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Sample records for effective patient education

  1. Choosing effective patient education materials

    MedlinePLUS

    Your patient's preferences can guide your choice of education materials and methods. Find out how your patient ... aware that you may need to adjust your education plan based on the patient's health status and ...

  2. Educating Patient Educators: Enhancing Instructional Effectiveness in Physical Therapy for Low Back Pain Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerssens, Jan J.; Sluijs, Emmy M.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Knibbe, Hanneke J.; Hermans, Irma M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of a training program designed for physical therapists (N=19) to aid them in the enhancement of patient education. Five therapist-skills were tested. After the training only a minority of the trained skills appeared to have improved. Results show that the training program was not very effective. (Author/MKA)

  3. How effective are your patient education materials? Guidelines for developing and evaluating written educational materials.

    PubMed

    Farrell-Miller, P; Gentry, P

    1989-01-01

    Written educational materials are an essential component of a comprehensive education program. To be effective and useful, educational materials must meet the specific needs of the target patient population. Many available educational materials may not meet the needs of your patients, therefore efforts to develop appropriate written educational tools may be necessary. Developing quality educational materials include several steps: conducting a needs assessment, establishing learning objectives, writing the text, and evaluating the piece. The quality of the text is often determined by readability. The text should be written on a level that is appropriate for the patient group. Content and style, layout, color, and illustrations all influence readability and quality. Most important, good quality educational materials help promote the relationship between the patient and the health care professional as well as enhance patient knowledge and self-care. PMID:2776637

  4. Effects of preoperative education on spinal surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Papanastassiou, Ioannis; Anderson, Roberta; Barber, Nicole; Conover, Cathleen; Castellvi, Antonio E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preoperative patient education (PE) has been used by many institutions to deal with patient anxiety, pain control, and overall satisfaction. Although the literature suggests PE's effectiveness in joint reconstruction, data are missing in spinal surgery. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients having elective spinal surgery who underwent PE (spine pre-care class) from October 2009 to March 2010. Of the 155 patients surveyed, 77 (49.7%) attended the class whereas 78 (50.3%) did not. Results Of the participants in the pre-care class, 96% were satisfied with their pain management versus 83% in the control group (P =.02). There was also a trend for better overall satisfaction in the pre-care class group (91% vs 85%; P > .05, multiple regression analysis). Elderly women tend to be less satisfied with pain management and overall treatment. Conclusions Implementation of PE has had a positive impact on patient satisfaction, especially in terms of pain management. PMID:25802678

  5. Patient Education in Thyrotoxicosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, N. B.; Sturrock, N. D. C.; Sowter, H.; Abbott-Harland, S.; Nichols, E.; Jeffcoate, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    Study aims to assess the need for a thyrotoxicosis patient education programs and evaluates a group education session. Patients with thyrotoxicosis were surveyed to assess their needs. Determined that people with thyrotoxicosis had limited knowledge about their condition. The offer of a group education program has little effect on that knowledge…

  6. Effect of standard versus patient-targeted in-patient education on patients' anxiety about self-care after discharge from cardiovascular surgery clinics.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Tlin; Grkan, Selami; Gr, zcan; nsal, Cneyt; Gkta?, Sonay Baltac?; zen, Ycel

    2014-01-01

    We compared standard and patient-targeted in-patient education in terms of their effect on patients' anxiety. One hundred and ninety-eight patients who were hospitalised for coronary artery bypass surgery were given standard education (group 1) or individualised education (group 2) on the management of their healthcare after discharge. Patients in group 2 were assessed on the patient learning needs scale and were given education according to their individual needs. The level of anxiety was measured by the state-trait anxiety inventory. Anxiety scores were significantly lower in group 2 than group 1 after education (p < 0.001). While state anxiety did not change after education in group 1 (p = 0272), it decreased significantly in group 2 (p < 0.001). For cardiovascular surgery patients, patient-targeted in-patient education was more effective than standard education in decreasing anxiety levels, therefore the content of the education should be individualised according to the patient's particular needs. PMID:25363789

  7. Caring for Dying Patients: Attitude of Nursing Students and Effects of Education

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mojtaba; Rafiei, Hossein; Nassehi, Asra; Soleimani, Farzaneh; Arab, Mansuor; Noormohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Education about caring for dying patients could be effective in changing nursing students attitude toward caring for dying patients. Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude. Materials and Methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method with using one-group pre-test/post-test design conducted in Bam in southeast of Iran. The attitude of nursing students was measured using Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale before and after an educational intervention. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 18 software. Results: Of 32 students, 30 participated in this study (response rate of 94%). Only 20% of the students reported previous experience of dying patients in their clinical courses. Students showed moderately negative to neutral attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Education has improved students attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 0.33) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Educational programs about death and caring for dying patients should be added to undergraduate nursing curricula. Further research recommended examining nursing students knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge. PMID:26009673

  8. [Effectiveness of therapeutic education and respiratory rehabilitation programs for the patient with asthma].

    PubMed

    Cano-De La Cuerda, Roberto; Useros-Olmo, Ana Isabel; Muñoz-Hellín, Elena

    2010-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic complex and heterogeneous disease, with great variability and has a huge impact, not only on patients who suffer the disease but also their families and society in general. The education of the asthmatic patient and their families is essential for therapeutic intervention. Through continuous, dynamic and adaptive education, changes in attitudes and behaviours of the patient and family can be achieved, and will undoubtedly lead to an improvement in their quality of life. Among other non-pharmacological interventions, respiratory rehabilitation is an alternative treatment, and is primarily aimed at patients with moderate to severe asthma. Although the latest clinical practice guidelines published in the scientific literature recommend two strategies for treatment, the results of relevant publications are diverse. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of therapeutic and educational programs in respiratory rehabilitation of the asthmatic patient. PMID:20846775

  9. Rethinking patient education.

    PubMed

    Luker, K; Caress, A L

    1989-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to critically examine and challenge some of the assumptions which underpin the research and non-research based literature on patient education. Doubts are expressed concerning the transferability of theories of adult learning to patient education; and concern is expressed over the imbalance in the literature where emphasis is placed on the psychological benefits of teaching, rather than physical outcomes. In the light of the available evidence which suggests that nurses are not 'good patient teachers' the case is made to support the suggestion that patient education should become the responsibility of specialist nurses. In addition, computer-assisted learning (CAL) is proffered as the solution to a number of the problems facing patient educators. CAL is seen as a means of empowering the patient, rather than the nurse to take control, and this is viewed as a positive move in the direction of self-care. The paper concludes by suggesting that CAL might be used with good effect by patients with particular learning difficulties; for example the blind or partially sighted, and people who are illiterate or have a low reading ability. PMID:2674244

  10. Effect of 16-Hour Duty Periods on Patient Care and Resident Education

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Christopher P.; Halvorsen, Andrew J.; Loftus, Conor G.; McDonald, Furman S.; Oxentenko, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of duty periods no longer than 16 hours on patient care and resident education. PATIENTS AND METHODS: As part of our Educational Innovations Project, we piloted a novel resident schedule for an inpatient service that eliminated shifts longer than 16 hours without increased staffing or decreased patient admissions on 2 gastroenterology services from August 29 to November 27, 2009. Patient care variables were obtained through medical record review. Resident well-being and educational variables were collected by weekly surveys, end of rotation evaluations, and an electronic card-swipe system. RESULTS: Patient care metrics, including 30-day mortality, 30-day readmission rate, and length of stay, were unchanged for the 196 patient care episodes in the 5-week intervention month compared with the 274 episodes in the 8 weeks of control months. However, residents felt less prepared to manage cross-cover of patients (P=.006). There was a nonsignificant trend toward decreased perception of quality of education and balance of personal and professional life during the intervention month. Residents reported working fewer weekly hours overall during the intervention (64.3 vs 68.9 hours; P=.40), but they had significantly more episodes with fewer than 10 hours off between shifts (24 vs 2 episodes; P=.004). CONCLUSION: Inpatient hospital services can be staffed with residents working shifts less than 16 hours without additional residents. However, cross-cover of care, quality of education, and time off between shifts may be adversely affected. PMID:21307390

  11. Patient Education on Pain

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... People with Pain Press Room Position Statements Patient Education on Pain AAPM Past President, Perry G. Fine, ... Member Center Patient Center Research Advocacy Practice Management Education Annual Meeting Contact Us Privacy Policy Sitemap Close ...

  12. Using Standardized Patients in Nursing Education: Effects on Students' Psychomotor Skill Development.

    PubMed

    Sarmasoglu, Senay; Dinç, Leyla; Elçin, Melih

    2016-01-01

    The present study used a quasi-experimental design to examine the effects of using standardized patients for the psychomotor skills development of nursing students. The performance of the experimental group in blood pressure measurement was significantly higher than that of the control group; however, there was no significant difference between the groups with regard to their administration of subcutaneous injections. The results indicated that standardized patients can be integrated into nursing education for developing psychomotor skills of students. PMID:26102639

  13. Medication Adherence in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Effect of Patient Education, Health Literacy, and Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Joplin, Samantha; van der Zwan, Rick; Joshua, Fredrick; Wong, Peter K. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting <1% of the population. Incompletely controlled RA results in fatigue, joint and soft tissue pain, progressive joint damage, reduced quality of life, and increased cardiovascular mortality. Despite an increasing range of disease modifying agents which halt disease progression, poor patient adherence with medication is a significant barrier to management. Objective. The goal of this review was to examine the effectiveness of measures to improve patient medication adherence. Methods. Studies addressing treatment adherence in patients with RA were identified by trawling PsycINFO, Medline, Cochrane, Pubmed, and ProQuest for studies published between January 2000 and October 2014. Articles were independently reviewed to identify relevant studies. Results. Current strategies were of limited efficacy in improving patient adherence with medications used to treat RA. Conclusion. Poor medication adherence is a complex issue. Low educational levels and limited health literacy are contributory factors. Psychological models may assist in explaining medication nonadherence. Increasing patient knowledge of their disease seems sensible. Existing educational interventions appear ineffective at improving medication adherence, probably due to an overemphasis on provision of biomedical information. A novel approach to patient education using musculoskeletal ultrasound is proposed. PMID:26060812

  14. Patient Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jeannette

    Topics included in this annotated bibliography on patient education are (1) background on development of patient education programs, (2) patient education interventions, (3) references for health professionals, and (4) research and evaluation in patient education. (TA)

  15. Psychological effects of a cosmetic education programme in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, H Y; Kim, J H; Choi, S; Kang, E; Oh, S; Kim, J Y; Kim, S W

    2015-07-01

    Treatments for breast cancer often include interventions related to psychosocial issues such as negative body image, loss of femininity, and low self-esteem. We identified the psychological effects of a cosmetics education programme in patients with breast cancer. Cosmetic programme is a specific care designed to help patients handle appearance-related side effects. Thirty-one women with breast cancer at a university hospital in South Korea who received a cosmetics education programme were compared with 29 subjects in a control group who received the treatment as usual. Psychological factors including distress, self-esteem, and sexual functioning were assessed three times (before and after the programme, and at the 1-month follow-up). After the programme, patients in the treatment group were significantly less likely than those in the control group to rely on distress (P = 0.038) and avoidance coping (P < 0.001) but not on self-esteem. The mean scores in the treatment group for sexual functioning were higher than those in the control group after the treatment. Our results suggest the potential usefulness of a brief cosmetics education programme for reducing distress and reliance on negative coping strategies. Implementing a cosmetics programme for patients with breast cancer may encourage patients to control negative psychological factors. PMID:25651297

  16. Effects of nurse staffing, work environments, and education on patient mortality: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunhee; Sloane, Douglas M.; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Sera; Choi, Miyoung; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hye Sun; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background While considerable evidence has been produced showing a link between nursing characteristics and patient outcomes in the U.S. and Europe, little is known about whether similar associations are present in South Korea. Objective To examine the effects of nurse staffing, work environment, and education on patient mortality. Methods This study linked hospital facility data with staff nurse survey data (N=1,024) and surgical patient discharge data (N = 76,036) from 14 high-technology teaching hospitals with 700 or more beds in South Korea, collected between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2008. Logistic regression models that corrected for the clustering of patients in hospitals were used to estimate the effects of the three nursing characteristics on risk-adjusted patient mortality within 30 days of admission. Results Risk-adjusted models reveal that nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and nurse education were significantly associated with patient mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.001.10; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.310.88; and OR 0.91, CI 0.830.99; respectively). These odds ratios imply that each additional patient per nurse is associated with an 5% increase in the odds of patient death within 30 days of admission, that the odds of patient mortality are nearly 50% lower in the hospitals with better nurse work environments than in hospitals with mixed or poor nurse work environments, and that each 10% increase in BSN nurse is associated with a 9% decrease in patient deaths. Conclusions Nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and percentages of BSN nurses in South Korea are associated with patient mortality. Improving hospital nurse staffing and work environments and increasing the percentages of BSN nurses would help reduce the number of preventable in-hospital deaths. PMID:25213091

  17. The Effect of Educational Intervention on Nurses' Attitudes and Beliefs about Depression in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Systematic depression screening is feasible, efficient, and well accepted; however the lack of consistent assessment in heart failure inpatients suggests barriers preventing its effective diagnosis and treatment. This pilot study assessed the impact of an educational intervention on nurses' beliefs about depression and their likelihood of routinely screening heart failure patients. Registered nurses (n = 35) from adult medical-surgical units were surveyed before and after an educational intervention to assess their beliefs about depression prevalence and screening in heart failure patients. There was no significant influence on nurses' beliefs about depression, but the results suggested an increased likelihood that nurses would routinely screen for depression. The moderately significant correlation between beliefs and intent to screen for depression indicates that educational intervention could ultimately have a positive influence on patient outcomes through early detection and treatment of depression in patients with cardiovascular disease; however the observed increase in the intent to screen without a corresponding change in beliefs indicates other influences affecting nurses' intent to screen heart failure patients for depression. PMID:25525516

  18. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  19. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the

  20. The Effects of an Information Specialist On Patient Care and Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Agnes A.; Addington, Whitney W.

    1975-01-01

    A medical librarian joined the pulmonary medicine health care team at Cook County Hospital in order to provide a quick response to information needs regarding patient care, graduate medical education, continuing education, and research. (Author)

  1. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of a collaborative patient education hypertension intervention in Utah.

    PubMed

    Trogdon, Justin G; Larsen, Barbara; Larsen, David; Salas, Wendy; Snell, Matt

    2012-11-01

    This study analyzed the cost-effectiveness of a patient hypertension education intervention that provided patient education through interactive voice response technology and distribution of automated blood pressure monitors to high-risk plan members with uncontrolled hypertension. A total of 17,318 members were identified with hypertension in an administrative database. The study sample consisted of all 534 high-risk hypertensive plan members who received blood pressure monitors. Using data on activity-based program costs and changes in hypertension control, this study modeled the intervention's cost-effectiveness relative to no intervention. The intervention was estimated to have brought hypertension under control in 151 patients during the study year. Across all 534 participants in 1 year, 0.3 events (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and renal failure) were avoided and 2.77 life-years were gained (LYG). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the intervention compared with no intervention was $767 per person brought under control or $41,927 per LYG. If the gains in hypertension control from 1 year's investment were assumed to last 10 years, the 10-year ICER relative to no intervention was $1857 per LYG. The intervention is a cost-effective strategy to address hypertension and can serve as a model for future innovations. PMID:23126347

  2. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  3. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were

  4. [Management of type 2 diabetes: patient education].

    PubMed

    Meillet, Lucie; Combes, Jrme; Penfornis, Alfred

    2013-05-01

    Patient education emerged initially as an essential component of the management of type 1 diabetes. Patient education has also been for long an integral part of the recommendations for managing type 2 diabetes. Studies about patient education and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated the effectiveness of patient education by studying the evolution of bioclinic markers including HbA1c. However, if we return to the foundations of patient education definition, we cannot summarize the effectiveness of patient education on the only decrease of HbA1c. So, if the aim of patient education is to support patients to take better care of themselves, it might be interesting to use other types of evaluation methodology, including qualitative studies, to reflect the different dimensions of patient education, especially psychosocial. PMID:23523080

  5. The Effects of Health Education on Patients with Hypertension in China: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, L. J.; Meng, Q.; He, S. W.; Yin, X. L.; Tang, Z. L.; Bo, H. Y.; Lan, X. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study collected on from all research relating to health education and hypertension in China and, with the aid of meta-analysis tools, assessed the outcomes of such health education. The analysis provides a basis for the further development of health-education programmes for patients with hypertension. Methods: Literature searches…

  6. The Effects of Health Education on Patients with Hypertension in China: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, L. J.; Meng, Q.; He, S. W.; Yin, X. L.; Tang, Z. L.; Bo, H. Y.; Lan, X. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study collected on from all research relating to health education and hypertension in China and, with the aid of meta-analysis tools, assessed the outcomes of such health education. The analysis provides a basis for the further development of health-education programmes for patients with hypertension. Methods: Literature searches

  7. Web-Based Immersive Virtual Patient Simulators: Positive Effect on Clinical Reasoning in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Heiermann, Nadine; Plum, Patrick Sven; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Hua; Maus, Martin; Chon, Seung-Hun; Hoelscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical reasoning is based on the declarative and procedural knowledge of workflows in clinical medicine. Educational approaches such as problem-based learning or mannequin simulators support learning of procedural knowledge. Immersive patient simulators (IPSs) go one step further as they allow an illusionary immersion into a synthetic world. Students can freely navigate an avatar through a three-dimensional environment, interact with the virtual surroundings, and treat virtual patients. By playful learning with IPS, medical workflows can be repetitively trained and internalized. As there are only a few university-driven IPS with a profound amount of medical knowledge available, we developed a university-based IPS framework. Our simulator is free to use and combines a high degree of immersion with in-depth medical content. By adding disease-specific content modules, the simulator framework can be expanded depending on the curricular demands. However, these new educational tools compete with the traditional teaching Objective It was our aim to develop an educational content module that teaches clinical and therapeutic workflows in surgical oncology. Furthermore, we wanted to examine how the use of this module affects student performance. Methods The new module was based on the declarative and procedural learning targets of the official German medical examination regulations. The module was added to our custom-made IPS named ALICE (Artificial Learning Interface for Clinical Education). ALICE was evaluated on 62 third-year students. Results Students showed a high degree of motivation when using the simulator as most of them had fun using it. ALICE showed positive impact on clinical reasoning as there was a significant improvement in determining the correct therapy after using the simulator. ALICE positively impacted the rise in declarative knowledge as there was improvement in answering multiple-choice questions before and after simulator use. Conclusions ALICE has a positive effect on knowledge gain and raises students’ motivation. It is a suitable tool for supporting clinical education in the blended learning context. PMID:26577020

  8. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-Ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5h or endovascular procedures within 8h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5h; P=0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5%; P=0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5%; P=0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5% of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged. PMID:26306697

  9. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational program for improving quality of life of fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernndez, Rita; Pearubia, Maria T; Luciano, Juan V; Blanco, Maria E; Jimnez, Mnica; Montesano, Adrin; Verduras, Camino; Ruiz, Jos M; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background Most fibromyalgia patients are seen in primary care (PC). However, the effectiveness of the treatments prescribed by general practitioners is usually minimal. The main objective of the present research is to assess the efficacy of structured psycho-educational intervention, combined with relaxation, developed to improve the quality of life of patients suffering fibromyalgia (FM). The second objective is to assess the cost-effectiveness of this multimodal intervention. Method/Design Design. Randomized controlled trial with a 12-month follow-up involving two groups, one of which is the intervention group that includes patients receiving a psychoeducational program and the other the control group consisting of patients treated for FM in the usual way. Setting. Three urban PC centers in the province of Barcelona (Spain). Sample. The total sample comprises 218 patients (over 18 years of age) suffering FM, selected from a database (Rheumatology service-Viladecans Hospital) of patients with this illness. Only those patients introduced in the database between the years 2005 and 2007 were included in the selection. Selected patients will be asked for written informed consent to participate in the study. Intervention. Multi-component program including information about the illness, counselling about physical exercise and training in autogenic relaxation. The intervention consists of nine 2-hour sessions delivered during a two-month period. The pharmacological treatment prescribed by the physician was maintained in both groups. Main variables. Sociodemographic characteristics, quality of life, use and cost of healthcare and social services. Measures. Quality of life is to be measured with the FIQ and the EuroQol-5D, and the use of healthcare services with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI). These variables will be measured before the beginning of the program (baseline) and 1, 2, 6 and 12 months later. Discussion This research project is an attempt to demonstrate that a psycho-educational program implemented in the context of PC can produce a significant increase in the quality of life for patients with FM, as well as a decrease in the use of healthcare and social services, compared with usual care. Trial registration NCT00550966

  10. Meta-analysis: The effect of patient education on bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chen-Wang; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Wang, Horng-Yuan; Chu, Cheng-Hsin; Wang, Tsang-En; Hung, Chien-Yuan; Shieh, Tze-Yu; Lin, Yang-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The proportion of outpatients with inadequate bowel preparation before colonoscopy is high owing to patient unawareness of its importance and poor adherence to instructions. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation before colonoscopy. Patients and methods: A comprehensive literature review identified randomized controlled trials measuring the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation. Two reviewers independently screened relevant articles, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. The primary outcome was the quality of each bowel preparation before colonoscopy, using a particular assessment scale. The secondary outcomes were polyp detection rates during the procedure and the need for a repeat colonoscopy due to incomplete examination. Results: Nine randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis. In all, 2885 patients were enrolled, with 1458 receiving education and 1427 assigned to the control group. An educational intervention before colonoscopy significantly improved bowel preparation (relative risk [RR] = 1.22; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.10 – 1.36), however, no significant differences were identified in polyp detection rates (RR = 1.14; 95 %CI 0.87 – 1.51) or the need for repeat colonoscopy (RR = 0.52; 95 %CI 0.25 – 1.04) between the groups. Asymmetry in the appearance of the funnel plot and the result of Egger test (P < 0.001) suggested that publication bias existed. Conclusions: Evidence from these randomized controlled trials shows that a brief counseling session with patients before colonoscopy ensures better bowel preparation. However, evidence is insufficient to assess improvements in polyp detection rate and avoidance of a repeat colonoscopy. Despite these encouraging observations, this meta-analysis had some limitations, including potential publication bias and significant heterogeneity of the types of bowel purgatives. These results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:26716129

  11. Patient Education Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn

    This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood and

  12. Effects of a Pre-dialysis Patient Education Program on the Relative Frequencies of Dialysis Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Ribitsch, Werner; Haditsch, Bernd; Otto, Ronald; Schilcher, Gernot; Quehenberger, Franz; Roob, Johannes M.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Pre-dialysis education can guide the choice of the dialysis modality best tailored to meet the needs and preferences of individual patients with chronic kidney disease. ♦ Methods: In a retrospective single-center cohort study, we evaluated the impact of a pre-dialysis education program on the incidence rates of patients using hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) in our unit. The frequency distribution of dialysis modalities between people attending our education program and people not attending the program (control group) was analyzed for the 4-year period 2004 - 2008. ♦ Results: From among all the incident chronic kidney disease 5D patients presenting during the 4-year period, we analyzed 227 who started dialysis either with an arteriovenous fistula or a PD catheter. In that cohort, 70 patients (30.8%) took part in the education program, and 157 (69.2%) did not receive structured pre-dialysis counseling. In the group receiving education, 38 patients (54.3%) started with PD, and 32 (45.7%), with HD. In the standard-care group not receiving education, 44 patients (28%) started with PD, and 113 (72%), with HD (p < 0.001). ♦ Conclusions: Our multidisciplinary pre-dialysis program had a significant impact on the frequency distribution of dialysis modalities, increasing the proportion of patients initiating dialysis with PD. PMID:23547278

  13. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective

  14. The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of

  15. Effects of intensive nutrition education on nutritional status and quality of life among postgastrectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Ok; Han, So Ra; Choi, Sung Il; Lee, Jung Joo; Kim, Sang Hyun; Ahn, Hong Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the effects of 3 months of intensive education (IE) after hospital discharge compared to conventional education (CE) on nutritional status and quality of diet and life among South Korean gastrectomy patients. Methods The study was conducted among 53 hospitalized gastrectomy in-patients (IE group, n = 28; CE group, n = 25) at Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong. Baseline data were collected from electronic medical records and additional information was gathered via anthropometric measurements, assessment of nutritional status through a patient-generated, subjective global assessment (PG-SGA), diet assessment, and measures of self-efficacy and satisfaction with meals for 3 months following hospital discharge. Results Total PG-SGA scores were significantly higher in the CE group than in the IE group at 3-week post-discharge (5.2 in the IE group vs. 10.4 in the CE group, P < 0.001), with higher scores indicating a greater severity of malnutrition. Energy intake over the 3 months increased in both the IE group (from 1,390 to 1,726 kcal/day) and the CE group (from 1,227 to 1,540 kcal/day). At 3-week post-discharge, the IE group had significantly higher daily protein and fat intake (P < 0.05). Self-efficacy improved in each category (P < 0.001), except for 'difficulty eating adequate food'. When assessing satisfaction with meals, there was a difference in the 'satisfaction with the current meal size' (P < 0.001) and 'satisfaction with the menu content' (P < 0.001). Conclusion Nutritional status among gastrectomy patients in the IE group improved. Relative to the CE control, the IE group demonstrated improved self-efficacy and meal satisfaction 3-week post-discharge. PMID:26878015

  16. Comparison of Patient Education Methods: Effects on Knowledge of Cardiac Rehabilitation Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Julie Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    Patient education programs for persons undergoing cardiac surgery related to knowledge of cardiac rehabilitation principles were conducted with either traditional (n=49) or collaborative (n=47) educational interventions. The two methods produced similar levels of knowledge, but significant differences appeared depending on whether subjects had

  17. [What patients think of patient education].

    PubMed

    Giroux, Valrie

    2013-10-01

    What patients think of therapeutic education. Therapeutic education for patients has proven beneficial in the management of many chronic diseases. At the Marie-Madeleine hospital centre in Forbach, France, where a therapeutic education unit has been in place since 2006, a satisfaction survey undertaken in a group of patients with heart failure shows areas for improvement. PMID:24288891

  18. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  19. Comparing the Effect of Two Educational Programs on the Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Shahram; Zarea, Kourosh; Dashtbozorgi, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various researchers have shown that the health level, performance status, and quality of life (QOL) are often less than expected especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of the two methods of educational programs on health- related QOL (HRQOL) in Iranian HD patients. Patients and Methods: In this quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest interventional study, we employed each subject as his/her own control. The study was conducted at the dialysis units in three major general hospitals affiliated with Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. A total of 90 HD patients were randomly allocated to two 45-patient groups of oral and video education programs, respectively. The educational programs included dietary and fluid regimens, the care of fistula and skin, and stress management. HRQOL was assessed in both groups using a Farsi version of the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) before and after the educational programs. Repeated measures analysis of variance and ANOVA were used for data analysis through SPSS. Results: SF-36 domains of physical functioning (P < 0.021), role physical (P < 0.031), social functioning (P < 0.001) and mental health (P < 0.001) were significantly increased in both oral and vide education groups after the interventions. There was no difference in the effectiveness of the two educational programs. Conclusions: Appropriate interventions may potentially lead to improvement in the HRQOL of these patients. Therefore, video education as an effective, inexpensive, simple, and attractive method is recommended for HD patients. PMID:25389489

  20. Comparison of the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction, walking, and patient education in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee Young; Lee, Haejung; Park, Jina

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction (K-MBSR), walking, and patient education regarding diabetes mellitus (DM) on stress response, glycemic control, and vascular inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A cluster randomized trial including 56 adults with diabetes mellitus (K-MBSR group = 21, walking group = 18, patient education group = 17) was conducted between 13 July and 14 September 2012. The questionnaire included the Diabetes Distress Scale and Perceived Stress Response Inventory. Fasting blood samples were used to measure levels of cortisol, blood glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on stress, glycemic control, or vascular inflammation. However, in the K-MBSR and walking groups, significant reductions in the levels of serum cortisol and PAI-1 were observed. A significant reduction in psychological responses to stress was observed in the walking and patient education groups. Longitudinal studies could provide better insight into the impact of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on health outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26275164

  1. Impact of an educational intervention on steroid prescribing and dosing effect on patient outcomes in COPD exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Nancy H.; Ray, Shaunta M.; Franks, Andrea S.; Heidel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The increasing number of patients affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and associated exacerbations has led to both rising hospital admissions and significant economic impact. Evidence-based guidelines have been formulated for COPD management recommending the use of low dose, oral corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of exacerbations. However, fewer than 50% of physicians prescribing practices appropriately reflect the published clinical guidelines on the use of systemic corticosteroids in these patients. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist-led educational intervention on prescribing practices and patient outcomes when using systemic corticosteroids in patients with COPD exacerbations. Methods This retrospective case-control study included patients admitted to an inpatient family medicine service with a COPD exacerbation who received systemic corticosteroids. Two pharmacist-led educational interventions were delivered to prescribers to review current guidelines for managing COPD exacerbations with systemic corticosteroids. Patients were retrospectively identified over a three month span prior to and following the educational intervention. Data was collected via chart review to evaluate prescribing practices prior to and following the educational sessions. In addition, data was collected to evaluate the effects of an educational intervention on length of stay, adverse events, and cost of treatment. Results A total of 23 pre-intervention patients and 18 post-intervention patients met inclusion criteria. After pharmacist-led interventions, guidelines were not more likely to be adhered to by prescribers when compared to guideline adherence in the pre-intervention patients. Because no statistically significant change in guideline adherence was observed, there was no impact on secondary outcomes. Conclusion Pharmacist-led didactic educational interventions and guideline dissemination do not improve guideline adherence and prescribing practices with respect to systemic corticosteroids in COPD exacerbations. PMID:25126135

  2. [DGRW-update: patient education].

    PubMed

    Faller, H; Reusch, A; Meng, K

    2011-10-01

    Patient education programmes, i.?e. standardized, manualized, interactive group programmes aiming to increase self-management and empowerment, are a core element of medical rehabilitation for chronic conditions. In an update of the evidence of the effectiveness of patient education, its effectiveness was proven for a broad spectrum of chronic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic low back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, bronchial asthma, COPD, and cancer, as well as for the modification of health behaviours, such as diet and exercise. To sustain effects, aftercare interventions, such as support provided by phone, were found to be successful. Interventions targeted to particular patient groups according to gender, age, or migration background are also being developed more frequently. When evaluating educational interventions not only distal outcomes, such as quality of life and participation, should be used but also proximal outcomes such as self-management skills. A recent survey of patient education practice in medical rehabilitation revealed a continuing potential for optimization relative to manualization, evaluation and didactics. However, the dissemination of innovative programmes into rehabilitation routine presents a major challenge. PMID:21976261

  3. Twitter Social Media is an Effective Tool for Breast Cancer Patient Education and Support: Patient-Reported Outcomes by Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite reported benefits, many women do not attend breast cancer support groups. Abundant online resources for support exist, but information regarding the effectiveness of participation is lacking. We report the results of a Twitter breast cancer support community participant survey. Objective The aim was to determine the effectiveness of social media as a tool for breast cancer patient education and decreasing anxiety. Methods The Breast Cancer Social Media Twitter support community (#BCSM) began in July 2011. Institutional review board approval with a waiver of informed consent was obtained for a deidentified survey that was posted for 2 weeks on Twitter and on the #BCSM blog and Facebook page. Results There were 206 respondents to the survey. In all, 92.7% (191/206) were female. Respondents reported increased knowledge about breast cancer in the following domains: overall knowledge (80.9%, 153/189), survivorship (85.7%, 162/189), metastatic breast cancer (79.4%, 150/189), cancer types and biology (70.9%, 134/189), clinical trials and research (66.1%, 125/189), treatment options (55.6%, 105/189), breast imaging (56.6%, 107/189), genetic testing and risk assessment (53.9%, 102/189), and radiotherapy (43.4%, 82/189). Participation led 31.2% (59/189) to seek a second opinion or bring additional information to the attention of their treatment team and 71.9% (136/189) reported plans to increase their outreach and advocacy efforts as a result of participation. Levels of reported anxiety before and after participation were analyzed: 29 of 43 (67%) patients who initially reported “high or extreme” anxiety reported “low or no” anxiety after participation (P<.001). Also, no patients initially reporting low or no anxiety before participation reported an increase to high or extreme anxiety after participation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that breast cancer patients’ perceived knowledge increases and their anxiety decreases by participation in a Twitter social media support group. PMID:26228234

  4. Effect of Physician-Delivered Patient Education on the Quality of Bowel Preparation for Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Jen; Chang, Chen-Wang; Kuo, Yang-Che; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Wang, Horng-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inadequate bowel preparation is common in outpatients undergoing screening colonoscopy because of unawareness and poor adherence to instruction. Methods. Herein, 105 consecutive outpatients referred for screening colonoscopy were enrolled in this prospective, colonoscopist-blinded study. The patients were assigned to an intensive-education group, with 10 minutes of physician-delivered education, or to standard care. At the time of colonoscopy, the quality of bowel preparation was assessed using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS). The primary outcome was a BBPS score ≥5. The secondary outcomes were the mean BBPS score, insertion time, adenoma detection rate, and number of adenomas detected. Results. We analyzed 39 patients who received intensive education and 60 controls. The percentage of adequate bowel preparations with a BBPS score ≥5 was higher in the intensive-education group than in the control group (97.4% versus 80.0%; P = 0.01). The adjusted odds ratio for having a BBPS score ≥5 in the intensive-education group was 10.2 (95% confidence interval = 1.23–84.3; P = 0.03). Other secondary outcomes were similar in the 2 groups. Conclusions. Physician-delivered education consisting of a brief counseling session in addition to written instructions improves the quality of bowel preparation in outpatients undergoing screening colonoscopy. PMID:24454341

  5. Vocal Hygiene Education, Voice Production Therapy, and the Role of Patient Adherence: A Treatment Effectiveness Study in Women with Phonotrauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Alison; Rutledge, John; Hembree, Amanda; Sheridan, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of vocal hygiene education (VHE) and voice production therapy (VP) in altering patient perception of vocal handicap in adult women with benign, bilateral phonotraumatic vocal fold lesions and the role of adherence in that perception. Method: Sixty-two women were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of VP (n = 31) or

  6. Creating an anticoagulant patient education class.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, Jennifer S; Wangen, Tina M; Notch, Katie B; Ferguson, Tanya J; Nickel, Travis W; Schafer, Amy R; Bush, Diana L

    2010-12-01

    A patient education workgroup was developed on a progressive care medical/vascular surgical unit. The workgroup identified patient education needs regarding discharge education for postsurgical patients and those discharging with oral anticoagulants (OAC). Staff surveys aided the workgroup in identifying a need for additional discharge education for patients and families. After various methods of patient education were explored, it was determined the workgroup could best meet the needs of the patient population through a class format providing group discussion and interaction. Logistical details and class formatting were configured to meet both the needs of the patients and the nursing staff. Current institutional patient education pamphlets were used to develop the content for the class. Physician review and input were obtained during the development of the content. A patient education specialist was also consulted to ensure proper literacy levels were used. To meet the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal regarding anticoagulant safety, the content focused on home management, which included the following: knowledge of INR goal range, dietary factors, when to call the provider and safety precautions. Other topics to promote self-efficacy in anticoagulation therapy were also included in the content. Postclass evaluations completed by patients and families provided useful feedback for continuous improvement and patient satisfaction. Preliminary survey results indicate high patient satisfaction with the class. Plans include a quality improvement project to evaluate the effectiveness of the patient education class on OAC. PMID:21074115

  7. Effects of patient occupation and education variables on the choice of neuropsychological assessment instruments.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Laura A; Barr, William B; Burton, Leslie A

    2007-01-01

    The current study surveyed test-usage practices of clinical neuropsychologists to determine whether respondents varied their assessment batteries based on specific patient demographic characteristics. Respondents were 747 doctorate-level psychologists (40% usable response rate) affiliated with Division 40 of the American Psychological Association, National Academy of Neuropsychology, or the International Neuropsychological Society. Respondents read a vignette about a traumatic brain injury patient and subsequently reported the instruments they would utilize to assess this patient's memory, attention, executive functioning, and ability to return to work. There were three versions of the case study, which varied according to the patient's occupation and level of education. Results revealed that the reported proportion of only 9 of 516 instruments (1.7%) varied across classifications, indicating that some neuropsychologists slightly modified their test batteries based on patients' demographic characteristics. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to enhancing predictions of real-world outcomes based on neuropsychological test data. PMID:18067420

  8. [The "Patient Anxiety Seminar" as a graduate education program--effectiveness and use in general practice].

    PubMed

    Perkonigg, A; Wittchen, H U; Winkler, S

    1995-08-01

    This article describes results of an evaluation study of a seminar for patients with anxiety, an education program for primary care physicians. Before and after the two seminars, 109 participants filled out a questionnaire about their opinion on the program as well as their attitudes, experience and knowledge in dealing with anxiety patients. They were compared with a control group which did not take part in the program. After 3 and 12 months, a part of the participants was interviewed again. It was found that anxiety patients call for a lot of attention from general practitioners and that diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge is not sufficient. The educational program was highly rated by the participants. The seminars were conducted in the practice by most of the participants in groups as well as on single patients. It became evident that in spite of high expenses there is a wide acceptance of such seminars and that the variables examined up to now indicate a surprisingly high efficiency of the educational programme. PMID:7571737

  9. Moving towards health oriented patient education (HOPE).

    PubMed

    Glanville, I K

    2000-01-01

    The economics of prevention supports reimbursement of nurse practitioners for patient education. The role has undergone historical change, shifting from imparting disease-oriented health education (DOPE) toward empowering patients to use their own resources to the fullest to attain health. Nurse practitioners are well suited to provide care that facilitates behavior change and health-oriented patient education (HOPE). Essentials for effective patient education include use of an open communication style, written instructions, and the address of barriers. Adult literacy and reader-friendliness must be considered when assembling written materials. PMID:12119971

  10. [Organizing patient education in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric; Thieffry, Eliane

    2014-02-01

    A central element of the care management of patients with heart failure, therapeutic patient education mobilises caregivers into forming a multi-disciplinary team. In this article, a hospital team shares the different stages in the construction and implementation of a programme for use with hospitalised patients and in consultations. To do this, the nurses undertook training to acquire new educational skills. PMID:24654334

  11. Podcasting: contemporary patient education.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Daniel V; Tamura, Thomas K; Sipp, J Andrew; Keamy, Donald G; Eavey, Roland D

    2008-04-01

    Portable video technology is a widely available new tool with potential to be used by pediatric otolaryngology practices for patient and family education. Podcasts are media broadcasts that employ this new technology. They can be accessed via the Internet and viewed either on a personal computer or on a handheld device, such as an iPod or an MP3 player. We wished to examine the feasibility of establishing a podcast-hosting Web site. We digitally recorded pediatric otologic procedures in the operating room and saved the digital files to DVDs. We then edited the DVDs at home with video-editing software on a personal computer. Next, spoken narrative was recorded with audio-recording software and combined with the edited video clips. The final products were converted into the M4V file format, and the final versions were uploaded onto our hospital's Web site. We then downloaded the podcasts onto a high-quality portable media player so that we could evaluate their quality. All of the podcasts are now on the hospital Web site, where they can be downloaded by patients and families at no cost. The site includes instructions on how to download the appropriate free software for viewing the podcasts on a portable media player or on a computer. Using this technology for patient education expands the audience and permits portability of information. We conclude that a home computer can be used to inexpensively create informative surgery demonstrations that can be accessed via a Web site and transferred to portable viewing devices with excellent quality. PMID:18478793

  12. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients

  13. Behavioral health integration: Transforming patient care, medical resident education, and physician effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health care into the family medicine residency has had a dramatic impact on patient care, resident training, and physician effectiveness. With a cursory glance, it may seem that integrated behavioral health providers spend their days exclusively having 30-min office visits with patients. A full exploration, however, reveals that well-integrated behavioral health offers not only brief and effective visits with patients but also increased collaboration, better patient comanagement, and multiple opportunities for resident learning. Behavioral health integration transforms the way in which medical providers at all levels of training work, teach, and conceptualize their future practice. In an internal survey of 33 medical providers in an integrated family medicine residency, 97% of respondents report they value behavioral health integration to such a degree that they are more likely to accept a job in a setting that offers integrated behavioral health. PMID:26142288

  14. The Effect of Physician Continuing Medical Education on Patient-Reported Outcomes for Identifying and Optimally Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara S.; Castle, Patricia H.; Van Marter, Deborah; Roc, Anne; Neubauer, David; Auerbach, Sanford; DeAguiar, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effect of continuing medical education (CME) activities on patient reported outcomes with regard to (1) screening for excessive sleepiness (ES) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and (2) appropriate referral and treatment. Methods: A total of 725 patients were recruited from 75 providers who either participated or did not participate in Transtheoretical Model (TTM)-based OSA CME activities. Patient reported outcomes from participating (n = 36) and non-participating providers (n = 39) were compared using generalized estimating equations examining random effects of provider as unit of assignment. Results: Patients' reports demonstrate that participating physicians were 1.7 times more likely to initiate discussion of sleep problems than non-participating physicians (t1,411 = 3.71, p = 0.05) and 2.252.86 times more likely to administer validated measures for OSA (Epworth Sleepiness Scale and STOP-BANG). Patient reports also indicated that participating clinicians (79.9%) were significantly more likely to recommend seeing a sleep specialist compared to non-participating clinicians (60.7%; t1,348 = 9.1, p < 0.01, OR = 2.6). Furthermore, while 89.4% of participating clinicians recommended a sleep study, only 73.2% of the non-participating physicians recommended one (t1,363 = 11.46, p < 0.001, OR = 3.1). Conclusions: Participation in TTM-based OSA CME activities was associated with improved patient reported outcomes compared to the non-participating clinicians. Citation: Johnson SS, Castle PH, Van Marter D, Roc A, Neubauer D, Auerbach S, DeAguiar E. The effect of physician continuing medical education on patient-reported outcomes for identifying and optimally managing obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):197204. PMID:25845903

  15. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators

  16. Accurate Monitoring Leads to Effective Control and Greater Learning of Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.; O'Neil, Rochelle; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes) can depend on the extent to which patients can learn and remember disease-relevant information. In two experiments, we explored a technique motivated by theories of self-regulated learning for improving people's learning of information relevant to managing a chronic disease. Materials were

  17. Accurate Monitoring Leads to Effective Control and Greater Learning of Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.; O'Neil, Rochelle; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes) can depend on the extent to which patients can learn and remember disease-relevant information. In two experiments, we explored a technique motivated by theories of self-regulated learning for improving people's learning of information relevant to managing a chronic disease. Materials were…

  18. The effect of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Duty Hours Policy on plastic surgery resident education and patient care: an outcomes study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Chandrasekhar Bob; Chen, Li-Mei; Hollier, Larry H; Shenaq, Saleh M

    2004-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Work-Hours Duty Policy became effective on July 1, 2003, mandating the reduction of resident duty work hours. The Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program instituted a resident duty work-hours policy on July 1, 2002 (1 year ahead of the national mandate). Outcomes data are needed to facilitate continuous improvements in plastic surgical residency training while maintaining high-quality patient care. To assess the effect of this policy intervention on plastic surgery resident education as measured through the six core competencies and patient/resident safety, the investigators surveyed all categorical plastic surgery residents 6 months after implementation of the policy. This work represents the first empiric study investigating the effect of duty hours reduction on plastic surgery training and education. The categorical plastic surgery residents at the Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program completed a 68-item survey on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree). Residents were asked to rate multiple parameters based on the ACGME six core competencies, including statements on patient care and clinical/operative duties, resident education, resident quality of life, and resident perceptions on this policy. All surveys were completed anonymously. The sample size was n = 12 (program year 3 through program year 6), with a 100 percent response rate. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis was conducted with SPSS version 10.0 statistical software. Specifically, interquartile deviations were used to find consensus among resident responses to each statement. Descriptive statistics indicated higher percentages of agreement on a majority of statements in three categories, including patient care and clinical/operative duties, academic duties, and resident quality of life. Using interquartile deviation, the highest levels of consensus among the residents were found in positive statements addressing resident alertness (both in and out of the operative environment), time to read/prepare for cases/conferences, efficacy of the didactic curriculum, and overall satisfaction with this policy for surgery resident education. Residents also felt that their patients favored this work hours policy. In addition, there was high consensus that this policy improved overall patient care. The majority of residents identified a negative effect of this policy through an increase in cross-coverage responsibilities, however, and half of the residents perceived that faculty negatively viewed their unavailability postcall. In addition, no consensus among the residents was achieved regarding perceptions on overall weekly operative experience. Plastic surgery residents perceived that the reduction of resident work hours through adherence to the ACGME guidelines has beneficial effects on patient care and clinical/operative duties, academic duties, and resident quality of life. Residents felt, however, that these benefits may increase cross-coverage workloads. Furthermore, residents were concerned about faculty perception of their changes in postcall duties. In contrast to previously published findings in the general surgery literature, the current results indicate that residents do not believe that this policy negatively affects continuity of patient care. In fact, the current findings suggest that adherence to this policy improves patient care on multiple levels. The effect on the operative experience remains to be elucidated. Further large-scale and longitudinal research design and analysis is warranted to better assess the results of the ACGME resident duty work-hours policy in plastic surgery resident education. PMID:15577363

  19. Effect that an educational program for cystic fibrosis patients and caregivers has on the contamination of home nebulizers*

    PubMed Central

    Zuana, Adriana Della; Garcia, Doroti de Oliveira; Juliani, Regina Clia Turola Passos; da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the pathogens found in home nebulizers and in respiratory samples of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and to evaluate the effect that a standardized instruction regarding cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers has on the frequency of nebulizer contamination. METHODS: We included 40 CF patients (22 males), all of whom used the same model of nebulizer. The median patient age was 11.2 3.74 years. We collected samples from the nebulizer mouthpiece and cup, using a sterile swab moistened with sterile saline. Respiratory samples were collected by asking patients to expectorate into a sterile container or with oropharyngeal swabs after cough stimulation. Cultures were performed on selective media, and bacteria were identified by classical biochemical tests. Patients received oral and written instructions regarding the cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers. All determinations were repeated an average of two months later. RESULTS: Contamination of the nebulizer (any part) was detected in 23 cases (57.5%). The nebulizer mouthpiece and cup were found to be contaminated in 16 (40.0%) and 19 (47.5%), respectively. After the standardized instruction had been given, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of contaminated nebulizers (43.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In our sample of CF patients, nebulizer contamination was common, indicating the need for improvement in patient practices regarding the cleaning and disinfection of their nebulizers. A one-time educational intervention could have a significant positive impact. PMID:24831395

  20. A model for improving cancer patient education.

    PubMed

    Fredette, S L

    1990-08-01

    Adjustment to cancer requires modification of behavior that may be aided through patient education. Numerous programs have been developed to meet this need; however, studies show that even after being taught, patients are not well informed. It seems that the process of educating cancer patients needs to be improved. Authors suggest a progression of psychosocial stages of adjustment to serious illness during which specific behaviors are exhibited and coping mechanisms utilized. Understanding the nature of this process forms the basis for effective patient education since theories of adaptation describe behaviors that impact on motivation to learn, information required, and teaching methodology. Failure to attend to this variable of emotional response to the disease can prevent learning. This article integrates the theories of Weisman, Crate, Engle, and Kubler-Ross into an educational model for the cancer patient consisting of six periods. The model suggests nursing approaches, educational topics, and teaching strategies based on the patient's behavioral responses. Use of this model can improve teaching effectiveness in clinical practice by ensuring that the patient is ready to learn prior to teaching and by utilizing teaching strategies appropriate to the educational period. It can further be used as a tool to teach students of nursing how to use the stages of adjustment to chronic illness when planning patient teaching. PMID:2208096

  1. Educating future leaders in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Leotsakos, Agns; Ardolino, Antonella; Cheung, Ronny; Zheng, Hao; Barraclough, Bruce; Walton, Merrilyn

    2014-01-01

    Education of health care professionals has given little attention to patient safety, resulting in limited understanding of the nature of risk in health care and the importance of strengthening systems. The World Health Organization developed the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multiprofessional Edition to accelerate the incorporation of patient safety teaching into higher educational curricula. The World Health Organization Curriculum Guide uses a health system-focused, team-dependent approach, which impacts all health care professionals and students learning in an integrated way about how to operate within a culture of safety. The guide is pertinent in the context of global educational reforms and growing recognition of the need to introduce patient safety into health care professionals' curricula. The guide helps to advance patient safety education worldwide in five ways. First, it addresses the variety of opportunities and contexts in which health care educators teach, and provides practical recommendations to learning. Second, it recommends shared learning by students of different professions, thus enhancing student capacity to work together effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Third, it provides guidance on a range of teaching methods and pedagogical activities to ensure that students understand that patient safety is a practical science teaching them to act in evidence-based ways to reduce patient risk. Fourth, it encourages supportive teaching and learning, emphasizing the need to establishing teaching environments in which students feel comfortable to learn and practice patient safety. Finally, it helps educators incorporate patient safety topics across all areas of clinical practice. PMID:25285012

  2. Educating future leaders in patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Leotsakos, Agns; Ardolino, Antonella; Cheung, Ronny; Zheng, Hao; Barraclough, Bruce; Walton, Merrilyn

    2014-01-01

    Education of health care professionals has given little attention to patient safety, resulting in limited understanding of the nature of risk in health care and the importance of strengthening systems. The World Health Organization developed the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multiprofessional Edition to accelerate the incorporation of patient safety teaching into higher educational curricula. The World Health Organization Curriculum Guide uses a health system-focused, team-dependent approach, which impacts all health care professionals and students learning in an integrated way about how to operate within a culture of safety. The guide is pertinent in the context of global educational reforms and growing recognition of the need to introduce patient safety into health care professionals curricula. The guide helps to advance patient safety education worldwide in five ways. First, it addresses the variety of opportunities and contexts in which health care educators teach, and provides practical recommendations to learning. Second, it recommends shared learning by students of different professions, thus enhancing student capacity to work together effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Third, it provides guidance on a range of teaching methods and pedagogical activities to ensure that students understand that patient safety is a practical science teaching them to act in evidence-based ways to reduce patient risk. Fourth, it encourages supportive teaching and learning, emphasizing the need to establishing teaching environments in which students feel comfortable to learn and practice patient safety. Finally, it helps educators incorporate patient safety topics across all areas of clinical practice. PMID:25285012

  3. [Preoperative structured patient education].

    PubMed

    Lamarche, D

    1993-04-01

    This article describes the factors that motivated the nursing staff of the cardiac surgery unit at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, to revise their preoperative teaching program. The motivating factors described are the length of the preoperative waiting period; the level of preoperative anxiety; the decreased length of hospital stay; the dissatisfaction of the nursing staff with current patient teaching practices; and the lack of available resources. The reorganization of the teaching program was based upon the previously described factors combined with a review of the literature that demonstrated the impact of preoperative anxiety, emotional support and psycho-educational interventions upon the client's recovery. The goals of the new teaching program are to provide the client and the family with cognitive and sensory information about the client's impending hospitalization, chronic illness and necessary lifestyle modifications. The program consists of a system of telephone calls during the preoperative waiting period; a videotape viewing; a tour of the cardiac surgery unit; informal discussion groups; and the availability of nursing consultation to decrease preoperative anxiety. The end result of these interventions is more time for client support and integration of necessary information by the client and family. This kind of program has the potential to provide satisfaction at many levels by identifying client's at risk; increasing client knowledge; increasing support; decreasing anxiety during the preoperative waiting period; and decreasing the length of hospital stay. The nursing staff gained a heightened sense of accomplishment because the program was developed according to the nursing department's philosophy, which includes primary nursing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8472243

  4. [Empowerment by patient education in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Faller, H; Ehlebracht-König, I; Reusch, A

    2015-09-01

    Due to the chronic course, rheumatic diseases may be associated with both long-lasting pain and movement limitations. Those afflicted by these disorders thus face continuous challenges regarding both adapting to their illness as well as changing their lifestyle habits, for example increasing the physical activity levels. However, patient education may provide patients with the competencies they need to cope with their illness and modify their behavior. Therefore, patient education programs are core elements of rehabilitation in rheumatology. The German Society for Rheumatology has performed pioneering work concerning conceptualization and evaluation of standardized educational programs. In this article some more recent developments and up to date standards for contents and didactics of self-management programs are presented. Empowerment may be considered the overriding aim of these programs, i.e. enabling patients to make informed decisions in situations where their health is involved. Patient-centered didactic methods as used in state of the art concepts mirror the empowerment approach. To foster sustainability of lifestyle changes, detailed planning of behavioral modifications is recommended, thus increasing the chance of transferring changes adopted during rehabilitation into everyday living. Such methods have been proven to be effective and are employed in the updated education concept for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome, which is described here as an example. The Centre for Patient Education offers support in updating and evaluating patient education concepts. PMID:26224532

  5. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients…

  6. Cost effectiveness of patient education for the prevention of falls in hospital: economic evaluation from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Falls are one of the most frequently occurring adverse events that impact upon the recovery of older hospital inpatients. Falls can threaten both immediate and longer-term health and independence. There is need to identify cost-effective means for preventing falls in hospitals. Hospital-based falls prevention interventions tested in randomized trials have not yet been subjected to economic evaluation. Methods Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken from the health service provider perspective, over the period of hospitalization (time horizon) using the Australian Dollar (A$) at 2008 values. Analyses were based on data from a randomized trial among n = 1,206 acute and rehabilitation inpatients. Decision tree modeling with three-way sensitivity analyses were conducted using burden of disease estimates developed from trial data and previous research. The intervention was a multimedia patient education program provided with trained health professional follow-up shown to reduce falls among cognitively intact hospital patients. Results The short-term cost to a health service of one cognitively intact patient being a faller could be as high as A$14,591 (2008). The education program cost A$526 (2008) to prevent one cognitively intact patient becoming a faller and A$294 (2008) to prevent one fall based on primary trial data. These estimates were unstable due to high variability in the hospital costs accrued by individual patients involved in the trial. There was a 52% probability the complete program was both more effective and less costly (from the health service perspective) than providing usual care alone. Decision tree modeling sensitivity analyses identified that when provided in real life contexts, the program would be both more effective in preventing falls among cognitively intact inpatients and cost saving where the proportion of these patients who would otherwise fall under usual care conditions is at least 4.0%. Conclusions This economic evaluation was designed to assist health care providers decide in what circumstances this intervention should be provided. If the proportion of cognitively intact patients falling on a ward under usual care conditions is 4% or greater, then provision of the complete program in addition to usual care will likely both prevent falls and reduce costs for a health service. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register: ACTRN12608000015347. PMID:23692953

  7. Effect of allergist intervention on patient-centered and societal outcomes: allergists as leaders, innovators, and educators.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, R S; Schatz, M

    2000-12-01

    Atopic disorders, which afflict millions of Americans and hundreds of millions worldwide, are at epidemic levels with concomitant increases in morbidity and mortality. Environmental and lifestyle changes over the past three to five decades are proposed causes for this pandemic and as such present major burdens to reverse. The scope of allergy practice bridges directly on this challenge. Allergy as a specialty is a major leader in developing effective strategies to confront this epidemic. Allergists have made major contributions to the understanding of the risk factors, immunology, pathophysiology, immunomodulation, and prevention of atopic and immunologic disorders. Allergist epidemiologists and clinicians have helped develop and implement national and international guidelines in the recognition, management, and prevention of asthma and rhinitis. Allergist clinical researchers are active in (1) outcomes research that demonstrates convincingly the value of allergy as a specialty in asthma, allergic rhinitis, anaphylaxis, drug and food allergy, and other atopic disorders, (2) National Institutes of Health clinical trials that will form the basis for the future treatment of asthma and allergic disease, and (3) pharmaceutical trials that evaluate new, effective, and safe medication to treat atopic disease. Allergist educators, comprising academic and practicing allergists, supported by allied health professionals, national associations, and affiliated lay organizations, provide comprehensive education to fellows, residents, colleague physicians, media, the public, and patients. Documentation of the value of allergists in improving patient-centered and societal outcomes in their core domain, allergy, is the appropriate final topic contribution in the important series "New millennium: The conquest of allergy." PMID:11112881

  8. [Patient education and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Arfé, Emmanuelle; Bombail, Marie

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic education program set up at the Institut Universitaire du Cancer (University Cancer Institute) in Toulouse accompanies the treatment pathway of breast cancer patients. It includes nine collective workshops. From work organization to application, professionals and patients are closely involved. PMID:26455624

  9. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  10. Effects of educational intervention based on PRECEDE model on self care behaviors and control in patients with type 2 diabetes in 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a chronic disease and its control requires essential change in patients' life style. The aim of this study was survey of effects of educational intervention based on PRECEDE Model on self care behaviors and control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study carried out in 78 patients with type 2 diabetes who have referred to Minoodasht clinic of diabetes. The educational program has been designed according to the PRECEDE Model. Prior to perform the educational intervention, the patients filled a questionnaire which was designed according to the structure of PRECEDE Model for type 2 diabetes patients. The diabetes education program was performed on three target groups (patients, their families and Health care personnel). After four weeks, the effects of the educational program have been evaluated through the same questionnaire. The findings were analyzed by SPSS version 16 and p-value less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results The mean age of participants was 49years, 87.2% were married and 19.2% was illiterate. The rate of income of 44.9% was low. 66% had a family history of diabetes and 64% had been afflicted with diabetes more than 5years. The Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between formation of a file in diabetes clinic and on-time presence to receive services and participation in the educational classes with the marital status variable. The results also showed that there is a significant relationship between observing food diet and job. The mean scores of knowledge, attitude, practice, reinforcing factors and enabling factors has increased after educational intervention. The Chi-square test shows a significant difference before and after of education intervention in stages of the model. Conclusion The obtained results based on PRECEDE Model would support the positive effect of the educational intervention and its major elements (predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors) on diabetes self-care behaviors. PMID:25075380

  11. Effect of zoledronic acid on serum calcium in Pagets disease patients after educational strategies to improve calcium and vitamin D supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Henry G.; Su, Guoqin; Tan, Monique; Ozturk, Zafer E.; Aftring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Bisphosphonates are the most effective therapeutic agents in patients with Pagets disease of bone. As a result of their inhibition of osteoclastic activity, hypocalcemia of variable frequency and severity following intravenous bisphosphonate therapy has been reported. The present study assessed the effect of physician and patient education on adequate supplementation of calcium and vitamin D to reduce the potential risk of developing hypocalcemia following infusion of 5 mg zoledronic acid. Methods: This was an open-label, multicenter, controlled registry trial in which patients with Pagets disease were treated with a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid. Physicians were provided with educational materials focusing on optimization of calcium and vitamin D supplementation following zoledronic infusion that they used to educate their patients. The primary safety variable was the percentage of patients with serum calcium level <2.07mmol/l 911 days after zoledronic acid infusion. Results: A total of 75 patients were evaluable in the post dose hypocalcemia safety analysis. Of these, only 1 patient had treatment-emergent hypocalcemia, with a serum calcium level of 1.92 mmol/l 4 days following therapy. Hypocalcemia-related symptoms were not reported in this patient and the serum calcium returned to normal range at 2.17 mmol/l within 1 week on oral calcium supplementation. Conclusions: These results suggest that, with optimization of calcium and vitamin D supplementation by physician and patient education, hypocalcemia is an infrequent occurrence following zoledronic acid infusion. PMID:26301065

  12. Patient education resource assessment: project management.

    PubMed

    Patyk, M; Gaynor, S; Verdin, J

    2000-01-01

    To thrive in today's health care environment, hospitals are constantly striving to exceed their customers' expectations in delivering quality care in a cost-effective manner. Meeting the patient educational needs of the consumer is one well-recognized aspect of quality care. Delivering quality care does not happen by chance; rather, it requires intense planning. Our academic medical center formalized this process by empowering professional staff from Nursing Development to develop and implement a patient education strategic plan. This article outlines the project management for the assessment phase of this strategic planning process. The findings were instrumental in outlining the future direction for patient education initiatives that will benefit both the patient and the organization. PMID:10646297

  13. National Council on Patient Information and Education

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to the National Council on Patient Information and Education One of the original patient safety coalitions, NCPIE ... 1999-2016 National Council on Patient Information and Education. All rights reserved. | Privacy Policy NCPIE 200-A ...

  14. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective…

  15. Advances in patient education in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Daltroy, L H; Liang, M H

    1991-01-01

    Education of patients with arthritis began with an emphasis on conveying knowledge, grew to include behaviour change, compliance, and more general coping and management of disease and then progressed to consider physical and psychosocial health outcomes. Research continues in all these areas. Control, in many forms (locus of control, self perceived efficacy, learned helplessness), is now suggested to be a central mediating variable. Evaluation of programmes is moving away from programme v usual care towards comparison of alternative methods of delivery and matching of method to learner. The first generation of researchers in arthritis education tended to be care givers with little formal education in behavioural sciences and evaluation methodology; the programmes they designed were often empirically based. The current generation, nurtured in large part by funds from the Arthritis Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, is better trained in designing programmes grounded in behavioural sciences and educational theory. In the long run, collaborations with care givers and patients will considerably strengthen the effectiveness of education programmes for patients. A variety of educational strategies have been shown to change the knowledge, behaviour, and health of patients with arthritis for the better. Many methods seem to work, so long as the programme is planned, has a goal, and is accountable. There is much work still to be done to teach care givers to be better teachers, and patients to be better managers of their diseases, in concert with their doctors, and to focus on high risk groups. Although most work has been done with patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, many of these findings can and should be safely generalised to less studied rheumatic diseases. Finally, we need to consider the patient first as a person, and to provide education through all avenues, not just the medical care system. PMID:2059091

  16. Advances in patient education in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Daltroy, L H; Liang, M H

    1991-06-01

    Education of patients with arthritis began with an emphasis on conveying knowledge, grew to include behaviour change, compliance, and more general coping and management of disease and then progressed to consider physical and psychosocial health outcomes. Research continues in all these areas. Control, in many forms (locus of control, self perceived efficacy, learned helplessness), is now suggested to be a central mediating variable. Evaluation of programmes is moving away from programme v usual care towards comparison of alternative methods of delivery and matching of method to learner. The first generation of researchers in arthritis education tended to be care givers with little formal education in behavioural sciences and evaluation methodology; the programmes they designed were often empirically based. The current generation, nurtured in large part by funds from the Arthritis Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, is better trained in designing programmes grounded in behavioural sciences and educational theory. In the long run, collaborations with care givers and patients will considerably strengthen the effectiveness of education programmes for patients. A variety of educational strategies have been shown to change the knowledge, behaviour, and health of patients with arthritis for the better. Many methods seem to work, so long as the programme is planned, has a goal, and is accountable. There is much work still to be done to teach care givers to be better teachers, and patients to be better managers of their diseases, in concert with their doctors, and to focus on high risk groups. Although most work has been done with patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, many of these findings can and should be safely generalised to less studied rheumatic diseases. Finally, we need to consider the patient first as a person, and to provide education through all avenues, not just the medical care system. PMID:2059091

  17. Creating a patient education tool.

    PubMed

    Stonecypher, Karen

    2009-10-01

    Developing a patient education tool based on low literacy levels, behavioral theories, role modeling, and The Joint Commission's standards was the primary objective of this project. The initial goal was merely to develop a population-appropriate patient education tool. This led to a process whereby significant knowledge was gained by all to enrich overall professional development. An interdisciplinary team developed a low-literacy, self-management book for patients who had suffered a stroke. Team experts were responsible for the development of specific subject matter. Editing addressed the message, readability, typeface and font size, and charts and illustrations. Collaboration with the National Stroke Association guided the didactic pedagogical content presented. A well-known cartoonist who was a U.S. military veteran was willing to work with the team to develop the illustrations. PMID:19831328

  18. Computer-based Approaches to Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    All articles indexed in MEDLINE or CINAHL, related to the use of computer technology in patient education, and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1971 and 1998 were selected for review. Sixty-six articles, including 21 research-based reports, were identified. Forty-five percent of the studies were related to the management of chronic disease. Thirteen studies described an improvement in knowledge scores or clinical outcomes when computer-based patient education was compared with traditional instruction. Additional articles examined patients' computer experience, socioeconomic status, race, and gender and found no significant differences when compared with program outcomes. Sixteen of the 21 research-based studies had effect sizes greater than 0.5, indicating a significant change in the described outcome when the study subjects participated in computer-based patient education. The findings from this review support computer-based education as an effective strategy for transfer of knowledge and skill development for patients. The limited number of research studies (N = 21) points to the need for additional research. Recommendations for new studies include cost-benefit analysis and the impact of these new technologies on health outcomes over time. PMID:10428001

  19. Effects of a Short Educational Program for the Prevention of Foot Ulcers in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Monami, Matteo; Zannoni, Stefania; Gaias, Marianna; Nreu, Besmir; Marchionni, Niccol; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Patient education is capable of reducing the risk for diabetic foot ulcers. However, specific education on foot ulcer prevention was either included in broader programs addressing different parts of diabetes care or provided with time- and resource-consuming curricula. The aim of the study is to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a brief educational program for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. Methods. The study was performed on type 2 diabetic patients, randomized in a 1?:?1 ratio either to intervention or to control group. The principal endpoint was the incidence of foot ulcers. The intervention was a two-hour program provided to groups of 5-7 patients, including a 30-minute face-to-face lesson on risk factors for foot ulcers, and a 90-minute interactive session with practical exercises on behaviors for reducing risk. Results. The study was prematurely terminated due to a highly significant difference in outcome between the two treatment groups. The final sample was therefore composed of 121 patients. Six patients, all in the control group, developed ulcers during the 6-month follow-up (10% versus 0%, p = 0.012). Conclusions. A brief, 2-hour, focused educational program is effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. PMID:26448748

  20. Effects of a Short Educational Program for the Prevention of Foot Ulcers in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Matteo; Zannoni, Stefania; Gaias, Marianna; Nreu, Besmir; Marchionni, Niccolò; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Patient education is capable of reducing the risk for diabetic foot ulcers. However, specific education on foot ulcer prevention was either included in broader programs addressing different parts of diabetes care or provided with time- and resource-consuming curricula. The aim of the study is to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a brief educational program for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. Methods. The study was performed on type 2 diabetic patients, randomized in a 1 : 1 ratio either to intervention or to control group. The principal endpoint was the incidence of foot ulcers. The intervention was a two-hour program provided to groups of 5–7 patients, including a 30-minute face-to-face lesson on risk factors for foot ulcers, and a 90-minute interactive session with practical exercises on behaviors for reducing risk. Results. The study was prematurely terminated due to a highly significant difference in outcome between the two treatment groups. The final sample was therefore composed of 121 patients. Six patients, all in the control group, developed ulcers during the 6-month follow-up (10% versus 0%, p = 0.012). Conclusions. A brief, 2-hour, focused educational program is effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. PMID:26448748

  1. A Study of Professional Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum, Julie; Ridenour, Maureen; Shaff, Gaye; Hammons, Mary; Taylor, Monica

    2002-01-01

    Of 124 acute care nurses, 97% felt that patient education was a priority. Inhibiting factors were time, staffing, and patient receptiveness. Enhancers included having time to teach, receiving effective teaching guidance materials, and having access to teaching resources. (SK)

  2. Prescription Opioid Analgesics: Promoting Patient Safety with Better Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Costello, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Patients expect and deserve adequate postoperative pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely used and effective in controlling postoperative pain, but their use poses risks that many patients don't understand and that all too often result in adverse outcomes. Inappropriate and often dangerous use of prescription medication has increased sharply in the past two decades in the United States. Patients and caregivers must have an adequate understanding of safe use, storage, and disposal of opioids to prevent adverse drug events in patients and others. Nurses play a key role in providing this patient education. This article provides a case study that highlights the risks and important aspects of opioid medication use in the postoperative patient. PMID:26510070

  3. The Effects on Knowledge of the Systematic Education of Patients with Joint Diseases Treated with NSAIDs and Diuretics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linne, Agneta Bjorck; Liedholm, Hans; Jacobsson, Lennart

    2001-01-01

    In a randomized, controlled trial, patients with joint diseases and concomitant treatment with NSAIDs and diuretics received systematic education. The intervention group was given information focusing on awareness of drug interactions and encouragement of self-adjustment of treatment. Results reveal that the intervention group achieved greater

  4. Arthritis Self-Management: A Study of the Effectiveness of Patient Education for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of an Arthritis Self Management course for people aged 55-95 (N=200). Results indicated significant gains in knowledge and pain reduction. Trends toward less disability were observed for participants under age 74. (JAC)

  5. Patient safety curriculum in medical education.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Mee

    2009-09-01

    Since release of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer System, patient safety has emerged as a global concern in the provision of quality health care. In response to growing recognition of the importance of patient safety, some medical schools in other countries have created and/or implemented patient safety curricula. In Korea, however, patient safety medical curriculum has not been actively discussed by medical educators. The purpose of this article is to introduce patient safety concepts and the global efforts on patient safety medical education. Specifically, this article describes; 1) current concepts in patient safety, 2) global trends of patient safety movement and education, 3) contents, instructional and assessment methods of patient safety education for both undergraduate medical education and graduate medical education, suggested in the previous studies, 4) WHO Patient Safety Guide for Medical Curriculum developed by the Medical Education Team within the World Alliance for Patient Safety and 5) known barriers against patient safety education. Patient safety is a major priority for all healthcare providers. In reality, however, teaching and learning about patient safety in medical curriculum offers a challenge to all medical schools, especially, the health care environment is not favorable to physicians such as Korea. More attention and recognition about patient safety by all health personnel and medical educators is needed. In addition, the national conversation about medical errors and patient safety and how best to incorporate it to the existing curriculum should be discussed. PMID:25813311

  6. Effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients with high-risk diabetic foot: a follow-up analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Yang, Chuan; Lin, Diao Zhu; Xiao, Hui Sheng; Mai, Li Fang; Guo, Yi Chen; Yan, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to discuss the effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. One hundred eighty-five diabetes patients at high risk for foot diseases were enrolled in this study and provided with intensive nursing education, including individualized education about diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot diseases, instruction in podiatric care (the right way of washing the foot, the care of foot skin, appropriate choice of shoes and socks, intense examinations and records of feet by patients themselves every day, and the assistant management of calluses). Study subjects were followed up for 2 years. Once the foot ulceration developed, the inducing factors of foot ulceration were inquired about, the ulcers were evaluated, and the incidence of foot ulceration was analyzed before and after the intensive nursing education according to self-paired data. Results showed there were highly statistically significant improvements in the intensive treatment group compared with the control group in plasma glucose, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. More important is that intensive nursing education helps to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and to decrease the rate of amputation among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. PMID:25004241

  7. Devising standards for patient education in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Wyness, M A

    1989-09-01

    The Patient Education Committee's work to develop patient education standards and criteria has been a challenging and positive experience for the committee members. Some questions about the standards and criteria have yet to be answered, and further refinement may be indicated by future monitoring and evaluation activities. For example, the question still remains of how realistic, achievable, and measureable are the standards. Work on patient education standards continues. Excellence in patient education will only be achieved when nurses are fully committed to it as an integral part of nursing care, when issues related to evaluation are clearly and consistently addressed, and when the process of patient education is continually refined to achieve effective outcomes and desired behavioral changes. Developing standards and working within the QA context is the first step along the path to high-quality patient education. PMID:2510111

  8. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  9. Timely Topics: Hypertension Education--A Summative Evaluation of Direct and Indirect Care Providers' Knowledge, Roles, and Attitudes; Effects of Enforced Behavior Change on Attitudes; Evaluation of a Workshop on Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattron, Judith M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) an investigation of how nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and practice changed after a continuing education program on nursing management of adults with essential hypertension; (2) a study showing that even with enforced behavior changes, attitudes are slow to change; and (3) a workshop on principles of effective patient

  10. Comparative investigation of the effectiveness of face-to-face verbal training and educational pamphlets on readiness of patients before undergoing non-emergency surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Noorian, Cobra; Aein, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The thought of having a surgery can be stressful for everyone. Providing the necessary information to the patient can help both the patient and the treatment team. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of face-to-face verbal training and educational pamphlets on the readiness of patients for undergoing non-emergency surgeries. Materials and Methods: The study was a beforeafter randomized clinical trial. 90 patients scheduled to undergo non-emergency surgery who referred to Shahrekord Ayatollah Kashani Hospital in 2013 were distributed randomly and gradually into two experimental groups (group of face-to-face verbal training and group of educational pamphlet) and one control group. Dependent variable of the study was pre-surgery readiness. Data analysis was carried out by using SPSS statistical software. Statistical analysis were analysis of variance (ANOVA) and correlation test. Results: Results showed that the mean scores of pre-surgery readiness in both interventional groups were significantly higher than that in the control group after the intervention (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Each of the methods of face-to-face verbal education and using the pamphlet could be equally effective in improving the readiness of the patients undergoing surgery. Therefore, in environments where the health care providers are facing with the pressure of work and lack of sufficient time for face-to-face verbal training, suitable educational pamphlets can be used to provide the necessary information to patients and prepare them for surgery. PMID:26097859

  11. Patient Education and Involvement in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiric, Linda Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health

  12. Patient Education and Involvement in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiric, Linda Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health…

  13. Development and Evaluation of Patient Education Materials for Elderly Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Jewitt, Natalie; Hope, Andrew J; Milne, Robin; Le, Lisa W; Papadakos, Janet; Abdelmutti, Nazek; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2016-03-01

    Patients treated for lung cancer are often elderly presenting a unique challenge for developing patient education materials. This study developed and evaluated a patient education pamphlet on lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) designed specifically for an elderly population. The SBRT pamphlet was developed using a participatory design involving a convenience sample of patients. This prospective study assessed patient's opinions of pamphlet effectiveness through self-report questionnaires. The pamphlet was deemed "effective" if patients rated 16/18 evaluation statements as "strongly agree" or "agree." Demographic data and health literacy (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine short-form (REALM-SF)) were also assessed. Patient opinion of pamphlet "effectiveness" was compared between patients with REALM-SF scores of 7 versus <7 using Fisher's exact test. The overall EQ-5D-5L score was compared for patients who did and did not find the pamphlet effective using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Thirty-seven patients participated. The median age was 76 years (range 56-93) and 22 patients (59 %) had ≤high school education. Most patients preferred to have verbal (65 %) or written (78 %) educational materials as opposed to online information or educational classes. Thirty-two patients (86 %) rated the pamphlet as effective. The proportion of patients who found the pamphlet effective was 85.7 versus 86.7 % (p = 1.00) in those with REALM 7 versus <7. The mean EQ-5D score was 67.5 (SD 19.1) versus 71.8 (SD 8.7) (p = 0.84) in those who found the pamphlet effective versus not. Participatory design is an effective method for developing education materials for challenging patient groups such as elderly patients. Despite advanced age and comorbidity, this patient group had adequate health literacy. PMID:25572462

  14. Long-term effects of asthma education for physicians on patient satisfaction and use of health services.

    PubMed

    Clark, N M; Gong, M; Schork, M A; Kaciroti, N; Evans, D; Roloff, D; Hurwitz, M; Maiman, L A; Mellins, R B

    2000-07-01

    This randomized clinical trial evaluated the long-term impact of an interactive seminar for physicians based on principles of self-regulation on clinician behaviour, children's use of health services for asthma, and parent's views of physician performance. Seventy-four general practice paediatricians, and 637 of their asthma patients aged 1-12 yrs, were randomized to treatment or control. Children and parents were blind to physicians' participation. Data were collected at baseline and follow-up through self-administered surveys (paediatricians), telephone interviews (parents) and medical records. The seminar focused on development of communication and teaching skills and use of therapeutic medical regimens for asthma as outlined in the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. Approximately 2 yrs postintervention, treatment group physicians were more likely than control physicians to: use protocols for delivering asthma education (odds ratio (OR) 4.9, p=0.2), write down for patients how to adjust medicines when symptoms change (OR 5.7, p=0.05), and provide more guidelines for modifying therapy (OR 3.8, p=0.06). Parents scored treatment group physicians higher than control physicians on five specific positive communication behaviours. Children seen by treatment group physicians had fewer hospitalizations (p=0.03) and those with higher levels of emergency department (ED) use at baseline had fewer subsequent ED visits (p=0.03). No differences regarding the number of office visits were noted. There were no significant differences found between treatment and control group physicians in the amount of time spent with patients during office visits (26 versus 29 min) or in the number of patients treated with anti-inflammatory medicine. It is concluded that interactive asthma seminars for paediatricians had significant long-term benefits for their asthma care. PMID:10933079

  15. A Pilot Study of the Incidence of Post-thoracotomy Pulmonary Complications and the Effectiveness of Pre-thoracotomy Physiotherapy Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Anne; Bond, Jennifer; Versi, Bashir M.; Nagar, Arpit; Ng, Bernard H.K.; Moreland, Julie D.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To estimate the incidence and examine the pattern of post-thoracotomy pulmonary complications (PPC) that are amenable to physiotherapy treatment and to estimate the effect size of a pre-thoracotomy physiotherapy education session compared to no preoperative physiotherapy for reducing PPC. Methods: Forty-two patients undergoing thoracotomy participated in this two-group retrospective-prospective cohort study. The preop group (n=22) received physiotherapy education prior to surgery and the no preop group (n=20) did not receive preoperative physiotherapy education. Chest radiographs were examined for PPC for 5 days postoperatively. Incidences of PPC were determined. The effect size was based on a grand count of PPC. Results: The 5-day incidence of atelectasis, collapse, consolidation, and other complications was 85.0%, 39.0%, 31.7%, and 38.1%, respectively. Patterns of PPC showed large increases at days 2 and 3. The effect size for pre-thoracotomy physiotherapy education was zero. Conclusions: In our sample, incidence of PPC was high and did not substantially differ based on whether or not preoperative education was provided. PMID:21197180

  16. The Effect of Diabetes Self-Management Education on Body Weight, Glycemic Control, and Other Metabolic Markers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Christopher W. K.; Chan, Lawrence W. C.; Law, Helen K. W.; Ying, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of a short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME) on metabolic markers and atherosclerotic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. 76 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited in this study. They were divided into the intervention group (n = 36) and control group (n = 40). The patients in the intervention group received a 3-month intervention, including an 8-week education on self-management of diabetes mellitus and subsequent 4 weeks of practice of the self-management guidelines. The patients in the control group received standard advice on medical nutrition therapy. Metabolic markers, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and carotid arterial stiffness (CAS) of the patients in both groups were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention. Results. There was a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, −0.2 ± 0.56% versus 0.08 ± 0.741%; P < 0.05) and body weight (−1.19 ± 1.39 kg versus −0.61 ± 2.04 kg; P < 0.05) in the intervention group as compared to the control group. However, no significant improvements were found in other metabolic markers, CIMT and CAS (P > 0.05). Conclusions. DSME can improve HbA1c and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25136645

  17. Effect of CPOE User Interface Design on User-Initiated Access to Educational and Patient Information during Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Geissbuhler, Antoine J.; Dupont, William D.; Giuse, Dario A.; Talbert, Douglas A.; Tierney, William M.; Plummer, W. Dale; Stead, William W.; Miller, Randolph A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Authors evaluated whether displaying context sensitive links to infrequently accessed educational materials and patient information via the user interface of an inpatient computerized care provider order entry (CPOE) system would affect access rates to the materials. Design: The CPOE of Vanderbilt University Hospital (VUH) included baseline clinical decision support advice for safety and quality. Authors augmented this with seven new primarily educational decision support features. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial compared clinicians' utilization rates for the new materials via two interfaces. Control subjects could access study-related decision support from a menu in the standard CPOE interface. Intervention subjects received active notification when study-related decision support was available through context sensitive, visibly highlighted, selectable hyperlinks. Measurements: Rates of opportunities to access and utilization of study-related decision support materials from April 1999 through March 2000 on seven VUH Internal Medicine wards. Results: During 4,466 intervention subject-days, there were 240,504 (53.9/subject-day) opportunities for study-related decision support, while during 3,397 control subject-days, there were 178,235 (52.5/subject-day) opportunities for such decision support, respectively (p = 0.11). Individual intervention subjects accessed the decision support features at least once on 3.8% of subject-days logged on (278 responses); controls accessed it at least once on 0.6% of subject-days (18 responses), with a response rate ratio adjusted for decision support frequency of 9.17 (95% confidence interval 4.618, p < 0.0005). On average, intervention subjects accessed study-related decision support materials once every 16 days individually and once every 1.26 days in aggregate. Conclusion: Highlighting availability of context-sensitive educational materials and patient information through visible hyperlinks significantly increased utilization rates for study-related decision support when compared to standard VUH CPOE methods, although absolute response rates were low. PMID:15802487

  18. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.

  19. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  20. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional

  1. The effect of group psycho-education program on the burden of family caregivers with multiple sclerosis patients in Isfahan in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saeid; Dalvi-Isfahani, Fariba; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lack of adequate training and support of primary caregivers of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is the major factor in causing stress, anxiety, and increase of burden. Therefore, the treatment team members such as psychiatric nurses can help these vulnerable people overcome psychiatric pressures effectively not only through their care and referral role but also through their supportive characteristic, which helps the patients improve their clinical status, together with their social, familial, and work adaptation. Therefore, the researcher tried to identify the effect of a group psycho-education program on the burden family caregivers with MS patients. Materials and Methods: This is a two-group three-stage clinical trial. The researcher referred to the heads of neurology clinics to present the purpose of the study and to start the sampling. The neurology clinics of AL Zahra University Hospital, and also a Private Neurology Clinic were selected to collect the data of the study. The subjects were randomly selected, and then, assigned to two groups of study and control. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant reduction in family caregivers’ burden immediately after and 1-month after intervention in the study group, compared to control. Repeated measure ANOVA showed a significant reduction in caregivers’ burden mean score in the study group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As group psycho-education reduced family caregivers’ burden, it is recommended to develop and design other programs for the family caregivers of the patients with MS. PMID:26257794

  2. Patient education programmes in obstructive airway disease. The Ingelheim Model for promoting health through patient education.

    PubMed

    Klein, K; Troglauer, K G; Ahlstich, G; Schunke, B; Theissen, E; Voss, H W; Clausen, V

    1992-06-01

    Chronic obstructive airway diseases (COAD) can be regarded as one of the major health problems needing environmental actions and screening programs for early detection and intensive patient education programs to cope with the needs of tertiary prevention. On the basis of our epidemiological study focused on COAD carried out in FRG (sample size August 1988: 63,000 participants) a patient education program has been developed and evaluated. In cooperation with general practitioners and pneumologists the program has been installed at practice and community level. The need for a patient education program has been assessed during the three years of the PNEUMOBIL-Project. It is not just a matter of cutting costs, but to a large extent a matter of the wellbeing of the patients and of reducing side effects to a minimum. The objective of the project can be split into three dimensions: (1) The cognitive aspect. Here significant lack of knowledge has to be overcome. At this point it has to be stated clearly that at the present time the medical community is not able to solve this problem on their own. (2) The psychomotoric aspect. Here the competent use of medication has to be trained. (3) The emotional aspect. The patient has to be motivated and integrated into the therapeutic process in a way that his compliance contributes significantly. The didactical concept consists of modules that can be used in varying sequences according to the needs of the target audience.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1497798

  3. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers

  4. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  5. E-Learning Virtual Patients for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Eric; Mulhausen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based virtual patients (VPs) are an emerging medium for medical education that addresses barriers faced by geriatrics educators. Research has shown VPs to be as effective in changing knowledge and behavior as more traditional forms of teaching. This paper presents a descriptive study of the development of the University of Iowa's…

  6. The Effect of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge and Adherence to Treatment in Hemodialysis Patients: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Parvan, Kobra; Hasankhani, Hadi; Seyyedrasooli, Allehe; Riahi, Seyed Mohammad; Ghorbani, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) deal with many potential problems with hemodialysis for all their life. Regarding the importance of preventing dialysis adverse effects, which are in close connection with lack of knowledge and report on how to train the patients? This study aims at comparing the impact of two methods of face to face training and training pamphlet on complying and informing of hemodialysis treatments. Methods: This clinical trial study was conducted on 58 hemodialysis patients who visited Shahid Rahnemun Teaching hospital, Yazd, Iran, and had required conditions of the research. Data were collected through a questionnaire including personal-social information, several questions to assess the level of compliance and to inform the treatment method. The quantitative analysis of this study used the Statistical Package for Social Sciences SPSS version 13 and descriptive (frequency, mean, standard deviation) and inferential (Chi-square, paired t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA) statistics were employed. Results: The mean scores for informing both groups (face to face and training pamphlet) were significantly increased. The mean score for adherence to treatments was also significant.Conclusion: In this research, face to face training was found to be more effective than training pamphlet. It seemed to have more strong effect on increasing the level of information and adherence to treatment. To train these people, face to face training should be, thus, preferred. PMID:25821762

  7. The Effect of Educating Health Promotion Strategies on Self-Care Self-Efficacy in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplantation: A Double Blind Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltannezhad, Fateme; Farsi, Zahra; Jabari Moroei, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-care self-efficacy in patients with end stage renal disease, waiting for kidney transplantation, probably decreases due to facing new conditions and side effects of treatment. Objectives: The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of educating health promotion strategies on self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: A double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 52 patients undergoing kidney transplantation in Baqiyatallah Hospital in 2012. Patients were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. The questionnaire of Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH) was employed to measure self-care self-efficacy. At first, the two groups filled the questionnaire. Then, the intervention group was trained regarding health promotion strategies within 4 sessions before the transplantation. The control group was trained according to routine protocol of the transplantation unit. Then, the two groups were followed up for two months, and reassessed at the end of the first and second months after the transplantation. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics including independent samples T test, Chi square and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In the intervention group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 106.96 25.1 at first, and changed to 135.81 9.65 and 111.19 12.45 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). In the control group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 112.73 14.33 at first, and changed to 118.58 17.59 and 108.73 15.93 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the first post-test regarding total score of self-care self-efficacy (P = 0.001) and dimensions of reduction of stress (P = 0.001), enjoying life (P = 0.01), and coping (P = 0.001). The mean scores of the intervention group were higher than those of the controls in all domains of self-care self-efficacy in the second post-test. However, the difference was only significant in decision-making dimension (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Educating health promotion strategies was effective in improving self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Establishment of a holistic caring program is suggested to integrate the pre-transplantation educations with a continual post discharge follow-up. PMID:25414881

  8. Effectiveness of a risk-minimization activity involving physician education on metabolic monitoring of patients receiving quetiapine: results from two postauthorization safety studies.

    PubMed

    Brody, Robert S; Liss, Charles L; Wray, Heather; Iovin, Ramon; Michaylira, Carmen; Muthutantri, Anushini; Damstetter, Philip; Datto, Catherine; Jefferies, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Following Good Pharmacovigilance Practices Module XVI, two complementary studies were performed that included process and outcome measurements of the effectiveness of physician education on metabolic monitoring of patients receiving quetiapine. A multinational survey of 800 European Union physicians was utilized to assess the receipt of educational materials and also to assess the degree of monitoring as reported by physicians. Recall of receipt of educational materials ranged from 16.0 to 69.0% across the participating countries; however, physicians reported that 64.5% of patients were being monitored, with the majority reporting performance of three or more of four key metabolic-monitoring activities. Higher rates of monitoring were reported by those who reported receiving materials. Assessment of outcomes in a separate retrospective analysis of electronic medical record data showed lower levels of monitoring performed by specialist physicians. The monitoring activities observed were assessed as acceptable on the basis of the established performance of UK physicians, who are incentivized to deliver preventive screening. PMID:26451964

  9. Effects of educational intervention on adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Erimara Dall'Agnol; Fleck, Caren Schlottefeld; Borges, Januário José Vieira; Condessa, Robledo Leal; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention on healthcare professionals' adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in intensive care unit patients. Methods A quasi-experimental study was performed to evaluate intensive care unit professionals' adherence to the tracheobronchial aspiration technical recommendations in intensive care unit patients both before and after a theoretical and practical educational intervention. Comparisons were performed using the chi-square test, and the significance level was set to p<0.05. Results A total of 124 procedures, pre- and post-intervention, were observed. Increased adherence was observed in the following actions: the use of personal protective equipment (p=0.01); precaution when opening the catheter package (p<0.001); the use of a sterile glove on the dominant hand to remove the catheter (p=0.003); the contact of the sterile glove with the catheter only (p<0.001); the execution of circular movements during the catheter removal (p<0.001); wrapping the catheter in the sterile glove at the end of the procedure (p=0.003); the use of distilled water, opened at the start of the procedure, to wash the connection latex (p=0.002); the disposal of the leftover distilled water at the end of the procedure (p<0.001); and the performance of the aspiration technique procedures (p<0.001). Conclusion There was a low adherence by health professionals to the preventive measures against hospital infection, indicating the need to implement educational strategies. The educational intervention used was shown to be effective in increasing adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration. PMID:23917976

  10. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management. PMID:26846749

  11. [Hilarein, a patient education game for kidney transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Césarini, Carole; Callens, Cécile

    2013-03-01

    At Nice university hospital, an educational board game has been designed by the kidney transplant team for patients suffering from kidney failure. Hilarein is a tool to support therapeutic education which demonstrates that it is possible to learn while having fun. PMID:23593797

  12. Avatar-based interactive ileostomy education in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Bedra, McKenzie; Wick, Elizabeth; Brotman, Daniel; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Computer-assisted education can be an effective means for patient engagement and empowerment however the feasibility of postoperative computer-assisted ileostomy education has not been studied systematically. The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility and patient acceptance of tablet-based interactive ileostomy education in patients with new stomas, and to evaluate the impact of this education modality on knowledge and self-efficacy. An interactive multimedia education for ileostomy management guided by adult learning theories was tested in 15 hospitalized patients with new ileostomies. After using the avatar-based education, the ileostomy knowledge score improved from 27.83.4 to 31.31.5 (p<0.002) and stoma care self-efficacy improved from 78.422.7 to 92.714.1 (p<0.05). Attitudinal surveys and qualitative interviews demonstrated high level of acceptance and provided valuable feedback for future improvements. We concluded that avatar-based interactive instruction can potentially be an effective means to deliver health education to hospitalized patients. PMID:23823383

  13. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial to estimate the effects and costs of a patient centred educational intervention in glaucoma management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Poor glaucoma education is thought to be a causative factor of non-adherence to glaucoma therapy. However, the multi-factorial nature of non-adherent behaviour may explain the failure of purely educational interventions to achieve significant improvement in adherence. Behaviour Change Counselling (BCC) allows both the imparting of information and assessment of patient ambivalence to medication use and may elicit behaviour change in order to achieve better adherence. The chronic and complex nature of glaucoma means that patient non-adherence to glaucoma therapy does not easily correlate with measureable objective clinical endpoints. However, electronic medication monitoring offers an objective method of measuring adherence without reliance on clinical endpoints. Methods/design The study is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with glaucoma (open angle) or ocular hypertension patients attending a glaucoma clinic and prescribed travoprost. The study will determine whether additional glaucoma education using BCC is beneficial and cost effective in improving adherence with glaucoma therapy. An 8-month follow-up period, using an electronic adherence monitoring device (Travalert® dosing aid, TDA), will indicate if the intervention is likely to be sustained in the longer term. Additionally, a cost-effectiveness framework will be used to estimate the cost benefit of improving adherence. The development of a novel intervention to deliver glaucoma education using BCC required practitioner training and fidelity testing. Five practitioners were successfully trained to become Glaucoma Support Assistants able to deliver the BCC intervention. The research group had prior clinical and investigative experience in this setting, and used multiple strategies to design a method to address the study objectives. Discussion This RCT, using BCC to improve adherence to ocular hypotensive therapy, to our knowledge is the first within this disease area. Using a variety of adherence measures allows examination of the known inaccuracies of patient self-report with respect to glaucoma medication. The novel BCC component has undergone fidelity testing using BECCI and the BCC template will ensure conformity to a standardised intervention. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN89683704 PMID:23171166

  14. Medium-/Long-Term Effects of a Specific Exercise Protocol Combined with Patient Education on Spine Mobility, Chronic Fatigue, Pain, Aerobic Fitness and Level of Disability in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Erika; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Pigatto, Maurizia; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Doria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To propose a rehabilitation protocol able to produce immediate and long-term beneficial effects on level of disability and overall performance in ADLs. Materials and Methods. Forty-one FM patients were randomized to an exercise and educational-behavioral programme group (experimental group, EG = 21) or to a control group (CG = 20). Each subject was evaluated before, at the end (T1), and after 6 months (T6) from the conclusion of the rehabilitation treatment using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), tender points count (TPC), and spinal active range of motion. The exercise protocol included 20 sessions consisting in self-awareness, stretching, strengthening, spine flexibility, and aerobic exercises, which patients were subsequently educated to perform at home. Results. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At T1, the EG showed a positive trend in FIQ, VAS, HAQ, and FSS scales and significant improvement in 6MWT and in most spinal active range of motion measurements (P between 0.001 and 0.04). The positive results were maintained at the follow-up. Conclusion. The proposed programme was well tolerated and produced immediate and medium-term beneficial effects improving function and strain endurance. This trial is registered with DRKS00005071 on DRKS. PMID:24616894

  15. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource

    PubMed Central

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care. PMID:26557411

  16. Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stanley G.

    The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a

  17. Patient education preferences in ophthalmic care

    PubMed Central

    Rosdahl, Jullia A; Swamy, Lakshmi; Stinnett, Sandra; Muir, Kelly W

    2014-01-01

    Background The learning preferences of ophthalmology patients were examined. Methods Results from a voluntary survey of ophthalmology patients were analyzed for education preferences and for correlation with race, age, and ophthalmic topic. Results To learn about eye disease, patients preferred one-on-one sessions with providers as well as printed materials and websites recommended by providers. Patients currently learning from the provider were older (average age 59 years), and patients learning from the Internet (average age 49 years) and family and friends (average age 51 years) were younger. Patients interested in cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eye were older; patients interested in double vision and glasses were younger. There were racial differences regarding topic preferences, with Black patients most interested in glaucoma (46%), diabetic retinopathy (31%), and cataracts (28%) and White patients most interested in cataracts (22%), glaucoma (22%), and macular degeneration (19%). Conclusion Most ophthalmology patients preferred personalized education: one-on-one with their provider or a health educator and materials (printed and electronic) recommended by their provider. Age-related topics were more popular with older patients, and diseases with racial risk factors were more popular with high risk racial groups. PMID:24812493

  18. [Therapeutic patient education in chronic hand dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Gelot, P; Avenel-Audran, M; Balica, S; Bensefa, L; Crpy, M-N; Debons, M; Ammari, H; Milpied, B; Raison, N; Vigan, M; Weibel, N; Stalder, J-F; Bernier, C

    2014-06-01

    Hand dermatitis (HD) is usually due to a combination of various interacting factors. It involves significant impairment of the quality of life with psychological and socioeconomic impact. A therapeutic education program in HD.was elaborated by 19 health professionals (dermatologists, occupational clinical physicians, nurses, psychologists, environmental medical advisor) with experience in therapeutic education or skills in HD, according to the recommendations of Haute Autorit de Sant. The program includes an individual medical consultation to perform educational diagnostic, two collective workshops and a medical evaluation consult. Two group workshops "the disease, irritant factors and its treatments" and "the experiences and feelings" were elaborated with learning objectives and educative tools. Different scores were proposed to evaluate the program and acquired skills. Therapeutic education is an efficient way to help patients to adopt skin protection measures essential to healing. We propose a guideline of therapeutic education in HD including skills and educative tools and intended for health professionals to serve as working basis. PMID:24953622

  19. Patient literacy levels: a consideration when designing patient education programs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, F L; McLemore, R

    1997-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine (a) the relationship between patients' own reports of the highest grade completed in school and their actual reading level and (b) the relationship between literacy and the level of knowledge about self-care after patients had received education involving written discharge instructions. In addition, the content of the materials was analyzed for its cultural sensitivity. Twenty-six patients who had had either hip- or knee-replacement surgery at an inner-city hospital participated in this correlational descriptive study. There was a significant negative relationship between patients' own reports of highest grade completed in school and their actual reading level (r = -.39, p < .05). Rehabilitation nurses should find this study beneficial for developing, assessing, and using written patient education materials appropriate for the reading level of their patient populations. PMID:9416192

  20. Designing "Educationally Effective" Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses data from a curriculum intervention project designed to introduce new forms of discussion, seen as educationally effective, into the primary classroom. While the introduction of talk as an aid to learning is premised on a social approach to learning, such interventions are often evaluated in terms of cognitive benefits and

  1. Patient education. Developing a health care partnership.

    PubMed

    Currie, B F; Renner, J H

    1979-01-01

    Increasingly, patients are insisting on becoming partners in their own health care. Physicians who welcome such involvement should try to determine the medical IQ and knowledge base of the patient and then provide appropriate educational experiences. An atmosphere encouraging genuine dialogue is essential to a successful partnership. PMID:310548

  2. [Bariatric surgery and patient therapeutic education].

    PubMed

    Mvel, Katell

    2015-11-01

    Weight loss surgery or "bariatric surgery", used in cases of severe obesity, is a complex procedure aiming to reduce food intake. An increasingly accessible technique, it requires a long postoperative follow-up and a change in eating habits. Patient therapeutic education encourages the patient to become a player in their care. PMID:26548392

  3. Comparing Effectiveness of High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation vs Case-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Ling Yap, Yen; Leng Lee, Wee; Chang Soh, Yee

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether human patient simulation (HPS) is superior to case-based learning (CBL) in teaching diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and thyroid storm (TS) to pharmacy students. Design. In this cross-over, open-label, single center, randomized control trial, final-year undergraduate pharmacy students enrolled in an applied therapeutics course were randomized to HPS or CBL groups. Pretest, posttest, knowledge retention tests, and satisfaction survey were administered to students. Assessment. One hundred seventy-four students participated in this study. The effect sizes attributable to HPS were larger than CBL in both cases. HPS groups performed significantly better in posttest and knowledge retention test compared to CBL groups pertaining to TS case (p<0.05). Students expressed high levels of satisfaction with HPS sessions. Conclusion. HPS was superior to CBL in teaching DKA and TS to final-year undergraduate pharmacy students. PMID:25386018

  4. Patients' perceptions of patient education on psychiatric inpatient wards: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Htnen, H; Suhonen, R; Warro, H; Pitknen, A; Vlimki, M

    2010-05-01

    This study describes patients' perceptions of different types of patient education interventions and areas where patient education should be improved on psychiatric wards. Thematic interviews were conducted with 16 patients who had completed the information technology (IT)-based patient education, conventional patient education with leaflets or patient education according to ward standards during their hospital stay. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Patients' perceptions of patient education varied depending on which patient education group they had participated in. Patients participating in IT-based or conventional patient education perceived education as a systematic and planned process. However, especially patients in the patient education group applying ward standard education perceived patient education as occasional information dissemination situations. To improve patient education, patients suggested that it should be based on their individual needs and offered with different methods systematically to all patients. The results indicate that patients find structured and systematic patient education programmes useful. Different educational methods should be used, not forgetting interaction between patient and nurse, which was reportedly as an essential element of patient education. PMID:20529184

  5. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55

  6. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  7. Effect of an Educational Program on Adherence to Therapeutic Regimen among Chronic Kidney Disease Stage5 (CKD5) Patients under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deif, Hala I. Abo; Elsawi, Khiria; Selim, Mohga; NasrAllah, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease on health care services worldwide is growing and the increased development of educational interventions which help patients to better manage their conditions is evident internationally. It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients. Adherence to fluid…

  8. Roy’s Adaptation Model-Based Patient Education for Promoting the Adaptation of Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Afrasiabifar, Ardashir; Karimi, Zohreh; Hassani, Parkhideh

    2013-01-01

    Background In addition to physical adaptation and psychosocial adjustment to chronic renal disease, hemodialysis (HD) patients must also adapt to dialysis therapy plan. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of Roy’s adaptation model-based patient education on adaptation of HD patients. Patients and Methods This study is a semi-experimental research that was conducted with the participation of all patients with end-stage renal disease referred to the dialysis unit of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj city, 2010. A total of 59 HD patients were randomly allocated to two groups of test and control. Data were collected by a questionnaire based on the Roy’s Adaptation Model (RAM). Validity and reliability of the questionnaire were approved. Patient education was determined by eight one-hour sessions over eight weeks. At the end of the education plan, the patients were given an educational booklet containing the main points of self-care for HD patients. The effectiveness of education plan was assessed two months after plan completion and data were compared with the pre-education scores. All analyses were conducted using the SPSS software (version 16) through descriptive and inferential statistics including correlation, t-test, ANOVA and ANCOVA tests. Results The results showed significant differences in the mean scores of physiological and self-concept models between the test and control groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03 respectively). Also a statistical difference (P = 0.04) was observed in the mean scores of the role function mode of both groups. There was no significant difference in the mean scores of interdependence modes between the two groups. Conclusions RAM based patient education could improve the patients’ adaptation in physiologic and self-concept modes. In addition to suggesting further research in this area, nurses are recommended to pay more attention in applying RAM in dialysis centers. PMID:24396575

  9. Factors influencing nutrition education for patients with low literacy skills.

    PubMed

    Macario, E; Emmons, K M; Sorensen, G; Hunt, M K; Rudd, R E

    1998-05-01

    Although there has been increasing attention to cancer prevention among low-income and minority populations, only a few nutrition interventions have addressed the special needs of people with low literacy skills. To determine the best provider and the most effective format for a nutrition intervention targeting patients with low literacy skills, we conducted interviews with literacy experts and health care providers and focus groups with members of adult basic education classes. Thirty-five literacy experts and health-center-based physicians, nurses, and nutritionists in Boston, Mass, were interviewed. In addition, 50 volunteer clients from 4 Boston-based adult basic education programs participated in 6 focus groups. Results suggested that health care providers consider nutrition to be a fundamental health education topic, but that its successful inculcation in patients with limited literacy skills is hindered mostly by insufficient provider time. Almost all providers agreed that patients need to be referred to nutritionists for nutrition education. Although most providers and patients acknowledged that patients perceive physicians to be the authorities on health, patients with low literacy skills turned first to family members and friends for health information. These results suggest that effective nutrition interventions must build on patients' social networks; appear in a visually based, interactive format; and be culturally appropriate. PMID:9597029

  10. Use of technology for educating melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Marble, Nicole; Loescher, Lois J; Lim, Kyung Hee; Hiscox, Heather

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using technology for melanoma patient education in a clinic setting. We assessed technology skill level and preferences for education. Data were collected using an adapted version of the Use of Technology Survey. Most participants owned a computer and DVD player and were skilled in the use of these devices, along with Internet and e-mail. Participants preferred the option of using in-clinic and at-home technology versus in-clinic only use. Computer and DVD applications were preferred because they were familiar and convenient. Using technology for patient education intervention is a viable option; however, patients' skill level and preferences for technology should be considered. PMID:20336399

  11. Health Literacy: An Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Jay, Melanie; Maness, Leslie; Zabar, Sondra; Kalet, Adina

    2015-09-01

    We have previously proposed that by identifying a set of Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcomes (ESPOs), medical education outcomes research becomes more feasible and likely to provide meaningful guidance for medical education policy and practice. ESPOs are proximal outcomes that are sensitive to provider education, measurable, and linked to more distal health outcomes. Our previous model included Patient Activation and Clinical Microsystem Activation as ESPOs. In this paper, we discuss how Health Literacy, defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions," is another important ESPO. Between one-third and one-half of all US adults have limited health literacy skills. Providers can be trained to adopt a "universal precautions approach" to addressing patient health literacy, through the acquisition of specific skills (e.g., teachback, "chunking" information, use of plain language written materials) and by learning how to take action to improve the "health literacy environment." While there are several ways to measure health literacy, identifying which measurement tools are most sensitive to provider education is important, but challenging and complex. Further research is needed to test this model and identify additional ESPOs. PMID:26173523

  12. Factors influencing the patient education: A qualitative research

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Mohammadi, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Mohammadi, Nooredin

    2013-01-01

    Background: The related literatures revealed that there is a lack of effective patient/family education in the health care centers. Several studies indicate that patients, while getting discharged from hospitals, receive insufficient information about their illness and self-care. The purpose of the study was to explore the factors influencing patient education from the perspectives of nurses in Iran. Materials and Methods: We conducted a qualitative study using a content analysis approach. We used a purposive sampling technique to recruit and interview 18 nurses with at least 2 years of working experience in the cardiac care unit (CCU) and post-CCU ward of two educational hospitals in Tehran related to Tehran University. Data were collected through face-to-face audio-taped interviews and field observations. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed concurrently with data collection. Results: The major theme extracted in this study was the inappropriate organizational culture which includes eight categories listed as follows: Not putting value on education, non-professional activities, physician-oriented atmosphere, conflict and lack of coherence in education, inappropriate communication skills, ignoring patient's right in education, lack of motivation, rewarding system in the organization, and poor supervision and control. Conclusions: The results of this study show that according to the participants’ perspective, organizational culture is in a poor level. So, to improve the performance of nurses, it is necessary to increase their motivation through optimization of organizational culture. PMID:23983743

  13. Interprofessionalism: Educating to Meet Patient Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirch, Darrell G.; Ast, Cori

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teams in health care are showing promise in achieving the triple aim--providing better care for the individual patient, reducing costs, and improving population health. To complement current changes in health care delivery in the United States, there is a growing consensus among health professions educators that students should

  14. Interprofessionalism: Educating to Meet Patient Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirch, Darrell G.; Ast, Cori

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teams in health care are showing promise in achieving the triple aim--providing better care for the individual patient, reducing costs, and improving population health. To complement current changes in health care delivery in the United States, there is a growing consensus among health professions educators that students should…

  15. Developing and Evaluating Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsivais, Diane; Reynolds, Audree

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for nurse involvement in the development of patient education materials. Presents guidelines for evaluating existing material, including print and web resources, for credibility and readability. Makes recommendations for rewriting material at an easier-to-read level. (SK)

  16. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  17. Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edith E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance

  18. Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edith E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance…

  19. The effect of education based on the main concepts of logotherapy approach on the quality of life in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mahdizadeh, Mostafa; Alavi, Mousa; Ghazavi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Improving the patients’ quality of life (QOL) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is one of the main concerns of the treatment team. Educational interventions may affect the aspects of QOL in various ways. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of education based on the main concepts of logotherapy approach on the CABG patients’ quality of life. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, a convenient sample of 67 patients who had undergone CABG in Isfahan Chamran hospital were randomly allocated to two groups of experimental (n = 35) and control (n = 32). While the control group received routine care, the experiment group benefitted from logotherapy-based education program (six 90-min sessions, twice a week). SF-36 questionnaire was completed by both two groups (before and 1 month after intervention). Descriptive and inferential statistical tests (consisting of independent t-test) were employed to analyze data in SPSS version 13. Results: The pre-test mean total score of SF-36 questionnaire and also the mean scores of its eight dimensions were not significantly different between the two groups. The post-test mean score change [Standard Error (SE)] in the intervention group was 24.95 (3) and in the control group was 9.27 (0.82). There were significant differences between the two groups (P < 0.001). Moreover, the mean scores of six dimensions of QOL (vitality, bodily pain, general health, emotional role, social functioning, and mental health) changed significantly in the intervention group. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that the intervention has improved the patients’ QOL after CABG. Integration of such an intervention in these patients’ rehabilitation programs is recommended. PMID:26985218

  20. Anaphylaxis avoidance and management: educating patients and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Kirsi M; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an increasingly prevalent problem in westernized countries. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the increasing numbers of patients at risk for anaphylaxis receive proper education on the etiology and risk factors as well as appropriate treatment of anaphylaxis with epinephrine. The physician’s role is crucial in order to educate the patients and care takers on effective measures to prevent anaphylaxis and empower them to take charge of early recognition and proper management of an anaphylactic reaction to prevent poor outcomes. This review summarizes the clinical presentation, triggers, avoidance, and management of anaphylaxis. PMID:25031541

  1. Theories used in patient/health education.

    PubMed

    Padilla, G V; Bulcavage, L M

    1991-05-01

    Patient and health education programs may need to use a multitheory approach to promote health behaviors such as cancer prevention and early detection practices and decrease negative responses such as anxiety, distress, pain, and use of damaging alternative treatments. Multiple intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, and community approaches are required. For example, a strategy for breast cancer education should be characterized by an understanding of the target population's attitudes and beliefs about breast cancer, communication of information, education regarding specific facts about breast health and breast cancer, social influence strategies to promote acceptance of the target behaviors, and organizational and community-based interventions to reach the widest audience. Nurses should design education programs that carefully integrate theories to obtain predicted result for the largest number of people for whom the results are desirable. Intervention strategies designed to alter the identified influential factors will have the most successful impact and optimal chance of attaining program goals. PMID:1882154

  2. Interprofessionalism: Educating to meet patient needs.

    PubMed

    Kirch, Darrell G; Ast, Cori

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teams in health care are showing promise in achieving the triple aim-providing better care for the individual patient, reducing costs, and improving population health. To complement current changes in health care delivery in the United States, there is a growing consensus among health professions educators that students should be trained in interprofessional models prior to entering clinical practice. Current interprofessional education (IPE) efforts in anatomy education are producing positive results in enhancing professional respect, collaboration, and teamwork among health professions students. In spite of existing structural and cultural barriers to IPE, health professions educators must continue to lead and grow IPE efforts as a critical component to improving the health of our nation. PMID:25394336

  3. The Effect of Self-Care Education on the Awareness, Attitude, and Adherence to Self-Care Behaviors in Hospitalized Patients Due to Heart Failure with and without Depression

    PubMed Central

    Navidian, Ali; Yaghoubinia, Fariba; Ganjali, Alireza; Khoshsimaee, Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are among somatic disorders and psychological factors affect their onset, exacerbation, and treatment. This study was conducted on the hospitalized patients who had heart failure with and without depression. The study criteria was to evaluate the effect of self-care education on awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors on these patients. Materials and Methods In this quasi-experimental study, seventy patients with heart failure that met the inclusion criteria were recruited through purposive sampling method. They were assigned in to two equal size groups regarding their depression status. First, the eligible patients were selected; then Beck Depression Inventory was done on the patients followed by examination by the clinical psychologist. Patients with average and higher scores were classified in the depressed group and others who got lower than average scores were classified as the non -depressed group. A questionnaire containing items related to awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors was used to collect the data. First, self-care behavior was determined and then a four-sessions of educational intervention were held individually for both groups. The second round of questionnaires were completed at patients home twelve weeks after the discharge. The Collected data was analyzed using independent-samples and paired-sample t tests, Chi square, and statistical analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tests through SPSS (version 21, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results After the educational sessions, the statistical analysis showed significant differences in the mean scores of awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors between the two groups (P<0.0001). Conclusion Self-care behavior education had lower effects on the depressed patients with heart failure. Therefore, before providing education for these patients, it is necessary to consider their psychological problems such as depression. PMID:26091101

  4. Effective Educational Practices. Educational Practices Series--3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.; Paik, Susan J.

    This booklet focuses on aspects of effective education that appear to be universal in formal schooling. The practices, which are generally for use in elementary and secondary classrooms, show large, positive learning effects for students in widely varying conditions. Information in the booklet is based on research spanning half a century. Each

  5. Effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or Diabetes Support and Education on insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Chin Meng; Chen, Jiegen; Pamuklar, Zehra; Torquati, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Objective The long-term changes in insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who undergo RYGB surgery or standard medical care remain unclear. We prospectively studied longitudinal changes of glucostatic parameters in morbidly obese patients with T2DM undergoing RYGB surgery or Diabetes Support and Education (DSE). Research Methods and Design 61 morbidly obese subjects (41.7±0.6 kg/m2) with T2DM were assigned to RYGB surgery (n=30) or DSE (n=31). They were matched for sex, age and body weight. Insulin sensitivity index (Si) and acute insulin response (AIR) were derived from frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Body composition was measured using dual-emission absorptiometry X-ray. General linear model with repeated measures were used to examine the longitudinal changes (baseline, 6-month, 12-month) in these parameters. Results At 12-month follow-up, significant improvement in obesity measures, body composition, glucose homeostasis, Si and AIR were observed following RYGB surgery and weight loss. These outcomes were not influenced by pre-operative insulin use. Although there were no significant changes in the body composition amongst DSE subjects, they experienced a decline in the Si and AIR, along with an increase in fasting glucose and HbA1c. The between-group differences in Si and AIR at 12-month follow-up were completely attenuated with adjustment to changes in body weight. Conclusions The long-term effects of RYGB surgery on glucostatic parameters are partly dependent on weight loss. In morbidly obese diabetic patients who were offered DSE, a progressive decline in the glucose homeostasis and glucostatic parameters is observed despite absence of weight gain. (NCT00787670) PMID:23732262

  6. The effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities: a systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Kristi; Côté, Pierre; Gross, Douglas P; Wong, Jessica J; Yu, Hainan; Sutton, Deborah; Southerst, Danielle; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Mior, Silvano; Stupar, Maja; Shearer, Heather M; Lindsay, Gail M; Jacobs, Craig; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1, 1990 to March 14, 2015. Paired reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for eligibility. The internal validity of studies was assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. Results from studies with a low risk of bias were synthesized using the best-evidence synthesis methodology. Results: We identified two randomized trials with a low risk of bias. Our review suggests that: 1) multimodal care and corticosteroid injections lead to faster pain relief and improvement than reassurance and advice in the short-term and similar outcomes in the long-term for patients with persistent lateral epicondylitis; and 2) providing health education material alone may be less effective than multimodal care for the management of persistent patellofemoral pain syndrome. Conclusion: Our systematic search of the literature demonstrates that little is known about the effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities. Two studies suggest that when used alone, structured patient education may be less effective than other interventions used to manage persistent lateral epicondylitis and persistent patellofemoral syndrome. PMID:26816413

  7. Low Literacy Levels in Adults: Implications for Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Evelyn

    1999-01-01

    Health-education materials often require reading levels higher than that of many patients. Nurses need awareness of the prevalence of low literacy and the ability to assess reading levels so they can develop appropriate patient-education materials. (SK)

  8. Educating psychiatric patients about their treatment: do fact sheets work?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M; Macpherson, R; Thompson, E; Babiker, I

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric patients are sometimes given fact sheets about their treatment but the benefits of these are uncertain. We tested three strategies in three cohorts of psychiatric inpatients--fact sheets alone, fact sheets and subsequent discussion, and control. Knowledge of medication was assessed by questionnaire. For various reasons, only 33 of the 77 patients were included in the study or analysis. Of the patients who had been given fact sheets, 87% independently read them and reported finding them helpful whilst all asked for more information. Receiving a fact sheet alone had no significant effect, whereas having discussed it with a health care professional was associated with a significant increase in knowledge about medication. Patients receiving fact sheets selectively learned more about side-effects than about drug action or precautions. This strategy for patient education could be used by ward nurses and deserves further evaluation. PMID:9014880

  9. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. Results: The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Conclusion: Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals. PMID:26478878

  10. Effectiveness of PRECEDE model for health education on changes and level of control of HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individual health education is considered to be essential in the overall care of patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), although there is some uncertainty regarding its metabolic control benefits. There have been very few randomized studies on the effects of individual education on normal care in DM2 patients with a control group, and none of these have assessed the long-term results. Therefore, this study aims to use this design to assess the effectiveness of the PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, Enabling, Causes in Educational Diagnosis, and Evaluation) education model in the metabolic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods An open community effectiveness study was carried out in 8 urban community health centers in the North-East Madrid Urban Area (Spain). Six hundred patients with DM2 were randomized in two groups: PRECEDE or conventional model for health promotion education. The main outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin A1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids and control criteria during the 2-year follow-up period. Results Glycated hemoglobin A1c and systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels decreased significantly in the PRECEDE group (multivariate analysis of covariance, with baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c, SBP, and variables showing statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visits). The decrease levels in diastolic blood pressure (DBP), triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were nonsignificant. PRECEDE increased compliance in all control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. BMI did not change during the study in either of the two models analyzed. Conclusions PRECEDE health education model is a useful method in the overall treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, which contributes to decrease glycated hemoglobin A1c and SBP levels and increase the compliance in all the control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01316367 PMID:21524316

  11. Patient education for diabetic patients. An integral part of quality health care.

    PubMed

    Valente, L A; Nelson, M S

    1995-03-01

    The diabetic patient is at high risk for developing long-term medical complications including serious foot problems with potential loss of limb. With today's growing awareness of the importance of curtailing overall health care costs, the importance of comprehensive diabetic patient education programs is academic. It is demonstrated that a multidisciplinary approach to diabetic care management, with foot care assessment encompassing early preventive measures, can serve as a model for other Veterans Affairs Medical Centers to follow. Foot screenings can individualize specific foot problems and provide an understanding of risk factors to prevent complications. Patients with diabetes or peripheral vascular disease and, especially those individuals at risk of foot ulceration, are referred to the appropriate clinic for ongoing management to prevent amputation. Patient education is considered most effective when it is encouraged throughout a diabetic patient's medical care, and it becomes a part of lifestyle habits. PMID:7776211

  12. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individuals competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been promoted as one such potential approach. PMID:22312219

  13. Does Stage of Change Modify the Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention to Improve Diet among Family Members of Hospitalized Cardiovascular Disease Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mochari, Heidi; Terry, Mary Beth; Mosca, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether effectiveness of a special intervention (SI) to improve diet versus a control intervention (CI) differs by readiness to reduce dietary saturated fat based on the Transtheoretical Model stages of change among family members of hospitalized CVD patients. Methods Stage of change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance) was assessed by standardized questionnaire. Diet was measured by Block 98 Food Frequency Questionnaire at baseline and one-year in participants in the Family Intervention Trial for Heart Health (n=501; 36% racial/ethnic minorities; 66% female). Therapeutic Lifestyle Change diet education was provided to each SI subject tailored to baseline stage of change. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine whether the effect of the intervention was modified by stage of change. Results Baseline saturated fat and cholesterol intakes were lower among those in maintenance stage vs. others [(9.9% vs. 11.2% kcals; p<.0001) and (112.2 vs. 129.7 mg/1000kcal; p=.0003) respectively]. Overall, change in the percentage of calories from saturated fat from baseline to one-year was ?0.7 in the SI vs. ?0.4 in the CI (p=.18). Among participants in contemplation greater reductions in saturated fat (?2.1% vs. +0.3% kcals; p=.04) and cholesterol (?34.0 vs. +32.6 mg/1000kcal; p=.01) were seen in the SI vs. CI. The SI was more likely than CI to achieve new adherence to a diet <10% saturated fat /<300mg cholesterol at one-year among those not in maintenance stage (30% vs. 15%; p=.03). CI participants were more likely than SI to revert to lower levels on the stage of change continuum from baseline to one-year (17% vs. 7%; p=.002). Conclusion Effectiveness of an intervention to lower saturated fat varies by baseline stage of change among family members of hospitalized CVD patients. This may be important to consider when designing research or clinical diet interventions. PMID:20630159

  14. An Educational Program That Contributes to Improved Patient and Parental Understanding of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Yeon; Kim, Do Won; Park, Chun Wook; Seo, Seong Jun; Park, Young Lip; Lee, Jong Rok; Kim, Moon Bum; Kim, Kyu Han; Ro, Young Suck

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing an educational program as part of a health care program for the management of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients has rapidly become popular. AD educational programs can be of benefit in measured outcomes for both dermatology specialists and patients. Objective To determine the effects of programmed education delivered by dermatology specialists on the management and knowledge of AD, we assessed the effectiveness of patient/parental education at improving AD knowledge, and determined the usefulness of the education. Methods The program consisted of five, 20-minutes sessions which were prepared, discussed, reviewed, and delivered by professors of dermatology. At the end of the program, AD knowledge was assessed using a standardized questionnaire. A total of 148 people were included. Fifty-eight patients/parents received the programmed education and the remaining 90 did not receive the programmed education. Results The mean questionnaire scores from both groups were compared. Mean knowledge scores were significantly higher for those who received the education (p=0.00). We analyzed the knowledge score according to factors such as gender, education level, marital status, and occupation. The data indicated that education level influences the subjects' knowledge level of AD, but gender, occupation, and marital status do not. Conclusion An educational program can be an effective tool to improve patient quality of life and treatment compliance by providing psychological support to the patients and their parents. PMID:24648688

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention to improve the patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students: a cross-sectional study using a latent growth curve modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the recognition that educating healthcare students in patient safety is essential, changing already full curricula can be challenging. Furthermore, institutions may lack the capacity and capability to deliver patient safety education, particularly from the start of professional practice studies. Using senior students as peer educators to deliver practice-based education can potentially overcome some of the contextual barriers in training junior students. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-led patient safety education programme for junior pharmacy students. Design A repeat cross-sectional design utilising a previously validated patient safety attitudinal survey was used to evaluate attitudes prior to, immediately after and 1 month after the delivery of a patient safety education programme. Latent growth curve (LGC) modelling was used to evaluate the change in attitudes of first-year students using second-year students as a comparator group. Setting Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia. Participants 175 first-year and 140 second-year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy programme at the University of Sydney. Intervention An introductory patient safety programme was implemented into the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy curriculum at the University of Sydney. The programme covered introductory patient safety topics including teamwork, communication skills, systems thinking and open disclosure. The programme consisted of 2 lectures, delivered by a senior academic, and a workshop delivered by trained final-year pharmacy students. Results A full LGC model was constructed including the intervention as a non-time-dependent predictor of change (χ2 (51)=164.070, root mean square error of approximation=0.084, comparative fit index=0.913, standardised root mean square=0.056). First-year students’ attitudes significantly improved as a result of the intervention, particularly in relation to internalising errors (p=0.010), questioning behaviours (p<0.001) and open disclosure (p=0.008). Conclusions Peer-led education is an effective method that can be adopted to improve junior pharmacy students’ attitudes towards patient safety. PMID:26646830

  16. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.

  17. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

  18. [Functional re-education, self-education, and education of patients with leg arthrosis].

    PubMed

    Rouillon, O

    2002-01-12

    EXPERT OPINIONS: Functional rehabilitation, self-rehabilitation in the patient's home and patient education are the basis of non-drug management of patients with osteoarthritis. This approach helps reduce pain and the frequency of consultations, and improves physical activity and quality of life. FUNCTIONAL REHABILITATION: The objective is to limit pain, to maintain joint mobility and muscle force, and to learn how to manage one's disease. Evidence in the literature demonstrates the efficacy of functional rehabilitation. SELF-REHABILITATION: The objective of self-rehabilitation is the same as functional rehabilitation and data in the literature indicate positive results on pain and functional symptoms. PATIENT EDUCATION PROGRAMS: Presented in the form of advise booklet or videos (CD-Room Arthemus), patient education programs improve non-drug management of osteoarthritis. COMPLEMENTARITY: It is logical to associate the different modalities of non-drug management of osteoarthritis since their objectives are complementary and synergetic. PMID:11826588

  19. An initial, qualitative investigation of patient-centered education in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Marc; Borromeo, Chuck; Hess, Sherry; Hochheiser, Harry; Schleyer, Titus

    2013-01-01

    Patient education plays an important role in the delivery of dental care. Current evidence suggests that the emergence of the Internet and other electronic resources are significantly influencing how patients learn about their healthcare. We conducted a qualitative inquiry using a combination of interviews with patients and clinicians, and direct observation of patient education episodes, to begin identifying requirements for customized, patient-centered approaches to education at the point of care. Most patients in our study felt comfortable with the amount and method of education during the dental visit, but 38% sought additional information on the Internet. Dentists and their team members provided patient education mostly verbally, supported by media such as radiographs, images and models. Electronic means, especially the Internet, were little used. Patient education occupied a significant portion of the time of initial comprehensive examination (29%) and routine (7%) dental visits. A deeper understanding of patient knowledge deficits and information needs will be needed to design effective educational interventions. Patient education should be meaningfully integrated into the workflow shared by dentists, their team members and patients, in order to maximize its outcomes. PMID:23388305

  20. The Effects of Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David

    Although fear of death is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of death and the fear of death have only occurred for the last few decades. Death education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of death education on death anxiety by…

  1. The Effects of Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David

    Although fear of death is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of death and the fear of death have only occurred for the last few decades. Death education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of death education on death anxiety by

  2. Patient Education Level As a Predictor of Survival In Lung Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, James E.; Kornblith, Alice B.; Holland, Jimmie C.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of socioeconomic status, as measured by education, on the survival of 1,577 lung cancer patients treated on 11 studies conducted by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B. Patients and Methods Sociodemographic data, including education, was reported by the patient at the time of clinical trial accrual. Cox proportional hazards model stratified by treatment arm/study was used to examine the effect of education on survival after adjustment for known prognostic factors. Results The patient population included 1,177 patients diagnosed with nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; stage III or IV) and 400 patients diagnosed with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC; extensive or limited). Patients with less than an eighth grade education (13% of patients) were significantly more likely to be male, nonwhite, and older; have a performance status (PS) of 1 or 2; and have chest pain. Significant predictors of poor survival in the final model included male sex, PS of 1 or 2, dyspnea, weight loss, liver or bone metastases, unmarried, presence of adrenal metastases and high alkaline phosphatase levels among patients with NSCLC, and high WBC levels among patients with advanced disease. Education was not predictive of survival. Conclusion The physical condition of patients with low education who enroll onto clinical trials is worse than patients with higher education. Once enrolled onto a clinical trial, education does not affect the survival of patients with SCLC or stage III or IV NSCLC. The standardization of treatment and follow-up within a clinical trial, regardless of education, is one possible explanation for this lack of effect. PMID:18757325

  3. Medical Utilization of Kiosks in the Delivery of Patient Education: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yvonne Chan, Yu-Feng; Nagurka, Roxanne; Bentley, Suzanne; Ordonez, Edgardo; Sproule, William

    2014-01-01

    Background: The utilization of kiosks has previously been shown to be effective for collecting information, delivering educational modules, and providing access to health information. We discuss a review of current literature for the utilization of kiosks for the delivery of patient education. Methods: The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were: (1) study discusses the utilization of kiosks for patient health education; (2) study discusses the use of touch screens for patient health information; (3) published in English. Our review includes searches via MEDLINE databases and Google Scholar for the years 1996-2014. Results: Overall, 167 articles were screened for final eligibility, and after discarding duplicates and non-eligible studies with abstract. Full-text review of 28 articles was included in the final analysis. Conclusion: The review of available literature demonstrates the effectiveness of touch screen kiosks to educate patients and to improve healthcare, both at a performance and cost advantage over other modes of patient education. PMID:25097831

  4. The impact of a patient education bundle on neurosurgery patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kliot, Tamara; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Imershein, Sarah; Lau, Catherine; Kliot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background: As reimbursements and hospital/physician performance become ever more reliant on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) and other quality metrics, physicians are increasingly incentivized to improve patient satisfaction. Methods: A faculty and resident team at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Neurological Surgery developed and implemented a Patient Education Bundle. This consisted of two parts: The first was preoperative expectation letters (designed to inform patients of what to expect before, during, and after their hospitalization for a neurosurgical procedure); the second was a trifold brochure with names, photographs, and specialty/training information about the attending surgeons, resident physicians, and nurse practitioners on the neurosurgical service. We assessed patient satisfaction, as measured by HCAHPS scores and a brief survey tailored to our specific intervention, both before and after our Patient Education Bundle intervention. Results: Prior to our intervention, 74.6% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. After our intervention, 78.7% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. “Neurosurgery Patient Satisfaction survey” results showed that 83% remembered receiving the preoperative letter; of those received the letter, 93% found the letter helpful; and 100% thought that the letter should be continued. Conclusion: Although effects were modest, we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients’ hospital experiences and have a positive impact on physician performance scores and hospital ratings. PMID:26664909

  5. Integrating a Patient Safety Conference into Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Institute of Medicine has established aims for improvement in patient care that emphasize safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered medicine. This goal is echoed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Methods The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) graduate medical education program implemented a Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) project whose aim is to support a patient and trainee safety environment. An ongoing biannual patient and learner safety conference is able to capture close calls, safety attitudes, potential learner mistreatment, and trainee fatigue in a nonpunitive manner that supports answering the question, “What was learned and what needs to be improved?” Results Group recommendations were captured at a quality improvement conference. We documented a shift in attitudes away from one where the institution is perceived to be weakest at supporting safety reporting. Conclusions This project is designed to serve as a mechanism for insuring care that is respectful and responsive to patient needs and values. It identifies keys to avoiding wasted re-sources or harmful delay while also seeking to improve care based upon scientific knowledge. PMID:26835179

  6. Differences in Perceived Difficulty in Print and Online Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Written patient education materials frequently exceed the reading ability of the general public. Patients are often intimidated by the task of reading patient education materials, perceiving the materials’ difficulty levels as prohibitive, even when they do not exceed the patients’ reading abilities. It is unclear how the delivery mechanism—print or a computer screen—affects a patient’s reading experience through his/her perception of its difficulty. Objective: To determine whether first-year college students perceived online or print-based patient education materials as more difficult to read. Design: Convenience sampling of first-year college students. Results: Some first-year college students perceived online patient education materials to be more difficult to read than print-based ones—even when the reading level of the patient education materials was similar. Demographic information about this sample’s high levels of digital literacy suggests that other populations might also perceive online patient education materials as more difficult to read than print-based equivalents. Patients’ perceptions of the difficulty of patient education materials influenced their ability to effectively learn from those materials. Conclusion: This article concludes with a call for more research into patients’ perceptions of difficulty of patient education materials in print vs on a screen. PMID:25662526

  7. Nurses attitude to patient education barriers in educational hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Aghakhani, Nader; Nia, Hamid Sharif; Ranjbar, Hadi; Rahbar, Narges; Beheshti, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to explore nurses attitudes to the barriers of patient education as a right for getting information based on work situation of nurses, educational facilities in hospitals, and patients situation. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted using a cross-sectional design. The populations consisted of 240 nurses affiliated in the Educational Hospitals. The data were gathered by a questionnaire. Demographic variables and three domains were studied. Twenty questions were about their working situation, 4 questions about hospital educating facilities, and 12 questions were about patients situation in hospital. The type and frequency of education barriers were evaluated, and variables associated with reporting an obstacle were analyzed. Findings: In our questionnaire, we used a Likert scale for determining severity of three domains as the barriers of patient education that ranged from 0 to 4. Generally, it was obvious that educational condition in our hospitals was not good and most of the nurses believed that patient education is not their duties, facilities in hospitals are not sufficient and shortness of time is the most important cause of insufficiency of patient education Conclusions: The interactions of patient, physician and systemic factors have implications for the implementation of patient education. The failure of adequate patient education may be attributed to the lack of patient adherence, the failure of nurses knowledge and skill level or the insufficient funding and organization of necessary programs in the current health care system. PMID:23492814

  8. The effect of problem-based learning in patient education after an event of CORONARY heart disease – a randomised study in PRIMARY health care: design and methodology of the COR-PRIM study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even though there is convincing evidence that self-care, such as regular exercise and/or stopping smoking, alters the outcomes after an event of coronary heart disease (CHD), risk factors remain. Outcomes can improve if core components of secondary prevention programmes are structurally and pedagogically applied using adult learning principles e.g. problem-based learning (PBL). Until now, most education programs for patients with CHD have not been based on such principles. The basic aim is to discover whether PBL provided in primary health care (PHC) has long-term effects on empowerment and self-care after an event of CHD. Methods/Design A randomised controlled study is planned for patients with CHD. The primary outcome is empowerment to reach self-care goals. Data collection will be performed at baseline at hospital and after one, three and five years in PHC using quantitative and qualitative methodologies involving questionnaires, medical assessments, interviews, diaries and observations. Randomisation of 165 patients will take place when they are stable in their cardiac condition and have optimised cardiac medication that has not substantially changed during the last month. All patients will receive conventional care from their general practitioner and other care providers. The intervention consists of a patient education program in PHC by trained district nurses (tutors) who will apply PBL to groups of 6–9 patients meeting on 13 occasions for two hours over one year. Patients in the control group will not attend a PBL group but will receive home-sent patient information on 11 occasions during the year. Discussion We expect that the 1-year PBL-patient education will improve patients’ beliefs, self-efficacy and empowerment to achieve self-care goals significantly more than one year of standardised home-sent patient information. The assumption is that PBL will reduce cardiovascular events in the long-term and will also be cost-effective compared to controls. Further, the knowledge obtained from this study may contribute to improving patients’ ability to handle self-care, and furthermore, may reduce the number of patients having subsequent CHD events in Sweden. Trial registration NCT01462799 PMID:23164044

  9. Distinguishing among incretin-based therapies. Patient education and self-management.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R Keith; Cobble, Michael E; Reid, Timothy S; Shomali, Mansur E

    2010-09-01

    Working closely with patients and providing ongoing education, ideally in conjunction with a diabetes care team, can help ensure that the best treatment options are selected for an individual patient and that the patient is capable of effective self-management. PMID:20824237

  10. A Comparative Evaluation of the Traditional Versus a Systems Approach for Hypertensive Patient Education. Final Report, October 1975-March 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucha, Deloros H.

    A study was conducted to evaluate the traditional method (physician, nurse) versus a systems approach method of providing health education. The objectives included the following: identify cost-effective and feasible ways of delivering patient education; guarantee an important resource for the professional in fulfilling his/her patient education

  11. Potential spillover educational effects of cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising on cancer patients' increased information seeking behaviors: results from a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy S L

    2014-06-01

    Spillover effects of exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of cancer treatments on patients' general inquiry about their treatments and managing their illness are not well understood. This study examines the effects of cancer patients' exposure to cancer-related DTCA on subsequent health information seeking behaviors from clinician and non-clinician sources (lay media and interpersonal contacts). Using a longitudinal survey design over 3 years, data was collected from cancer survivors diagnosed with colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer who were randomly sampled from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Study outcome measures include patients' information engagement with their clinicians and information seeking from non-medical sources about cancer treatment and quality of life issues, measured in the second survey. The predictor variable is the frequency of exposure to cancer-related DTCA since diagnosis, measured at the round 1 survey. The analyses utilized lagged-weighted multivariate regressions and adjusted for round 1 levels of patient-clinician engagement, information seeking from nonmedical sources, and confounders. Exposure to cancer-related DTCA is associated with increased levels of subsequent patient-clinician information engagement (B?=?.023, 95% CI?=?.005-.040, p?=?.012), controlling for confounders. In comparison, exposure to DTCA is marginally significant in predicting health information seeking from non-clinician sources (B?=?.009, 95% CI?=?-.001-.018, p?=?.067). Cancer-related DTCA has potentially beneficial spillover effects on health information seeking behaviors among cancer patients. Exposure to DTCA predicts (a little) more patient engagement with their physicians. PMID:24254248

  12. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Stacy L.; Waterman, Amy D.; Davis, LaShara A.; Peipert, John D.; Fish, Anne F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients’ lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant. PMID:25758805

  13. Conventional vs. Tablet Computer-Based Patient Education following Lung Transplantation – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Hendrik; Rademacher, Jessica; Zinowsky, Imke; Fuge, Jan; Greer, Mark; Warnecke, Gregor; Smits, Jacqueline M.; Bertram, Anna; Haverich, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Gottlieb, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate immunosuppression is of critical importance in preventing rejection, while avoiding toxicity following lung transplantation. The mainstay immunosuppressants are calcineurin inhibitors, which require regular monitoring due to interactions with other medications and diet. Adherence to immunosuppression and patient knowledge is vital and can be improved through patient education. Education using tablet-computers was investigated. Objective To compare tablet-PC education and conventional education in improving immunosuppression trough levels in target range 6 months after a single education. Secondary parameters were ratio of immunosuppression level measurements divided by per protocol recommended measurements, time and patient satisfaction regarding education. Design Single-centre, open labelled randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients >6 months after lung-transplantation with <50% of calcineurin inhibitor trough levels in target range. Intervention Tablet-pc education versus personal, nurse-led education. Measurements Calcineurin inhibitor levels in target range 6 months after education, level variability, interval adherence, knowledge and adherence was studied. As outcome parameter, renal function was measured and adverse events registered. Results Sixty-four patients were 1:1 randomised for either intervention. Levels of immunosuppression 6 months after education were equal (tablet-PC 58% vs. conventional 48%, p = 0.27), both groups improved in achieving a CNI trough level within target range by either education method (delta tablet-PC 29% vs. conventional 20%). In all patients, level variability decreased (−20.4%), whereas interval adherence remained unchanged. Knowledge about immunosuppression improved by 7% and compliance tests demonstrated universal improvements with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion Education is a simple, effective tool in improving adherence to immunosuppression. Tablet-PC education was non-inferior to conventional education. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398488 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01398488?term=gottlieb+tablet+pc+education&rank=1. PMID:24608864

  14. [Education of patients with asthma, chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema].

    PubMed

    Krstić-Burić, M; Pavicić, F; Rozman, A; Bogić, B; Crc, M; Plesko, N; Sarajlić, N

    1997-02-01

    Patients' education belongs to the most efficient therapeutic measures in the management of asthma, chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema. The following paper reports the experience in the educational programme at the Polyclinic for Respiratory Diseases in Zagreb. Each patient's education lasted 5 days, 3 lessons per day, in groups of 10-15 persons. The education was carried out by a teaching team consisting of pulmonologists, psychosomatologist, pharmacist, physiotherapist and biometeterologist. From March 1995 to February 1996 135 persons completed the educational programme, 65 of whom were asthma patients. Data on cough and dyspnoea, skills in inhaler and breathing technique were collected at the beginning and 3 months after the education in all asthma patients. Three months after the education the asthma patients showed a significant decrease in dyspnoea and a significant improvement in inhaler and breathing technique. A standard questionnaire was given to all patients at the end of the education and in more than 80% the education was well accepted by the patients. Initial results are encouraging and the programme should be expanded to all parts of Croatia. PMID:9297038

  15. Family Medicine Education with Virtual Patients: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sobocan, Monika; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Virtual patients (VP) have been present within the medical education process for some time. Although they are assumed to be of great benefit for student learning, very little is know about student perception and outcomes of learning, especially during the pre-clerkship years. Therefore we have decided to investigate the use of VPs during lectures, which has never been analyzed before, but could present an opportunity for more effective and holistic learning. Methods: This was a qualitative study among the 4th year undergraduate medical students at the Medical Faculty, University of Maribor, Slovenia. Students, after completing 4 virtual patient cases during the semester, were asked to participate in focus groups. Using these focus groups we asked students to provide information about their perceptions of VP cases, their learning, and suggestions for educational improvements. Data was transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory-based coding method (open coding). Results: Medical students reported having a positive attitude towards virtual patient learning. They perceived them as helpful for filling in knowledge gaps, learning appropriate patient care and clinical reasoning. However, especially within the setting of early clinical learning, students felt the need to discuss their questions with their tutors in order to achieve better learning outcomes. Conclusion: Students on teaching courses feel the need for structured instructor sessions and the integration of VPs in the course planning in order to maximize their learning outcomes. PMID:26483591

  16. The effects of preoperative, video-assisted anesthesia education in Spanish on Spanish-speaking patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    West, Amy M; Bittner, Edward A; Ortiz, Vilma E

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of an instructional video in Spanish on self-reported anxiety, knowledge about general anesthesia procedures, and satisfaction with the preoperative anesthesia process in patients requiring a Spanish interpreter. This prospective, randomized, nonblinded pilot study took place at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a university-affiliated tertiary-care hospital. Twenty adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, scheduled for elective surgery (gynecological, orthopedic, and intrabdominal surgery) during general anesthesia were studied. Anxiety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). There was a significant reduction in anxiety score in patients who viewed the video compared with those who did not (median reduction 2 vs 0; P = 0.020). There was an increase in satisfaction score in the video group (median increase 2 vs 0; P = 0.046). There was no difference in reported knowledge-improvement scores between the two groups (3.5 vs 4; P = 0.908). In Spanish-speaking patients, the addition of an instructional video in Spanish to a preanesthesia interview decreased anxiety and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:24882604

  17. A new paradigm for parent and patient education

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Don

    2000-01-01

    Details of an innovative model for providing health education to families and patients using a coordinated series of skill-based educational opportunities are described. The model offers a variety of educational courses for parents of children at each developmental stage. Each course provides transferable skills that assist parents in caring for their children and/or managing their children’s psychosocial problems. The development and evaluation of these educational opportunities, and the application of this program to patient education in paediatric settings are also discussed. PMID:20177550

  18. Patient-reported disease knowledge and educational needs in Lynch syndrome: findings of an interactive multidisciplinary patient conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with Lynch Syndrome, the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, benefit from genetic education and family counseling regarding diagnostic testing and cancer surveillance/prevention recommendations. Although genetic counseling is currently the most common venue where such education and counseling takes place, little is known about the level of disease knowledge and education needs as directly reported by patients and families with Lynch Syndrome. Furthermore, experiences with forums for larger-scale knowledge transfer have been limited in the current literature. Methods We conducted a one-day interactive multidisciplinary patient conference, designed to complement individual genetic counseling for updating disease knowledge, supportive networking and needs assessment among Lynch Syndrome patients and their family members. The patient conference was designed utilizing the conceptual framework of action research. Paired pre- and post-conference surveys were administered to 44 conference participants anonymously to assess patient-reported disease knowledge and education needs. Results A multidisciplinary team of expert providers utilized a variety of educational formats during the one-day conference. Four main focus areas were: genetic testing, surveillance/prevention, living with Lynch Syndrome, and update on research. Thirty-two participants (73%) completed the pre-conference, and 28 (64%) participants completed the post-conference surveys. Nineteen respondents were affected and the remaining were unaffected. The scores of the disease-knowledge items significantly increased from 84% pre- to 92% post-conference (p?=?0.012). Patients reported a high level of satisfaction and identified further knowledge needs in nutrition (71%), surveillance/prevention options (71%), support groups (36%), cancer risk assessment (32%), active role in medical care (32%), and research opportunities (5%). Conclusion Our experience with a dedicated patient education conference focused on Lynch Syndrome demonstrated that such an educational format is effective for updating or reinforcing disease knowledge, for identifying patient-reported unmet educational needs, as well as for peer-support. PMID:24499499

  19. A dialogue-based approach to patient education

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Natasja K.; Pals, Regitze Anne Saurbrey

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the need for person-centered patient education has become evident. To translate this approach into practice, new theoretically and empirically sound methods and models are required. This brief communication introduces a newly developed toolkit that has shown promise in facilitating person-centered education and active involvement of patients. Two health education models constituting the underlying basis for the toolkit are also presented. PMID:25593847

  20. Development and validation of the Patient Opioid Education Measure

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lorraine S; Wexler, Randell K; Miser, W Frederick; McDougle, Leon; Haddox, J David

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there are screening tools to aid clinicians in assessing the risk of opioid misuse, an instrument to assess opioid-related knowledge is not currently available. The purpose of this study was to develop a content-valid, understandable, readable, and reliable Patient Opioid Education Measure (POEM). Methods Using concept mapping, clinicians caring for patients with chronic pain participated in brainstorming, sorting, and rating need-to-know information for patients prescribed opioids. Concept mapping analyses identified seven clusters addressing knowledge and expectations associated with opioid use, including medicolegal issues, prescribing policies, safe use and handling, expected outcomes, side effects, pharmacology, and warnings. Results The 49-item POEM was verbally administered to 83 patients (average age 51.3 9.8 years, 77.1% female, 47.1% African American) taking opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. Patients averaged in total 63.9% 14.3% (range 23%91%) correct responses on the POEM. The POEM demonstrated substantial test-retest reliability (interclass correlation coefficient 0.87). The POEM had a mean readability Lexile (L) score of 805.9 257.3 L (equivalent to approximately a US fifth grade reading level), with individual items ranging from 280 L to 1370 L. Conclusion The POEM shows promise for rapidly identifying patients opioid-related knowledge gaps and expectations. Correcting misunderstandings and gaps could result in safer use of opioids in a clinical care setting. PMID:24049456

  1. Effective Showcase Projects: Office of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC. Indian Education Programs.

    The Indian Education Programs supplement state, local, and tribal education efforts to improve the quality of Indian education and assure parental and community participation. Each year, the Office of Indian Education, assisted by the six regional Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers, selects effective projects to be showcased at the

  2. Drug Education Effects. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Michael L.

    This is a research project that was intended to study the effects of a factual drug education program on the attitudes on high school and junior high students toward the use of psychoactive drugs. The approximately 250 eighth and twelfth grade students involved in the study filled out a number of questionnaires designed to measure a variety of

  3. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In

  4. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  5. Quality of doctor-patient communication through the eyes of the patient: variation according to the patient's educational level.

    PubMed

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-10-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In this study we describe patients' perspective in doctor-patient communication according to their educational level, and to what extent these perspectives lean towards the expert opinion on doctor-patient communication. In a multi-center study (Belgium, The Netherlands, UK and Italy), focus group discussions were organised using videotaped medical consultations. A mixed methods approach was used to analyse the data. Firstly, a difference in perspective in communication style was found between the lower educated participants versus the middle and higher educated participants. Secondly, lower educated participants referred positively most to aspects related to the affective/emotional area of the medical consultation, followed by the task-oriented/problem-focused area. Middle and higher educated participants positively referred most to the task-oriented/problem-focused area. The competency of the physician was an important category of communication for all participants, independent of social background. The results indicate that the preferences of lower educated participants lean more towards the expert opinion in doctor-patient communication than the middle and higher educated participants. Patients' educational level seems to influence their perspective on communication style and should be taken into account by physicians. Further quantitative research is needed to confirm these results. PMID:25428194

  6. Enhancing clinical practice and education with high-fidelity human patient simulators.

    PubMed

    Peteani, Leigh Ann

    2004-01-01

    Research shows that students exhibit increased autonomy and self-confidence when delivering patient care after practicing first with high-fidelity human patient simulators (HPS). Practicing clinical skills on a high-fidelity HPS allows students to learn in a highly adaptable, safe educational environment that fosters autonomy, independence, and the development of sound analytical skills. The author discusses the use of patient simulators in nursing education, a definition of a high-fidelity HPS, and their value to clinical practice and education. A cost-effective example of how to acquire a high-fidelity HPS without going over budget is provided. PMID:14726796

  7. Interprofessional Education Among Student Health Professionals Using Human Patient Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Chmil, Joyce V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the planning, implementation, and outcomes of an interprofessional education clinical laboratory facilitated through human patient simulation. Design. An interprofessional education clinical laboratory was developed with a patient-care scenario of acute exacerbation of heart failure that incorporated the use of a high-fidelity patient simulator. Pharmacy and nursing students assumed clinical roles in this realistic scenario and collaborated to diagnose and treat the patient. Assessment. Student attitudes toward and readiness to participate in interprofessional education improved following participation in the laboratory. Students reported that the greatest benefit of the experience was in their communication skills. Conclusion. Students ability to participate in interprofessional education experiences and their attitudes toward them improved following participation in this curricular initiative. Further evaluation of the impact of interprofessional education on student learning outcomes and changes in practice is warranted. PMID:24954934

  8. Educational inequalities in patient-centred care: patients' preferences and experiences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Educational attainment is strongly related to specific health outcomes. The pathway in which individual patient-provider interactions contribute to (re)producing these inequalities has yet to be studied. In this article, the focus is on differences between less and more highly educated patients in their preferences for and experiences with patient-centred care., e.g. shared decision making, receiving understandable explanations and being able to ask questions. Methods Data are derived from several Consumer Quality-index (CQ-index) studies. The CQ-index is a family of standardized instruments which are used in the Netherlands to measure quality of care from the patients perspective. Results The educational level of patients is directly related to the degree of importance patients attribute to specific aspects of patient-centred care. It has a minor influence on the experienced level of shared decision making, but not on experiences regarding other aspects of patient-centred care. Conclusions All patients regard patient-centred care as important and report positive experiences. However, there is a discrepancy between patient preferences for patient-centred care on one hand and the care received on the other. Less educated patients might receive too much, and more highly educated patients too little in the domains of communication, information and shared decision making. PMID:22900589

  9. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated

  10. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  11. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.

  12. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  13. Pilot educational program to enhance empowering patient education of school-age children with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nurses have a crucial role in patient education of children with type 1 diabetes, but they often exhibit lack of knowledge of the patient education process. This study aimed to describe an educational program to enhance empowering patient education process for the blood glucose monitoring education of school-age children and nurses’ perceptions of using empowering techniques. Methods An empowering patient education process for the diabetes education of school-age children was developed. The researcher collected nurse’s perceptions of managing the educational program by semi-structured interviews. Ten nurses carried out the diabetes education, and 8 of them participated in the interview. Three nurses implemented the diabetes education twice and were interviewed twice. The data consisted of 11 descriptions of the blood glucose monitoring education. The interviewer analyzed the data deductively and inductively by content analysis. Results Nurses described successful managing of the empowering patient education process. The need assessment consisted of using multiple methods and clarifying the capabilities and challenges of children and their parents. Planning manifested itself in adequate preparation and multiple objectives stated together with the family. Implementation comprised the relevant content, and the use of suitable teaching materials and methods. Evaluation was performed with various methods and documented accurately. Nurses also faced some challenges related to management and leadership, ambivalence with traditional and empowering patient education, and families’ overall situation. Conclusion An example of developing evidence-based patient education program is presented, but besides education other factors supporting changes in work practices should be considered in further development. PMID:23641969

  14. Are end-of-life patient education materials readable?

    PubMed

    Ache, K A; Wallace, L S

    2009-09-01

    Although established guidelines for developing low-literacy patient education materials are available, poorly designed material continue to be disseminated. We evaluated the readability and layout of English-language end-of-life patient education materials available on the Internet. Internet websites of five national palliative care organizations were searched to identify patient education materials for review. A convenience sample of 15 patient education materials per palliative care organization (n = 75) was downloaded and printed. The Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) was used to calculate the reading grade level (readability) of the text, while the layout features was assessed using criteria from the User-Friendliness Tool (UFT). The reading grade level of patient education materials ranged from 7(th) to 12(th) grade (mean +/- SD = 11.1 +/- 1.9). None of the patient education materials scored high on all UFT criteria. In particular, the greatest need was increasing the amount of white space and improving the way in which information was organized visually. Healthcare providers can only aid in the decision process, patients and their loved ones are ultimately responsible for making these choices. These decisions are important as choices need to be made about end-of-life care while patients are still cognitively able to do so. Well designed end-of-life patient education materials can offer a wealth of knowledge to assist and guide decision making. On the basis of these results, end-of-life patient education materials should be revised so that the average adult is able to understand the message presented, thereby enhancing his/her ability to make informed decisions. PMID:19460831

  15. Perpetuating 'New Public Management' at the expense of nurses' patient education: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the conditions for nurses' daily patient education work by focusing on managers' way of speaking about the patient education provided by nurses in hospital care. An explorative, qualitative design with a social constructionist perspective was used. Data were collected from three focus group interviews and analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Discursive practice can be explained by the ideology of hegemony. Due to a heavy workload and lack of time, managers could 'see' neither their role as a supporter of the patient education provided by nurses, nor their role in the development of nurses' pedagogical competence. They used organisational, financial, medical and legal reasons for explaining their failure to support nurses' provision of patient education. The organisational discourse was an umbrella term for 'things' such as cost-effectiveness, which were prioritised over patient education. There is a need to remove managerial barriers to the professional development of nurses' patient education. Managers should be responsible for ensuring and overseeing that nurses have the prerequisites necessary for providing patient education as well as for enabling continuous reflective dialogue and opportunities for learning in practice. PMID:25327764

  16. The effects of a weekly radiation therapy newsletter on patients.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, G A

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects that structured patient educational information in the form of a weekly newsletter has on the knowledge, side effects, and self-care behaviors of patients with cancer who are undergoing radiation therapy. It was hypothesized that subjects reading the newsletter would know more about radiation therapy and its side effects than subjects not reading the newsletter and, therefore, would employ more self-care behaviors, resulting in less severe side effects. A post-test-only control group design was used. Although the subjects who read the newsletter scored significantly higher on the knowledge test, there were no significant differences in the helpfulness or number of self-care behaviors or in the severity of side effects. Patient education in the form of a newsletter may provide benefits to patients other than knowledge (e.g., reduced anxiety) that may be just as important as side effects relief. PMID:1945966

  17. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on improving clinical diagnosis and treatment of the traumatized refugee patient. PMID:23957962

  18. Patient Safety in Medical Education: Students Perceptions, Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Nabilou, Bahram; Feizi, Aram; Seyedin, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a new and challenging discipline in the Iranian health care industry. Among the challenges for patient safety improvement, education of medical and paramedical students is intimidating. The present study was designed to assess students perceptions of patient safety, and their knowledge and attitudes to patient safety education. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 2012 at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, West Azerbaijan province, Iran. 134 students studying medicine, nursing, and midwifery were recruited through census for the study. A questionnaire was used for collecting data, which were then analyzed through SPSS statistical software (version 16.0), using Chi-square test, Spearman correlation coefficient, F and LSD tests. A total of 121 questionnaires were completed, and 50% of the students demonstrated good knowledge about patient safety. The relationships between students attitudes to patient safety and years of study, sex and course were significant (0.003, 0.001 and 0.017, respectively). F and LSD tests indicated that regarding the difference between the mean scores of perceptions of patient safety and attitudes to patient safety education, there was a significant difference among medical and nursing/midwifery students. Little knowledge of students regarding patient safety indicates the inefficiency of informal education to fill the gap; therefore, it is recommended to consider patient safety in the curriculums of all medical and paramedical sciences and formulate better policies for patient safety. PMID:26322897

  19. Effects of Lifestyle Modification on Telomerase Gene Expression in Hypertensive Patients: A Pilot Trial of Stress Reduction and Health Education Programs in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Duraimani, Shanthi; Schneider, Robert H.; Randall, Otelio S.; Nidich, Sanford I.; Xu, Shichen; Ketete, Muluemebet; Rainforth, Maxwell A.; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W.; Fagan, John

    2015-01-01

    Background African Americans suffer from disproportionately high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Psychosocial stress, lifestyle and telomere dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This study evaluated effects of stress reduction and lifestyle modification on blood pressure, telomerase gene expression and lifestyle factors in African Americans. Methods Forty-eight African American men and women with stage I hypertension who participated in a larger randomized controlled trial volunteered for this substudy. These subjects participated in either stress reduction with the Transcendental Meditation technique and a basic health education course (SR) or an extensive health education program (EHE) for 16 weeks. Primary outcomes were telomerase gene expression (hTERT and hTR) and clinic blood pressure. Secondary outcomes included lifestyle-related factors. Data were analyzed for within-group and between-group changes. Results Both groups showed increases in the two measures of telomerase gene expression, hTR mRNA levels (SR: p< 0.001; EHE: p< 0.001) and hTERT mRNA levels (SR: p = 0.055; EHE: p< 0.002). However, no statistically significant between-group changes were observed. Both groups showed reductions in systolic BP. Adjusted changes were SR = -5.7 mm Hg, p< 0.01; EHE = -9.0 mm Hg, p < 0.001 with no statistically significant difference between group difference. There was a significant reduction in diastolic BP in the EHE group (-5.3 mm Hg, p< 0.001) but not in SR (-1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.42); the between-group difference was significant (p = 0.04). The EHE group showed a greater number of changes in lifestyle behaviors. Conclusion In this pilot trial, both stress reduction (Transcendental Meditation technique plus health education) and extensive health education groups demonstrated increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP. The association between increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP observed in this high-risk population suggest hypotheses that telomerase gene expression may either be a biomarker for reduced BP or a mechanism by which stress reduction and lifestyle modification reduces BP. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00681200 PMID:26571023

  20. Identify practice gaps in medication education through surveys to patients and physicians

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhan-Miao; Zhi, Xiao-Jie; Yang, Ling; Sun, Shu-Sen; Zhang, Zhuo; Sun, Zhi-Ming; Zhai, Suo-Di

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective communication and education formats between health care providers and patients about medication use are associated with patients satisfaction, recall of information, and eventually their health status. Limited research exists on physician-delivered education interventions, as well as on whether the current content of medication education and delivery formats satisfies the needs of both patients and physicians. Our objective was to identify the practice gaps regarding medication education content and delivery. Methods Separate surveys were obtained from ambulatory care patients presenting to the outpatient pharmacy for medication pickups, and physicians working at the hospital clinics. Results A total of 108 patients completed the patient survey, and 116 hospital clinic physicians completed the physician survey. Female patients had a higher degree of concern regarding medication information compared with male patients (4.040.65 versus 3.580.66, P=0.001). Physicians were less likely to educate patients regarding their medications on drugdrug interactions (24.3%), drugfood interactions (24.3%), and what to do about their prescriptions if an adverse reaction is experienced (24.3%) during physicianpatient encounters. Patients most desired education format was physician counseling (82.4%) and the second most desired education format was pharmacist counseling (50.9%). Medication device demonstration (7.0%) was the least used educational format delivered to patients by physicians, and patients would like to see an increased education delivery format through medication device demonstration (Method desired [MD] Method received [MR] =12.0%). Patients would like to see expanded roles of patient focused handout (MD-MR=22.2%), telephone consultation (21.2%), pharmacist counseling (12.9%), the use of medication database embedded within the hospital information system (12.2%) and device demonstration (12.0%). Conclusion This study illustrates that there are practice gaps in current medication education both in terms of content and delivery format. The study provided valuable information in designing and implementing future education activities that are drivers of good medication use and adherence. PMID:26557752

  1. Patient satisfaction and pain management: an educational approach.

    PubMed

    Innis, Jennifer; Bikaunieks, Nancy; Petryshen, Patricia; Zellermeyer, Valerie; Ciccarelli, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The importance of assessing and managing pain has become paramount in today's hospital environment. Poor pain management is associated with impaired health, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased healthcare costs. This quality improvement project on an internal medicine unit at an urban teaching hospital examined the impact of pain education on patient satisfaction with pain management. Although pain scores did not improve, there were improvements made with respect to patient assessment, patient satisfaction, and nursing knowledge. PMID:15535537

  2. Is Patient Education About Adhesions a Requirement in Abdominopelvic Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Hirschelmann, A.; Wallwiener, C. W.; Wallwiener, M.; Weyhe, D.; Tchartchian, G.; Hackethal, A.; De Wilde, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the past decades, our knowledge and understanding of adhesions and adhesion-related complications has increasingly grown and it has become evident that adhesions have significant implications for patients, physicians and the healthcare system. The question arises whether this has resulted in greater awareness of adhesion-related problems among practicing physicians and appropriate patient education on this topic in daily practice. The following article provides a brief overview of the important subject of adhesions, discusses current awareness of adhesions among patients and doctors and addresses the consequences of failure to provide patient education and consent from a medical perspective. Methods: Selective literature searches were conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library. A patient information and consent form was developed based on several yearsʼ experience and expertise in the field of adhesions. Results: Adhesions are the most common type of complication in abdominopelvic surgery today, with devastating consequences for some patients. Surveys investigating the awareness of adhesions among physicians and patients clearly showed that even well-informed physicians fail to educate their patients adequately. Such failure could potentially lead to successful medical malpractice lawsuits against doctors. Conclusion: Considering their clear clinical impact, adhesions and related consequences should always be discussed with patients preoperatively. A newly developed consent form that specifically addresses adhesion formation may serve to thoroughly educate patients preoperatively and to adequately document the process of doing so. PMID:25284835

  3. Patient Education through Pregnancy Counseling: A Preventive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Linda; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Gynecology Clinic, Wilce Health Center, Ohio State University, is putting into operation a comprehensive family planning service program that includes (1) patient education, (2) medical care, (3) pregnancy counseling, and (4) reproductive and sexuality counseling. (Author)

  4. Implementing Electronic Tablet-Based Education of Acute Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Tenita; Nelson, Monica J; McKee, Vickie; Bowers, Margaret T; Meggitt, Corilin; Baxt, Sarah K; Washington, Delphine; Saladino, Louise; Lehman, E Philip; Brewer, Cheryl; Locke, Susan C; Abernethy, Amy; Gilliss, Catherine L; Granger, Bradi B

    2016-02-01

    Poor education-related discharge preparedness for patients with heart failure is believed to be a major cause of avoidable rehospitalizations. Technology-based applications offer innovative educational approaches that may improve educational readiness for patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings; however, a number of challenges exist when implementing electronic devices in the clinical setting. Implementation challenges include processes for "on-boarding" staff, mediating risks of cross-contamination with patients' device use, and selling the value to staff and health system leaders to secure the investment in software, hardware, and system support infrastructure. Strategies to address these challenges are poorly described in the literature. The purpose of this article is to present a staff development program designed to overcome challenges in implementing an electronic, tablet-based education program for patients with heart failure. PMID:26830181

  5. [Visual materials for the education of patients with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Morineau, Claudie

    2015-12-01

    Some people living with diabetes are not included in any educational approach due to their cultural or linguistic particularities, their level of elementary education or their metacognitive deficiencies. It is essential for the caregiver to reflect on how to provide adapted and relevant therapeutic education to these patients. In this context, visual materials have been designed in order to be able to offer personalised support. PMID:26675098

  6. Facilitating Behavior Change with Low-Literacy Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods: We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder…

  7. Nursing education and job effectiveness.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, J C

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple regression study was to determine whether nurses with different educational preparation differ in job effectiveness. The dependent variable job effectiveness was ascertained by asking head nurses to rate their staff nurses on job effectiveness by comparing them to each other and to ideal best and worst possible nurses. Job effectiveness was not defined; rather, a profile of the effective nurse was constructed from the study data. Questionnaire data were analyzed for 299 staff nurses (75 percent return): 53 practical nurses, 63 associate degree nurses, 134 diploma nurses and 49 baccalaureate nurses. The sample was obtained from 52 units located in 12 Chicago area hospitals chosen randomly from a stratified list. PMID:6549845

  8. Non-Specific Effects in Psycho-Educational Intervention Research

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Heidi S.; Kwekkeboom, Kristine L.; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q.; Ward, Sandra E.

    2009-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials support the efficacy of a wide range of psycho-educational interventions. However, the mechanisms through which these interventions improve outcomes are not always clear. At times, the theoretically specified factors within interventions have been shown to have specific effects on patient outcomes. But it has also been argued that other factors not identified in the intervention theory (e.g. non-specific factors such as patient expectations and therapeutic patient-clinician alliances) have powerful non-specific effects that account for most, if not all, of the observed efficacy of psycho-educational interventions. This paper describes important concepts in this debate and discusses key issues in distinguishing between specific and non-specific effects of psycho-educational nursing interventions. Four examples are used to illustrate potential methods of identifying and controlling for non-specific effects in clinical intervention trials. PMID:19617580

  9. Innovative system to improve use of patient education materials.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. L.; Levitt, C.; Franco, E. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a new storage system for patient education materials. DESIGN: Anonymous surveys before and after implementation of new storage system. SETTING: Family medicine residency teaching centre. PARTICIPANTS: All nurses, staff doctors, and first- and second-year residents in the unit. INTERVENTIONS: Implementation of a new storage system for patient education materials, orientation of all health professionals in the unit to the new system, and periodic distribution of patient education newsletters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported use of patient education materials. RESULTS: Response rates were 73% (30 of 41 health professionals) in 1990 and 86% (36 of 42) in 1992. Responses to the first survey on use of 20 categories of patient education materials showed materials were seldom used by most respondents. Back Care, Nutrition, Diabetes, VD/Birth Control, and Pregnancy categories were the most frequently used. In the second survey, more respondents reported using these five categories of pamphlets. Rates of use varied only slightly for the remaining 15 categories. CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals reported more frequent use of certain patient education materials following implementation of a new storage system. PMID:9626424

  10. [Health Literacy and patient education in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Eva Maria; Spörhase, U

    2015-09-01

    Medical rehabilitation in Germany has a long tradition. It is covered by the statutory sickness funds and pension schemes, and is aimed at the prevention of work disability and need for nursing care due to chronic conditions. Chronically ill but health-literate patients - patients capable of making good health-related decisions, or of participating strongly in this decision making - have better health outcomes. To enhance health literacy and participation, medical rehabilitation relies heavily on patient education. This article describes health literacy from the perspective of educational research, outlines the basics of learning principles, and draws conclusions for developing patient education programmes in medical rehabilitation. Implementing a constructivist learning paradigm promotes changes within the trainer team and within the rehabilitation institution - turning it into a health-literate health care organisation. Health literacy in medical rehabilitation is aimed at neither turning the patient into a physician nor replacing evidence-based recommendations through subjective preferences. Medical rehabilitation reaches patients best by using modern health education programmes based on findings from education research, theoretically founded and directed towards building competencies. Furthermore, an educationally qualified training team and a rehabilitation institution are essential in enabling formal and informal learning processes. PMID:26153473

  11. Educational Equity: Challenges for Educator Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Jane; Winslow, Emily

    2015-01-01

    With increasingly diverse student populations, educational equity is a bigger challenge than ever for public schools across the United States. While federal government, states, and school districts work to identify and address the root causes of equity gaps, efforts are often hampered by a limited body of research-based strategies and approaches…

  12. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  13. Developing a patient education method - the e-Knowledge Test with feedback.

    PubMed

    Siekkinen, Mervi; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer and its treatment radiotherapy, have impact on woman's psychosocial and physical well-being causing disruption to quality of life. Because of the positive effects of knowledge on quality of life there is a challenge to develop effective education methods. Due to the growing use of internet among breast cancer patients the development should be focused on e-education. An e-education method, the e-Knowledge Test of radiotherapy with feedback for breast cancer patients (e-KTRT-BC) was planned and piloted. The content of it based on literature of breast cancer patients' knowledge needs of radiotherapy and structured through aspects of empowerment as a nursing intervention. The face validity study that was conducted via email revealed that the content of e-KTRC-BC was easy to use and understand. The e-KTRT-BC could be used as an e-education method to meet the breast cancer patients' knowledge needs. Evaluating the empowering effect of patient e-education with feedback is important for further development of e-education methods. PMID:22874365

  14. The Use of Standardized Patients in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Standardized patients are widely used in health care programs to both teach and evaluate the communication and clinical skills of students. Although athletic training education programs (ATEPs) commonly use simulations, little information exists related to the use and implementation of standardized patients (SPs). Objective: To provide…

  15. Health Literacy, Education Levels, and Patient Portal Usage During Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sharon E.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kripalani, Sunil; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2015-01-01

    Patient portal adoption has rapidly increased, and portal usage has been associated with patients’ sociodemographics, health literacy, and education. Research on patient portals has primarily focused on the outpatient setting. We explored whether health literacy and education were associated with portal usage in an inpatient population. Among 60,159 admissions in 2012–2013, 23.3% of patients reported limited health literacy; 50.4% reported some post-secondary education; 34.4% were registered for the portal; and 23.4% of registered patients used the portal during hospitalization. Probability of registration and inpatient portal use increased with educational attainment. Health literacy was associated with registration but not inpatient use. Among admissions with inpatient use, educational attainment was associated with viewing health record data, and health literacy was associated use of appointment and health education tools. The inpatient setting may provide an opportunity to overcome barriers to patient portal adoption and reduce disparities in use of health information technologies. PMID:26958286

  16. Providing community education: lessons learned from Native Patient Navigators.

    PubMed

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities' needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research. PMID:25087698

  17. Providing Community Education: Lessons Learned from Native Patient Navigators

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U.; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities’ needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research. PMID:25087698

  18. An Analysis, Using Concept Mapping, of Diabetic Patients' Knowledge, before and after Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, C.; d'Ivernois, J. F.; Assal, J. P.; Slama, G.; Hivon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses whether concept maps used with diabetic patients could describe their cognitive structure, before and after having followed an educational program. Involves 10 diabetic patients and shows that concept maps can be a suitable technique to explore the type and organization of the patients' prior knowledge and to visualize what they have

  19. Promoting Immigrant Women's Cardiovascular Health Redesigning Patient Education Interventions.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Suzanne; Guruge, Sepali

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death among women from low- to middle-income countries. The most common cardiovascular nursing intervention is that of patient education. However, the applicability of this intervention is questionable, as these educational initiatives are typically designed and evaluated using samples of "white" homogeneous males. Using the social determinants of health framework, this discursive article identifies specific strategies for redesigning existing cardiovascular education interventions to enhance their applicability to immigrant women. The recommendations will allow nurses to enhance the educational support offered resulting in the reduction and/or prevention of cardiovascular-related symptoms and/or complications. PMID:26517345

  20. Gedanken Experiments in Educational Cost Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brudner, Harvey J.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the effectiveness of cost determining techniques in education. The areas discussed are: education and management; cost-effectiveness models; figures of merit determination; and the implications as they relate to the areas of audio-visual and computer educational technology. (Author/GA)

  1. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination

  2. [Trial of interprofessional education for effective IPW].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Miho; Son, Daisuke; Kawamura, Kazumi; Nakashima, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    To work collaboratively in healthcare practice, health professionals should learn not only the competencies of their own specialties but also those of other professions so as to promote effective interprofessional work (IPW), thus optimizing patient/client outcomes. For this reason interprofessional education (IPE) is urgently needed. Since the establishment of Centre for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education (CAIPE) in 1987, many IPE programs have been developed and implemented worldwide. Currently, our Japan Society for Instructional Systems in Healthcare (JSISH) IPE program project team is conducting a study to develop an effective and versatile IPE program according to the framework of instructional design (ID). The main categories of learning goals of our program are intellectual skills and attitudes among Gagne's five categories. Therefore we designed our program to start from the drama (skit or video) of a bad example of IPW for learners to see and discuss the barriers of interprofessional collaboration. The drama of IPW seems to enhance attention and relevance for learners; both of which are components of the ARCS model. We expect every health professional including pharmacists to learn about IPW competencies through participating in our IPE program, enabling us further to pursue the ideal patient/client/family-centered care together. PMID:25743910

  3. Patients' Views of the Medical Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Michael; Bazuin, Charles H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a survey of patients at three community health centers operated by the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford are presented and discussed. The research was designed to obtain a better understanding of the patient's views on the quality of care and medical students. (Author/MLW)

  4. Evaluating the usefulness of patient education materials on surgical site infection: a systematic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Caroline; Zimdars, Peggy; Parker, Sarah; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-02-01

    Patient education is important for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). The usefulness of available patient education materials is unclear. Using a validated evaluation tool, the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool, we systematically assessed patient education materials for SSI. We found that available materials performed poorly, and further research is needed in this area. PMID:25541334

  5. Effectiveness of continuing medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Marinopoulos, Spyridon S; Dorman, Todd; Ratanawongsa, Neda; Wilson, Lisa M; Ashar, Bimal H; Magaziner, Jeffrey L; Miller, Redonda G; Thomas, Patricia A; Prokopowicz, Gregory P; Qayyum, Rehan; Bass, Eric B

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Despite the broad range of continuing medical education (CME) offerings aimed at educating practicing physicians through the provision of up-to-date clinical information, physicians commonly overuse, under-use, and misuse therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. It has been suggested that the ineffective nature of CME either accounts for the discrepancy between evidence and practice or at a minimum contributes to this gap. Understanding what CME tools and techniques are most effective in disseminating and retaining medical knowledge is critical to improving CME and thus diminishing the gap between evidence and practice. The purpose of this review was to comprehensively and systematically synthesize evidence regarding the effectiveness of CME and differing instructional designs in terms of knowledge, attitudes, skills, practice behavior, and clinical practice outcomes. REVIEW METHODS We formulated specific questions with input from external experts and representatives of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) which nominated this topic. We systematically searched the literature using specific eligibility criteria, hand searching of selected journals, and electronic databases including: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), PsycINFO, and the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC). Two independent reviewers conducted title scans, abstract reviews, and then full article reviews to identify eligible articles. Each eligible article underwent double review for data abstraction and assessment of study quality. RESULTS Of the 68,000 citations identified by literature searching, 136 articles and 9 systematic reviews ultimately met our eligibility criteria. The overall quality of the literature was low and consequently firm conclusions were not possible. Despite this, the literature overall supported the concept that CME was effective, at least to some degree, in achieving and maintaining the objectives studied, including knowledge (22 of 28 studies), attitudes (22 of 26), skills (12 of 15), practice behavior (61 of 105), and clinical practice outcomes (14 of 33). Common themes included that live media was more effective than print, multimedia was more effective than single media interventions, and multiple exposures were more effective than a single exposure. The number of articles that addressed internal and/or external characteristics of CME activities was too small and the studies too heterogeneous to determine if any of these are crucial for CME success. Evidence was limited on the reliability and validity of the tools that have been used to assess CME effectiveness. Based on previous reviews, the evidence indicates that simulation methods in medical education are effective in the dissemination of psychomotor and procedural skills. CONCLUSIONS Despite the low quality of the evidence, CME appears to be effective at the acquisition and retention of knowledge, attitudes, skills, behaviors and clinical outcomes. More research is needed to determine with any degree of certainty which types of media, techniques, and exposure volumes as well as what internal and external audience characteristics are associated with improvements in outcomes. PMID:17764217

  6. ETHICAL MODELS OF PHYSICIAN--PATIENT RELATIONSHIP REVISITED WITH REGARD TO PATIENT AUTONOMY, VALUES AND PATIENT EDUCATION.

    PubMed

    Borza, Liana Rada; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Stockman, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The present paper revisits the ethical models of patient--physician relationship from the perspective of patient autonomy and values. It seems that the four traditional models of physician--patient relationship proposed by Emanuel & Emanuel in 1992 closely link patient values and patient autonomy. On the other hand, their reinterpretation provided by Agarwal & Murinson twenty years later emphasizes the independent expression of values and autonomy in individual patients. Additionally, patient education has been assumed to join patient values and patient autonomy. Moreover, several authors have noted that, over the past few decades, patient autonomy has gradually replaced the paternalistic approach based on the premise that the physician knows what is best for the patient. Neither the paternalistic model of physician-patient relationship, nor the informative model is considered to be satisfactory, as the paternalistic model excludes patient values from decision making, while the informative model excludes physician values from decision making. However, the deliberative model of patient-physician interaction represents an adequate alternative to the two unsatisfactory approaches by promoting shared decision making between the physician and the patient. It has also been suggested that the deliberative model would be ideal for exercising patient autonomy in chronic care and that the ethical role of patient education would be to make the deliberative model applicable to chronic care. In this regard, studies have indicated that the use of decision support interventions might increase the deliberative capacity of chronic patients. PMID:26204658

  7. Patient Education in University Health Services: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Planning and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensley, Loren B., Jr.; Moffitt, Patrick B.

    1978-01-01

    This article looks at the patient education program and explains the role of the patient education intern at Central Michigan University. Included are helpful recommendations for persons interested in developing similar health education programs. (YG)

  8. Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported…

  9. Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported

  10. Educators’ perspectives about how older hospital patients can engage in a falls prevention education programme: a qualitative process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Anne-Marie; McPhail, Steven M; Francis-Coad, Jacqueline; Waldron, Nicholas; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Flicker, Leon; Ingram, Katharine; Haines, Terry P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals. Patient and staff education delivered by trained educators significantly reduced falls and injurious falls in an older rehabilitation population. The purpose of the study was to explore the educators’ perspectives of delivering the education and to conceptualise how the programme worked to prevent falls among older patients who received the education. Design A qualitative exploratory study. Methods Data were gathered from three sources: conducting a focus group and an interview (n=10 educators), written educator notes and reflective researcher field notes based on interactions with the educators during the primary study. The educators delivered the programme on eight rehabilitation wards for periods of between 10 and 40 weeks. They provided older patients with individualised education to engage in falls prevention and provided staff with education to support patient actions. Data were thematically analysed and presented using a conceptual framework. Results Falls prevention education led to mutual understanding between staff and patients which assisted patients to engage in falls prevention behaviours. Mutual understanding was derived from the following observations: the educators perceived that they could facilitate an effective three-way interaction between staff actions, patient actions and the ward environment which led to behaviour change on the wards. This included engaging with staff and patients, and assisting them to reconcile differing perspectives about falls prevention behaviours. Conclusions Individualised falls prevention education effectively provides patients who receive it with the capability and motivation to develop and undertake behavioural strategies that reduce their falls, if supported by staff and the ward environment. PMID:26656027

  11. Educational Conference Scheduling, Patient Discharge Time, and Resident Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Steffanie; Campbell, Matthew; Shah, Chirayu; Djuricich, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Limits on resident duty hours instituted in 2003 and 2011 have compressed medical resident daily workload. Despite this compression, residents must gain competence to practice medicine without supervision. Objective We sought to determine whether moving the time our educational conference is scheduled affects the time when patient discharges are completed on an internal medicine teaching service. Methods The study was conducted at a county hospital within a large internal medicine residency program. During the 4-month study period, the morning report conference for internal medicine residents was shifted from 8:30 am to 2 pm. Patient discharge times, defined as the time the discharge order set was signed, were obtained for the service via the electronic health record. The outcomes measured were patient discharge time variation and internal medicine resident preference for conference time. Results Survey response rate was 82% (42 of 51). Of the residents who responded, 64% (27 of 42) preferred the 8:30 am report time, and 74% (31 of 42) felt the 8:30 am time was also better for education and timing of teaching rounds. There was no difference in discharge times for 2999 patients on the medicine teaching service, whether educational case conference morning report occurred at 8:30 am or at 2 pm. Conclusions Medical patient average discharge time was not influenced by time of educational conference. Factors other than the timing of educational conference appear to influence hospital discharge times on an inpatient internal medicine service. PMID:26279788

  12. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  13. The influence of the patients' educational levels on socioeconomic, clinical, immunological and virological endpoints.

    PubMed

    Collazos, Julio; Asensi, Vctor; Carton, Jos Antonio; Ibarra, Sofa

    2009-04-01

    To analyse the influence of educational levels on diverse baseline and follow-up characteristics and outcomes of HIV-infected patients, we sequentially evaluated 1352 individuals with known educational levels, who initiated a nelfinavir-based regimen. Higher educational degrees were associated with better baseline clinical (P=0.03) and immunological (P=0.003) conditions, not related to transmission categories, which were also observed during follow-up (P=0.003). However, these differences were only found in antiretroviral-experienced patients (P=0.002), while naive patients had very similar values (P=0.8). Overall, there were different CD4 responses (P=0.06), but not viral load responses (P=0.6), to antiretroviral therapy according to the educational level, but these differences were more marked in the last six months of follow-up (P=0.008). Patients with higher educational degrees had higher rates of adherence to medical appointments both before (P=0.0003) and during the study period (P=0.01), as well as to antiretroviral therapy in univariate (P=0.003) and multivariate analyses (P=0.007). Similarly, baseline CD4 counts proved to be independently associated with education after adjustment for other variables (P=0.0006). The educational groups also differed in diverse socioeconomic parameters and certain beliefs about HIV infection (P<0.0001 for each). We conclude that the patient's educational level influences clinical and immunological outcomes of HIV infection. This impact is probably mediated through differences in the long-term effects of treatment, as a result of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and to medical indications. The evaluation of social aspects such as the patient's education should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to improve the results of treatment. PMID:19266411

  14. Utilization of Blood Glucose Data in Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Kumah-Crystal, Yaa; Mulvaney, Shelagh

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have tested clinical and behavioral approaches for improving glycemic control in people with diabetes. We review research to identify how blood glucose (BG) values have been used in patient-focused clinical research and interventions. We sought to describe the frequency that BG values have been the focus of patient education research and to characterize the different methods to integrate BG into an intervention, the approaches implemented to support patient education and behavior change, and the nature of communication about BG values. Thirty-four eligible studies were identified that included patient education using BG values. Information regarding the study and intervention characteristics include: 1) Characteristics of the study sample, 2) How BG values were obtained, 3) Use of a graphical interface for BG values, 4) Use of a BG log, 5) BG interpretation and regimen adjustments, 6) Recommended actions to patient, 7) Modality of intervention, and 8) Intervention communication schedule. The review demonstrated that new BG technologies provide outstanding opportunities for greater access to BG data, and for patient support and intervention. However, it also indicated a need to improve and expand support for people with diabetes in their daily use of BG values to maintain and improve glycemic control. In order to make the most sustainable impact on behavior, generalizable skills such as problem solving need to be integrated into BG education. PMID:24057927

  15. A Comparison of Face to Face and Video-Based Self Care Education on Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati Maslakpak, Masumeh; Shams, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Background End stage renal disease negatively affects the patients quality of life. There are different educational methods to help these patients. This study was performed to compare the effectiveness of self-care education in two methods, face to face and video educational, on the quality of life in patients under treatment by hemodialysis in education-medical centers in Urmia. Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 120 hemodialysis patients were selected randomly; they were then randomly allocated to three groups: the control, face to face education and video education. For face to face group, education was given individually in two sessions of 35 to 45 minutes. For video educational group, CD was shown. Kidney Disease Quality Of Life- Short Form (KDQOL-SF) questionnaire was filled out before and two months after the intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS software by using one-way ANOVA. Results ANOVA test showed a statistically significant difference in the quality of life scores among the three groups after the intervention (P=0.024). After the intervention, Tukeys post-hoc test showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups of video and face to face education regarding the quality of life (P>0.05). Conclusion Implementation of the face to face and video education methods improves the quality of life in hemodialysis patients. So, it is suggested that video educational should be used along with face to face education. PMID:26171412

  16. Creating Competitive Advantage through Effective Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Clinton O.; Ariss, Sonny S.

    2002-01-01

    Managers trained in executive education programs (n=203) identified ways in which management education can increase an organization's competitive advantage: exposure to new ideas and practices, skill development, and motivation. Characteristics of effective management education included experience-based learning orientation, credible instructors,

  17. Collaborative Education To Ensure Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    Results of a joint meeting between national advisory councils in medicine and nursing on physician-nurse collaboration to enhance patient safety are reported. Recommendations on which participants reached consensus are organized by these Institute of Medicine (IOM) themes: establish a national focus to create leadership through research and

  18. Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

    A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,

  19. Asthma patient education opportunities in predominantly minority urban communities.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Luis E; McLean, Don

    2007-12-01

    Disenfranchised ethnic minority communities in the urban United States experience a high burden of asthma. Conventional office-based patient education often is insufficient to promote proper asthma management and coping practices responsive to minority patients' environments. This paper explores existing and alternative asthma information and education sources in three urban minority communities in western New York State to help design other practical educational interventions. Four focus groups (n = 59) and four town hall meetings (n = 109) were conducted in one Hispanic and two black communities. Focus groups included adult asthmatics or caretakers of asthmatics, and town meetings were open to all residents. A critical theory perspective informed the study. Asthma information and education sources, perceptions of asthma and ways of coping were elicited through semi-structured interviews. Data analysis followed a theory-driven immersion-crystallization approach. Several asthma education and information resources from the health care system, media, public institutions and communities were identified. Intervention recommendations highlighted asthma workshops that recognize participants as teachers and learners, offer social support, promote advocacy, are culturally appropriate and community-based and include health care professionals. Community-based, group health education couched on people's experiences and societal conditions offers unique opportunities for patient asthma care empowerment in minority urban communities. PMID:16896054

  20. The Medical Education and Best Practice in Orthopedic Patient Care in Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2012-07-01

    The leadership organization focuses on education, teamwork, customer relationship and developing strategy which help in building added value, in managing activities, time and quality. Everyday orthopedic experience shows that medical education is a mixture of: specific knowledge, skills and attitudes of people working together, and that creates effective teamwork in a hospital environment. Apart from the main reason of medical education, teaching about disease treatment and health problem solving, medical education should also concentrate on human factors and behavioral aspects of patient treatment in hospital.Assessment of an organization and medical education process by cultural and teamwork criteria, offers a powerful new way to think about performance at the frontlines of healthcare and in the future it could be gold standard for assessing the success of an organization, and standards in medical education, not only in orthopedics.

  1. Improving Cost-Effectiveness of Radio Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Manzoor

    Radio is recognized as a powerful but underutilized educational medium, and ways of improving the cost-effectiveness of the educational use of radio are discussed. Topics include the meaning of and need for cost effectiveness analysis, building an information system for cost effectiveness analysis, and five factors affecting cost

  2. Evaluation of the quality and contents of diabetes mellitus patient education on Internet.

    PubMed

    Thakurdesai, Prasad A; Kole, Prashant L; Pareek, R P

    2004-06-01

    Patient education is widely regarded as an essential component of chronic disease care and effective health promotion. Internet is extremely useful medium in this respect. Web-based information is seldom the subject of systematic investigation for its accuracy and appropriateness for patients. Objective of this study was to evaluate of web-based diabetes patient education material for well-accepted evaluation criteria and core education concepts. Out of 214 web-sites retrieved from meta search engine, 53 sites themselves provide patient information and so considered for evaluation. Data obtained was analyzed by cluster analysis and classified into four categories with respect to quality. Considerable variability in quality of diabetes patient education web-sites was found with respect to core educational concepts and HSWG criteria. Inclusion of evidence-based medicine concepts, role of family support, enhancement in customized content and easier feedback mechanism in the web-sites can be a significant development in the direction of patient-centered diabetes care. PMID:15186868

  3. On Effecting Change in Educational Bureaucracies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantini, Mario D.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines the author's participation in several programs designed to effect change in educational institutions. Observations regarding school decentralization, community participation, and staff development programs are presented. (APM)

  4. Outpatient education reduces emergency room use by patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Franchette T; Hoang, Kathy; Hollen, Christopher; Swearingen, Richard; Hakimi, Andrea S; King, Jeanne Ann; Thompson, David

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a costly diagnosis, with emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions comprising a large portion of total direct cost. An educational intervention to decrease the number of ER visits was implemented on outpatients with epilepsy, using educational handouts and DVD. The number of ER visits declined significantly in the four months following intervention compared with the preceding four months. This finding supports patient education as a valuable tool to reduce ER use, which may, in turn, cut down on health-care cost. PMID:25499153

  5. A Pilot Study of an Exercise-Based Patient Education Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahli, Mohammed; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Lutz, Christina; Liebherr, Magnus; Schubert, Patric; Haas, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather). Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T0) and after (T1) a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T2). Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T0 to T1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T1 to T2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients' integral constitution concerning physical and mental health. PMID:25587449

  6. A pilot study of an exercise-based patient education program in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Stephanie; Mahli, Mohammed; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Lutz, Christina; Liebherr, Magnus; Schubert, Patric; Haas, Christian T

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather). Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T 0) and after (T 1) a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T 2). Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T 0 to T 1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T 1 to T 2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients' integral constitution concerning physical and mental health. PMID:25587449

  7. Strategies for improving the quality of verbal patient and family education: a review of the literature and creation of the EDUCATE model

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Cara

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patient and family education includes print, audio-visual methods, demonstration, and verbal instruction. Our objective was to study verbal instruction as a component of patient and family education and make recommendations for best practices for healthcare providers who use this method. Methods: We conducted a literature review of articles from 1990 to 2014 about verbal education and collaborated on departmental presentations to determine best practices. A survey was sent to all nursing staff to determine perceptions of verbal education and barriers to learning. Results: Through our work, we were able to identify verbal education models, best practices, and needs. We then constructed the EDUCATE model of verbal education, which built upon our findings. Conclusion: Verbal education of patients and family members requires a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account learning styles, literacy, and culture to apply clear communication and methods for the assessment of learning. Providers need the skills, time, and training to effectively perform patient and family verbal education every time they care for patients. Further research needs to be performed on how to test, document, and quantify patients' comprehension and retention of verbal instructions. PMID:25750796

  8. The effect of peer-led education on the life quality of mastectomy patients referred to breast cancer-clinics in Shiraz, Iran 2009

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer among women is a relatively common with a more favorable expected survival rates than other forms of cancers. This study aimed to determine the improved quality of life for post-mastectomy women through peer education. Methods Using pre and post test follow up and control design approach, 99 women with stage I and II of breast cancer diagnosis were followed one year after modified radical mastectomy. To measure the quality of life an instrument designed by the European organization for research and treatment of cancer, known as the Quality of Life Question (QLQ-30) and it's breast cancer supplementary measure (QLQ-BR23) at three points in time (before, immediately and two months after intervention) for both groups were used. The participant selection was a convenient sampling method and women were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups. The experimental group was randomly assigned to five groups and peer educators conducted weekly educational programs for one month. Tabulated data were analyzed using chi square, t test, and repeated measurement multivariate to compare the quality of life differences over time. Results For the experimental group, the results showed statistically significant improvement in all performance aspects of life quality and symptom reduction (P < 0.001), while the control group had no significant differences in all aspects of life quality. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that peer led education is a useful intervention for post-mastectomy women to improves their quality of life. PMID:20653966

  9. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Methods/Design Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of the Home Care Program carried out in 8 Primary Care Centers (Spain). These patients are dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and have caregivers. The socioeconomic and educational characteristics of the patient and the caregiver are recorded. On a schedule of 0612 months, patients are evaluated as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), food intake, dentures, degree of dependency (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), mood status (Yesavage test), and anthropometric and serum parameters of nutritional status: albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, lymphocyte count, iron, and ferritin. Prior to the intervention, the educational procedure and the design of educational material are standardized among nurses. The nurses conduct an initial session for caregivers and then monitor the education impact at home every month (4 visits) up to 6 months. The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) methodology will be used. The investigators will study the effect of the intervention with caregivers on the patients nutritional status using the MNA test, diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters. Bivariate normal test statistics and multivariate models will be created to adjust the effect of the intervention. The SPSS/PC program will be used for statistical analysis. Discussion The nutritional status of dependent patients has been little studied. This study allows us to know nutritional risk from different points of view: diet, anthropometry and biochemistry in dependent patients at nutritional risk and to assess the effect of a nutritional education intervention. The design with random allocation, inclusion of all patients, validated methods, caregivers education and standardization between nurses allows us to obtain valuable information about nutritional status and prevention. Trial Registration number Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01360775 PMID:22625878

  10. Establishing a culture for patient safety - the role of education.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Frank J

    2007-02-01

    This paper argues that the process of making significant moves towards a patient safety culture requires changes in healthcare education. Improvements in patient safety are a shared international priority as too many errors and other forms of unnecessary harm are currently occurring in the process of caring for and treating patients. A description of the patient safety agenda is given followed by a brief analysis of human factors theory and its use in other safety critical industries, most notably aviation. The all too common problem of drug administration errors is used to illustrate the relevance of human factors theory to healthcare education with specific mention made of the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS). PMID:16713030

  11. Draping Education to Promote Patient Dignity: Canadian Physiotherapy Student and Instructor Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicole; Lusty, Christopher; Averns, Henry; Hopman, Wilma

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the perceptions of educators and students in Canadian entry-level professional physiotherapy programmes with respect to the current draping curriculum and the methods of delivery of that content and to determine if there is a need for additional draping education time and resources in these programmes. Methods: Canadian university physiotherapy students (n=127) and educators (n=183) completed questionnaires designed by the authors. Data were collected via Survey Monkey, exported as Excel files, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson chi-square analysis. Results: Students and educators agreed that dignity as a concept and draping as a skill to protect patient dignity are both important and should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. Respondents also agreed that students often have difficulty with draping. Educators identified barriers to teaching draping while students identified components of an effective educational resource on draping. Conclusions: To enhance the development of effective draping skills among entry-level physiotherapists, draping education should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. An effective draping educational resource should be developed for educators and students. PMID:23450117

  12. In Your Own Words: Toward a More Perfect Union of Patient Care and Education.

    PubMed

    Tribble, Curt; Merrill, Walter H

    2016-03-01

    Communication with patients and their families is a challenge for busy trainees. It is essential, however, that these trainees learn effective communication skills to create rapport with their patients, to add to their own satisfaction in caring for these patients and to use these conversations to constantly reassess their plans for treating their patients. Reflecting on the plans for and the outcomes of the care of their patients will also significantly enhance the educational value of the participation of trainees in this patient care, while simultaneously improving the care of both their current and their future patients. Finally, gaining facility in elaborating on their plans for and the delivery of patient care will help trainees become more articulate and thoughtful practitioners. PMID:26897183

  13. [The cure of type 2 diabetes and patient education].

    PubMed

    Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Correia, J C; Sittarame, F; Miganne, G; Lasserre Moutet, A; Golay, A

    2015-03-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a potentially reversible disease. Patient education encompasses a deep investment of the health care providers, who with the aid of pedagogic tools, help the pa tient commit to this path. This facilitates the learning of uncommon knowledge and skills required. Whether or not it leads to a complete remission of the disease may not be the main purpose. The main goal lies in the patient's motivation to learn and change on a long term basis. PMID:26027202

  14. Estimation of Unreimbursed Patient Education Costs at a Large Group Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Arthur R.; McDougall, John C.; Bruggeman, Sandra K.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Kroshus, Margo E.; Naessens, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: A search of the literature on the cost of patient education found that provider education time per patient per day was rarely reported and usually not derivable from published reports. Costs of continuing education needed by health professionals to support patient education also were not given. Without this information, it is…

  15. Patient Education and Health Promotion: Clinical Health Promotion--The Conceptual Link.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraher, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Presents a model linking health promotion, health education, and patient education. The bases for distinctions between health education, patient education, and clinical health promotion are examined. The linking elements of the model are patient role, relationships adopted, and focus of the encounter; i.e., disease process vs. disease management.…

  16. Effectiveness of E-learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M.; Clifford, Rhonda M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

  17. A Meta-Analysis of Continuing Medical Education Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansouri, Maliheh; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: We undertook a meta-analysis of the Continuing Medical Education (CME) outcome literature to examine the effect of moderator variables on physician knowledge, performance, and patient outcomes. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE and ERIC was conducted for randomized controlled trials and experimental design studies of CME

  18. Keys to educator effectiveness in radiology.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2006-05-01

    Knowing what makes an educator effective is a key step in becoming an effective educator. There is a paucity of literature on this subject related specifically to radiology, but the tenets of effective teaching and learning can be applied to all educational domains. The desired outcome of all educators is motivation of students to learn. Put in this perspective, the primary role of the teacher is that of a facilitator. The teacher must possess enough knowledge in his or her domain to demonstrate credibility to students. He or she must be able to create effective learning environments and effectively communicate with students. In addition to demonstrating these and other skills, an effective educator must act as a role model for professional behavior. By doing so, he or she encourages students to become life-long learners who will make positive contributions to the world in which they live and work. PMID:16627205

  19. [A patient-expert in patient education. The story of practice].

    PubMed

    Helle, Patrick; Clavagnier, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    The notion of patient-expert has existed in France since the years 2000 and has been used by patients' associations, notably the Association François Aupetit (AFA). Patrick Helle, who suffers from a chronic inflammatory disease, holds a degree in therapeutic education. He organizes and hosts workshops on this topic, alone or in cooperation with healthcare professionals at three public hospitals. This patient-expert serves as a bridge between caregivers and patients, sharing his experience as a patient and transmitting experiential knowledge. He shares his story with us. PMID:26455619

  20. What happens when patients know more than their doctors? Experiences of health interactions after diabetes patient education: a qualitative patient-led study

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Rosamund; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of patient education on the lives of people with diabetes, including the effect on interactions with doctors and other healthcare professionals. Design Qualitative user-led study using longitudinal interviews and 146 h of participant observation. Data were analysed using a narrative approach. Participants 21 patients with type 1 diabetes, those either about to attend a patient education course or those who had completed the course in the previous 10 years. Setting Established patient education centres in three UK teaching hospitals teaching the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) course. Results Both postcourse and several years later, most participants spoke of the experience of taking part in education as life-changingly positive. It helped them understand how to gain control over a very complex disease and freed them from dependence on medical advice and restrictive regimes. However, interactions within the health system following patient education could be fraught. Participants emerged from the course with greater condition-specific knowledge than many of the healthcare professionals they encountered. When these professionals did not understand what their patients were trying to do and were uncomfortable trusting their expertise, there could be serious consequences for these patients' ability to continue effective self-management. Conclusions Patients who have in-depth knowledge of their condition encounter problems when their expertise is seen as inappropriate in standard healthcare interactions, and expertise taught to patients in one branch of medicine can be considered non-compliant by those who are not specialists in that field. Although patient education can give people confidence in their own self-management skills, it cannot solve the power imbalance that remains when a generalist healthcare professional, however well meaning, blocks access to medication and supplies needed to manage chronic diseases successfully. There is a role for those involved in primary and hospital care, including those supporting and training healthcare professionals, to recognise these problems and find ways to acknowledge and respect chronic patients' biomedical and practical expertise. PMID:24231459

  1. Quality assessment of online patient education resources for peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hansberry, David R; Suresh, Ragha; Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2013-03-01

    Given its practicality, the internet is a primary resource for patients afflicted with diseases like peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, it is important that the readily available online resources on peripheral neuropathy are tailored to the general public, particularly concerning readability. Patient education resources were downloaded from the US National Library of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Neuropathy.org, GBS/CIDP Foundation International, Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association, Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy, and Neuropathy Action Foundation websites. All patient education material related to peripheral neuropathy was evaluated for its level of readability using the Flesch Reading Ease (FRE) and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level. The FRE scores averaged 43.4 with only the US National Library of Medicine scoring above 60 (76.5). The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level scores averaged 11.0. All scores were above a seventh-grade level except the US National Library of Medicine, which had a score of a fifth-grade reading level. Most Americans may not fully benefit from patient education resources concerning peripheral neuropathy education on many of the websites. Only the US National Library of Medicine, which is written at a fifth-grade level, is likely to benefit the average American. PMID:23521643

  2. The Use of Readability Formulas in Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Paul J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the SMOG readability formula scores of currently available patient education materials. It was hypothesized that the reading level of the materials would be higher than 7.5, the reading level of the average American citizen; and that there would be a significant reduction in the measured document reading levels…

  3. The Development of Kidney Stone Dietary Plans for Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Darwin; Mayo, M. Leah; Abraham, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Currently patient education programs and urology practices provide individuals with "lists of foods to avoid" for dietary management of kidney stones. However, "planned diets" that include daily meal plans and recipes provide structure and specificity for diet management and are preferred by many individuals. This article describes the development…

  4. The Use of Readability Formulas in Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Paul J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the SMOG readability formula scores of currently available patient education materials. It was hypothesized that the reading level of the materials would be higher than 7.5, the reading level of the average American citizen; and that there would be a significant reduction in the measured document reading levels

  5. Standardized Patients in Art Therapy Education: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Helen; Deaver, Sarah; Johansson, Mark; Calisch, Abby

    2013-01-01

    Simulation is used widely in medical and health professions educational programs. Standardized patients (SPs) are individuals who are trained to simulate specific symptoms or conditions as part of a structured learning experience with students. In this qualitative, phenomenological study the researcher interviewed 8 first-year graduate art therapy

  6. Standardized Patients in Art Therapy Education: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Helen; Deaver, Sarah; Johansson, Mark; Calisch, Abby

    2013-01-01

    Simulation is used widely in medical and health professions educational programs. Standardized patients (SPs) are individuals who are trained to simulate specific symptoms or conditions as part of a structured learning experience with students. In this qualitative, phenomenological study the researcher interviewed 8 first-year graduate art therapy…

  7. Educating and Informing Patients Receiving Psychopharmacological Medications: Are Family Physicians in Pakistan up to the Task?

    PubMed Central

    Ganatra, Hammad Ashraf; Bhurgri, Hadi; Channa, Roomasa; Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Chaudhry, Rafia Ishfaq; Batool, Syeda Hina; Basit, Abdul; Asghar, Mehmood; Saleem, Sarah; Naqvi, Haider

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown a high prevalence of psychiatric illnesses among patients in primary health care settings. Family physicians have a fundamental role in managing psychiatric illness with psychopharmacological medications. Providing information about the disease, its management and the potential adverse effects of the medications is an important part of the management of mental illnesses. Our objective was to determine if patients who were prescribed psychopharmacological drugs by family physicians at a community health center in Karachi, Pakistan were provided adequate education about their disease and its management. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Community Health Centre (CHC), Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. Details about the prescriptions and patient education were acquired from the patients after their consultations. Results A total of 354 adult patients were interviewed during 3 days. Among them, 73 (20.6%) were prescribed psychopharmacological medications. Among patients receiving psychopharmacological medicines, 37 (50.7%) did not know their diagnosis; 50 (68.5%) were unaware of the disease process; 52 (71.2%) were unaware of alternative treatments; 63 (86.3%) were not cautioned about the potential adverse effects of the drugs; 24 (32.9%) were unaware of the duration of treatment and in 60 (82.2%) of the participants an appropriate referral had not been discussed. For all aspects of education, patients prescribed psychopharmacological medications knew less as compared to those patients that were prescribed other medications. Discussion The practice of imparting information to patients who receive psychopharmacological medications seems to be inadequate in Pakistan. We have hypothesized about the possible reasons for our findings, and identified a need for further research to determine the cause for such findings and to address them accordingly. At the same time there is a need to educate family physicians in Pakistan about the special importance of providing adequate information to such patients. PMID:19247488

  8. Numerical distance effect in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pourrahimi, Ali Mohammad; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Shabani, Mohammad; Tabrizi, Yousef Moghadas; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-03-23

    There is growing evidence showing that mental representation of numbers is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Yet, no study has examined the distance effect in the patients. We assessed the distance effect using two number size comparison tasks, with different number references (5 and 7) in 23 patients and 28 healthy individuals. Response times and error rates significantly increased when the distances between the centered references and the targets decreased in both groups. However, patients responded significantly slower and had more error rates compared to controls. Our finding indicates distance effect in patients is similar to the controls, indicating an automatic numerical processing is preserved in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26845561

  9. Aid Effectiveness in Education: Why It Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermingham, Desmond; Christensen, Olav Rex; Mahn, Timo Casjen

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue of "Prospects" on "Aid effectiveness in education". It brings together case studies of attempts in several very different contexts to improve the effectiveness of the use of aid in the education sector. By drawing on the historical evolution of the new paradigm over the last 20 years, the authors make the

  10. Profile of an Effective Urban Music Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of an effective urban music educator in an effort to provide strategies for university teacher training programs to prepare students to teach in urban schools. The study examined urban music teachers' (N = 158) educational background, effective and ineffective characteristics, perceived

  11. Profile of an Effective Urban Music Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of an effective urban music educator in an effort to provide strategies for university teacher training programs to prepare students to teach in urban schools. The study examined urban music teachers' (N = 158) educational background, effective and ineffective characteristics, perceived…

  12. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance

  13. Effective Online Instruction in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford-Ferre, Heather Glynn; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2012-01-01

    Online education has emerged as an effective and increasingly common alternative to face-to-face instruction in postsecondary education. This article is a summary of effective practices in online instructional methods, including course design, interaction among course participants, and instructor preparation and support.

  14. Developing Effective Drug Education Programs. Fastback 332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Lowell

    This booklet discusses obstacles to effective drug education programs and suggests components that should be included in order to ensure effective programs. The first section presents six questions to ask of one's drug education program, noting that a poorly conceived program can do more harm than good. The second section focuses on convincing

  15. Bootstrapping Results of Exercise Therapy and Education for Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witta, E. Lea; Brubaker, Craig

    2003-01-01

    When studies are conducted over a period of time, the sample size typically decreases. In a study of the effects of exercise therapy and education with recovering congestive heart failure (CHF) patients (Brubaker, Witta, & Angelopoulus, 2003), the sample size decreased from over 40 to 9 participants after an 18-month time span. Although the…

  16. Effects of Patient Navigation on Patient Satisfaction Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Post, Douglas M; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Young, Gregory S; Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Plascak, Jesse J; Paskett, Electra D

    2015-12-01

    Patient navigation (PN) may reduce cancer health disparities. Few studies have investigated the effects of PN on patient-reported satisfaction with care or assessed patients' satisfaction with navigators. The objectives of this study are to test the effects of PN on patient satisfaction with cancer care, assess patients' satisfaction with navigators, and examine the impact of barriers to care on satisfaction for persons with abnormal cancer-related screening tests or symptoms. Study participants included women and men with abnormal breast, cervical, or colorectal cancer screening tests and/or symptoms receiving care at 18 clinics. Navigated (n=416) and non-navigated (n=292) patients completed baseline and end-of-study measures. There was no significant difference between navigated and non-navigated patients in change in patient satisfaction with cancer care from baseline to exit. African-American (p<0.001), single (p=0.03), low income (p<0.01), and uninsured patients (p<0.001) were significantly less likely to report high patient satisfaction at baseline. A significant effect was found for change in satisfaction over time by employment status (p=0.04), with full-time employment showing the most improvement. The interaction between satisfaction with navigators and satisfaction with care over time was marginally significant (p=0.08). Baseline satisfaction was lower for patients who reported a barrier to care (p=0.02). Patients reporting other-focused barriers (p=0.03), including transportation (p=0.02), had significantly lower increases in satisfaction over time. Overall, results suggested that assessing barriers to cancer care and tailoring navigation to barrier type could enhance patients' experiences with health care. PN may have positive effects for healthcare organizations struggling to enhance quality of care. PMID:25510369

  17. Patient and staff assessment of an audiovisual education tool for head and neck radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Morley, Lyndon; McAndrew, Alison; Tse, Karen; Rakaric, Peter; Cummings, Bernard; Cashell, Angela

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand and compare patient and staff perceptions of a video-based preparatory education tool for head and neck radiotherapy. Patients and staff completed a questionnaire assessing their perceptions of whether the education tool was relevant, clear, complete and reassuring. Staff rated the video's accuracy and anticipated impact on future patient information needs. Demographic information was collected. Open-ended questions were used to elicit additional feedback. Quantitative responses from 50 patients and 48 staff were very positive and not significantly different between the two groups. Content analysis of the qualitative data provided insight into the information and approaches valued by patients and staff and how these differed. Staff members were more critical of the production quality and completeness of information related to procedures and treatment side effects. Patients valued seeing procedures acted out and desired more information about what these experiences would feel like and how to engage in self-care. Although staff-driven development may be an effective method of designing the content and approach of a preparatory education video, care should be taken to consider differences between patient and staff perceptions of information needs. PMID:23784367

  18. Social and educational resources for patients with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Packer, L E

    1997-05-01

    Patients with Tourette syndrome may experience significant behavioral, academic, social, and vocational difficulty. Early diagnosis and a comprehensive treatment plan which includes the school and family may prevent exacerbation of tic symptoms and behavior problems. Since the extent of impairment frequently is unrelated to the severity of any observed or reported tics, clinicians evaluating a child or adolescent who presents with tics or a history of tics should include assessment of family dynamics, a description of any school-based or peer problems, and an evaluation for motor deficits as well as determination of whether features of any associated or comorbid disorders are present. The clinician provides vital services as an educator and advocate for the patient and as a guide in directing the family and patient to available social, educational, and vocational resources. PMID:9115475

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Trials Evaluating Patient Education and Counseling for Three Groups of Preventive Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Simons-Morton, Denise G.; Ramirez, Gilbert; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Green, Lawrence W.; Mains, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The overall effectiveness of patient education and counseling on preventive health behaviors was examined across published clinical trials, 1971-1994. The effectiveness of various approaches for modifying specific types of behaviors among patients without diagnosed disease was assessed. Multiple regression models indicated differences among

  20. Outcomes in Registered, Ongoing Randomized Controlled Trials of Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Cécile; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life). Methods On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1) patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2) surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. Principal Findings We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333) of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623) of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150) used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150) as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150), primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61) of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59) in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22) in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months). Conclusions There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs. PMID:22916183

  1. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  2. Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: patient education, information and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Gignon, Maxime; Traulle, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) are implanted increasingly frequently. CIEDs are indicated for the treatment of bradycardia, tachycardia and heart failure and therefore improve quality of life and life expectancy. CIED can treat ventricular arrhythmias that would be fatal without immediate care. However, CIEDs raise several patient education, medico-legal, and ethical questions that will be addressed in this article. Information is a patient's right, and necessary for informed consent. When implanting a CIED, the patient must be educated about the need for the device, the function of the device, any restrictions that apply postimplant, and postimplant follow-up methods and schedules. This transfer of information to the patient makes the patient responsible. The occupational physician can determine whether a patient wearing a CIED is able to work. Under current French law, patients are not prohibited from working while wearing a CIED. However, access to certain job categories remains limited, such as jobs involving mechanical stress to the chest, exposure to electromagnetic fields, or jobs requiring permanent vigilance. Pacemakers and defibrillators are medical treatments and are subject to the same ethical and clinical considerations as any other treatment. However, stopping a pacemaker or a defibrillator raises different ethical issues. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator shocks can be considered to be equivalent to resuscitation efforts and can be interpreted as being unreasonable in an end-of-life patient. Pacing is painless and it is unlikely to unnecessarily prolong the life of a patient with a terminal disease. Patients with a CIED should live as normally as possible, but must also be informed about the constraints related to the device and must inform each caregiver about the presence of the device. The forensic and ethical implications must be assessed in relation to current legislation. PMID:23248837

  3. Effective Use of Resources in State Higher Education: Graduate Education, Community Colleges, Education for Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    The papers in this volume were delivered at a Symposium on the "Effective Use of Resources in State Higher Education" at the annual meeting of the Southern Regional Education Board in Houston, Texas, June 11-12, 1970. The papers deal with three general subjects: (1) the orderly development of graduate education; (2) evaluating the community junior…

  4. Implementing a patient education intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention and effect on knowledge and behavior in veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Charlesnika T.; Hill, Jennifer N.; Guihan, Marylou; Chin, Amy; Goldstein, Barry; Richardson, Michael S. A.; Anderson, Vicki; Risa, Kathleen; Kellie, Susan; Cameron, Kenzie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and effect of a nurse-administered patient educational intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevention on knowledge and behavior of Veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Design Blinded, block-randomized controlled pilot trial. Setting Two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) SCI Centers. Participants Veterans were recruited March–September 2010 through referral by a healthcare provider from inpatient, outpatient, and residential care settings. Intervention Thirty participants were randomized to the nurse-administered intervention and 31 to the usual care group. The intervention included a brochure and tools to assist nurses in conducting the education. Outcome measures Pre- and post-intervention measurement of knowledge and behaviors related to MRSA and prevention strategies and feasibility measures related to implementation. Results Participants were primarily male (95.1%), white (63.9%), with tetraplegia (63.9%) and mean age and duration of injury of 64.3 and 20.5 years, respectively. The intervention groups mean knowledge score significantly increased between pre- and post-test (mean change score = 1.70, 95% confidence interval, CI 0.25–3.15) while the usual care groups score did not significantly change (mean change score = 1.45, 95% CI −0.08–2.98). However, the mean knowledge change between intervention and usual care groups was not significantly different (P = 0.81). Overall behavior scores did not significantly differ between treatment groups; however, the intervention group was more likely to report intentions to clean hands (90.0% vs. 64.5%, P = 0.03) and asking providers about MRSA status (46.7% vs. 16.1%, P = 0.01). Nurse educators reported that the quality of the intervention was high and could be implemented in clinical care. Conclusions A targeted educational strategy is feasible to implement in SCI/D clinical practices and may improve some participants’ knowledge about MRSA and increase intentions to improve hand hygiene and engagement with providers about their MRSA status. PMID:24090538

  5. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication. PMID:25847051

  6. Effective writing that attracts patients.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Doctors today not only must communicate verbally, they must also realize that the written word is important to their ability to connect with the patients that they already have and also to attract new patients. Doctors will be expected to write blogs, to create content for their Web sites, to write articles for local publications, and even to learn to express themselves in 140 characters or less (i.e., Twitter). This article presents 10 rules for selecting the right words to enhance your communication with existing patients and potentially to attract new patients to your practice. PMID:26062324

  7. Development and validation of a theory-based multimedia application for educating Persian patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Feizalahzadeh, Hossein; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Moghaddasi, Hamid; Farahani, Mansoureh A; Khosrovshahi, Hamid Tayebi; Zareh, Zahra; Mortazavi, Fakhrsadat

    2014-05-01

    Although patients on hemodialysis require effective education for self-care, several issues associated with the process raise barriers that make learning difficult. Computer-based education can reduce these problems and improve the quality of education. This study aims to develop and validate a theory-based multimedia application to educate Persian patients on hemodialysis. The study consisted of five phases: (1) content development, (2) prototype development 1, (3) evaluation by users, (4) evaluation by a multidisciplinary group of experts, and (5) prototype development 2. Data were collected through interviews and literature review with open-ended questions and two survey forms that consisted of a five-level scale. In the Results section, patient needs on hemodialysis self-care and related content were categorized into seven sections, including kidney function and failure, hemodialysis, vascular access, nutrition, medication, physical activity, and living with hemodialysis. The application designed includes seven modules consisting of user-controlled small multimedia units. During navigation through this application, the users were provided step-by-step information on self-care. Favorable scores were obtained from evaluations by users and experts. The researchers concluded that this application can facilitate hemodialysis education and learning process for the patients by focusing on their self-care needs using the multimedia design principles. PMID:24642877

  8. [Health education in transplant patients and their families in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Pueyo-Garrigues, M; San Martín Loyola, Á; Caparrós Leal, M C; Jiménez Muñoz, C

    2016-01-01

    Health Education (HE) is extremely important in transplant patients and their families in order to promote suitable self-care in this new stage of life. Intensive Care Units offer various opportunities by nurses in order to improve their Health Education. This process could start in this unit where the interaction between nurse and family is constant. The HE of transplant patient includes three dimensions: Knowledge: information about self-care in order to have a healthy way of life, and getting some information on how to reduce anxiety in patients and their families; Skills: as regards the abilities to properly apply the Health Education, where the families are really important; and finally Attitudes: ambivalent attitudes that are experienced by transplant patients. The objective is to describe the level of development of HE for critical transplant patients and their families from Intensive Care Units. A non-systematic literature review was performed in Pubmed and CINHAL data bases. In conclusion, it is emphasised that the skill of the HE nurse in an Intensive Care Units is important to promote lifestyles appropriate to the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of transplant patients. Its implementation entails positive effects on clinical outcomes of the patient, decreased morbidity and mortality, costs, and health resources. PMID:26810953

  9. A Pilot Project to Develop and Assess a Health Education Programme for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atak, Nazli; Arslan, Umit

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The current research was designed to develop a health education programme for type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the Taba-Tyler model and to evaluate its effect. Design: The study was quasi-experimental in design. Setting: Fifty-five patients from the Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, University Hospital of Ankara. Method: An education

  10. How Effective Are Outdoor Education Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Twelve classes of students in grades 4 through 6 studied beaver ecology, either at an outdoor-education center near Toronto or in the classroom. Results indicate that outdoor education was more effective in promoting students' cognitive achievement than classroom study, but did not confirm the popular belief that outdoor programs influence…

  11. Designing Educational Social Machines for Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee-King, Matthew; Krivenski, Maria; Brenton, Harry; Grimalt-Reynes, Andreu; d'Inverno, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report on our development of an educational social machine based on the concept that feedback in communities is an effective means to support the development of communities of learning and practice. Key challenges faced by this work are how best to support educational and social interactions, how to deliver personalised tuition, and how to…

  12. Review of the Effects of Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geboers, Ellen; Geijsel, Femke; Admiraal, Wilfried; ten Dam, Geert

    2013-01-01

    Based on the assumption that schools can play a significant role in the citizenship development of students, in most contemporary modern societies schools are obligated to provide citizenship education. However, the effectiveness of different forms of citizenship education is still unclear. From the empirical literature on citizenship over the

  13. The Effects of Student Higher Education Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegfried, John J.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies higher education subsidy concerns and evalutates two papers on student financial assistance in this "Economics of Education Review" issue. Faults Ehrenberg and Luzadis for not addressing the Social Security Student Benefit Progam's effect on college attendance decisions and wealth neutrality. Criticizes Schwartz's paper for excluding

  14. Towards a Theory on Educational Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert P. M.

    Research on school effectiveness has shown that schools differ in regard to outcomes of comparable groups of students. Some schools are found to be more effective than others and these more effective schools have identifiable characteristics that help them excel. Outcomes measured to determine educational effectiveness include basic skills and…

  15. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer H; Austin, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ). Patients and methods One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records. Results Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients’ understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this. Conclusion A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non-inferior knowledge to those seen in standard clinics. PMID:25987832

  16. A health/patient education database for family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P A; Ruby, C; Craig, M D

    1991-01-01

    Using pilot project funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation (AAFP/F) developed a program by which health/patient education print materials were reviewed. Favorably reviewed materials were entered into a database accessible through the AAFP/F's Huffington Library. The review service and resulting database were designed to help the busy clinician identify scientifically accurate, reliable materials for use in patient education. The review process developed for the project is described, as is the database and its use by family physicians. Research findings from the pilot project are discussed, some of which assisted in planning the self-supporting second phase of the program. PMID:1958908

  17. Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Jennifer M.; Sorenson, James R.; Bowling, J. Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

    2005-01-01

    The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of

  18. Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Jennifer M.; Sorenson, James R.; Bowling, J. Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

    2005-01-01

    The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of…

  19. Quality Assessment of Spinal Cord Injury Patient Education Resources.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Singh, Priyanka L; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-04-01

    Study Design. Analysis of spinal cord injury patient education resources.Objective. To assess the quality of online patient education materials written about spinal cord injury.Summary of Background Data. The use of online materials by healthcare consumers to access medical information presents unique challenges. Most Americans have access to the Internet and frequently turn to it as a first-line resource.Methods. The quality of online patient education materials was evaluated via a readability analysis. Materials provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS); Centers for Disease Control (CDC); American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS); National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA); Mayo Clinic (Mayo); Department of Veterans Affairs (VA); Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (Kessler); American Academy of Neurology (AAN); Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA); and the Shepherd Center (SC) were assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level evaluations with Microsoft Office Word software. Unnecessary formatting was removed and the readability was evaluated with the Spelling and Grammar function.Results. A total of 104 sections from 10 different websites were analyzed. Overall, the average values of the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (11.9) and Flesch Reading Ease (40.2) indicated that most Americans would not be able to fully comprehend this material.Conclusion. Results indicate that the language used on materials provided by the aforementioned sites is perhaps too advanced for the average American to fully comprehend. The quality of these education resources may be improved via website revisions, which might be beneficial for improved patient utilization. PMID:24718059

  20. Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brahm, Carl-Otto; Lundgren, Jesper; Carlsson, Sven G; Nilsson, Peter; Hultqvist, Johanna; Hgglin, Catharina

    2013-06-01

    The aims were to explore dentists' skills in dental fear, current strategies when treating fearful adult patients, and the possible need for additional education among dentists working in Sweden. A sample of 1,293 members of the Association of Public Health Dentists in Sweden were asked to respond to a Web survey concerning dental fear. The response rate was 69% (n = 889); 91% trained in Sweden and 9% trained in another country. The most frequently used pharmacological anxiety-reducing techniques were medication with a midazolame mixture (72%) and benzodiazepine tablets (77%), and the most commonly used psychological techniques were relaxation (68%), distraction (66%), and Tell-Show-Do (86%). A larger proportion of dentists trained in Sweden, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries, reported that they had received undergraduate training in dental fear. Dentists trained in Sweden more often reported competence in pharmacological and psychological anxiety-reducing techniques, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries. Higher levels of self-rated efficacy in treating fearful patients accompanied additional education in dental fear after graduation. In conclusion, Swedish dentists use a variety of techniques to meet the needs of fearful dental patients. Competence in anxiety-reducing techniques is associated with self-efficacy and the site of education. PMID:23659263

  1. What can virtual patient simulation offer mental health nursing education?

    PubMed

    Guise, V; Chambers, M; Vlimki, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of simulation in nursing education and training, including potential benefits and barriers associated with its use. In particular, it addresses the hitherto scant application of diverse simulation devices and dedicated simulation scenarios in psychiatric and mental health nursing. It goes on to describe a low-cost, narrative-based virtual patient simulation technique which has the potential for wide application within health and social care education. An example of the implementation of this technology in a web-based pilot course for acute mental health nurses is given. This particular virtual patient technique is a simulation type ideally suited to promoting essential mental health nursing skills such as critical thinking, communication and decision making. Furthermore, it is argued that it is particularly amenable to e-learning and blended learning environments, as well as being an apt tool where multilingual simulations are required. The continued development, implementation and evaluation of narrative virtual patient simulations across a variety of health and social care programmes would help ascertain their success as an educational tool. PMID:22070549

  2. The Economic Effects of Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, William G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    As long as vocational education is presented as an investment in the future, it must stand the test of economic evaluation. Research on its economic effectiveness is essential to more informed public policy and support for vocational programs. (SK)

  3. Is patient education helpful in providing care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A qualitative study involving French nurses.

    PubMed

    Fall, Estelle; Chakroun, Nadia; Dalle, Nathalie; Izaute, Marie

    2013-09-01

    This French study explored nurses' involvement in patient education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study design was qualitative. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital nurses. Data analysis was performed according to Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method, and supported by specific qualitative analysis software (Sphinx). The results showed the important role of hospital nurses in rheumatoid arthritis care. Patient education is a core part of nurses' work, allowing them to give patients information and emotional support. The interviewees displayed skills in helping patients learn to care for themselves. However, patient education mostly concerned patients who are already committed to their health care. Non-adherent patients warrant special attention; their acceptance of their disease, perceptions about disease and treatment, motivation, and autonomy should be specifically addressed. French nurses could benefit from more training, and could be aided by psychologists. Ambulatory services could also be developed for patient education in France, based on examples from other countries. PMID:23480278

  4. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based

  5. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since

  6. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

  7. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

  8. Quality Physical Education: A Commentary on Effective Physical Education Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term "quality teaching" rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the

  9. Iranian nurses and nursing students' attitudes on barriers and facilitators to patient education: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Raheb; Soleimani, Mohsen; Zeinali, Mohammad-Reza; Davaji, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the attitudes of Iranian nurses and students on barriers and facilitators to patient education. In this descriptive quantitative study, 103 nurses and 84 nursing students in two teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran responded to a questionnaire investigating their attitudes on patient education. Results showed that all nurses and the majority (87.3%) of the students mentioned that they performed patient education. Moreover, 95% and 63.3% of the nurses and students respectively accepted that patient education was one of their roles. The nurses stated that heavy workload, inadequate time and lack of educational facilities were main barriers to patient education. The students believed that lack of knowledge, lack of communication skills and heavy workload were main barriers to patient education from their perspectives. While Iranian nurses and nursing students had positive attitudes towards patient education, it could not guarantee the implementation of patient education. Therefore, the clarification of patient education activities and development of a patient education team with the support of healthcare settings' administrators can facilitate the process of patient education in the Iranian healthcare settings. PMID:25023615

  10. The effect of health education video on ocular massage after trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Hua, Liu; Yingjuan, Lv; Jingshu, Zhao; Wei, Cao

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different ocular massage health education methods on ocular massage in glaucoma patients after trabeculectomy. Eighty-six patients with glaucoma after trabeculectomy (86 eyes) were randomly divided into two health education groups. One group was a watch video group (43 patients, 43 eyes), while the other was an orally taught health education group (43 patients, 43 eyes). Patients were followed up for 1 week, 1 month, and 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge. Records of the patient responses after health education, compliance of patients with follow-up, and intraocular pressure were determined. Measurements included intraocular pressure and differences between the watch video and orally taught health education groups. The differences between the watch video group and orally taught health education group were not statistically significant at 1 week and 1 month, while the differences were statistically significant at 3, 6, and 12 months. The results indicated that health education videos can enable glaucoma patients to have a better mastery of ocular massage after trabeculectomy. According to the needs of patients, health education video use produced good results and should be promoted. PMID:24937652

  11. Behavior modification for orthodontic patients: an exploratory approach to patient education.

    PubMed

    Rich, S K

    1980-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore the usefulness of a behavior modification approach in changing oral hygiene habits of orthodontic patients. Two orthodontists identified patients in their practice who exhibited excessive plaque formation and inflammation and referred them to a health educator/dental hygienist. The health education program was subsequently presented to fifty-three patients, 8 to 18 years of age. Three counseling sessions with parental participation were scheduled approximately 2 weeks apart. The program consisted of a model for counseling, a rising and retiring survey to identify home routines, a list of "possible reinforcers" geared toward preteen interests, a monitoring card to record toothbrushing behavior, and a contract signed by both parent and child. Behavioral change in oral hygiene habits was measured through general assessment of toothbrushing technique, plaque accumulation, and soft-tissue appearance. Change in frequency of brushing was measured by patient self-monitoring. Patient and parental comments, as well as educator reactions, were considered in the over-all evaluation of the project. PMID:6933851

  12. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use. PMID:24313072

  13. Nurse led Patient Education Programme for patients undergoing a lung resection for primary lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increase in the number of patients undergoing lung resection for primary or suspected primary lung cancer in the UK due to improved staging techniques, dedicated thoracic surgeons and other initiatives such as preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation. This has had an impact on local healthcare resources requiring new ways of delivering thoracic surgical services. When considering service changes, patient reported outcomes are pivotal in terms of ensuring that the experience of care is enhanced and may include elements such as involving patients in their care, reducing the length of inpatient stay and reducing postoperative complications. The implementation of a thoracic surgical Patient Education Programme (PEP) has the potential to address these measures and improve the psychological and physical wellbeing of patients who require a lung resection. It may also assist in their care as an inpatient and to enhance recovery after surgery both in the short and long term. PMID:25984358

  14. Online virtual patients - A driver for change in medical and healthcare professional education in developing countries?

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, David; Borgstein, Eric; Grant, Mary E; Begg, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The development of online virtual patients has proved to be an effective vehicle for pedagogical and technological skills transfer and capacity building for medical and healthcare educators in Malawi. A project between the University of Edinburgh and the University of Malawi has delivered more than 20 collaboratively developed, virtual patients, contextualised for in-country medical and healthcare education and, more significantly, a cadre of healthcare professionals skilled in developing digital resources and integrating these into their emerging curricula. The process of engaging with new approaches to teaching and delivering personalised, context sensitive content via a game-informed, technology-supported process has contributed to the ability of healthcare educators in Malawi to drive pedagogical change, meet the substantial challenges of delivering new curricula, cope with increasing student numbers and promote teacher professional development. This initial phase of the project has laid the foundation for a broader second phase that focuses on promoting curriculum change, developing educational infrastructure and in-country capacity to create, and integrate digital resources into education and training across multi-professional groups and across educational levels. PMID:19811208

  15. Patient information and education with modern media: the Spine Society of Europe Patient Line

    PubMed Central

    Sell, P.

    2009-01-01

    The role of the patient as an active partner in health care, and not just a passive object of diagnostic testing and medical treatment, is widely accepted. Providing information to patients is considered a crucial issue and the central focus in patient educational activities. It is necessary to educate patients on the nature of the outcomes and the benefits and risks of the procedures to involve them in the decision-making process and enable them to achieve fully informed consent. Information materials must contain scientifically reliable information and be presented in a form that is acceptable and useful to patients. Given the mismatch between public beliefs and current evidence, strategies for changing the public perceptions are required. Traditional patient education programmes have to face the potential barriers of storage, access problems and the need to keep content materials up to date. A computer-based resource provides many advantages, including just-in-time availability and a private learning environment. The use of the Internet for patient information needs will continue to expand as Internet access becomes readily available. However, the problem is no longer in finding information, but in assessing the credibility and validity of it. Health Web sites should provide health information that is secure and trustworthy. The large majority of the Web sites providing information related to spinal disorders are of limited and poor quality. Patient Line (PL), a patient information section in the Web site of Eurospine, was born in 2005 to offer patients and the general population the accumulated expertise represented by the members of the society and provide up-to-date information related to spinal disorders. In areas where evidence is scarce, Patient Line provides a real-time opinion of the EuroSpine membership. The published data reflect the pragmatic and the common sense range of treatments offered by the Eurospine membership. The first chapters have been dedicated to sciatica, scoliosis, cervical pain syndromes, low back pain and motion preservation surgery. Since 2008, the information has been available in English, German, French and Spanish. The goal is for Patient Line to become THE European patient information Web site on spinal disorders, providing reliable and updated best practice and evidence-based information where the evidence exists. PMID:19381695

  16. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a comprehensive self-management educational program by a cluster randomized trial within inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Furthermore, subgroup-related treatment effects will be explored. Study results will contribute to a better understanding of both the effectiveness and mechanisms of a self-management group program as part of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00004841; WHO International Clinical Trials: = DRKS00004841 PMID:23968340

  17. Leap for Life: innovative patient education to optimize outcomes among patients with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the Leap for Life cardiovascular risk factor education program based on outcome measurements of self-reported hospital readmission, goal achievement, satisfaction, and educational model preference. Setting Four hospitals and one senior center of Baylor Health Care System in the Dallas, Texas, area. Design Administration of a satisfaction questionnaire and resurvey of participants by telephone at 3, 6, and 12 months. Patients 161 patients with cardiovascular disease enrolled in the Leap for Life program during calendar year 1997. Patients were primarily male (59%), with an average age of 66 years; they had an average of 4 cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results Of the 152 participants who took part in the telephone follow-up, 19% reported a hospital admission with a cardiovascular diagnosis during the 12-month follow-up period. Twenty-one percent reported meeting all of their goals; 56%, some of their goals; and 23%, none of their goals. All stated that the educational sessions met their informational needs, and 75% preferred the Leap for Life setting over other educational settings. Conclusion and next steps These data provide initial validation of the program and are being used as a starting point for another assessment that involves individualized health enhancement measures and 6- and 12-month follow-up of participants using a survey designed to assess readiness, lifestyle changes, and quality of life. PMID:16369612

  18. Effectiveness of educational and administrative interventions in medical outpatient clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Pozen, M W; Bonnet, P D

    1976-01-01

    This study examines the popular belief that increased educational supervision and increased administrative support in university outpatient clinics will improve physician performance, which in turn will improve the process and outcome of patient care. Positive effects on house officers' attitudes and better functioning of clinics with respect to follow-up, information retrieval, and prescribing practices were demonstrated. However, no differences in the process and outcome of care were identified by faculty judges using implicit criteria. PMID:175666

  19. Does addition of `mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone.

  20. Does addition of 'mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study.

    PubMed

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone. PMID:25917265

  1. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  2. Role of physiotherapy and patient education in lymphedema control following breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hong, Rong-Bin; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether education in combination with physiotherapy can reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods We analyzed 1,217 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2011 who underwent tumor resection and axillary lymph node dissection. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A (n=415), who received neither education nor physiotherapy postsurgery; Group B (n=672), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery; and Group C (n=130), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery, followed by a physiotherapy program. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether BCRL developed. BCRL risk factors were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During the follow-up, 188 patients (15.4%) developed lymphedema, including 77 (18.6%) in Group A, 101 (15.0%) in Group B, and 10 (7.7%) in Group C (P=0.010). The median period from surgery to lymphedema was 0.54 years (interquartile range =0.18–1.78). The independent risk factors for BCRL included positive axillary lymph node invasion, a higher (>20) number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, and having undergone radiation therapy, whereas receiving an educational program followed by physiotherapy was a protective factor against BCRL (hazard ratio =0.35, 95% confidence interval =0.18–0.67, P=0.002). Conclusion Patient education that begins within the first week postsurgery and is followed by physiotherapy is effective in reducing the risk of BCRL in women with breast cancer. PMID:25750536

  3. Education and implementing evidence-based nursing practice for diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Varaei, Shokoh; Salsali, Mahvash; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Tehrani, Mohammad Reza Mohajeri; Heshmat, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Foot ulceration is one of the most common complications associated with diabetes that needs to be managed. In Iran, prevalence of diabetes foot ulcer is 3%. According to studies, evidence-based nursing (EBN) is an effective alternative to facilitate clinical decision making in patient care and may lead to quality improvement in nursing practice. The aims of this study are to assess the effects of EBN education on the knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses who take care of patient with diabetes foot ulcer. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental study (based on IOWA model as a framework to improve nursing practice) was conducted using a before-and-after design. All of nurses (consisted of 19 baccalaureate nurses) who are working in an endocrinology ward were chosen and taught using EBN approach through different workshops. Before and after educational intervention, the data about nurses knowledge, attitude, and practice were gathered by questionnaire and then compared. The nurses performance in patient care was evaluated in 3 months by one checklist. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There were statistically significant differences in knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses before and after intervention (P = 0.001). The nurses performance in caring for patient with diabetes foot ulcer, based on clinical guideline, showed the improvement in clinical practice. Conclusion: Education of EBN can improve the nurse's knowledge and attitude to EBN, and be used as a basis on which to influence the professional practice of nursing. PMID:23983764

  4. Patient Education Self-Management During Surgical Recovery: Combining Mobile (iPad) and a Content Management System

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S. Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Fischer, Erin N.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and “just-in-time” education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods: Patients were provided with iPad® (Apple®, Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily “to do” list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. Results: A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. Conclusions: We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and “just-in-time” education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models. PMID:24443928

  5. Interprofessional education about patient decision support in specialty care.

    PubMed

    Politi, Mary C; Pieterse, Arwen H; Truant, Tracy; Borkhoff, Cornelia; Jha, Vikram; Kuhl, Laura; Nicolai, Jennifer; Goss, Claudia

    2011-11-01

    Specialty care involves services provided by health professionals who focus on treating diseases affecting one body system. In contrast to primary care - aimed at providing continuous, comprehensive care - specialty care often involves intermittent episodes of care focused around specific medical conditions. In addition, it typically includes multiple providers who have unique areas of expertise that are important in supporting patients' care. Interprofessional care involves multiple professionals from different disciplines collaborating to provide an integrated approach to patient care. For patients to experience continuity of care across interprofessional providers, providers need to communicate and maintain a shared sense of responsibility to their patients. In this article, we describe challenges inherent in providing interprofessional patient decision support in specialty care. We propose ways for providers to engage in interprofessional decision support and discuss promising approaches to teaching an interprofessional decision support to specialty care providers. Additional evaluation and empirical research are required before further recommendations can be made about education for interprofessional decision support in specialty care. PMID:21899397

  6. Impact of Education Provided by Nurses on Quality of Life, Anxiety, and Depression in Patients Receiving Hepatitis C Virus Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Sezgi; Ozdogan, Osman Cavit; Alahdab, Yesim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of education provided by a nurse on quality of life, anxiety, and depression in patients receiving hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy. The total number of patients receiving HCV treatment was 25 patients (18 females and 7 males). Organized patient lectures addressed transmission routes of HCV, effects of virus on the liver, interferon treatment, treatment complications and care, and psychosocial problems faced by patients with HCV and their families. Lectures were followed by interviews in small groups including 3-4 patients each and repeated 3 months after. Data were collected by patient surveys, Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale, and Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey (SF-36). There were no significant differences between pre- and posteducation for the SF-36 domains, namely role physical, health perception, social functioning, role emotion, and mental health, whereas there were significant differences between pre- and posteducation for the SF-36 domains, namely physical function, bodily pain, and vitality. Pre-education depression and anxiety scores were higher than posteducation depression and anxiety scores. Specific educational programs provided by nurses improved patients' quality of life and decreased anxiety and depression in patients receiving HCV therapy. These findings support the importance of educational programs provided by nurses for HCV patients. PMID:26166422

  7. Staffing effectiveness evaluation: a best kept secret for educational needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    Staff development educators use many sources of information to conduct educational needs assessments to improve existing educational programs and to develop new ones. Staffing effectiveness evaluation information targets patient care and staffing outcomes. The overall objective of this article is to familiarize staff development educators with the staffing effectiveness evaluation process, events that have led to organizational efforts to measure it, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations' (JCAHO) expectations, methods for assessing variation and relationships of indicators, and implications for staff development educators. PMID:16331080

  8. Leading Educationally Effective Family-Centered Bedside Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Amonpreet K.; Amin, Harish J.; McLaughlin, Kevin; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    Background Family-centered bedside rounds (family-centered rounds) enable learning and clinical care to occur simultaneously and offer benefits to patients, health care providers, and multiple levels of learners. Objective We used a qualitative approach to understand the dimensions of successful (ie, educationally positive) family-centered rounds from the perspective of attending physicians and residents. Methods We studied rounds in a tertiary academic hospital affiliated with the University of Calgary. Data were collected from 7 focus groups of pediatrics residents and attendings and were analyzed using grounded theory. Results Attending pediatricians and residents described rounds along a spectrum from successful and highly educational to unsuccessful and of low educational value. Perceptions of residents and attendings were influenced by how well the environment, educational priorities, and competing priorities were managed. Effectiveness of the manager was the core variable for successful rounds led by persons who could develop predictable rounds and minimize learner vulnerability. Conclusions Success of family-centered rounds in teaching settings depended on making the education and patient care aims of rounds explicit to residents and attending faculty. The role of the manager in leading rounds also needs to be made explicit. PMID:24455007

  9. Theories on Educational Effectiveness and Ineffectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Following Snow's (1973) description of an "inductive" process of theory formation, this article addresses the organization of the knowledge base on school effectiveness. A multilevel presentation stimulated the conceptualization of educational effectiveness as an integration of system-level, school-level, and classroom-level…

  10. Theories on Educational Effectiveness and Ineffectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Following Snow's (1973) description of an "inductive" process of theory formation, this article addresses the organization of the knowledge base on school effectiveness. A multilevel presentation stimulated the conceptualization of educational effectiveness as an integration of system-level, school-level, and classroom-level

  11. Peer Effects in Higher Education. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Gordon C.; Zimmerman, David J.

    This paper, prepared as a chapter for a forthcoming book, describes the potential significance of student peer effects for the economic structure and behavior of higher education. The existence of student peer effects would motivate much of the restricted supply, student queuing, and selectivity, and institutional competition via merit and honors

  12. The Picture Superiority Effect and Biological Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses learning behaviors where the "picture superiority effect" (PSE) seems to be most effective in biology education. Also considers research methodology and suggests a new research model which allows a more direct examination of the strategies learners use when matching up picture and text in efforts to "understand" biology. (JN)

  13. Effective Teaching in Physical Education: Slovenian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pišot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; Štemberger, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However,…

  14. Effective Teaching in Physical Education: Slovenian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; temberger, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However,

  15. Economic Viewpoints in Educational Effectiveness: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Educational Improvement Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; van der Werf, Greetje

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation of the Primary Education Quality Improvement Project in Indonesia illustrates that combining the knowledge base and methodology of educational effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness analysis provides fruitful possibilities for future theoretical/practical developments in both approaches. PEQIP positively affected student

  16. The ripple effect: patients influencing others.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Cecilio

    2012-10-01

    This paper deals with what seems an insufficiently explored aspect of psychoanalytic practice: the ripple effect of a patient's evolution on the present and future of his or her significant others. Clinical vignettes are provided to illustrate patients' influence on relatives; patients acting as therapists; psychoanalysis by proxy; the ripple effect in psychotherapy; and some countertransference problems. The psychic lives of individuals not in treatment may be considerably affected by their interactions with our patients; seemingly, extraclinical character adjustments may ensue. Sociological findings and plausible psychodynamic explanations are discussed. A psychoanalytic perspective may not only help the analyst understand how therapeutic influence extends beyond the identified patient, but may also help guide interventions that are ripple-effective, even when they depart from classical analytic technique. PMID:23327000

  17. Adolescent cancer patients' perspectives on their educational experiences: Ten case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Nancy Smith

    The goal of this study was to explore the educational experiences of adolescent cancer patients in treatment for cancer and enrolled in hospital, homebound, or community schools. The incidence of students who have or had cancer is becoming more prevalent in schools today because of increases in the population, the incidence rate of cancer, and the survival rate of cancer. The number of students surviving cancer has increased over 41% in the past ten years and underscores the importance of assuring an excellent education to children and adolescents with cancer so that they may enjoy a good quality of life as long-term survivors. This study explored the educational experiences of students who were adolescent cancer patients and identified educational and psychosocial issues important to their success. The goal of this research effort was to provide educators and medical staff with a deeper understanding of the unique psychoeducational needs of this population and to provide a foundation for developing ideas for improving the educational programs and support available to students who continue their middle and high school education while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants included ten cancer patient whose mean age at onset of disease was 13.8 +/- 1.7 years, and mean age at interview was 15.2 +/- 1.8 years. The researcher conducted individual, in-depth, ethnographic interviews of students, and one parent and one teacher of each student. Case studies of the students included extensive dialogue of each of the contributing participants. An analysis of the case studies was conducted by coding emerging themes so that topics could be fully explored and compared between individuals, groups of individuals, and educational settings to identify the meaning that these students placed on the educational and psychosocial issues that they voiced as important. Advantages and disadvantages of each educational situation, homebound, hospital school, and community school, were compared. Psychosocial issues related to education were discussed. Additional findings included information about student computer use and information gathering, and the effects of cancer treatment on student interest in science and future occupational plans.

  18. The Process of Breast Augmentation with Special Focus on Patient Education, Patient Selection and Implant Selection.

    PubMed

    Adams, William P; Small, Kevin H

    2015-10-01

    Breast augmentation remains one of the most commonly performed plastic surgical procedures worldwide; however, Food and Drug Administration clinical trials have suggested that this procedure has a reoperation rate of 14% to 24% after 3 years. Recent literature has proposed that breast augmentation should not only be a surgical procedure but ultimately a surgical process to reduce postoperative complications and enhance patient satisfaction. The process of breast augmentation has been documented to optimize postsurgical outcomes and includes the following 4 steps: patient education, tissue-based planning, refined surgical techniques, and defined postoperative management. PMID:26408433

  19. Perceptions of primary healthcare professionals towards their role in type 2 diabetes mellitus patient education in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to analyze the perceptions, knowledge, and practices of primary healthcare professionals in providing patient education to people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A total of 23 health professionals working in primary healthcare units in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, participated in a focus group in order to discuss their patient education practices and the challenges for effective patient education in diabetes self-management. Results The results were categorized as follows: 1) lack of preparation and technical knowledge among the health professionals on some aspects of diabetes mellitus and the health professionals' patient education practices; 2) work conditions and organization; 3) issues related or attributed to the clientele themselves; and 4) diabetes care model. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of reorienting the patient education practices, health professionals' skills and work goals, and evaluation of the educational interventions, in order to establish strategies for health promotion and prevention and control of the disease. Descriptors Health Education; Prevention of Diabetes Mellitus; Primary Healthcare PMID:20920232

  20. Interventions to Improve Patient Education Regarding Multifactorial Genetic Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Meilleur, Katherine G.; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T.

    2009-01-01

    The careful education of patients with complex genetic disease is essential. However, healthcare providers often have limited time to spend providing thorough genetic education. Furthermore, the number of healthcare professionals possessing strong genetics training may be inadequate to meet increasing patient demands. Due to such constraints, several interventions have been investigated over the past decade to identify potential resources for the facilitation of this specific type of patient education. This systematic literature review of these interventions for patient education attempts to elucidate the answer to the question: is there sufficient evidence for best practice for delivering genetic information to patients with multifactorial conditions? The various interventions (CD-ROM, group counseling, video/decision aid, and miscellaneous) were analyzed in terms of quality criteria and achievement of specific outcomes and were rated according to the Stetler model for evidence based practice. Seven main outcomes were evaluated: 1. objective and subjective knowledge assessment 2. psychological measures (general anxiety, depression, stress, cancer worry) 3. satisfaction/effectiveness of intervention 4. time spent in counseling (time spent on basic genetic information vs. specific concerns) 5. decision making/intent to undergo genetic testing 6. treatment choice and value of that choice, and, finally 7. risk perception. Overall, the computer interventions resulted in more significant findings that were beneficial than any other category followed by the video category, although the group and miscellaneous categories did not measure all of the outcomes reported by the other two categories. Nevertheless, while these groups had neutral or negative findings in some of the outcomes, the computer intervention group showed significant improvement in genetics knowledge, psychological measures, satisfaction/effectiveness, time spent with counselor, and decision/intent to undergo testing. PMID:19291763

  1. The Future of Graduate Medical Education: A Systems-Based Approach to Ensure Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Bagian, James P

    2015-09-01

    In the past 15 years, there has been growing recognition that improving patient safety must be more systems based and sophisticated than the traditional approach of simply telling health care providers to "be more careful." Drawing from his own experience, the author discusses barriers to systems-based patient safety initiatives and emphasizes the importance of overcoming those barriers. Physicians may be slow to adopt standardized patient safety initiatives because of a resistance to standardization, but faculty in training institutions have a responsibility to model safe, effective, systems-based approaches to patient care in order to instill these values in the residents they teach. Importantly, graduate medical education (GME) is well positioned to influence not only how future physicians provide care to patients but also how today's physicians and health care systems improve patient safety and care. The necessary systems-based knowledge and skills are rooted in both understanding and proficiently identifying threats to patient safety, their underlying causes, the development and implementation of effective countermeasures, and the measurement of whether the threat has been successfully addressed. This knowledge and its application is notably absent in the operation of most institutions that sponsor GME training programs in terms of didactic instruction and everyday demonstrated proficiency. Most important of all, faculty must model the behavior and competencies that are desirable in future physicians and not fall into the trap of the "do as I say, not as I do" mentality, which can have a corrosive deleterious effect on the next generation of physicians. PMID:26312603

  2. Pediatrics Education in an AHEC Setting: Preparing Students to Provide Patient Centered Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Steven Owens

    2012-01-01

    Patient centered medicine is a paradigm of health care that seeks to treat the whole person, rather than only the illness. The physician must understand the patient as a whole by considering the patient's individual needs, social structure, socioeconomic status, and educational background. Medical education includes ways to train students in this

  3. Pediatrics Education in an AHEC Setting: Preparing Students to Provide Patient Centered Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Steven Owens

    2012-01-01

    Patient centered medicine is a paradigm of health care that seeks to treat the whole person, rather than only the illness. The physician must understand the patient as a whole by considering the patient's individual needs, social structure, socioeconomic status, and educational background. Medical education includes ways to train students in this…

  4. Patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of cancer-related fatigue randomized controlled feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a prominent clinical problem. There are calls for multi-modal interventions. Methods We assessed the feasibility of delivering patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of CRF in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with breast cancer survivors using usual care as control. Social cognitive and integrative medicine theories guided integration of patient education with acupuncture into a coherent treatment protocol. The intervention consisted of two parts. First, patients were taught to improve self-care by optimizing exercise routines, improving nutrition, implementing some additional evidence-based cognitive behavioral techniques such as stress management in four weekly 50-minute sessions. Second, patients received eight weekly 50-minute acupuncture sessions. The pre-specified primary outcome, CRF, was assessed with the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Secondary outcomes included three dimensions of cognitive impairment assessed with the FACT-COGv2. Results Due to difficulties in recruitment, we tried several methods that led to the development of a tailored recruitment strategy: we enlisted oncologists into the core research team and recruited patients completing treatment from oncology waiting rooms. Compared to usual care control, the intervention was associated with a 2.38-point decline in fatigue as measured by the BFI (90% Confidence Interval from 0.586 to 5.014; p <0.10). Outcomes associated with cognitive dysfunction were not statistically significant. Conclusions Patient education integrated with acupuncture had a very promising effect that warrants conducting a larger RCT to confirm findings. An effective recruitment strategy will be essential for the successful execution of a larger-scale trial. Trial registration NCT00646633 PMID:21703001

  5. Effective primate conservation education: gaps and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Susan K

    2010-05-01

    Conservation education goals generally include influencing people's conservation awareness, attitudes, and behaviors. Effective programs can help foster sustainable behavior, improve public support for conservation, reduce vandalism and poaching in protected areas, improve compliance with conservation regulations, increase recreation carrying capacities, and influence policies and decisions that affect the environment. Primate conservation problems cut across many disciplines, and primate conservation education must likewise address cross-disciplinary issues. Conservation educators must incorporate both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to develop effective programs, and the skill set must stretch beyond pedagogy. Expertise needed comes from the areas of planning, collaboration, psychology, entertainment, and evaluation. Integration of these elements can lead to greater program success. PMID:20041471

  6. Family-Centered Education and Its Clinical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis Short Running

    PubMed Central

    Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Asgari, Parvaneh; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Farokhnezhad Afshar, Pouya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor adherence to treatment in patients undergoing hemodialysis leads to many complications, including death of the patient. Objectives: This study was aimed to investigate the effect of family-based training on common side-effects during dialysis. Patients and Methods: The present randomized controlled trial study was conducted on 60 patients undergoing hemodialysis at hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from May 2012 to October 2012. Samples were randomly divided into two groups of patient-education (n = 30) and education of patient associated with an active member of the family (n = 30). Blood pressure, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, headaches and muscle cramps were followed with a check list and a questionnaire. The frequencies of the abovementioned complications at the mentioned intervals were recorded in three stages (before the intervention as well as two and four weeks after the intervention). Data analysis was performed using SPSS software, version 16, with chi-square test, Fishers exact test and independent t-test. Results: The mean ages of the patients in patient-centered and the family-oriented groups were 47.41 10.31 and 48.16 9.21, respectively. The result showed that some of the variables such as chest pain (P = 0.50, P = 0.01), nausea (P = 0.50, P = 0.01), headache (P = 0.81, P = 0.016), and blood pressure (P = 0.91, P = 0.016) were statistically significant before and four weeks after the intervention. Conclusions: According to the result of this study, the presence of families in a treatment plan could be essential to follow the treatment plan and subsequently reduced the complications of hemodialysis. PMID:26290749

  7. Five-year blood pressure control and mortality following health education for hypertensive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Morisky, D E; Levine, D M; Green, L W; Shapiro, S; Russell, R P; Smith, C R

    1983-01-01

    Three health education interventions for urban poor hypertensive patients were introduced sequentially in a randomized factorial design: 1) an exit interview to increase understanding of and compliance with the prescribed regimen; 2) a home visit to encourage a family member to provide support for the patient's regimen; and 3) invitations to small group sessions to increase the patient's confidence and ability to manage his/her problem. Previous evaluation of the initial two-year experience demonstrated a positive effect of the educational program on compliance with the medical treatment and blood pressure control. Data accumulated over an additional three years, including mortality analysis, are now presented. The study group consisted of the same cohort of 400 ambulatory hypertensive outpatients in the eight experimental and control groups. The five-year analysis shows a continuing positive effect on appointment keeping, weight control, and blood pressure control. All-cause life table mortality rate was 57.3 per cent less for the experimental group compared to the control group (12.9/100 vs 30.2/100, p less than .05), while the hypertension-related mortality rate was 53.2 per cent less (8.9/100 vs 19.0/100, p less than .01). The results from this longitudinal study provide evidence to encourage health practitioners to utilize such educational programs in the long-term management and control of high blood pressure. PMID:6849473

  8. Interprofessional continuing health education for diabetic patients in an urban underserved community.

    PubMed

    Davis, Penny; Clackson, Jody; Henry, Carol; Bobyn, Joan; Suveges, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The CPD(iQ) Saskatchewan Project (ICEC(4)) is directed by the Inter-Professional Continuing Education for Collaborative Client Centered Care Committee, representing the disciplines of medicine, nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy, kinesiology and dentistry at the University of Saskatchewan. It was designed to serve two target audiences: the urban underserved community that would access services at the West Winds Primary Care Centre; and health professionals at the West Winds who would deliver educational modules to those in need. The main objectives were to identify the learning needs of health professionals related to working collaboratively in urban underserved community settings; identify and develop relevant educational modules to address needs identified, implement the program, and evaluate participants' experience with the educational modules. Evaluation consisted of debriefing after each educational session and the completion of a self administered questionnaire. Findings from this pilot study. The results of the study suggest the modules as a useful approach to addressing some of the barriers to effective inter-professional collaborative care. Common themes from the evaluation included satisfaction with learning other professionals' contributions to patient care. The module format may serve useful in an inter-professional case-based clinical educational setting. PMID:19005954

  9. The impact of an educational program on HCV patient outcomes using boceprevir in community practices (OPTIMAL trial)

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, Vinod; Brown, Robert S.; Patel, Vishal; Kugelmas, Marcelo; Regenstein, Fredric; Balart, Luis; LaBrecque, Douglas; Brown, Kimberly; Avila, Mark; Biederman, Michael; Freed, Glenn; Smith, Richard; Bernstein, Marc; Arnold, Hays; Cahan, Joel; Fink, Scott; Katkov, William; Massoumi, Hatef; Harrison, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although effective, direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies for genotype 1 (GT 1) hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been associated with compliance challenges. Additionally, treatment at predominantly community-based centers has been associated with low retention of patients on treatment and higher dropout rates. The OPTIMAL Phase IV interventional trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01405027) was designed to evaluate the impact of an education program for community investigator (CI) sites participating in a Chronic Liver Disease Foundation study treating chronic GT 1 HCV patients. Methods: This physician educational program was administered by 22 Hepatology Centers of Educational Expertise (HCEE) academic sites to 33 CI sites asked to participate from December 2011 to July 2012. The HCEE mentors from DAA-experienced academic sites educated those at CI sites on therapeutic management, practice, and patient outcomes through a series of four standardized educational sequence visits regarding the use of first generation HCV protease inhibitors and the overall treatment of HCV. Results: Treatment duration compliance rates for patients treated at CI sites versus those treated at HCEE academic sites were evaluable in 77 of 84 HCEE academic site patients, 102 of 113 patients treated at CI sites, and 179 of 197 overall patients. The treatment duration compliance rates for patients treated at HCEE academic sites, CI sites and overall were 85.4 25.39%, 83.8 27.37%, and 84.5 26.48%, respectively, and did not differ statistically between the groups (p = 0.49). Almost half (47%) of the patients in the study achieved a sustained virological response for 24 weeks (SVR24) regardless of the type of site (p = 0.64). Safety profiles were similar at both HCEE and CI sites. Conclusions: These results demonstrated that education of CI sites unfamiliar with DAAs resulted in patient outcomes consistent with those observed at DAA-experienced academic sites. PMID:26327916

  10. Development of a web-based, work-related asthma educational tool for patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ghajar-Khosravi, Shadi; Tarlo, Susan M; Liss, Gary M; Chignell, Mark; Ribeiro, Marcos; Levinson, Anthony J; Gupta, Samir

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common chronic condition. Work-related asthma (WRA) has a large socioeconomic impact and is increasing in prevalence but remains under-recognized. Although international guidelines recommend patient education, no widely available educational tool exists. OBJECTIVE: To develop a WRA educational website for adults with asthma. METHODS: An evidence-based database for website content was developed, which applied evidence-based website design principles to create a website prototype. This was subsequently tested and serially revised according to patient feedback in three moderated phases (one focus group and two interview phases), followed by face validation by asthma educators. RESULTS: Patients (n=10) were 20 to 28 years of age; seven (70%) were female, three (30%) were in university, two (20%) were in college and five (50%) were currently employed. Key format preferences included: well-spaced, bulleted text; movies (as opposed to animations); photos (as opposed to cartoons); an explicit listing of website aims on the home page; and an exploding tab structure. Participants disliked integrated games and knowledge quizzes. Desired informational content included a list of triggers, prevention/control methods, currently available tools and resources, a self-test for WRA, real-life scenario presentations, compensation information, information for colleagues on how to react during an asthma attack and a WRA discussion forum. CONCLUSIONS: The website met the perceived needs of young asthmatic patients. This resource could be disseminated widely and should be tested for its effects on patient behaviour, including job choice, workplace irritant/allergen avoidance and/or protective equipment, asthma medication use and physician prompting for management of WRA symptoms. PMID:24137573

  11. Patient education, disease activity and physical function: can we be more targeted? A cross sectional study among people with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In order to target educational needs of patients more effectively, an Austrian-German educational needs assessment tool (OENAT) was developed, the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and hand osteoarthritis (HOA) were described and the relationships between educational needs, gender, disease activity and function were explored. Methods The English ENAT was adapted into Austrian-German using Beaton's cross-cultural adaptation process. Internal construct validity was assessed by Rasch analysis. Educational needs across diagnostic groups and subgroups of patients were summarized descriptively and their relationship with disease activity and physical functioning explored. Results The sample comprised 130 RA, 125 PsA and 48 HOA patients. Their mean ages ± SD were 56 ± 14, 51 ± 11 and 64 ± 7 years for RA, PsA and HOA; disease duration was 11 ± 9, 11 ± 11 and 14 ± 9 years, respectively. More than 70% in each patient group expressed interest in receiving education about their disease. The educational needs differed significantly between women and men in all 3 groups. In RA and PsA, female patients expressed significantly higher educational needs than men in 'movements’ and 'feelings’ domains (p=0.04 and p=0.03 for RA and p<0.01 and p=0.01 for PsA). Female patients in the HOA group had significantly higher scores on all domains except for the 'movements’. Older patients with PsA scored significantly higher than their younger counterparts in the 'pain’ domain (p=0.05). RA patients with disease duration >5 years), expressed higher educational needs in 'movements’ (p<0.01). Educational background had effects in the PsA group only, patients with basic education had greater scores than those with higher education on 'movements’ and 'arthritis process’ (p=0.01). In the RA group, DAS28 correlated significantly with 'movements’ (r=0.24, p=0.01), 'feelings’ (r=0.22, p=0.02), and 'treatments’ (r=0.22, p=0.03). In the PsA group, all OENAT domains correlated with disease activity (DAPSA and CDAI). Conclusions This study showed that educational needs vary with personal characteristics. Patient education may be more targeted and effective, if gender, age, educational background and disease duration are taken into account. Correlations with disease activity and function suggest that the OENAT could enable identification of 'intervention points’, which can be ideal opportunities for effective patient education. PMID:24286444

  12. A Reverse Hawthorne Effect in Educational Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdep, Stanley M.; Irvine, Sidney H.

    1970-01-01

    In an evaluation of the effectiveness of broadcasting media in education the control class achieved higher posttest scores than the experimental classes. These results suggest that when experimental and control classes are housed at the same location, teachers of control classes may and can motivate their students so that their classes no longer

  13. Multilevel Design Efficiency in Educational Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cools, Wilfried; De Fraine, Bieke; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Onghena, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    In educational effectiveness research, multilevel data analyses are often used because research units (most frequently, pupils or teachers) are studied that are nested in groups (schools and classes). This hierarchical data structure complicates designing the study because the structure has to be taken into account when approximating the accuracy

  14. Effects of Government Regulations on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhard, John T.; Hannah, Robert W.

    Results of a self-study conducted by Western Michigan University on the effects of government regulations on higher education are presented. The self-study, conducted with the aid of questionnaires, followup visits, or telephone calls, addressed the following main concerns: (1) academic programs; (2) maintenance, buildings, physical plant, and…

  15. Educational Innovation, Quality, and Effects: An Exploration of Innovations and Their Effects in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the extensive literature on educational innovations, there is only limited empirical research available into the impact of innovations on student achievement. In this article, the following research questions will be answered: What form do innovations in secondary education take, are there types of innovative schools, and what effect do

  16. Meta-Analysis of Patient Education Interventions to Increase Physical Activity among Chronically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Brown, Sharon A.; Brown, Lori M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This meta-analysis integrates primary research testing the effect of patient education to increase physical activity (PA) on behavior outcomes among adults with diverse chronic illnesses. Methods Extensive literature searching strategies located published and unpublished intervention studies that measured PA behavior outcomes. Primary study results were coded. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analytic procedures included moderator analyses. Results Data were synthesized across 22,527 subjects from 213 samples in 163 reports. The overall mean weighted effect size for two-group comparisons was 0.45 (higher mean for treatment than control). This effect size is consistent with a difference of 48 minutes of PA per week or 945 steps per day. Preliminary moderator analyses suggest interventions were most effective when they targeted only PA behavior, used behavioral strategies (vs. cognitive strategies), and encouraged PA self-monitoring. Differences among chronic illnesses were documented. Individual strategies unrelated to PA outcomes included supervised exercise sessions, exercise prescription, fitness testing, goal setting, contracting, problem solving, barriers management, and stimulus/cues. PA outcomes were unrelated to gender, age, ethnicity, or socioeconomic distribution among samples. Conclusion These findings suggest that some patient education interventions to increase PA are effective, despite considerable heterogeneity in the magnitude of intervention effect. Practice Implications Moderator analyses are preliminary and provide suggestive evidence for further testing of interventions to inform practice. PMID:18023128

  17. Parental educational program: effectiveness and retention.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, W

    1996-06-01

    55 parents of adolescent children were asked to rate the effectiveness of their communication with their adolescents before and after a 10-wk. parent educational program encouraging authoritative parent-adolescent interactions. Parents reported improved effectiveness of communication from the pre- to post-program assessment times. Retention was compared across groups receiving high and low support in attendance of meetings, but retention did not differ across the two groups. PMID:8816050

  18. Annual Review: Educational Psychology and the Effectiveness of Inclusive Education/Mainstreaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    Background: Inclusive education/mainstreaming is a key policy objective for the education of children and young people with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities. Aims: This paper reviews the literature on the effectiveness of inclusive education/mainstreaming. The focus is on evidence for effects in terms of child outcomes with

  19. Effects of Hospital Care Environment on Patient Mortality and Nurse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Linda H.; Clarke, Sean P.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Lake, Eileen T.; Cheney, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the net effects of nurse practice environments on nurse and patient outcomes after accounting for nurse staffing and education. Background Staffing and education have well-documented associations with patient outcomes, but evidence on the effect of care environments on outcomes has been more limited. Methods Data from 10,184 nurses and 232,342 surgical patients in 168 Pennsylvania hospitals were analyzed. Care environments were measured using the practice environment scales of the Nursing Work Index. Outcomes included nurse job satisfaction, burnout, intent to leave, and reports of quality of care, as well as mortality and failure to rescue in patients. Results Nurses reported more positive job experiences and fewer concerns with care quality, and patients had significantly lower risks of death and failure to rescue in hospitals with better care environments. Conclusion Care environment elements must be optimized alongside nurse staffing and education to achieve high quality of care. PMID:18469615

  20. Development of SMOG-Cro readability formula for healthcare communication and patient education.

    PubMed

    Brangan, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Effective communication shows a positive impact on patient satisfaction, compliance and medical outcomes, at the same time reducing the healthcare costs. Written information for patients needs to correspond to health literacy levels of the intended audiences. Readability formulas correlate well with the reading and comprehension tests but are considered an easier and quicker method to estimate a text difficulty. SMOG readability formula designed for English language needs to be modified if used for texts in other languages. The aim of this study was to develop a readability formula based on SMOG, that could be used to estimate text difficulty of written materials for patients in Croatian language. Contras- tive analysis of English and Croatian language covering a corpus of almost 100,000 running words showed clear linguis- tic differences in the number of polysyllabic words. The new formula, named SMOG-Cro, is presented as an equation: SMOG-Cro = 2 + √4+ syllables, with the score showing the number of years of education a person needs to be able to understand a piece of writing. The presented methodology could help in the development of readability formulas for other languages. We hope the results of this study are soon put into practice for more effective healthcare communication and patient education, and for development of a health literacy assessment tool in Croatian language. PMID:26040062

  1. SCI-U: E-learning for patient education in spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, John D.; Badger-Brown, Karla M.; Legassic, Matthew S.; Walia, Saagar; Wolfe, Dalton L.

    2012-01-01

    Background/objectives To develop an online patient education resource for use in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Participants The development process involved more than 100 subject-matter experts (SMEs) (rehabilitation professionals and consumers) from across Canada. Preliminary evaluation was conducted with 25 end-users. Methods An iterative development process was coordinated by a project team; SMEs (including patients) developed the content in working groups using wiki-based tools. Multiple rounds of feedback based on early prototypes helped improve the courses during development. Results Five courses were created, each featuring more than 45 minutes of video content and hundreds of media assets. Preliminary evaluation results indicate that users were satisfied by the courses and perceived them to be effective. Conclusions This is an effective process for developing multimedia patient education resources; the involvement of patients in all parts of the process was particularly helpful. Future work will focus on implementation, integration into clinical practice and other delivery formats (smart phones, tablets). PMID:23031169

  2. Sexuality Education: A More Realistic View of Its Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Douglas

    1985-01-01

    This article compares the effects of sexuality education programs with the results of other educational programs and discusses why sex education programs may increase knowledge but may not effectively change behavior. Reasons to offer sexuality education are discussed. (Author/MT)

  3. A Study of the Effectiveness on Parental Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yen-Chin; Chu, Yuan-Hsiang; Lin, Helene H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the effectiveness of sexuality education training on the parents in the group regarding their sex knowledge, awareness of sexuality education, attitude towards sexuality education, self-efficacy in sexuality education, communication effectiveness and communication behavior in the hope that they would be…

  4. Combining Software Games with Education: Evaluation of its Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virvou, Maria; Katsionis, George; Manos, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01

    Computer games are very popular among children and adolescents. In this respect, they could be exploited by educational software designers to render educational software more attractive and motivating. However, it remains to be explored what the educational scope of educational software games is. In this paper, we explore several issues concerning

  5. Venous thromboembolism: patient awareness and education in the pre-operative assessment clinic.

    PubMed

    Haymes, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Each year venous thromboembolism (VTE) causes up to 60,000 deaths in the UK, many resulting from hospital-acquired thromboses following elective surgery. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines state that all elective surgical patients should receive verbal and written information pre-operatively regarding the risks of developing VTE. This audit assessed elective surgical patient's prior awareness of VTE and examined how effective targeted patient education during the pre-operative assessment is in increasing this awareness. A 13 point questionnaire designed to assess a pre-operative patient's understanding of topics relating to VTE was provided to consecutive patients identified as being at risk of developing VTE at the end of their pre-operative assessment over a two-week period. A total of 68 questionnaires were completed. Provision of verbal and written information was poor (47 %, n = 32 and 47 %, n = 32 respectively). Despite this, 71 % (n = 48) of patients were aware of the consequences of developing VTE. Many patients correctly identified surgery (71 %, n = 48), immobility (71 %, n = 48) and being overweight (68 %, n = 46) as risk factors, but not dehydration (47 %, n = 32). Lack of awareness regarding personal methods to reduce the risk of developing a VTE post-operatively (24 %, n = 16) and potential side-effects of medical prophylaxis (32 %, n = 22) were also identified. Many patients already possess an awareness of VTE, however, specific knowledge regarding its risk factors and methods of prevention is lacking. Provision of targeted written and verbal educational information during the pre-operative assessment is an effective method of increasing a patient's awareness of these topics. Increased patient awareness may empower patients in their post-operative recovery and enable them to make more informed decisions regarding VTE prophylaxis options. PMID:25991380

  6. Assessment of Telemedicine in Surgical Education and Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Demartines, Nicolas; Mutter, Didier; Vix, Michel; Leroy, Jol; Glatz, Dieter; Rsel, Fritz; Harder, Felix; Marescaux, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the value of teleconferencing for patient care and surgical education by assessing the activity of an international academic network. Summary Background Data The uses of telemedicine include teleeducation, training, and consulting, and surgical teams are now involved, sharing diagnostic information and opinions without the need for travel. However, the value of telematics in surgery remains to be assessed. Methods During a 2-year period, weekly surgical teleconferences were held among six university hospitals in four European countries. To assess the accuracy of telediagnosis for surgical cases, 60 randomly selected cases were analyzed by a panel of surgeons. Participants opinions were analyzed by questionnaire. Results Seventy teleconferences (50 lectures and 271 case presentations) were held. Ninety-five of the 114 participants (83.3%) completed the final questionnaire. Eighty-six percent rated the surgical activity as good or excellent, 75.7% rated the scientific level as good or excellent, 55.8% rated the daily clinical activity as good or excellent, and 28.4% rated the manual surgical technique as good or excellent. The target organ was identified in all the cases; the organ structure and pathology were considered well defined in 93.3%, and the fine structure was considered well defined in 58.3%. Diagnosis was accurate in 17 cases (28.3%), probable in 25 (41.7%), possible but uncertain in 16 (26.7%), and not possible in 2 cases (3.3%). Discussion among the remote sites increased the rate of valuable therapeutic advice from 55% of cases before the discussion to 95% after the discussion. Eighty-six percent of the surgeons expressed satisfaction with telematics for medical education and patient care. Conclusions Participant satisfaction was high, transmission of clinical documents was accurate, and the opportunity to discuss case documentation and management significantly improved diagnostic potential, resulting in an accuracy rate of up to 95%. Teleeducation and teleconsultation in surgery appear to be beneficial. PMID:10674622

  7. An 8-Week Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Program of Hyaluronic Acid Injection, Deliberate Physical Rehabilitation, and Patient Education is Cost Effective at 2 Years Follow-up: The OsteoArthritis Centers of AmericaSM Experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nonsurgical interventions have been reported to improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA) over the short term. However, longer follow-up is required to accurately characterize outcomes such as cost effectiveness and delayed arthroplasty. A total of 553 patients with symptomatic knee OA who previously underwent a single 8-week multimodal treatment program were contacted at 1 year (n = 336) or 2 years (n = 217) follow-up. The percentage of patients who underwent knee arthroplasty was 10% at 1 year and 18% at 2 years following program completion. The treatment program was highly cost effective at $12,800 per quality-adjusted life year at 2 years. Cost effectiveness was maintained under a variety of plausible assumptions and regardless of gender, age, body mass index, disease severity, or knee pain severity. In summary, a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program is cost effective and may lower knee arthroplasty utilization through 2 years follow-up. PMID:25574144

  8. Pairing Physician Education With Patient Activation to Improve Shared Decisions in Prostate Cancer Screening: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Michael S.; Day, Frank C.; Srinivasan, Malathi; Griffin, Erin; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Rainwater, Julie A.; Kravitz, Richard L.; Bell, Douglas S.; Hoffman, Jerome R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most expert groups recommend shared decision making for prostate cancer screening. Most primary care physicians, however, routinely order a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test with little or no discussion about whether they believe the potential benefits justify the risk of harm. We sought to assess whether educating primary care physicians and activating their patients to ask about prostate cancer screening had a synergistic effect on shared decision making, rates and types of discussions about prostate cancer screening, and the physicians final recommendations. METHODS Our study was a cluster randomized controlled trial among primary care physicians and their patients, comparing usual education (control), with physician education alone (MD-Ed), and with physician education and patient activation (MD-Ed+A). Participants included 120 physicians in 5 group practices, and 712 male patients aged 50 to 75 years. The interventions comprised a Web-based educational program for all intervention physicians and MD-Ed+A patients compared with usual education (brochures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). The primary outcome measure was patients reported postvisit shared decision making regarding prostate cancer screening; secondary measures included unannounced standardized patients reported shared decision making and the physicians recommendation for prostate cancer screening. RESULTS Patients ratings of shared decision making were moderate and did not differ between groups. MD-Ed+A patients reported that physicians had higher prostate cancer screening discussion rates (MD-Ed+A = 65%, MD-Ed = 41%, control=38%; P <.01). Standardized patients reported that physicians seeing MD-Ed+A patients were more neutral during prostate cancer screening recommendations (MD-Ed+A=50%, MD-Ed=33%, control=15%; P <.05). Of the male patients, 80% had had previous PSA tests. CONCLUSIONS Although activating physicians and patients did not lead to significant changes in all aspects of physician attitudes and behaviors that we studied, interventions that involved physicians did have a large effect on their attitudes toward screening and in the discussions they had with patients, including their being more likely than control physicians to engage in prostate cancer screening discussions and more likely to be neutral in their final recommendations. PMID:23835818

  9. Tobacco cessation treatment education for dental students using standardized patients.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jacqueline A; Carrico, Ruth M; Myers, John A; Scott, David A; Wilson, Richard W; Worth, Celeste T

    2014-06-01

    The use of standardized patients (SPs) shows promise in tobacco cessation treatment (TCT) training by providing a simulated clinical environment for dental students to practice counseling skills with individuals trained to portray patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in attitudes, perceptions, and knowledge between dental students who received a lecture and practice sessions with SPs and those who received a lecture only. Dental students in an introductory clinical course at one dental school were invited to participate in the study by completing a pre and post questionnaire. The pre questionnaire was administered to all students prior to a tobacco cessation lecture. Students were group-randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group completed the post questionnaire after the lecture and practice sessions with SPs, and the control group completed it after the lecture only. Of ninety-eight students who attended the lecture and were invited to participate in the study, a total of ninety-four from the two groups (96 percent) provided two linkable questionnaires for analysis. In the results, training with lecture and SPs increased the students' understanding of barriers, subjective norms, perceived skills, self-efficacy, and intentions to provide TCT more than those in the lecture only; however, it did not significantly increase their attitudes and knowledge. These findings suggest that using SPs is a valuable educational method to promote the provision of TCT by dental students and graduates. PMID:24882775

  10. The Delivery of Sexuality-related Patient Education to Adolescent Patients: A Preliminary Study of Family Practice Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Brey, Rebecca A.; Banter, Amy E.; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2012-01-01

    Background: Risky sexual behavior among adolescents is one of the leading health behaviors most associated with mortality, morbidity, and social problems. Adolescents need reliable sources of information to help them promote healthy sexual behaviors. Physicians in the United States are often seen by adolescents as a reliable and trustworthy source of accurate sexual information. However, many physicians feel uncomfortable or ill-prepared to deal with sexuality issues among their adolescent patients. Purpose: This study examined the impact of family resident physicians sexual attitudes, knowledge, and comfort, on the delivery of sexuality-related patient education to their adolescent patients. Materials and Methods: Pre-post-test scales were administered to 21 physicians. Data were also collected for patient (n=644) charts. Factors that determined the delivery of sexuality-related patient education were analyzed. Results: Results indicate that sexuality-related patient education was rarely provided to adolescent patients. Conclusions: Adolescent sexuality education is not a high priority for physicians. Professional medical organizations should play a leadership role in training physicians on delivering sexuality education to adolescent patients. PMID:24478998

  11. The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program as an Educational Tool and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabe, Darren W.; Bailie, George R.; Manley, Harold J.; Yeaw, Barbara F.

    1998-01-01

    The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program provides early clinical education for pharmacy students and clinical services for patients. Six students were assigned to visit 12-15 hemodialysis patients monthly under preceptor supervision. Topics covered include approach to patient, medical information retrieval, pharmaceutical care philosophy,…

  12. The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program as an Educational Tool and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabe, Darren W.; Bailie, George R.; Manley, Harold J.; Yeaw, Barbara F.

    1998-01-01

    The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program provides early clinical education for pharmacy students and clinical services for patients. Six students were assigned to visit 12-15 hemodialysis patients monthly under preceptor supervision. Topics covered include approach to patient, medical information retrieval, pharmaceutical care philosophy,

  13. Patient education in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant: What patients wish they had known about quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Gwede, Clement K.; Cases, Mallory G.; Barata, Anna; Cessna, Julie; Christie, Juliette; Gonzalez, Luis; Koskan, Alexis; Pidala, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but patient education is often overlooked. The goal of the current qualitative study was to examine education regarding post-HCT QOL from the patient’s perspective. Allogeneic HCT recipients participated in one of four focus groups. Participants were asked to recall what they had been told about post-HCT QOL as they were preparing for transplant, how their QOL differed from what they expected, and how to educate future patients about post-HCT QOL. Verbatim transcripts were coded for both a priori and emergent themes using content analysis. A total of 24 patients participated (54% female, mean age 51, range 23-73). Participants frequently expressed the desire for additional education regarding post-HCT QOL, particularly late complications. They noted that late complications were often unexpected, had a profound impact on their QOL, and threatened their ongoing sense of recovery. They emphasized that the timing, content, and format of education regarding QOL should be flexible to meet their diverse needs. Findings from the current study draw attention to the importance of patient education regarding post-HCT QOL as well as additional QOL research designed with patient education in mind. PMID:24121210

  14. Health Related Quality of Life May Increase when Patients with a Stoma Attend Patient Education – A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adaptation to living with a stoma is complex, and studies have shown that stoma creation has a great impact on patients' health related quality of life. The objective was to explore the effect of a structured patient education program on health related quality of life. Therefore, we implemented interventions aimed at increasing health related quality of life during and after hospital admission. Materials and Methods We designed a case/control study aimed at adult patients admitted to the surgical ward for stoma creation, irrespective of type of stoma or reason for creation of stoma. We included 50 patients in the study. Health related quality of life was measured before hospital discharge, three months and six months after stoma creation. The program included educational interventions involving lay-teachers, alongside health professional teachers. Results We found a significant rise in health related quality of life in the intervention group (P<0.001) and no significant change in the control group (P = 0.144). However, we found no significant differences when comparing between groups at 3 and 6 months (p = 0.12 and p =  0.63, respective). Additionally, there were differences in scores in health related quality of life baseline (p = 0.045) with lower scores in the intervention group compared with the intervention group. However, there were no significant differences in the demographic variables at baseline Conclusions Educational activities aimed at increase in knowledge and focusing on patients' psychosocial needs may lead to a rise in patients' health related quality of life. When patients with a stoma attend a structured patient education program it is possible to improve their health related quality of life compared with patients with a stoma, who do not attend the program. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01154725 PMID:24609004

  15. Informing patients about drug side effects

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, L.A.; Kanouse, D.E.

    1982-09-01

    Two hundred forty-nine newly diagnosed hypertensive patients prescribed thiazide medication were recruited for study. Two-thirds were given a leaflet or patient package insert (PPI) that described the drug and its possible side effects, and one-third were not. At a revisit about 1 month later, patients were asked whether they had experienced any of 17 different health problems. For each problem that they experienced, they were asked whether they thought the problem was related to the medicine they were taking. Ten of the health problems were taken verbatim from the PPI's list of possible drug side effects. Patients who received the PPI reported experiencing about the same number of side effects as the non-PPI subjects. However, those who received the PPI were more likely to attribute experienced reactions to the drug. This was true for both reactions specifically listed in the PPI and for similar reactions not listed. Results support the notion of an attribution-labeling process rather than a suggestion effect.

  16. Influence of Education on the Pattern of Cognitive Deterioration in Ad Patients: The Cognitive Reserve Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carret, N.L.; Auriacombe, S.; Letenneur, L.; Bergua, V.; Dartigues, J.F.; Fabrigoule, C.

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated

  17. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  18. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials

  19. The Diffusion Process of Patient Education in Dutch Community Pharmacy: An Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronk, M. C. M.; Blom, A. Th. G.; Van Burg, A.; Jonkers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and classifies these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers'"Innovations in Organizations" model. Discusses the implementation of patient education activities that require individual and organizational change in…

  20. A Pilot Project to Develop and Assess a Health Education Programme for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atak, Nazli; Arslan, Umit

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The current research was designed to develop a health education programme for type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the Taba-Tyler model and to evaluate its effect. Design: The study was quasi-experimental in design. Setting: Fifty-five patients from the Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, University Hospital of Ankara. Method: An education…

  1. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for

  2. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  3. The Importance of Indirect Teaching Behaviour and Its Educational Effects in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunwoo; Choi, Euichang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical education teacher behaviour has been a subject of study in physical education including physical education teacher education for 30 years. However, the research on teacher behaviour has tended to focus on direct teaching behaviour (DTB) to demonstrate the benefits of effective teaching, centred on a technical understanding of

  4. The Importance of Indirect Teaching Behaviour and Its Educational Effects in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunwoo; Choi, Euichang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical education teacher behaviour has been a subject of study in physical education including physical education teacher education for 30 years. However, the research on teacher behaviour has tended to focus on direct teaching behaviour (DTB) to demonstrate the benefits of effective teaching, centred on a technical understanding of…

  5. Special Education: A Systematic Approach to Efficiency and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haar, Jean M.; Robicheau, Jerry W.; Palladino, John

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and the efficacy of regional special education programs. Focus groups were conducted in an independent school district and two special education cooperatives. Focus groups were conducted with general education teachers, special education teachers, principals, paraprofessionals,

  6. Effectiveness of Early Childhood Education Programs: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoegl, Juergen

    Undertaken as a background paper for an early childhood education policy study intended to identify current issues in early childhood education and policy alternatives for consideration by the State Board of Education of Illinois, this report focuses on the effectiveness of early childhood education programs. Specifically addressed are (1) reasons

  7. Exploring the self-learning experiences of patients with depression participating in a multimedia education program.

    PubMed

    Chou, Mei-Hsien; Lin, Mei-Feng; Hsu, Mei-Chi; Wang, Yao-Hua; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the self-learning experiences of depression patients on interactive multimedia education program. Qualitative in-depth interviews were employed. Fourteen patients with a first episode of major depression were recruited from a psychiatric outpatient department. Explanations of the purposes of the exercise and on-the-spot teaching were provided by the researcher before the study began. A tape-recorded, semi-structured interview format was employed after two weeks. Data analysis was performed in the framework of line-by-line content, contextual and thematic analysis. Eight subjects successfully completed the entire learning activities. Content analysis revealed 4 main aspects of successful self-learning experiences: the triggering of learning motivation, the enjoyment of self-paced learning, support for the effects of learning materials, and the gaining of self- awareness and changes. The factors influencing learning performance were related to: environmental impact, the degree of familiarity with traditional learning, possession or non-possession of the necessary computer operation skills, and good computer support. However, the findings provide a preliminary understanding of the application of interactive multimedia education programs in terms of self-learning outcomes and recognizing key elements of learning impediments among the study sample. A larger sample size with different clinical contexts is recommended to determine the effect and generalizability for future research. Furthermore, the creation of a computerized learning environment with different educational styles is crucial to patients' success in obtaining depression-related information and understanding effective adaptive skills. PMID:15619180

  8. Psychosocial, educational and communicative interventions for patients with cachexia and their family carers

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Cancer cachexia has a substantial impact on both patients and their family carers. It has been acknowledged as one of the two most frequent and devastating problems of advanced cancer. The impact of cachexia spans biopsychosocial realms. Symptom management in cachexia is fraught with difficulties and globally, there remains no agreed standard care or treatment for this client group. There is a need to address the psychosocial impact of cachexia for both patients and their family carers. Recent findings Patients living at home and their family carers are often left to manage the distressing psychosocial impacts of cancer cachexia themselves. Successful symptom management requires healthcare professionals to address the holistic impact of cancer cachexia. High quality and rigorous research details the existential impact of cachexia on patients and their family carers. This information needs to inform psychosocial, educational and communicative supportive healthcare interventions to help both patients and their family carers better cope with the effects of cachexia. Summary Supportive interventions need to inform both patients and their family carers of the expected impacts of cachexia, and address how to cope with them to retain a functional, supported family unit who are informed about and equipped to care for a loved one with cachexia. PMID:25144837

  9. Development of self-care educational material for patients with heart failure in Japan: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Sano, Miho; Seki, Satomi; Kogure, Asuka; Kobukata, Kihoko; Ochiai, Ryota; Wakita, Sanae; Kazuma, Keiko

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the need for information regarding heart failure and self-care, developed self-care educational material, and investigated the feasibility of the material. A total of 22 hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 63 years) completed a self-administered questionnaire. We found that more than 90% of patients desired information, particularly about heart failure symptoms, time to notify healthcare providers, prognosis, and exercise/physical activity. After examining the eight existing brochures for Japanese heart failure patients, we developed self-care educational material. This was based on heart failure guidelines and on the results of our inquiry regarding information needs. Finally, a pilot study was conducted in nine hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 57 years). None of the patients had difficulty reading or understanding the educational material. The self-administrated questionnaire survey revealed that comprehension of the following improved after the educational sessions with the material: heart failure symptoms, medication, weighing, sodium intake, and fluid intake (P < 0.05). In conclusion, heart failure patients have a great need for information about heart failure. Our pilot study suggests that the material was readable and had a beneficial effect on heart failure comprehension. PMID:22339764

  10. The problems of anticholinergic adverse effects in older patients.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, M

    1993-01-01

    The old saying 'red as a beet, dry as a bone, blind as a bat, hot as a hare, mad as a hatter' is often quoted when describing the autonomic effects of drugs that block the muscarinic cholinergic system. These effects may be subtle or dramatic, yet can be overlooked or discounted as a natural consequence of old age. Elderly patients can be particularly sensitive to the anticholinergic action of drugs because of physiological and pathophysiological changes that often accompany the aging process. The use of multiple drugs, a common finding in older patients, may result in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions that heighten anticholinergic effects. While the classic anticholinergic problems of decreased secretions, slowed gastrointestinal motility, blurred vision, increased heart rate, heat intolerance, sedation and possibly mild confusion, may be uncomfortable for a younger patient in relatively good health, these effects can be disastrous for older patients. Even the most common peripheral anticholinergic complaint of dry mouth can reduce the ability to communicate, predispose to malnutrition, promote mucosal damage, denture misfit or dental caries, and increase the risk of serious respiratory infection secondary to loss of antimicrobial activity of saliva. Mydriasis and the inability to accommodate will impair near vision and may precipitate narrow angle glaucoma in predisposed patients, but less obviously could lead to an increased risk of accidents, including falls. Somatic complaints of constipation and urinary hesitancy, could, in the presence of anticholinergic challenge, result in faecal impaction or urinary retention. Cardiac effects may be poorly tolerated. Increases in heart rate may precipitate or worsen angina. Finally, thermoregulatory impairment induced by anticholinergics, which block the ability to sweat, may lead to life threatening hyperthermia. Central anticholinergic effects range from sedation, mild confusion and inability to concentration to frank delirium. Even mild effects can reduce function and increase dependency. At any level of care, the loss of independence increases the caregiver burden, costs, and most importantly, can negatively affect quality of life. Many age-related and disease-related conditions may predispose elderly patients to anticholinergic drug toxicity. Careful attention to anticholinergic effects when prescribing drugs, patient education, regular review of the entire drug regimen, and familiarity with the signs and symptoms of anticholinergic toxicity will help to reduce the risk of drug-induced problems. PMID:8369593

  11. Outreach to Improve Patient Education at South Carolina Free Medical Clinics

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Karen D.; McConnaughy, Rozalynd P.; Riley, Ruth A.

    2011-01-01

    The University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine (SOM) librarians have partnered with eight free medical clinics in South Carolina to enhance patient education efforts. During these outreach projects, project librarians purchased and installed computers, projectors, screens, LCD monitors, and touch-screen information kiosks equipment in each clinic, conducted MedlinePlus training sessions with clinic staff, and added links to MedlinePlus on the patient education area of the clinics websites. As a result, the free medical clinics incorporated MedlinePlus into their patient education classes or use the self-playing tutorials in patient waiting rooms. PMID:22084623

  12. The effect of nanotechnology on education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriyavejakul, Chantana

    2008-04-01

    The research objective was to study 1) the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology and 2) to propose the plans, the strategies and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the system. The data collection was done by 4 methods: 1) documentary study, 2) observation, 3) informal interviews, and 4) group discussion. The findings revealed that: 1. William Wresch's Theory (1997) was used in this research to study of the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology. 1) Getting connected to nanotechnology by search engine websites, libraries, magazines, books, and discussions with experts. 2) Curriculum integration: nanotechnology should be integrated in many branches of engineering, such as industrial, computer, civil, chemical, electrical, mechanical, etc. 3) Resources for educators: nanotechnology knowledge should be spread in academic circles by publications and the Internet websites. 4) Training and professional resources for teachers: Teachers should be trained by experts in nanotechnology and researchers from the National Nanotechnology Center. This will help trainees get correct knowledge, comprehension, and awareness in order to apply to their professions and businesses in the future. 2. As for the plans, the strategies, and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the present system, I analyzed the world nanotechnology situation that might have an effect on Thai society. The study is based on the National Plan to Develop Nanotechnology. The goal of this plan is to develop nanotechnology to be the national strategy within 10 years (2004-2013) and have it integrated into the Thai system. There are 4 parts in this plan: 1) nanomaterials, 2) nanoelectronics, 3) nanobiotechnology, and 4) human resources development. Data for human resource development should be worked with the present technology and use the country's resources to produce many products of nanotechnology, such as 1) handicrafts, decorations, and gifts, 2) agricultural products and food, 3) beverages, such as alcoholic and non- alcoholic drinks, and 5) textiles.

  13. User involvement as sharing knowledge – an extended perspective in patient education

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Anita; Fagermoen, May Solveig

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient education is undergoing a paradigm shift in which the perspectives of patients are increasingly being incorporated into learning programs. Access to the users’ experience is now considered a prerequisite for the development of quality health services, but how this user experience is incorporated is somewhat unclear. The inclusion of experiential knowledge and user involvement can challenge professional authority, roles, and working methods because knowledge sharing is different from persuasion, professional explanation, and consent. Dialogue and collaboration between professionals and users are essential to effective user involvement; however, little is understood about the characteristics of their collaboration. Objective To describe characteristics of the collaboration between users and health professionals in developing, implementing, and evaluating patient education courses in hospitals. Design, setting, and methods A field study was conducted in three different hospitals. Data collection comprised open observations in meetings of 17 different collaboration groups with a total of 100 participants, and 24 interviews with users and professionals. The data analyses included both thematic and the Systematic Data Integration approach. Results Two contrasting types of collaboration emerged from the analyses; knowledge sharing and information exchange. The first was characterized by mutual knowledge sharing, involvement, and reciprocal decision making. Characteristics of the second were the absence of dialogue, meagre exploration of the users’ knowledge, and decisions usually made by the professionals. Conclusion Collaboration between users and health personnel takes place in an asymmetric relationship. Mutual knowledge sharing was found to be more than the exchange of information and consultation and also to be a prerequisite for shared decision making. In developing patient education when users are involved the health professionals have the power and responsibility to ensure that knowledge sharing with users takes place. PMID:25489248

  14. The Educational Effectiveness of a Simulation/Game in Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashibuchi, Megumi; Sakamoto, Akira

    2001-01-01

    Examines the educational effectiveness of a game named POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE for sex education in a Japanese high school. Compares the effectiveness of educational videos with game conditions and discusses results that show the value of playing the game in the role of the opposite sex. (Author/LRW)

  15. Effect of health education on compliance in asthma.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Jai; Garg, Kranti

    2012-10-01

    Non-compliance is a major problem in the treatment of any chronic disease. Asthma is one such chronic disease where non-compliance is a major problem. Several factors for non-compliance like cost of the drugs and relief of symptoms on taking medications for a short time are common to all chronic diseases but in asthma, inhalational therapy especially in elderly because of senile changes, economic factors and comorbidities is an added factor. Health education can improve the compliance. So a study was undertaken to observe the causes of non-compliance in asthmatics, to compare these causes in elderly and young asthmatics and to see the effect of health education on non-compliance in asthmatics. One hundred patients of bronchial asthma, group A consisting 50 patients > or = 65 years old and group B 50 patients < 40 years attending tuberculosis and chest diseases hospital, Patiala were studied. Initial compliance and reasons for non-compliance, initial usage of inhalational devices and their techniques of inhalation were studied. Patients were educated on asthma and inhalational techniques.These patients were followed up at 15th day, 1st, 2nd and 3rd months for changes in compliance and lung functions. At the initial stage, non-compliance was observed in 30 patients (60%) amongst elderly and only 15 patients (30%) amongst the young. Cause for non-compliance was cost in 6, memory in 11, both cost and memory in 7 and relief of symptoms in 6 in elderly and 4, 0, 0 and 11 in young respectively. Only 23 patients (40%) amongst the elderly and 33 patients (66%) amongst the young were put on inhalational therapy. There were statistically significant differences between elderly and young with respect to all the above factors. Out of these 23 elderly, only 7 (30.4%) were confident of the technique of inhalation and demonstrated it correctly.The health education resulted in significant improvement in compliance in both the groups, but more so in the young. The compliance for medications improved from a baseline of 40% to 88% amongst elderly and from 70% to 96% amongst young. There was an improvement in the confidence and technique of inhalation from 44% to 86% amongst elderly and from 64% to 98% amongst young at follow-ups. Mean PEFR improved statistically significantly from 75.25% to 81.13% in elderly and 84.38% to 89.74% in young asthmatics. However, during the follow-up at 2nd month, it was realised that 7 patients amongst elderly and 1 amongst young could not be sustained on inhalational medications because of the cost factor, therefore they were put on only oral medications which were supplied free of cost to them and thus at followup at 3rd month, these patients were not on inhalational medications any more. PMID:23738402

  16. Entertainment Education for Prostate Cancer Screening: A Randomized Trial among Primary Care Patients with Low Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Robert J.; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Kneuper, Suzanne; Spann, Stephen J.; Miles, Brian J.; Hyman, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate an entertainment-based patient decision aid for prostate cancer screening among patients with low or high health literacy. Methods Male primary care patients from two clinical sites, one characterized as serving patients with low health literacy (n=149) and the second as serving patients with high health literacy (n=301), were randomized to receive an entertainment-based decision aid for prostate cancer screening or an audiobooklet-control aid with the same learner content but without the entertainment features. Postintervention and 2-week follow-up assessments were conducted. Results Patients at the low-literacy site were more engaged with the entertainment-based aid than patients at the high-literacy site. Overall, knowledge improved for all patients. Among patients at the low-literacy site, the entertainment-based aid was associated with lower decisional conflict and greater self-advocacy (i.e., mastering and obtaining information about screening) when compared to patients given the audiobooklet. No differences between the aids were observed for patients at the high-literacy site. Conclusions Entertainment education may be an effective strategy for promoting informed decision making about prostate cancer screening among patients with lower health literacy. Practice Implications As barriers to implementing computer-based patient decision support programs decrease, alternative models for delivering these programs should be explored. PMID:18760888

  17. Using Webcasts in Education: Evaluation of its Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakos, Michail N.; Vlamos, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    Educational webcasts are nowadays widely used by many organizations and institutions all over the world. However, the educational effectiveness of webcasts when used as an autonomous method is yet to be explored. In this paper, the clarification of certain issues concerning their educational effectiveness is attempted. Following specific…

  18. Education's Effect on Income Inequality: An Economic Globalisation Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Utilising a globalisation framework this study contributes to discussions concerning inequality, education, and development by re-examining the effects of educational and economic variables on income inequality. This research shows that the effects of education on income inequality are affected by the level of economic freedom in a country, and

  19. Using Webcasts in Education: Evaluation of its Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakos, Michail N.; Vlamos, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    Educational webcasts are nowadays widely used by many organizations and institutions all over the world. However, the educational effectiveness of webcasts when used as an autonomous method is yet to be explored. In this paper, the clarification of certain issues concerning their educational effectiveness is attempted. Following specific

  20. A patient-centered approach to the development and pilot of a warfarin pharmacogenomics patient education tool for health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Megan R.; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Abdalrhim, Ahmed D.; Han, Leona C.; McBane, Robert D.; Fiksdal, Alexander S.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe an exploratory project to develop and pilot a novel patient educational tool that explains the concept of pharmacogenomics and its impact on warfarin dosing that can be utilized by health professionals providing patient counseling. Methods A pharmacogenomics educational tool prototype was developed by an interdisciplinary team. During the pilot of the tool, focus group methodology was used to elicit input from patients based upon their perspectives and experiences with warfarin. Focus group sessions were audio-recorded and transcribed, and the data was analyzed through consensus coding in NVivo. Results The focus group participants were generally unfamiliar with the concept of pharmacogenomics but were receptive to the information. They thought the patient education tool was informative and would provide the most benefit to patients newly initiated on warfarin therapy. Conclusions Preliminary results from this exploratory project suggest that implementation and further feasibility testing of this pharmacogenomics patient education tool should be performed in a population of newly initiated patients taking warfarin. PMID:25729462

  1. Evaluating Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Health-Care Workers Regarding Patient Education in Iran.

    PubMed

    Garshasbi, Sima; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Fakhraei, Nahid; Naghdi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the position of patient education measuring knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) among health care workers (HCWs). It is also aimed to emphasize the need for a real position for patient education. This survey was performed among a group of HCWs in Iran. The scores had an acceptable level. However, nurses, females and younger people received higher scores. The staff was already aware of patient education necessity and considered it as the duty of all medical team. Often HCWs cannot include patient education in their routine due to time shortage, lack of staff's financial motivation, fatigue, and loads of work, etc. There is still need for a real training in the educational curriculum. Additionally, the various HCWs-related obstacles should be taken into account. PMID:26853292

  2. Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Attached office nurses more recovered medical waste from patients’ homes. • Most nurses educated their patients on how to store home medical care waste in their homes and on how to separate them. • Around half of nurses educated their patients on where to dispose of their home medical care waste. - Abstract: To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as ”attached offices” and others as “independent offices”. More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients’ homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years, with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education.

  3. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of

  4. Comparison of Two Educational Methods on Nurses' Adoption of Safe Patient Handling Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folami, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries caused by patient lifting and transfers are a concern to health care workers. The Safe Patient Handling Act calls for all health care organizations to move to mechanical assistance from previous manual methods of transfers. This research analyzed two different educational programs that addressed safe patient handling for

  5. Special considerations in the care of the physician-patient: a lesson for medical education.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sherrell T

    2014-10-01

    In the field of medicine, there is strong emphasis on the healing of others, but not as much on the healing of self. It is therefore not surprising that physicians may be ill-equipped to not only care for other physicians, but to be treated as patients. Multiple studies indicate that relatively few physicians have their own primary physicians and often rely on self-treatment, rather than obtaining comprehensive care from other physicians. Through the lens of a personal struggle with serious illness, the author develops a discussion about potential barriers physicians face in seeking care, the downstream effects of physicians' perceptions of health care, and ways to make changes to prevailing physician health attitudes. Potential changes at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education levels are considered, in order to help physicians both to embrace their roles as patients and also better serve their colleagues who are under their care. PMID:24823487

  6. Developing Effective Virtual Education Programs. The Informed Educator Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This "Informed Educator" provides a snapshot of the current state of virtual education at the elementary and secondary levels. A number of critical factors are addressed, including: (1) the types of online courses and schools now available; (2) virtual program providers-- institutional, school, district, state, consortia and private sector; (3)…

  7. Patient-centered Bedside Education and Traditional Jewish Law and Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Shafran, Yigal; Wolowelsky, Joel B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bedside rounds have long been a time-honored component of medical education. Recently, there have been various recommendations that residency-training programs further incorporate bedside teaching into clinical curricula. Objectives To compare these current attitudes regarding bedside education with the position of traditional Jewish law and ethics. Methods Relevant medical journal articles and traditional Jewish sources were reviewed. Results Halacha (the corpus of traditional Jewish law and ethics) gives greater focus to a patient-centered rather than student-centered bedside education experience. Conclusion Residency training programs should give greater consideration to the importance of a patient-centered bedside education experience. PMID:23908828

  8. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001

  9. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

  10. A prospective study of nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common clinical manifestation that may have clinical significance. Objectives To evaluate if there is a difference between nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation on nutritional status in patients with AD. Methods A randomized, prospective 6-month study which enrolled 90 subjects with probable AD aged 65 years or older divided into 3 groups: Control Group (CG) [n = 27], Education Group (EG) [n = 25], which participated in an education program and Supplementation Group (SG) [n = 26], which received two daily servings of oral nutritional supplementation. Subjects were assessed for anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI, TSF, AC and AMC), biochemical data (total protein, albumin, and total lymphocyte count), CDR (Clinical Dementia Rating), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination), as well as dependence during meals. Results The SG showed a significant improvement in the following anthropometric measurements: weight (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), BMI (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), AC (H calc = 12.99, p =< 0.002), and AMC (H calc = 8.67, p =< 0.013) compared to the CG and EG. BMI of the EG was significantly greater compared to the CG. There were significant changes in total protein (H calc = 6.17, p =< 0.046), and total lymphocyte count in the SG compared to the other groups (H cal = 7.94, p = 0.019). Conclusion Oral nutritional supplementation is more effective compared to nutrition education in improving nutritional status. PMID:21943331

  11. More educated emergency department patients are less likely to receive opioids for acute pain.

    PubMed

    Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Hunold, Katie M; Bortsov, Andrey V; Soward, April C; Peak, David A; Jones, Jeffrey S; Swor, Robert A; Lee, David C; Domeier, Robert M; Hendry, Phyllis L; Rathlev, Niels K; McLean, Samuel A

    2012-05-01

    Inadequate treatment of pain in United States emergency departments (EDs) is common, in part because of the limited and idiosyncratic use of opioids by emergency providers. This study sought to determine the relationship between patient socioeconomic characteristics and the likelihood that they would receive opioids during a pain-related ED visit. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of ED data obtained as part of a multicenter study of outcomes after minor motor vehicle collision (MVC). Study patients were non-Hispanic white patients between the ages of 18 and 65 years who were evaluated and discharged home from 1 of 8 EDs in 4 states. Socioeconomic characteristics include educational attainment and income. Of 690 enrolled patients, the majority had moderate or severe pain (80%). Patients with higher education attainment had lower levels of pain, pain catastrophizing, perceived life threat, and distress. More educated patients were also less likely to receive opioids during their ED visit. Opioids were given to 54% of patients who did not complete high school vs 10% of patients with post-college education (?(2) test P<.001). Differences in the frequency of opioid administration between patients with the lowest educational attainment (39%, 95% confidence interval 22% to 60%) and highest educational attainment (13%, 95% confidence interval 7% to 23%) remained after adjustment for age, sex, income, and pain severity (P=.01). In this sample of post-MVC ED patients, more educated patients were less likely to receive opioids. Further study is needed to assess the generalizability of these findings and to determine the reason for the difference. PMID:22386895

  12. Dental education and dentists' attitudes and behavior concerning patients with autism.

    PubMed

    Weil, Taryn N; Inglehart, Marita R

    2010-12-01

    The number of patients diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in the United States has increased significantly. The objectives of this study were to explore general and pediatric dentists' professional attitudes and behavior towards patients with ASD; these dentists' perceptions of their dental education about these issues; and the relationships among their educational experiences, attitudes, and behaviors concerning patients with ASD. Survey data were collected from 162 general dentists in Michigan and 212 pediatric dentists across the United States. The results showed that 89 percent of pediatric dentists and 32 percent of general dentists treat patients with ASD. The respondents disagreed with statements indicating that their predoctoral dental education had prepared them well to treat patients with ASD. However, the better they felt prepared, the more likely they were to provide care for these patients. The frequency with which pediatric dentists said they use appropriate behavior management strategies when treating patients with ASD correlated with the quality of their educational experiences. In conclusion, given the growing number of patients with ASD, it is important to revisit dental education efforts targeted towards preparing future dental care providers for the treatment of patients with ASD and special needs. PMID:21123497

  13. Effective Compensatory Education Sourcebook. Volume I (Revised): Effective Educational Practices in Schools that Serve Disadvantaged Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisner, Elizabeth R.; Haslam, M. Bruce

    This publication, part of a series initiated in 1986, describes effective educational practices of schools that serve disadvantaged students and adds information on recent research about the characteristics of these schools to support the review. Following an introduction, four types of attributes are examined in four sections. Section 1 considers

  14. Computer-based learning for ESRD patient education: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J K; Frisby, A J

    1995-07-01

    Computer use in everyday life has expanded human potential in virtually every possible arena. In health care, computer technology affects direct clinical care through diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, and documentation processes. Patient care systems use computer technology to manage billing, scheduling, and multiple other administrative functions. Computer technology for education of health care professionals has been primarily in selected undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs. Computer-based continuing education for health care professionals has been available for at least a decade, but computer-based patient education is just now beginning to emerge as a learning option. This article describes examples of patient education programs using different types of hardware and software and explores potential areas for further development of this area for end-stage renal disease patients and families. Computer technology is not a replacement for professional involvement in patient education, but rather offers a new arena of media to enhance and expand current teaching and learning resources. Computer-based learning is characterized by features representative of many highly regarded principles of adult education. Further, instructional design concepts used for program development are fundamentally sound for patient education. PMID:7614360

  15. The Associations between the Family Education and Mortality of Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Kai; Han, Qing-Feng; Zhu, Tong-Ying; Ren, Ye-Ping; Chen, Jiang-Hua; Zhao, Hui-Ping; Chen, Meng-Hua; Dong, Jie; Wang, Yue; Hao, Chuan- Ming; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Mei; Tian, Na; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether education level of family members predicts all-cause and cardiovascular death and initial-episode peritonitis in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods A total of 2264 patients on chronic PD were collected from seven centers affiliated with the Socioeconomic Status on the Outcome of Peritoneal Dialysis (SSOP) Study. All demographic, socioeconomic and laboratory data of patients and the education level of all family members were recorded at baseline. Multivariate Cox regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and initial-episode peritonitis with adjustments for recognized traditional factors. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between patients with (n?=?1752) and without (n?=?512) complete education information. According to the highest education level of patients' family, included 1752 patients were divided into four groups, i.e. elementary or lower (15%), middle (27%), high (24%) and more than high school (34%). The family highest education (using elementary school or lower group as reference, hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval of middle school group, high school group and more than high school group was 0.68[0.480.96], 0.64[0.450.91], 0.66[0.480.91], respectively) rather than their average education level or patients' or spouse's education was significantly associated with the higher mortality. Neither patients' nor family education level did correlate to the risk for cardiovascular death or initial-episode peritonitis. Conclusions Family members' education level was found to be a novel predictor of PD outcome. Family, as the main source of health care providers, should be paid more attention in our practice. PMID:24797080

  16. Randomised controlled trial of an education and support package for stroke patients and their carers

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Sally; Hoffmann, Tammy; Worrall, Linda; Read, Stephen; Wong, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objective Tailoring stroke information and providing reinforcement opportunities are two strategies proposed to enhance the effectiveness of education. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of an education package which utilised both strategies on the knowledge, health and psychosocial outcomes of stroke patients and carers. Design Multisite, randomised trial comparing usual care with an education and support package. Setting Two acute stroke units. Participants Patients and their carers (N=138) were randomised (control n=67, intervention n=71) of which data for 119 participants (control n=59, intervention n=60) were analysed. Intervention The package consisted of a computer-generated, tailored written information booklet and verbal reinforcement provided prior to, and for 3 months following, discharge. Outcome measures Outcome measures were administered prior to hospital discharge and at 3-month follow-up by blinded assessors. The primary outcome was stroke knowledge (score range: 0–25). Secondary outcomes were: self-efficacy (1–10), anxiety and depression (0–21), ratings of importance of information (1–10), feelings of being informed (1–10), satisfaction with information (1–10), caregiver burden (carers) (0–13) and quality of life (patients) (1–5). Results Intervention group participants reported better: self-efficacy for accessing stroke information (adjusted mean difference (MD) of 1.0, 95% CI 0.3 to 1.7, p=0.004); feeling informed (MD 0.9, 95% CI 0.2 to 1.6, p=0.008); and satisfaction with medical (MD 2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.8, p<0.001); practical (MD 1.1, 95% CI 0.3 to 1.9, p=0.008), services and benefits (MD 0.9, 95% CI 0.1 to 1.8, p=0.036) and secondary prevention information (MD 1.7, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.5, p<0.001). There was no significant effect on other outcomes. Conclusions Intervention group participants had improved self-efficacy for accessing stroke information and satisfaction with information, but other outcomes were not significantly affected. Evaluation of a more intensive intervention in a trial with a larger sample size is required to establish the value of an educational intervention that uses tailoring and reinforcement strategies. ACTRN12608000469314 PMID:23657469

  17. A model of genetic guidance for hemoglobinopathy patients and laboratory diagnosis of family members as educational and preventive measures

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiana Dela-Svia; Freire, Adriana Sousa; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisngela de Paula; Garca-Zapata, Marco Tlio Antnio

    2012-01-01

    Background: The high frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Brazil constitutes a public health problem and thus educational and preventive measures are necessary to reduce the incidence. Genetic guidance, a modality of genetic counseling, and family screening are measures that can assist in reproductive decisions and mitigate clinical, psychological and social problems of families with these disorders. Objetive: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of educational and preventive measures for hemoglobinopathies using genetic guidance and laboratory screening of families. Methods: The diagnoses of patients with hemoglobinopathies were confirmed and then the level of knowledge about their disease was evaluated and genetic guidance was provided. Three months later, the level of assimilated information of these patients was evaluated. In addition, laboratory diagnosis of family members was carried out. Results: Diagnosis of sickle cell anemia was confirmed for most patients. Moreover, the majority of the patients who had a low level of knowledge before genetic guidance (68.8%) demonstrated a higher level of assimilated information after the process (81.8%). Almost 70% of the family members had hemoglobin changes and some had hemoglobinopathies(2.6%). They were duly informed about the results of the examinations, which made it possible to investigate further. Conclusion: Genetic guidance and family screening were effective preventive and educational measures that improved the quality of life of patients, preventing complications and sequels and allowed the referral of those who may transmit altered genes for clinical diagnosis and to genetic counseling services. PMID:23125541

  18. NSAID-Avoidance Education in Community Pharmacies for Patients at High Risk for Acute Kidney Injury, Upstate New York, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Min; Cerulli, Jennifer; Grabe, Darren W.; Fox, Chester; Vassalotti, Joseph A.; Prokopienko, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently associated with community-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI), a strong risk factor for development and progression of chronic kidney disease. Using access to prescription medication profiles, pharmacists can identify patients at high risk for NSAID-induced AKI. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of a community pharmacybased patient education program on patient knowledge of NSAID-associated renal safety concerns. Methods Patients receiving prescription medications for hypertension or diabetes mellitus were invited to participate in an educational program on the risks of NSAID use. A patient knowledge questionnaire (PKQ) consisting of 5 questions scored from 1 to 5 was completed before and after the intervention. Information was collected on age, race, sex, and frequency of NSAID use. Results A total of 152 participants (60% women) completed both the pre- and post-intervention questionnaire; average age was 54.6 (standard deviation [SD], 17.5). Mean pre-intervention PKQ score was 3.3 (SD, 1.4), and post-intervention score was 4.6 (SD, 0.9) (P = .002). Participants rated program usefulness (1 = not useful to 5 = extremely useful) as 4.2 (SD, 1.0). In addition, 48% reported current NSAID use and 67% reported that the program encouraged them to limit their use. Conclusion NSAID use was common among patients at high risk for AKI. A brief educational intervention in a community pharmacy improved patient knowledge on NSAID-associated risks. Pharmacists practicing in the community can partner with primary care providers in the medical home model to educate patients at risk for AKI. PMID:25523351

  19. Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education. Teacher Education Yearbook VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, D. John, Ed.; Byrd, David M., Ed.

    This yearbook addresses the nation's need to train and retain good teachers, exploring exemplary practices in teacher education. There are four sections divided into 12 chapters. The book begins with a forward, "Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education: Powerful Teacher Education Programs" (E.M. Guyton). Section 1, "Models for Enhancing

  20. Community-Based Eco-Education: Sound Ecology and Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niesenbaum, Richard A.; Gorka, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the development of a college-level eco-educational course that attempts to capitalize on the ecological and educational strengths of ecotourism by establishing a partnership with a local community. Makes suggestions for establishing community partnerships for effective international eco-educational program development. (Contains 15

  1. Community-Based Eco-Education: Sound Ecology and Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niesenbaum, Richard A.; Gorka, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the development of a college-level eco-educational course that attempts to capitalize on the ecological and educational strengths of ecotourism by establishing a partnership with a local community. Makes suggestions for establishing community partnerships for effective international eco-educational program development. (Contains 15…

  2. More Educated Emergency Department Patients are Less Likely to Receive Opioids for Acute Pain

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Timothy F.; Hunold, Katie M.; Bortsov, Andrey V.; Soward, April C.; Peak, David A.; Jones, Jeffrey S.; Swor, Robert A.; Lee, David C.; Domeier, Robert M.; Hendry, Phyllis L.; Rathlev, Niels K.; McLean, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Inadequate treatment of pain in United States emergency departments (EDs) is common, in part due to the limited and idiosyncratic use of opioids by emergency providers. We sought to determine the relationship between patient socioeconomic characteristics and the likelihood they would receive opioids during a pain-related ED visit. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of ED data obtained as part of a multi-center study of outcomes after minor motor vehicle collision (MVC). Study patients were non-hispanic whites between the ages of 1865 who were evaluated and discharged home from one of nine EDs in four states. Socioeconomic characteristics included educational attainment and income. Of 690 enrolled patients, the majority had moderate or severe pain (80%). Patients with higher education attainment had lower levels of pain, pain catastrophizing, perceived life-threat, and distress. More educated patients were also less likely to receive opioids during their ED visit. Opioids were given to 54% of patients who did not complete high school vs. 10% of patients with post-college education (chi-square test p<.001). Differences in the frequency of opioid administration between patients with the lowest educational attainment (39%, 95% CI 22%60%)and highest educational attainment (13%, 95% CI 7%23%) remained after adjustment for age, sex, income, and pain severity (p=.01). In this sample of post-MVCED patients, more educated patients were less likely to receive opioids. Further study is needed to assess the generalizability of these findings and determine the reason for the difference. PMID:22386895

  3. Educational intervention for metabolic bone disease in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuexian; Zhao, Yinning; Liu, Junduo; Hou, Yahong; Zhao, Yue

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The currently accepted international guidelines for treatment of CKD-MBD has been published, unfortunately adequate control of serum markers of disorder, especially hyperphosphatemia, is poorly achieved. Whether educational intervention is an effective way for improving CKD-MBD remains controversial. A systematic review of educational intervention versus routine care to improve patients with CKD-MBD was conducted. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs examining the efficacy of educational intervention to improve patients with CKD-MBD were included. We performed a comprehensive search of several databases and sources to identify eligible trials. In addition, we searched unpublished studies by tracking the SIGLE (System for Information on Grey Literature) database. Finally, 8 RCTs and 2 quasi-RCTs containing 775 participants were included in our systematic review. The result of our study revealed that the educational intervention to patients with CKD-MBD led to an improvement of the serum phosphorus and calcium by phosphate product. Educational intervention is a beneficial supplement method in improving CKD-MBD and putting off deterioration of the disease. PMID:25193107

  4. Highlighting Specific Patient Education Needs in an Aging Cardiac Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Abby C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article describes how, by using a paper-and-pencil, multiple-risk-factor assessment instrument referred to as the Heart Health Assessment Questionnaire, the specific educational needs of an aging veteran population were more clearly identified. Findings are discussed in relation to the pivotal role of the health education professional for

  5. Reducing readmissions using teach-back: enhancing patient and family education.

    PubMed

    Peter, Debra; Robinson, Paula; Jordan, Marie; Lawrence, Susan; Casey, Krista; Salas-Lopez, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a quality improvement initiative, implemented by a patient education workgroup within a tertiary Magnet facility. The project focused on the association between inadequate care transitions in patients with heart failure and subsequent costly readmissions. The teach-back initiative was piloted with patients hospitalized with heart failure, because of this population's high risk of readmission. Learning outcomes included documented improvements in patients' understanding of their disease and reduced readmission rates. PMID:25479173

  6. DIFFERENTIAL PATIENT RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION, COUNSELING, AND DENTAL TREATMENT. PAPER PRESENTED AT A NATIONAL SEMINAR ON ADULT EDUCATION RESEARCH (CHICAGO, FEBRUARY 11-13, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LUPTON, DANIEL E.

    RESEARCH (1) ANALYZED SPECIFIC OUTCOMES OF COUNSELING, INSTRUCTION, AND DENTAL THERAPY, AND (2) DETERMINED THE RELATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF PATIENT EDUCATION FOR RELIEF OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT (TMJ) DYSFUNCTION. SIXTY ADULT PATIENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS TMJ RESEARCH CENTER WERE RANDOMLY ASSIGNED TO ONE OF THREE PROGRAMS--DENTISTRY,

  7. Students or Patients? Provision of Education in the Mental Health Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter; Godding, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    British government proposals for community care of psychiatric patients require a response from adult educators about the need for learning opportunities both inside and outside institutions for people with mental health problems. (SK)

  8. [Medical nutritional therapy and therapeutic patient education in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Jans, Margarida; Murillo, Serafin; Vidal, Merc

    2011-05-01

    This article includes an introduction to the current approach to dietary treatment of diabetes. Are provided the nutritional recommendations to primary secondary and tertiary prevention of diabetes, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) adapted to different types of diabetes, treatments and special situations. Secondly, it introduces the concept of Therapeutic Education, especially education and nutritional diet for persons with diabetes and their families, the educational objectives in food according to type of diabetes type 1 or type 2 in different treatment modalities and educational strategies recommended by the Diabetes Education Study Group (wear) of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) to facilitate better adherence to dietary treatment. PMID:21776930

  9. Embedding Patient Education in Mobile Platform for Patients With Heart Failure: Theory-Based Development and Beta Testing.

    PubMed

    Athilingam, Ponrathi; Osorio, Richard E; Kaplan, Howard; Oliver, Drew; O'neachtain, Tara; Rogal, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    Health education is an important component of multidisciplinary disease management of heart failure. The educational information given at the time of discharge after hospitalization or at initial diagnosis is often overwhelming to patients and is often lost or never consulted again. Therefore, the aim of this developmental project was to embed interactive heart failure education in a mobile platform. A patient-centered approach, grounded on several learning theories including Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning, Sweller's Cognitive Load, Instructional Design Approach, and Problem-Based Learning, was utilized to develop and test the mobile app. Ten heart failure patients, who attended an outpatient heart failure clinic, completed beta testing. A validated self-confidence questionnaire was utilized to assess patients' confidence in using the mobile app. All participants (100%) reported moderate to extreme confidence in using the app, 95% were very likely to use the app, 100% reported the design was easy to navigate, and content on heart failure was appropriate. Having the information accessible on their mobile phone was reported as a positive, like a health coach by all patients. Clinicians and nurses validated the content. Thus, embedding health education in a mobile app is proposed in promoting persistent engagement to improve health outcomes. PMID:26765655

  10. Improvement in Stress, General Self-Efficacy, and Health Related Quality of Life following Patient Education for Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Haugland, Trude; Veenstra, Marijke; Vatn, Morten H.; Wahl, Astrid K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, health related quality of life (HRQoL), and stress among patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) following a multidisciplinary educational intervention. Forty-one patients were enrolled in this exploratory pilot study. A total of 37 patients completed the full 26-week intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. General self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale, HRQoL was measured with the SF-36, and stress was measured with the Impact of Event Scale. Mixed effect models were used to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, mental and physical components of HRQoL, and stress adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. Results showed significant improvements in patients' general self-efficacy (β = 0.71; P < 0.05), physical component scores of HRQoL (β = 3.09; P < 0.01), and stress (β = −2.10, P = 0.008). Findings suggest that patients with NET have the capacity to improve their ability to cope with their disease, problem-solve, improve their physical status, and reduce their stress following an educational intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. These preliminary data provide a basis for future randomized controlled trials to test interventions to improve HRQoL for patients with NET. PMID:23738063

  11. Are Distance Laboratories Effective Tools for Technology Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Salam, Tarek M.; Kauffmann, Paul J.; Crossman, Gary R.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to perform a laboratory experiment as a nonhands-on observer, such as in a distance education context, has been questioned by some educators who ponder whether distance education lab courses are as effective as those held in a physical laboratory environment. This article examines this issue and compares the performance of distance

  12. Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the

  13. Two Instructional Designs for Dialogic Citizenship Education: An Effect Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuitema, Jaap; Veugelers, Wiel; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; ten Dam, Geert

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite the renewed interest in citizenship education, relatively little is known about effective ways to realize citizenship education in the classroom. In the literature on citizenship education, dialogue is considered to be a crucial element. However, there is very little, if any, empirical research into the different ways to

  14. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, LeaAnn Tyson

    2004-01-01

    This article applies Stephen R. Covey's "seven habits of highly effective people" to physical educators. Although the habits were not written specifically for physical educators, they certainly do apply. The article focuses on how the seven habits can help physical educators work more successfully with administrators and other teachers. In

  15. Effective Mathematics Teaching in Finnish and Swedish Teacher Education Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmi, Kirsti; Ryve, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores effective mathematics teaching as constructed in Finnish and Swedish teacher educators' discourses. Based on interview data from teacher educators as well as data from feedback discussions between teacher educators and prospective teachers in Sweden and Finland, the analysis shows that several aspects of the recent…

  16. Personal Finance Education: Effective Practice Guide for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielhofer, Thomas; Kerr, David; Gardiner, Clare

    2010-01-01

    This document provides guidance on effective practice in delivering personal finance education in secondary schools. It is based on the findings from research carried out by NFER (the National Foundation for Educational Research) on behalf of pfeg (Personal Finance Education Group) as part of an evaluation of Learning Money Matters (LMM). This…

  17. Positioning for Effectiveness: Applying Marketing Concepts to Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenburg, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates how colleges can use distance education to attract and retain a "critical mass" of learners for distance programs. Explores alternative ways to view distance education market opportunities and determine which avenues to pursue. Suggests how to be more effective in all aspects of distance education programs. (13 citations) (YKH)

  18. Sexuality Education: An Evaluation of Programs and Their Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Douglas

    This document is the first volume of a six-volume report on sexuality education. This volume summarizes the structure and content of sexuality education in the United States, reviews the literature on the effects of sexuality education, describes the evaluation methods, provides a description of and the evaluation data for each program, and…

  19. Effective Mathematics Teaching in Finnish and Swedish Teacher Education Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmi, Kirsti; Ryve, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores effective mathematics teaching as constructed in Finnish and Swedish teacher educators' discourses. Based on interview data from teacher educators as well as data from feedback discussions between teacher educators and prospective teachers in Sweden and Finland, the analysis shows that several aspects of the recent

  20. The Effect of Community Colleges on Changing Students' Educational Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Duane E.; Gill, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    The education literature provides numerous estimates of community college diversion and democratization effects measured in terms of educational attainment. Kane and Rouse [J Econ Pers 13 (1999) 64] suggest testing for diversion by comparing the impacts of two-year and four-year colleges on the changes in educational aspirations that underlie

  1. Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the…

  2. Major Findings on the Effectiveness of Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Tadeo

    A review of 10 major studies, conducted since 1976, assessing the effectiveness of Title VII bilingual education programs suggest that bilingual education is a viable instructional program for children of limited English-speaking ability. The studies examined are: "Bilingual Education: An Appraisal of Empirical Research," Zappert and Cruz;

  3. Beneficial effects of rosuvastatin treatment in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Cem; Yildiz, Ahmet; Ozkan, Alev Arat; Uzunhasan, Isil; Kaya, Aysem; Yigit, Zerrin

    2015-02-01

    We determined the effect of 6-month rosuvastatin treatment on blood lipids, oxidative parameters, apolipoproteins, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Healthy individuals (men aged >40 years and postmenopausal women) with a body mass index ? 30 (n = 100) who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III diagnostic criteria for MetS were included. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels decreased (P < .0001). The change in LDL 1 to 3 subgroups was significant (P = .0007, P < .0001, and P = .006, respectively). Changes in LDL 4 to 7 subgroups were not significant. There was a beneficial effect on oxidized LDL, fibrinogen, homocysteine, and HbA1c. Rosuvastatin significantly increased high-density lipoprotein levels (P = .0003). The oxidant/antioxidant status and subclinical inflammatory state were also beneficially changed. Rosuvastatin had a significant beneficial effect on atherogenic dyslipidemia as well as on oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with MetS. PMID:24554427

  4. Five-Year Blood Pressure Control and Mortality Following Health Education for Hypertensive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Three health education interventions for urban poor hypertensive patients were introduced in a randomized factorial design. Two-year data on compliance with therapy and five-year mortality data indicate the success of such educational programs in the long-term management and control of high blood pressure. (Author/GC)

  5. Integrating Education and Patient Care. Observations from the GME Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) appointed a task force in November 1999 to examine how AAMC member institutions and others were developing, and could develop, new ways to integrate education and patient care. Mechanisms were identified that would aid in reorienting residency programs to education, rather than services. These

  6. Exploring Interprofessional Education through a High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation Scenario: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossler, Kelly Lynn

    2013-01-01

    High-fidelity human patient simulation has emerged as a valuable medium to reinforce educational content within programs of nursing. As simulation learning experiences have been identified as augmenting both didactic lecture content and clinical learning, these experiences have expanded to incorporate interprofessional education. Review of

  7. Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saksena, Anuraag

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional

  8. Exploring Interprofessional Education through a High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation Scenario: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossler, Kelly Lynn

    2013-01-01

    High-fidelity human patient simulation has emerged as a valuable medium to reinforce educational content within programs of nursing. As simulation learning experiences have been identified as augmenting both didactic lecture content and clinical learning, these experiences have expanded to incorporate interprofessional education. Review of…

  9. Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saksena, Anuraag

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional…

  10. Some Observations on Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geske, Terry G.

    1979-01-01

    The general nature of cost-effectiveness analysis is discussed, analytical frameworks for conducting cost-effectiveness studies are described, and some of the problems inherent in measuring educational costs and in assessing program effectiveness are addressed. (Author/IRT)

  11. Educational quality improvement report: outcomes from a revised morbidity and mortality format that emphasised patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Bechtold, M L; Scott, S; Nelson, K; Cox, K R; Dellsperger, K C; Hall, L W

    2007-01-01

    Problem Although morbidity and mortality conferences (MMCs) are meant to promote quality care through careful analysis of adverse events, focus on individual actions or the fear of incrimination may interfere with identification of system issues contributing to the adverse outcomes. Design Participant attitudes before and after the intervention towards patient safety and conference redesign were assessed using an attitudinal survey. A list of contributing factors, recommended solutions and targeted system improvements was maintained with ongoing progress recorded. Setting Department of Internal Medicine training programme at University of MissouriColumbia. Participants Residents and fellows from the above residency programme. Educational objectives (1) Distinguish between culture of blame/shame and patient safety culture, (2) identify gaps in quality contributing to adverse outcomes (3) identify strategies to close gaps and (4) participate in root cause analysis, demonstrating an ability to review an adverse event and recommend an action plan. Strategies for change An interdisciplinary team modified the internal medicine MMC to emphasise a better understanding of patient safety principles and system?based practice interventions. For each adverse event analysed, root causes were identified, followed by discussion of system interventions that might prevent future such events. Key measures for improvement (1) Attitudes of residents and fellows regarding patient safety, as measured on a 20?item, five?point ordinal scale survey, (2) system improvements generated from the patient safety MMC (PSMMC) and (3) attendance at PSMMC. Effects of change Clinical outcomes: 121 system improvement recommendations were made and 39 were pursued on the basis of likelihood of achieving high impact changes. 23 improvements were implemented, 11 were partially implemented or in progress, and 5 were abandoned due to impracticality or redundancy. Educational outcomes: 58 residents and fellows completed surveys before and after modification of conference format. 6/20 survey items showed substantial change with four of these changes occurring in the desired direction. Eleven of the remaining 14 responses changed in the desired direction. Average MMC attendance increased from 418 to 5010 participants (p<0.03). Lessons learnt The new PSMMC initiated multiple improvements in the quality of patient care without sacrificing attendance or attitudes of the residents or fellows. The new PSMMC promotes opportunities for participants to improve quality of patient care in a safe and nurturing environment. PMID:18055885

  12. In Search of Effective Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laming, James S.

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes major trends in character education in U.S. classrooms, beginning with an early twentieth-century "Children's Morality Code," and progressing through 1950s moral and values education, three past decades of drug and sex education programs, and current efforts to develop valid program evaluation methods. The next step is developing a

  13. The Effectiveness of Microcomputers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploeger, Floyd D.

    This in-depth review of the literature synthesizes articles and abstracts identified as education-oriented microcomputer research studies published since 1979. A brief, historic overview of educational computing is followed by a review of the Becker (1983) survey, which concerned the distribution of microcomputers in education in the United…

  14. Getting patients to say yes: effective case presentations.

    PubMed

    Manji, I

    1992-08-01

    Getting patients to say yes to recommended treatment requires the dedication of each team member. It demands a commitment to educating patients and motivating them to turn their dental needs into dental wants, as well as providing financial options to make treatment affordable. When the dental team takes the time to nurture the case presentation process, the results can be dramatic. Patients embrace treatment and the practice provides it. It is nothing short of a win-win scenario. PMID:1504897

  15. Teams, tribes and patient safety: overcoming barriers to effective teamwork in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Boyd, Matt; Cumin, David

    2014-03-01

    Modern healthcare is delivered by multidisciplinary, distributed healthcare teams who rely on effective teamwork and communication to ensure effective and safe patient care. However, we know that there is an unacceptable rate of unintended patient harm, and much of this is attributed to failures in communication between health professionals. The extensive literature on teams has identified shared mental models, mutual respect and trust and closed-loop communication as the underpinning conditions required for effective teams. However, a number of challenges exist in the healthcare environment. We explore these in a framework of educational, psychological and organisational challenges to the development of effective healthcare teams. Educational interventions can promote a better understanding of the principles of teamwork, help staff understand each other's roles and perspectives, and help develop specific communication strategies, but may not be sufficient on their own. Psychological barriers, such as professional silos and hierarchies, and organisational barriers such as geographically distributed teams, can increase the chance of communication failures with the potential for patient harm. We propose a seven-step plan to overcome the barriers to effective team communication that incorporates education, psychological and organisational strategies. Recent evidence suggests that improvement in teamwork in healthcare can lead to significant gains in patient safety, measured against efficiency of care, complication rate and mortality. Interventions to improve teamwork in healthcare may be the next major advance in patient outcomes. PMID:24398594

  16. Educators' Guide to Effective Special Education Materials. 1983-84 Edition (As Reported by 500 Special Educators).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Paul, Ed.

    The catalog lists special education materials identified by approximately 500 special educators (through the Teacher Initiated Materials Evaluation Process) as effective with handicapped and gifted children. The evaluation process is built on the premise that teachers in contact with handicapped children know the most effective materials.

  17. Selecting and Evaluating Media for Patient Education: A Fairy Tale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David

    1979-01-01

    The MERL system, a four-component decision-making approach which evaluates media from a communications theory perspective, is useful to the health educator in evaluating media in a systematic and efficient manner. (Author/CMV)

  18. My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App (MyIDEA): Patient-Centered Design Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Adhir; Groo, Vicki; Dickens, Carolyn; Field, Jerry; Baumann, Matthew; Welland, Betty; Gutowski, Gerry; Flores Jr, Jose D; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Bahroos, Neil; Hynes, Denise M; Wilkie, Diana J

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient adherence to medication regimens is critical in most chronic disease treatment plans. This study uses a patient-centered tablet app, “My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App (MyIDEA).” This is an educational program designed to improve patient medication adherence. Objective Our goal is to describe the design, methodology, limitations, and results of the MyIDEA tablet app. We created a mobile technology-based patient education app to improve dual antiplatelet therapy adherence in patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention and received a drug-eluting stent. Methods Patient advisers were involved in the development process of MyIDEA from the initial wireframe to the final launch of the product. The program was restructured and redesigned based on the patient advisers’ suggestions as well as those from multidisciplinary team members. To accommodate those with low health literacy, we modified the language and employed attractive color schemes to improve ease of use. We assumed that the target patient population may have little to no experience with electronic tablets, and therefore, we designed the interface to be as intuitive as possible. Results The MyIDEA app has been successfully deployed to a low-health-literate elderly patient population in the hospital setting. A total of 6 patients have interacted with MyIDEA for an average of 17.6 minutes/session. Conclusions Including patient advisers in the early phases of a mobile patient education development process is critical. A number of changes in text order, language, and color schemes occurred to improve ease of use. The MyIDEA program has been successfully deployed to a low-health-literate elderly patient population. Leveraging patient advisers throughout the development process helps to ensure implementation success. PMID:26139587

  19. The Effect of Hardiness Education on Hardiness and Burnout on Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jaye

    2015-01-01

    Nurse leaders need to be aware of the costly implications of staff retention, unit finances, and patient satisfaction caused by unmanaged stress and burnout as well as staff disengagement. It is vital to the organizational behavior of the health care facility for nurse managers to promote, educate, and screen for hardiness in their staff. Hardiness education can lessen the effects of stress and burnout. Nurse managers and executives can give their staff valuable tools and resources to enhance hardiness and coping abilities through hardiness education. PMID:26477118

  20. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the

  1. Effect of Medical Education on Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry and Individuals with Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Marzellus; Harendza, Sigrid; Meyer, Jelka; Drabik, Anna; Reimer, Jens; Kuhnigk, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the effect of medical education on students' attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatric patients, and examined the usefulness of a new evaluation tool: the 6-item Psychiatric Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge (PEAK-6). Method: Authors studied the attitudes of 116 medical students toward psychiatry…

  2. Effect of Medical Education on Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry and Individuals with Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Marzellus; Harendza, Sigrid; Meyer, Jelka; Drabik, Anna; Reimer, Jens; Kuhnigk, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the effect of medical education on students' attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatric patients, and examined the usefulness of a new evaluation tool: the 6-item Psychiatric Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge (PEAK-6). Method: Authors studied the attitudes of 116 medical students toward psychiatry

  3. A study of interactivity in educational patient hypermedia.

    PubMed

    Maaske, L

    1999-01-01

    This study explores the use of interactive graphics for patients about to undergo Ishiki Type I thyroplasty, a surgery for unilateral vocal cord palsy. Steps include exploration of previous studies, needs assessment, prototype creation, and formative evaluation. Research suggests that interactive graphics should include the opportunity for the patients to practice and engage in a relevant, realistic scenario. Needs assessment results suggest the need for further studies with interactive graphics using larger patient sample sizes. PMID:10659444

  4. [Therapeutic patient education for children and adolescents: some dentofacial orthopedic reflections].

    PubMed

    Mano, Marie-Charlotte; Begu-Simon, Anne-Marie; Hamel, Olivier; Sorel, Olivier; Herv, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Non-compliance and, even more, abandonment of treatment raise many questions. From a medical and economic point of view, these occurrences affect the efficiency of the proposed therapy. These failures therefore invite us to question the nature and purpose of health care providers' mission. Adherence of the patient to medical advice is a key factor to the success of the therapy. Therefore, how can we modify the patient's behaviour, particularly when dealing with teenage patients? How can we adopt and make our own a therapeutic strategy encouraging cooperation of patients? Patient education, recently integrated into the French public health code (Code de la sant publique), brings new elements to answer these questions. The purpose of the present work is to question the concept of patient education, notably with regards to medical ethics. What can patient education bring to medical practices that face non compliance or deficiency of adherence to treatment recommendations? What new perspectives does patient education bring, notably regarding medical practices? PMID:21144472

  5. Continuing Education Meets the Learning Organization: The Challenge of a Systems Approach to Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Increased attention to medical errors and patient safety highlights the importance of quality improvement in continuing medical education. Ways to enhance quality include informatics, clinical practice guidelines, learning from opinion leaders and patients, learning organizations, and just-in-time and point-of-care delivery of continuing

  6. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the

  7. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  8. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

  9. Seven practical principles for improving patient education: Evidence-based ideas from cognition science.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Martin V; Ching, Kevin; Yin, Hsiang Shonna; Kessler, David

    2014-03-01

    An important role of the paediatrician is that of a teacher - every clinician is an educator to patients and their families. This education, however, often occurs under difficult or time-pressured learning conditions. The authors present principles derived from three basic theories of human cognition that may help to guide clinicians' instruction of parents and patients. Cognitive load theory holds that an individual's capacity to process information is finite. By controlling information flow rate, decreasing reliance on working memory and removing extraneous cognitive load, learning is improved. Dual code theory suggests that humans have separate cognitive 'channels' for text/audio information versus visual information. By constructing educational messages that take advantage of both channels simultaneously, information uptake may be improved. Multimedia theory is based on the notion that there is an optimal blend of media to accomplish a given learning objective. The authors suggest seven practical strategies that clinicians may use to improve patient education. PMID:24665218

  10. Potentials of Web 2.0 for Diabetes Education of Adolescent Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    Diabetes is a very common chronic disease which produces compli-cations in almost all body organs and consumes a huge amount of the health budget. Although education has proved to be useful in diabetes management, there is a great need to improve the availability of these courses for the increasing number of diabetic patients. E-learning can facilitate this service, but the current education system should be tailored towards e-learning standards. Amongst diabetic patients, adolescents as computer natives are suggested as the best target to e-learning diabetes education. With regards to its features, Web 2.0 can be a very good technology to build a framework for diabetes education and consequent evaluation of this education.

  11. Pilot study utilizing a patient educational brochure at a vesicovaginal fistula hospital in Nigeria, Africa.

    PubMed

    Gerten, Kimberly A; Venkatesh, Sheila; Norman, Andy M; Shu'aibu, Joy; Richter, Holly E

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a pilot study exploring the utility and feasibility of use of a vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) patient educational brochure. Women awaiting or recently having undergone VVF surgery examined a six-paneled educational brochure detailing the causes, treatment options, and prevention methods of VVF. Participants answered demographic questions and gave detailed responses to a questionnaire that addressed the brochure material. A convenience sample of 50 patients, with a mean age of 26.1 years, participated. Universally, these women felt that the information they learned from the brochure was useful. Suggestions by participants regarding prevention of VVF included laboring in a hospital (80%), educating other women (30%), and discouraging early marriage (8%). Primary barriers to prevention and treatment included financial restraints (84%) and transportation difficulties (30%). The utilization of a simple, low-cost educational brochure has the ability to educate women on the causes, treatment, and prevention of VVF. PMID:18810301

  12. Compliance and side effects in sleep apnea patients treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Nino-Murcia, G; McCann, C C; Bliwise, D L; Guilleminault, C; Dement, W C

    1989-01-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective therapy for sleep apnea. We treated 144 patients with nasal CPAP and observed them for periods of as long as 25 months. No pneumothoraces occurred in any patient. Compliance rates were between 65% (90/139) and 83% (90/108), depending on the patient population considered. Demographic factors unrelated to discontinuing using CPAP included age, sex, and the presence of a housemate. Better-educated patients were less able to tolerate the equipment. Dry throat and nose and sore eyes were the most common side effects, but only sore eyes related to the amount of pressure. Side effects were unrelated to the number of months on the treatment, and obesity was related to higher pressures. Our study provides optimistic intermediate-term follow-up observations of patients on nasal CPAP therapy for sleep apnea. Whether adverse consequences occur over longer periods of time remains to be seen. PMID:2658326

  13. Effects of Program and Patient Characteristics on Retention of Drug Treatment Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Joshi, Vandana; Maglione, Margaret; Chou, Chih Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effects of program and patient characteristics on patient retention in residential, out-patient, and methadone maintenance drug treatment programs. Data for 26,047 patients in 87 programs show that threshold retention rates were generally low for all 3 program types, although program practice and service provision played important…

  14. Effective Inclusive Education: Equipping Education Professionals with Necessary Skills and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Tyler, Naomi Chowdhuri

    2011-01-01

    As a result of educational reforms, students with disabilities are educated in inclusive settings to a greater degree than ever before. Regrettably, many teachers report that they feel unprepared to work effectively with these students. Because teacher effectiveness is strongly linked to student outcomes, these perceptions of inadequacy are

  15. Educational outreach visits to improve nurses' use of mechanical venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Duff, Jed; Walker, Kim; Omari, Abdullah; Middleton, Sandy; McInnes, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized medical patients. Evidence-based guidelines exist for preventing VTE; unfortunately, these guidelines are not always adhered to by clinicians. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, utility and clinical impact of an educational outreach visit (EOV) on nurses' provision of mechanical prophylaxis to hospitalized medical patients using a prospective, uncontrolled, before-and-after design. Nurses received a 1-to-1 educational session on mechanical VTE prevention by a trained nurse facilitator. The EOV intervention was designed by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals using social marketing theory. Eighty-five of the 120 eligible nurses (71%) attended the EOV. The median length of each visit was 11.5 minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 10-15) and the median time spent arranging and conducting each visit was 63 minutes (IQR, 49-85). Eighty-four (99%) of the 85 participants gave a verbal commitment to trial the new evidence-based mechanical VTE prevention practices. However, there were no measurable improvements in the proportion of patients risk assessed (-1.7% improvement; 95% confidence interval [CI], -7.0 to 10.3; P = .68) or provided appropriate mechanical prophylaxis (-0.3% improvement; 95% CI, -13.4 to 14; P = .96). Researchers conclude that EOV should not be used to improve nurses' use of mechanical VTE prevention because it has no measurable impact on clinical practice and is resource intensive, requiring 4.5 minutes of preparation for every minute spent face to face with participants. Further research into the specific mechanism of action is required to explain the variability in clinical effect seen with this intervention. PMID:24238096

  16. Improvement of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care by the Development of Educational Programs

    PubMed Central

    Vissarion, Bakalis; Malliarou, Maria; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Zyga, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion educational programs help patients with diabetes to obtain information about their condition and improve their self-care skills. PMID:26973922

  17. Effecting change in elementary school science education

    SciTech Connect

    Parravano, C.

    1994-12-31

    The mission of the Merck Institute for Science Education is to improve the quality of science education during the formative years of kindergarten through eighth grade. To accomplish this mission, the Institute has three primary goals: Transform the teaching of science to communicate the excitement and relevance of science; Reform the education of teachers to instill in tomorrow`s teachers an understanding and appreciation of science; and Create a consensus on the importance of elementary science education among leaders in education, business, and science. Merck has made a minimum ten year commitment of funding and resources to the Institute. The Institute will work very closely with faculty, administration, and community leaders in target school districts to enhance science education in the elementary grades of their schools. Once the Institute`s goals have been achieved in these initial partner districts, the Institute will replicate its programs in other districts.

  18. The Nurse as Patient Advocate: Implications for Nurse Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banja, John D.

    This essay examines ethical considerations in the nurse patient relationship, in particular the relationship between "professional morality" and the nurse's professional identity in the role of advocate for doctors, patients, and hospitals. A discussion of ethics and professionals explores professional ethics, the need for such ethics, and their

  19. Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda, Ed.; Rothman, Robert, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The issue of teacher effectiveness has risen rapidly to the top of the education policy agenda, and the federal government and states are considering bold steps to improve teacher and leader effectiveness. One place to look for ideas is the experiences of high-performing education systems around the world. Finland, Ontario, and Singapore all have

  20. Effective PSHE Education: Values, Purposes and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Ben; Clague, Lucy; Coldwell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the perceived effectiveness of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education in primary and secondary schools. It outlines the relationship between perceived effectiveness and a range of explanatory factors, linking these to the values and ethos of schools, differing views of the purposes of PSHE education, and

  1. Returns to Education: Accounting for Enrolment and Completion Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hérault, Nicolas; Zakirova, Rezida

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature by separately analysing the course enrolment and completion effects of vocational education and training (VET) as well as higher education. Moreover, we investigate the persistence of these wage effects over time while controlling for two potential selection biases. We take advantage of the Longitudinal…

  2. Returns to Education: Accounting for Enrolment and Completion Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrault, Nicolas; Zakirova, Rezida

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature by separately analysing the course enrolment and completion effects of vocational education and training (VET) as well as higher education. Moreover, we investigate the persistence of these wage effects over time while controlling for two potential selection biases. We take advantage of the Longitudinal

  3. Disentangling the Effect of Education on Emergency Department Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dismuke, Clara, E.; Kunz, F. Michael, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Since Grossman's seminal paper in 1972, there have been a number of studies concerning the effect of education on health and health care demand. Though several studies have distinguished between preventive and curative care, no study has investigated the effects of general education on the utilization of unnecessary emergency department use. We

  4. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Michele L.; Fetro, Joyce V.

    2006-01-01

    This article seeks to describe attributes of effective health educators by presenting the interrelationships between Stephen Covey's "Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" and the responsibilities and competencies proposed by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. A brief historical account of key figures and events

  5. Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Victor C. X.

    2010-01-01

    As adult learners and educators pioneer the use of technology in the new century, attention has been focused on developing strategic approaches to effectively integrate adult learning and technology in different learning environments. "Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches" provides innovative

  6. Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda, Ed.; Rothman, Robert, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The issue of teacher effectiveness has risen rapidly to the top of the education policy agenda, and the federal government and states are considering bold steps to improve teacher and leader effectiveness. One place to look for ideas is the experiences of high-performing education systems around the world. Finland, Ontario, and Singapore all have…

  7. Effects of Death Education on Conscious and Unconscious Death Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Adults (n=162) varying in extent of participation in didactic or experiential forms of death education versus those who had no such exposure to death and dying-related issues completed measures of conscious and unconscious death fears. Findings suggest that didactic death education was effective in altering death anxiety, although effects were

  8. Taiwanese nurses' experiences of difficulties in providing patient education in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Che, Hui-Lian; Yeh, Mei-Yu; Jiang, Ru-Shang; Wu, Shu-Mei

    2016-03-01

    Taiwanese nurses face increasingly demanding working conditions along with a distinctive culture where family members participate in medical decisionmaking. This research explores Taiwanese nurses' perceptions of patient education, with a focus on the difficulties. Data were collected by in-depth focus group discussions with nursing staff (n=53) from the medical and surgical wards of two teaching hospitals. Transcripts were analyzed and revealed six themes: source of fulfillment and pressure; excessive workload; alternating between patients; not knowing who to teach; difficulty in communication; and disrupted confidence and work rhythm. Research findings could help managers understand the difficulties faced by nurses in providing health education. Nurses should broaden the scope of patient education activities to include family members. Additionally, nurses should discuss patients' desires and expectations from family members in medical treatment and decisionmaking. PMID:26663779

  9. Civic Returns to Higher Education: A Note on Heterogeneous Effects

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jennie E.

    2011-01-01

    American educational leaders and philosophers have long valued schooling for its role in preparing the nations youth to be civically engaged citizens. Numerous studies have found a positive relationship between education and subsequent civic participation. However, little is known about possible variation in effects by selection into higher education, a critical omission considering educations expressed role as a key mechanism for integrating disadvantaged individuals into civic life. I disaggregate effects and examine whether civic returns to higher education are largest for disadvantaged low likelihood or advantaged high likelihood college goers. I find evidence for significant effect heterogeneity: civic returns to college are greatest among individuals who have a low likelihood for college completion. Returns decrease as the propensity for college increases. PMID:22223924

  10. [Chronic noncancer pain and patient education: a place for e-learning?].

    PubMed

    Braillard, Olivia; Cedraschi, Christine; Jesaimani, Ameena; Piguet, Valérie

    2015-06-24

    Chronic non cancerous pain considerably limits the patients' quality of life. Yet, chronic non cancerous pain has a prevalence as high as 25% to 35%, Therapeutic education allows to work on the knowledge and know-how about the disease, the treatment, the management of health resources and health behaviors. E-learning uses new technologies of communication to improve the quality of learning by facilitating access to the resources and favoring the interactivity. It is attractive by its wide accessibility and its limited logistic needs. The level of proof of its efficacy is weak, mainly because of methodological limitations. Some good quality studies are promising, with a positive effect of e-learning programs on pain intensity, disability, autonomy and medication misuse. PMID:26267947

  11. The Practice Improvement in Education (PIE) Project: Patient Outcome Related to Education on Depression in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Aida; Bell, Christina; Parkins, Sebrina; Shishido, Jan; Masaki, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is an important factor related to agitation and other behaviors in nursing home residents. As the next step in our Geriatric Education Center (GEC) Practice Improvement in Education (PIE) project on depression in nursing homes, we focused on non-pharmacologic behavioral management and psychoactive medication reduction. Methods This quality improvement (QI) pilot included training on effective interdisciplinary management approaches for depressive symptoms and challenging behaviors, and implementing an adapted ABC (antecedents, behaviors, consequences) log and behavioral activation. We targeted two nursing home floors and included data on residents present both before and after the QI, in June 2013 and July 2014. We examined changes in depressive symptom scores (Patient Health Questionnaire, or PHQ-9, scale 0-27, higher=worse) and antipsychotic/antidepressant medication use with paired T-tests and Fisher's exact tests. Results Of the 66 nursing home residents in this QI pilot, 70% were female, 60.6% were > 89 years old (range = 48–108, mean = 88.8), 83% were Asian and 51% had severe cognitive impairment. Mean PHQ-9 scores decreased significantly from 3.74 to 2.38 (P = .017). Of the 13/66 (19.7%) residents on antipsychotic medications, 10/13 (76.9%) had dose reductions and 4/13 (30.8%) had medications completely discontinued (P < .0001 for change pre/post). Of the 34 (51.5%) residents on antidepressant medication, 15/34 (42.9%) had dose reductions and 3/34 (8.8%) had medications completely discontinued (P < .0001 for change pre/post). Conclusion Mean depression scores and antipsychotic and antidepressant medication use decreased significantly in this GEC PIE QI project to manage depression and behaviors non-pharmacologically in nursing home residents.

  12. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients’ Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento e Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Fernandes, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n = 102) over 9 months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In the latter, a psycho-educational program was implemented and 6 months later measured adherence to HAART. Knowledge about the infection, CD4 T lymphocytes and HIV-ribonucleic acid values were measured before and after this program. The sample was predominantly male (70%), heterosexual (78%), with a mean age of 49 (SD = 12.7) years, and 48% of participants were not adhering to HAART. After the program, non-adherence decreased to 21.6%. Knowledge about the infection increased from 79 to 97%. A significant increase in CD4 T lymphocytes (mean 540–580) and a decrease in viral load (mean 5411–3052) were observed, the latter of statistical significance. This program seems to be feasible and efficient, improving adherence to HAART. PMID:25642197

  13. Effective Educational Strategies for Desegregated Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Willis D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is based on a review of research and other commentary about educational policies in desegrated schools. It identifies four general conditions likely to affect educational quality and suggests 12 policies and practices concerning school and classroom organization, human relations activities, and school staff. (PP)

  14. Bringing Effective Professional Development to Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Career and technical education (CTE) teachers, through ongoing professional development, gain a deeper understanding of the content they teach, stay informed of the latest research, and ensure that the skills they teach are aligned to the most current workplace standards. Professional development has long been a part of educators' lives, but the

  15. Hiring an Effective Special Education Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenlon, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    The task of hiring special education teachers may seem daunting because they serve in what is undeniably the most complex of teaching roles. This article provides guidance and suggestions for identifying key competencies that a viable special education teacher candidate should possess. Although many building leaders may still subscribe to gut

  16. Partnering for Effective Educational Researching for Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onuka, Adams O. U.

    2012-01-01

    That research is a veritable tool for rapid social and economic development is undoubtedly well known globally. That educational researching is fraught with multi-dimensional challenges cannot be over-stressed. That multi-disciplinary approach and public-private, public-public, private-private partnership in educational researching for better and

  17. The Educational Software/Website Effectiveness Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furner, Joseph M.; Daigle, Debra

    2004-01-01

    In today's growing technological age of educational software and interactive Internet teaching/learning websites, it is important to note that educators must take the time to see that the interactive electronic experiences their students are involved meet the appropriate standards, hence been evaluated. This article provides the readers with an

  18. Enhancing the Educational Effectiveness of Zoos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Marc T.; Yates, Mary Ellen

    This study addressed whether the educational impact of a zoo visit can be enhanced through the provision of appropriate instructional supports such as preparatory trainings or orientations. One important function of the educational process, in contrast to providing direct information or skill development, is to make the learner more sensitive to

  19. Fishing and Vygotsky's Concept of Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinson, Beth McCulloch

    2001-01-01

    Relates Vygotsky's concept of zone of proximal development to a fishing story, thereby providing a scaffold allowing preservice students to better understand the educational concept. Concludes that educators should use the right bait (determined by how engaged children are), technique, and progress at the right pace (evidenced by children's

  20. Hiring an Effective Special Education Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenlon, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    The task of hiring special education teachers may seem daunting because they serve in what is undeniably the most complex of teaching roles. This article provides guidance and suggestions for identifying key competencies that a viable special education teacher candidate should possess. Although many building leaders may still subscribe to gut…