Gray

2010-01-01

322

Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1 Reviewed 3/11/12  

E-print Network

Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1 Reviewed 3/11/12 Tinea Versicolor What Causes Tinea Versicolor? Tinea versicolor is a harmless skin disorder caused by a yeast fungus living, or arms known as tinea versicolor. On untanned skin, tinea versicolor rash is pink to coppery tan

Yener, Aylin

323

Walking a mile in their patients' shoes: empathy and othering in medical students' education  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the major tasks of medical educators is to help maintain and increase trainee empathy for patients. Yet research suggests that during the course of medical training, empathy in medical students and residents decreases. Various exercises and more comprehensive paradigms have been introduced to promote empathy and other humanistic values, but with inadequate success. This paper argues that the

Johanna Shapiro

2008-01-01

324

Images, femininity and cancer: an analysis of an international patient education programme.  

PubMed

This article is an analysis of a cancer patient education programme run by cosmetic companies. I focus on an analysis of imagery, arguing that there are particular discursive elements that the cosmetic companies use in order to make productive the relationship between femininity and cancer. I contextualize this education programme by presenting the controversies regarding cosmetics as they relate to the growth of breast tumours. In doing so, I conclude that conversations and questions about a link between chemicals and cancer are subverted by both ;horror' narratives of cancer and the provocative use of standards of beauty. Such discursive dominance in patient education programmes makes it difficult to engage in a more public understanding of cancer growth as affected by cosmetic chemicals. PMID:19103716

Phillips, Catherine

2009-01-01

325

Relationship between Nursing Students' Views about Web-Based Patient Education Course and Anxiety in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was designed as descriptive and cross-sectional to determine the relation between students' views about web-based Patient Education course and anxiety. The study group consisted of all students registered the web-based Patient Education course (N: 148) at 2010-2011 semester at a nursing school. Data were collected using…

Tasocak, Gülsün; Kaya, Hülya; Senyuva, Emine; Isik, Burçin; Bodur, Gönül

2014-01-01

326

Motivational Interviewing Delivered by Diabetes Educators: Does It Improve Blood Glucose Control Among Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Patients?  

PubMed Central

Aims To determine whether glycemic control is improved when Motivational Interviewing (MI), a patient-centered behavior change strategy, is used with Diabetes Self Management Education (DSME) as compared to DSME alone. Methods Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients (n=234) were randomized into 4 groups: MI+DSME or DSME alone, with or without use of a computerized summary of patient self management barriers. We compared HbA1c changes between groups at 6 months and investigated mediators of HbA1c change. Results Study patients attended the majority of intervention visits (mean 3.4/4), but drop-out rate was high at follow-up research visits (35%). Multiple regression showed that groups receiving MI had a mean change in HbA1c that was significantly lower (less improved) than those not receiving MI (t=2.10; p=0.037). Mediators of HbA1c change for the total group were diabetes self-care behaviors and diabetes distress; no between-group differences were found. Conclusions DSME improved blood glucose control, underlining its benefit for T2DM management. However, MI+DSME was less effective than DSME alone. Overall, weak support was found for the clinical utility of MI in the management of T2DM delivered by diabetes educators. PMID:21074887

Zagarins, Sofija E.; Feinberg, Rebecca G.; Garb, Jane L.

2010-01-01

327

Educational outreach visits to improve venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalised medical patients: a prospective before-and-after intervention study  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention clinical audit and research reveals that hospitalised medical patients frequently receive suboptimal prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, utility and clinical impact of an educational outreach visit (EOV) on the provision of VTE prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients in a 270 bed acute care private hospital in metropolitan Australia. Methods The study used an uncontrolled before-and-after design with accompanying process evaluation. The acceptability of the intervention to participants was measured with a post intervention survey; descriptive data on resource use was collected as a measure of utility; and clinical impact (prophylaxis rate) was assessed by pre and post intervention clinical audits. Doctors who admit >40 medical patients each year were targeted to receive the intervention which consisted of a one-to-one educational visit on VTE prevention from a trained peer facilitator. The EOV protocol was designed by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals using social marketing theory. Results Nineteen (73%) of 26 eligible participants received an EOV. The majority (n?=?16, 85%) felt the EOV was effective or extremely effective at increasing their knowledge about VTE prophylaxis and 15 (78%) gave a verbal commitment to provide evidence-based prophylaxis. The average length of each visit was 15 minutes (IQ range 15 to 20) and the average time spent arranging and conducting each visit was 92 minutes (IQ range 78 to 129). There was a significant improvement in the proportion of medical patients receiving appropriate pharmacological VTE prophylaxis following the intervention (54% to 70%, 16% improvement, 95% CI 5 to 26, p?=?0.004). Conclusions EOV is effective at improving doctors’ provision of pharmacological VTE prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients. It was also found to be an acceptable implementation strategy by the majority of participants; however, it was resource intensive requiring on average 92 minutes per visit. PMID:24103108

2013-01-01

328

[Pregnancy continuation following patient education of primary abortion applicants].  

PubMed

Between 1972 and 1987 a total of 417 patients at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Görlitz Hospital, changed their minds about an abortion after discussion with their doctor (average 5%, 1977 11.8%). A random survey (n = 176) was analysed, bearing in mind the medical and social aspects as well as the main reason for the planned abortion. It was established that the duration of pregnancy and birth in women who had changed the duration of pregnancy and birth in women who had changed their minds about an abortion did not differ from that of women who had not considered termination. However, a higher level of social care was needed. PMID:2038904

Wolf, B

1991-01-01

329

Effectiveness of a condensed protocol for disclosing APOE genotype and providing risk education for Alzheimer disease  

PubMed Central

Purpose Brief, effective models of patient genetic education are needed for common, complex diseases. Using Alzheimer disease as a model, we compared participants’ risk knowledge and recall in extended versus condensed education protocols. Methods A four-site randomized clinical trial enrolled 280 first-degree relatives of individuals with Alzheimer disease (mean age = 58 years, 71% female); each received lifetime Alzheimer disease risk information (range: 13–74%) that incorporated apolipoprotein E genotype. In the condensed protocol, participants received an educational brochure in place of an in-person education session. Outcomes were assessed at 6 weeks and 6 months following risk disclosure. Results The condensed protocol required less clinician time than the extended protocol (mean = 34 min vs. 77 min). The groups did not differ on recall of apolipoprotein E genotype or lifetime risk, and most participants in both groups recalled and retained this information over time. Both groups showed improvement from baseline in Alzheimer disease risk knowledge (e.g., understanding the magnitude of apolipoprotein E genotype effect on risk). Conclusion A condensed protocol for communicating genetic risk for Alzheimer disease achieved similar educational results as an extended protocol in this study. Further research should explore the efficacy of brief genetic education protocols for complex diseases in diverse populations. PMID:22498844

Roberts, J. Scott; Chen, Clara A.; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Green, Robert C.

2013-01-01

330

Preoperative Patient Education Reduces In-hospital Falls After Total Knee Arthroplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Inpatient hospital falls after orthopaedic surgery represent a major problem, with rates of about one to three falls per 1000\\u000a patient days. These falls result in substantial morbidity for the patient and liability for the institution.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes  We determined whether preoperative patient education reduced the rate of in-hospital falls after primary TKA and documented\\u000a the circumstances and the injuries resulting from

Henry D. Clarke; Vickie L. Timm; Brynn R. Goldberg; Steven J. Hattrup

331

Effect of an Educational Toolkit on Quality of Care: A Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Printed educational materials for clinician education are one of the most commonly used approaches for quality improvement. The objective of this pragmatic cluster randomized trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational toolkit focusing on cardiovascular disease screening and risk reduction in people with diabetes. Methods and Findings All 933,789 people aged ?40 years with diagnosed diabetes in Ontario, Canada were studied using population-level administrative databases, with additional clinical outcome data collected from a random sample of 1,592 high risk patients. Family practices were randomly assigned to receive the educational toolkit in June 2009 (intervention group) or May 2010 (control group). The primary outcome in the administrative data study, death or non-fatal myocardial infarction, occurred in 11,736 (2.5%) patients in the intervention group and 11,536 (2.5%) in the control group (p?=?0.77). The primary outcome in the clinical data study, use of a statin, occurred in 700 (88.1%) patients in the intervention group and 725 (90.1%) in the control group (p?=?0.26). Pre-specified secondary outcomes, including other clinical events, processes of care, and measures of risk factor control, were also not improved by the intervention. A limitation is the high baseline rate of statin prescribing in this population. Conclusions The educational toolkit did not improve quality of care or cardiovascular outcomes in a population with diabetes. Despite being relatively easy and inexpensive to implement, printed educational materials were not effective. The study highlights the need for a rigorous and scientifically based approach to the development, dissemination, and evaluation of quality improvement interventions. Trial Registration http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01411865 and NCT01026688 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24505216

Shah, Baiju R.; Bhattacharyya, Onil; Yu, Catherine H. Y.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Parsons, Janet A.; Straus, Sharon E.; Zwarenstein, Merrick

2014-01-01

332

Physician empathy: Definition, outcome-relevance and its measurement in patient care and medical education  

PubMed Central

Objective: The present study gives a brief introduction into the definition of physician empathy (PE) and its influence on patients’ health outcomes. Furthermore we present assessment instruments to measure PE from the perspective of the patient and medical student. The latter topic will be explored in detail as we conducted a pilot study on the German versions of two self-assessment instruments of empathy, which are mostly used in medical education research, namely the “Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy, Student Version” (JSPE-S) and the “Interpersonal Reactivity Index” (IRI). Methods: We first present an overview of the current empirical and theoretical literature on the definition and outcome-relevance of PE. Additionally, we conducted basic psychometric analyses of the German versions of the JSPE-S and the IRI. Data for this analyses is based on a cross-sectional pilot-survey in N=44 medical students and N=63 students of other disciplines from the University of Cologne. Results: PE includes the understanding of the patient as well as verbal and non-verbal communication, which should result in a helpful therapeutic action of the physician. Patients’ health outcomes in different healthcare settings can be improved considerably from a high quality empathic encounter with their clinician. Basic psychometric results of the German JSPE-S and IRI measures show first promising results. Conclusion: PE as an essential and outcome-relevant element in the patient-physician relationship requires more consideration in the education of medical students and, thus, in medical education research. The German versions of the JSPE-S and IRI measures seem to be promising means to evaluate these education aims and to conduct medical education research on empathy. PMID:22403596

Neumann, Melanie; Scheffer, Christian; Tauschel, Diethard; Lutz, Gabriele; Wirtz, Markus; Edelhauser, Friedrich

2012-01-01

333

Higher Education Masterof Education  

E-print Network

2 Higher Education Masterof Education (M.ttu.edu Effective Fall 2013, Updated 12/09/13 #12;3 Higher Education Masters of Education Program Overview The Higher Education Program is committed to excellence in preparing and supporting instructional

Rock, Chris

334

A Study on the Effects of Education Welfare Action Zone Policy in Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to analyze the effects of the support programs provided in education welfare action zones. Education welfare action zone policy came into effect by government from 2003 to guarantee actual educational opportunity to disadvantaged children in urban areas by providing educational, cultural, and welfare service. Education

Lee, Hae-young

2008-01-01

335

Differences in the Delivery of Health Education to Patients With Chronic Disease by Provider Type, 2005–2009  

PubMed Central

Introduction Health education provided to patients can reduce mortality and morbidity of chronic disease. Although some studies describe the provision of health education by physicians, few studies have examined how physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners differ in the provision of health education. The objective of our study was to evaluate the rate of health education provision by physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners/certified midwives. Methods We analyzed 5 years of data (2005–2009) from the outpatient department subset of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We abstracted data on 136,432 adult patient visits for the following chronic conditions: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), depression, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and obesity. Results Health education was not routinely provided to patients who had a chronic condition. The percentage of patients who received education on their chronic condition ranged from 13.0% (patients with COPD or asthma who were provided education on smoking cessation by nurse practitioners) to 42.2% (patients with diabetes or obesity who were provided education on exercise by physician assistants). For all conditions assessed, rates of health education were higher among physician assistants and nurse practitioners than among physicians. Conclusion Physician assistants and nurse practitioners provided health education to patients with chronic illness more regularly than did physicians, although none of the 3 types of clinicians routinely provided health education. Possible explanations include training differences, differing roles within a clinic by provider type, or increased clinical demands on physicians. More research is needed to understand the causes of these differences and potential opportunities to increase the delivery of condition-specific education to patients. PMID:24602587

Bingenheimer, Jeffrey B.; Scholting, Patty; Cawley, James F.

2014-01-01

336

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Helicopter EMS for Trauma Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of helicopter EMS for trauma patients. Methods: We applied a cost-effectiveness analysis from the service provider's perspective to cost and effectiveness estimates. The cost estimates comprise direct operating costs and additional survivors' hospital costs. The effectiveness estimates were calculated with the TRISS methodology from literature sources and data from a cohort of patients transported

Peter A Gearhart; Richard Wuerz; A. Russell Localio

1997-01-01

337

Depo-Provera Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee  

E-print Network

-feeding mothers, or at 6 weeks after delivery if breast-feeding. Depo-Provera® may also be given immediately after an abortion procedure. The shot is given in the buttocks or upper arm. Most women experience minimal to sterilization · Proven safe and effective for nursing mothers Potential benefits · Light periods or no periods

Yener, Aylin

338

Advancing interprofessional education through the use of high fidelity human patient simulators  

PubMed Central

Background Modern medical care increasingly requires coordinated teamwork and communication between healthcare professionals of different disciplines. Unfortunately, healthcare professional students are rarely afforded the opportunity to learn effective methods of interprofessional (IP) communication and teamwork strategies during their education. The question of how to best incorporate IP interactions in the curricula of the schools of health professions remains unanswered. Objective We aim to solve the lack of IP education in the pharmacy curricula through the use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) to allow teams of medical, pharmacy, nursing, physician assistant, and social work students to work together in a controlled environment to solve cases of complex medical and social issues. Methods Once weekly for a 4-week time period, students worked together to complete complex simulation scenarios in small IP teams consisting of pharmacy, medical, nursing, social work, and physician assistant students. Student perception of the use of HFS was evaluated by a survey given at the conclusion of the HFS sessions. Team communication was evaluated through the use of Communication and Teamwork Skills (CATS) Assessment by 2 independent evaluators external to the project. Results The CATS scores improved from the HFS sessions 1 to 2 (p = 0.01), 2 to 3 (p = 0.035), and overall from 1 to 4 (p = 0.001). The inter-rater reliability between evaluators was high (0.85, 95% CI 0.71, 0.99). Students perceived the HFS improved: their ability to communicate with other professionals (median =4); confidence in patient care in an IP team (median=4). It also stimulated student interest in IP work (median=4.5), and was an efficient use of student time (median=4.5) Conclusions The use of HFS improved student teamwork and communication and was an accepted teaching modality. This method of exposing students of the health sciences to IP care should be incorporated throughout the curricula. PMID:24155851

Smithburger, Pamela L.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.; Kloet, Megan A.; Lohr, Brian; Seybert, Amy L.

339

Effects of Bariatric Surgery in Older Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Evaluate the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in older patients. Background: Because of an increased morbidity in older patients who may not be as active as younger individuals, there remain concerns that they may not tolerate the operation well or lose adequate amounts of weight. Methods: The database of patients who had undergone bariatric surgery since 1980 and

Harvey J. Sugerman; Eric J. DeMaria; John M. Kellum; Elizabeth L. Sugerman; Jill G. Meador; Luke G. Wolfe

2004-01-01

340

Assessing the Impact of Education on Leadership Effectiveness of Graduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ninety-three percent of Ontario's community health supervisors participated in a study investigating the impact of educational preparation on leadership effectiveness. The Fiedler Contingency Model of Leadership Effectiveness provided the study's rationale. Each supervisor completed: (1) a Least Preferred Coworker (LPC) scale to determine whether…

Loyer, Marie des Anges; O'Reilly, Robert R.

341

Work-Related Continuing Education and Training: Participation and Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Within the context of policies on developing the workforce of the government health sector in England, this paper aims to investigate participation in work-related continuing education and training (WRCET), its pedagogy and effectiveness. Individual and organizational characteristics associated with effective WRCET are examined.…

Thomas, Hywel; Qiu, Tian

2012-01-01

342

Effective Educational Practices for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students With autism spectrum disorders (ASD) present unique challenges to educators trying to plan effective instructional programs. Although an impressive body of research identifying effective practices has emerged, there have been minimal attempts to integrate the findings into a curricular foundation to be adopted by school districts. This article provides a description of 6 core elements that have empirical support

Rose Iovannone; Glen Dunlap; Heather Huber; Don Kincaid

2003-01-01

343

THE EFFECT OF FERTILITY LEVELS ON THE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF  

E-print Network

significant because a mother would have to give birth to a humanly infeasible number of children in order by Altonji et al (2005) can be used in order to further scrutinize the insignificance of this effect. ScatterTHE EFFECT OF FERTILITY LEVELS ON THE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF CHILDREN IN UGANDA Tara Roach

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

344

[Pharmaceutical consultation for liver transplant patients: a contribution to therapeutic education].  

PubMed

The pharmaceutical consultation offered to liver transplant patients is one of the components of therapeutic education. The content of this consultation has been designed on the basis of research results led in the field of health communication. This research has highlighted the need to clarify to the patient the aims and format of the consultation, to obtain patient approval, and to elicit patient participation in the elaboration of the treatment plan. Studying and taking into account patient representations of transplantation, of transplant treatment and rejection is indispensable to the design of an efficient communication plan. Setting up this consultation requires initial training or continuing vocational training of the pharmacist - this training will address issues in psychology, cognitive science and health communication. No such training is currently available in universities and needs to be set up. It should be followed by practice and training during internships in hospitals and community pharmacies. PMID:19152850

Brandon, M-T; Charpiat, B

2009-01-01

345

[Educational program for doctors and nurses taking care for primary immunodeficiency patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins].  

PubMed

Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are presenting the most common in childhood. PID are genetically determined disorders of the immune system resulting in greatly enhanced susceptibility to infectious disease. Therapy in these group of patients preventing infectious diseases is immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy. Nowadays the quality of life is very important issue which doctors should consider treating their patients. The subcutaneous immunoglobulins appears to be the best solution for them. Treating patients with subcutaneous Ig require good educational programme not only for patients but also for doctors and nurses. We would like to provide practical guidelines for identifying patients who should be referred for assessment of possible immunodeficiency and give some practical instructions how to start and follow-up subcutaneous therapy in all centers of immunology in Poland who are engaged in this kind of treatment. PMID:21751558

Lewandowicz-Uszy?ska, Aleksandra; Szaflarska, Anna; Pietrucha, Barbara; Tarnowska, Iwona

2011-06-01

346

Patient and Medical Education on Complementary and Alternative Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of Americans use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies, often in the absence of scientific evidence\\u000a of their safety and effectiveness and, in many cases, with-out including a medical professional in the decision-making process\\u000a (1). Depending on how broadly one defines it, between 36 and 62% of the US population now relies on some form of CAM (2). Although

Catherine Leffler

347

Study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial comparing the efficacy of two educational interventions to improve inhalation techniques in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): TIEPOC Study  

PubMed Central

Background: An appropriate inhalation technique and adherence to treatment are both critical determinants of the success of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. We have observed that up to 75% of patients do not use a successful inhalation technique. Knowledge evaluation and frequent reassessment of inhaler use, together with education of patients and healthcare professionals, can significantly improve the benefits that patients with COPD will derive from inhaler therapy. The objective of this study is to test the efficacy of two educational interventions to improve inhalation techniques in patients with COPD. Methods: Multicenter randomized controlled trial with 296 patients diagnosed with COPD selected by a non-probabilistic method of sampling from seven Spanish Primary Care Centers. The patients will be divided into three groups by block randomization. The three groups are: 1) control; 2) Intervention A; and 3) Intervention B. The control group will comprise patients with no explanations or written information; the Intervention A group will comprise patients to whom we give written information only; and the Intervention B group will comprise patients to whom we give written information plus instructor training. Every patient in each group will be visited four times during the year of the study at the health centers. Discussion: Our hypothesis is that the application of educational interventions (A or B) in patients with COPD who use inhaler therapy will increase the number of patients who perform a correct inhalation technique by at least 25%. We will evaluate the effectiveness of these interventions on patient inhalation technique improvement, where feasible within the context of clinical practice. PMID:24991223

Leiva-Fernandez, Jose; Leiva-Fernandez, Francisca; Vazquez-Alarcon, Ruben L; Garcia-Ruiz, Antonio; Prados-Torres, Daniel; Barnestein-Fonseca, Pilar

2014-01-01

348

Video Education Provides Effective Wound Care Instruction Pre- or Post-Mohs Micrographic Surgery  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if delivery of wound care instruction pre-Mohs micrographic surgery versus the typical, post-Mohs surgery would allow for greater patient retention. Design: A non-blinded, randomized, controlled trial receiving institutional review board exemption from Michigan State University was conducted over a three-month period. Patients scheduled for Mohs surgery on 13 selected days were randomized into pre- versus post-procedure groups to receive wound care education. Setting: This study was conducted at a dermatology practice in Saint Joseph, Michigan. Participants: Fifty cognitive and literate patients greater than 18 years of age were evaluated in this study. Measurements: Participants’ ability to recall instructions delivered by a Mohs surgeon in the form of digital media was assessed by a 10-question, multiple-choice exam. Additional analyses were conducted on patient’s disposition around medical professionals, past experience with Mohs surgery, preference for digital media versus human instruction, and desire for home access. Results: Pre- (n=24; score=77±14%) versus post-(n=26; 83±11%) procedure education displayed no significant difference (p=0.13) in overall questionnaire performance. Seventy-four percent of participants preferred video delivery as opposed to provider instruction. Thirty-four percent reported being intimidated by healthcare workers. Participant performance showed no significant change (p=0.78) with previous exposure (79±19%) to Mohs surgery versus a first-time encounter (80±11%). Conclusion: Video education prior to or post-Mohs surgery serves as an effective mechanism for patient education and improvement of time management in clinical practice. PMID:24765229

Kuriata, Mark A.

2014-01-01

349

Educational Intervention Improves Anticoagulation Control in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: The TREAT Randomised Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF), most commonly with warfarin, requires maintenance of a narrow therapeutic target (INR 2.0 to 3.0) and is often poorly controlled in practice. Poor patient-understanding surrounding AF and its treatment may contribute to the patient’s willingness to adhere to recommendations. Method A theory-driven intervention, developed using patient interviews and focus groups, consisting of a one-off group session (1–6 patients) utilising an “expert-patient” focussed DVD, educational booklet, self-monitoring diary and worksheet, was compared in a randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN93952605) against usual care, with patient postal follow-ups at 1, 2, 6, and 12-months. Ninety-seven warfarin-naïve AF patients were randomised to intervention (n=46, mean age (SD) 72.0 (8.2), 67.4% men), or usual care (n=51, mean age (SD) 73.7 (8.1), 62.7% men), stratified by age, sex, and recruitment centre. Primary endpoint was time within therapeutic range (TTR); secondary endpoints included knowledge, quality of life, anxiety/depression, beliefs about medication, and illness perceptions. Main Findings Intervention patients had significantly higher TTR than usual care at 6-months (76.2% vs. 71.3%; p=0.035); at 12-months these differences were not significant (76.0% vs. 70.0%; p=0.44). Knowledge increased significantly across time (F (3, 47) = 6.4; p<0.01), but there were no differences between groups (F (1, 47) = 3.3; p = 0.07). At 6-months, knowledge scores predicted TTR (r=0.245; p=0.04). Patients’ scores on subscales representing their perception of the general harm and overuse of medication, as well as the perceived necessity of their AF specific medications predicted TTR at 6- and 12-months. Conclusions A theory-driven educational intervention significantly improves TTR in AF patients initiating warfarin during the first 6-months. Adverse clinical outcomes may potentially be reduced by improving patients’ understanding of the necessity of warfarin and reducing their perception of treatment harm. Improving education provision for AF patients is essential to ensure efficacious and safe treatment. The trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN93952605, and details are available at www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN93952605. PMID:24040156

Clarkesmith, Danielle E.; Pattison, Helen M.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Lane, Deirdre A.

2013-01-01

350

[The anxious patient during magnetic resonance tomography (MRI) examination. Health care economic aspects of patient education].  

PubMed

Due to the increasing debate of limiting costs in the public health system, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been under discussion for several times. Diagnostic imaging by means of MRI is an expensive but informative and safe method. Instead of looking on cost-benefit analysis, it is shown how the efficiency of MRI can be increased by improving patient information about this imaging method. Because of the technical conditions, up to 40% of the patients show anxiety-related-reactions. These reactions include slight discomfort up to claustrophobic reactions and panic attacks. Therefore, correct and complete informing of patients prior to MRI examinations by the physicians is very important. The given information should include technical aspects about MRI and in addition, the physician has a chance to evaluate the patients' disposition to anxiety-related-reactions. To prepare risk patients for successful MRI technics like music, prone positioning, sedatives and relaxation exercises are available. By taking patients' anxiety into consideration and using the techniques mentioned above, unnecessary costs for unsuccessful or repeated MRI examinations can be avoided and the overall costs for clinical diagnostics will be reduced. PMID:9340201

Goyen, M; Klewer, J

1997-07-01

351

Effect Sizes in Gifted Education Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent calls for reporting and interpreting effect sizes have been numerous, with the 5th edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (2001) calling for the inclusion of effect sizes to interpret quantitative findings. Many top journals have required that effect sizes accompany claims of statistical significance.…

Gentry, Marcia; Peters, Scott J.

2009-01-01

352

The Effects of TV on Speech Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Generally, the speaking aspect is not properly debated when discussing the positive and negative effects of television (TV), especially on children. So, to highlight this point, this study was first initialized by asking the question: "What are the effects of TV on speech?" and secondly, to transform the effects that TV has on speech in a…

Gocen, Gokcen; Okur, Alpaslan

2013-01-01

353

Late effects of radiotherapy on patients with cerebellar medulloblastoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nine long-term survivors of cerebellar medulloblastoma treated with surgery and irradiation were retrospectively examined with a complete battery of neuropsychological tests and the results compared with their nonirradiated siblings. Significant decreased scores were found in the full-scale intelligence quotients (IQ), performance IQ, and verbal IQ with all nine irradiated patients scoring below their siblings. Also, educational quotients (EQ) of the

C. L. Silverman; H. Palkes; B. Talent; E. Kovnar; J. W. Clouse; Prm Thomas

1984-01-01

354

Educational intervention to increase detection of metabolic syndrome in patients at community mental health centers.  

PubMed

The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated illness is approximately double in individuals with mental illness compared with the general public. An educational intervention on metabolic syndrome was provided to mental health counselors, who performed intake assessments of patients newly admitted to two outpatient mental health facilities. Researchers of the current study first measured mastery of metabolic syndrome content following the educational intervention; they then conducted a chart audit on new admissions to measure changes in clinician behavior. Prior to the intervention, neither facility screened for metabolic syndrome at intake or referred patients with a body mass index (BMI) >25 for medical evaluation. A paired t test showed no significant difference in the educational pre-posttest scores; however, following the intervention, 53 of 132 patients had a documented BMI >25, and 47 of 53 patients were referred to a primary care provider for evaluation. The current study's findings suggest that mental health counselors who screen for metabolic syndrome and associated illnesses will increase the rate of detection of these chronic conditions. PMID:25019253

Arms, Tamatha; Bostic, Tawanda; Cunningham, Patricia

2014-09-01

355

Patient Safety in the Context of Neonatal Intensive Care: Research and Educational Opportunities  

PubMed Central

Case reports and observational studies continue to report adverse events from medical errors. However, despite considerable attention to patient safety in the popular media, this topic is not a regular component of medical education, and much research needs to be carried out to understand the causes, consequences, and prevention of healthcare-related adverse events during neonatal intensive care. To address the knowledge gaps and to formulate a research and educational agenda in neonatology, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) invited a panel of experts to a workshop in August 2010. Patient safety issues discussed were: the reasons for errors, including systems design, working conditions, and worker fatigue; a need to develop a “culture” of patient safety; the role of electronic medical records, information technology, and simulators in reducing errors; error disclosure practices; medico-legal concerns; and educational needs. Specific neonatology-related topics discussed were: errors during resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, and performance of invasive procedures; medication errors including those associated with milk feedings; diagnostic errors; and misidentification of patients. This article provides an executive summary of the workshop. PMID:21386749

Raju, Tonse N. K.; Suresh, Gautham; Higgins, Rosemary D.

2012-01-01

356

Effectiveness of oral health education programs: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

In recent years, attention has been drawn toward assessing the effectiveness of oral health education programs. This is in line with demand for evidence based research and will help to inform policy makers on how to allocate resources. (1) Collect and collate all information on oral health education programs. (2) Assess the programs based on various coding criteria. (3) Assess effectiveness of oral health education programs on oral health status and knowledge, attitude and practice. A search of all published articles in Medline was done using the keywords “oral health education, dental health education, oral health promotion”. The resulting titles and abstracts provided the basis for initial decisions and selection of articles. Out of the primary list of articles, a total number of 40 articles were selected as they fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: (1). Articles on oral health programs with an oral health education component (2). Articles published after the year 1990 (3). Articles published in English. The full text of the articles was then obtained from either the internet or libraries of dental research colleges and hospitals in and around Bangalore. A set of important variables were identified and grouped under five headings to make them amenable for coding. The coding variables were then described under various subheadings to allow us to compare the chosen articles. Oral health education is effective in improving the knowledge attitude and practice of oral health and in reducing plaque, bleeding on probing of the gingiva and caries increment. This study identifies a few important variables which contribute to the effectiveness of the programs. There is an indication in this review that the most successful oral health programs are labor intensive, involve significant others and has received funding and additional support. A balance between inputs and outputs and health care resources available will determine if the program can be recommended for general use. PMID:24778989

Nakre, Priya Devadas; Harikiran, A. G.

2013-01-01

357

A systematic review of the effects of residency training on patient outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background Residents are vital to the clinical workforce of today and tomorrow. Although in training to become specialists, they also provide much of the daily patient care. Residency training aims to prepare residents to provide a high quality of care. It is essential to assess the patient outcome aspects of residency training, to evaluate the effect or impact of global investments made in training programs. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effects of relevant aspects of residency training on patient outcomes. Methods The literature was searched from December 2004 to February 2011 using MEDLINE, Cochrane, Embase and the Education Resources Information Center databases with terms related to residency training and (post) graduate medical education and patient outcomes, including mortality, morbidity, complications, length of stay and patient satisfaction. Included studies evaluated the impact of residency training on patient outcomes. Results Ninety-seven articles were included from 182 full-text articles of the initial 2,001 hits. All studies were of average or good quality and the majority had an observational study design. Ninety-six studies provided insight into the effect of 'the level of experience of residents' on patient outcomes during residency training. Within these studies, the start of the academic year was not without risk (five out of 19 studies), but individual progression of residents (seven studies) as well as progression through residency training (nine out of 10 studies) had a positive effect on patient outcomes. Compared with faculty, residents' care resulted mostly in similar patient outcomes when dedicated supervision and additional operation time were arranged for (34 out of 43 studies). After new, modified or improved training programs, patient outcomes remained unchanged or improved (16 out of 17 studies). Only one study focused on physicians' prior training site when assessing the quality of patient care. In this study, training programs were ranked by complication rates of their graduates, thus linking patient outcomes back to where physicians were trained. Conclusions The majority of studies included in this systematic review drew attention to the fact that patient care appears safe and of equal quality when delivered by residents. A minority of results pointed to some negative patient outcomes from the involvement of residents. Adequate supervision, room for extra operation time, and evaluation of and attention to the individual competence of residents throughout residency training could positively serve patient outcomes. Limited evidence is available on the effect of residency training on later practice. Both qualitative and quantitative research designs are needed to clarify which aspects of residency training best prepare doctors to deliver high quality care. PMID:22742521

2012-01-01

358

Continuing Medical Education Effect on Practice Performance: Effectiveness of Continuing Medical Education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There has been sizable debate and widespread skepticism about the effect of continuing medical education (CME) on the performance of physicians in the practice setting. This portion of the review was undertaken to examine that effect. Methods: The guideline panel used data from a comprehensive review of the effectiveness of CME developed by The Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center,

Dave Davis; Robert Galbraith

2009-01-01

359

Educating Adolescents About Healthy Sleep: Experimental Study of Effectiveness of Educational Leaflet  

PubMed Central

Aim To evaluate how exposure to educational leaflet about healthy sleep affects knowledge about sleep in adolescents. Methods The study included students aged 15-18 years from 12 high schools (1209 participants; 85% of eligible study population). Multistage sampling was used and the selected schools were randomly assigned into two intervention groups and two control groups, according to the Solomon experimental design. Intervention groups received educational leaflets and control groups did not. In one of the intervention groups and one of the control groups, pre-testing of knowledge about sleep was performed. Students answered the Sleep Knowledge Test, which was constructed in accordance with the information on the leaflet. Data were analyzed by four-way ANOVA and additional analyses of simple main effects were performed. Results Positive effect of educational leaflet was found in students aged 15 (F?=?28.46; P?effect in students aged 18 (P?=?0.467). In male students, positive effect of the leaflet was found only in the group that had not been pre-tested (F?=?6.29; P?=?0.012), while in female students, it was found in both pre-tested (F?=?26.24; P?effect in pre-tested group (F?=?5.70; P?=?0.017). Female students generally showed better knowledge about sleep than male students (F?=?95.95; P?Educational leaflets can be an effective first step in educating younger high school students about healthy sleep, with the method being more effective in female adolescents. PMID:19399951

Bakotic, Marija; Radosevic-Vidacek, Biserka; Koscec, Adrijana

2009-01-01

360

Educational Effects of Practical Education Using a Debate Exercise on Engineering Ethics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The educational effects of practical education using a debate exercise are investigated using questionnaires. For the group-work composed of discussion and debate, students understand thoroughly various engineering ethical topics, such as factors preventing ethical decision-making. Students enhance their abilities to make a rational and logical decision by themselves such as a judgment based on correct information. Mutual evaluation by students through group interaction elevates positive educational effects. However, students answer fewer questions related to the understanding of professional duties and cooperate social responsibility because of the group-work using failure cases. Students also show less progress in their abilities to communicate with others and to express their opinions to audiences. A more suitable number of group members solves the latter problem.

Takanokura, Masato; Hayashi, Shigeo

361

Computing & Interpreting Effect Sizes in Educational Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present article provides a primer on using effect sizes in research. A small heuristic data set is used in order to make the discussion concrete. Additionally, various admonitions for best practice in reporting and interpreting effect sizes are presented. Among these is the admonition to not use Cohen's benchmarks for "small," "medium," and…

Thompson, Bruce

2009-01-01

362

The Greenhouse Effect and Built Environment Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The greenhouse effect has always existed. Without the greenhouse effect, Earth could well have the oven-like environment of Venus or the deep-freeze environment of Mars. There is some debate about how much the Earth's surface temperature will rise given a certain amount of increase in the amount of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous…

Greenall Gough, Annette; Gough, Noel

363

Maintaining Effective Classroom Control in Vocational Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook is designed to assist vocational teachers in maintaining effective classroom and laboratory control. Following an introduction to the topic, the importance of effective control and teacher attitude are overviewed. The third section offers definitions of discipline and "in loco parentis", a perspective on discipline, and reasons for…

Bowen, Blannie E., Ed.; McCracken, J. David

364

Effectiveness of Educational Programs on Nutritional Behavior in Addicts Referring to Baharan Hospital, Zahedan (Eastern of IR Iran)  

PubMed Central

Background: There are many factors which affect nutritional status of addicted such as lack o f knowledge, incorrect attitude toward modification of food pattern, and careless to food intake. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational program on nutritional behavior in addicts referring to Baharan hospital in Zahedan. Patients and Methods: Thirty-six addict patients were selected randomly. After recording general demographic data of patients, nutritional behaviors were determined. To determine the effectiveness of nutritional educational program, pre and post-tests were performed. Evaluation of nutritional behavior was determined as poor, fair and satisfactory levels. Statically analysis was performed by SPSS software. Results: Most addict patients had a medium level of education. Improvement in knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of patients after intervention was observed as follows; decreasing KAP in poor level (2.8% vs. 30.6%), (3% vs. 50%), (25% vs. 80.6%), respectively; also, increasing KAP in fair level (7% vs. 55.6 %), (15% vs. 15%), (19% vs. 7%), respectively and increasing KAP in satisfactory levels (77.8% vs. 13.8%), (50% vs. 8.3%), and (22.2% vs. 0%), respectively (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference regarding the grade of KAP in patients based on gender, marital status, and education level after education (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study showed that nutritional KAP was improved in addicts. After intervention, there was a significant difference in the score of knowledge, attitude, and practice scores in patients in the current study. KAP was improved in patients after intervention including; decreased KAP in poor level and increased KAP in fair and satisfactory levels. This finding indicates that addict patients would like to modify their life style. PMID:25032162

Karajibani, Mansour; Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Dashipour, Alireza; Lashkaripour, Kobra; Abery, Maryam; Salari, Sajedeh

2014-01-01

365

Setting, patient, and doctor effects on drug response in neurotic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diazepam was compared to placebo and phenobarbital sodium in a double-blind study with 472 anxious psychoneurotic patients. Patients were treated in 3 settings — medical clinic, general practice, and private psychiatric practice. The treatment setting was found to be at least as important as the medication in producing a treatment response. Drug effects were pronounced. Compared to phenobarbital patients, diazepam

Peter T. Hesbacher; Karl Rickels; Paul E. Gordon; Bruce Gray; Robert Meckelnburg; Charles C. Weise; W. J. Vandervort

1970-01-01

366

Effects of a Program of Career Education in Kentucky's Education Region XII: Phase Two. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data were gathered relevant to two components, professional staff and students, to identify and assess effective and/or ineffective practices and procedures in the second phase of a Regional Career Education Program conducted in eight Eastern Kentucky counties. The data base, collected in the 1974 study (Phase 1), was used to provide comparisons…

Omvig, Clayton P.

367

AMEE Guide No. 12. Multiprofessional Education: Part 1--Effective Multiprofessional Education: A Three-Dimensional Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that the extent to which the approach to multiprofessional education matches the context for the learning and curriculum goals is an indication of its effectiveness. Recommends that a three-dimensional model be used for planning and implementation of these programs. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

Harden, R. M.

1998-01-01

368

Cost-Effectiveness and Educational Policy. Yearbook of the American Education Finance Association, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers provides decision-makers with tools to improve resource allocation. The two primary tools, or modes, are cost-effective analysis and cost-benefit analysis, which researchers in education have devised and refined. This volume has three main goals, all intended to help decision-makers construct a useful research program:…

Levin, Henry M., Ed.; McEwan, Patrick J., Ed.

369

[The effective Communication in Vaccination Program as a Patient Safety tool: the Lombardy region experience].  

PubMed

The communication is strategic in Public Health because it is at the heart of who we are as human beings. It is our way of exchanging information and it also ensures the effectiveness of empowerment strategies. In this semantic context, the effective communication/education/information can be a Patient Safety tool because can reduce the adverse events by failure of information or education. In the multicultural collectivity, the risk of miscommunication and unsafe care is very high. This paper describes the design of a multilingual information/education tools to reduce the information failure in vaccination and the related adverse events by information failure or deficiency of adherence in the paediatric vaccination. PMID:23073376

Amato, S; Aquino, I; Basilico, O; Cicciarello, E; Gramegna, M; Laviola, F; Malchiodi, G; Mazzoleni, G; Mozzanica, D; Omarini, S; Oppezzo, C; Panciroli, E; Picchetti, C

2012-01-01

370

Inpatient Diabetes Education Is Associated With Less Frequent Hospital Readmission Among Patients With Poor Glycemic Control  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To explore the relationship between inpatient diabetes education (IDE) and hospital readmissions in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients with a discharge diagnosis of diabetes (ICD-9 code 250.x) and HbA1c >9% who were hospitalized between 2008 and 2010 were retrospectively identified. All-cause first readmissions were determined within 30 days and 180 days after discharge. IDE was conducted by a certified diabetes educator or trainee. Relationships between IDE and hospital readmission were analyzed with stepwise backward logistic regression models. RESULTS In all, 2,265 patients were included in the 30-day analysis and 2,069 patients were included in the 180-day analysis. Patients who received IDE had a lower frequency of readmission within 30 days than did those who did not (11 vs. 16%; P = 0.0001). This relationship persisted after adjustment for sociodemographic and illness-related factors (odds ratio 0.66 [95% CI 0.51–0.85]; P = 0.001). Medicaid insurance and longer stay were also independent predictors in this model. IDE was also associated with reduced readmissions within 180 days, although the relationship was attenuated. In the final 180-day model, no IDE, African American race, Medicaid or Medicare insurance, longer stay, and lower HbA1c were independently associated with increased hospital readmission. Further analysis determined that higher HbA1c was associated with lower frequency of readmission only among patients who received a diabetes education consult. CONCLUSIONS Formal IDE was independently associated with a lower frequency of all-cause hospital readmission within 30 days; this relationship was attenuated by 180 days. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this association. PMID:23835695

Healy, Sara J.; Black, Dawn; Harris, Cara; Lorenz, Andrew; Dungan, Kathleen M.

2013-01-01

371

[Lifestyle changes: effects on an obese patient].  

PubMed

Obesity is often caused by an unhealthy lifestyle, which is a composite of various individual behaviors. Nurses may assist obese patients to lose weight and avoid chronic disease by identifying risky lifestyle behaviors and helping to develop improvement strategies. This article describes the nursing experience of the authors in caring for an obese patient who had made several unsuccessful attempts to reduce weight. An intervention approach was used to review the patient's lifestyle. Using self-regulation theory, the authors identified that the patient's fat-related daily behavior included: lack of exercise, high-fat diet, and daily snacks consumed even late at night. The authors also helped the patient discover the reasons underlying his fat- related behavior and his previous failed attempts to lose weight and to develop a feasible improved approach that considered such. After six weeks of care, the patient's body weight had reduced and body fat and body mass index had decreased with no relapse. The patient further lost significant weight and body fat during the three-month follow up period. The authors would like to share with nursing professionals this approach to weight loss, with the hope that this case study can contribute to medical efforts to help obese patients not only lose weight but also prevent chronic illnesses. PMID:21809294

Wu, Ya-Ke; Lin, Chiu-Chu

2011-08-01

372

Usability of a Patient Education and Motivation Tool Using Heuristic Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Background Computer-mediated educational applications can provide a self-paced, interactive environment to deliver educational content to individuals about their health condition. These programs have been used to deliver health-related information about a variety of topics, including breast cancer screening, asthma management, and injury prevention. We have designed the Patient Education and Motivation Tool (PEMT), an interactive computer-based educational program based on behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic learning theories. The tool is designed to educate users and has three key components: screening, learning, and evaluation. Objective The objective of this tutorial is to illustrate a heuristic evaluation using a computer-based patient education program (PEMT) as a case study. The aims were to improve the usability of PEMT through heuristic evaluation of the interface; to report the results of these usability evaluations; to make changes based on the findings of the usability experts; and to describe the benefits and limitations of applying usability evaluations to PEMT. Methods PEMT was evaluated by three usability experts using Nielsen’s usability heuristics while reviewing the interface to produce a list of heuristic violations with severity ratings. The violations were sorted by heuristic and ordered from most to least severe within each heuristic. Results A total of 127 violations were identified with a median severity of 3 (range 0 to 4 with 0 = no problem to 4 = catastrophic problem). Results showed 13 violations for visibility (median severity = 2), 38 violations for match between system and real world (median severity = 2), 6 violations for user control and freedom (median severity = 3), 34 violations for consistency and standards (median severity = 2), 11 violations for error severity (median severity = 3), 1 violation for recognition and control (median severity = 3), 7 violations for flexibility and efficiency (median severity = 2), 9 violations for aesthetic and minimalist design (median severity = 2), 4 violations for help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors (median severity = 3), and 4 violations for help and documentation (median severity = 4). Conclusion We describe the heuristic evaluation method employed to assess the usability of PEMT, a method which uncovers heuristic violations in the interface design in a quick and efficient manner. Bringing together usability experts and health professionals to evaluate a computer-mediated patient education program can help to identify problems in a timely manner. This makes this method particularly well suited to the iterative design process when developing other computer-mediated health education programs. Heuristic evaluations provided a means to assess the user interface of PEMT. PMID:19897458

Arora, Mohit; Dai, Liwei; Price, Kathleen; Vizer, Lisa; Sears, Andrew

2009-01-01

373

Campylobacter Bacteremia in Hemodialysis Patients by Eating Raw Meat - The Importance of Sanitary Education  

PubMed Central

In 2011, simultaneous, widespread outbreaks of food poisoning by contaminated enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in beef, which killed four and hospitalized more than 30 people, occurred in Japan. While the press was widely reporting this disaster, two maintenance hemodialysis patients were suffering from Campylobacter bacteremia by eating undercooked meat. One patient was infected with C. upsaliensis and the other with C. fetus. Although these patients could be successfully treated, they led us to consider the characteristics of C. upsaliensis and C. fetus as opportunistic pathogens, as well as changes in dietary behaviors and food markets. Moreover, they emphasized the need for hemodialysis patients to be not only educated in that they should restrict potassium, phosphate and water intake, but also that they should take care of food sanitation. PMID:23197970

Shimizu, Yoshio; Ishii, Arisa; Takahata, Akiko; Kajiyama, Tadahiro; Yamahatsu, Aya; Io, Hiroaki; Kurusu, Atsushi; Hamada, Chieko; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko

2012-01-01

374

Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

2010-01-01

375

Points of View: Effective Partnerships Between K12 and Higher Education  

E-print Network

Feature Points of View: Effective Partnerships Between K­12 and Higher Education Building partnerships between K-12 education and higher educa- tion?'' K-12 educators and college/university faculty the needs and the responsibilities of our institutions of higher education to support K-12 science education

376

Educational Effects of a Tailored Leaflet Addressing Drinking During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To examine the educational effects of a tailored leaflet on current drinking behavior, thoughts about drinking alcohol during pregnancy, and knowledge of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) among pregnant women. DESIGN Intervention. PARTICIPANTS We recruited pregnant women who were participating in maternity classes held at five municipal health centers in Saitama Prefecture and Tokyo in Japan. METHODS Questionnaires were administered before and after distribution of either a tailored or a non-tailored leaflet and again after the women delivered their babies. RESULTS More women read the non-tailored leaflet than the tailored one; this was because they felt they could read the non-tailored leaflet immediately. As for educational effects, the tailored leaflet was not superior to the non-tailored one in changing the women’s behavior, thoughts, or knowledge. CONCLUSION It is more important for health education leaflets to seem easy to read in terms of volume than to be tailored. PMID:24812531

Toyama, Natsumi; Sudo, Noriko

2014-01-01

377

Importance of therapeutic patient education in ichthyosis: results of a prospective single reference center study  

PubMed Central

Background Ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of rare genodermatoses. Patients and their families face difficulties related to daily care and management that may be aggravated by social isolation. Objectives To evaluate the impact of therapeutic educational programs in improving the knowledge of ichthyosis patients, and their relatives, about their disease. Patients and methods We organized a two sessions-program of “know-how” dedicated to the overall management of ichthyoses. These sessions were conducted based on a tool specifically designed for the study, which addressed our various areas of expertise through a collective game. The participants (patients and their parents and siblings) were divided into groups, and the questions were tailored according to the participants’ age. The program was conceived as a knowledge reinforcement program that took place during a weekend of education and rest, organized away from healthcare structures. Our aim was to facilitate the program in a neutral place to encourage respite care and to ensure the availability of a multidisciplinary healthcare team. Results After the reinforcement session, children aged from 6 to 12 years and their families acquired the targeted know-how and social skills. Conclusion Benefits of TPE in the management of ichthyoses are the following: (1) the trust between patients their families and the caregivers was strengthened; (2) the context of the program encouraged self-expression, answered questions and provided mutual aid; and (3) the more self-sufficient families could better manage emergencies. PMID:23902898

2013-01-01

378

Effectiveness of Nonpharmacological Approaches in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients are at increased risk of developing dementia. There is a conflict if cognitive interventions can improve cognitive and functional performances in order to delay the development of dementia. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a holistic cognitive rehabilitation program on patients with MCI. Methods: The participants, 176 MCI patients with Mini-Mental

Magda Tsolaki; Fotini Kounti; Christina Agogiatou; Eleni Poptsi; Evangelia Bakoglidou; Myrto Zafeiropoulou; Aikaterini Soumbourou; Evdokia Nikolaidou; Georgia Batsila; Aikaterini Siambani; Stella Nakou; Christos Mouzakidis; Anna Tsiakiri; Stavros Zafeiropoulos; Konstantina Karagiozi; Chaido Messini; Alexandra Diamantidou; Maria Vasiloglou

2011-01-01

379

The relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the Netherlands.  

PubMed

Active provider choice by patients has become an important policy theme in western, countries over the last decades. However, not many patients and consumers exercise their right to, choose. Both health literacy and patient activation are likely to have an impact on the choice process. In, this article the relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the, Netherlands is studied. A questionnaire was sent to a representative sample of 2000 Dutch citizens. The questionnaire, included a measure of functional health literacy, the Dutch version of the Patient Activation Measure, and questions assessing active provider choice, reasons not to engage in it and other ways of provider, selection. The majority of respondents (59.6%) would not search for information on the basis of which they, could select the best provider or hospital. Most people rely on their general practitioner's advice. Both, low literacy and lower patient activation levels were negatively associated with active provider choice. In a regression analysis gender, education and patient activation proved the most important, predictors. The policy focus on active provider choice might result in inequity, with men, less educated, and less activated people being at a disadvantage. PMID:23972373

Rademakers, Jany; Nijman, Jessica; Brabers, Anne E M; de Jong, Judith D; Hendriks, Michelle

2014-02-01

380

Comparison of neurological healthcare oriented educational resources for patients on the internet.  

PubMed

The internet has become a major contributor to health literacy promotion. The average American reads at 7th-8th grade level and it is recommended to write patient education materials at or below 6th grade reading level. We tried to assess the level of literacy required to read and understand online patient education materials (OPEM) for neurological diseases from various internet resources. We then compared those to an assumed reference OPEM source, namely the patient education brochures from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world's largest professional association of neurologists. Disease specific patient education brochures were downloaded from the AAN website. OPEM for these diseases were also accessed from other common online sources determined using a predefined criterion. All OPEM were converted to Microsoft Word (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, USA) and their reading level was analyzed using Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1 (Oleander Software, Vandalia, OH, USA). Descriptive analysis and analysis of variance were used to compare reading levels of OPEM from different resources. Medline Plus, Mayo clinic and Wikipedia qualified for OPEM analysis. All OPEM from these resources, including the AAN, were written above the recommended 6th grade reading level. They were also found to be "fairly difficult", "difficult" or "confusing" on the Flesch Reading Ease scale. AAN OPEM on average needed lower reading level, with Wikipedia OPEM being significantly (p<0.01) more difficult to read compared to the other three resources. OPEM on neurological diseases are being written at a level of reading complexity higher than the average American and the recommended reading levels. This may be undermining the utility of these resources. PMID:25194822

Punia, Vineet; Dagar, Anjali; Agarwal, Nitin; He, Wenzhuan; Hillen, Machteld

2014-12-01

381

Computer-based Approaches to Patient Education : A Review of the Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

All articles indexed in MEDLINE or CINAHL, related to the use of computer technology in patient education, and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1971 and 1998 were selected for review. Sixty-six articles, including 21 research-based reports, were identified.Forty-five percent of the studies were related to the management of chronic disease. Thirteen studies described an improvement in knowledge scores or clinical

Deborah Lewis

1999-01-01

382

Prevention Education Effects on Fundamental Memory Processes  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated effects of a key session from a nationally recognized drug abuse prevention program on basic memory processes in 211 high-risk youth in Southern California. In a randomized, between-subject design, the authors manipulated assignment to a Myth and Denial program session and the time of assessment (immediate vs. one-week delay). The authors examined program decay effects on memory accessibility and judgment errors. Those participants exposed to the program session generated more myths and facts from the program than those in the control group, suggesting that even a single program session influenced students’ memory for program information and this was retained at least one week and detectable with indirect tests of memory accessibility. However, consistent with basic research perspectives, participants in the program delayed assessment group erroneously generated more fact-related information from the session to the prompt “It is a myth that_____” than the participants in the program immediate assessment group; that is, they retained more facts as myths. These types of program effects, anticipated by basic memory theory, were not detected with a traditional judgment task in the present sample. The results suggest that basic science approaches offer a novel way of conceptually recasting prevention effects to more completely understand how these effects may operate. Implications for program evaluation and conceptualization are discussed. PMID:22544598

Ames, Susan L.; Krank, Marvin; Grenard, Jerry L.; Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan W.

2014-01-01

383

Can patient flow be effectively controlled?  

PubMed

BACKGROUND Emergency department (ED) overcrowding may affect the ability to provide quality care and maximize patient flow. Study objectives To analyse the impact of the control of the patient flow during a conflict on ED overcrowding. METHODS During a recent military conflict in Israel the Ministry of Health issued a directive aimed at redirecting the patient flow to EDs in a metropolitan area. The admissions were monitored to identify trends and determine if any changes occurred after the policy change. RESULTS Medical admissions in the only level I trauma centre decreased by 6.5% after the notification, while rising in two other level II hospitals by 3.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Pre- and post-conflict trauma admissions in the level I trauma centre dropped by 2.2% and increased by 6.4% and 1.8%, respectively, in the other hospitals. CONCLUSIONS It is possible to direct the flow of patients to EDs and rationalize the use of resources, making it possible for patients to be admitted to EDs best able to care for them. These findings are especially relevant to emergency situations, but also to non-emergent situations in which control of patient flow may be required. Direct communication with the public is recommended to minimize the implementation time of directives regarding patient flow. PMID:21278076

Adini, Bruria; Cohen, Robert; Laor, Daniel; Israeli, Avi

2011-11-01

384

Effects and side effects of inspections and accountability in education: an overview of empirical studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of studies into effects and side effects of control mechanisms in education. We focus on effects and side effects of inspection visits and public performance indicators. A first conclusion is that the studies do not provide us with a clear answer to the question of whether inspections have positive causal effects on the quality of

Inge F. de Wolf; Frans J. G. Janssens

2007-01-01

385

Effects and Side Effects of Inspections and Accountability in Education: An Overview of Empirical Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents an overview of studies into effects and side effects of control mechanisms in education. We focus on effects and side effects of inspection visits and public performance indicators. A first conclusion is that the studies do not provide us with a clear answer to the question of whether inspections have positive causal effects on…

de Wolf, Inge F.; Janssens, Frans J. G.

2007-01-01

386

Dimensions of Effective Interactive Learning with Telematics for Distance Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two forms of telematics, audiographics and live interactive television, that are being used for distance education in Western Australia. Effective telematics teaching is discussed, including collaboration, generative learning, contextual engagement, personal autonomy, and motivation. Recommendations for further research are included.…

Oliver, Ron; Reeves, Thomas C.

1996-01-01

387

Characteristics of Effective Interpreter Education Programs in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The general purpose of this study was to investigate effective practices of interpreting education programs in the United States as measured by the readiness to credential gap. The increasing demand for interpreters has created an environment with under-credentialed interpreters and this is compounded by the fact that the field of interpreter…

Godfrey, Lisa Ann Boegner

2010-01-01

388

The effect of veterans' benefits on education and earnings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Veterans benefits that subsidize education and training constitute the largest federal program for student aid. Using data from the 1987 Survey of Veterans, the author presents estimates of the effect of veterans benefits on schooling completed since entering the military and on subsequent earnings. Veterans benefits are estimated to increase schooling by roughly 1.4 years, which implies annual earnings approximately

Joshua D. Angrist

1993-01-01

389

Apartheid; Its Effects on Education, Science, Culture and Information.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prepared in response to growing criticism of South Africa's policies of apartheid, this report was designed to assess the effects of such policies within South Africa. The results of the investigation are carefully laid out under four general areas. The first section deals with education, covering its aims, administration and finance, enrollment,…

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

390

Constructing a Model for the Effective Mentoring of Music Educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, a model for the effective mentoring of music educators is presented. Mentoring and induction literature is referenced to examine recent trends and determine the contents of the model. The model begins with state government design and funding of a mentoring program. Layers are built on this foundation, including (a) support of professional organizations; (b) mentor selection, training,

Jay N. Jacobs

2008-01-01

391

Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences. Educational Practices Series-23  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is a synthesis of research on social sciences teaching that has been shown to have a positive effect on a range of desirable student outcomes: cognitive, skills, participatory and affective outcomes. Education in the social sciences plays an important role in developing students' sense of identity and influencing the ways in which…

Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, Graeme

2012-01-01

392

Case Studies of Educational Effectiveness in Rural China  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much educational effectiveness research has been conducted over the past 40 years in developed countries, whereas few studies have focused on developing or newly industrialized countries such as the People's Republic of China. The case studies discussed in this article are part of a larger multiple-case, mixed-methods study that investigated 6…

Liu, Shujie; Teddlie, Charles

2009-01-01

393

Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The health benefits of physical activity are well documented, and the important role that schools and physical education (PE) can play in reducing sedentary behavior and contributing to population health has been identified. Although effective teaching is ultimately judged by student achievement, a major component of teacher and school…

McKenzie, Thomas L.; Lounsbery, Monica A. F.

2013-01-01

394

Effective Pedagogy in Mathematics. Educational Practices Series-19  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet focuses on effective mathematics teaching. Drawing on a wide range of research, it describes the kinds of pedagogical approaches that engage learners and lead to desirable outcomes. The aim of the booklet is to deepen the understanding of practitioners, teacher educators, and policy makers and assist them to optimize opportunities for…

Anthony, Glenda; Walshaw, Margaret

2009-01-01

395

Inservice Education Programs for Principals Promotes sic! Effective Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research indicates that the behavior of a school's principal is crucial to educational quality. A staff development program in the Wheeling, Illinois, school district, based on Madeline Hunter's clinical supervision model, has helped principals to become effective leaders in instructional improvement. (MCG)

Gerald, Virginia W.; Sloan, Charles A.

1984-01-01

396

Measuring the Distributional Effects of Public Education in Peru.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the 1985-86 Peru Living Standards Survey were used to analyze the targeting of public education expenditures and the effects on enrollment of public school fees and reduced travel time to secondary schools. This chapter also focuses on strengths and weaknesses of using either an estimation-based measure of benefit or a…

Selden, Thomas M.; Wasylenko, Michael J.

397

Revealing the Effects of Cognitive Education Programmes through Dynamic Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The major objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of dynamic assessment (DA) in revealing outcomes of cognitive education programmes. Three programmes based on "mediated learning experience" theory are reviewed: "Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment", "Bright Start", and "Peer Mediation with Young Children". In all three…

Tzuriel, David

2011-01-01

398

The Short Term Effect of Educational Debt on Job Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper studies the effect of educational debt on a college attendee's future wage and wage growth. I hypothesize that those who took larger loans to pay for college are subject to higher borrowing interest rates and thus prefer income profiles with higher initial earnings, sacrificing future income growth, relative to those who did not take on…

Minicozzi, A.

2005-01-01

399

Effect of Sexual Education on Sexual Health in Iran  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a special sex education program in sexual health on Iranian newly-wed couples. A sample of 64 couples referred to three health centers of Tehran Medicine University, a few months prior to their marriage, were divided into case and control groups. The case group received three lecture sessions…

Farnam, Farnaz; Pakgohar, Minoo; Mirmohamadali, Mandana; Mahmoodi, Mahmood

2008-01-01

400

The Effects of Postsecondary Correctional Education: "Final Report"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research presented in this report examines the effect of prison-based postsecondary education (PSE) on offenders both while incarcerated and after release. Urban Institute researchers worked with the staff of four institutions in three states to conduct inmate focus groups and stakeholder interviews to explore the motivations for enrolling in…

Winterfield, Laura; Coggeshall, Mark; Burke-Storer, Michelle; Correa, Vanessa; Tidd, Simon

2009-01-01

401

The Effects of College Type and Characteristics on Educational Attainment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of institutional types and their structural and compositional characteristics on students entering two- or four-year academic programs were examined, with a focus on students' educational attainment. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972. Individual student variables were considered,…

Anderson, Kristine L.

402

Effective computer use in physics education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The computer is a relatively new device in teaching physics. Experience is necessary to determine how it can be used in the most effective way. This paper oulines a variety of uses which have proved successful with physics students at the University of California, Irvine. The types of usage are (1) diagnostic remedial, (2) games, (3) interactive proofs, (4) alternate

Alfred M. Bork

1975-01-01

403

Effectiveness and Sustainability of Education about Incident Reporting at a University Hospital in Japan  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of educational interventions to encourage incident reporting. Methods This was a quasi-experimental design. The study involved nurses working in two gastroenterology surgical wards at Fukuoka University Hospital, Japan. The number of participants on each ward was 26 nurses at baseline. For the intervention group, we provided 15 minutes of education about patient safety and the importance of incident reporting once per month for six months. After the completion of the intervention, we compared incident reporting in the subsequent 12 months for both groups. Questionnaires about reasons/motives for reporting were administered three times, before the intervention, after the intervention, and six months after the intervention for both the intervention group and the control group. Results For the intervention group, incident reporting during the 6 months after the intervention period increased significantly compared with the baseline. During the same period, the reasons and motives for reporting changed significantly in the intervention group. The increase in reported incidents during the 6- to 12-month period following the intervention was not significant. In the control group, there was no significant difference during follow-up compared with the baseline. Conclusions A brief intervention about patient safety changed the motives for reporting incidents and the frequency of incidents reported by nurses working in surgical wards in a university hospital in Japan. However, the effect of the education decreased after six months following the education. Regular and long-term effort is required to maintain the effect of education. PMID:25152834

Yamashita, Yuichi; Tanihara, Shinichi; Maeda, Chiemi

2014-01-01

404

Effects of Welfare Reform on Education Acquisition of Adult Women.  

PubMed

Education beyond traditional ages for schooling is an important source of human capital acquisition among adult women. Welfare reform, which began in the early 1990s and culminated in the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act in 1996, promoted work rather than education acquisition for this group. Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, we undertake a comprehensive study of the effects of welfare reform on adult women's education acquisition. We first estimate effects of welfare reform on high school drop-out of teenage girls, both to improve upon past research on this issue and to explore compositional changes that may be relevant for our primary analyses of the effects of welfare reform on education acquisition among adult women. We find that welfare reform significantly reduced the probability that teens from disadvantaged families dropped out of high school, by about 15%. We then estimate the effects of welfare reform on adult women's school enrollment and conduct numerous specification checks, investigate compositional selection and policy endogeneity, explore lagged effects, stratify by TANF work incentives and education policies, consider alternative comparison groups, and explore the mediating role of work. We find robust and convincing evidence that welfare reform significantly decreased the probability of college enrollment among adult women at risk of welfare receipt, by at least 20%. It also appears to have decreased the probability of high school enrollment among this group, on the same order of magnitude. Future research is needed to determine the extent to which this behavioral change translates to future economic outcomes. PMID:23504449

Dave, Dhaval M; Corman, Hope; Reichman, Nancy E

2012-06-01

405

Effects of Welfare Reform on Education Acquisition of Adult Women  

PubMed Central

Education beyond traditional ages for schooling is an important source of human capital acquisition among adult women. Welfare reform, which began in the early 1990s and culminated in the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act in 1996, promoted work rather than education acquisition for this group. Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, we undertake a comprehensive study of the effects of welfare reform on adult women’s education acquisition. We first estimate effects of welfare reform on high school drop-out of teenage girls, both to improve upon past research on this issue and to explore compositional changes that may be relevant for our primary analyses of the effects of welfare reform on education acquisition among adult women. We find that welfare reform significantly reduced the probability that teens from disadvantaged families dropped out of high school, by about 15%. We then estimate the effects of welfare reform on adult women’s school enrollment and conduct numerous specification checks, investigate compositional selection and policy endogeneity, explore lagged effects, stratify by TANF work incentives and education policies, consider alternative comparison groups, and explore the mediating role of work. We find robust and convincing evidence that welfare reform significantly decreased the probability of college enrollment among adult women at risk of welfare receipt, by at least 20%. It also appears to have decreased the probability of high school enrollment among this group, on the same order of magnitude. Future research is needed to determine the extent to which this behavioral change translates to future economic outcomes. PMID:23504449

Dave, Dhaval M.; Corman, Hope; Reichman, Nancy E.

2013-01-01

406

The effects of physical exercise on patients with Crohn's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:Despite the suggested benefits of exercise training in the prevention and management of chronic diseases, few data exist regarding the safety of exercise in Crohn's disease and whether or not exercise may have beneficial effects on patients' health. We performed a pilot study to evaluate the effects of regular light-intensity exercise on sedentary patients with Crohn's disease.METHODS:Sedentary patients with inactive

Colleen P. Loudon; Victor Corroll; Janice Butcher; Patricia Rawsthorne; Charles N. Bernstein

1999-01-01

407

Gastrointestinal adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs in intractable epileptic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gastrointestinal (GI) discomforts are among the most common side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that might lead to discontinuation or irregular consumption of the drugs. This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of GI side effects of different AEDs in intractable epileptic patients treated with single or multiple drugs. GI discomfort of 100 epileptic patients (aged 35–76 years) treated

Soodeh Razeghi Jahromi; Mansoureh Togha; Sohrab Hashemi Fesharaki; Masoumeh Najafi; Nahid Beladi Moghadam; Jalil Arab Kheradmand; Hadi Kazemi; Ali Gorji

2011-01-01

408

Effects of a Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program on Patient Self-Care Outcomes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program on patient self-care outcomes. METHOD. We used a retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of 1,292 patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. Self-care scores from the FIM™ for patients who participated in rehabilitation before implementation of an SPHM program were compared with the scores of patients who participated after implementation of the program. RESULTS. Patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program. CONCLUSION. SPHM programs may not affect self-care performance in adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. However, more work must be done to define specific and effective methods for integrating patient handling technologies into occupational therapy practice. PMID:25184472

Shiyko, Mariya; Margulis, Heather; Campo, Marc

2014-01-01

409

Office laboratory procedures, office economics, patient and parent education, and urinary tract infection.  

PubMed

This section updates the reader on four important areas of office practice: office laboratory procedures, office economics, patient and parent education, and urinary tract infections. Dr. Michael Aldous reviews the recent literature about office laboratory procedures, including the continued impact of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Ammendments, what is new in the diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis, urinalysis improvements, the diagnosis of anemia, and which patients should undergo cholesterol screening. Dr. Rickey Williams discusses the literature on office economics, including new technology for billing and charting, whether pediatricians should bill for telephone calls, and the latest information on health care policy and the changes offices are facing with the growing managed care market. Dr. Burris Duncan reviews patient and parent education, including new apporaches to infant colic, sleep positioning for the prevention of sudden infant death, the need for the hepatitis B vaccine (which has been slowly implemented), and finally ways that pediatricians can help with parenting. Dr. John Ey discusses the recent literature on urinary tract infections in children, including better ways of making the diagnosis, whether there are any new treatment approaches for urinary tract infections, useful investigational studies for evaluating the urinary system, and how best to follow up children with infected urinary tracts. We hope that this review will help the practicing pediatrician to better care for patients and provide each of you with a greater satisfaction in delivering health care in an office setting. PMID:8776028

Ey, J L; Aldous, M B; Duncan, B; Williams, R L

1995-12-01

410

Education for patients with progressive CKD and acute-start dialysis.  

PubMed

For individuals living with CKD and those who have been discovered to have ESRD, the decisions facing them can be daunting. Such decisions include having renal replacement therapy (RRT) or conservative care, having a kidney transplant, or selecting a modality of dialysis that would fit their lifestyle and values. Education at this critical time is essential, but it must be tailored to the individual and his or her readiness to learn, and it must be provided with empathy and understanding of the chronicity of the disease and the magnitude of the effect of kidney failure on their life. We present strategies derived from education and psychology that can assist health-care practitioners to provide such education and support to individuals with advanced CKD. We also present an approach to educate and support those who have urgently started dialysis and require chronic RRT. This educational model has its basis in theories of education and decision-making and has been used with success in this population. PMID:23809282

Porter, Eveline; Watson, Diane; Bargman, Joanne M

2013-07-01

411

Colorectal Cancer Educational Intervention Targeting Latino Patients Attending a Community Health Center  

PubMed Central

Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death for Latino men and women; and Latinos are more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage, which is most likely due to underutilization of CRC preventive screening. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a brief, clinic-based intervention by a community health advisor (CHA) would increase CRC knowledge compared with traditional educational methodologies (eg, use of print materials). Methods Latino adults 50 years and older attending a San Diego community health center were recruited while waiting for their primary care provider routine visit and were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 CRC educational interventions: community health advisor (CHA) plus CRC educational brochure (CHA intervention group), CRC educational brochure (minimal intervention group), or 5-a-day nutrition brochure (usual care). CRC knowledge was assessed before and after the primary care provider visit for 130 participants. Results Results demonstrate that the CRC educational brochure (minimal intervention group) was effective at increasing CRC screening knowledge as compared to usual care. Conclusions Future research is needed to explore innovative health education strategies that improve knowledge and subsequent CRC screening behaviors among low-income, low-literacy, unacculturated Latinos. PMID:23803776

Castaneda, Sheila F.; Xiong, Yer; Gallo, Linda C.; Yepes-Rios, Monica; Ji, Ming; Talavera, Ana C.; Mendoza, Paulina M.; Talavera, Gregory A.

2014-01-01

412

Management of side effects associated with sunitinib therapy for patients with renal cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Advances in the understanding of the biology of renal cell carcinoma have led to recent approval of several new agents including drugs that target vascular endothelial growth factor. Sunitinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor which interferes with multiple intracellular tumorogenic pathways, and has demonstrated impressive antitumor activity in phase II and subsequently improvement in progression free survival in phase III renal cancer trials. We review the unique side effects of sunitinib therapy with emphasis on establishing effective patient education for anticipation and early management of therapy-related side effects. PMID:20616894

Schwandt, Anita; Wood, Laura S; Rini, Brian; Dreicer, Robert

2009-01-01

413

Influência do método Reequilíbrio Toracoabdominal sobre a força muscular respiratória de pacientes com fibrose cística* Influence of the technique of re-educating thoracic and abdominal muscles on respiratory muscle strength in patients with cystic fibrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the effect that re-education of the thoracic and abdominal muscles has on the respiratory muscle strength of patients with cystic fibrosis evaluated over time at the Cystic Fibrosis Outpatient Clinic of the Universidade Católica de Brasília (Catholic University of Brasília). Methods: The sample consisted of 29 cystic fibrosis patients, characterized based on anthropometric, genetic and bacterial colonization

RENATA CLAUDIA ZANCHET; MAYARA AZEVEDO CHAGAS; JULIANA SARMENTO MELO; PATRÍCIA YUKI WATANABE; AUGUSTO SIMÕES-BARBOSA; GILVÂNIA FEIJÓ

2006-01-01

414

Understanding patient perceptions following a psycho-educational intervention for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.  

PubMed

This study formed part of an evaluation of a brief educational intervention for patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). The sessions provide information, seizure control techniques and management planning. The qualitative component of the research reported here aimed to provide insight into the participants' perceptions following the intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve patients. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed and analyzed, using principles of thematic analysis. Six key themes were identified: getting answers; understanding the link with emotions; seeking a physiological explanation; doubting the diagnosis; the role of medication; and finding a way forward. The findings highlight considerable individual variation in response, with evidence of changed perceptions or enhanced understanding in some patients while others continued to seek answers or explanations about the cause of their seizures. There were no clear links between reported improved understanding or acceptance of the diagnosis and a perceived improvement in the condition. PMID:22386913

Baxter, Susan; Mayor, Rebecca; Baird, Wendy; Brown, Richard; Cock, Hannah; Howlett, Stephanie; House, Allan; Messina, Josie; Smith, Phil; Reuber, Markus

2012-04-01

415

Real-world impact of education: treating patients with ipilimumab in a community practice setting  

PubMed Central

After decades without promising new treatments for advanced and metastatic melanoma, ipilimumab was the first systemic therapy approved for use in this patient population. A fully human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) to augment antitumor T-cell responses, ipilimumab significantly extended overall survival in clinical trials. Because ipilimumab is associated with a set of immune-related adverse events that likely reflect the agent’s mechanism of action, a management guide has been established. Nurses play a significant role in initially identifying these adverse reactions and assisting in patient education, treatment, and follow-up. Herein, we discuss commonly asked questions related to ipilimumab therapy and treatment of adverse events, and how nurses can be prepared to answer these questions as they arise from patients and caregivers. PMID:24379698

Ledezma, Blanca; Heng, Annie

2014-01-01

416

Secondary prevention of diabetic foot infections in a Caribbean nation: a call for improved patient education.  

PubMed

Most countries have instituted measures to limit the complications of diabetes. We evaluate secondary prevention strategies for diabetic foot infections in a Caribbean country. We performed a prospective questionnaire study evaluating all patients admitted to tertiary care hospitals across Trinidad and Tobago from July 2011 to June 2012. Primary study end points were the number of patient-detected injuries and the time interval between injury and presentation. Secondary end points included the practice of regular foot inspection (?2 foot examinations per week) for early detection and the use of self-directed nonmedical therapies to treat foot infections. There were 446 patients admitted with diabetic foot infections at an average age of 56.9 ± 12.4 years. Three hundred and fifty-six (80%) were previously hospitalized with foot infections and 226 (51%) had already sustained end organ injury from diabetes. There were 163 (36.6%) patients walking barefoot at the time of injury and 189 (42.4%) had footwear-related injuries. In 257 (57.6%) cases, patients identified their foot injury shortly after the event. Despite early detection, they presented to hospital after a mean interval of 6.2 ± 5.03 days, with 78 (30.4%) having tried some form of home therapy first. Overall, 190 (42.6%) patients did not practice regular foot examinations. There is room for improvement in secondary preventative measures for diabetic foot infections in this setting. Educational campaigns may be beneficial to educate diabetics on the dangers of walking barefoot, the importance of appropriate footwear, regular foot inspection, and the importance of seeking immediate medical attention instead of experimenting with home remedies. PMID:23667105

Islam, Shariful; Harnarayan, Patrick; Cawich, Shamir; Mahabir, Vijai; Budhooram, Steve; Bheem, Vinoo; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Naraynsingh, Vijay

2013-09-01

417

Development and evaluation of a point-of-care interactive patient education kiosk.  

PubMed

We have developed an interactive patient education kiosk. The kiosk provides access to stored health information and to selected Websites via a high-speed Internet connection. The output is bilingual (English or Spanish) and an enclosed printer allows information to be printed and taken home for later reading. Each kiosk records patient usage, as well as the results of a brief, voluntary, online evaluation questionnaire. Three kiosks were placed in the patient waiting area of busy multi-specialty clinics. Two kiosks were active for 2.5 years and one was active for 1.5 years. There were 38,868 user sessions recorded and 2878 users participated in the online survey questionnaire (7% of all user sessions). Patient satisfaction was high; for example, 68% of respondents found some or all of the information they were looking for on the kiosk. In the year following the introduction of the first kiosk (the 2001/02 flu season), there was a 24% increase in the number of patients receiving flu vaccinations within the Palo Alto health-care system, compared with the previous year. Experience to date suggests that the kiosks may increase patient compliance with selected clinical guidelines and instructions. PMID:15603602

Goldschmidt, Leonard; Goodrich, Gregory L

2004-01-01

418

Education and Ethnic Prejudice in Europe: Explanations for Cross-National Variances in the Educational Effect on Ethnic Prejudice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied cross-national variances in the effect of education on ethnic prejudice using data from11 European countries with a total sample of 11,904 adults. Findings show that a country's democratic tradition and degree of religious heterogeneity are important for the strength of an educational effect on ethnic prejudice, while ethnic composition…

Hello, Evelyn; Scheepers, Peer; Gijsberts, Merove

2002-01-01

419

The Effects of Varicocelectomy on the Patients With Premature Ejaculation  

PubMed Central

Background: Premature ejaculation is one of the most problems in clinical practice. The association between varicocele and premature ejaculation was poorly understood. The effects of varicocelectomy on premature ejaculation in varicocele patient was studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the impacts of varicocelectomy on patients with both premature ejaculation and varicoceles. Patients and Methods: This was a clinical trial study, conducted on 124 patients (20-35 years old), with varicoceles and premature ejaculation (PE), since March 2011 to April 2013. Inguinal and sub inguinal varicocelectomy were performed for them. All patients had both impairment of spermiogram and PE. These patients were followed up for about 2 years and evaluated for PE, in addition to parameters of spermiogram, before and after the surgery. Results: A total number of 124 patients with varicoceles and PE were enrolled into the study. Following the surgery 46 patients (37%) were fully treated (P < 0.001), 78 patients (63%) had improvements in PE symptoms changed to early ejaculation (P < 0.05) and 89 patients (72%) had improved parameters of spermiogram (P < 0.002). Conclusions: In a significant number of patients who had clinical varicocele and not well responded to medical treatments for PE, varicocelectomy could effectively improve PE and spermiogram parameters. PMID:25032134

Asadpour, Amir Abbas; Aslezare, Mohammad; Nazari Adkani, Lina; Armin, Mohsen; Vojdani, Mohammad

2014-01-01

420

Teaching dental students about patient communication following an adverse event: a pilot educational module.  

PubMed

Adverse events are an important but understudied area in dentistry. Most dentists will face the issue of an adverse event several times in their clinical careers. The authors implemented a six-hour pilot educational module at one dental school to improve fourth-year dental students' knowledge and confidence in communicating with patients about adverse events. Based on results from the twenty-nine students who completed both the pre- and posttests, the module significantly increased the students' knowledge of the key concepts involved in adverse events. However, the module did not improve the students' confidence that they would be able to implement these communication skills in clinical situations. Based on these results, this article discusses how future educational efforts can be modified to better prepare students for the communication challenges associated with adverse events. PMID:24789835

Raja, Sheela; Rajagopalan, Chelsea F; Patel, Janki; Van Kanegan, Kevin

2014-05-01

421

Effects of back posture education on elementary schoolchildren's back function  

PubMed Central

The possible effects of back education on children’s back function were never evaluated. Therefore, main aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of back education in elementary schoolchildren on back function parameters. Since the reliability of back function measurement in children is poorly defined, another objective was to test the selected instruments for reliability in 8–11-year olds. The multi-factorial intervention lasting two school-years consisted of a back education program and the stimulation of postural dynamism in the class. Trunk muscle endurance, leg muscle capacity and spinal curvature were evaluated in a pre-post design including 41 children who received the back education program (mean age at post-test: 11.2 ± 0.9 years) and 28 controls (mean age at post-test: 11.4 ± 0.6 years). Besides, test–retest reliability with a 1-week interval was investigated in a separate sample. Therefore, 47 children (mean age: 10.1 ± 0.5 years) were tested for reliability of trunk muscle endurance and 40 children (mean age: 10.2 ± 0.7 years) for the assessment of spinal curvatures. Reliability of endurance testing was very good to good for the trunk flexors (ICC = 0.82) and trunk extensors (ICC = 0.63). The assessment of the thoracic (ICC = 0.69) and the lumbar curvature (ICC = 0.52) in seating position showed good to acceptable reliability. Low ICCs were found for the assessment of the thoracic (ICC = 0.39) and the lumbar curvature (ICC = 0.37) in stance. The effects of 2 year back education showed an increase in trunk flexor endurance in the intervention group compared to a decrease in the controls and a trend towards significance for a higher increase in trunk extensor endurance in the intervention group. For leg muscle capacity and spinal curvature no intervention effects were found. The small samples recommend cautious interpretation of intervention effects. However, the present study’s findings favor the implementation of back education with focus on postural dynamism in the class as an integral part of the elementary school curriculum in the scope of optimizing spinal loading through the school environment. PMID:16944227

Geldhof, Elisabeth; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Danneels, Lieven; Coorevits, Pascal; Vanderstraeten, Guy; De Clercq, Dirk

2006-01-01

422

A Multimedia Interactive Education System for Prostate Cancer Patients: Development and Preliminary Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Background A cancer diagnosis is highly distressing. Yet, to make informed treatment choices patients have to learn complicated disease and treatment information that is often fraught with medical and statistical terminology. Thus, patients need accurate and easy-to-understand information. Objective To introduce the development and preliminary evaluation through focus groups of a novel highly-interactive multimedia-education software program for patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Methods The prostate interactive education system uses the metaphor of rooms in a virtual health center (ie, reception area, a library, physician offices, group meeting room) to organize information. Text information contained in the library is tailored to a person's information-seeking preference (ie, high versus low information seeker). We conducted a preliminary evaluation through 5 separate focus groups with prostate cancer survivors (N = 18) and their spouses (N = 15). Results Focus group results point to the timeliness and high acceptability of the software among the target audience. Results also underscore the importance of a guide or tutor who assists in navigating the program and who responds to queries to facilitate information retrieval. Conclusions Focus groups have established the validity of our approach and point to new directions to further enhance the user interface. PMID:15111269

Butz, Brian P

2004-01-01

423

Collection and sharing of information on patient safety education and training in Europe.  

PubMed

The European Union Network for Patient Safety (EUNetPaS) is a project funded and supported by the European Commission within the 2007 Public Health Programme and aims to encourage and enhance the collaboration of participating EU countries in the field of Patient Safety. One of its major objectives is to promote Patient Safety (PS) education and training in Member States, through building a platform for mutual exchange of experience and knowledge on methods of planning and implementing sustainable learning activities. Towards this direction, a methodology has been applied, based on a three axes schema, which describes the roles, the awareness level and the competences of the PS Education and Training Activities. Based on this scheme, a questionnaire has been developed and distributed across EU organizations though National Contact Points, as a tool for information collection. Looking to the above structure, a web-based resource has been developed aiming to facilitate the information collection and sharing, in a truly networking environment. PMID:19745410

Zikos, Dimitris; Liaskos, Joseph; Diomidous, Marianna; Mantas, John

2009-01-01

424

Walking a mile in their patients' shoes: empathy and othering in medical students' education  

PubMed Central

One of the major tasks of medical educators is to help maintain and increase trainee empathy for patients. Yet research suggests that during the course of medical training, empathy in medical students and residents decreases. Various exercises and more comprehensive paradigms have been introduced to promote empathy and other humanistic values, but with inadequate success. This paper argues that the potential for medical education to promote empathy is not easy for two reasons: a) Medical students and residents have complex and mostly unresolved emotional responses to the universal human vulnerability to illness, disability, decay, and ultimately death that they must confront in the process of rendering patient care b) Modernist assumptions about the capacity to protect, control, and restore run deep in institutional cultures of mainstream biomedicine and can create barriers to empathic relationships. In the absence of appropriate discourses about how to emotionally manage distressing aspects of the human condition, it is likely that trainees will resort to coping mechanisms that result in distance and detachment. This paper suggests the need for an epistemological paradigm that helps trainees develop a tolerance for imperfection in self and others; and acceptance of shared emotional vulnerability and suffering while simultaneously honoring the existence of difference. Reducing the sense of anxiety and threat that are now reinforced by the dominant medical discourse in the presence of illness will enable trainees to learn to emotionally contain the suffering of their patients and themselves, thus providing a psychologically sound foundation for the development of true empathy. PMID:18336719

Shapiro, Johanna

2008-01-01

425

National survey addressing the information needs of primary care physicians: Side effect management of patients on androgen deprivation therapy  

PubMed Central

Objective: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a common treatment for prostate cancer with numerous side effects. We assess primary care physicians’ (PCPs) knowledge of ADT side effects and their interest in increasing their knowledge in this area. Methods: A list of active Canadian PCPs was obtained using the Canadian Medical Directory. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 600 randomly selected physicians. We collected PCPs’ demographic information, experience with ADT management, knowledge regarding ADT side effects and desired sources for obtaining knowledge on ADT management. Results: In total, we received 103 completed questionnaires. Of these, 89% of PCPs had patients on ADT. One-third of respondents prescribed ADT and over half of them administered ADT annually. Thirty-eight percent felt their knowledge of ADT side effects was inadequate and 50% felt uncomfortable counselling patients on ADT. Many PCPs were less familiar with the incidence of functional side effects of ADT (i.e., hot flashes, fatigue and erectile dysfunction) compared to life-threatening side effects (i.e., cardiovascular events, metabolic syndrome, fractures). In terms of increasing their knowledge of ADT side effects, 82% of PCPs would use educational resources if they were available (52% and 32% preferred continued medical education [CME] events and educational pamphlets, respectively). Conclusions: PCPs play an important role in managing ADT side effects. There is poor awareness of the prevalence of ADT side effects, and many are uncomfortable in managing these side effects. These areas may be addressed through CME programs and educational pamphlets. PMID:24839488

Soeyonggo, Tony; Locke, Jennifer; Giudice, Maria Elizabeth Del; Alibhai, Shabbir; Fleshner, Neil Eric; Warde, Padraig

2014-01-01

426

Income-, education- and gender-related inequalities in out-of-pocket health-care payments for 65+ patients - a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background In all OECD countries, there is a trend to increasing patients' copayments in order to balance rising overall health-care costs. This systematic review focuses on inequalities concerning the amount of out-of-pocket payments (OOPP) associated with income, education or gender in the Elderly aged 65+. Methods Based on an online search (PubMed), 29 studies providing information on OOPP of 65+ beneficiaries in relation to income, education and gender were reviewed. Results Low-income individuals pay the highest OOPP in relation to their earnings. Prescription drugs account for the biggest share. A lower educational level is associated with higher OOPP for prescription drugs and a higher probability of insufficient insurance protection. Generally, women face higher OOPP due to their lower income and lower labour participation rate, as well as less employer-sponsored health-care. Conclusions While most studies found educational and gender inequalities to be associated with income, there might also be effects induced solely by education; for example, an unhealthy lifestyle leading to higher payments for lower-educated people, or exclusively gender-induced effects, like sex-specific illnesses. Based on the considered studies, an explanation for inequalities in OOPP by these factors remains ambiguous. PMID:20701794

2010-01-01

427

The Effectiveness of Special Education Programs: Rethinking the Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study compared the life outcomes of four groups of graudates (N=844) from the Maryland high school class of 1981: regular education/nonvocational, regular education/vocational, special education/nonvocational, and special education/vocational. Data were analyzed to determine how special education graduates differed from regular education

Clark, DeWitt S., Jr.; And Others

428

Evaluation of an Emergency Department Educational Campaign for Recognition of Suicidal Patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction To evaluate the impact of a simple emergency department (ED)–based educational intervention designed to assist ED providers in detecting occult suicidal behavior in patients who present with complaints that are not related to behavioral health. Methods Staff from 5 ED sites participated in the study. Four ED staff members were exposed to a poster and clinical guide for the recognition and management of suicidal patients. Staff members in 1 ED were not exposed to training material and served as a comparator group. Results At baseline, only 36% of providers reported that they had sufficient training in how to assess level of suicide risk in patients. Greater than two thirds of providers agreed that additional training would be helpful in assessing the level of patient suicide risk. More than half of respondents who were exposed to the intervention (51.6%) endorsed increased knowledge of suicide risk during the study period, while 41% indicated that the intervention resulted in improved skills in managing suicidal patients. Conclusion This brief, free intervention appeared to have a beneficial impact on providers' perceptions of how well suicidality was recognized and managed in the ED. PMID:22461920

Currier, Glenn W; Litts, David; Walsh, Patrick; Schneider, Sandra; Richardson, Thomas; Grant, William; Triner, Wayne; Robak, Nancy; Moscati, Ronald

2012-01-01

429

Community-based dental education and dentists' attitudes and behavior concerning patients from underserved populations.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to explore how dentists with well-structured vs. not well-structured community-based dental education (CBDE) experiences differ in perceptions of their CBDE and its impact on their professional lives and in their professional attitudes and behavior related to treating patients from underserved populations. The relationships between CBDE evaluations and impact on the dentists' professional lives and professional attitudes and behavior were explored as well. Data were collected from 254 dentists who participated in CBDE before graduating from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry between 1970 and 2011. The results showed that the alumni with well-structured experiences rated the quality of their CBDE more positively and its impact on their professional lives as stronger than those with less well-structured experiences. They also had more positive attitudes concerning treating underserved patients and were more likely to treat underserved patients than their peers with less well-structured experiences. These dentists' perceptions of the quality of CBDE and impact on their professional lives correlated significantly with their attitudes and behavior concerning treating underserved patients. Their perceptions of the quality of their CBDE experiences and perceptions of benefits from these experiences were significantly related to their professional attitudes and behavior related to providing care for patients from underserved populations. PMID:24385531

Rohra, Ashok K; Piskorowski, Wilhelm A; Inglehart, Marita R

2014-01-01

430

Training in studying in higher education: Objectives and effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the findings of 20 studies designed to evaluate learning strategies courses in higher education. It focuses on the relationship between the objectives of these courses and their effects. For this purpose a model is used which distinguishes four categories of study activities,strategic study activities (formulating the general study goals),operational study activities (designing a study plan),executive study activities

Jan Kaldeway; Fred A. J. Korthagen

1995-01-01

431

The effect of Ondansetron on memory in schizophrenic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been well established that patients with schizophrenia have impaired cognitive function on neuropsychological tasks related to memory. Previous studies also suggest serotonin's central role in memory. This double-blind crossover study aimed to explore the effect of Ondansetron, a selective serotonin 3 receptor (5-HT3) antagonist, on a variety of memory tasks in schizophrenic patients. Clozapine-treated schizophrenic patients in remission

Y. Levkovitz; G. Arnest; S. Mendlovic; I. Treves; S. Fennig

2005-01-01

432

Effect of hemoglobin levels in hemodialysis patients with asymptomatic cardiomyopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effect of hemoglobin levels in hemodialysis patients with asymptomatic cardiomyopathy.BackgroundHemoglobin levels below 10 g\\/dL lead to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, LV dilation, a lower quality of life, higher cardiac morbidity, and a higher mortality rate in end-stage renal disease. The benefits and risks of normalizing hemoglobin levels in hemodialysis patients without symptomatic cardiac disease are unknown.MethodsOne hundred forty-six hemodialysis patients

Robert N Foley; Patrick S Parfrey; Janet Morgan; Paul E Barré; Patricia Campbell; Pierre Cartier; Douglas Coyle; Adrian Fine; Paul Handa; Iris Kingma; Cathy Y Lau; Adeera Levin; David Mendelssohn; Norman Muirhead; Brendan Murphy; Richard K Plante; Gerald Posen; George A Wells

2000-01-01

433

Cardiovascular effects of recombinant human erythropoietin in predialysis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has solved the problem of anemia in patients on dialysis. However, its application to predialysis patients has raised some doubts about its effects on the progression of renal disease and on blood pressure (BP) and hemodynamic regulation. We have prospectively studied over at least 6 months a group of 11 predialysis patients receiving rHuEPO

Jose Portolés; Antonio Torralbo; Piedad Martin; Jose Rodrigo; Jose A. Herrero; Alberto Barrientos

1997-01-01

434

Minimizing Cardiovascular Adverse Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

The use of atypical antipsychotic agents has rapidly increased in the United States and worldwide in the last decade. Nonetheless, many health care practitioners do not appreciate the significance of the cardiovascular side effects that may be associated with their use and the means to minimize them. Thus, atypical antipsychotic medications can cause cardiovascular side effects such as arrhythmias and deviations in blood pressure. In rare cases, they may also cause congestive heart failure, myocarditis, and sudden death. Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality than healthy individuals, possibly because of excessive smoking, the underlying disorder itself, or a combination of both factors. Increased awareness of these potential complications can allow pharmacists and physicians to better manage and monitor high risk patients. Accurate assessments are very important to avoid medications from being given to patients inappropriately. Additionally, monitoring patients regularly via blood draws and checking blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram can help catch any clinical problems and prevent further complications. Finally, patient and family-member education, which pharmacists in particular can play key roles in, is central for the management and prevention of side effects, which is known to reflect positively on morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:24649390

Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Shankar, Gollapudi S.

2014-01-01

435

Minimizing cardiovascular adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

The use of atypical antipsychotic agents has rapidly increased in the United States and worldwide in the last decade. Nonetheless, many health care practitioners do not appreciate the significance of the cardiovascular side effects that may be associated with their use and the means to minimize them. Thus, atypical antipsychotic medications can cause cardiovascular side effects such as arrhythmias and deviations in blood pressure. In rare cases, they may also cause congestive heart failure, myocarditis, and sudden death. Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality than healthy individuals, possibly because of excessive smoking, the underlying disorder itself, or a combination of both factors. Increased awareness of these potential complications can allow pharmacists and physicians to better manage and monitor high risk patients. Accurate assessments are very important to avoid medications from being given to patients inappropriately. Additionally, monitoring patients regularly via blood draws and checking blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram can help catch any clinical problems and prevent further complications. Finally, patient and family-member education, which pharmacists in particular can play key roles in, is central for the management and prevention of side effects, which is known to reflect positively on morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:24649390

Khasawneh, Fadi T; Shankar, Gollapudi S

2014-01-01