Sample records for effective patient education

  1. Choosing effective patient education materials

    MedlinePLUS

    Your patient's preferences can guide your choice of education materials and methods. Find out how your patient ... aware that you may need to adjust your education plan based on the patient's health status and ...

  2. Effects of preoperative education on spinal surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Papanastassiou, Ioannis; Anderson, Roberta; Barber, Nicole; Conover, Cathleen; Castellvi, Antonio E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preoperative patient education (PE) has been used by many institutions to deal with patient anxiety, pain control, and overall satisfaction. Although the literature suggests PE's effectiveness in joint reconstruction, data are missing in spinal surgery. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients having elective spinal surgery who underwent PE (spine pre-care class) from October 2009 to March 2010. Of the 155 patients surveyed, 77 (49.7%) attended the class whereas 78 (50.3%) did not. Results Of the participants in the pre-care class, 96% were satisfied with their pain management versus 83% in the control group (P =.02). There was also a trend for better overall satisfaction in the pre-care class group (91% vs 85%; P > .05, multiple regression analysis). Elderly women tend to be less satisfied with pain management and overall treatment. Conclusions Implementation of PE has had a positive impact on patient satisfaction, especially in terms of pain management.

  3. The effect of an educational patient compliance program on serum phosphate levels in patients receiving hemodialysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi J Shaw-Stuart; Andrew Stuart

    2000-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to determine the effectiveness of a recently developed educational patient compliance program (A Taste for Life [1995]; Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) on improving serum phosphate levels in patients receiving hemodialysis.Design: An ABA time series design was used.Participants\\/setting: Eighty-one patients receiving hemodialysis participated. The experimental group consisted of 50 participants (mean [M] = 57.9 years of

  4. Patient Education on Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Education Annual Meeting Safe Prescribing Resources Clinical Pearls Patient Center Home > Patient Center > Patient Education > Patient Education ... to People with Pain Press Room Position Statements Patient Education on Pain AAPM Past President, Perry G. ...

  5. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients’ Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento e Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Fernandes, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n?=?102) over 9?months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In the latter, a psycho-educational program was implemented and 6?months later measured adherence to HAART. Knowledge about the infection, CD4 T lymphocytes and HIV-ribonucleic acid values were measured before and after this program. The sample was predominantly male (70%), heterosexual (78%), with a mean age of 49 (SD?=?12.7) years, and 48% of participants were not adhering to HAART. After the program, non-adherence decreased to 21.6%. Knowledge about the infection increased from 79 to 97%. A significant increase in CD4 T lymphocytes (mean 540–580) and a decrease in viral load (mean 5411–3052) were observed, the latter of statistical significance. This program seems to be feasible and efficient, improving adherence to HAART. PMID:25642197

  6. Lifestyle effects of group health education for patients with coronary heart disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thérèse van Elderen; Elise Dusseldorp

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, effects of a health education (INFO) and a PsychoEducational Prevention (INFO + PEP) Programme were Investigated in three hospitals. These programmes were offered to groups of coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and their partners alter discharge from hospital. The INFO was offered to 127 CHD patients in addition to FIT (i.e. standard medical care and physical

  7. Effectiveness of Educational Technology to Improve Patient Care in Pharmacy Curricula

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael A.; Benedict, Neal

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature on the effectiveness of educational technologies to teach patient care skills to pharmacy students was conducted. Nineteen articles met inclusion criteria for the review. Seven of the articles included computer-aided instruction, 4 utilized human-patient simulation, 1 used both computer-aided instruction and human-patient simulation, and 7 utilized virtual patients. Educational technology was employed with more than 2700 students at 12 colleges and schools of pharmacy in courses including pharmacotherapeutics, skills and patient care laboratories, drug diversion, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) orientation. Students who learned by means of human-patient simulation and virtual patients reported enjoying the learning activity, whereas the results with computer-aided instruction were mixed. Moreover, the effect on learning was significant in the human-patient simulation and virtual patient studies, while conflicting data emerged on the effectiveness of computer-aided instruction. PMID:25741031

  8. Strategies for selecting effective patient nutrition education materials.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Laura H

    2010-10-01

    Nutrition and diet therapy are at the center of health promotion activities and self-management of chronic diseases. To assist an individual in making informed decisions regarding his or her diet and increase adherence to dietary recommendations or treatments, healthcare professionals must select health information that is appropriate to the client's level of understanding. A systematic approach in the evaluation of patient education material, whether in print or on the World Wide Web, must focus on the information's content, literacy level, graphical displays, layout and typography, motivating principles, cultural relevance, and feasibility. Additional criteria should be evaluated when accessing Web sites and include source, site credibility, conflict of interest, disclaimer, disclosure, navigation, and interactivity information. PMID:20962303

  9. Effect of Discharge Education on Quality of Life and Hospital Readmission in Patients with Heart Failure: Is It Effective?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmad Reza Assareh; Mohammad Alasti; Shahla Beigi; Seddigheh Fayyazi

    Background: A relatively common disease, congestive heart failure has a significant effect on the quality of life. Given that hospital admission is an important problem in patients afflicted with congestive heart failure, we sought to evaluate the effect of discharge education on the quality of life and hospital readmission in this group of patients. Methods: Eighty patients admitted with decompensated

  10. The Effects of PostRadiation Education Pamphlet On Self-efficacy in Cancer Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Lian; Caroline Davey; Michele Wake; Angela Cashell

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy often experience anxiety and a sense of loss of control immediately after completion of their active treatment. This study aims to evaluate, using a cross-sectional survey, the effects of a post-radiation education pamphlet on the self-efficacy of cancer patients in terms of seeking\\/understanding medical information, seeking support, and coping with radiation side effects. Forty-eight patients from

  11. [Effectiveness of therapeutic education and respiratory rehabilitation programs for the patient with asthma].

    PubMed

    Cano-De La Cuerda, Roberto; Useros-Olmo, Ana Isabel; Muñoz-Hellín, Elena

    2010-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic complex and heterogeneous disease, with great variability and has a huge impact, not only on patients who suffer the disease but also their families and society in general. The education of the asthmatic patient and their families is essential for therapeutic intervention. Through continuous, dynamic and adaptive education, changes in attitudes and behaviours of the patient and family can be achieved, and will undoubtedly lead to an improvement in their quality of life. Among other non-pharmacological interventions, respiratory rehabilitation is an alternative treatment, and is primarily aimed at patients with moderate to severe asthma. Although the latest clinical practice guidelines published in the scientific literature recommend two strategies for treatment, the results of relevant publications are diverse. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of therapeutic and educational programs in respiratory rehabilitation of the asthmatic patient. PMID:20846775

  12. Evaluation's Role in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Andrew J.

    1977-01-01

    The most desirable outcome of any patient education program is a patient who is aware of medical alternatives and their potential effects and who chooses voluntarily and intelligently whether or not to follow medical advice. (MM)

  13. Effects of an outpatient education program in patients with uncontrolled asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Carmen Denise Borba; Pereira, Rosemary Petrik; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of an outpatient education program in patients with uncontrolled asthma. METHODS: This was an uncontrolled study evaluating an educational intervention and involving patients with uncontrolled asthma ? 14 years of age. The participants completed a questionnaire designed to assess the level of asthma control, the inhalation technique, and quality of life. All of the patients underwent pulmonary function testing, after which they participated in an education program consisting of one 45-min face-to-face session, followed by phone interviews at two, four, and eight weeks. The participants were reevaluated after three months. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients completed the study. There was a significant improvement in the level of asthma control (p < 0.001). Of the 63 patients, 28 (44.4%) and 6 (9.5%) were classified as having partially controlled asthma and controlled asthma, respectively. The mean FEV1 was 63.0 ± 20.0% and 68.5 ± 21.2% of the predicted value prior to and after the educational intervention, respectively (p = 0.002), and all of the quality of life scores improved (p < 0.05 for all). The same was true for the proportion of patients prior to and after the educational intervention using the proper inhalation technique when using metered dose inhalers (15.4% vs. 46.2%; p = 0.02) and dry powder inhalers (21.3% vs. 76.6%; p < 0.001). The logistic regression analysis revealed that an incorrect inhalation technique identified during the first evaluation was independently associated with a favorable response to the educational intervention. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that an outpatient education program for asthma patients improves the level of asthma control, lung function parameters, and quality of life. An incorrect inhalation technique identified during the first evaluation was predictive of a favorable response to the educational intervention. PMID:23857690

  14. Patient perception of understanding health education and instructions has moderating effect on glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Whether health literacy is independently associated with processes or outcomes of diabetes-related care is controversial. We tried to demonstrate the interaction of health literacy and understanding of health education and instructions in achieving glycemic control. Methods Five hundred and one consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in the outpatient clinic of the metabolism department were recruited into this pilot study. The demographic data were collected from patients’ self-reports. The clinical background information was collected through electronic medical records. A questionnaire derived from part of the Mandarin Health Literacy Scale was used to measure numeracy and functional health literacy of people with diabetes. Health literacy levels were categorized into inadequate, marginal and adequate. Patient self-ratings of their perceived understanding of the health education information and instructions provided by their case manager in the past were categorized into two subgroups: better and poor. Patients with an HbA1c level equal to or below 7% were considered to have good glycemic control. Multivariate logistic regression was used to find associated factors of health literacy and understanding of health education and instructions. GENMOD procedures were used to analyze repeated outcome measurements of glycemic control. Results Higher educational attainment and higher household income (odds ratios were 2.23 and 2.22, respectively) were significantly associated with patients who had adequate health literacy. Higher educational attainment and patients with a family history of DM (odds ratios were 4.99 and 1.85, respectively) were significantly associated with better understanding of health education and instructions. Adequate health literacy is not the only factor associated with good glycemic control. The effect of adequate health literacy in achieving good glycemic control might be masked by patients with better understanding of health education and instructions. Conclusions Our results revealed that not only were patients with adequate health literacy associated with good glycemic control but patients with marginal health literacy were also able to achieve good glycemic control. Adequate health literacy and better understanding of health education is highly correlated. The role of adequate health literacy on glycemic control could be suppressed if variables are over-controlled during analysis. PMID:24996669

  15. The effect of an education program utilising PRECEDE model on the Quality of Life in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MH Taghdisi; M Borhani; M Solhi; ME Afkari; F Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient’s quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of patients with

  16. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  17. The Effects of Pre-Coronary Angioplasty Education and Counselling on Patients and Their Spouses: A Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooth, Leigh; McKenna, Kryss; Maas, Frikkie; McEniery, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The effect of a precoronary angioplasty education and counseling program on knowledge and psychological status of patients and on knowledge and quality of life/coping status of their spouses was evaluated. Knowledge, psychological status, and coping status of patients (N=40), their spouses, and controls were assessed. Results show that education

  18. Effects of an educational patient safety campaign on patients' safety behaviours and adverse events.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, David L B; Frank, Olga; Buschmann, Ute; Babst, Reto

    2013-04-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives? The study aims to investigate the effects of a patient safety advisory on patients' risk perceptions, perceived behavioural control, performance of safety behaviours and experience of adverse incidents. Method? Quasi-experimental intervention study with non-equivalent group comparison was used. Patients admitted to the surgical department of a Swiss large non-university hospital were included. Patients in the intervention group received a safety advisory at their first clinical encounter. Outcomes were assessed using a questionnaire at discharge. Odds ratios for control versus intervention group were calculated. Regression analysis was used to model the effects of the intervention and safety behaviours on the experience of safety incidents. Results? Two hundred eighteen patients in the control and 202 in the intervention group completed the survey (75 and 77% response rates, respectively). Patients in the intervention group were less likely to feel poorly informed about medical errors (OR?=?0.55, P?=?0.043). There were 73.1% in the intervention and 84.3% in the control group who underestimated the risk for infection (OR?=?0.51, CI 0.31-0.84, P?=?0.009). Perceived behavioural control was lower in the control group (meanCon ?=?3.2, meanInt ?=?3.5, P?=?0.010). Performance of safety-related behaviours was unaffected by the intervention. Patients in the intervention group were less likely to experience any safety-related incident or unsafe situation (OR for intervention group?=?0.57, CI 0.38-0.87, P?=?0.009). There were no differences in concerns for errors during hospitalization. There were 96% of patients (intervention) who would recommend other patients to read the advisory. Conclusions? The results suggest that the safety advisory decreases experiences of adverse events and unsafe situations. It renders awareness and perceived behavioural control without increasing concerns for safety and can thus serve as a useful instrument for communication about safety between health care workers and patients. PMID:22332730

  19. The effect of individual education on patients' physical activity capacity after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Hilal; Ozcan, ?eyda

    2015-02-01

    The present study aims to determine the effects of individual education and counselling given to first-time myocardial infarction patients, including its effect on compliance with treatment. The sample comprised 90 patients, 45 in the intervention and 45 in the control group, selected by sequential sampling from first-time myocardial infarction patients. Data were collected between April and November 2008 by means of patient information form, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, 6?min walk test, Modified Borg Scale, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale and Canadian Cardiovascular Society Angina Grade Classification. In the intervention group more improvement was observed in comparison with the control group in terms of frequency of physical activity, body mass index and waist circumference. It was observed that the intervention group's metabolic equivalent of task values and 6?min walk test distance increased more in comparison with the control group 3 months after baseline, and there was a statistically significant difference. The results indicated that individual education and counselling provided to patients having experienced acute myocardial infarction increased functional capacity by providing patients with advice on how to lose weight and by improving compliance with treatment through physical activity behaviours (frequency and duration). PMID:24237752

  20. Effects on caregiver burden of education related to home care in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Mollao?lu, Mukadder; Kayata?, Mansur; Yürügen, Birsen

    2013-07-01

    Caring for a patient undergoing hemodialysis is highly stressful and can negatively affect a caregiver's physical and psychological well-being. This study was conducted to examine the effect of educational support concerning caregiver burden and given to the caregivers of hemodialysis patients. This experimental study was performed with 122 caregivers. Patients' data were collected by means of Personal Information Form and Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale (ZCBS). Characteristics of caregivers of hemodialysis patients were analyzed descriptively in terms of frequencies and percentages for categorical data, means, and standard deviations. Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskall-Wallis test, and percentages were used in the data analysis. The mean ZCBS score was 52.1?±?8.6 (range, 0-88). Among the caregivers, the mean score of the ZCBS was significantly higher in women, single, young, family relatives as "daughter/sister/brother/daughter-in-law and town/district, high educational level (P?educational needs of home-based such as nutrition (35.2%), dialysis (27.8%), fistula care (20.4%), catheter care (18.8%), the information about chronic kidney disease (18.0%), blood pressure (17.2%), weight control (17.2%), hygiene (3.1%), and travel/exercise (6.5%). The post-educational mean scores (55.0?±?7.6) of caregiver burden were observed to be lower than the pre-educational scores (43.9?±?5.2), and the difference was found to be statistically significant. The home-based educational program demonstrated a decrease in the burden of hemodialysis caregivers. PMID:23279118

  1. Effects of systematic education on heart failure patients' knowledge after 6 months. A randomised, controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bjorck Linne; H. Liedholma

    Background: Many procedures for patient education are introduced in clinical practice without proper evaluation in randomised trials. Aims: To compare systematic nurse and pharmacist led education including an interactive Kodak Photo-CD Portfolio technique with conventional information regarding heart failure patients' knowledge. Methods: One hundred and thirty heart failure patients discharged from hospital were randomised to receive either conventional information or

  2. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  3. Self-care and quality of life in patients with advanced heart failure: The effect of a supportive educational intervention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Jaarsma; R. Halfens; F. Tan; H. Huijer Abu-Saad; K. Dracup; J. Diederiks

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a supportive educational nursing intervention on self-care abilities, self-care behavior, and quality of life of patients with advanced heart failure. Design: The study design was an experimental, random assignment. Setting: The study was located at the University Hospital in Maastricht, The Netherlands. Patients: The study included 179 patients

  4. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of a collaborative patient education hypertension intervention in Utah.

    PubMed

    Trogdon, Justin G; Larsen, Barbara; Larsen, David; Salas, Wendy; Snell, Matt

    2012-11-01

    This study analyzed the cost-effectiveness of a patient hypertension education intervention that provided patient education through interactive voice response technology and distribution of automated blood pressure monitors to high-risk plan members with uncontrolled hypertension. A total of 17,318 members were identified with hypertension in an administrative database. The study sample consisted of all 534 high-risk hypertensive plan members who received blood pressure monitors. Using data on activity-based program costs and changes in hypertension control, this study modeled the intervention's cost-effectiveness relative to no intervention. The intervention was estimated to have brought hypertension under control in 151 patients during the study year. Across all 534 participants in 1 year, 0.3 events (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and renal failure) were avoided and 2.77 life-years were gained (LYG). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the intervention compared with no intervention was $767 per person brought under control or $41,927 per LYG. If the gains in hypertension control from 1 year's investment were assumed to last 10 years, the 10-year ICER relative to no intervention was $1857 per LYG. The intervention is a cost-effective strategy to address hypertension and can serve as a model for future innovations. PMID:23126347

  5. The Effects of Health Education on Patients with Hypertension in China: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, L. J.; Meng, Q.; He, S. W.; Yin, X. L.; Tang, Z. L.; Bo, H. Y.; Lan, X. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study collected on from all research relating to health education and hypertension in China and, with the aid of meta-analysis tools, assessed the outcomes of such health education. The analysis provides a basis for the further development of health-education programmes for patients with hypertension. Methods: Literature searches…

  6. Patient Education Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn

    This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood and…

  7. Effectiveness of self-management promotion educational program among diabetic patients based on health belief model

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Farzad; Motlagh, Fazel Zinat; Solhi, Mahnaz; Gharibnavaz, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is a chronic disease; it can cause serious complications. Diabetes self-management is essential for prevention of disease complications. This study was conducted to evaluate self-management promotion educational program intervention efficiency among diabetic patients in Iran and health belief model (HBM) was applied as a theoretical framework. Materials and Methods: Overall, 120 Type 2 diabetic patients referred to rural health centers in Gachsaran, Iran participated in this study as randomly divided into intervention and control group. This was a longitudinal randomized pre- and post-test series control group design panel study to implement a behavior modification based intervention to promotion self-management among diabetic patients. Cross-tabulation and t-test by using SPSS statistical package, version 16 was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Mean age was 55.07 years (SD = 9.94, range: 30-70). Our result shows significant improvements in average response for susceptibility, severity, benefit and self-management among intervention group. Additionally, after intervention, average response of the barrier to self-management was decreased among intervention group. Conclusion: Our result showed education program based on HBM was improve of self-management and seems implementing these programs can be effective in the and prevention of diabetes complications. PMID:24741654

  8. The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

  9. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective

  10. EFFECT OF DIABETIC PATIENT EDUCATION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mani UV; Srivastava R; Parekh A; Shah V; Mehta NC; Patel HR; Dosi M

    Diabetic Patient Education (DPE) was imparted for a period of 30 days to 31 maturity onset diabetics. The DPE included knowledge about the disease, types, symptoms, complications and ways of achieving a good control with major emphasis on diet and exercise. The education was imparted using visual aids, printed pamphlets and oral com- munication. The efficacy of DPE was moni-

  11. Comparing the Effect of Two Educational Programs on the Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Shahram; Zarea, Kourosh; Dashtbozorgi, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various researchers have shown that the health level, performance status, and quality of life (QOL) are often less than expected especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of the two methods of educational programs on health- related QOL (HRQOL) in Iranian HD patients. Patients and Methods: In this quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest interventional study, we employed each subject as his/her own control. The study was conducted at the dialysis units in three major general hospitals affiliated with Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. A total of 90 HD patients were randomly allocated to two 45-patient groups of oral and video education programs, respectively. The educational programs included dietary and fluid regimens, the care of fistula and skin, and stress management. HRQOL was assessed in both groups using a Farsi version of the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) before and after the educational programs. Repeated measures analysis of variance and ANOVA were used for data analysis through SPSS. Results: SF-36 domains of physical functioning (P < 0.021), role physical (P < 0.031), social functioning (P < 0.001) and mental health (P < 0.001) were significantly increased in both oral and vide education groups after the interventions. There was no difference in the effectiveness of the two educational programs. Conclusions: Appropriate interventions may potentially lead to improvement in the HRQOL of these patients. Therefore, video education as an effective, inexpensive, simple, and attractive method is recommended for HD patients. PMID:25389489

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  13. Nurse education regarding agitated patients and its effects on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Leyla; Karabulut, Erdem

    This study identified the impact of an education program on nurses' practices for agitated patients and documented the changes in practice after completion of the training. Eighteen cardiac intensive care nurses were included to the study. Prior to nurses' participation in an education program, a pre-test indicating nurses' current practices for 40 agitated patients was evaluated with the 'Nurse Practice Form'. After the pre-test data collection period was completed, the 2-day training program on caring for agitated patients was conducted. The last step of the study was evaluation of post-test nurses' practices for 40 agitated patients using the 'Nurse Practice Form'. The findings indicated that instead of pre-test nurses' use of physical restraints for controlling agitated patients without a physician order, none of post-test nurses applied them. The training program provided nurses the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate and to manage the causes of agitation. PMID:20230178

  14. Pre-screening education in multiple marker screening programs: The effect on patient anxiety and knowledge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelly E. Ormond; Eugene Pergament; Beth A. Fine

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that unexplained deviations in maternal serum multiple marker screening (MMS) generate considerable anxiety during the remainder of pregnancy. While the role of education in decreasing anxiety is documented, to date there has been no prospective evaluation of which educational practices might minimize this emotional stress. In a pilot study, we prospectively examined the effects on anxiety

  15. The Effect of a Patient Education Program on Emergency Room Use for Inner-City Children with Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Mark C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates an educational program for inner-city children designed to improve patients' knowledge and behaviors related to asthma, in order to improve their control of the disease and thereby reduce the number of emergency room visits. Discusses the failure of this program due to failures of implementation and program effectiveness. (JS)

  16. Effect of Diet Education on Blood Pressure Changes and Interdialytic Weight in Hemodialysis Patients Admitted in Hajar Hospital in Shahrekord

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Fatemeh; Mobasheri, Mahmoud; Mirzaeian, Razieh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Nutrition is a key factor in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease because kidney burden decrease causes uremic reduction and its side effects. The aim of this research is to examine the effect of diet education on blood pressure changes and interdialytic weight in Hemodialysis patients admitted to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital in Shahrekord. Methods: This quasi-experimental and interventional study of 100 dialysis patients referred to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital was performed in a pre-test and post-test in 2011. Diet education, including face to face training with instruction booklets, were conducted in the two sessions. Having carried out the educational program, blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain were measured and recorded one month before and during three stages and after the educational program by researcher-designed checklists. The data were analyzed through SPSS 16 software by Paired t-test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that mean of primary weight of the patients increase from 66.15±15.10 to 64.43±14.67. Mean of Systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients in three stages were reduced to 6.65±1.51 mmg 2.24±1.82 mmg respectively. There was a significant difference between the creatinine amount in patients before and after of training (p?0.01) but no meaningful difference was observed between the BUN amount before and after of training (p?0.031). Conclusion: training to patients underwent hemodialysis in order to observe diet and its effects on improvement in treatment are of significant importance. PMID:25395881

  17. Effect of Diet Education on Blood Pressure Changes and Interdialytic Weight in Hemodialysis Patients Admitted in Hajar Hospital in Shahrekord

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Fatemeh; Mobasheri, Mahmoud; Mirzaeian, Razieh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Nutrition is a key factor in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease because kidney burden decrease causes uremic reduction and its side effects. The aim of this research is to examine the effect of diet education on blood pressure changes and interdialytic weight in Hemodialysis patients admitted to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital in Shahrekord. Methods: This quasi-experimental and interventional study of 100 dialysis patients referred to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital was performed in a pre-test and post-test in 2011. Diet education, including face to face training with instruction booklets, were conducted in the two sessions. Having carried out the educational program, blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain were measured and recorded one month before and during three stages and after the educational program by researcher-designed checklists. The data were analyzed through Spss16 software by Paired t-test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that mean of primary weight of the patients increase from 66.15±15.10 to 64.43±14.67. Mean of Systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients in three stages were reduced to 6.65±1.51 mmg 2.24±1.82 mmg respectively. There was a significant difference between the creatinine amount in patients before and after of training (p?0.01) but no meaningful difference was observed between the BUN amount before and after of training (p?0.031). Conclusion: Training to patients underwent hemodialysis in order to observe diet and its effects on improvement in treatment are of significant importance. PMID:25568630

  18. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients

  19. Effect of an in-patient education programme upon the knowledge, behaviour and glycaemic control of insulin dependent diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Buysschaert, M; Lepair-Gadisseux, N; Weil, R; Vandeleene, B; Leonet, J; Lambert, A E

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a diabetes education programme (5 days in hospital) in type I diabetic patients by comparing their diabetes-related knowledge, behaviour and the level of HbA1 before with that 6 months and 1 year after the teaching session. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to whether they answered a questionnaire after 6 months (group I; 41 "responder" patients) or not (group II; 38 "non-responder" patients). Their usual regime of insulin therapy (2 daily injections of a mixture of regular and intermediate-acting insulins) was not modified during their hospitalization for teaching; the total daily doses of insulin and the percentages of regular insulin were comparable before and after the teaching session. In group I, we observed an improvement in knowledge and behaviour indices (evaluated by a written questionnaire) from 69 +/- 3 and 67 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) before the teaching session to 86 +/- 2 and 85 +/- 2% 6 months after, respectively (p less than 0.001). HbA1 decreased from 12.1 +/- 0.3% to 11.2 +/- 0.3% (p less than 0.05) and to 10.7 +/- 0.4% (p less than 0.025) after 6 and 12 months respectively. This improvement was observed in patients with or without residual insulin secretion. In group II patients, the index of knowledge increased similarly from 67 +/- 4 to 85 +/- 2% (p less than 0.001). No significant decrease of HbA1 was observed in this group after 6 and 12 months, however whether the patients possessed residual insulin secretion or not.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3569632

  20. Long-term effects of asthma education for physicians on patient satisfaction and use of health services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. M. Clark; M. Gong; M. A. Schork; N. Kaciroti; D. Evans; D. Roloff; M. Hurwitz; L. A. Maiman; R. B. Mellins

    2000-01-01

    Long-term effects of asthma education for physicians on patient satisfaction and use of health services. N.M. Clark, M. Gong, M.A. Schork, N. Kaciroti, D. Evans, D. Roloff, M. Hurwitz, L.A. Maiman, R.B. Mellins. #ERS Journals Ltd 2000. ABSTRACT: This randomized clinical trial evaluated the long-term impact of an interactive seminar for physicians based on principles of self-regulation on clinician behaviour,

  1. Therapeutic education of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Golay, A; Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Carrard, I; Lasserre-Moutet, A

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic patient education is a patient-centred approach, focussed on patients' needs, resources, values and strategies. It allows patients to improve their knowledge and skills not only concerning their illness but also their treatment. It brings a better quality of life, a greater therapeutic compliance and a reduction in complications. The most difficult part of therapeutic patient education occurs when patients must change their behaviour. Motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavioural approaches contribute greatly here and allow both the preparation and support of patients during progressive 'step by step' change. The work on resistance to change is fundamental, and ambivalence when faced with the choice of a new way of life must be measured, discussed and negotiated. Patients become partners and we become 'coaches'. The negotiation of objectives must allow patients to choose their own strategies, which normally should cost them the least possible, psychologically, and bring them the maximum benefit. The efficiency of therapeutic patient education no longer needs to be proved: 80% less amputations over 10 years in diabetic patients; 50% maintenance of weight loss over 5 years, etc. In conclusion, therapeutic education is part of a humanistic medical approach centred on patients; it allows them to be active participants in their own treatment with the aim of improving their quality of life and therapeutic compliance, as well as reducing potential complications. Thus, health care professionals teach, inform, train, negotiate with, motivate and accompany patients in the long-term follow-up of their illness. PMID:18229887

  2. EFFECTIVENESS OF A DIABETES EDUCATION AND INTERVENTION PROGRAM ON BLOOD GLUCOSE CONTROL FOR PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES IN A TURKISH COMMUNITY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasemin Acik; Hulya Yildizhan Bulut; Canan Gulbayrak; Ozge Ardicoglu; Nevin Ilhan

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of patient education and other interven- tions (regular exercise and diet), combined with existing oral antidiabetic therapy, on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Two out of 16 primary health care centers present in Elazig, an eastern Turkish city, were randomly selected for this study; the patients

  3. WASC EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS REVIEW EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS APPROACH

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to its citizens, articulated in the Master Plan for Higher Education, UC Santa Cruz must continue to doWASC EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS REVIEW EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS APPROACH UC Santa Cruz ... ranked sought to maintain the high quality of our undergraduate education. We also seek to continue growth

  4. The effect of group psycho-educational program on quality of life in families of patients with mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Dehkhoda, Fateme; Yazdani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mood disorders related behaviors are imposed on family members and influence the family's mental atmosphere and level of quality of life. Therefore, the researchers decided to study the effect of group psycho-educational program on the quality of life in families of patients with mood disorders. Materials and Methods: This is a two-group interventional study conducted on 32 members of families of the patients with mood disorders selected through random sampling. A group psycho-educational program was conducted in ten 90-min sessions (twice a week) for the study group. (World Health Organization's Quality of Life-BREF WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire was adopted in the study and was filled before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the scores of quality of life in the domains of mental health, social communications, and environmental health, immediately after and 1 month after intervention in the study group compared to the control group. Repeated measure analysis of variance showed a significant increase in the mean scores of quality of life in the study group. Conclusions: The results showed that the impact of group psycho-educational program is observed in the prevention of reduction in quality of life and its promotion in the families of patients with mood disorders. PMID:24554960

  5. Patient education and disease activity: A study among rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herman L. M. Brus; Erik Taal; Laar van de Martin A. F. J; Johannes J. Rasker; Oene Wiegman

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether patients experiencing high disease activity derive more benefit from patient education than those experiencing low disease activity. - \\u000aMethods: Data from a randomized study on the effects of a program of patient education were analyzed retrospectively. Four subgroups were studied: the high disease activity subgroup of patients who had participated in the educational program, the complementary

  6. ClimateGP - web based patient education.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin

    2007-05-01

    People with chronic disease need to know how to manage their disorders. While doctors often lack time to educate patients, online learning is always available. ClimateGP is an online education suite that combines patient education with feedback to, and guidance from, the doctor. It covers the major chronic diseases and will soon cover the common smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity (SNAP) risk factors. ClimateGP also provides web based continuing medical education approved by The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. ClimateGP is currently the subject of randomised controlled trials, with preliminary results showing that it is effective and comparable to other established patient education materials. PMID:17492076

  7. Effect that an educational program for cystic fibrosis patients and caregivers has on the contamination of home nebulizers*

    PubMed Central

    Zuana, Adriana Della; Garcia, Doroti de Oliveira; Juliani, Regina Célia Turola Passos; da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the pathogens found in home nebulizers and in respiratory samples of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and to evaluate the effect that a standardized instruction regarding cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers has on the frequency of nebulizer contamination. METHODS: We included 40 CF patients (22 males), all of whom used the same model of nebulizer. The median patient age was 11.2 ± 3.74 years. We collected samples from the nebulizer mouthpiece and cup, using a sterile swab moistened with sterile saline. Respiratory samples were collected by asking patients to expectorate into a sterile container or with oropharyngeal swabs after cough stimulation. Cultures were performed on selective media, and bacteria were identified by classical biochemical tests. Patients received oral and written instructions regarding the cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers. All determinations were repeated an average of two months later. RESULTS: Contamination of the nebulizer (any part) was detected in 23 cases (57.5%). The nebulizer mouthpiece and cup were found to be contaminated in 16 (40.0%) and 19 (47.5%), respectively. After the standardized instruction had been given, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of contaminated nebulizers (43.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In our sample of CF patients, nebulizer contamination was common, indicating the need for improvement in patient practices regarding the cleaning and disinfection of their nebulizers. A one-time educational intervention could have a significant positive impact. PMID:24831395

  8. Effects of pulmonary rehabilitation education for caregivers on pulmonary function and pain in patients with lung cancer following lung resection.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong-Hwa; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation education program for caregivers on patients who underwent lung resection surgery. [Subjects] Subjects who underwent lung resection by visual assisted thoracotomy (VATs) were selected and divided into a control group of 19 and an experimental group of 22. [Methods] The experimental group received a pulmonary rehabilitation education program for caregivers, while the control group received typical care for 4 weeks. This study assessed the subjects 2 weeks (baseline) and 6 weeks after surgery (4 weeks). The forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) were measured to evaluate pulmonary function. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was utilized to evaluate pain. [Results] Pulmonary function (FVC and FEV1) increased more in the experimental group compared with the control group. Furthermore, VAS scores were lower in the experimental group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] A pulmonary rehabilitation education program for caregivers had a positive effect on pulmonary function in patients with lung cancer after lung resection. PMID:25729198

  9. Effects of pulmonary rehabilitation education for caregivers on pulmonary function and pain in patients with lung cancer following lung resection

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong-hwa; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation education program for caregivers on patients who underwent lung resection surgery. [Subjects] Subjects who underwent lung resection by visual assisted thoracotomy (VATs) were selected and divided into a control group of 19 and an experimental group of 22. [Methods] The experimental group received a pulmonary rehabilitation education program for caregivers, while the control group received typical care for 4 weeks. This study assessed the subjects 2 weeks (baseline) and 6 weeks after surgery (4 weeks). The forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) were measured to evaluate pulmonary function. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was utilized to evaluate pain. [Results] Pulmonary function (FVC and FEV1) increased more in the experimental group compared with the control group. Furthermore, VAS scores were lower in the experimental group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] A pulmonary rehabilitation education program for caregivers had a positive effect on pulmonary function in patients with lung cancer after lung resection. PMID:25729198

  10. Education of creative art therapy to cancer patients: Evaluation and effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriaan Visser; Mayke Op ’T Hoog

    2008-01-01

    Background. The course Cancer and Creative Art offers cancer patients the possibility to cope with their illness through creativity\\u000a and self-expression. Methods. Five groups of 35 participants, predominantly composed of women with breast cancer, participated in an explorative evaluation\\u000a and effect study; premeasures and postmeasures were applied. Results. The course met the needs of participants that included personal growth and

  11. Effects of education and support on self-care and resource utilization in patients with heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Jaarsma; R. Halfens; H. Huijer Abu-Saad; K. Dracup; T. Gorgels; J. van Ree; J. Stappers

    1999-01-01

    Aims To test the eVect of education and support by a nurse on self-care and resource utilization in patients with heart failure. Methods A total of 179 patients (mean age 73, 58% male, NYHA III-IV) hospitalized with heart failure were evalu- ated prospectively. Patients were randomized to the study intervention or to 'care as usual'. The supportive educative intervention consisted

  12. IU Health Physicians Patient Education

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    to a more "informed' informed consent. Improved Outcomes: Informed patients are more likely to be compliant with self-care Patients who are better educated are more likely to be medication compliant, adhere better Intervention Control 3 out of 3 12% 0% 2 out of 3 42% 23% 1 out of 3 33% 46% 0 out of 3 13% 31% #12;

  13. Effects of education on self-monitoring of blood pressure based on BASNEF model in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Baghianimoghadam, Mohammad Hossein; Rahaee, Zohreh; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Andishmand, Abas; Azadbakht, Leila

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension is one of the most important health problems. Self-monitoring may be an effective method for controlling this disease. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of education on blood pressure self-monitoring in patients with hypertension based on BASNEF model. METHODS: In this clinical trial, 150 outpatients with hypertension were randomly selected from those referred to private clinics in Yazd, Iran, during 2008. They were divided in two groups. The data were collected by a validated and reliable questionnaire. The implementing educational program was continued for 2 months and the pre-test and post-test had an interval of 2-months. BASNEF model was applied to explain the motivation of a behavior. Descriptive analysis, correlation test and also regression analysis were used to analyze data. RESULTS: The respondents acquired 17.72% of total score for self-monitoring behavior, 47.03% of attitude, 12.37% of subjective norms, 33.46% of intention and 50.95% of enabling factors. After intervention, there were significant increases in self-monitoring behavior (173.31%), attitude (62.60%), subjective norms (54.70%), intention (129.93%) and enabling factors (46.62%) in the intervention group. There was no significant difference between the constructs of BASNEF model in the control group after intervention compared to the baseline values (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed that the level of self-monitoring behavior in the patients was low. Educational programs are helpful and necessary to improve self-monitoring behavior in patients with hypertension. PMID:21526062

  14. Association between patient education and health-related quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Shimbo; M. Goto; T. Morimoto; K. Hira; M. Takemura; K. Matsui; A. Yoshida; T. Fukui

    2004-01-01

    Background: Providing patients with disease- and treatment-related information is an important role of medical staff and is now reimbursed in Japan by the national health insurance system under the rubric ‘patient education’. Evaluation of the effectiveness of patient education programs is necessary to ensure that limited health care resources are used efficiently. Objective: The objective is to determine whether educating

  15. Effects of the characteristics of teaching on the outcomes of heart failure patient education interventions: A systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Fredericks; Heather Beanlands; Karen Spalding; Monica Da Silva

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundLimited research has examined the specific approach, mode of delivery, and dose of educational interventions. Yet such knowledge is essential to develop effective heart failure educational interventions.

  16. Patient education in home care: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen; Oermann, Marilyn H

    2014-05-01

    This article describes principles for patient education, beginning with assessment of learning needs through evaluation. Strategies for effective teaching in the home care setting are presented, including use of educational resources. PMID:24802599

  17. The effectiveness of a supportive educative group intervention on family caregiver burden of patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Etemadifar, Shahram; Bahrami, Masoud; Shahriari, Mohsen; Farsani, Alireza Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Living with heart failure patients is a complex situation for family caregivers. Few studies have been conducted to examine the effects of interventional programs to ease this condition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a supportive educative group intervention in reducing family caregivers’ burden of caregiving. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trail was conducted at a selective teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran in 2012. The intervention consisted of four weekly multimedia training sessions of 2 h that included education and family support for 50 family caregivers. Caregiver burden was measured using the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI). Paired t-test, Student's t-tests, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to test for significant differences of the mean scores of burden between the intervention and control groups over a 3-month period. Results: The intervention was successful in reducing caregiver burden over time both at the end of the intervention period (P = 0.000) and 3 months after the intervention (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Nurses and other healthcare providers can use the findings of this study in order to implement effective programs to reduce family caregivers’ challenges and to provide them more support. PMID:24949057

  18. A prospective multicenter study of the effect of patient education on acceptability of generic prescribing in general practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan-Antoni Vallès; Maica Barreiro; Glòria Cereza; Juan-José Ferro; Mar??a-José Mart??nez; Josep-Maria Escribà; Begoña Iglesias; Esther Cucurull; Estrella AU-Barcelo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess patients’ acceptability of the substitution of brand-name drugs for generic drugs in the primary health care prescribing practices for chronic conditions. A prospective randomised multicentre study was conducted over a 12-month period in which patients taking medications for chronic disorders received an educational intervention on generic drugs at the time they attended

  19. A Study of Professional Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum, Julie; Ridenour, Maureen; Shaff, Gaye; Hammons, Mary; Taylor, Monica

    2002-01-01

    Of 124 acute care nurses, 97% felt that patient education was a priority. Inhibiting factors were time, staffing, and patient receptiveness. Enhancers included having time to teach, receiving effective teaching guidance materials, and having access to teaching resources. (SK)

  20. The Effect of Medical Education on Students' Patient-Satisfaction Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klamen, Debra L.; Williams, Reed G.

    1997-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 133 medical students at the University of Illinois used multiple clinical encounters with standardized patients to test student interpersonal and communication skills after the second and during the fourth year. Mean patient satisfaction improved from first to second encounter, and female students performed better than…

  1. Garlic, hypertension and patient education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mustafa Capraz; Melda Dilek; Tekin Akpolat

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the frequency of garlic usage in hypertensive population and to evaluate acute effect of garlic and garlic tablets on blood pressure in patients with hypertension. 4102 of the 7703 patients (53.3%) reported that they were using garlic. No significant effect on blood pressure was observed in any of the three groups (placebo,

  2. The Effect of Face-to-Face Education and Educational Booklet on Heart Health Indexes of the Hospitalized Patients with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili Vardanjani, Safar Ali; Fanisaberi, Laleh; Alirezaee Shahraki, Firozeh; Khalilzadeh, Ahmad; Tavakoli Vardanjani, Abdolazim; Ghani Dehkordi, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Management of risk factors and heart health indexes in the patients who have been diagnosed with myocardial infarction will result in prevention of secondary myocardial infarction, reduction of postimprovement mortality, increase of life span and improvement of life quality. Patient education has been found to be one of the most fundamental and essential care programs on the basis of identification and control of the patients' health criteria. The study is a quasi-experimental research consisting of two groups. In this study, 112 patients with myocardial infarction who were below the age of 70 were selected randomly and divided into two groups (case group and control group) after being matched based on age and sex. The researcher first measured the health indexes including smoking, cholesterol level, body mass, level of anxiety, and amount of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients who have been diagnosed with myocardial infarction for the first time. He performed education program in case group and analyzed the said variables after four months. He also compared the behaviors in the two groups after being educated. The data was analyzed by SPSS software, version 15 (This product is licensed to FeFDBi, ABiComputer, 1337), and the two groups were compared by using appropriate statistical tests. According to the results, after education period, systolic blood pressure of the case group improves compared with control group (P < 0.05/P = 0.022), case group tends to quit smoking more than control group does (P = 0.013), cholesterol level of case group improves compared with control group (P < 0.0001), changes of body mass are more positive in case group compared with control group (P = 0.012), and anxiety of case group reduces compared with control group (P < 0.0001). PMID:23781336

  3. Patient Education and Involvement in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiric, Linda Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health…

  4. Timely Topics: Hypertension Education--A Summative Evaluation of Direct and Indirect Care Providers' Knowledge, Roles, and Attitudes; Effects of Enforced Behavior Change on Attitudes; Evaluation of a Workshop on Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattron, Judith M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) an investigation of how nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and practice changed after a continuing education program on nursing management of adults with essential hypertension; (2) a study showing that even with enforced behavior changes, attitudes are slow to change; and (3) a workshop on principles of effective patient

  5. Does patient educational level affect office visits to family physicians?

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, Kevin; Goodwin, Meredith A.; Stange, Kurt C.

    2002-01-01

    Significant disparities in health care based on patient socioeconomic status have been documented. The extent to which physician behavior accounts for these differences is not known. We examined the impact of patient socioeconomic status, measured by years of education, on physician behavior assessed by direct observation of office visits, chart audits, and patient reports among 138 family physicians in 84 practices. Outcomes included time use measured with the Davis Observation Code, delivery of preventive services recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force, satisfaction assessed with the MOS 9-item Visit Rating Scale, and delivery of attributes of primary care measured by the Components of Primary Care Index. After controlling for patient characteristics among 2538 visits by adult patients who returned questionnaires, a high school education or less was associated with slightly greater proportion of time spent on physical examination and providing nutrition counseling, and less time on patient questions, assessing patient health knowledge, negotiation, and exercise counseling. This indicates that physicians adopt a more directive style with less educated patients. Screening tests were provided at lower rates among less educated patients, but there were no differences in rates of health habit counseling or immunization services delivered and no differences in delivery of patient-reported components of primary care. Less educated patients had similar overall visit satisfaction, but were slightly less likely to have their expectations met. These show that patients' education has relatively small, but potentially important, effects on the outpatient delivery of primary care. PMID:11918385

  6. Preparing patients for threatening medical treatments: effects of a chemotherapy educational DVD on anxiety, unmet needs, and self-efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penelope Schofield; Michael Jefford; Mariko Carey; Kathryn Thomson; Melanie Evans; Carl Baravelli; Sanchia Aranda

    2008-01-01

    Goals of work  Based on meta-analyses regarding the preparation of patients for potentially threatening medical procedures, a DVD, incorporating\\u000a behavioral role modelling, was developed to prepare patients for chemotherapy and assist them to self-manage side effects.\\u000a It was hypothesized that patients who watched the DVD (vs those who did not) would report (1) lower anxiety; (2) higher self-efficacy\\u000a related to coping

  7. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  8. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  9. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  10. Diabetic education, special consideration of oriental patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chanika Tuchinda; Nirun Vanaprapa; Suthida Nirapik; Ranoo Wongarn; Sathit Vannasaeng

    1989-01-01

    The important of patient education program in the management of diabetes has been widely recognized. We studied to find out\\u000a in general what the patients and their parents know about diabetes and their self-care by using a questionnaire. Then, the\\u000a diabetic education was given by one-to-one basis to every patient. Thirty four insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus attended\\u000a the diabetic the clinic

  11. Effect of CPOE User Interface Design on User-Initiated Access to Educational and Patient Information during Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Geissbuhler, Antoine J.; Dupont, William D.; Giuse, Dario A.; Talbert, Douglas A.; Tierney, William M.; Plummer, W. Dale; Stead, William W.; Miller, Randolph A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Authors evaluated whether displaying context sensitive links to infrequently accessed educational materials and patient information via the user interface of an inpatient computerized care provider order entry (CPOE) system would affect access rates to the materials. Design: The CPOE of Vanderbilt University Hospital (VUH) included “baseline” clinical decision support advice for safety and quality. Authors augmented this with seven new primarily educational decision support features. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial compared clinicians' utilization rates for the new materials via two interfaces. Control subjects could access study-related decision support from a menu in the standard CPOE interface. Intervention subjects received active notification when study-related decision support was available through context sensitive, visibly highlighted, selectable hyperlinks. Measurements: Rates of opportunities to access and utilization of study-related decision support materials from April 1999 through March 2000 on seven VUH Internal Medicine wards. Results: During 4,466 intervention subject-days, there were 240,504 (53.9/subject-day) opportunities for study-related decision support, while during 3,397 control subject-days, there were 178,235 (52.5/subject-day) opportunities for such decision support, respectively (p = 0.11). Individual intervention subjects accessed the decision support features at least once on 3.8% of subject-days logged on (278 responses); controls accessed it at least once on 0.6% of subject-days (18 responses), with a response rate ratio adjusted for decision support frequency of 9.17 (95% confidence interval 4.6–18, p < 0.0005). On average, intervention subjects accessed study-related decision support materials once every 16 days individually and once every 1.26 days in aggregate. Conclusion: Highlighting availability of context-sensitive educational materials and patient information through visible hyperlinks significantly increased utilization rates for study-related decision support when compared to “standard” VUH CPOE methods, although absolute response rates were low. PMID:15802487

  12. The effect of self-care education program on reducing HbA1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zareban, Iraj; Karimy, Mahmood; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Haidarnia, Alireza; Rakhshani, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes as the most common diseases caused by metabolic disorders is an important global challenge. This is a disease that requires lifelong self-care because self-care and improved quality of life is cost effective. This study is aimed to determine the impact of self-care education program on reducing HbA1c, type 2 diabetic patients and was conducted in Zahedan. Materials and Methods: This is an experimental study done on 138 diabetic female patients in Zahedan city, in 2011 (1390). This sampling method of patients was based on inclusion and exclusion criteria of the Diabetes Center, at Hazrat Ali Asghar Hospital (AS) in Zahedan. Samples were divided randomly in to two groups: 69 cases and 69 controls. Data collected included validity and reliability confirmed questionnaire. Checklist was based on patients ‘performance of reporting and (HbA1c) testing. Before the educational intervention, the checklist of questions for recording the (HbA1c) test for both the groups were completed, and study samples received 5 sessions of education (with the group discussion and film show) for a month. However, the control group received only routine training. Three months after the educational intervention, both groups completed the questionnaire and the check list and data using SPSS software and the appropriate tests were analyzed. Results: Findings showed that the mean domain scores of area of knowledge, attitude and practice educational groups, were recorded as (46.6 ± 8.57, 46.5 ± 0.86 and 29.06 ± 10.02), respectively. And after education scores of knowledge, attitude and practice were recorded as (52.80 ± 2.20, 12.98 ± 1.02 and 39.69 ± 4.74), respectively, and in study group significant difference (P < 0/001) was seen. Conclusion: Self-care training in striation leads to improve knowledge, attitude and self-care performance of the study samples and also improves the average (HbA1c). Because it seems to increase the active participation of learners in their care that they have experienced with this training method and their motivation enhanced them to learn better self-care. So this type of care education should be given to the attention of nurses and healthcare's staff. PMID:25540796

  13. [Therapeutic education of the diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Golay, A; Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Lasserre-Moutet, A

    2005-01-01

    Therapeutic education is a patient centred approach focused on patients' needs, values and strategies. It allows not only to increase patients' knowledge and skills on the disease, but also on their treatments. It brings a better quality of life, an increased therapeutic compliance, and decreases complications. The most difficult part of therapeutic education occurs when patients must change their behaviour. Motivational interviewing techniques are of great support and allow to prepare and support patients in "step by step" progressive changes. It is essential to work on resistance to change. The ambivalence in the choice of a new lifestyle must be measured, discussed and negotiate. Patients become partners and health care providers become coaches. To negotiate objectives must allow patients to choose their own strategies which should cost them minimum psychological efforts and bring them maximum benefits. The efficacy of therapeutic education has not to be proved any more: 80% less of amputations at 10 years in diabetic patients, 50% of stable body weight after weight loss at 5 years, etc. In conclusion, therapeutic education is part of a humanist medicine centred on patients which allow them to take care of their own treatment, in order to improve their quality of life, therapeutic compliance and potential complications. The health care providers teach, train, negotiate, motivate and accompany their patients in the long-term follow-up of their diseases. PMID:16035335

  14. The Effect of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge and Adherence to Treatment in Hemodialysis Patients: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Parvan, Kobra; Hasankhani, Hadi; Seyyedrasooli, Allehe; Riahi, Seyed Mohammad; Ghorbani, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) deal with many potential problems with hemodialysis for all their life. Regarding the importance of preventing dialysis adverse effects, which are in close connection with lack of knowledge and report on how to train the patients? This study aims at comparing the impact of two methods of face to face training and training pamphlet on complying and informing of hemodialysis treatments. Methods: This clinical trial study was conducted on 58 hemodialysis patients who visited Shahid Rahnemun Teaching hospital, Yazd, Iran, and had required conditions of the research. Data were collected through a questionnaire including personal-social information, several questions to assess the level of compliance and to inform the treatment method. The quantitative analysis of this study used the Statistical Package for Social Sciences SPSS version 13 and descriptive (frequency, mean, standard deviation) and inferential (Chi-square, paired t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA) statistics were employed. Results: The mean scores for informing both groups (face to face and training pamphlet) were significantly increased. The mean score for adherence to treatments was also significant.Conclusion: In this research, face to face training was found to be more effective than training pamphlet. It seemed to have more strong effect on increasing the level of information and adherence to treatment. To train these people, face to face training should be, thus, preferred.

  15. Effects of self-management, education and specific exercises, delivered by health professionals, in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, S; Briffa, NK; Carroll, G; Inderjeeth, C; Cook, N; McQuade, J

    2008-01-01

    Background An education self-management program for people with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee was designed to be delivered by health professionals, incorporating their knowledge and expertise. Improvement in quality of life, health status and pain in response to this program has previously been demonstrated in an uncontrolled pilot study. To more rigorously test the effectiveness of the program we will undertake a randomised controlled trial of people with OA of the knee offering specific self-administered exercises and education, in accordance with the principles of self-management. Aim: To determine whether an education self management program for subjects with Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (OAK program) implemented by health professionals in a primary health care setting can achieve and maintain clinically meaningful improvements compared standard medical management in a control group. Methods The effects of standard medical management will be compared with the effects of the OAK program in a single-blind randomized study. Participants: 146 male and female participants with established OA knee will be recruited. Volunteers with coexistent inflammatory joint disease or serious co-morbidities will be excluded. Interventions: Participants will be randomized into either intervention or control groups (delayed start). The intervention group will complete the OA knee program and both groups will be followed for 6 months. Measurements: Assessments will be at baseline, 8 weeks and 6 months. SF-36, WOMAC and VAS pain questionnaires will be completed. Isometric quadriceps and hamstring strength will be measured using a dynamometer; knee range of movement using a goniometer; and physical function will be determined by a modified timed up and go test. Data will be analysed using repeated measures ANOVA. Discussion While there is evidence to support the effectiveness of SM programs for people with hypertension, diabetes and asthma, the evidence available for treatment of arthritis remains equivocal. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a disease specific self-management program for people with OA knee. The study design includes all the important features of a clinical experimental study to minimize bias so the results of the study will provide a high level of evidence. People with OA of the knee have identified pain and problems with daily activities as the most important problems associated with their condition. The outcome measures selected specifically address these issues and have demonstrated validity and are responsive within the range of change expected in response to the intervention. Hence the results of the study will reflect their priorities. The results of the study will provide evidence to guide clinicians and funding bodies seeking to establish priorities regarding the provision of this disease specific program. Trial registration ACTR number: 12607000080426 PMID:18831745

  16. Effects of educational intervention on adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Erimara Dall'Agnol; Fleck, Caren Schlottefeld; Borges, Januário José Vieira; Condessa, Robledo Leal; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention on healthcare professionals' adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in intensive care unit patients. Methods A quasi-experimental study was performed to evaluate intensive care unit professionals' adherence to the tracheobronchial aspiration technical recommendations in intensive care unit patients both before and after a theoretical and practical educational intervention. Comparisons were performed using the chi-square test, and the significance level was set to p<0.05. Results A total of 124 procedures, pre- and post-intervention, were observed. Increased adherence was observed in the following actions: the use of personal protective equipment (p=0.01); precaution when opening the catheter package (p<0.001); the use of a sterile glove on the dominant hand to remove the catheter (p=0.003); the contact of the sterile glove with the catheter only (p<0.001); the execution of circular movements during the catheter removal (p<0.001); wrapping the catheter in the sterile glove at the end of the procedure (p=0.003); the use of distilled water, opened at the start of the procedure, to wash the connection latex (p=0.002); the disposal of the leftover distilled water at the end of the procedure (p<0.001); and the performance of the aspiration technique procedures (p<0.001). Conclusion There was a low adherence by health professionals to the preventive measures against hospital infection, indicating the need to implement educational strategies. The educational intervention used was shown to be effective in increasing adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration. PMID:23917976

  17. Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stanley G.

    The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a…

  18. Educating nurses and patients to manage heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Strömberg

    2002-01-01

    Patient education is an important component in the management of patients with heart failure and nurses are increasingly involved in this area. This paper reviews the literature on education to patients with heart failure and the education and training for heart failure nurses. Patients with heart failure need education in order to adapt to their chronic syndrome and perform self-care.

  19. Health education for STD patients in a New Delhi hospital.

    PubMed

    Hiramani, A B; Srivastava, U; Misra, R S

    1985-09-01

    The impact of sexually transmitted disease (STD) education on patients who presented for treatment of syphillis, gonorrhea, chancroid, or gonorrhea and chancroid at the STD clinic of a hospital in New Delhi, India, was assessed. 1st a pilot study of 31 patients was undertaken to determine their level of knowledge about syphilis, gonorrhea, and chancroid. This information was then used to design appropriate educational materials, including folders, photographs, flip-charts, and posters. The impact of these materials on the knowledge level of a group of patients with 1 or more of the 3 diseases was then assessed. 107 patients who presented at the clinic for treatment were interviewed in order to obtain baseline information on their STD knowledge levels. Individual education sessions were held with 80 of the 107 patients. Some of the educational materials were used during the education sessions and the patients were instructed to read the remaining materials on their own. Approximately 18 days following the education sessions, 56 of the 80 patients were retested on their knowledge of STDs. The remaining patients were lost to followup. Analysis of the data indicated that the majority of the 107 respondents were unmarried, between 20-25 years of age, and earning less than Rs.600. The baseline test indicated that most of the patients had some knowledge about their own diseases, but little knowledge about the other 2 diseases. Many of the respondents had misconceptions about the causes and effects of the diseases. The results of the retests following the educational sessions indicated that the patients with syphilis or gonorrhea tripled their knowledge level of the 3 STDs and that patients with chancroid more than doubled their STD knowledge level. 2/3 of the 56 patients said that the program increased their understanding of STDs. The educational method preferred by the largest proportion of respondents (64%) was the individual educational sessions. The folders and photographs were ranked as 2nd and 3rd in preference. Many of the patients had delayed seeking treatment for their condition. The major reason for the delay was that the patient did not understand the seriousness of the disease. PMID:3840120

  20. Roy’s Adaptation Model-Based Patient Education for Promoting the Adaptation of Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Afrasiabifar, Ardashir; Karimi, Zohreh; Hassani, Parkhideh

    2013-01-01

    Background In addition to physical adaptation and psychosocial adjustment to chronic renal disease, hemodialysis (HD) patients must also adapt to dialysis therapy plan. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of Roy’s adaptation model-based patient education on adaptation of HD patients. Patients and Methods This study is a semi-experimental research that was conducted with the participation of all patients with end-stage renal disease referred to the dialysis unit of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj city, 2010. A total of 59 HD patients were randomly allocated to two groups of test and control. Data were collected by a questionnaire based on the Roy’s Adaptation Model (RAM). Validity and reliability of the questionnaire were approved. Patient education was determined by eight one-hour sessions over eight weeks. At the end of the education plan, the patients were given an educational booklet containing the main points of self-care for HD patients. The effectiveness of education plan was assessed two months after plan completion and data were compared with the pre-education scores. All analyses were conducted using the SPSS software (version 16) through descriptive and inferential statistics including correlation, t-test, ANOVA and ANCOVA tests. Results The results showed significant differences in the mean scores of physiological and self-concept models between the test and control groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03 respectively). Also a statistical difference (P = 0.04) was observed in the mean scores of the role function mode of both groups. There was no significant difference in the mean scores of interdependence modes between the two groups. Conclusions RAM based patient education could improve the patients’ adaptation in physiologic and self-concept modes. In addition to suggesting further research in this area, nurses are recommended to pay more attention in applying RAM in dialysis centers. PMID:24396575

  1. Group patient education: effectiveness of a brief intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary health care in Greece: a clinically controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Merakou, K; Knithaki, A; Karageorgos, G; Theodoridis, D; Barbouni, A

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55 individuals). The intervention group, instead of receiving standard care, attended a structured group educational programme using Conversation Maps while the control group had standard care. The main outcome measures were HbA1c, body mass index (BMI), triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), measured at baseline and 6 months after the intervention. After 6 months, significant differences in changes of the studied parameters were observed between the groups in HbA1c, 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1, 1.7), (P < 0.001) and HDL -4.4 (95% CI: -8.1, -0.8), (P < 0.001) in favour of group education. Within the groups, the intervention group presented a significant reduction in HbA1c, -0.6 (95% CI: -0.8, -0.3), (P < 0.001), in BMI, -0.7 (95% CI: -0.9, -0.1), (P = 0.007), in triglycerides, -21.1 (95% CI: -47.1, -9.9), (P = 0.003) and LDL, -10.0 (95% CI: -22.5, -5.7), (P < 0.001), while in the control group significant reductions were observed in HbA1c, -0.5 (95% CI: -0.5, -0.3), (P = 0.003), in HLD, -4.1 (95% CI: -7.7, -2.3), (P = 0.001) and in LDL, -9.4 (95% CI: -19.9, -3.9), (P = 0.018). Group-based patient education using Conversation Maps for people with type 2 diabetes is more effective, compared with individual education, in diabetes self-management. PMID:25724879

  2. Educating our patients collaboratively: a novel interprofessional approach.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Rebecca; D'Alimonte, Laura; Osmar, Kari; Court, Arlene; Szumacher, Ewa; Bristow, Bonnie; Robson, Sheila; Dawdy, Krista; Burnett, Julie; Di Prospero, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Providing cancer patients with more information regarding their treatments allows them to feel more in control, increases self efficacy, and can decrease anxiety. The aims of the present study were to develop an interprofessional group education session and to evaluate the usefulness and acceptability of this session. In addition, informational distress levels pre- and post-education were evaluated. A prostate radiation therapy (RT) education session was developed and facilitated by an interprofessional team. Topics discussed included how RT works, side effects and management, and support services available. Prior to the education session, participants reported their informational RT distress levels using the validated Distress Thermometer (DT). Post-education session, the DT was readministered. In addition, participants completed an acceptability survey to assess format, structure, and usefulness of the education session. Participants agreed that the session contained valuable and useful information helping them understand expectations during treatment, including resource availability, side effects and management, as well as procedural expectation during treatment. All stated they would recommend the session to other patients. The interprofessional nature of the sessions was deemed useful. Suggested areas for improvement included addition of a dietitian, information on long-term side effects, statistics of radiotherapy side effects, impact of radiotherapy on sexual function, and overall quality of life. The group education session significantly improved informational distress levels (p?=?0.04). Educating prostate cancer patients utilizing an interprofessional group format can decrease anxiety and stress related to their RT treatment. Future development of group education sessions for other disease site groups may be valuable. PMID:24532366

  3. Comparing Effectiveness of High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation vs Case-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Ling Yap, Yen; Leng Lee, Wee; Chang Soh, Yee

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether human patient simulation (HPS) is superior to case-based learning (CBL) in teaching diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and thyroid storm (TS) to pharmacy students. Design. In this cross-over, open-label, single center, randomized control trial, final-year undergraduate pharmacy students enrolled in an applied therapeutics course were randomized to HPS or CBL groups. Pretest, posttest, knowledge retention tests, and satisfaction survey were administered to students. Assessment. One hundred seventy-four students participated in this study. The effect sizes attributable to HPS were larger than CBL in both cases. HPS groups performed significantly better in posttest and knowledge retention test compared to CBL groups pertaining to TS case (p<0.05). Students expressed high levels of satisfaction with HPS sessions. Conclusion. HPS was superior to CBL in teaching DKA and TS to final-year undergraduate pharmacy students. PMID:25386018

  4. [Patient education in rheumatology: a way to better disease management using patients' empowerment].

    PubMed

    Lind-Albrecht, Gudrun

    2006-11-01

    Patients' empowerment has become a main issue in modern treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. Within this concept patient education is an important instrument. Specific standardized programs, developed by multicenter groups under the leadership of the DGRh (German Society for Rheumatology) have become widely used all over Germany. The DGRh takes care of the program quality and of the trainers and heads of courses. Based on modern educational theories for adults and using a modular concept, which must be adapted to the individual situation of the patients, the curricula are put into practice by trainees of the different professions concerned. Controlled studies have not only shown the progress of patients' knowledge, compliance and coping, but also showed striking socioeconomic advantages in long-term follow-up. Patient education leads to a better and cost-effective management of rheumatic diseases. PMID:17160375

  5. Best practice for atrial fibrillation patient education.

    PubMed

    Lane, Deirdre A; Barker, Rachel V; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    Patients' beliefs about their health (and illness), medications and healthcare they receive are important determinants of whether or not they accept recommended treatments; influence their coping responses in relation to their illness; make them adhere to recommended therapy and ultimately affect health outcomes. Incorporation of patients' preferences for therapy should now be considered an integral part of the decision-making process. This gradual shift in health-care practice from paternalistic to shared-decision making, whereby there is a two-way exchange of information between the patient and healthcare provider and both are involved in the treatment decision, requires a reasonable level of understanding and knowledge of the condition and its treatment by the patient. However, patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) often have poor knowledge about their condition and the benefits and risks of AF and AF treatments. Physicians and other healthcare providers may have doubts over a patient's ability to adhere to certain treatment regimens, particularly oral anticoagulation, due in part to the lack of patient knowledge, and this may be an important determinant of whether such treatments are even considered as therapeutic options. Further, patients often hold misconceptions about AF and treatment options, which may act as barriers to their acceptance of the condition and adherence to therapy. This review will summarise the literature on the knowledge of patients about AF and its management, how patients' values and preferences can impact on their treatment choices, the ideal components of patient education, the impact of educational interventions on patients' knowledge and perceptions of AF, and where appropriate highlight specific issues facing lone AF patients. PMID:25175094

  6. Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edith E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance…

  7. Anaphylaxis avoidance and management: educating patients and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Kirsi M; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an increasingly prevalent problem in westernized countries. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the increasing numbers of patients at risk for anaphylaxis receive proper education on the etiology and risk factors as well as appropriate treatment of anaphylaxis with epinephrine. The physician’s role is crucial in order to educate the patients and care takers on effective measures to prevent anaphylaxis and empower them to take charge of early recognition and proper management of an anaphylactic reaction to prevent poor outcomes. This review summarizes the clinical presentation, triggers, avoidance, and management of anaphylaxis. PMID:25031541

  8. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  9. The crucial role of patient education in heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Strfmberg

    2005-01-01

    Background: Deterioration of heart failure causes and complicates many hospital admissions in people aged over 65 years. Frequent readmissions cause an immense burden on the individual, the family and the health care system. Heart failure management programmes, in which patient education is an important component, have been shown to be effective in improving self-care and reducing readmissions. Aim: This paper

  10. Patient education about schizophrenia: initial expectations and later satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ascher-Svanum, H; Rochford, S; Cisco, D; Claveaux, A

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated patients' expectations prior to participation in an education program about coping with schizophrenia, and their evaluations of the program upon its completion. Adult inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenic disorders (N = 123) responded anonymously to a preintervention expectation measured and a postintervention evaluation questionnaire. Results point to high expectations of this illness self-management education program, and a high level of satisfaction upon its completion, with a self-fulfilling prophecy effect, in which those with high expectations later reported greater satisfaction. Patients perceived, however, a differential level of helpfulness of the program's nine content areas, and rated learning about diagnosis and medication management as most helpful. Content areas that were rated less helpful included prevalence of schizophrenia, its psychosocial rehabilitation, and use of community resources. Implications for clinical practice in patient education are identified and discussed. PMID:11885215

  11. Evaluation of Patients' Education on Foot Self-Care Status in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kafaie, Parichehr; Noorbala, Mohamad Taghi; Soheilikhah, Sedigheh; Rashidi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background Skin problems caused by neuropathy and antipathy are common manifestations of diabetes. The most serious about such problem is the diabetic foot, which may lead to eventual ulceration and amputation, and will decrease a patient’s quality of life dramatically. Objectives The aim of this study is to assess the level of foot self-care and foot conditions in diabetic patients, and to demonstrate the role of self-care education in diabetic foot care. Patients and Methods A total of 80 diabetic patients were included in the study, all of whom had referred to "Yazd Diabetic Research Center." The levels of their foot self-care were recorded in pre-test questionnaires, and then all of the patients were visited and educated by a Dermatologist for their foot self-care on a monthly basis, after which their post-test results were recorded through a second administration of the same questionnaire. Eventually, data from the pre and post-test questionnaires were analyzed to identify the possible effects of education. Results A total of 80 diabetic patients (34 males, 46 females) with a mean average age of 53.53 ± 10.19 and mean average duration of diabetes 12.42 ± 6.73 years were assessed. A significant increase in foot self-care through education was observed (baseline 27.06 ± 8.77, vs. post education 43.12 ± 8.77; P = 0.0001). After education, foot and nail lesions improved completely in 84% and 62.8%. Moreover, 77.8% of patients had suitable shoes and 79.6% had suitable socks. Conclusions Our findings showed that foot self-care education could improve knowledge and performance of patients about various foot problems, and was significantly important in preventing ulcers. PMID:23482390

  12. Differences in Perceived Difficulty in Print and Online Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Written patient education materials frequently exceed the reading ability of the general public. Patients are often intimidated by the task of reading patient education materials, perceiving the materials’ difficulty levels as prohibitive, even when they do not exceed the patients’ reading abilities. It is unclear how the delivery mechanism—print or a computer screen—affects a patient’s reading experience through his/her perception of its difficulty. Objective: To determine whether first-year college students perceived online or print-based patient education materials as more difficult to read. Design: Convenience sampling of first-year college students. Results: Some first-year college students perceived online patient education materials to be more difficult to read than print-based ones—even when the reading level of the patient education materials was similar. Demographic information about this sample’s high levels of digital literacy suggests that other populations might also perceive online patient education materials as more difficult to read than print-based equivalents. Patients’ perceptions of the difficulty of patient education materials influenced their ability to effectively learn from those materials. Conclusion: This article concludes with a call for more research into patients’ perceptions of difficulty of patient education materials in print vs on a screen. PMID:25662526

  13. Evaluation of the effect of patient education on rates of falls in older hospital patients: Description of a randomised controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne-Marie Hill; Keith Hill; Sandra Brauer; David Oliver; Tammy Hoffmann; Christopher Beer; Steven McPhail; Terry P Haines

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accidental falls by older patients in hospital are one of the most commonly reported adverse events. Falls after discharge are also common. These falls have enormous physical, psychological and social consequences for older patients, including serious physical injury and reduced quality of life, and are also a source of substantial cost to health systems worldwide. There have been a

  14. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    PubMed

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes. PMID:25540194

  15. Patient-centered diabetes self-management education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoffrey C. Williams; Allan Zeldman

    2002-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) has been shown to improve health outcomes. Yet, relatively little is known about\\u000a how DSME has its effects. Literature reviewed from the past 3 years indicates that if DSME is to become more effective interventions\\u000a need to be theory-based, to increase patient involvement in their care, and to encompass a broader array of evidenced-based\\u000a outcomes. Outcomes

  16. Effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or Diabetes Support and Education on insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Chin Meng; Chen, Jiegen; Pamuklar, Zehra; Torquati, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Objective The long-term changes in insulin sensitivity and ?-cell function in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who undergo RYGB surgery or standard medical care remain unclear. We prospectively studied longitudinal changes of glucostatic parameters in morbidly obese patients with T2DM undergoing RYGB surgery or Diabetes Support and Education (DSE). Research Methods and Design 61 morbidly obese subjects (41.7±0.6 kg/m2) with T2DM were assigned to RYGB surgery (n=30) or DSE (n=31). They were matched for sex, age and body weight. Insulin sensitivity index (Si) and acute insulin response (AIR) were derived from frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Body composition was measured using dual-emission absorptiometry X-ray. General linear model with repeated measures were used to examine the longitudinal changes (baseline, 6-month, 12-month) in these parameters. Results At 12-month follow-up, significant improvement in obesity measures, body composition, glucose homeostasis, Si and AIR were observed following RYGB surgery and weight loss. These outcomes were not influenced by pre-operative insulin use. Although there were no significant changes in the body composition amongst DSE subjects, they experienced a decline in the Si and AIR, along with an increase in fasting glucose and HbA1c. The between-group differences in Si and AIR at 12-month follow-up were completely attenuated with adjustment to changes in body weight. Conclusions The long-term effects of RYGB surgery on glucostatic parameters are partly dependent on weight loss. In morbidly obese diabetic patients who were offered DSE, a progressive decline in the glucose homeostasis and glucostatic parameters is observed despite absence of weight gain. (NCT00787670) PMID:23732262

  17. Effectiveness of PRECEDE model for health education on changes and level of control of HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individual health education is considered to be essential in the overall care of patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), although there is some uncertainty regarding its metabolic control benefits. There have been very few randomized studies on the effects of individual education on normal care in DM2 patients with a control group, and none of these have assessed the long-term results. Therefore, this study aims to use this design to assess the effectiveness of the PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, Enabling, Causes in Educational Diagnosis, and Evaluation) education model in the metabolic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods An open community effectiveness study was carried out in 8 urban community health centers in the North-East Madrid Urban Area (Spain). Six hundred patients with DM2 were randomized in two groups: PRECEDE or conventional model for health promotion education. The main outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin A1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids and control criteria during the 2-year follow-up period. Results Glycated hemoglobin A1c and systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels decreased significantly in the PRECEDE group (multivariate analysis of covariance, with baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c, SBP, and variables showing statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visits). The decrease levels in diastolic blood pressure (DBP), triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were nonsignificant. PRECEDE increased compliance in all control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. BMI did not change during the study in either of the two models analyzed. Conclusions PRECEDE health education model is a useful method in the overall treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, which contributes to decrease glycated hemoglobin A1c and SBP levels and increase the compliance in all the control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01316367 PMID:21524316

  18. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

  19. National Council on Patient Information and Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Since 1982, the National Council on Patient Information and Education (NCPIE) has been working to "Educate Before You Medicate". Over 3.5 billion prescriptions are dispensed yearly, yet easy to understand information about prescription drugs is hard to find. The NCPIE website provides information for consumers, special populations of consumers, and those health care workers who work with patients directly. The "Educational Resources" link has both free and pay publications. The free pamphlets, such as "Priorities & Approaches for Improving Prescription Medicine Use by Older Adults" and "Children and America's Other Drug Problem: Guidelines for Improving Prescription Medicine Use Among Children and Teenagers" can be downloaded, and even previewed before downloading. The pay pamphlets have to be ordered, and some of them are in both English and Spanish. The "For Medicine Users" section is dedicated to the issues that represent a majority of inquiries to NCPIE. This section includes links to resources on talking about prescriptions, information about specific medicines, use of non-prescription medicines, and much more.

  20. Electronic Resources in Patient Education: Issues and Solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iryna Berezovska; Karen L. Buchinger; Ulyana Chernyaha

    2008-01-01

    Management of electronic resources has become a critical function for successful patient education. The aim of our project is to promote relevant life style changes in the city of Lviv and the nearby region by direct provision of health care consumer educational services that focus on education of patient and caregiving families in the proper ways of modifying life style

  1. Chronic neuropathic pain: issues in patient education.

    PubMed

    Arnstein, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is difficult to diagnose and treat. For the patient, multiple aspects of his or her life may be altered, including physical, emotional, and spiritual health, as well as the ability to work, and family and social relationships. Successful treatment plans require more than just pharmacotherapy. Patients often need to receive a lot of information about complex regimens related to both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies. Additionally, patients with neuropathic pain need nursing support and guidance to help them master the self-management and coping skills required to minimize pain flares, while optimizing mood and functioning. A number of specific strategies are available based on the cognitive-behavioral model. These include the ability to interpret changes in pain in a helpful way, engagement in health promoting behaviors (including diet and exercise), and the development of an action plan for coping with pain exacerbations. A central element in this approach is to help patients become experts in understanding and managing their pain, then addressing the toll it has taken on their emotions, daily activities, and important relationships. Self-initiated techniques, such as relaxation, imagery, and hypnosis, can also be used to alter the subjective experience of pain. This article presents an overview of patient education approaches useful in the management of chronic pain. PMID:15644857

  2. Professional views on patient education in osteoporosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Bångsbo; Anita Björklund

    2010-01-01

    Summary  The aim of this study was to investigate patient education in osteoporosis, with a consensus-building Delphi survey. The results\\u000a showed that the purposes of osteoporosis schools are to reduce the risk of falling, facilitate empowerment, increase levels\\u000a of function and activity and teach participants to master or reduce pain.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  According to the World Health Organization, osteoporosis is a major health

  3. Creating Patient and Family Education Web Sites

    PubMed Central

    YADRICH, DONNA MACAN; FITZGERALD, SHARON A.; WERKOWITCH, MARILYN; SMITH, CAROL E.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives details about the methods and processes used to ensure that usability and accessibility were achieved during development of the Home Parenteral Nutrition Family Caregivers Web site, an evidence-based health education Web site for the family members and caregivers of chronically ill patients. This article addresses comprehensive definitions of usability and accessibility and illustrates Web site development according to Section 508 standards and the national Health and Human Services’ Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines requirements. PMID:22024970

  4. Patient Education Level As a Predictor of Survival In Lung Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, James E.; Kornblith, Alice B.; Holland, Jimmie C.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of socioeconomic status, as measured by education, on the survival of 1,577 lung cancer patients treated on 11 studies conducted by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B. Patients and Methods Sociodemographic data, including education, was reported by the patient at the time of clinical trial accrual. Cox proportional hazards model stratified by treatment arm/study was used to examine the effect of education on survival after adjustment for known prognostic factors. Results The patient population included 1,177 patients diagnosed with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; stage III or IV) and 400 patients diagnosed with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC; extensive or limited). Patients with less than an eighth grade education (13% of patients) were significantly more likely to be male, nonwhite, and older; have a performance status (PS) of 1 or 2; and have chest pain. Significant predictors of poor survival in the final model included male sex, PS of 1 or 2, dyspnea, weight loss, liver or bone metastases, unmarried, presence of adrenal metastases and high alkaline phosphatase levels among patients with NSCLC, and high WBC levels among patients with advanced disease. Education was not predictive of survival. Conclusion The physical condition of patients with low education who enroll onto clinical trials is worse than patients with higher education. Once enrolled onto a clinical trial, education does not affect the survival of patients with SCLC or stage III or IV NSCLC. The standardization of treatment and follow-up within a clinical trial, regardless of education, is one possible explanation for this lack of effect. PMID:18757325

  5. Medical Utilization of Kiosks in the Delivery of Patient Education: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yvonne Chan, Yu-Feng; Nagurka, Roxanne; Bentley, Suzanne; Ordonez, Edgardo; Sproule, William

    2014-01-01

    Background: The utilization of kiosks has previously been shown to be effective for collecting information, delivering educational modules, and providing access to health information. We discuss a review of current literature for the utilization of kiosks for the delivery of patient education. Methods: The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were: (1) study discusses the utilization of kiosks for patient health education; (2) study discusses the use of touch screens for patient health information; (3) published in English. Our review includes searches via MEDLINE databases and Google Scholar for the years 1996-2014. Results: Overall, 167 articles were screened for final eligibility, and after discarding duplicates and non-eligible studies with abstract. Full-text review of 28 articles was included in the final analysis. Conclusion: The review of available literature demonstrates the effectiveness of touch screen kiosks to educate patients and to improve healthcare, both at a performance and cost advantage over other modes of patient education. PMID:25097831

  6. The Effects of Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David

    Although fear of death is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of death and the fear of death have only occurred for the last few decades. Death education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of death education on death anxiety by…

  7. Developing Effective Cancer Pain Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Pisu, Maria; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; Johns, Shelley A.

    2013-01-01

    Pain is prevalent, burdensome, and undertreated in individuals with cancer across the disease trajectory. Providing patients and family caregivers psychosocial support and education to manage cancer pain is a core component of quality care that can result in significant clinical benefit. In this review, we (1) outline an approach for developing and assessing the effectiveness of education programs for adults with cancer pain; (2) discuss considerations for tailoring programs to the needs of diverse populations and those with limited health literacy skills; (3) describe the resource needs and costs of developing a program; and (4) highlight innovative approaches to cancer pain education. We conclude with recommendations for future research and the next generation of educational interventions. PMID:22644901

  8. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Stacy L; Waterman, Amy D; Davis, LaShara A; Peipert, John D; Fish, Anne F

    2015-03-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615 000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100 000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients' lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant. PMID:25758805

  9. A Comparative Evaluation of the Traditional Versus a Systems Approach for Hypertensive Patient Education. Final Report, October 1975-March 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucha, Deloros H.

    A study was conducted to evaluate the traditional method (physician, nurse) versus a systems approach method of providing health education. The objectives included the following: identify cost-effective and feasible ways of delivering patient education; guarantee an important resource for the professional in fulfilling his/her patient education

  10. Educational Technology for Effective Distance Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, N. K.; Menon, M. B.

    1997-01-01

    Explains the concepts of distance education and educational technology and describes the major objectives of teacher education. Discusses the teacher education programs of Indira Gandhi National Open University (India) and describes print materials, audio-video programs, assignments, project work, academic counseling, the extended contact…

  11. Conventional vs. Tablet Computer-Based Patient Education following Lung Transplantation – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Hendrik; Rademacher, Jessica; Zinowsky, Imke; Fuge, Jan; Greer, Mark; Warnecke, Gregor; Smits, Jacqueline M.; Bertram, Anna; Haverich, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Gottlieb, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate immunosuppression is of critical importance in preventing rejection, while avoiding toxicity following lung transplantation. The mainstay immunosuppressants are calcineurin inhibitors, which require regular monitoring due to interactions with other medications and diet. Adherence to immunosuppression and patient knowledge is vital and can be improved through patient education. Education using tablet-computers was investigated. Objective To compare tablet-PC education and conventional education in improving immunosuppression trough levels in target range 6 months after a single education. Secondary parameters were ratio of immunosuppression level measurements divided by per protocol recommended measurements, time and patient satisfaction regarding education. Design Single-centre, open labelled randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients >6 months after lung-transplantation with <50% of calcineurin inhibitor trough levels in target range. Intervention Tablet-pc education versus personal, nurse-led education. Measurements Calcineurin inhibitor levels in target range 6 months after education, level variability, interval adherence, knowledge and adherence was studied. As outcome parameter, renal function was measured and adverse events registered. Results Sixty-four patients were 1:1 randomised for either intervention. Levels of immunosuppression 6 months after education were equal (tablet-PC 58% vs. conventional 48%, p?=?0.27), both groups improved in achieving a CNI trough level within target range by either education method (delta tablet-PC 29% vs. conventional 20%). In all patients, level variability decreased (?20.4%), whereas interval adherence remained unchanged. Knowledge about immunosuppression improved by 7% and compliance tests demonstrated universal improvements with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion Education is a simple, effective tool in improving adherence to immunosuppression. Tablet-PC education was non-inferior to conventional education. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398488 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01398488?term=gottlieb+tablet+pc+education&rank=1. PMID:24608864

  12. Implementation of an evidence-based education practice change for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Portz, Denise; Johnston, Mary Pat

    2014-10-01

    As oncology care continues to move toward delivery in the outpatient setting, oncology nurses must find ways to effectively educate patients about diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management. A cancer diagnosis induces high levels of anxiety, often affecting a patient's ability to retain information about his or her disease, treatment, and symptom management. Based on results from the ONS Foundation-supported Breast Cancer Care Quality Measures Set and Breast Cancer Survivorship Quality Measures Set, a community-based, multisite cancer center located in the midwestern United States embarked on a quality project in patient education. The purpose of this article is to describe a quality project that evolved from a review of the patient education process for patients with cancer in three medical oncology clinics to a pilot of a new model for patient education. The pilot identified gaps, developed and implemented evidence-based improvement strategies, and planned for evaluation of process and patient outcomes of this practice change. A pilot study to assess processes and workflows associated with a one-hour separate patient education visit was designed and initiated. Patients and oncology nurses have expressed satisfaction with standardized patient education. Although processes and workflows continue to be evaluated, a proposal was developed, submitted, and accepted by the institutional review board to evaluate patient-centered outcomes. PMID:25252991

  13. Pretreatment lymphedema education and identified educational resources in breast cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheila H. Ridner

    2006-01-01

    ObjectiveIn 1998, the American Cancer Society (ACS) Lymphedema Workshop, called for a three phase approach to patient lymphedema education: (1) pretreatment, (2) postoperatively, and (3) continuing education. The objectives of this study were: to compare recalled pretreatment lymphedema education before and after the 1998 ACS call; compare recalled lymphedema pretreatment education between women with and without breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema;

  14. Evaluation of asthma websites for patient and parent education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn H Oermann; Jane Gerich; Lisa Ostosh; Sylvia Zaleski

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of websites on asthma for patient and parent education. Seventy websites were evaluated based on the Health Information Technology Institute (HITI) criteria; eight core content criteria from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines; and readability. The ten best websites for asthma education were identified for patient teaching and

  15. Students Learning from Patients: Let's Get Real in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-01-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of…

  16. Patient-reported disease knowledge and educational needs in Lynch syndrome: findings of an interactive multidisciplinary patient conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with Lynch Syndrome, the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, benefit from genetic education and family counseling regarding diagnostic testing and cancer surveillance/prevention recommendations. Although genetic counseling is currently the most common venue where such education and counseling takes place, little is known about the level of disease knowledge and education needs as directly reported by patients and families with Lynch Syndrome. Furthermore, experiences with forums for larger-scale knowledge transfer have been limited in the current literature. Methods We conducted a one-day interactive multidisciplinary patient conference, designed to complement individual genetic counseling for updating disease knowledge, supportive networking and needs assessment among Lynch Syndrome patients and their family members. The patient conference was designed utilizing the conceptual framework of action research. Paired pre- and post-conference surveys were administered to 44 conference participants anonymously to assess patient-reported disease knowledge and education needs. Results A multidisciplinary team of expert providers utilized a variety of educational formats during the one-day conference. Four main focus areas were: genetic testing, surveillance/prevention, living with Lynch Syndrome, and update on research. Thirty-two participants (73%) completed the pre-conference, and 28 (64%) participants completed the post-conference surveys. Nineteen respondents were affected and the remaining were unaffected. The scores of the disease-knowledge items significantly increased from 84% pre- to 92% post-conference (p?=?0.012). Patients reported a high level of satisfaction and identified further knowledge needs in nutrition (71%), surveillance/prevention options (71%), support groups (36%), cancer risk assessment (32%), active role in medical care (32%), and research opportunities (5%). Conclusion Our experience with a dedicated patient education conference focused on Lynch Syndrome demonstrated that such an educational format is effective for updating or reinforcing disease knowledge, for identifying patient-reported unmet educational needs, as well as for peer-support. PMID:24499499

  17. The Patient Handoff: A Comprehensive Curricular Blueprint for Resident Education to Improve Continuity of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Horwitz, Leora I.; Bass, Ellen J.; Mahar, Sean E.; Philibert, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education released its resident duty hours restrictions, requiring that faculty monitor their residents’ patient handoffs to ensure that residents are competent in handoff communications. Although studies have reported the need to improve the effectiveness of the handoff and a variety of curricula have been suggested and implemented, a common method for teaching and evaluating handoff skills has not been developed. Also in 2010, engineers, informaticians, and physicians interested in patient handoffs attended a symposium in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery, entitled Handovers and Handoffs: Collaborating in Turns. As a result of this symposium, a workgroup formed to develop practical and readily implementable educational materials for medical educators involved in teaching patient handoffs to residents. In this article, the result of that yearlong collaboration, the authors aim to provide clarity on the definition of the patient handoff, to review the barriers to performing effective handoffs in academic health centers, to identify available solutions to improve handoffs, and to provide a structured approach to educating residents on handoffs via a curricular blueprint. The authors’ blueprint was developed to guide educators in customizing handoff education programs to fit their specific, local needs. Hopefully, it also will provide a starting point for future research into improving the patient handoff. Increasingly complex patient care environments require both innovations in handoff education and improvements in patient care systems to improve continuity of care. PMID:22361791

  18. Coordinated individual education with an arthritis passport for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert P. Riemsma; Erik Taal; Herman L. M. Brus; Johannes J. Rasker; Oene Wiegman

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a program for individual education in combination with the use of an arthritis passport. - \\u000aMethods: We studied 3 groups of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The first experimental group received educational materials and followed the program under the guidance of their regular providers of health care whose activities were coordinated through arthritis passports. The

  19. Potential spillover educational effects of cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising on cancer patients' increased information seeking behaviors: results from a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy S L

    2014-06-01

    Spillover effects of exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of cancer treatments on patients' general inquiry about their treatments and managing their illness are not well understood. This study examines the effects of cancer patients' exposure to cancer-related DTCA on subsequent health information seeking behaviors from clinician and non-clinician sources (lay media and interpersonal contacts). Using a longitudinal survey design over 3 years, data was collected from cancer survivors diagnosed with colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer who were randomly sampled from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Study outcome measures include patients' information engagement with their clinicians and information seeking from non-medical sources about cancer treatment and quality of life issues, measured in the second survey. The predictor variable is the frequency of exposure to cancer-related DTCA since diagnosis, measured at the round 1 survey. The analyses utilized lagged-weighted multivariate regressions and adjusted for round 1 levels of patient-clinician engagement, information seeking from nonmedical sources, and confounders. Exposure to cancer-related DTCA is associated with increased levels of subsequent patient-clinician information engagement (B?=?.023, 95% CI?=?.005-.040, p?=?.012), controlling for confounders. In comparison, exposure to DTCA is marginally significant in predicting health information seeking from non-clinician sources (B?=?.009, 95% CI?=?-.001-.018, p?=?.067). Cancer-related DTCA has potentially beneficial spillover effects on health information seeking behaviors among cancer patients. Exposure to DTCA predicts (a little) more patient engagement with their physicians. PMID:24254248

  20. Quality of doctor-patient communication through the eyes of the patient: variation according to the patient's educational level.

    PubMed

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2014-11-27

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In this study we describe patients' perspective in doctor-patient communication according to their educational level, and to what extent these perspectives lean towards the expert opinion on doctor-patient communication. In a multi-center study (Belgium, The Netherlands, UK and Italy), focus group discussions were organised using videotaped medical consultations. A mixed methods approach was used to analyse the data. Firstly, a difference in perspective in communication style was found between the lower educated participants versus the middle and higher educated participants. Secondly, lower educated participants referred positively most to aspects related to the affective/emotional area of the medical consultation, followed by the task-oriented/problem-focused area. Middle and higher educated participants positively referred most to the task-oriented/problem-focused area. The competency of the physician was an important category of communication for all participants, independent of social background. The results indicate that the preferences of lower educated participants lean more towards the expert opinion in doctor-patient communication than the middle and higher educated participants. Patients' educational level seems to influence their perspective on communication style and should be taken into account by physicians. Further quantitative research is needed to confirm these results. PMID:25428194

  1. Educational inequalities in patient-centred care: patients' preferences and experiences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Educational attainment is strongly related to specific health outcomes. The pathway in which individual patient-provider interactions contribute to (re)producing these inequalities has yet to be studied. In this article, the focus is on differences between less and more highly educated patients in their preferences for and experiences with patient-centred care., e.g. shared decision making, receiving understandable explanations and being able to ask questions. Methods Data are derived from several Consumer Quality-index (CQ-index) studies. The CQ-index is a family of standardized instruments which are used in the Netherlands to measure quality of care from the patient’s perspective. Results The educational level of patients is directly related to the degree of importance patients attribute to specific aspects of patient-centred care. It has a minor influence on the experienced level of shared decision making, but not on experiences regarding other aspects of patient-centred care. Conclusions All patients regard patient-centred care as important and report positive experiences. However, there is a discrepancy between patient preferences for patient-centred care on one hand and the care received on the other. Less educated patients might receive ‘too much’, and more highly educated patients ‘too little’ in the domains of communication, information and shared decision making. PMID:22900589

  2. Patient information and education with modern media: the Spine Society of Europe Patient Line

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ferran Pellisé; P. Sell

    2009-01-01

    The role of the patient as an active partner in health care, and not just a passive object of diagnostic testing and medical\\u000a treatment, is widely accepted. Providing information to patients is considered a crucial issue and the central focus in patient\\u000a educational activities. It is necessary to educate patients on the nature of the outcomes and the benefits and

  3. Are end-of-life patient education materials readable?

    PubMed

    Ache, K A; Wallace, L S

    2009-09-01

    Although established guidelines for developing low-literacy patient education materials are available, poorly designed material continue to be disseminated. We evaluated the readability and layout of English-language end-of-life patient education materials available on the Internet. Internet websites of five national palliative care organizations were searched to identify patient education materials for review. A convenience sample of 15 patient education materials per palliative care organization (n = 75) was downloaded and printed. The Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) was used to calculate the reading grade level (readability) of the text, while the layout features was assessed using criteria from the User-Friendliness Tool (UFT). The reading grade level of patient education materials ranged from 7(th) to 12(th) grade (mean +/- SD = 11.1 +/- 1.9). None of the patient education materials scored high on all UFT criteria. In particular, the greatest need was increasing the amount of white space and improving the way in which information was organized visually. Healthcare providers can only aid in the decision process, patients and their loved ones are ultimately responsible for making these choices. These decisions are important as choices need to be made about end-of-life care while patients are still cognitively able to do so. Well designed end-of-life patient education materials can offer a wealth of knowledge to assist and guide decision making. On the basis of these results, end-of-life patient education materials should be revised so that the average adult is able to understand the message presented, thereby enhancing his/her ability to make informed decisions. PMID:19460831

  4. Partnering with diabetes educators to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sandra D; Sherr, Dawn; Lipman, Ruth D

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, progressive disease that affects millions worldwide. The paradigm of diabetes management has shifted to focus on empowering the person with diabetes to manage the disease successfully and to improve their quality of life. Diabetes self-management education is a collaborative process through which people with diabetes gain the knowledge and skills needed to modify their behavior and to self-manage successfully the disease and its related conditions. Diabetes educators are health care professionals who apply in-depth knowledge and skills in the biological and social sciences, communication, counseling, and pedagogy to enable patients to manage daily and future challenges. Diabetes educators are integral in providing individualized education and promoting behavior change, using a framework of seven self-care behaviors known as the AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors™, developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. The iterative process of promoting behavior change includes assessment, goal setting, planning, implementation, evaluation, and documentation. Diabetes educators work as part of the patient’s health care team to engage with the patient in informed, shared decision making. The increasing prevalence of diabetes and the growing focus on its prevention require strategies for providing people with knowledge, skills, and strategies they need and can use. The diabetes educator is the logical facilitator of change. Access to diabetes education is critically important; incorporating diabetes educators into more and varied practice settings will serve to improve clinical and quality of life outcomes for persons with diabetes. PMID:24550679

  5. Alcohol Education Provided to Opioid Treatment Program Patients: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Harris, Gavin; Katigbak, Carina; Rindskopf, David M.; Singh, Sheena; Greenblum, Ilana; Brown, Lawrence S.; Kipnis, Steven; Kritz, Steven A.; Parrino, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-related problems are especially common among opioid treatment program (OTP) patients, suggesting that educating OTP patients about alcohol and its harmful effects needs to be a priority in OTPs. Using data collected in interviews with a nationwide U.S. sample of OTP directors (N = 200) in 25 states, we identified factors that differentiate…

  6. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on improving clinical diagnosis and treatment of the traumatized refugee patient. PMID:23957962

  7. Authoring and Generation of Individualized Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, C.; Bray, P.; Covvey, H.D.; Cowan, D.D.; Di Ciccio, V.; Hovy, E.; Lipa, Joan; Yang, C.

    2006-01-01

    Although the pre-surgical patient-surgeon encounter is the opportunity to educate the patient, it is essential that the patient be given educational materials to complement the face-to-face exchange. This is virtually impossible to do well with brochures, because many combinations of procedures are possible, different patients have different concerns, and patients have varying levels of literacy and knowledge. In the extreme, a patient would either be given a set of brochures selected from 100s of variants, or all patients would be given the same set of brochures without regard for differing needs. We have been developing an information brochure generator that customizes material for every individual patient regardless of the complexity of the surgical intervention. PMID:17238330

  8. [Therapeutic education in oncology: involving patient in the management of cancer].

    PubMed

    Pérol, David; Toutenu, Pauline; Lefranc, Anne; Régnier, Véronique; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Saltel, Pierre; Chauvin, Franck

    2007-03-01

    The notion of therapeutic education was only recently introduced in cancer. Although the term is commonly used, no standard definition exists for the concept and principles of therapeutic education and its efficacy remains to be assessed. Therapeutic education is complementary to the healthcare approach and aims to get the patients more involved in their disease and the treatment decision-making process. This discipline, placed at the interface of human and social sciences, was first developed for the management of chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma). It derives from the principle that involving patients in their own care and management can help them better adjust to life with a chronic disease. The lengthening survival time of cancer patients, which contributes to making cancer a chronic disease, as well as changes in the patient-caregiver relationship contribute to the development of therapeutic education in cancer. Pilot studies, conducted principally in the United States, evaluating the side effects of chemotherapy and the management of pain, have demonstrated that such educational programs could improve patient quality of life and decrease the side effects of treatments. The success of these programs depends on several parameters: taking into account patient's opinion in the elaboration and preparation of the programs; involving skilled multidisciplinary teams engaged in iterative educational actions; having recourse to methodological tools to evaluate the impact of implemented programs. Consistent with the World Health Organization guidelines, research should be conducted in France in order to elaborate and implement cancer-specific education programs and evaluate their potential benefit. Patient education programs on pain, fatigue, nutrition and treatment compliance are currently being developed at Saint-Etienne Regional Resource Centre for cancer information, prevention and education, within the framework of the Canceropole Lyon Auvergne Rhône-Alpes. PMID:17371769

  9. Patient Education Video Series | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The free patient education website (Cancer.net) offers information about cancer and clinical trials in patient-friendly videos. The videos are produced by ASCO and posted regularly on their YouTube channel. The series includes a variety of cancer topics that patients will find helpful, including clinical trials. Information is presented by physicians and advocates and helps patients accumulate accurate information and formulate questions for their physician as they consider a clinical trial.

  10. Spa treatment for primary fibromyalgia syndrome: a combination of thalassotherapy, exercise and patient education improves symptoms and quality of life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. R. Zijlstra; Laar van de M. A. F. J; H. J. Bernelot Moens; E. Taal; L. Zakraoui; J. J. Rasker

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effect of a combination of thalassotherapy, exercise and patient education in people with fibromyalgia. -\\u000aMethods: Patients with fibromyalgia, selected from a rheumatology out-patient department and from members of the Dutch fibromyalgia patient association, were pre-randomized to receive either 2 weeks of treatment in a Tunisian spa resort, including thalassotherapy, supervised exercise and group education (active

  11. Facilitating Behavior Change with Low-Literacy Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods: We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder…

  12. RESEARCH Open Access Importance of therapeutic patient education in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH Open Access Importance of therapeutic patient education in ichthyosis: results. Objectives: To evaluate the impact of therapeutic educational programs in improving the knowledge healthcare structures. Our aim was to facilitate the program in a neutral place to encourage respite care

  13. Uses and Limitations of Simulated Patients in Psychiatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Adam M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The use of standardized patients (SPs) is becoming prominent as a learning and evaluation tool in both undergraduate and graduate medical education. As increasing attempts are made to extend this tool to psychiatric training and education, it has been suggested that SPs can be useful not only to expose students to the variety of…

  14. Evaluation of a Patient CAM-with-Chemotherapy Educational Brochure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter J.; Clavarino, Alexandra M.; Long, Jeremy E.; Steadman, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Biologically active CAM may detrimentally interfere with chemotherapy treatment, so cancer patients require targeted, evidence-based information on chemotherapy-CAM integration consequences. The object of this study was to investigate the potential for medical doctor recommendation and patient acceptance of a purpose-designed patient educational brochure on the safe use of CAM with chemotherapy. Cancer care doctors (n = 17) were provided a draft version of a patient educational brochure developed by the authors and completed a structured feedback form. Cancer patients receiving treatment (n = 12) were provided with the brochure and completed the local health service consumer testing feedback form. All 17 doctors perceived a need for the brochure and all would recommend the brochure to their patients. Approximately 59% of the doctors indicated they would recommend the brochure to all patients receiving chemotherapy and 41% preferred that only patients using CAM or who enquired about CAM be given the brochure. Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy reported that the brochure information answered their questions and was easy to understand. This evidence-based CAM-chemotherapy patient brochure may be a useful adjunct for use by cancer care health professionals to educate patients on the potential dangers of biologically active CAM use with chemotherapy and to provide patients with safe CAM alternatives. PMID:25802538

  15. Preoperative patient education in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Richard I; Grant, Patricia D

    2005-05-01

    Preoperative patient teaching may take many forms and is offered to patients across many venues and formats. The goal of patient teaching is to improve patients' understanding of their disease process and the operation that they are about to experience with the goal of enlisting their active participation in the healing process. The additional goal of obtaining informed consent is not only codified in law, but also has become an ingrained component to the current physician-patient relationship. The preoperative teaching process is best approached as a team effort, and multiple modalities often must be used so that the patient becomes a knowledgeable and willing member of the team. PMID:15999517

  16. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  17. Effective physician-patient communication and health outcomes: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether the quality of physician-patient communication makes a significant difference to patient health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: The MEDLINE database was searched for articles published from 1983 to 1993 using "physician-patient relations" as the primary medical subject heading. Several bibliographies and conference proceedings were also reviewed. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and analytic studies of physician-patient communication in which patient health was an outcome variable. DATA EXTRACTION: The following information was recorded about each study: sample size, patient characteristics, clinical setting, elements of communication assessed, patient outcomes measured, and direction and significance of any association found between aspects of communication and patient outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of the 21 studies that met the final criteria for review, 16 reported positive results, 4 reported negative (i.e., nonsignificant) results, and 1 was inconclusive. The quality of communication both in the history-taking segment of the visit and during discussion of the management plan was found to influence patient health outcomes. The outcomes affected were, in descending order of frequency, emotional health, symptom resolution, function, physiologic measures (i.e., blood pressure and blood sugar level) and pain control. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the studies reviewed demonstrated a correlation between effective physician-patient communication and improved patient health outcomes. The components of effective communication identified by these studies can be used as the basis both for curriculum development in medical education and for patient education programs. Future research should focus on evaluating such educational programs. PMID:7728691

  18. Providing community education: lessons learned from Native Patient Navigators.

    PubMed

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities' needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research. PMID:25087698

  19. The Use of Standardized Patients in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Standardized patients are widely used in health care programs to both teach and evaluate the communication and clinical skills of students. Although athletic training education programs (ATEPs) commonly use simulations, little information exists related to the use and implementation of standardized patients (SPs). Objective: To provide…

  20. Patient literacy and the readability of smoking education literature.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, C D; Byrd, J C

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if primary care clinic patients read at a level congruent to the reading grade level of available smoking literature. Reading estimates of smoking education literature (N = 49) ranged from grade 3 to college level (median = 9.5). Reading skills of 258 smoking patients were estimated by reported years of schooling (median = 10), and by scores on the Wide-Range Achievement Test (median = 6). A serious disparity existed between the reading estimates of smoking education literature and the literacy skills of patients in our sample. PMID:2913844

  1. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  2. Clinical risk management and patient safety education for nurses: a critique.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2007-04-01

    Nurses have a pivotal role to play in clinical risk management (CRM) and promoting patient safety in health care domains. Accordingly, nurses need to be prepared educationally to manage clinical risk effectively when delivering patient care. Just what form the CRM and safety education of nurses should take, however, remains an open question. A recent search of the literature has revealed a surprising lack of evidence substantiating models of effective CRM and safety education for nurses. In this paper, a critical discussion is advanced on the question of CRM and safety education for nurses and the need for nurse education in this area to be reviewed and systematically researched as a strategic priority, nationally and internationally. It is a key contention of this paper that without 'good' safety education research it will not be possible to ensure that the educational programs that are being offered to nurses in this area are evidence-based and designed in a manner that will enable nurses to develop the capabilities they need to respond effectively to the multifaceted and complex demands that are inherent in their ethical and professional responsibilities to promote and protect patient safety and quality care in health care domains. PMID:16828205

  3. Trial of Interprofessional Education for Effective IPW.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Miho; Son, Daisuke; Kawamura, Kazumi; Nakashima, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

      To work collaboratively in healthcare practice, health professionals should learn not only the competencies of their own specialties but also those of other professions so as to promote effective interprofessional work (IPW), thus optimizing patient/client outcomes. For this reason interprofessional education (IPE) is urgently needed. Since the establishment of Centre for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education (CAIPE) in 1987, many IPE programs have been developed and implemented worldwide. Currently, our Japan Society for Instructional Systems in Healthcare (JSISH) IPE program project team is conducting a study to develop an effective and versatile IPE program according to the framework of instructional design (ID). The main categories of learning goals of our program are intellectual skills and attitudes among Gagne's five categories. Therefore we designed our program to start from the drama (skit or video) of a bad example of IPW for learners to see and discuss the barriers of interprofessional collaboration. The drama of IPW seems to enhance attention and relevance for learners; both of which are components of the ARCS model. We expect every health professional including pharmacists to learn about IPW competencies through participating in our IPE program, enabling us further to pursue the ideal patient/client/family-centered care together. PMID:25743910

  4. Education, survival and avoidable deaths in cancer patients in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, A; Martikainen, P; Pukkala, E; Rautalahti, M; Seppä, K; Hakulinen, T

    2010-01-01

    Background: Relative survival after cancer in Finland is at the highest level observed in Europe and has, in general, been on a steady increase. The aim of this study is to assess whether the high survival is equally shared by different population subgroups and to estimate the possible gains that might be achieved if equity prevailed. Materials and method: The educational level and occupation before the cancer diagnosis of patients diagnosed in Finland in 1971–2005 was derived from an antecedent population census. The cancers were divided into 27 site categories. Cancer (cause)-specific 5-year survival proportions were calculated for three patient categories based on the educational level and for an occupational group of potentially health-conscious patients (physicians, nurses, teachers etc.). Proportions of avoidable deaths were derived by assuming that the patients from the two lower education categories would have the same mortality owing to cancer, as those from the highest educational category. Estimates were also made by additionally assuming that even the mortalities owing to other causes of death were all equal to those in the highest category. Results: For almost all the sites considered, survival was consistently highest for patients with the highest education and lowest for those with only basic education. The potentially health-conscious patients had an even higher survival. The differences were, in part, attributable to less favourable distributions of tumour stages in the lower education categories. In 1996–2005, 4–7% of the deaths in Finnish cancer patients could have potentially been avoided during the first 5-year period after diagnosis, if all the patients had the same cancer mortality as the patients with the highest educational background. The proportion would have also been much higher, 8–11%, if, in addition, the mortality from other causes had been the same as that in the highest educational category. Interpretation: Even in a potentially equitable society with high health care standards, marked inequalities persist in cancer survival. Earlier cancer diagnosis and the ability to cope within the health care system may be a partly relevant explanation, but personal habits and lifestyles also have a role, particularly for the cancer patients' mortality from other causes of death than cancer. PMID:20717112

  5. Authoring and Generation of Tailored Preoperative Patient Education Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chrysanne Di Marco; Peter Bray; Dominic Covvey; Don Cowan; Eduard Hovy; Joan Lipa; Cathy Yang

    In reconstructive surgery, multiple interventions during one surgical episode are com-mon. Each intervention must be explained, its intended and potential consequences ar-ticulated, and informed consent of the patient secured. Although the pre-surgical en-counter between the patient and the surgeon is the opportunity to accomplish this, it is essential that the patient be given educational materials to complement and augment face-to-face

  6. Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported…

  7. Short-term effectiveness of an asthma educational program: results of a randomized controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. MARABINI; G. BRUGNAMI; F. CURRADI; G. CASCIOLA; R. STOPPONI; L. PETTINARI; A. SIRACUSA

    2002-01-01

    Asthma educational programs have been shown to reduce the use of emergency room, frequency of severe asthma attacks and hospitalization. However, its effectiveness in other morbidity parameters and on quality of life has yet to be fully understood. This prospective randomized control trial evaluated the effectiveness of a patient education program in 77 asthmatics according to “Teach Your Patients About

  8. Strategies for improving the quality of verbal patient and family education: a review of the literature and creation of the EDUCATE model

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Cara

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patient and family education includes print, audio-visual methods, demonstration, and verbal instruction. Our objective was to study verbal instruction as a component of patient and family education and make recommendations for best practices for healthcare providers who use this method. Methods: We conducted a literature review of articles from 1990 to 2014 about verbal education and collaborated on departmental presentations to determine best practices. A survey was sent to all nursing staff to determine perceptions of verbal education and barriers to learning. Results: Through our work, we were able to identify verbal education models, best practices, and needs. We then constructed the EDUCATE model of verbal education, which built upon our findings. Conclusion: Verbal education of patients and family members requires a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account learning styles, literacy, and culture to apply clear communication and methods for the assessment of learning. Providers need the skills, time, and training to effectively perform patient and family verbal education every time they care for patients. Further research needs to be performed on how to test, document, and quantify patients' comprehension and retention of verbal instructions.

  9. A problem-solving education intervention in caregivers and patients during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Castro, Kathleen; Prince, Patricia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in informal caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. Patient/caregiver teams attended three 1-hour problem-solving education sessions to help cope with problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Primary measures included the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale-transplant and Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Active caregivers reported improvements in self-efficacy (p < 0.05) and distress (p < 0.01) post-problem-solving education; caregiver responders also reported better health outcomes such as fatigue. The effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation caregivers supports its inclusion in future interventions to meet the multifaceted needs of this population. PMID:23471761

  10. The Medical Education and Best Practice in Orthopedic Patient Care in Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2012-07-01

    The leadership organization focuses on education, teamwork, customer relationship and developing strategy which help in building added value, in managing activities, time and quality. Everyday orthopedic experience shows that medical education is a mixture of: specific knowledge, skills and attitudes of people working together, and that creates effective teamwork in a hospital environment. Apart from the main reason of medical education, teaching about disease treatment and health problem solving, medical education should also concentrate on human factors and behavioral aspects of patient treatment in hospital.Assessment of an organization and medical education process by cultural and teamwork criteria, offers a powerful new way to think about performance at the frontlines of healthcare and in the future it could be gold standard for assessing the success of an organization, and standards in medical education, not only in orthopedics.

  11. JAMA Patient Page: Continuing Medical Education

    MedlinePLUS

    ... doctors to learn about research results through CME. Evidence-based medicine is medical practice that is guided by ... Doctors and patients alike benefit from learning about evidence-based medicine guidelines. This is best done through CME ...

  12. Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans-Christoph Pape; Roman Pfeifer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing

  13. Health Related Quality of Life May Increase when Patients with a Stoma Attend Patient Education – A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adaptation to living with a stoma is complex, and studies have shown that stoma creation has a great impact on patients' health related quality of life. The objective was to explore the effect of a structured patient education program on health related quality of life. Therefore, we implemented interventions aimed at increasing health related quality of life during and after hospital admission. Materials and Methods We designed a case/control study aimed at adult patients admitted to the surgical ward for stoma creation, irrespective of type of stoma or reason for creation of stoma. We included 50 patients in the study. Health related quality of life was measured before hospital discharge, three months and six months after stoma creation. The program included educational interventions involving lay-teachers, alongside health professional teachers. Results We found a significant rise in health related quality of life in the intervention group (P<0.001) and no significant change in the control group (P?=?0.144). However, we found no significant differences when comparing between groups at 3 and 6 months (p?=?0.12 and p?=? 0.63, respective). Additionally, there were differences in scores in health related quality of life baseline (p?=?0.045) with lower scores in the intervention group compared with the intervention group. However, there were no significant differences in the demographic variables at baseline Conclusions Educational activities aimed at increase in knowledge and focusing on patients' psychosocial needs may lead to a rise in patients' health related quality of life. When patients with a stoma attend a structured patient education program it is possible to improve their health related quality of life compared with patients with a stoma, who do not attend the program. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01154725 PMID:24609004

  14. A Pilot Study of an Exercise-Based Patient Education Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahli, Mohammed; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Lutz, Christina; Liebherr, Magnus; Schubert, Patric; Haas, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather). Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T0) and after (T1) a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T2). Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T0 to T1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T1 to T2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients' integral constitution concerning physical and mental health. PMID:25587449

  15. Draping Education to Promote Patient Dignity: Canadian Physiotherapy Student and Instructor Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicole; Lusty, Christopher; Averns, Henry; Hopman, Wilma

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the perceptions of educators and students in Canadian entry-level professional physiotherapy programmes with respect to the current draping curriculum and the methods of delivery of that content and to determine if there is a need for additional draping education time and resources in these programmes. Methods: Canadian university physiotherapy students (n=127) and educators (n=183) completed questionnaires designed by the authors. Data were collected via Survey Monkey, exported as Excel files, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson chi-square analysis. Results: Students and educators agreed that dignity as a concept and draping as a skill to protect patient dignity are both important and should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. Respondents also agreed that students often have difficulty with draping. Educators identified barriers to teaching draping while students identified components of an effective educational resource on draping. Conclusions: To enhance the development of effective draping skills among entry-level physiotherapists, draping education should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. An effective draping educational resource should be developed for educators and students. PMID:23450117

  16. Creating Competitive Advantage through Effective Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Clinton O.; Ariss, Sonny S.

    2002-01-01

    Managers trained in executive education programs (n=203) identified ways in which management education can increase an organization's competitive advantage: exposure to new ideas and practices, skill development, and motivation. Characteristics of effective management education included experience-based learning orientation, credible instructors,…

  17. CEP's Eleven Principles of Effective Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickona, Tom; Schaps, Eric; Lewis, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    There is no single script for effective character education, but there are some important basic principles. This document presents eleven principles that schools and other groups can use to plan a character education effort and to evaluate available character education programs: (1) Promotes core ethical values and supportive performance values as…

  18. Outpatient education reduces emergency room use by patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Franchette T; Hoang, Kathy; Hollen, Christopher; Swearingen, Richard; Hakimi, Andrea S; King, Jeanne Ann; Thompson, David

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a costly diagnosis, with emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions comprising a large portion of total direct cost. An educational intervention to decrease the number of ER visits was implemented on outpatients with epilepsy, using educational handouts and DVD. The number of ER visits declined significantly in the four months following intervention compared with the preceding four months. This finding supports patient education as a valuable tool to reduce ER use, which may, in turn, cut down on health-care cost. PMID:25499153

  19. The cultural challenges of educating Saudi ophthalmic patients at KKESH.

    PubMed

    Astle, B J

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this final article in a three-part series "Ophthalmic nursing in Saudi Arabia: A western expatriate's perspective" is to acquaint readers with some of the cultural challenges confronting the expatriate nursing staff when educating Saudi ophthalmic patients at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The foreign nurse is able to plan and provide patient education that is culturally compatible, by possessing an increased awareness and understanding of the diversity in Saudi culture and how it influences their healthcare beliefs. PMID:8301188

  20. Collaborative Education To Ensure Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    Results of a joint meeting between national advisory councils in medicine and nursing on physician-nurse collaboration to enhance patient safety are reported. Recommendations on which participants reached consensus are organized by these Institute of Medicine (IOM) themes: establish a national focus to create leadership through research and…

  1. Using health web sites for patient education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn H. Oermann

    2003-01-01

    There are thousands of health web sites, but because of the unregulated nature of the Internet, not all sites provide accurate, complete, and up-to-date information. Nurses have an important role in evaluating health web sites and directing patients to quality sites with information they can understand. The purpose of this article is to describe how to evaluate health web sites

  2. Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

    A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

  3. Evaluation of heart failure websites for patient education.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Jillian L; Oermann, Marilyn H; Shaw-Kokot, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Eight of 10 people use the Internet to find health information. Considering the prevalence of heart failure (HF), there are many websites dedicated to patient education, disease management, and symptom prevention of HF. However, some of these websites may not offer accurate and up-to-date information. The purpose of this project was to evaluate websites for use by patients with HF by examining their credibility using Health on the Net standards, content, and readability. Based on the evaluations, 5 websites were identified for use in patient education. All of the websites included essential content on HF, had an average reading level between the eighth and ninth grades, were easily navigated, and offered another supplement to reading such as an audio version. These 5 websites could be recommended by advanced practice nurses and other nurses in the emergency department to patients who want to learn more about HF. PMID:23899948

  4. Effectiveness of E-learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M.; Clifford, Rhonda M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

  5. What Is Effective Music Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues that affected the perspectives and roles of music education such as Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, a national interest in educational accountability, the National Standards for Music Education, and research focusing on the correlation between music skills and higher achievement. Recommends teaching strategies…

  6. Pilot Study of a Physician-Delivered Education Tool to Increase Patient Knowledge About CKD

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Julie Wright; Greene, Jane; Wallston, Kenneth; Eden, Svetlana; Shintani, Ayumi; Elasy, Tom; Rothman, Russell; ?kizler, T. Alp; Cavanaugh, Kerri

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited research exists on physician-delivered education interventions. We examined the feasibility and impact of an educational tool on facilitating physician-patient kidney disease communication. Study Design Pilot feasibility clinical trial with a historical control to examine effect size on patient knowledge and structured questions to elicit physician and patient feedback. Setting & Participants Adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 1–5, seen in nephrology clinic. Intervention One page educational worksheet, reviewed by physicians with patients. Outcomes Kidney knowledge between patient groups and provider/patient feedback. Measurements Patient kidney knowledge was measured using a previously validated questionnaire compared between patients receiving the intervention (April–October 2010) and a historical cohort (April–October 2009). Provider input was obtained using structured interviews. Patient input was obtained through survey questions. Patient characteristics were abstracted from the medical record. Results 556 patients were included, with 401 patients in the historical cohort, and 155 receiving the intervention. Mean age was 57 ± 16 (SD) years, with 53% male, 81% White, and 78% CKD stages 3–5. Compared to the historical cohort, patients receiving the intervention had higher adjusted odds of knowing they had CKD (adjusted OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.16–4.17; p=0.01), knowing their kidney function (adjusted OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.27–3.97; p=0.005), and knowing their stage of CKD (adjusted OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.49–6.92; p=0.003). Physicians found the intervention tool easy and feasible to integrate into practice and 98% of patients who received the intervention recommended it for future use. Limitations Study design did not randomize patients for comparison and enrollment was performed in clinics at one center. Conclusions In this pilot study, a physician delivered education intervention was feasible to use in practice, and was associated with higher patient kidney disease knowledge. Further examination of physician delivered education interventions for increasing patient disease understanding should be tested through randomized trials. PMID:23540261

  7. Birth Control for Women Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    The Pill Birth Control for Women Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2. However, failure rate with typical use is 8%. Other Medications and the Pill The following medications first develop in a lower leg and are a potentially life threatening side effect which can lead to heart

  8. What happens when patients know more than their doctors? Experiences of health interactions after diabetes patient education: a qualitative patient-led study

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Rosamund; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of patient education on the lives of people with diabetes, including the effect on interactions with doctors and other healthcare professionals. Design Qualitative user-led study using longitudinal interviews and 146?h of participant observation. Data were analysed using a narrative approach. Participants 21 patients with type 1 diabetes, those either about to attend a patient education course or those who had completed the course in the previous 10?years. Setting Established patient education centres in three UK teaching hospitals teaching the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) course. Results Both postcourse and several years later, most participants spoke of the experience of taking part in education as life-changingly positive. It helped them understand how to gain control over a very complex disease and freed them from dependence on medical advice and restrictive regimes. However, interactions within the health system following patient education could be fraught. Participants emerged from the course with greater condition-specific knowledge than many of the healthcare professionals they encountered. When these professionals did not understand what their patients were trying to do and were uncomfortable trusting their expertise, there could be serious consequences for these patients' ability to continue effective self-management. Conclusions Patients who have in-depth knowledge of their condition encounter problems when their expertise is seen as inappropriate in standard healthcare interactions, and expertise taught to patients in one branch of medicine can be considered non-compliant by those who are not specialists in that field. Although patient education can give people confidence in their own self-management skills, it cannot solve the power imbalance that remains when a generalist healthcare professional, however well meaning, blocks access to medication and supplies needed to manage chronic diseases successfully. There is a role for those involved in primary and hospital care, including those supporting and training healthcare professionals, to recognise these problems and find ways to acknowledge and respect chronic patients' biomedical and practical expertise. PMID:24231459

  9. The Use of Readability Formulas in Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Paul J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the SMOG readability formula scores of currently available patient education materials. It was hypothesized that the reading level of the materials would be higher than 7.5, the reading level of the average American citizen; and that there would be a significant reduction in the measured document reading levels…

  10. Ear Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Ear Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Reviewed 02/08/2012 Page 1 of 1 Otitis Media Otitis Media is an infection of the middle ear behind the eardrum. Most infections occur after does not equalize air pressure properly. Symptoms of otitis media include ear pain, fever, fullness

  11. Human Patient Simulators in Nursing Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehring, Wendy M.; Ellis, Wayne E.; Lashley, Felissa R.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the human patient simulator and discusses the value of this technology for undergraduate and graduate nursing education, research, and evaluation. Highlights include an example of the use of the simulator; critical incident nursing management as a framework for instruction using the simulator; and administrative considerations. (LRW)

  12. Pilonidal Disease Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Pilonidal Disease Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Revised 2/8/12 Page 1 of 1 What is Pilonidal Disease and What Causes It? Pilonidal disease is a chronic infection of the skin in the region occurring in the cleft between the buttocks. The disease is more common in men than women and frequently

  13. Skin Infections Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2014

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Skin Infections Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2014 Revised 02/12/14 Page 1 of 1 Types of Skin Infections Abscess: (Boil) a painful swelling and collection of pus within the skin caused by deep infection. This pus may ooze out through the skin or require minor surgery to drain. Cellulitis: A rapidly

  14. Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Reviewed 09/14/2011 Page 1 of 2 Most people take their eyes and eyesight for granted--that is, until they encounter eye problems. Whether it is an eye infection, accidental injury, allergic reaction, or a small blood vessel breaking, it is important

  15. Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Eye Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Reviewed 10/09/2013 Page 1 of 2 Most people take their eyes and eyesight for granted--that is, until they encounter eye problems. Whether it is an eye infection, accidental injury, allergic reaction, or a small blood vessel breaking, it is important

  16. Standardized Patients in Art Therapy Education: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Helen; Deaver, Sarah; Johansson, Mark; Calisch, Abby

    2013-01-01

    Simulation is used widely in medical and health professions educational programs. Standardized patients (SPs) are individuals who are trained to simulate specific symptoms or conditions as part of a structured learning experience with students. In this qualitative, phenomenological study the researcher interviewed 8 first-year graduate art therapy…

  17. The Development of Kidney Stone Dietary Plans for Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Darwin; Mayo, M. Leah; Abraham, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Currently patient education programs and urology practices provide individuals with "lists of foods to avoid" for dietary management of kidney stones. However, "planned diets" that include daily meal plans and recipes provide structure and specificity for diet management and are preferred by many individuals. This article describes the development…

  18. Adaptive Patient Education Framework Featuring Personalized Cardiovascular Risk Management

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    Adaptive Patient Education Framework Featuring Personalized Cardiovascular Risk Management Interventions Selena Davis and Syed Sibte Raza Abidi Health Informatics Laboratory, Faculty of Computer Science of cardiovascular risk. We present a web-based adaptive hypermedia system to create and deliver the personalized

  19. [Therapeutic education of heart failure patients in France].

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Patrick; Juillière, Yves; Boireau, Amélie; Bellorini, Michel; Desnos, Michel; Dagorn, Joël; Funck, François

    2009-12-01

    Heart failure is a frequent and severe disease. The rate of avoidable hospitalizations due to lack of treatment adherence is estimated at 30% and, makes this disease a prime target for patient education. Implementation of such education initially began as a function of the local possibilities and willingness, which has led to great variety in the programs (only some of which meet the criteria set forth in the National Authority for Health guidelines) and the tools used. More recently, regional and even national programs, such as ICARE, sponsored by the two principal learned societies (The French Society and French Federation of Cardiology) have helped more than 200 private and public hospitals to set up field patient education programs based upon common concepts and tools. PMID:19926440

  20. ‘Changing Minds’: determining the effectiveness and key ingredients of an educational intervention to enhance healthcare professionals’ intentions to prescribe physical activity to patients with physical disabilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are vital conduits of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) information; however, few discuss LTPA with their patients with disabilities. ‘Changing Minds, Changing Lives’ (CMCL) is a nationwide, theory- and evidence-based seminar aimed at increasing LTPA-discussion among HCPs by enhancing their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control (PBC), and intentions. The purposes of the current study were to: examine the effectiveness and short- and long-term maintenance of a CMCL seminar on HCPs’ social cognitions to discuss LTPA; and explore key implementation variables that predict changes in HCPs’ social cognitions. Methods Prior-to, as well as immediately, one, and six months following a CMCL seminar, 97 HCPs (Mage ± SD = 36.23 ± 10.42; 69.0% female; 97.9% Caucasian; 38.1% rehabilitation therapists; years in profession = 11.56 ± 9.94) from five Canadian provinces completed questionnaires that assessed the Theory of Planned Behaviour constructs with regard to discussing LTPA with their patients with a physical disability. Key presenter characteristics and intervention delivery components were extracted from presenter demographic questionnaires and seminar checklists, respectively. Separate repeated-measures ANOVAs and post-hoc t-tests evaluated changes in HCPs’ social cognitions. Hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to predict intentions and to understand which implementation variables may help explain significant changes in social cognitions. Results Significant increases in HCPs’ social cognitions for discussing LTPA were reported from pre- to post-seminar (ps <0.002); however, increases were not maintained at follow-up. PBC emerged as the strongest predictor of participants’ post-CMCL intentions (? = 0.45, p <0.001). Although several implementation characteristics were related to changes in perceptions, the number of seminars the presenter delivered was the only significant negative predictor of post-seminar PBC (? = -0.18, p <0.05). Conclusions Future iterations of the CMCL intervention should include additional strategies to sustain improvements in HCPs’ social cognitions over time. Future CMCL evaluations should measure additional implementation variables so that the key ingredients for ‘Changing Minds’ can continue to be investigated. PMID:24581329

  1. Developing Effective Drug Education Programs. Fastback 332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Lowell

    This booklet discusses obstacles to effective drug education programs and suggests components that should be included in order to ensure effective programs. The first section presents six questions to ask of one's drug education program, noting that a poorly conceived program can do more harm than good. The second section focuses on convincing…

  2. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

  3. Effective Use of Resources in State Higher Education: Graduate Education, Community Colleges, Education for Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    The papers in this volume were delivered at a Symposium on the "Effective Use of Resources in State Higher Education" at the annual meeting of the Southern Regional Education Board in Houston, Texas, June 11-12, 1970. The papers deal with three general subjects: (1) the orderly development of graduate education; (2) evaluating the community junior…

  4. Effect of Combined Systematized Behavioral Modification Education Program With Desmopressin in Patients With Nocturia: A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized, and Parallel Study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kim, Jang Hwan; Seo, Ju Tae; Choo, Myung-Soo; Kim, Joon Chul; Choi, Jong Bo; Song, Miho; Chun, Ji-Youn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate the efficacy of combining the systematized behavioral modification program (SBMP) with desmopressin therapy and to compare this with desmopressin monotherapy in the treatment of nocturnal polyuria (NPU). Methods Patients were randomized at 8 centers to receive desmopressin monotherapy (group A) or combination therapy, comprising desmopressin and the SBMP (group B). Nocturia was defined as an average of 2 or more nightly voids. The primary endpoint was a change in the mean number of nocturnal voids from baseline during the 3-month treatment period. The secondary endpoints were changes in the bladder diary parameters and questionnaires scores, and improvements in self-perception for nocturia. Results A total of 200 patients were screened and 76 were excluded from the study, because they failed the screening process. A total of 124 patients were randomized to receive treatment, with group A comprising 68 patients and group B comprising 56 patients. The patients' characteristics were similar between the groups. Nocturnal voids showed a greater decline in group B (-1.5) compared with group A (-1.2), a difference that was not statistically significant. Significant differences were observed between groups A and B with respect to the NPU index (0.37 vs. 0.29, P=0.028), the change in the maximal bladder capacity (-41.3 mL vs. 13.3 mL, P<0.001), and the rate of patients lost to follow up (10.3% [7/68] vs. 0% [0/56], P=0.016). Self-perception for nocturia significantly improved in both groups. Conclusions Combination treatment did not have any additional benefits in relation to reducing nocturnal voids in patients with NPU; however, combination therapy is helpful because it increases the maximal bladder capacity and decreases the NPI. Furthermore, combination therapy increased the persistence of desmopressin in patients with NPU. PMID:25558419

  5. Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy (NEMO) trial: Design and patient characteristics, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Saade; Elzein, Hafez; Haydar, Sarah; de Vries, Nanne

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of a trained dedicated dietitian on clinical outcomes among Lebanese hemodialysis (HD) patients: and thus demonstrate a viable developing country model. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline data. The study was a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel-group design involving 12 HD units: assigned to cluster A (n = 6) or B (n = 6). A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in cluster A were randomly assigned as per dialysis shift to the following: Dedicated Dietitian (DD) (n = 133) and Existing Practice (EP) (n = 138) protocols. Cluster B patients (n = 299) received Trained Hospital Dietitian (THD) protocol. Dietitians of the DD and THD groups were trained by the research team on Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. DD protocol included: individualized nutrition education for 2 hours/month/HD patient for 6 months focusing on renal osteodystrophy and using the Trans-theoretical theory for behavioral change. EP protocol included nutrition education given to patients by hospital dietitians who were blinded to the study. The THD protocol included nutrition education to patients given by hospital dietitian as per the training received but within hospital responsibilities, with no set educational protocol or tools. Baseline data revealed that 40% of patients were hyperphosphatemics (> 5.5 mg/dl) with low dietary adherence and knowledge of dietary P restriction in addition to inadequate daily protein intake (58.86%± 33.87% of needs) yet adequate dietary P intake (795.52 ± 366.94 mg/day). Quality of life (QOL) ranged from 48-75% of full health. Baseline differences between the 3 groups revealed significant differences in serum P, malnutrition status, adherence to diet and P chelators and in 2 factors of the QOL: physical and social functioning. The data show room for improvement in the nutritional status of the patients. The NEMO trial may be able to demonstrate a better nutritional management of HD patients. PMID:24611112

  6. A Pilot Project to Develop and Assess a Health Education Programme for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atak, Nazli; Arslan, Umit

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The current research was designed to develop a health education programme for type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the Taba-Tyler model and to evaluate its effect. Design: The study was quasi-experimental in design. Setting: Fifty-five patients from the Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, University Hospital of Ankara. Method: An education

  7. The Accessibility of patient information leaflets concerning cervical cancer - the effect of high leaflet readability level and the reader's level of education 

    E-print Network

    Gale, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that many Patient Information Leaflets are written at too high a level for the population to understand. This study took 2 leaflets on Cervical Cancer, with their readability measured using 3 different ...

  8. Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: patient education, information and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Gignon, Maxime; Traulle, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) are implanted increasingly frequently. CIEDs are indicated for the treatment of bradycardia, tachycardia and heart failure and therefore improve quality of life and life expectancy. CIED can treat ventricular arrhythmias that would be fatal without immediate care. However, CIEDs raise several patient education, medico-legal, and ethical questions that will be addressed in this article. Information is a patient's right, and necessary for informed consent. When implanting a CIED, the patient must be educated about the need for the device, the function of the device, any restrictions that apply postimplant, and postimplant follow-up methods and schedules. This transfer of information to the patient makes the patient responsible. The occupational physician can determine whether a patient wearing a CIED is able to work. Under current French law, patients are not prohibited from working while wearing a CIED. However, access to certain job categories remains limited, such as jobs involving mechanical stress to the chest, exposure to electromagnetic fields, or jobs requiring permanent vigilance. Pacemakers and defibrillators are medical treatments and are subject to the same ethical and clinical considerations as any other treatment. However, stopping a pacemaker or a defibrillator raises different ethical issues. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator shocks can be considered to be equivalent to resuscitation efforts and can be interpreted as being unreasonable in an end-of-life patient. Pacing is painless and it is unlikely to unnecessarily prolong the life of a patient with a terminal disease. Patients with a CIED should live as normally as possible, but must also be informed about the constraints related to the device and must inform each caregiver about the presence of the device. The forensic and ethical implications must be assessed in relation to current legislation. PMID:23248837

  9. Development and validation of a theory-based multimedia application for educating Persian patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Feizalahzadeh, Hossein; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Moghaddasi, Hamid; Farahani, Mansoureh A; Khosrovshahi, Hamid Tayebi; Zareh, Zahra; Mortazavi, Fakhrsadat

    2014-05-01

    Although patients on hemodialysis require effective education for self-care, several issues associated with the process raise barriers that make learning difficult. Computer-based education can reduce these problems and improve the quality of education. This study aims to develop and validate a theory-based multimedia application to educate Persian patients on hemodialysis. The study consisted of five phases: (1) content development, (2) prototype development 1, (3) evaluation by users, (4) evaluation by a multidisciplinary group of experts, and (5) prototype development 2. Data were collected through interviews and literature review with open-ended questions and two survey forms that consisted of a five-level scale. In the Results section, patient needs on hemodialysis self-care and related content were categorized into seven sections, including kidney function and failure, hemodialysis, vascular access, nutrition, medication, physical activity, and living with hemodialysis. The application designed includes seven modules consisting of user-controlled small multimedia units. During navigation through this application, the users were provided step-by-step information on self-care. Favorable scores were obtained from evaluations by users and experts. The researchers concluded that this application can facilitate hemodialysis education and learning process for the patients by focusing on their self-care needs using the multimedia design principles. PMID:24642877

  10. Education and Decision Making at the Time of Triptan Prescribing: Patient Expectations vs Actual Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Paul G.; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; Lettich, Alyssa; Wells, Rebecca E.; Robertson, Carrie E.; Mullin, Kathleen; Charleston, Larry; Dodick, David W.; Schwedt, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Optimizing patient satisfaction with their medical care and maximizing patient adherence with treatment plans requires an understanding of patient preferences regarding education and their role in decision making when treatments are prescribed. Objective To assess the congruence between patient expectations and actual practice regarding education and decision making at the time a triptan is prescribed. Methods This multicenter cross-sectional survey was performed by headache fellow members of the American Headache Society Headache Fellows Research Consortium at their respective tertiary care headache clinics. Migraine patients who were new patients to the headache clinic and who were current triptan users (use within prior 3 months and for ?1 year) or past triptan users (no use within 6 months; prior use within 2 years) completed questionnaires that assessed the education they received and their role in decision making at the time a triptan was first prescribed as well as their desire for education and participation in decision making when a triptan is prescribed. Results Consistent with patient preference, most participants received the majority of their education about the triptan from the prescriber's office (70.2%). In descending rank order, participants most desired to be informed about how to decide if a triptan should be taken, when during the course of migraine a triptan should be taken, possible side effects, cost, and how to obtain refills. Regarding side effects, most participants preferred to receive education about the most common side effects of a triptan rather than addressing all possible side effects. Regarding triptan dosing, participants desired to be informed in descending order of importance about taking other medications with triptans, how many doses can be taken for each migraine, how many doses can be taken each week/month, what to do if the triptan does not work, and the triptan mechanism of action. The vast majority of participants (92%) preferred that the decision to prescribe a triptan be a joint decision between the patient and the provider. In actual practice, participants were not as involved in decision making as they would like to be, with patients reporting that the prescriber was the sole decision maker 55.1% of the time. Participants had confidence in their providers (87.7%) and generally felt they did a good job educating them about the triptan (71.1%). Conclusions Based on this study, it is clear that patients prefer the shared model approach to medical decision making in regards to the prescription of triptans. The majority of patients received education that was generally consistent with their desires. Patients preferred that the prescribing provider be the primary source of information. The most desired educational topics included when/if a triptan should be taken, the number of times a triptan can be taken for a single migraine, co-administration with other acute medications, and the most common side effects. Focusing on these topics should enhance patient satisfaction and may improve compliance. PMID:24512184

  11. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  12. Evaluating Workplace Education Program Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff involved in developing and delivering workplace education programs, explains the workplace education evaluation process, the main approaches to evaluation, and considerations in selecting appropriate evaluation instruments. Discussed first are the…

  13. Quality physical education: a commentary on effective physical education teaching.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-06-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term quality teaching rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the potential to move our attention beyond a focus merely on issues of effectiveness relating to the achievement of prespecified objectives. I agree with Ward that teacher content knowledge is limited in physical education, and I argue that if the student does not have a connection to or relationship with the content, this will diminish their learning gains. I also argue for a more holistic approach to physical education coming from a broader conception. Physical educators who teach the whole child advocate for a plethora of physical activity, skills, knowledge, and positive attitudes that foster healthy and active playful lifestyles. Play is a valuable educational experience. I also endorse viewing assessment from different perspectives and discuss assessment through a social-critical political lens. The 3 articles also have implications for policy. Physical education is much broader than just physical activity, and we harm the future potential of our field if we adopt a narrow agenda. Looking to the future, I propose that we broaden the kinds of research that we value, support, and appreciate in our field. PMID:25098010

  14. 170.302 (m) Patient specific education resources Errata December 3, 2010

    E-print Network

    170.302 (m) Patient specific education resources Errata December 3, 2010 1 Errata for §170.302 (m) Patient specific education resources The purpose of this document is to record known technical corrections to v1.1 of the Patient Specific Education Resources test procedure. Errata for other test procedures

  15. Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Jennifer M.; Sorenson, James R.; Bowling, J. Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

    2005-01-01

    The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of…

  16. Satisfying patients’ rights in Iran: Providing effective strategies

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Zohreh; Mohammadi, Mehri; Taheri, Magid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Assessment of patients’ views about the observance of their rights and obtaining feedback from them is an integral component of service quality and ensures healthcare ethics. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ awareness of their rights and their satisfaction with observance of their rights, and provide effective strategies to improve the management of patients’ rights in hospitals of Markazi Province, Iran in 2012. Materials and Methods: This analytical study was conducted on 384 patients at 10 hospitals. Patients’ awareness of the relevant hospital legislation was assessed by a structured interview, and then patients’ satisfaction with observance of their rights was measured by a standardized questionnaire consisting of 10 principles approved by the Iran Ministry of Health of Iran in 2012. In this study, through Delphi technique, effective strategies have been provided to improve the management of patients’ rights in the hospitals of Iran. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Z test were applied for data analysis. Results: Overall, 89% of the patients were unaware of the relevant hospital legislation and 28% of them were not satisfied with the observance of their rights (1.4 ± 0.6). A significant difference was observed between observance of patients’ rights according to hospitals, language, and place of residence of the patients (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference with respect to patients’ rights according to sex, education, job, and duration of hospital stay (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The Patient Bill of Rights of Iran needs further revision and modification. Moreover, extensive education of patients and healthcare processionals as the most structural strategies to promote professional ethics, reduce ethical conflict, and increase implementation of the law to respect patients’ rights should be taken into deeper consideration.

  17. Hospital-based patient education programs and the role of the hospital librarian.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C L

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines current advances in hospital-based patient education, and delineates the role of the hospital librarian in these programs. Recently, programs of planned patient education have been recognized by health care personnel and the public as being an integral part of health care delivery. Various key elements, including legislative action, the advent of audiovisual technology, and rising health care costs have contributed to the development of patient education programs in hospitals. As responsible members of the hospital organization, hospital librarians should contribute their expertise to patient education programs. They are uniquely trained with skills in providing information on other health education programs; in assembling, cataloging, and managing collections of patient education materials; and in providing documentation of their use. In order to demonstrate the full range of their skills and to contribute to patient care, education, and research, hospital librarians should actively participate in programs of planned patient education. PMID:418835

  18. How Effective Are Outdoor Education Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Twelve classes of students in grades 4 through 6 studied beaver ecology, either at an outdoor-education center near Toronto or in the classroom. Results indicate that outdoor education was more effective in promoting students' cognitive achievement than classroom study, but did not confirm the popular belief that outdoor programs influence…

  19. Quality Assessment of Spinal Cord Injury Patient Education Resources.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Singh, Priyanka L; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-04-01

    Study Design. Analysis of spinal cord injury patient education resources.Objective. To assess the quality of online patient education materials written about spinal cord injury.Summary of Background Data. The use of online materials by healthcare consumers to access medical information presents unique challenges. Most Americans have access to the Internet and frequently turn to it as a first-line resource.Methods. The quality of online patient education materials was evaluated via a readability analysis. Materials provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS); Centers for Disease Control (CDC); American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS); National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA); Mayo Clinic (Mayo); Department of Veterans Affairs (VA); Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (Kessler); American Academy of Neurology (AAN); Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA); and the Shepherd Center (SC) were assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level evaluations with Microsoft Office Word software. Unnecessary formatting was removed and the readability was evaluated with the Spelling and Grammar function.Results. A total of 104 sections from 10 different websites were analyzed. Overall, the average values of the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (11.9) and Flesch Reading Ease (40.2) indicated that most Americans would not be able to fully comprehend this material.Conclusion. Results indicate that the language used on materials provided by the aforementioned sites is perhaps too advanced for the average American to fully comprehend. The quality of these education resources may be improved via website revisions, which might be beneficial for improved patient utilization. PMID:24718059

  20. What can virtual patient simulation offer mental health nursing education?

    PubMed

    Guise, V; Chambers, M; Välimäki, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of simulation in nursing education and training, including potential benefits and barriers associated with its use. In particular, it addresses the hitherto scant application of diverse simulation devices and dedicated simulation scenarios in psychiatric and mental health nursing. It goes on to describe a low-cost, narrative-based virtual patient simulation technique which has the potential for wide application within health and social care education. An example of the implementation of this technology in a web-based pilot course for acute mental health nurses is given. This particular virtual patient technique is a simulation type ideally suited to promoting essential mental health nursing skills such as critical thinking, communication and decision making. Furthermore, it is argued that it is particularly amenable to e-learning and blended learning environments, as well as being an apt tool where multilingual simulations are required. The continued development, implementation and evaluation of narrative virtual patient simulations across a variety of health and social care programmes would help ascertain their success as an educational tool. PMID:22070549

  1. Medical school education for whom, student or patient.

    PubMed Central

    Eichna, L. W.

    1991-01-01

    Replace current student-oriented medical school teaching by a patient-focused education. Strengthen biomedical sciences, essential for the biomedical-scientist physicians of the future. Patient activities before biomedical science, behavioral and ethical studies do not educate: they exploit patients. Replace lectures of the first two years by students' designated reading followed by seminars and problem-solving. Current passive "fact"-oriented teaching needs change to one of student input, questioning, learning to cope with uncertainty, and taking responsibility for one's education. Ethics belongs in the curriculum and psychological history in medical records. Examinations determine teaching. Replace the multiple-choice-question examination with an evaluation that tests wide medical knowledge and includes a final thesis. Replace normative and pass/fail grading with criterion grading to a standard of excellence. Replace the obsolete nine months school year--with holidays only eight months of instruction--by 11 full calendar months, with holidays 10 full months of instruction. PMID:2049568

  2. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n?=?540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a comprehensive self-management educational program by a cluster randomized trial within inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Furthermore, subgroup-related treatment effects will be explored. Study results will contribute to a better understanding of both the effectiveness and mechanisms of a self-management group program as part of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00004841; WHO International Clinical Trials: = DRKS00004841 PMID:23968340

  3. Quality Physical Education: A Commentary on Effective Physical Education Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term "quality teaching" rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the…

  4. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula. PMID:19745439

  5. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use. PMID:24313072

  6. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

  7. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

  8. The multimedia computer for office-based patient education: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wofford, James L; Smith, Edward D; Miller, David P

    2005-11-01

    Use of the multimedia computer for education is widespread in schools and businesses, and yet computer-assisted patient education is rare. In order to explore the potential use of computer-assisted patient education in the office setting, we performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (search date April 2004 using MEDLINE and Cochrane databases). Of the 26 trials identified, outcome measures included clinical indicators (12/26, 46.1%), knowledge retention (12/26, 46.1%), health attitudes (15/26, 57.7%), level of shared decision-making (5/26, 19.2%), health services utilization (4/26, 17.6%), and costs (5/26, 19.2%), respectively. Four trials targeted patients with breast cancer, but the clinical issues were otherwise diverse. Reporting of the testing of randomization (76.9%) and appropriate analysis of main effect variables (70.6%) were more common than reporting of a reliable randomization process (35.3%), blinding of outcomes assessment (17.6%), or sample size definition (29.4%). We concluded that the potential for improving the efficiency of the office through computer-assisted patient education has been demonstrated, but better proof of the impact on clinical outcomes is warranted before this strategy is accepted in the office setting. PMID:16257619

  9. [Patient education in practice-a workshop in a small group].

    PubMed

    Mattussek, S; Berg, P; Bönisch, A; von Loeben, Ch

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the workshop was to work out concrete plans and steps for implementing patient education courses in an outpatient setting by the collaborative arthritis centers in Germany. Primarily the patient education model of Lower Saxony was illustrated as an example of successful implementation of patient education programs in practice. In this state patient education courses are run in cooperation between the Arthritis Center of Hannover and the League against Rheumatism in Lower Saxony. Both institutions are in discussion with the health insurance companies for paying the costs for the patient education courses. Then the group discussed several important aspects which have to be considered when establishing patient education courses such as recruiting and motivating the trainers, recruiting the participants, choosing adequate rooms, fund raising and responsibilities. The participants considered the patient education model of Lower Saxony as a transferable model for every collaborative arthritis center in Germany and recommended to follow that path. PMID:14648087

  10. Education's Effects on Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Norval D.; Weaver, Charles N.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the effects of years of school completed on eight dimensions of psychological well-being. Notes a statistically significant negative effect for White males' community satisfaction, and some evidence that education has positive effects on psychological well-being in all subpopulations except Black men. (Author/RL)

  11. Detection, education and management of the asplenic or hyposplenic patient.

    PubMed

    Brigden, M L

    2001-02-01

    Fulminant, potentially life-threatening infection is a major long-term risk after splenectomy or in persons who are functionally hyposplenic as a result of various systemic conditions. Most of these infections are caused by encapsulated organisms such as pneumococci, Haemophilus influenzae and meningococci. A splenectomized patient is also more susceptible to infections with intraerythrocytic organisms such as Babesia microti and those that seldom affect healthy people, such as Capnocytophaga canimorsus. Most patients who have lost their spleens because of trauma are aware of their asplenic condition, but some older patients do not know that they are asplenic. Other patients may have functional hyposplenism secondary to a variety of systemic diseases ranging from celiac disease to hemoglobinopathies. The identification of Howell-Jolly bodies on peripheral blood film is an important clue to the diagnosis of asplenia or hyposplenia. Management of patients with these conditions includes a combination of immunization, antibiotic prophylaxis and patient education. With the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci, appropriate use of the pneumococcal vaccine has become especially important. PMID:11272299

  12. Patient Education Self-Management During Surgical Recovery: Combining Mobile (iPad) and a Content Management System

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S. Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Fischer, Erin N.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and “just-in-time” education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods: Patients were provided with iPad® (Apple®, Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily “to do” list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. Results: A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. Conclusions: We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and “just-in-time” education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models. PMID:24443928

  13. Advancing Educational Continuity in Primary Care Residencies: An Opportunity for Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2014-12-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  14. Role of physiotherapy and patient education in lymphedema control following breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hong, Rong-Bin; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether education in combination with physiotherapy can reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods We analyzed 1,217 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2011 who underwent tumor resection and axillary lymph node dissection. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A (n=415), who received neither education nor physiotherapy postsurgery; Group B (n=672), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery; and Group C (n=130), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery, followed by a physiotherapy program. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether BCRL developed. BCRL risk factors were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During the follow-up, 188 patients (15.4%) developed lymphedema, including 77 (18.6%) in Group A, 101 (15.0%) in Group B, and 10 (7.7%) in Group C (P=0.010). The median period from surgery to lymphedema was 0.54 years (interquartile range =0.18–1.78). The independent risk factors for BCRL included positive axillary lymph node invasion, a higher (>20) number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, and having undergone radiation therapy, whereas receiving an educational program followed by physiotherapy was a protective factor against BCRL (hazard ratio =0.35, 95% confidence interval =0.18–0.67, P=0.002). Conclusion Patient education that begins within the first week postsurgery and is followed by physiotherapy is effective in reducing the risk of BCRL in women with breast cancer.

  15. Education and implementing evidence-based nursing practice for diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Varaei, Shokoh; Salsali, Mahvash; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Tehrani, Mohammad Reza Mohajeri; Heshmat, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Foot ulceration is one of the most common complications associated with diabetes that needs to be managed. In Iran, prevalence of diabetes foot ulcer is 3%. According to studies, evidence-based nursing (EBN) is an effective alternative to facilitate clinical decision making in patient care and may lead to quality improvement in nursing practice. The aims of this study are to assess the effects of EBN education on the knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses who take care of patient with diabetes foot ulcer. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental study (based on IOWA model as a framework to improve nursing practice) was conducted using a before-and-after design. All of nurses (consisted of 19 baccalaureate nurses) who are working in an endocrinology ward were chosen and taught using EBN approach through different workshops. Before and after educational intervention, the data about nurses’ knowledge, attitude, and practice were gathered by questionnaire and then compared. The nurses’ performance in patient care was evaluated in 3 months by one checklist. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There were statistically significant differences in knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses before and after intervention (P = 0.001). The nurses’ performance in caring for patient with diabetes foot ulcer, based on clinical guideline, showed the improvement in clinical practice. Conclusion: Education of EBN can improve the nurse's knowledge and attitude to EBN, and be used as a basis on which to influence the professional practice of nursing. PMID:23983764

  16. Adolescent cancer patients' perspectives on their educational experiences: Ten case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Nancy Smith

    The goal of this study was to explore the educational experiences of adolescent cancer patients in treatment for cancer and enrolled in hospital, homebound, or community schools. The incidence of students who have or had cancer is becoming more prevalent in schools today because of increases in the population, the incidence rate of cancer, and the survival rate of cancer. The number of students surviving cancer has increased over 41% in the past ten years and underscores the importance of assuring an excellent education to children and adolescents with cancer so that they may enjoy a good quality of life as long-term survivors. This study explored the educational experiences of students who were adolescent cancer patients and identified educational and psychosocial issues important to their success. The goal of this research effort was to provide educators and medical staff with a deeper understanding of the unique psychoeducational needs of this population and to provide a foundation for developing ideas for improving the educational programs and support available to students who continue their middle and high school education while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants included ten cancer patient whose mean age at onset of disease was 13.8 +/- 1.7 years, and mean age at interview was 15.2 +/- 1.8 years. The researcher conducted individual, in-depth, ethnographic interviews of students, and one parent and one teacher of each student. Case studies of the students included extensive dialogue of each of the contributing participants. An analysis of the case studies was conducted by coding emerging themes so that topics could be fully explored and compared between individuals, groups of individuals, and educational settings to identify the meaning that these students placed on the educational and psychosocial issues that they voiced as important. Advantages and disadvantages of each educational situation, homebound, hospital school, and community school, were compared. Psychosocial issues related to education were discussed. Additional findings included information about student computer use and information gathering, and the effects of cancer treatment on student interest in science and future occupational plans.

  17. Developing bilingual patient education materials. Problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Talbert, R; Hendricson, B; Hudepohl, N; Richards, B; McPherson, M; Reed, B

    1981-03-01

    The bilingual format presents a challenging set of problems for media producers. Four factors seem to be of primary importance to the success of bilingual materials: 1. Identifying the unique educational and cultural characteristics of the target audience. 2. Developing strategies to establish credibility with the target audience. 3. Determining the most appropriate dialect for non-English scripts. 4. Designing a 'tri-script' to allow all project planners to easily follow the script in both languages. The article describes the development of a series of bilingual patient education materials on Renal Transplantation, particularly focussing on the efforts of the development team in regard to each of the four factors listed above. PMID:6166609

  18. Leading Educationally Effective Family-Centered Bedside Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Amonpreet K.; Amin, Harish J.; McLaughlin, Kevin; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    Background Family-centered bedside rounds (family-centered rounds) enable learning and clinical care to occur simultaneously and offer benefits to patients, health care providers, and multiple levels of learners. Objective We used a qualitative approach to understand the dimensions of successful (ie, educationally positive) family-centered rounds from the perspective of attending physicians and residents. Methods We studied rounds in a tertiary academic hospital affiliated with the University of Calgary. Data were collected from 7 focus groups of pediatrics residents and attendings and were analyzed using grounded theory. Results Attending pediatricians and residents described rounds along a spectrum from successful and highly educational to unsuccessful and of low educational value. Perceptions of residents and attendings were influenced by how well the environment, educational priorities, and competing priorities were managed. Effectiveness of the manager was the core variable for successful rounds led by persons who could develop predictable rounds and minimize learner vulnerability. Conclusions Success of family-centered rounds in teaching settings depended on making the education and patient care aims of rounds explicit to residents and attending faculty. The role of the manager in leading rounds also needs to be made explicit. PMID:24455007

  19. An educational module to improve healthcare staffs' attitudes toward sickle cell disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hanik, Maria; Sackett, Kay M; Hartman, Lisa L

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic blood disorder primarily affecting individuals of African descent. Studies of healthcare providers suggest there is inadequate knowledge about the pathophysiology and clinical presentations of the disease, and misperceptions of patients' behaviors and communication during crisis that have led to inappropriate staff attitudes and thus become major barriers to the delivery of optimal care. In this article, the authors describe the effect of an educational module on improving healthcare staffs' attitudes toward patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:25237914

  20. Effective Teaching in Physical Education: Slovenian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pišot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; Štemberger, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However,…

  1. Minnesota Educational Effectiveness. 1987 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    Conceived by the Minnesota State Legislature, the Minnesota Educational Effectiveness Program is a school improvement and staff development program. Its participants perceive the program as a method for identifying areas of concern and for providing staff with the processes to effect change. As of September 1987, 328 Minnesota schools are in…

  2. Theories on Educational Effectiveness and Ineffectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Following Snow's (1973) description of an "inductive" process of theory formation, this article addresses the organization of the knowledge base on school effectiveness. A multilevel presentation stimulated the conceptualization of educational effectiveness as an integration of system-level, school-level, and classroom-level…

  3. Competence in Patient Safety: A Multifaceted Experiential Educational Intervention for Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Lukela, Michael P; Parekh, Vikas I; Gosbee, John W; Purkiss, Joel A; Valle, John Del; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S

    2011-01-01

    Background The need to provide efficient, effective, and safe patient care is of paramount importance. However, most physicians receive little or no formal training to prepare them to address patient safety challenges within their clinical practice. Methods We describe a comprehensive Patient Safety Learning Program (PSLP) for internal medicine and medicine-pediatrics residents. The curriculum is designed to teach residents key concepts of patient safety and provided opportunities to apply these concepts in the “real” world in an effort to positively transform patient care. Residents were assigned to faculty expert-led teams and worked longitudinally to identify and address patient safety conditions and problems. The PSLP was assessed by using multiple methods. Results Resident team-based projects resulted in changes in several patient care processes, with the potential to improve clinical outcomes. However, faculty evaluations of residents were lower for the Patient Safety Improvement Project rotation than for other rotations. Comments on “unsatisfactory” evaluations noted lack of teamwork, project participation, and/or responsiveness to faculty communication. Participation in the PSLP did not change resident or faculty attitudes toward patient safety, as measured by a comprehensive survey, although there was a slight increase in comfort with discussing medical errors. Conclusions Development of the PSLP was intended to create a supportive environment to enhance resident education and involve residents in patient safety initiatives, but it produced lower faculty evaluations of resident for communication and professionalism and did not have the intended positive effect on resident or faculty attitudes about patient safety. Further research is needed to design or refine interventions that will develop more proactive resident learners and shift the culture to a focus on patient safety. PMID:22942963

  4. Building an effective doctor-patient relationship: From patient satisfaction to patient participation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward J. Speedling; David N. Rose

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the authors argue that patient satisfaction is an insufficient measure of the quality of the doctor-patient relationship. While shown to have a salutary effect on patient anxiety concerning illness and treatment, the only other significant outcome associated with levels of satisfaction is utilization behavior. This is not surprising, the authors argue, since prevailing conceptualizations of patient satisfaction

  5. Effects of Music on Patient Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther Mok; Kwai-Yiu Wong

    2003-01-01

    Undergoing surgery with local anesthesia is stressful because patients often are aware of their surroundings. This study investigated music as a method of reducing patients' anxiety during minor surgery with local anesthesia. For this study, researchers assessed the effectiveness of music as a relaxation modality by measuring patients' vital signs and self-reported anxiety before and after surgery. Study results indicate

  6. An educational video to increase clinical trials enrollment among lung cancer patients. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    An educational video increased patients’ self-assessed likelihood to enroll in a clinical trial. This format of patient education has potential for universal applicability because of its low cost of administration and the low demands on patient and staff time.

  7. Characteristics of Health Educators Desired by Inner-City Health Clinic Patients: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James; Sidani, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    A group (n = 170) of inner-city, predominantly African American, health clinic patients were asked to identify the characteristics they desired in a new clinic health educator. A plurality (44%) of the patients perceived a bachelor's degree would be a sufficient level of education. The vast majority of patients claimed the sex of the health…

  8. Use effective communication channels. Health education.

    PubMed

    Hubley, J

    1988-03-01

    This article describes different ways of communicating health education. Individual and group counseling are the most effective ways of changing people's behavior. It is a method by which, it could relieve anxieties, and offer better ways that explain information and help people make decisions on sexual and risk behavior subjects. Drawings, cartoons, visual aids and magazines could be of help in discussions. In the discussion of sensitive and embarrassing topics, it is much better for the use of traditional drama, storytelling, puppets etc. Leaflets and poster use are useful in the back up on counseling and health education programs. Establishing a health education regarding the struggle on AIDS takes time and effort, and it is best that counselors or educators are able to share their experiences and evaluate limited programs on this matter. PMID:12315653

  9. Educating our patients about life and the end of life: toward a pedagogy of dying.

    PubMed

    Ventres, William

    2014-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on how physicians can best educate their patients about living healthier-one might call it a "pedagogy of living." In this essay, I suggests that physicians develop a "pedagogy of dying" for their adult patients: educating them about how they can approach death with some measure of grace and dignity, as consistent with their wants as possible, and cognizant of the final reality we all face. This process happens in the ambulatory settings as part of ongoing care and precedes any serious illness or the crisis of hospitalization. I draws on known models for communicating effectively, my own practice experience, and the disciplines of palliative care and bioethics in asking physicians to consider developing such a "pedagogy of dying," a kind of anticipatory guidance toward aging, infirmity, and, ultimately, death. PMID:25201942

  10. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aina Olufemi Odusola; Marleen Hendriks; Constance Schultsz; Karien Stronks; Joep Lange; Akin Osibogun; Tanimola Akande; Shade Alli; Peju Adenusi; Kayode Agbede; Joke Haafkens

    2011-01-01

    Background  In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly.\\u000a Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered\\u000a cardiovascular health education is likely to improve shortcomings in adherence. This paper describes a study that aims to\\u000a develop a cardiovascular health education program for patients participating in

  11. SCI-U: E-learning for patient education in spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, John D.; Badger-Brown, Karla M.; Legassic, Matthew S.; Walia, Saagar; Wolfe, Dalton L.

    2012-01-01

    Background/objectives To develop an online patient education resource for use in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Participants The development process involved more than 100 subject-matter experts (SMEs) (rehabilitation professionals and consumers) from across Canada. Preliminary evaluation was conducted with 25 end-users. Methods An iterative development process was coordinated by a project team; SMEs (including patients) developed the content in working groups using wiki-based tools. Multiple rounds of feedback based on early prototypes helped improve the courses during development. Results Five courses were created, each featuring more than 45 minutes of video content and hundreds of media assets. Preliminary evaluation results indicate that users were satisfied by the courses and perceived them to be effective. Conclusions This is an effective process for developing multimedia patient education resources; the involvement of patients in all parts of the process was particularly helpful. Future work will focus on implementation, integration into clinical practice and other delivery formats (smart phones, tablets). PMID:23031169

  12. Educational Innovation, Quality, and Effects: An Exploration of Innovations and Their Effects in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the extensive literature on educational innovations, there is only limited empirical research available into the impact of innovations on student achievement. In this article, the following research questions will be answered: What form do innovations in secondary education take, are there types of innovative schools, and what effect do…

  13. Effective Civic Education: An Educational Effectiveness Model for Explaining Students' Civic Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isac, Maria Magdalena; Maslowski, Ralf; van der Werf, Greetje

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive educational effectiveness model is tested in relation to student's civic knowledge. Multilevel analysis was applied on the dataset of the IEA Civic Education Study (CIVED; Torney-Purta, Lehmann, Oswald, & Schulz, 2001), which was conducted among junior secondary-school students (age 14), their schools, and their…

  14. Assessing the reading level of online sarcoma patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shaan S; Sheppard, Evan D; Siegel, Herrick J; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients rely on patient education materials (PEMs) to gather information regarding their disease. Patients who are better informed about their illness have better health outcomes. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends that PEMs be written at a sixth- to seventh-grade reading level. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the readability of online PEMs of bone and soft-tissue sarcomas and related conditions. We identified relevant online PEMs from the following websites: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, academic training centers, sarcoma specialists, Google search hits, Bonetumor.org, Sarcoma Alliance, Sarcoma Foundation of America, and Medscape. We used 10 different readability instruments to evaluate the reading level of each website's PEMs. In assessing 72 websites and 774 articles, we found that none of the websites had a mean readability score at or below 7 (seventh grade). Collectively, all websites had a mean readability score of 11.4, and the range of scores was grade level 8.9 to 15.5. None of the PEMs in this study of bone and soft-tissue sarcomas and related conditions met the NIH recommendation for PEM reading levels. Concerted efforts to improve the reading level of orthopedic oncologic PEMs are necessary. PMID:25566558

  15. Multilevel Design Efficiency in Educational Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cools, Wilfried; De Fraine, Bieke; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Onghena, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    In educational effectiveness research, multilevel data analyses are often used because research units (most frequently, pupils or teachers) are studied that are nested in groups (schools and classes). This hierarchical data structure complicates designing the study because the structure has to be taken into account when approximating the accuracy…

  16. Combining Software Games with Education: Evaluation of its Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virvou, Maria; Katsionis, George; Manos, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01

    Computer games are very popular among children and adolescents. In this respect, they could be exploited by educational software designers to render educational software more attractive and motivating. However, it remains to be explored what the educational scope of educational software games is. In this paper, we explore several issues concerning…

  17. Patient Educational Media Preferences for Information About Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albena Halpert; Christine B. Dalton; Olafur Palsson; Carolyn Morris; Yuming Hu; Shrikant Bangdiwala; Jane Hankins; Nancy Norton; Douglas A. Drossman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To identify the educational media preferences of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods The IBS-Patient Education Questionnaire (PEQ) was administered to a national sample of IBS patients. Frequencies of item\\u000a endorsements were compared and meaningful clinical differences were used to identify differences among subgroups. Results 1,242 patients completed the survey, mean age 39.3 years, 85% female, IBS duration 6.9 years,

  18. Patient education in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant: what patients wish they had known about quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jim, H S L; Quinn, G P; Gwede, C K; Cases, M G; Barata, A; Cessna, J; Christie, J; Gonzalez, L; Koskan, A; Pidala, J

    2014-02-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but patient education is often overlooked. The aim of the current qualitative study was to examine education regarding post-HCT QOL from the patient's perspective. Allogeneic HCT recipients participated in one of four focus groups. Participants were asked to recall what they had been told about post-HCT QOL as they were preparing for transplant, how their QOL differed from what they expected and how to educate future patients about post-HCT QOL. Verbatim transcripts were coded for both a priori and emergent themes using content analysis. A total of 24 patients participated (54% female, mean age 51, range 23-73 years). Participants frequently expressed the desire for additional education regarding post-HCT QOL, particularly late complications. They noted that late complications were often unexpected, had a profound impact on their QOL and threatened their ongoing sense of recovery. They emphasized that the timing, content and format of education regarding QOL should be flexible to meet their diverse needs. Findings from the current study draw attention to the importance of patient education regarding post-HCT QOL as well as additional QOL research designed with patient education in mind. PMID:24121210

  19. Effectiveness of a Structured Intensive Weight Loss Program Using Health Educators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. Rohrer; Harvey D. Cassidy; Diane Dressel; Barbara Cramer

    2008-01-01

    Background: Primary care providers may refer their patients to a variety of weight loss programs and diet plans. However, the relative effectiveness of the available options is not well understood. This retrospective study compared weight loss in an intensive structured (IS) program using health educators versus weight loss in the general population of primary care patients seeking to lose weight

  20. Narrative in interprofessional education and practice: implications for professional identity, provider-patient communication and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Clark, Phillip G

    2014-01-01

    Health and social care professionals increasingly use narrative approaches to focus on the patient and to communicate with each other. Both effective interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP) require recognizing the various values and voices of different professions, how they relate to the patient's life story, and how they interact with each other at the level of the healthcare team. This article analyzes and integrates the literature on narrative to explore: self-narrative as an expression of one's professional identity; the co-creation of the patient's narrative by the professional and the patient; and the interprofessional multi-vocal narrative discourse as co-constructed by members of the healthcare team. Using a narrative approach to thinking about professional identity, provider-patient communication, and interprofessional teamwork expands our thinking about both IPE and IPP by providing new insights into the nature of professional practice based on relationships to oneself, the patient, and others on the team. How professionals define themselves, gather and present information from the patient, and communicate as members of a clinical team all have important dimensions that can be revealed by a narrative approach. Implications and conclusions for the further development of the narrative approach in IPE and IPP are offered. PMID:24224865

  1. Educational group support for patients with gynaecological cancer and their families.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M E; Strang, P M

    1996-03-01

    Prior to the start of a psychosocial project for patients with gynaecological cancer and their families, a questionnaire was mailed to evaluate their potential interest in an educational and supportive group. Another aim was to rank the most important issues. Group I consisted of patients with a newly diagnosed cancer and group II comprised patients who had been in clinical remission for 2-5 years; 173 questionnaires were sent. The response rate was 80%. The rates of interest in the proposed group sessions were 63% and 65% from patients and relatives in group I, and 52% and 36% from those in group II (P < 0.05). Younger individuals, couples and people with a higher formal education were generally more interested in participating (P < 0.05). The highest-ranked issues (mean 3.9-3.7 on a four-point scale) were cancer and cancer treatment, living with a cancer diagnosis, side-effects of treatment, cancer pain and psychological reactions to cancer. Among patients in group I, the interest in questions related to sexual activity was moderate (mean 2.8); the corresponding figure was significantly higher in group II (P < 0.05). Interest in supportive and educational groups was significantly higher than in comparable studies. Since relaxation programmes and issues concerning problems with relationships have been generally regarded as the most crucial topics in supportive programmes, the preference for specifically cancer-related issues was surprising. The study underlines the importance of specifically ascertaining which issues an intended group considers to be important. PMID:8673347

  2. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  3. Evidence-guided education: patients' outcome data should influence our teaching priorities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Thomas H

    2005-02-01

    How should medical educators choose learning objectives and teaching content in clinical education? Given the information chain reaction, coverage of all significant topics in sufficient depth is not possible. Choosing subjects of high priority is essential if education is to have maximum impact on quality of care. These priorities should not derive from tradition and opinion, but should be informed by patient outcomes, the ultimate standard for assessing educational effectiveness. Building upon prior initiatives linking education to practice, the author uses the term "evidence-guided education" to express the process of influencing curricular choices with evidence from health outcomes. Sources of outcome evidence include incident reports, morbidity and mortality conferences, surveillance of quality of care in particular venues, case series, surveys of adverse events and "near-misses," and malpractice claims. Starting with anecdotal occurrences, additional case-finding may establish patterns of poor outcomes, some of which may be preventable. Credible research data on outcomes can inform prioritization for objectives and content at successive institutional levels, which should improve practices and outcomes, completing the loop of feedback, implementation, and improved health. The closer the educational intervention is to practice, the more accountable it becomes. Thus, EGE is more amenable to evaluation at residents' and practitioners' levels and more difficult at the undergraduate level. However, outcome evidence should still inform undergraduate teaching, since this constitutes the platform for future learning. Severe constraints on learning time mandate prioritization of content and suggest the need for the judicious application of outcome evidence in place of mere opinion. PMID:15671318

  4. Influence of Education on the Pattern of Cognitive Deterioration in Ad Patients: The Cognitive Reserve Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carret, N.L.; Auriacombe, S.; Letenneur, L.; Bergua, V.; Dartigues, J.F.; Fabrigoule, C.

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated

  5. Community Engagement in New Mexico: Patient Care, Education & Research Sites, 2009

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    RESEARCH SITES TELEHEALTH SITES Preceptor Sites, College of Nursing CON Patient Care Sites Health Sciences Library Distance Ed Education Sites, College of Nursing Behavioral Health Education Sites Education Sites Gallup Navajo Gamerco Rehoboth Grants Laguna Casa Blanca San Fidel/ Acoma Las Vegas Pecos Rowe Glorieta

  6. UAF School of Education: "Preparing professional educators who are culturally responsive, effective practitioners"

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    . Touchstone, ISBN-13: 9781439194140 Scheuermann, B. & Webber, J., Educating Students with Autism, A Quick · Governer's Council on Disabilities and Special Education · Autism Society of America, Golden Heart ChapterUAF School of Education: "Preparing professional educators who are culturally responsive, effective

  7. Tobacco cessation treatment education for dental students using standardized patients.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jacqueline A; Carrico, Ruth M; Myers, John A; Scott, David A; Wilson, Richard W; Worth, Celeste T

    2014-06-01

    The use of standardized patients (SPs) shows promise in tobacco cessation treatment (TCT) training by providing a simulated clinical environment for dental students to practice counseling skills with individuals trained to portray patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in attitudes, perceptions, and knowledge between dental students who received a lecture and practice sessions with SPs and those who received a lecture only. Dental students in an introductory clinical course at one dental school were invited to participate in the study by completing a pre and post questionnaire. The pre questionnaire was administered to all students prior to a tobacco cessation lecture. Students were group-randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group completed the post questionnaire after the lecture and practice sessions with SPs, and the control group completed it after the lecture only. Of ninety-eight students who attended the lecture and were invited to participate in the study, a total of ninety-four from the two groups (96 percent) provided two linkable questionnaires for analysis. In the results, training with lecture and SPs increased the students' understanding of barriers, subjective norms, perceived skills, self-efficacy, and intentions to provide TCT more than those in the lecture only; however, it did not significantly increase their attitudes and knowledge. These findings suggest that using SPs is a valuable educational method to promote the provision of TCT by dental students and graduates. PMID:24882775

  8. The educated patient: new challenges for the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, J

    2000-01-01

    The medical profession is facing significant changes in the way the rest of society relates to it. Mass education, mass media and mass consumerism have boomed in the 20th century, putting an increasing amount of pressure on professionals to meet rising public expectations. If doctors are to continue to provide a service that meets the demands of citizens and taxpayers, they need to develop a new relationship with patients, acting not as instructors but as guides, to help people make decisions about their own health. They will have to be more accountable for the quality of care they provide and work with a wider range of health and non-health professionals to meet patients' needs. Doctors need not only to accept the consumer society but also, I will argue, to encourage it. They can work to ensure that the benefits of the information revolution are felt by people excluded from consumerism because of poverty and social isolation, working to create an empowered, informed public whose members are given the best opportunity to look after their own health. PMID:10672125

  9. The Diffusion Process of Patient Education in Dutch Community Pharmacy: An Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronk, M. C. M.; Blom, A. Th. G.; Van Burg, A.; Jonkers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and classifies these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers'"Innovations in Organizations" model. Discusses the implementation of patient education activities that require individual and organizational change in…

  10. Educational Level and the Quality of Life of Heart Failure Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgio Barbareschi; Robbert Sanderman; Ivonne Lesman Leegte; Dirk J. van Veldhuisen; Tiny Jaarsma

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundLower education in heart failure (HF) patients is associated with high levels of anxiety, limited physical functioning, and an increased risk of hospitalization. We examined whether educational level is related to longitudinal differences in quality of life (QoL) in HF patients.

  11. Melanoma patient self-detection: a review of efficacy of the skin self-examination and patient-directed educational efforts.

    PubMed

    Yagerman, Sarah; Marghoob, Ashfaq

    2013-12-01

    Early detection of cutaneous melanoma results in reduced morbidity and mortality. Although screening by physicians has been shown effective, the role of skin self-examination (SSE) in melanoma secondary prevention is less well studied. Various methods and educational strategies have been implemented to empower patients to perform efficacious SSEs. Patient demographics play an important role in their likelihood to examine their own skin and ability to detect melanoma. Visual aids such as total body photography and dermoscopy, which have improved physician exams, are becoming elements accessible to patients for augmentation of self-exam. This review examines the literature of SSE in melanoma detection. PMID:24236821

  12. [Adverse effects and patient information].

    PubMed

    Cortey, A; Brossard, Y

    2006-02-01

    Anti-D prophylaxis should be proposed to all RhD negative non-sensitized pregnant women, after delivering an information concerning both Rhesus disease and anti-D immunoglobulins. This information must be delivered as a written document and the patient's oral consent is required before administration of the anti-D immunoglobulins. Anti-D immunoglobulins currently used in France for prophylaxis are extracted from plasma of hyperimmunized paid donors. Even if all the conditions of viral safety are fulfilled in the preparation of anti-D immunoglobulins, they remain blood derived products. As such, prescription of anti-D immunoglobulins should follow legal rules concerning tracability and information. Refusal of rhesus prophylaxis can occur but should be transcribed and motivated in the patient's chart. Administration of anti-D immunoglobulins is usually well tolerated. Reactions to hemolysis of fetal Rhesus positive red cells can occur but remain rare and linked to important foeto-maternal hemorrhage. They can be easily prevented or treated by anti-inflammatory drugs. Patients can be vaccinated against rubella in the post-partum period even though they will receive a concomitant prophylaxis with Rh immunoglobulin. Persistence of passive anti-D in maternal circulation after injection lasts several weeks or months and could have various consequences. In the mother: it can interfere with diagnosis of active anti-D immunization. In most cases, it may be possible to differentiate passive and immune anti-D. When reliable information concerning date and dosage of antenatal anti-D prophylaxis are available. In the newborn: anti-D immunoglobulins can pass through the placenta and enter the fetal circulation, coat the D positive fetal red cells and give positive DAT. Positive DAT is reported in 5 to 15% of the newborns following rhesus prophylaxis in the third trimester but with no report of anemia or jaundice. In absence of ABO incompatibility, no additional investigation is needed in these newborns. PMID:16495836

  13. Influence of education on the pattern of cognitive deterioration in AD patients: The cognitive reserve hypothesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Le Carret; Sophie Auriacombe; Luc Letenneur; Valérie Bergua; Jean-François Dartigues; Colette Fabrigoule

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated patients because the neuropathology is more advanced. However, these studies have only

  14. A Model of More Culturally Inclusive and Educationally Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs, Carlton South (Australia).

    Conscious that the achievement of educational equality for Australia's Indigenous peoples is a national priority, Australia's ministers of education, at a March 2000 meeting, committed themselves to a model of more culturally inclusive and educationally effective schools. The model is based on findings from recent work to improve educational

  15. Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.

    2011-01-01

    "Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs" was written to assist adapted and general physical educators who are dedicated to ensuring that the physical and motor needs of all their students are addressed in physical education. While it is anticipated that adapted physical educators, where available, will typically…

  16. Psychosocial, educational and communicative interventions for patients with cachexia and their family carers

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Cancer cachexia has a substantial impact on both patients and their family carers. It has been acknowledged as one of the two most frequent and devastating problems of advanced cancer. The impact of cachexia spans biopsychosocial realms. Symptom management in cachexia is fraught with difficulties and globally, there remains no agreed standard care or treatment for this client group. There is a need to address the psychosocial impact of cachexia for both patients and their family carers. Recent findings Patients living at home and their family carers are often left to manage the distressing psychosocial impacts of cancer cachexia themselves. Successful symptom management requires healthcare professionals to address the holistic impact of cancer cachexia. High quality and rigorous research details the existential impact of cachexia on patients and their family carers. This information needs to inform psychosocial, educational and communicative supportive healthcare interventions to help both patients and their family carers better cope with the effects of cachexia. Summary Supportive interventions need to inform both patients and their family carers of the expected impacts of cachexia, and address how to cope with them to retain a functional, supported family unit who are informed about and equipped to care for a loved one with cachexia. PMID:25144837

  17. Distance Education Training for Distance Education Trainers: The "Roadmap to Effective Distance Education Instructional Design" Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telg, Ricky W.; Lundy, Lisa; Irani, Tracy; Bielema, Cheryl; Dooley, Kim E.; Anderson, Erik; Raulerson, Rebekah

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of a 6-university collaborative project, "Roadmap to Effective Distance Education Instructional Design." This project developed instructional materials and innovative approaches to better prepare instructional designers at land-grant universities and other universities with agricultural academic programs to…

  18. An 8-Week Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Program of Hyaluronic Acid Injection, Deliberate Physical Rehabilitation, and Patient Education is Cost Effective at 2 Years Follow-up: The OsteoArthritis Centers of AmericaSM Experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nonsurgical interventions have been reported to improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA) over the short term. However, longer follow-up is required to accurately characterize outcomes such as cost effectiveness and delayed arthroplasty. A total of 553 patients with symptomatic knee OA who previously underwent a single 8-week multimodal treatment program were contacted at 1 year (n = 336) or 2 years (n = 217) follow-up. The percentage of patients who underwent knee arthroplasty was 10% at 1 year and 18% at 2 years following program completion. The treatment program was highly cost effective at $12,800 per quality-adjusted life year at 2 years. Cost effectiveness was maintained under a variety of plausible assumptions and regardless of gender, age, body mass index, disease severity, or knee pain severity. In summary, a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program is cost effective and may lower knee arthroplasty utilization through 2 years follow-up. PMID:25574144

  19. User involvement as sharing knowledge – an extended perspective in patient education

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Anita; Fagermoen, May Solveig

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient education is undergoing a paradigm shift in which the perspectives of patients are increasingly being incorporated into learning programs. Access to the users’ experience is now considered a prerequisite for the development of quality health services, but how this user experience is incorporated is somewhat unclear. The inclusion of experiential knowledge and user involvement can challenge professional authority, roles, and working methods because knowledge sharing is different from persuasion, professional explanation, and consent. Dialogue and collaboration between professionals and users are essential to effective user involvement; however, little is understood about the characteristics of their collaboration. Objective To describe characteristics of the collaboration between users and health professionals in developing, implementing, and evaluating patient education courses in hospitals. Design, setting, and methods A field study was conducted in three different hospitals. Data collection comprised open observations in meetings of 17 different collaboration groups with a total of 100 participants, and 24 interviews with users and professionals. The data analyses included both thematic and the Systematic Data Integration approach. Results Two contrasting types of collaboration emerged from the analyses; knowledge sharing and information exchange. The first was characterized by mutual knowledge sharing, involvement, and reciprocal decision making. Characteristics of the second were the absence of dialogue, meagre exploration of the users’ knowledge, and decisions usually made by the professionals. Conclusion Collaboration between users and health personnel takes place in an asymmetric relationship. Mutual knowledge sharing was found to be more than the exchange of information and consultation and also to be a prerequisite for shared decision making. In developing patient education when users are involved the health professionals have the power and responsibility to ensure that knowledge sharing with users takes place. PMID:25489248

  20. The Educational Effectiveness of a Simulation/Game in Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashibuchi, Megumi; Sakamoto, Akira

    2001-01-01

    Examines the educational effectiveness of a game named POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE for sex education in a Japanese high school. Compares the effectiveness of educational videos with game conditions and discusses results that show the value of playing the game in the role of the opposite sex. (Author/LRW)

  1. Education, reregistration, and recommendation effect of iPhone Poomsae education app in Taekwondo academy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    In Sook Ha; Seung Il Lee; Eun Jong Cha; Tae Soo Lee

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzed the effect of a smartphone application in Taekwondo Academy. The iPhone app was self-developed to display Taekwondo education contents for Poomsae training. From the viewpoint of education, reregistration and recommendation effect, it showed statistically significant difference in 196 trainee sample survey. Therefore, the research suggest that the use of smartphone technology in Poomsae education would be a

  2. Emergency ventilation of the tracheostomy patient, part II: a story of tracheotomy history and emergency airway management--advocating education for emergency resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Deidra Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Over a period of 5000 years, dramatic changes have occurred in airway management, tracheotomy procedure terminology, indications, techniques, instruments, settings where procedures are performed, tube design and patient outcomes. Specialized knowledge and skills necessary to safely care for tracheostomy patients and to provide effective respiratory resuscitation are reviewed. The purpose of this paper is to document the history of the tracheotomy as a backdrop for understanding patient management. Recommendations for staff education regarding emergency ventilation of the tracheostomy patient are presented. PMID:15754869

  3. Entertainment Education for Prostate Cancer Screening: A Randomized Trial among Primary Care Patients with Low Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Robert J.; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Kneuper, Suzanne; Spann, Stephen J.; Miles, Brian J.; Hyman, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate an entertainment-based patient decision aid for prostate cancer screening among patients with low or high health literacy. Methods Male primary care patients from two clinical sites, one characterized as serving patients with low health literacy (n=149) and the second as serving patients with high health literacy (n=301), were randomized to receive an entertainment-based decision aid for prostate cancer screening or an audiobooklet-control aid with the same learner content but without the entertainment features. Postintervention and 2-week follow-up assessments were conducted. Results Patients at the low-literacy site were more engaged with the entertainment-based aid than patients at the high-literacy site. Overall, knowledge improved for all patients. Among patients at the low-literacy site, the entertainment-based aid was associated with lower decisional conflict and greater self-advocacy (i.e., mastering and obtaining information about screening) when compared to patients given the audiobooklet. No differences between the aids were observed for patients at the high-literacy site. Conclusions Entertainment education may be an effective strategy for promoting informed decision making about prostate cancer screening among patients with lower health literacy. Practice Implications As barriers to implementing computer-based patient decision support programs decrease, alternative models for delivering these programs should be explored. PMID:18760888

  4. Radioguided Parathyroidectomy Effective in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jocelyn F.; Jacobson, Kaitlin; Gosain, Ankush; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Chen, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radioguided parathyroidectomy (RGP) has been shown to be effective in adult patients with hyperparathyroidism (HPT), but the utility of RGP in pediatric patients has not been systematically examined. It is not known if adult criteria for radioactive counts can accurately detect hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands in pediatric patients. The purpose of our study was to determine the utility of RGP in children with primary hyperparathyroidism. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of our prospectively maintained single-institution database for patients who underwent a RGP for primary HPT identified 1694 adult and 19 pediatric patients age 19 years or younger. From the adult population, we selected a control group matched 3 to 1 for gland weight and gender, and compared pre- and post-operative lab values, surgical findings, pathology, and radioguidance values between this and the pediatric group. Results Excised glands from pediatric patients were smaller than those in the total adult population (437 ± 60 mg vs. 718 ± 31 mg, p=0.0004). When controlled for gland weight, ex vivo counts as a percentage of background were lower in the pediatric group (51 ± 5% vs. 91 ± 11%, p=0.04). However, ex vivo radionuclide counts >20% of the background were found in 100% of pediatric patients and 95% of the adult matched control group. Conclusions All pediatric patients met the adult detection criteria for parathyroid tissue removal when a RGP was performed, and 100% cure was achieved. We conclude RGP is a useful treatment option for pediatric patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:23827790

  5. The effect of nanotechnology on education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriyavejakul, Chantana

    2008-04-01

    The research objective was to study 1) the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology and 2) to propose the plans, the strategies and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the system. The data collection was done by 4 methods: 1) documentary study, 2) observation, 3) informal interviews, and 4) group discussion. The findings revealed that: 1. William Wresch's Theory (1997) was used in this research to study of the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology. 1) Getting connected to nanotechnology by search engine websites, libraries, magazines, books, and discussions with experts. 2) Curriculum integration: nanotechnology should be integrated in many branches of engineering, such as industrial, computer, civil, chemical, electrical, mechanical, etc. 3) Resources for educators: nanotechnology knowledge should be spread in academic circles by publications and the Internet websites. 4) Training and professional resources for teachers: Teachers should be trained by experts in nanotechnology and researchers from the National Nanotechnology Center. This will help trainees get correct knowledge, comprehension, and awareness in order to apply to their professions and businesses in the future. 2. As for the plans, the strategies, and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the present system, I analyzed the world nanotechnology situation that might have an effect on Thai society. The study is based on the National Plan to Develop Nanotechnology. The goal of this plan is to develop nanotechnology to be the national strategy within 10 years (2004-2013) and have it integrated into the Thai system. There are 4 parts in this plan: 1) nanomaterials, 2) nanoelectronics, 3) nanobiotechnology, and 4) human resources development. Data for human resource development should be worked with the present technology and use the country's resources to produce many products of nanotechnology, such as 1) handicrafts, decorations, and gifts, 2) agricultural products and food, 3) beverages, such as alcoholic and non- alcoholic drinks, and 5) textiles.

  6. Using Webcasts in Education: Evaluation of its Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakos, Michail N.; Vlamos, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    Educational webcasts are nowadays widely used by many organizations and institutions all over the world. However, the educational effectiveness of webcasts when used as an autonomous method is yet to be explored. In this paper, the clarification of certain issues concerning their educational effectiveness is attempted. Following specific…

  7. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

  8. A novel multidisciplinary educational programme for patients with chronic skin diseases: Ghent pilot project and first results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. LambertJ; J. Bostoen; B. Geusens; J. Bourgois; J. Boone; D. De Smedt; L. Annemans

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory skin disorders have a major impact on the patients’ health related quality of life. Preliminary studies\\u000a to date have suggested that additional educational and psychological training programmes may be effective in the management\\u000a of chronic skin diseases, although more rigid methodology is needed. Our purpose was to investigate the effect on quality\\u000a of life of a novel multidisciplinary

  9. The Effectiveness of a Parent Education Programme Offered through Distance Education about Independent Autistic Children Education Centre (IACEC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yucel, Gamze M. A.; Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a parent education program on parents' awareness about the Independent Autistic Children Education Centre (ACEC: in Turkish OCEM). The program was offered through a distance education program. Participants of the study included parents of 72 children with autism who were receiving…

  10. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  11. Using expert patients’ narratives as an educational resource

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teresa L. Swift; Paul A. Dieppe

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we examine the topic of patient participation in health care and report on how we have drawn on the concept of patient expertise to produce a new kind of information booklet for chronic arthritis patients. The booklet is patient-generated and contains the illness narratives of patients with three kinds of arthritis. The booklet draws upon the knowledge

  12. Effects of an interactive CD-program on 6 months readmission rate in patients with heart failure – a randomised, controlled trial [NCT00311194

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agneta Björck Linné; Hans Liedholm

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease-management programmes including patient education have promoted improvement in outcome for patients with heart failure. However, there is sparse evidence concerning which component is essential for success, and very little is known regarding the validity of methods or material used for the education. METHODS: Effects of standard information to heart failure patients given prior to discharge from hospital were

  13. A prospective study of nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common clinical manifestation that may have clinical significance. Objectives To evaluate if there is a difference between nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation on nutritional status in patients with AD. Methods A randomized, prospective 6-month study which enrolled 90 subjects with probable AD aged 65 years or older divided into 3 groups: Control Group (CG) [n = 27], Education Group (EG) [n = 25], which participated in an education program and Supplementation Group (SG) [n = 26], which received two daily servings of oral nutritional supplementation. Subjects were assessed for anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI, TSF, AC and AMC), biochemical data (total protein, albumin, and total lymphocyte count), CDR (Clinical Dementia Rating), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination), as well as dependence during meals. Results The SG showed a significant improvement in the following anthropometric measurements: weight (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), BMI (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), AC (H calc = 12.99, p =< 0.002), and AMC (H calc = 8.67, p =< 0.013) compared to the CG and EG. BMI of the EG was significantly greater compared to the CG. There were significant changes in total protein (H calc = 6.17, p =< 0.046), and total lymphocyte count in the SG compared to the other groups (H cal = 7.94, p = 0.019). Conclusion Oral nutritional supplementation is more effective compared to nutrition education in improving nutritional status. PMID:21943331

  14. The Associations between the Family Education and Mortality of Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Kai; Han, Qing-Feng; Zhu, Tong-Ying; Ren, Ye-Ping; Chen, Jiang-Hua; Zhao, Hui-Ping; Chen, Meng-Hua; Dong, Jie; Wang, Yue; Hao, Chuan- Ming; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Mei; Tian, Na; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether education level of family members predicts all-cause and cardiovascular death and initial-episode peritonitis in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods A total of 2264 patients on chronic PD were collected from seven centers affiliated with the Socioeconomic Status on the Outcome of Peritoneal Dialysis (SSOP) Study. All demographic, socioeconomic and laboratory data of patients and the education level of all family members were recorded at baseline. Multivariate Cox regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and initial-episode peritonitis with adjustments for recognized traditional factors. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between patients with (n?=?1752) and without (n?=?512) complete education information. According to the highest education level of patients' family, included 1752 patients were divided into four groups, i.e. elementary or lower (15%), middle (27%), high (24%) and more than high school (34%). The family highest education (using elementary school or lower group as reference, hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval of middle school group, high school group and more than high school group was 0.68[0.48–0.96], 0.64[0.45–0.91], 0.66[0.48–0.91], respectively) rather than their average education level or patients' or spouse's education was significantly associated with the higher mortality. Neither patients' nor family education level did correlate to the risk for cardiovascular death or initial-episode peritonitis. Conclusions Family members' education level was found to be a novel predictor of PD outcome. Family, as the main source of health care providers, should be paid more attention in our practice. PMID:24797080

  15. NSAID-Avoidance Education in Community Pharmacies for Patients at High Risk for Acute Kidney Injury, Upstate New York, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Min; Cerulli, Jennifer; Grabe, Darren W.; Fox, Chester; Vassalotti, Joseph A.; Prokopienko, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently associated with community-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI), a strong risk factor for development and progression of chronic kidney disease. Using access to prescription medication profiles, pharmacists can identify patients at high risk for NSAID-induced AKI. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of a community pharmacy–based patient education program on patient knowledge of NSAID-associated renal safety concerns. Methods Patients receiving prescription medications for hypertension or diabetes mellitus were invited to participate in an educational program on the risks of NSAID use. A patient knowledge questionnaire (PKQ) consisting of 5 questions scored from 1 to 5 was completed before and after the intervention. Information was collected on age, race, sex, and frequency of NSAID use. Results A total of 152 participants (60% women) completed both the pre- and post-intervention questionnaire; average age was 54.6 (standard deviation [SD], 17.5). Mean pre-intervention PKQ score was 3.3 (SD, 1.4), and post-intervention score was 4.6 (SD, 0.9) (P = .002). Participants rated program usefulness (1 = not useful to 5 = extremely useful) as 4.2 (SD, 1.0). In addition, 48% reported current NSAID use and 67% reported that the program encouraged them to limit their use. Conclusion NSAID use was common among patients at high risk for AKI. A brief educational intervention in a community pharmacy improved patient knowledge on NSAID-associated risks. Pharmacists practicing in the community can partner with primary care providers in the medical home model to educate patients at risk for AKI. PMID:25523351

  16. Educational intervention for metabolic bone disease in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuexian; Zhao, Yinning; Liu, Junduo; Hou, Yahong; Zhao, Yue

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The currently accepted international guidelines for treatment of CKD-MBD has been published, unfortunately adequate control of serum markers of disorder, especially hyperphosphatemia, is poorly achieved. Whether educational intervention is an effective way for improving CKD-MBD remains controversial. A systematic review of educational intervention versus routine care to improve patients with CKD-MBD was conducted. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs examining the efficacy of educational intervention to improve patients with CKD-MBD were included. We performed a comprehensive search of several databases and sources to identify eligible trials. In addition, we searched unpublished studies by tracking the SIGLE (System for Information on Grey Literature) database. Finally, 8 RCTs and 2 quasi-RCTs containing 775 participants were included in our systematic review. The result of our study revealed that the educational intervention to patients with CKD-MBD led to an improvement of the serum phosphorus and calcium by phosphate product. Educational intervention is a beneficial supplement method in improving CKD-MBD and putting off deterioration of the disease. PMID:25193107

  17. Effects of Asthma Education on Children's Use of Acute Care Services: A Meta-analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet M. Coffman; Michael D. Cabana; Edward H. Yelin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE.National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute clinical practice guidelines strongly recommend that health professionals educate children with asthma and their caregivers about self-management. We conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the effects of pediatric asthma education on hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and urgent physician visits for asthma. PATIENTS AND METHODS.Inclusion criteria included enrollment of children aged 2 to 17 years with

  18. Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education. Teacher Education Yearbook VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, D. John, Ed.; Byrd, David M., Ed.

    This yearbook addresses the nation's need to train and retain good teachers, exploring exemplary practices in teacher education. There are four sections divided into 12 chapters. The book begins with a forward, "Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education: Powerful Teacher Education Programs" (E.M. Guyton). Section 1, "Models for Enhancing…

  19. Reforms in Chinese Higher Education and Their Effect on Teacher Education in Inner Mongolia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Peter; Thomas, Harold

    2002-01-01

    Examines experiences of an English language teaching project at the Inner Mongolia Teacher University (China). Considers the effect of higher education reform processes on teacher education at Inner Mongolia. Presents these reforms in context of international trends in higher education over the past decade and more specific reforms happening in…

  20. The need for effective biomedical imaging education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CYNTHIA B. PASCHAL

    2003-01-01

    There are several challenges to producing high-quality BMI education programs. These include limited opportunities for hands-on education; a dearth of textbooks targeted toward engineers, especially undergraduate engineers; and, like many fields, advancements so rapid that textbooks and other educational resources become out of date quickly, often before being released. Although there are many challenges to BMI education, there are many

  1. Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2 Revised 05/09/2012

    E-print Network

    Influenza Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2 Revised 05/09/2012 The flu fibrosis, or heart disease), or are immunocompromised, are at greater risk for developing severe illness

  2. Reducing readmissions using teach-back: enhancing patient and family education.

    PubMed

    Peter, Debra; Robinson, Paula; Jordan, Marie; Lawrence, Susan; Casey, Krista; Salas-Lopez, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a quality improvement initiative, implemented by a patient education workgroup within a tertiary Magnet® facility. The project focused on the association between inadequate care transitions in patients with heart failure and subsequent costly readmissions. The teach-back initiative was piloted with patients hospitalized with heart failure, because of this population's high risk of readmission. Learning outcomes included documented improvements in patients' understanding of their disease and reduced readmission rates. PMID:25479173

  3. Effective Compensatory Education Sourcebook. Volume I (Revised): Effective Educational Practices in Schools that Serve Disadvantaged Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisner, Elizabeth R.; Haslam, M. Bruce

    This publication, part of a series initiated in 1986, describes effective educational practices of schools that serve disadvantaged students and adds information on recent research about the characteristics of these schools to support the review. Following an introduction, four types of attributes are examined in four sections. Section 1 considers…

  4. Promoting Early Literacy Skills: Effects of In-Service Education for Early Childhood Educators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Flowers; Luigi Girolametto; Elaine Weitzman; Janice Greenberg

    This study examined the effects of in-service education on educators' use of story comprehension utterances, narrative models, and print\\/sound references during interactive book reading. Participants included sixteen early childhood educators with groups of four typically-developing children, aged 18 to 67 months. Eight educators in the experimental group were taught to engage in story-related discussion to promote children's early literacy skills.

  5. Organizing an effective continuous medical education session.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A K

    2008-07-01

    Maintenance of professional competence remains an exercise of lifelong learning and an essential requirement for evidence -based medical practice. Physicians attend continuing medical education (CME) programs to update their knowledge. Often CME programs remain the main source of updating current information. CME organizers have considerable responsibility in determining appropriate curriculum for their meeting. Organizing an effective CME activity often requires understanding of the principles of adult education. Prior to deciding on the curriculum for a CME, course organizers should conduct needs assessment of physicians. CME planners need to be organize activities that would consistently improve physician competence. CME sessions that are interactive, using multiple methods of instructions for small groups of physicians from a single discipline are more likely to change physician knowledge and behavior. Effectiveness of a CME program should be evaluated at a level beyond measuring physician satisfaction. CME planners need to incorporate methods to determine the course attendees improvement of knowledge, skills and attitudes during the CME activities. Pre and post test of physicians using multiple choice questions form a useful method of assessment. Course organizers would need to ensure that the questions are appropriately constructed to assess the ability to use knowledge in real life situations. PMID:18846906

  6. The Impact of Medical Terminology on Readability of Patient Education Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kari Sand-Jecklin

    2007-01-01

    Most health-related literature is written above the reading ability of the lay audience; however, no studies to date have identified the impact of medical terms on readability of health education materials. The purpose of this study was to identify whether there was a change in calculated reading levels of patient education brochures after medical terms were removed from analysis passages.

  7. Integrating Education and Patient Care. Observations from the GME Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) appointed a task force in November 1999 to examine how AAMC member institutions and others were developing, and could develop, new ways to integrate education and patient care. Mechanisms were identified that would aid in reorienting residency programs to education, rather than services. These…

  8. Personal Finance Education: Effective Practice Guide for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielhofer, Thomas; Kerr, David; Gardiner, Clare

    2010-01-01

    This document provides guidance on effective practice in delivering personal finance education in secondary schools. It is based on the findings from research carried out by NFER (the National Foundation for Educational Research) on behalf of pfeg (Personal Finance Education Group) as part of an evaluation of Learning Money Matters (LMM). This…

  9. THE EFFECT OF FERTILITY LEVELS ON THE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF

    E-print Network

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    THE EFFECT OF FERTILITY LEVELS ON THE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF CHILDREN IN UGANDA Tara Roach fertility levels and the educational attainment of children in Uganda. It seeks to address whether or not lower fertility rates increase the amount of education a child receives, while controlling for other

  10. Socially Intelligent Agents to Improve the Effectiveness of Educational Games

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Conati; Maria Klawe

    2000-01-01

    We describe preliminary research on devising intelligent agents that can improve the educational effectiveness of collaborative, educational computer games. We illustrate how these agents can overcome some of the shortcomings of educational games by explicitly monitoring how students interact with the games, by modeling both the students' cognitive and emotional states, and by generating calibrated interventions to trigger constructive reasoning

  11. Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the…

  12. Educators' Guide to Effective Special Education Materials. 1985-86 Edition (as Reported by 611 Special Educators).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Div. of Special Education.

    The booklet lists special education materials rated effective by the Teacher Initiated Materials Evaluation (TIME) process. Six hundred eleven special educators completed report forms identifying effective materials. The contents are organized by exceptionality area, level and curricular area. The exceptionality area is broken into the following…

  13. Educators' Guide to Effective Special Education Materials. 1983-84 Edition (As Reported by 500 Special Educators).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Paul, Ed.

    The catalog lists special education materials identified by approximately 500 special educators (through the Teacher Initiated Materials Evaluation Process) as effective with handicapped and gifted children. The evaluation process is built on the premise that teachers in contact with handicapped children know the most effective materials.…

  14. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  15. Can small group education and peer review improve care for patients with asthma\\/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. J. Smeele; R. P. Grol; C. P. van Schayck; W. J. van den Bosch; H. J. van den Hoogen; J. W. Muris

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effectiveness of an intensive small group education and peer review programme aimed at implementing national guidelines on asthma\\/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on care provision by general practitioners (GPs) and on patient outcomes. DESIGN: A randomised experimental study with pre-measurement and post-measurement (after one year) in an experimental group and a control group in Dutch general

  16. Effect of Medical Education on Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry and Individuals with Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Marzellus; Harendza, Sigrid; Meyer, Jelka; Drabik, Anna; Reimer, Jens; Kuhnigk, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the effect of medical education on students' attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatric patients, and examined the usefulness of a new evaluation tool: the 6-item Psychiatric Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge (PEAK-6). Method: Authors studied the attitudes of 116 medical students toward psychiatry…

  17. Evaluation of quality of life and anxiety and depression levels in patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: impact of patient education before treatment initiation

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Ulku; Arpac?, Afey; Demir, Sat?; Erdal, Sevgi; Yalcin, ?uayib

    2014-01-01

    Background As a consequence of the improved survival due to the availability of several treatment option cost-effectiveness and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) issues have gained increasing attention in colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate quality of life, level of anxiety and depression before and after a 6-month follow-up period in chemotherapy receiving patients with CRC. Methods The study was conducted in 50 patients with colon or rectal cancer. All patients were informed and educated about their disease and treatment before getting the treatment and were followed for 6 months, during which they received chemotherapy. A “Questionnaire Form” to collect patient demographic characteristics; the “EORTC QLQ-C30 Scale” and “EQ-5D Scale” to evaluate patient’s quality of life; and the “Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale” to evaluate the level of anxiety and depression status of patients, were used as data collecting tools. Results Quality of life scores in all functional fields were high in the sixth course when compared to the first according to EORTC QLQ-C30 Scale, reaching to statistically significant level in emotional function score compared to the initial ones (P<0.05). Moreover quality of life score measured in the sixth month with EQ-5D was statistically significantly higher than the initial. Conclusions These data, shows that with proper patient management, quality of life score, and the anxiety and depression levels improve during the course of treatment. PMID:25083300

  18. Seven practical principles for improving patient education: Evidence-based ideas from cognition science

    PubMed Central

    Pusic, Martin V; Ching, Kevin; Yin, Hsiang Shonna; Kessler, David

    2014-01-01

    An important role of the paediatrician is that of a teacher – every clinician is an educator to patients and their families. This education, however, often occurs under difficult or time-pressured learning conditions. The authors present principles derived from three basic theories of human cognition that may help to guide clinicians’ instruction of parents and patients. Cognitive load theory holds that an individual’s capacity to process information is finite. By controlling information flow rate, decreasing reliance on working memory and removing extraneous cognitive load, learning is improved. Dual code theory suggests that humans have separate cognitive ‘channels’ for text/audio information versus visual information. By constructing educational messages that take advantage of both channels simultaneously, information uptake may be improved. Multimedia theory is based on the notion that there is an optimal blend of media to accomplish a given learning objective. The authors suggest seven practical strategies that clinicians may use to improve patient education. PMID:24665218

  19. Potentials of Web 2.0 for Diabetes Education of Adolescent Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    Diabetes is a very common chronic disease which produces compli-cations in almost all body organs and consumes a huge amount of the health budget. Although education has proved to be useful in diabetes management, there is a great need to improve the availability of these courses for the increasing number of diabetic patients. E-learning can facilitate this service, but the current education system should be tailored towards e-learning standards. Amongst diabetic patients, adolescents as computer natives are suggested as the best target to e-learning diabetes education. With regards to its features, Web 2.0 can be a very good technology to build a framework for diabetes education and consequent evaluation of this education.

  20. Development of an educational intervention for patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) – a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gisela Ringström; Stine Störsrud; Sara Lundqvist; Berndt Westman; Magnus Simrén

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many IBS patients experience that they receive limited information and that the health care system does not take their complaints seriously. We aimed to develop a structured patient education, an 'IBS school', and investigate if the efficacy could be evaluated in terms of improved knowledge, symptom severity and health related quality of life (HRQOL). METHODS: The IBS school consisted

  1. The Impact of Two Educational Techniques on Physician Knowledge, Performance and Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Larrie W.; Jewett, Leslie S.

    1984-01-01

    The cognitive knowledge, performance, and patient care of 23 pediatricians who participated in continuing medical education sessions were measured by pre-, post-, and six- to nine-month follow-up tests. In general, the knowledge and performance factors and patient behavior were better for those attending case presentations as opposed to…

  2. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

  3. [Therapeutic patient education for children and adolescents: some dentofacial orthopedic reflections].

    PubMed

    Mano, Marie-Charlotte; Begué-Simon, Anne-Marie; Hamel, Olivier; Sorel, Olivier; Hervé, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Non-compliance and, even more, abandonment of treatment raise many questions. From a medical and economic point of view, these occurrences affect the efficiency of the proposed therapy. These failures therefore invite us to question the nature and purpose of health care providers' mission. Adherence of the patient to medical advice is a key factor to the success of the therapy. Therefore, how can we modify the patient's behaviour, particularly when dealing with teenage patients? How can we adopt and make our own a therapeutic strategy encouraging cooperation of patients? Patient education, recently integrated into the French public health code (Code de la santé publique), brings new elements to answer these questions. The purpose of the present work is to question the concept of patient education, notably with regards to medical ethics. What can patient education bring to medical practices that face non compliance or deficiency of adherence to treatment recommendations? What new perspectives does patient education bring, notably regarding medical practices? PMID:21144472

  4. Continuing Education Meets the Learning Organization: The Challenge of a Systems Approach to Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Increased attention to medical errors and patient safety highlights the importance of quality improvement in continuing medical education. Ways to enhance quality include informatics, clinical practice guidelines, learning from opinion leaders and patients, learning organizations, and just-in-time and point-of-care delivery of continuing…

  5. Effective Inclusive Education: Equipping Education Professionals with Necessary Skills and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Tyler, Naomi Chowdhuri

    2011-01-01

    As a result of educational reforms, students with disabilities are educated in inclusive settings to a greater degree than ever before. Regrettably, many teachers report that they feel unprepared to work effectively with these students. Because teacher effectiveness is strongly linked to student outcomes, these perceptions of inadequacy are…

  6. Educational Connoisseurship and Educational Criticism: Pushing beyond Information and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koetting, J. Randall

    The dominant model of schooling is a technical-rational management model based on behavioral, positivistic, quasi-scientific language, which has shifted attention from the art and craft of teaching to the "science and technology" of teaching. However, this model and the language which it uses limit educational thinking. Emphasis on…

  7. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D scale) and the problem areas in diabetes (PAID) questionnaire were used to assess depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress in 1200 newly diagnosed male adult patients with type 2 diabetes before and after a two-week diabetes education by professionally trained nurses. Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to analyze the factors related to depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results: The incidence of depression in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes was 28%, and the rate of diabetes-specific emotional distress was 65.5%. High education levels, low income were correlated to depression in individuals with diabetes. After two weeks of diabetes education, the incidence of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress decreased significantly to 20.5% (P < 0.05) and 11% (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The incidence of depression, especially diabetes-specific emotional distress, was relatively high in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. The depression state could be improved by diabetes education. PMID:24353709

  8. Patient safety education at Japanese nursing schools: results of a nationwide survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient safety education is becoming of worldwide interest and concern in the field of healthcare, particularly in the field of nursing. However, as elsewhere, little is known about the extent to which nursing schools have adopted patient safety education into their curricula. We conducted a nationwide survey to characterize patient safety education at nursing schools in Japan. Results Response rate was 43% overall. Ninety percent of nursing schools have integrated the topic of patient safety education into their curricula. However, 30% reported devoting less than five hours to the topic. All schools use lecture based teaching methods while few used others, such as role playing. Topics related to medical error theory are widely taught, e.g. human factors and theories & models (Swiss Cheese Model, Heinrich's Law) while relatively few schools cover practical topics related to error analysis such as root cause analysis. Conclusions Most nursing schools in Japan cover the topic of patient safety, but the number of hours devoted is modest and teaching methods are suboptimal. Even so, national inclusion of patient safety education is a worthy, achievable goal. PMID:22005273

  9. An evaluation of sepsis Web sites for patient and family education.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Marilyn H; McInerney, Sean M

    2007-01-01

    More and more consumers are using the Internet to find answers to questions about healthcare. Unfortunately, information at health Web sites may be incorrect, biased, and outdated. The purpose of our project was to identify Web sites on sepsis that could be used for patient and family education. We evaluated 30 sites on the basis of the Health on the Net criteria for medical and health Web sites, key content areas that patients and families should know in relation to sepsis, and readability. This article shares the process we used to evaluate the Web sites and identify the top sites for patient education. PMID:18165726

  10. Mother's education and child health: is there a nurturing effect?

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuyu; Li, Hongbin

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of maternal education on the health of young children by using a large sample of adopted children from China. As adopted children are genetically unrelated to the nurturing parents, the educational effect on them is most likely to be the nurturing effect. We find that the mother's education is an important determinant of the health of adopted children even after we control for income, the number of siblings, health environments, and other socioeconomic variables. Moreover, the effect of the mother's education on the adoptee sample is similar to that on the own birth sample, which suggests that the main effect of the mother's education on child health is in post-natal nurturing. We also find suggestive evidence that the effect is causal. Our work provides new evidence to the general literature that examines the determinants of health and that examines the intergenerational immobility of socioeconomic status. PMID:19058866

  11. How Effectively Are We Preparing Teacher Educators in Special Education? The Case of Deaf Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirmer, Barbara R.

    2008-01-01

    The study assessed how well the field of teacher education in special education is preparing the next generation of teacher educators to be stewards of the discipline by exploring the particular case of deaf education. Assuming that preparing doctoral graduates who are able to conduct valuable and quality research requires mentoring by faculty who…

  12. Effect of yoga on patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Andréanne; Daneault, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether therapeutic yoga improves the quality of life of patients with cancer. Data sources Search of MEDLINE database (1950–2010) using key words yoga, cancer, and quality of life. Study selection Priority was given to randomized controlled clinical studies conducted to determine the effect of yoga on typical symptoms of patients with cancer in North America. Synthesis Initially, 4 randomized controlled clinical studies were analyzed, then 2 studies without control groups were analyzed. Three studies conducted in India and the Near East provided interesting information on methodologies. The interventions included yoga sessions of varying length and frequency. The parameters measured also varied among studies. Several symptoms improved substantially with yoga (higher quality of sleep, decrease in symptoms of anxiety and depression, improvement in spiritual well-being, etc). It would appear that quality of life, or some aspects thereof, also improved. Conclusion The variety of benefits derived, the absence of side effects, and the cost-benefit ratio of therapeutic yoga make it an interesting alternative for family physicians to suggest to their patients with cancer. Certain methodologic shortcomings, including the limited size of the samples and varying levels of attendance on the part of the subjects, might have reduced the statistical strength of the studies presented. It is also possible that the measurement scales used did not suit this type of situation and patient population, making it impossible to see a significant effect. However, favourable comments by participants during the studies and their level of appreciation and well-being suggest that further research is called for to fully understand the mechanisms of these effects. PMID:22972739

  13. Antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressed patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M Berman; Angela Cappiello; Amit Anand; Dan A Oren; George R Heninger; Dennis S Charney; John H Krystal

    2000-01-01

    Background: A growing body of preclinical research suggests that brain glutamate systems may be involved in the pathophysiology of major depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressants. This is the first placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial to assess the treatment effects of a single dose of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist in patients with depression.Methods: Seven subjects with major depression completed

  14. Effects of a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program in patients with coronary heart disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Sun; Lee, Sunhee; Kim, GiYon; Kang, Seok-Min; Ahn, Jeong-Ah

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program that considered patients' learning needs and cultural context, and to identify the impact of this program on patients with coronary heart disease in Korea. We employed a quasi-experimental design to evaluate the effects of the developed program in 61 patients with coronary heart disease. The experimental group received education, counseling, educational materials, and telephone follow-ups by cardiac nurses for six months. Results showed that participants of the program exhibited reduced body mass index and waist circumference as well as improved left ventricular diastolic function and cardiac disease-related quality of life. There was no significant difference between the groups with the rate of recurring symptoms or cardiac events. This comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program safely and effectively improved body composition, cardiac function, and quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:25040805

  15. Returns to Education: Accounting for Enrolment and Completion Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hérault, Nicolas; Zakirova, Rezida

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature by separately analysing the course enrolment and completion effects of vocational education and training (VET) as well as higher education. Moreover, we investigate the persistence of these wage effects over time while controlling for two potential selection biases. We take advantage of the Longitudinal…

  16. The Importance and Perspectives of International Studies in Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert P. M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues that international studies in the area of educational effectiveness are important for different reasons. It will increase the variation with respect to input process and output and it will show contextual differences between countries with respect to educational effectiveness. Furthermore, in international studies knowledge and…

  17. Policy Implications for Improving the Effectiveness of Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Donna M.

    A literature review was conducted to derive a set of policy implications for improving the effectiveness of vocational education. Variables in the areas of employment, education and training, and ancillary effects (aspirations, attitudes and values, feelings of success, and citizenship) were used to organize data collected from 232 studies…

  18. Effective PSHE Education: Values, Purposes and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Ben; Clague, Lucy; Coldwell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the perceived effectiveness of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education in primary and secondary schools. It outlines the relationship between perceived effectiveness and a range of explanatory factors, linking these to the values and ethos of schools, differing views of the purposes of PSHE education, and…

  19. Creation of standardized tools for therapeutic education specifically dedicated to chronic heart failure patients: The French I-CARE project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yves Juillière; Jean N. Trochu; Patrick Jourdain; Jérome Roncalli; Emmanuelle Gravoueille; Hélène Guibert; Hélène Lambert; Laure Spinazze; Nadine Tallec; Florence Beauvais; Cornélie Ertzinger; Guillaume Jondeau

    2006-01-01

    AimTo develop educational programs in chronic heart failure (CHF), creation of standardized tools for therapeutic education specifically dedicated to CHF patients was performed as a part of the French I-CARE project.

  20. The Nurse as Patient Advocate: Implications for Nurse Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banja, John D.

    This essay examines ethical considerations in the nurse patient relationship, in particular the relationship between "professional morality" and the nurse's professional identity in the role of advocate for doctors, patients, and hospitals. A discussion of ethics and professionals explores professional ethics, the need for such ethics, and their…

  1. Knowing the ABCs: A Comparative Effectiveness Study of Two Methods of Diabetes Education

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Aanand D.; Teal, Cayla R.; Rodriguez, Elisa; Haidet, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test an active-learning, empowerment approach to teaching patients about the “diabetes ABCs” (hemoglobin A1C, systolic blood pressure, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol). Methods 84 (97%) diabetic patients who participated in a randomized effectiveness trial of two clinic-based group educational methods and completed a post-intervention assessment. The empowerment arm participated in a group session that incorporated two educational innovations (a conceptual metaphor to foster understanding, and team-based learning methods to foster active learning). The traditional diabetes education arm received a didactic group session focused on self-management and educational materials about the diabetes ABCs. Participants in both arms received individual review of their current ABC values. Results A questionnaire evaluated knowledge, understanding, and recall of the diabetes ABCs was administered three months after enrollment in the study. At three months, participants in the empowerment group demonstrated greater understanding of the diabetes ABCs (P<.0001), greater knowledge of their own values (P<.0001), and greater knowledge of guideline-derived target goals for the ABCs compared with participants in the traditional arm (P<.0001). Conclusion An active-learning, empowerment-based approach applied to diabetes education can lead to greater understanding and knowledge retention. Practice Implications An empowerment approach to education can facilitate informed, activated patients and increase performance of self-management behaviors. PMID:21300516

  2. Teams, tribes and patient safety: overcoming barriers to effective teamwork in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Boyd, Matt; Cumin, David

    2014-03-01

    Modern healthcare is delivered by multidisciplinary, distributed healthcare teams who rely on effective teamwork and communication to ensure effective and safe patient care. However, we know that there is an unacceptable rate of unintended patient harm, and much of this is attributed to failures in communication between health professionals. The extensive literature on teams has identified shared mental models, mutual respect and trust and closed-loop communication as the underpinning conditions required for effective teams. However, a number of challenges exist in the healthcare environment. We explore these in a framework of educational, psychological and organisational challenges to the development of effective healthcare teams. Educational interventions can promote a better understanding of the principles of teamwork, help staff understand each other's roles and perspectives, and help develop specific communication strategies, but may not be sufficient on their own. Psychological barriers, such as professional silos and hierarchies, and organisational barriers such as geographically distributed teams, can increase the chance of communication failures with the potential for patient harm. We propose a seven-step plan to overcome the barriers to effective team communication that incorporates education, psychological and organisational strategies. Recent evidence suggests that improvement in teamwork in healthcare can lead to significant gains in patient safety, measured against efficiency of care, complication rate and mortality. Interventions to improve teamwork in healthcare may be the next major advance in patient outcomes. PMID:24398594

  3. From theory to pamphlet: the 3Ws and an H process for the development of meaningful patient education resources.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Christine Tina; Papadakos, Janet; Catton, Pamela; Houston, Patricia; McKernan, Patricia; Jusko Friedman, Audrey

    2014-06-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of patient education given the prevalence and consequences of low health literacy in Canada and the USA. Research has shown that in addition to plain language, the use of theories of learning can contribute to the effectiveness of patient education resources, and as such, various guidelines and toolkits have been put together to help healthcare providers utilize these theories. Despite these efforts, this knowledge is not consistently applied in practice. To address this gap, we describe a new theory-based protocol, the "3Ws and an H," that is designed to guide healthcare providers in the production of effective patient education resources. Adult learning theory underpins each step of the process, and by using the "3Ws and an H," relevant theories are applied as the steps of the protocol are followed. To facilitate the adoption of this process, we describe it using a resource development project for survivors of endometrial cancer as an example. PMID:24420003

  4. The therapeutic effects of the physician-older patient relationship: Effective communication with vulnerable older patients

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; DiMatteo, M Robin

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the outcomes of health care for seniors are dependent not only upon patients’ physical health status and the administration of care for their biomedical needs, but also upon care for patients’ psychosocial needs and attention to their social, economic, cultural, and psychological vulnerabilities. Even when older patients have appropriate access to medical services, they also need effective and empathic communication as an essential part of their treatment. Older patients who are socially isolated, emotionally vulnerable, and economically disadvantaged are particularly in need of the social, emotional, and practical support that sensitive provider-patient communication can provide. In this review paper, we examine the complexities of communication between physicians and their older patients, and consider some of the particular challenges that manifest in providers’ interactions with their older patients, particularly those who are socially isolated, suffering from depression, or of minority status or low income. This review offers guidelines for improved physician-older patient communication in medical practice, and examines interventions to coordinate care for older patients on multiple dimensions of a biopsychosocial model of health care. PMID:18044195

  5. Effectiveness of foot care education among people with type 2 diabetes in rural Puducherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Saurabh, Suman; Sarkar, Sonali; Selvaraj, Kalaiselvi; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Roy, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Background: The burden of diabetes and its foot complications is increasing in India. Prevention of these complications through foot care education should be explored. The objective of our study was to assess the risk factors of poor diabetic foot care and to find the effectiveness of health education in improving foot care practice among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to the outpatients of a rural health center with type 2 diabetes. Awareness regarding diabetes, care of diabetes and foot care practice ware assessed and scored. Individual and group health education focusing on foot care was performed. Foot care practice was reassessed after 2 weeks of education. Results: Only 54% were aware that diabetes could lead to reduced foot sensation and foot ulcers. Nearly 53% and 41% of the patients had good diabetes awareness and good diabetes care respectively. Only 22% of the patients had their feet examined by a health worker or doctor. The patients with poor, satisfactory and good practice scores were 44.7%, 35.9% and 19.4% respectively. Low education status, old age and low awareness regarding diabetes were the risk factors for poor practice of foot care. Average score for practice of foot care improved from 5.90 ± 1.82 to 8.0 ± 1.30 after 2 weeks of health education. Practice related to toe space examination, foot inspection and foot wear inspection improved maximally. Conclusion: Foot care education for diabetics in a primary care setting improves their foot care practice and is likely to be effective in reducing the burden of diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:24701439

  6. Beneficial effects of rosuvastatin treatment in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Cem; Yildiz, Ahmet; Ozkan, Alev Arat; Uzunhasan, Isil; Kaya, Aysem; Yigit, Zerrin

    2015-02-01

    We determined the effect of 6-month rosuvastatin treatment on blood lipids, oxidative parameters, apolipoproteins, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Healthy individuals (men aged >40 years and postmenopausal women) with a body mass index ? 30 (n = 100) who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III diagnostic criteria for MetS were included. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels decreased (P < .0001). The change in LDL 1 to 3 subgroups was significant (P = .0007, P < .0001, and P = .006, respectively). Changes in LDL 4 to 7 subgroups were not significant. There was a beneficial effect on oxidized LDL, fibrinogen, homocysteine, and HbA1c. Rosuvastatin significantly increased high-density lipoprotein levels (P = .0003). The oxidant/antioxidant status and subclinical inflammatory state were also beneficially changed. Rosuvastatin had a significant beneficial effect on atherogenic dyslipidemia as well as on oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with MetS. PMID:24554427

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis – Patients' Experiences, Information Interests and Responses to an Education Programme

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Judith; Köpke, Sascha; Kasper, Jürgen; Rahn, Anne; Backhus, Imke; Poettgen, Jana; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Siemonsen, Susanne; Heesen, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key diagnostic and monitoring tool in multiple sclerosis (MS) management. However, many scientific uncertainties, especially concerning correlates to impairment and prognosis remain. Little is known about MS patients' experiences, knowledge, attitudes, and unmet information needs concerning MRI. Methods We performed qualitative interviews (n?=?5) and a survey (n?=?104) with MS patients regarding MRI patient information, and basic MRI knowledge. Based on these findings an interactive training program of 2 hours was developed and piloted in n?=?26 patients. Results Interview analyses showed that patients often feel lost in the MRI scanner and left alone with MRI results and images while 90% of patients in the survey expressed a high interest in MRI education. Knowledge on MRI issues was fair with some important knowledge gaps. Major information interests were relevance of lesions as well as the prognostic and diagnostic value of MRI results. The education program was highly appreciated and resulted in a substantial knowledge increase. Patients reported that, based on the program, they felt more competent to engage in encounters with their physicians. Conclusion This work strongly supports the further development of an evidence-based MRI education program for MS patients to enhance participation in health-care. PMID:25415501

  8. Preventing AIDS and other STDs through condom promotion: a patient education intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, M Z; DeJong, W

    1989-01-01

    We report on two studies that assessed the impact of a soap-opera style videotape on inner-city STD (sexually transmitted disease) patients' knowledge about and attitudes toward condom use, and willingness to redeem coupons for free condoms. Subjects in the first study who viewed the videotape (and participated in a brief oral recall session) had higher knowledge scores and more accepting attitudes than subjects who did not (knowledge test means of 11.1 versus 7.9, attitude index means of 13.0 versus 11.3). The intervention was most effective among those who were relatively poorly educated and, to a lesser extent, among those who reported less frequent use of condoms and fewer sex partners. In the second study, intervention group subjects were more likely than control group subjects to redeem coupons. Both groups exhibited a high level of interest in the free condoms. We argue that education and accessibility to free condoms can increase condom use and that health care providers have a vital role in promoting this form of STD prevention. PMID:2929803

  9. Exposing shame and its effect on clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Bond, Mary Ellen

    2009-03-01

    Shame is identified as a universal dynamic in education. Brain-based learning theory suggests negative emotions like shame have a powerfully detrimental effect on learning. Shame theory may explain why students have difficulty identifying with professional nursing culture. Yet shame has neither been directly described nor referred to in the context of clinical nursing education. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to raise awareness among nurse educators about shame and its potential effect on students' ability to learn in clinical nursing education. This article examines shame in its many manifestations; the power to shame inherent in the clinical context; the consequences of shame on students' ability to learn; and, finally, the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by nurse educators to heal and prevent shaming in clinical nursing education. PMID:19297963

  10. Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients actively participating in students’ learning and they both experience it as a joint action. An attending relationship is based on a one-way relationship between patients and students resulting in patients passively participating by letting students to practice on their bodies but without engaging in a learning dialogue with the students. PMID:24989155

  11. Systematic review: knowledge and educational needs of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Flik, Carla E; van Rood, Yanda R; de Wit, Niek J

    2015-04-01

    Educational programs have been used as a control condition in trials on psychological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). An optimal control condition should have all logistic features of the experimental intervention, except the active component, but also have basic therapeutic benefit for the patient. The aim of the present study is to systematically determine patients' educational needs on the basis of the (mis)conceptions that they have of their disease and their reported desire for information to optimize the control intervention in IBS research. A systematic review of studies on the knowledge and educational needs of IBS patients in terms of their condition was performed. Studies published as full text in the English language in peer-reviewed journals and that included adult IBS patients diagnosed according to the Manning or Rome I, II, or III criteria were selected. Eight studies involving 2132 patients were included. When focusing on misconceptions of patients, the most prevalent are that IBS is caused by dietary factors, food allergies and intolerance (37-90%), heredity (52%), or a lack of digestive enzymes (52%); IBS is a form of colitis (43%); and will last a lifetime (31-54%), develop into cancer (15-49%), or worsens with age (48%). Patients are 'unhappy' with their level of knowledge or feel poorly informed (65%). They want information about the diagnostic process, which foods to avoid (63%), causes (62%), coping strategies (59%), new medications (55%), course (52%), and the role of psychological factors (51%). IBS patients do have a large variety of educational needs. Educational programs optimally addressing these needs can be used adequately as a placebo control condition in research on psychological interventions. PMID:25874506

  12. Readability of Patient Education Materials on the American Association for Surgery of Trauma Website

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam E. M.; Ghanian, Soha; Adams, Charles A.; Born, Christopher T.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because the quality of information on the Internet is of dubious worth, many patients seek out reliable expert sources. As per the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommendations, readability of patient education materials should not exceed a sixth-grade reading level. The average reading skill of U.S. adults is at the eighth-grade level. Objectives: This study evaluates whether a recognized source of expert content, the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) website’s patient education materials, recommended readability guidelines for medical information. Materials and Methods: Using the well-validated Flesch-Kincaid formula to analyze grade level readability, we evaluated the readability of all 16 of the publicly-accessible entries within the patient education section of the AAST website. Results: Mean ± SD grade level readability was 10.9 ± 1.8 for all the articles. All but one of the articles had a readability score above the sixth-grade level. Readability of the articles exceeded the maximum recommended level by an average of 4.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 4.0-5.8; P < 0.0001). Readability of the articles exceeded the eighth-grade level by an average of 2.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 2.0-3.8; P < 0.0001). Only one of the articles had a readability score below the eighth-grade level. Conclusions: The AAST’s online patient education materials may be of limited utility to many patients, as the readability of the information exceeds the average reading skill level of adults in the U.S. Lack of patient comprehension represents a discrepancy that is not in accordance with the goals of the AAST’s objectives for its patient education efforts. PMID:25147778

  13. Effectiveness of Mobile Learning in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yousuf, Muhammad Imran

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this research is to better understand and measure students' attitudes and perceptions towards the importance of mobile learning in distance education. Results of this survey clearly indicate that facilitating mobile learning can improve the entire distance education by enhancing ways of communication among distance learners, tutors…

  14. The Educational Software/Website Effectiveness Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furner, Joseph M.; Daigle, Debra

    2004-01-01

    In today's growing technological age of educational software and interactive Internet teaching/learning websites, it is important to note that educators must take the time to see that the interactive electronic experiences their students are involved meet the appropriate standards, hence been evaluated. This article provides the readers with an…

  15. Fishing and Vygotsky's Concept of Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinson, Beth McCulloch

    2001-01-01

    Relates Vygotsky's concept of zone of proximal development to a fishing story, thereby providing a scaffold allowing preservice students to better understand the educational concept. Concludes that educators should use the right bait (determined by how engaged children are), technique, and progress at the right pace (evidenced by children's…

  16. Comprehensive Sexuality Education or Abstinence-Only Education: Which Is More Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Vicki; Gahungu, Athanase

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in effectiveness between comprehensive sexuality abstinence-based education and abstinence-only education. A survey was developed and distributed to over 140 individuals via a variety of sources such as: (1) the researcher's e-mail lists; (2) a group of City Core/City Year volunteers; (3) a…

  17. Bridging the Gap Between Ocean Science and Education: Creating Effective Partnerships With Informal Science Education Centers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Peach; S. Franks; H. Helling; E. Solomon; N. Driscoll; J. Babcock

    2003-01-01

    Many scientists would describe an effective E&O partnership as one that did not take up too much of their time. The California Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (CA COSEE), educators at the Ocean Institute (OI), Dana Point, and researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) have collaborated to develop a highly efficient, productive and rewarding approach to crafting

  18. The Perceptions of Developmental Education Faculty regarding the Effectiveness of Developmental Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Diondrea R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of developmental faculty regarding the effectiveness of developmental education. Today, many individuals believe developmental education programs should not be a part of the college curriculum. They believe that developmental courses should be taught in high school or some other program…

  19. Is there data to support the concept that educated, empowered patients have better outcomes?

    PubMed

    Latham, C E

    1998-12-01

    Achieving positive patient outcomes through the delivery of high quality services encompasses a broad range of indicators, including quality of life, employment, satisfaction with care, utilization of services, cost-benefit, as well as the clinical indices frequently targeted. Empowering and educational initiatives have been shown to positively impact the quality of life of renal patients in both the psychosocial and functional domains. This has extreme relevance in the context of overall care, as empirical evidence has indicated that health-related quality of life measures are associated with improved hospitalization and survival. Home care and self-care training have been associated with better quality of life measures in hemodialysis. Educational efforts have also been associated with better outcomes such as decreased utilization of medical services, the maintenance of employment, consumer satisfaction with care, and a positive cost-benefit. There are data to support that the educated, empowered patient has better outcomes. This evidence will be explored. PMID:11443762

  20. Embodied Learning and Patient Education: From Nurses' Self-Awareness to Patient Self-Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ann L.

    2012-01-01

    This article is intended as a clear and practical introduction to use of a scientific perspective on embodied learning. It looks to embodied cognition and embodied cognitive science to explore education for self-care. The author presents a neurobiologic understanding of embodied learning to bridge adult education to the science-driven world of…

  1. Pilot project "Patient-Safety" in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Rosentreter, Michael; Groß, Dominik; Schäfer, Gereon

    2011-01-01

    Since the summer term 2009 the study project „Patientensicherheit – Der klinische Umgang mit Patienten- und Eingriffsverwechslungen sowie Medikationsfehlern“ (Patient Safety – the clinical handling of patients – and mistaking of procedures as well as medication errors) is offered within the Modellstudiengang Medizin. Seminars on patient safety in Germany so far mainly address trained doctors and health economists. In contrast, this study project on patient safety should at an early stage contribute to a “culture of discussing and preventing mistakes” – an aspect that is little established in clinical medicine, but also in medical training. For this purpose, a broad variety of courses was developed, which – relying on problem-oriented learning – enables the students to analyse so-called adverse events (AE) and develop adequate prevention measures on the basis of the insights gained by this analysis. Therefore, theoretical lessons are complemented by discussing prototypical clinical cases. These discussions are moderated by experienced clinicians. After completing the seminar, students showed a significant increase (comparison of means) in the self-assessed qualifications „Wissen zu Patientensicherheit“ (Knowledge of Patient Safety) and „Wahrnehmung von Risikosituationen“ (Appreciation of Risk Situations). All in all, the students rated their training success with a grade of 1.5 (good). PMID:21818227

  2. [Development of patient education materials for the "German Prostate Cancer Trial PREFERE"].

    PubMed

    Sänger, Sylvia; Wiegel, Thomas; Stöckle, Michael; Härter, Martin; Bergelt, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    The German prostate cancer study PREFERE (www.prefere.de) started in January 2014. It is the first randomised controlled and preference-based trial to investigate all four options available for the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer. According to the "Interdisciplinary evidence-based S3 guideline for the early detection, diagnosis and treatment of the different stages of prostate cancer" [1], these options include: radical prostatectomy, external radiotherapy, brachytherapy and active surveillance. In the context of PREFERE preference-based means that potential study participants who do not agree to being randomised into all four treatment arms can maximally refuse two treatment arms. This poses a big challenge to the patient education strategy employed and the information material it requires. In order to inform patients in the context of the PREFERE trial patient education materials (patient leaflet and video) had to be designed that provide patients with balanced and guideline-based information about the disease and the treatment options available, about the need for randomisation and, in particular, about the PREFERE trial and support their individual preference finding and shared decision making for participating in the trial. An iterative structured approach was used to develop the information materials on the basis of a previous literature search. Six focus groups with a total of 40 participants from three different self-help groups, affected men that do not belong to a self-help group, healthy men as well as experts, the members of the steering committee of the PREFERE trial and a focus group consisting of 18 male and female urologists were involved in the development and testing of both the patient information leaflet and the patient video. Both the patient information leaflet and the video supporting preference finding and decision making for participating in the PREFERE trial were tested for understandability and suitability by using a questionnaire and conducting a comprehensive discussion. The results of these lay evaluations have been included in the final revision. Also, a communication resource for physicians has been created comprising all the essential aspects of the PREFERE patient education materials. A short course conducted all over Germany will focus on the process of patient teaching as well as patient education materials. Whether and to what extent the decision for participating in the PREFERE trial has actually been influenced 1) by what the treating physicians communicated to the patient and 2) by the patient education materials used is one of the subjects of a quality of life survey that will be conducted following treatment or - in the case of the active surveillance option - after randomisation during the PREFERE trial. PMID:25839363

  3. Management of congestive heart failure in the home setting: A guide to clinical management and patient education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carrin Feagins; Denise Daniel

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses the clinical management of the patient with congestive heart failure in the home, stressing the importance of patient education. A case study is presented that incorporates the use of teaching materials.

  4. Educational interventions for improving control of blood pressure in patients with hypertension: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Cibele D; Resqueti, Vanessa R; Lima, Íllia; Dias, Fernando A L; Glynn, Liam; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of educational interventions on improving the control of blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Methods Randomised controlled trials including patients over 18?years of age, regardless of sex and ethnicity, with a diagnosis of hypertension (either treated or not treated with antihypertensive medications) will be assessed in our analysis. We will electronically search four databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro and ScienceDirect. There will be no language restrictions in the search for studies. The data will be extracted independently by two authors using predefined criteria. Disagreements will be resolved between the authors. The risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. After searching and screening of the studies, we will run a meta-analysis of the included randomised controlled trials. We will summarise the results as risk ratio for dichotomous data and mean differences for continuous data. Ethics and dissemination The review will be published in a journal. The findings from the review will also be disseminated electronically and at conference presentations. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD4201401071. PMID:25829369

  5. Critical review of patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Feghhi, Daniel P; Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Berberian, Wayne S; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2014-08-01

    We performed an expanded readability analysis to determine if the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, AAOS, had sufficiently improved its patient education materials since they were originally studied in 2007. In March 2013, we downloaded patient education materials from the AAOS patient information website, Your Orthopaedic Connection. Using 10 different readability formulas, we found that the mean grade level of patient education materials on the website is 8.84. Flesch-Kincaid analysis showed a mean grade level of 9.98, range, 6.6-12.6. Nine other readability analyses showed a mean reading level of 7.7, range, 6.5-13.7. Although this is an improvement over the 2007 level, it is above the average national reading comprehension level. The readability of patient education materials on the AAOS website still exceeds the average reading ability of a US adult. Revisions made over the 5 years leading up to this latest study resulted in better readability. The Prevention and Safety entries, written near seventh-grade level, should serve as a model for the remaining articles. PMID:25136874

  6. Effective Schools: Critical Issues in the Education of Black Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy, Ed.; Wilson, Ted, Ed.

    This collection of essays focuses on how Ronald Edmond's work on effective schools and school improvement can affect the education of black children. The book represents a cooperative effort of the Charles D. Moody Research Institute, established as a vehicle for the program services of the National Alliance of Black School Educators (NABSE), and…

  7. The Learning Effects of Computer Simulations in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Nico; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van der Veen, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the (quasi)experimental research of the past decade on the learning effects of computer simulations in science education. The focus is on two questions: how use of computer simulations can enhance traditional education, and how computer simulations are best used in order to improve learning processes and outcomes. We report on…

  8. Learning about the Effectiveness of Teacher Education: A Chilean Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avalos, Beatrice; Tellez, Francisco; Navarro, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The article reviews some of the problems faced by teacher education in general and in Chile specifically, and on this basis, presents the results of a study focused on the effects of six teacher education programmes on future primary level teachers' learning of mathematics and mathematics pedagogy. The study describes the programmes and presents…

  9. Orchestrating Effective Change: How Youth Organizing Influences Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Jerusha; Zaino, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Although research demonstrating the effectiveness of youth organizing for educational reform has expanded rapidly in the last two decades, the field remains substantially undertheorized. This article outlines a theoretical framework, based on 30 interviews with leading figures in education reform, that illuminates how a youth organizing group has…

  10. Increasing the Effectiveness of Education Management. A Research Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Management Inst., Inc., Westerville, OH.

    A 3-year research program is proposed to develop improved methods for increasing the effectiveness of education management, including those functions of the board of education and the superintendent that deal with planning, organizing, communicating, and evaluating. The proposal lists 30 major problems confronting school boards and superintendents…

  11. The Sports Participation Effect on Educational Attainment of Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the direct, indirect, and total effects of high school sports participation on educational attainment for Black males using the Educational Longitudinal Study (2002/2006), a large, nationally representative, database. A path analysis procedure for determining underlying causal relationships between variables…

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Selected Continuing Education Offerings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deets, Carol; Blume, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    This paper presented at the 1976 National Conference on Continuing Education in Nursing describes evaluation methodology used to determine the effectiveness of different continuing education offerings in nursing. The evaluation design, workshops for inservice directors, findings and problems, and examples of three evaluation forms used are…

  13. Long-Term Effects of a Nursing Home Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Robert D.; Gurian, Bennett S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey was conducted by a mental health center to evaluate the effects of a nursing home education project which attempted 1) to teach mental health professionals and nursing home staff how to set up in-service education programs in nursing homes, and 2) to teach nursing home staff mental health principles. (Author/EJT)

  14. The Effectiveness of Radio as an Educational Medium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aliza Duby

    1990-01-01

    Radio is a mass medium that can be harnessed to enhance an education campaign since it can span great distances and reach a large number oflisteners. Because of its wide coverage, relatively low unit cost, ability to reach those who are illiterate and without the use of mains power, it has proved to be an effective educational medium. The features

  15. Student Perceptions of Educator Effectiveness: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprinkle, Julie E.

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigates graduate student perceptions of educator effectiveness. This study is the follow-up to a pilot and instrument validation study conducted by the researcher. The findings of the previous study indicated student biases in areas such as gender, age, teaching style, learning style, grade awarded, and educator personality…

  16. Revisiting the Role of Organizational Effectiveness in Educational Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotto, Linda S.

    Organizational effectiveness ought to play a role in educational evaluation, and the development of alternative perspectives for viewing organizations could be a starting point for revisiting organizational evaluation in education. Five possible perspectives and criteria for evaluating organizations have been developed. If an organization is…

  17. ICT as an Effective Tool for Internationalization of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzan, Masha; Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela

    2009-01-01

    Globalization and new technologies have opened up a global market for education pressuring many institutions to be internationalized. Within mainly descriptive mode of analysis, this study investigates how internationalization of higher education can be facilitated by the effective use of information and communication technologies. Reporting…

  18. Effect of Geographic Distance on Distance Education: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Heng; Robinson, Anthony C.; Detwiler, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of geographic distance on students' distance learning experience with the aim to provide tentative answers to a fundamental question--does geographic distance matter in distance education? Using educational outcome data collected from an online master's program in Geographic Information Systems, this…

  19. Vision Effects: A Critical Gap in Educational Leadership Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantabutra, Sooksan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although leaders are widely believed to employ visions, little is known about what constitutes an "effective" vision, particularly in the higher education sector. This paper seeks to proposes a research model for examining relationships between vision components and performance of higher education institutions, as measured by financial…

  20. Investigating the educational effectiveness of multiplayer online games for children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franca Garzotto

    2007-01-01

    Multiplayer games are becoming an important part of Internet use, and have been the subject of many theoretical and empirical studies. Still, relatively few researches investigate multiplayer Internet games that are designed for young children and for educational purposes. This paper focuses on the educational effectiveness of this class of systems, and introduces some heuristics for its evaluation. We also

  1. Vernacular Education in Papua New Guinea: Is It Really Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Yasuko

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on an observational study concerning the effectiveness of elementary education. It was conducted in a rural area near Alotau, the provincial capital of the Milne Bay Province, with a special focus on the Maiwala Elementary School. In this paper, the author first briefly describes what elementary education is and how it has been…

  2. Patient-Centered Worksheets for Advance Care Planning: Education for Patients and Guidance for Clinician Communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Pearlman

    2011-01-01

    In the 1990s the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) developed worksheets to help patients think about and discuss aspects of advance care planning (ACP). The content of the worksheets was based on input from patients, family members, physicians, and religious leaders. Research demonstrated that the worksheets improved clinician understanding of patient values and preferences. The worksheets were updated in 2008–2009 with

  3. [The paradoxical effect of persuasive communication in health education sessions].

    PubMed

    Piperini, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the communication dynamics leading to the adoption of new attitudes and cognitions in health education sessions. We examined the verbal interactions at work in persuasive communication in 16 health education sessions. The study found that the medical expertise of the educator and the initial level of commitment of the participants had a positive effect on adherence to recommendations. However, persuasive communication in health education sessions appears to involve a paradoxical process in which criticism of the message can go hand in hand with the expression of an intention to implement new risk-reducing behaviors. PMID:23473047

  4. Using Standardized Patients to Educate Medical Students about Organ Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas Hugh; Anker, Ashley E.; Soriano, Rainier; Friedman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Medical students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine participated in an intervention designed to promote knowledge and improved communication skills related to cadaveric organ donation. The intervention required students to interact with a standardized patient for approximately 10 minutes and respond to questions posed about organ donation in a…

  5. Effects of Program and Patient Characteristics on Retention of Drug Treatment Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Joshi, Vandana; Maglione, Margaret; Chou, Chih Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effects of program and patient characteristics on patient retention in residential, out-patient, and methadone maintenance drug treatment programs. Data for 26,047 patients in 87 programs show that threshold retention rates were generally low for all 3 program types, although program practice and service provision played important…

  6. Effectiveness of Musculoskeletal Education Interventions in People With Low Literacy Levels: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Wendy; Ballinger, Claire; Protheroe, Jo; Lueddeke, Jill; Nutbeam, Don; Armstrong, Ray; Falzon, Louise; Edwards, Chris; Russell, Cynthia; McCaffery, Kirsten; Adams, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of patient education interventions delivered or directed by health professionals for people with musculoskeletal conditions who also have lower levels of literacy. Methods Electronic databases were searched from 1946 to May 2012. Randomized controlled trials with primary interventions designed specifically for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions and lower levels of literacy were eligible for inclusion. The quality of the study was determined by assessing method of randomization, allocation concealment, creation and maintenance of comparable groups, blinding of patients and providers, control of confounding, and the validity and reliability of outcome measures. Results Of the 2,440 studies located using the search strategy, 6 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three public health community studies and 3 rheumatology clinic-based studies delivered educational programs to people with musculoskeletal conditions who also had lower levels of literacy. Three moderate quality studies suggest that musculoskeletal educational interventions had a small short-term effect on knowledge and 2 moderate quality studies suggest musculoskeletal interventions had a small effect on self-efficacy (although results on self-efficacy were conflicting in 1 of these studies). Only 1 moderate quality study showed a small effect on anxiety and 1 on self-perceived health and well-being in people with lower literacy. Conclusion High quality evidence is lacking on the effectiveness of musculoskeletal education interventions for people with lower literacy levels. Research programs that test the effectiveness of patient education interventions for arthritis must recruit and engage people with lower levels of literacy. PMID:23925869

  7. Effects of Preschool on Educational Achievement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis M. Laosa

    Summary The current educational policy debate in the United States is centered largely on the educational achievement gap that persists between low-income and minority students, on the one hand, and higher- income and non- minority students, on the other. Present school reform efforts that seek to address this problem assume that establishing high curriculum standards, test-based accountability, and higher-quality teaching

  8. Outcome of Patients Attending a Specialist Educational and Mental Health Service for Social Anxiety Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerard Mcshane; Cheryl Bazzano; Garry Walter; Giles Barton

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of adolescents with anxiety-based school attendance problems enrolled in a specialist adolescent educational and mental health program that provides educational assistance and social skills development, and to suggest key elements that may account for its apparent effectiveness. Young people attending the Sulman Program in Sydney, Australia, between March 2003 and

  9. Readability and Content of Patient Education Material Related to Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Patricia H.; de Laat, Sonya; Carroll, Sandra L.; Schwartz, Lisa; Vaandering, Katie; Toor, Gurjit K.; Arthur, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are increasingly offered to patients for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Candidates for ICD receive ICD-related patient education material when they make decisions to consent or decline a primary prevention ICD. Printed patient education material directed at ICD candidates has not been the focus of direct appraisal. Objective We evaluated the readability and content of ICD-related print education materials made available to patients who were enrolled in a study involving patient decision making for ICD from 3 ICD sites in southern Ontario, Canada. Methods All ICD print materials referred to during interviews and/or that were available in ICD site waiting rooms were collected for analysis. Readability testing was conducted using the SMOG (“simple measurement of gobbledygook”) and Fry methods. The material was evaluated according to selected plain-language criteria, thematic content analysis, and rhetoric analysis. Results Twenty-one print materials were identified and analyzed. Documents were authored by device manufacturers, tertiary care hospitals, and cardiac support organizations. Although many documents adhered to plain-language recommendations, text-reading levels were higher than recommended. Twelve major content themes were identified. Content focused heavily on the positive aspects of living with the device to the exclusion of other possible information that could be relevant to the decisions that patients made. Conclusions Print-based patient education materials for ICD candidates are geared to a highly literate population. The focus on positive information to the exclusion of potentially negative aspects of the ICD, or alternatives to accepting 1, could influence and/or confuse patients about the purpose and implications of this medical device. Development of print materials is indicated that includes information about possible problems and that would be relevant for the multicultural and debilitated population who may require ICDs. The findings are highly relevant for nurses who care for primary prevention ICD candidates. PMID:21926915

  10. Cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Can; Kantar, Mehmet; Tuna, Arzu; Ertam, Ilgen; Aksoylar, Serap; Günayd?n, Asl?; Çetingül, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric oncology patients can present with various skin lesions related to both primary disease and immunosuppressive treatments. This study aimed to evaluate the cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients. Sixty-five pediatric oncology patients who were scheduled to undergo chemotherapy from May 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. Three patients were excluded from the results, as 2 patients died during treatment and 1 patient withdrew from the study; therefore, a total of 62 patients were evaluated for mucocutaneous findings. Patients were grouped according to their oncological diagnoses and a statistical analysis was performed. There was no statistical significance in the incidence of cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy among the different diagnostic groups. Awareness among dermatologists of the possible cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric patients and their causes can promote early diagnosis and treatment in this patient population. PMID:25671440

  11. Interactive education on CD-ROM—a new tool in the education of heart failure patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Strömberg; Henrik Ahlén; Bengt Fridlund; Ulf Dahlström

    2002-01-01

    The study aimed to develop and evaluate whether a computer-based program for patients with heart failure was user-friendly, could be operated by elderly patients and gave sufficient information about heart failure. The program was developed by a multidisciplinary group and designed with large, clear illustrations and buttons. A total of 42 patients aged 51–92 years tested the program and completed

  12. Development of Smartphone Educational Application for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Jung; Sim, Jae Lan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to develop a smartphone application (app) as an educational learning instrument for coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and to assess the users' level of satisfaction. Methods This methodological research involves elicited learning content for CAD patients to develop a learning instrument using the smartphone app. The app was developed according to the steps of Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation, which is a systematic instructional design model. The levels of satisfaction with the developed smartphone app among 30 outpatients with CAD were assessed via a questionnaire during their visits to a cardiology outpatient department. Results A smartphone app 'Strong Heart' was developed through reviewing the literature associated with education for CAD patients under professional supervision and searching for medical smartphone apps that are already available. The learning contents include six main sections containing essential learning issues in managing CAD and additional information to attract the user's attention, such as patient cases and quizzes. After modification with feedback from experts, the app was finally developed and evaluated by patients who reported that they were satisfied with the usefulness of the app. Conclusions The developed smartphone app is available on both the iPhone App Store and the Android Play Store. Patients with CAD may utilize the app for supporting educational material without limitations of time and space. PMID:24872910

  13. Effective Learning & Teaching in Medical, Dental & Veterinary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, John, Ed.; Huttly, Sharon, Ed.; Taylor, Ian, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes: (1) "Opportunities in Medical, Dental and Veterinary (MDV) Educational Development" (John Sweet); (2) "Culture, Collegiality, and Collaborative Learning" (George Brown, Madeline Rohin, and Michael Manogue); (3) "Communication Skills: On Being Patient-Centered" (Jeff Wilson); (4) "Curriculum" (John Sweet); (5)…

  14. Patient safety education for undergraduate medical students: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanli Nie; Lin Li; Yurong Duan; Peixian Chen; Bruce H Barraclough; Mingming Zhang; Jing Li

    2011-01-01

    Background  To reduce harm caused by health care is a global priority. Medical students should be able to recognize unsafe conditions,\\u000a systematically report errors and near misses, investigate and improve such systems with a thorough understanding of human\\u000a fallibility, and disclose errors to patients. Incorporating the knowledge of how to do this into the medical student curriculum\\u000a is an urgent necessity.

  15. Readability of Educational Materials for Patients with Cancer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cooley, Mary E.

    This article, jointly created by authors Mary E. Cooley, Helene Moriarty and Thomas H. Short, describes a dataset on the readability of American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute pamphlets about cancer. This tests are designed to test whether the reading levels of these patients are high enough to comprehend this literature. Students should be familiar with scales of measurement, data reduction, measuring center, constructing and interpreting displays, and reaching conclusions in real problems.

  16. The protective effect of education on cognition in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-02-01

    Education has a protective effect against cognitive deficits following various forms of brain insult. Professional fighting (boxing and mixed martial arts) provides a model for assessing the impact of cumulative brain injuries on cognition and brain health. In the current cross-sectional observational study, we explore whether education would be protective against cognitive loss in fighters. We tested 141 professional fighters using a computerized neurocognitive battery, in addition to structural MRI. We used automated segmentation software to compute the volumes of various brain structures. We found fighters with high school education or less to show more associations between fight exposure and cognitive test scores. The relationship between brain structure volume and exposure did not differ based on education. These results are interpreted as putatively showing a protective effect of education on functional integrity in fighters, although longitudinal data and a larger sample size are required to further understand this relationship. PMID:24191967

  17. Resource development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery: an analysis on patient education resource development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need for educational tools in the consenting process of otolaryngology-head and neck procedures. A development strategy for the creation of educational tools in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, particularly pamphlets on the peri-operative period in an adenotonsillectomy, is described. Methods A participatory design approach, which engages key stakeholders in the development of an educational tool, is used. Pamphlets were created through a review of traditional and grey literature and then reviewed by a community expert in the field. The pamphlets were then reviewed by an interdisciplinary team including educational experts, and finally by less vulnerable members of the target population. Questionnaires evaluating the pamphlets’ content, layout, style, and general qualitative features were included. Results The pamphlets yielded high ratings across all domains regardless of patient population. General feedback was provided by a non-vulnerable patient population and final pamphlets were drafted. Conclusions By using a participatory design model, the pamphlets are written at an appropriate educational level to incorporate a broad audience. Furthermore, this methodology can be used in future resource development of educational tools. PMID:25022351

  18. The Impact of Validated, Online Health Education Resources on Patient and Community Members' Satisfaction and Health Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atack, Lynda; Luke, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: While access to health education information has become easier, the quality of information retrieved from the Internet varies considerably. In response to the need for accessible, quality health information that is tailored to meet individual patient needs, a patient education website, called PEPTalk, was developed. The site houses text…

  19. Relationship between Nursing Students' Views about Web-Based Patient Education Course and Anxiety in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasocak, Gülsün; Kaya, Hülya; Senyuva, Emine; Isik, Burçin; Bodur, Gönül

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed as descriptive and cross-sectional to determine the relation between students' views about web-based Patient Education course and anxiety. The study group consisted of all students registered the web-based Patient Education course (N: 148) at 2010-2011 semester at a nursing school. Data were collected using…

  20. IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2012

    E-print Network

    IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 1 of 3 OVERVIEW -- Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic condition of the digestive system no identifiable cause. IBS is the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal condition. Several treatments

  1. HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal characteristics

    E-print Network

    DiMarco, Chrysanne

    , in advance of need, the large number of different editions of each publication that is entailed by individualHealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal Science University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario Canada N2L 3G1 **Department of Computer Science

  2. Sleep Hygiene Rules for Insomnia Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Sleep Hygiene Rules for Insomnia Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1. These habits often develop in response to insomnia, but are counterproductive. Practicing good sleep hygiene, Chapter 61 Morin et al. Nonpharmacologic Treatment of Chronic Insomnia. An American Academy of Sleep

  3. Tuberculosis and Latent TB Treatment Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Tuberculosis and Latent TB Treatment Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Revised 02/13/2013 Page 1 of 3 TB (tuberculosis) is a serious illness that most commonly affects the lungs, but can involve any major organ system. The cause is a bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Symptoms Symptoms

  4. Sexual Assault Victim Care Options Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Sexual Assault Victim Care Options Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Reviewed 8/2012 Page 1 of 1 Sexual Assault Victim Care Options- Points to help Penn State students make to address risk of pregnancy, sexually transmitted infection, involuntary drugging or injuries related

  5. An obesity educational intervention for medical students addressing weight bias and communication skills using standardized patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to manage the increasing worldwide problem of obesity, medical students will need to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to assess and counsel patients with obesity. Few educational intervention studies have been conducted with medical students addressing stigma and communication skills with patients who are overweight or obese. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in students' attitudes and beliefs about obesity, and their confidence in communication skills after a structured educational intervention that included a clinical encounter with an overweight standardized patient (SP). Methods First year medical students (n = 127, 47% female) enrolled in a communications unit were instructed to discuss the SPs' overweight status and probe about their perceptions of being overweight during an 8 minute encounter. Prior to the session, students were asked to read two articles on communication and stigma as background information. Reflections on the readings and their performance with the SP were conducted prior to and after the encounter when students met in small groups. A newly constructed 16 item questionnaire was completed before, immediately after and one year after the session. Scale analysis was performed based on a priori classification of item intent. Results Three scales emerged from the questionnaire: negative obesity stereotyping (7 items), empathy (3 items), and counseling confidence (3 items). There were small but significant immediate post-intervention improvements in stereotyping (p?=?.002) and empathy (p?effective for increasing confidence in counseling skills. PMID:24636594

  6. Effect of a Sport Education Program on Motivation for Physical Education and Leisure-Time Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Garn, Alex C.; Vidoni, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a high school sport education curriculum program on students' motivation for physical education and leisure-time physical activity. Method: Participants were 568 high school students enrolled in the required physical education programs at 2 schools, 1 taught using sport education

  7. Images, femininity and cancer: an analysis of an international patient education programme.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article is an analysis of a cancer patient education programme run by cosmetic companies. I focus on an analysis of imagery, arguing that there are particular discursive elements that the cosmetic companies use in order to make productive the relationship between femininity and cancer. I contextualize this education programme by presenting the controversies regarding cosmetics as they relate to the growth of breast tumours. In doing so, I conclude that conversations and questions about a link between chemicals and cancer are subverted by both ;horror' narratives of cancer and the provocative use of standards of beauty. Such discursive dominance in patient education programmes makes it difficult to engage in a more public understanding of cancer growth as affected by cosmetic chemicals. PMID:19103716

  8. The oncology nurse's role in educating patients on endocrine therapy for metastatic breast cancer--focus on fulvestrant.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Jean

    2002-04-01

    Fulvestrant, an estrogen receptor downregulator, is an effective and a safe endocrine option for postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer who progress or develop recurrent disease on prior endocrine therapy. The recommended dose is 250 mg given as a single 5-mL or 2 concurrent 2.5-mL monthly intramuscular injections. Common adverse events associated with fulvestrant are hot flashes, nausea, and mild injection site reactions. Applying warm or cold compresses to the injection site can minimize injection site reactions. In randomized double-blind clinical trials, the frequency of injection site reactions for fulvestrant are no different from the comparator (anastrozole) arm. Overall, fulvestrant has a safety profile similar to aromatase inhibitors. Advantages of this agent are its effectiveness in tamoxifen-resistant tumors and the lack of agonistic property, creating a favorable side-effect profile. One limitation is that there is no evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of fulvestrant in premenopausal women. Among endocrine therapies used to treat breast cancer, fulvestrant is unique not only in its mechanism of action but also in its mode of administration. With oral therapies, the patient fills the prescription in a pharmacy and takes the medication home. In contrast, with monthly fulvestrant intramuscular injection, the patient will have increased contact with the nurse. The increased interaction between the patient and the nurse will affect the role of nurses providing patient education and monitoring. PMID:12080536

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Helicopter EMS for Trauma Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter A Gearhart; Richard Wuerz; A. Russell Localio

    1997-01-01

    Study objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of helicopter EMS for trauma patients. Methods: We applied a cost-effectiveness analysis from the service provider's perspective to cost and effectiveness estimates. The cost estimates comprise direct operating costs and additional survivors' hospital costs. The effectiveness estimates were calculated with the TRISS methodology from literature sources and data from a cohort of patients transported

  10. The challenge of effectively communicating patient safety information.

    PubMed

    Hugman, Bruce; Edwards, I Ralph

    2006-07-01

    Rational use of drugs and patient safety are seriously compromised by a lack of good information, education and effective communication at all stages of drug development and use. From animal trials through to dispensing, there are misconceptions and opportunities for error which current methods of drug information communication do not adequately address: they do not provide those responsible for prescribing and dispensing drugs with the data and information they need to pass on complex and often changing messages to patients and the public. The incidence of adverse reactions due to the way drugs are used; the variable impact of regulatory guidelines and warnings on prescribing behaviour; drug scares and crises suggest a great gap between the ideals of the safe use of medicines and the reality in homes, clinics and hospitals around the world. To address these challenges, the authors review the several levels at which safety information is generated and communicated, and examine how, at each stage, the content and its significance, and the method of communication can be improved. PMID:16774488

  11. A Picture of Health and Education. Higher Education in Focus: Professors and Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Our universities are an indispensible part of the UK's healthcare system. This publication is the first in a series of Universities UK reports depicting the vital connections between higher education and healthcare. It illustrates the virtuous partnership between health providers and universities in supplying and developing the healthcare…

  12. Spica cast care: a collaborative staff-led education initiative for improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Reed, Cynthia; Carroll, Lee; Baccari, Susan; Shermont, Herminia

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects for nurses caring for incontinent children in spica casts is maintaining healthy skin integrity. Noting an increase in the number of phone calls from parents of discharged children in spica casts concerning diaper rash and skin breakdown, inpatient orthopedics staff nurses lead an interdisciplinary quality improvement and educational initiative. They standardized pediatric spica cast care and education by creating an intranet narrated PowerPoint presentation for staff and parents of children with spica casts. A take-home DVD of this education module is now produced and given to parents, reinforcing nursing discharge teaching and giving parents the opportunity to review these new skills at home as needed. The purpose of this article is to share this experience of improving patient outcomes and empowering other orthopedics nurses to develop creative educational solutions. PMID:22124183

  13. Physician empathy: Definition, outcome-relevance and its measurement in patient care and medical education

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Melanie; Scheffer, Christian; Tauschel, Diethard; Lutz, Gabriele; Wirtz, Markus; Edelhäuser, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study gives a brief introduction into the definition of physician empathy (PE) and its influence on patients’ health outcomes. Furthermore we present assessment instruments to measure PE from the perspective of the patient and medical student. The latter topic will be explored in detail as we conducted a pilot study on the German versions of two self-assessment instruments of empathy, which are mostly used in medical education research, namely the “Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy, Student Version” (JSPE-S) and the “Interpersonal Reactivity Index” (IRI). Methods: We first present an overview of the current empirical and theoretical literature on the definition and outcome-relevance of PE. Additionally, we conducted basic psychometric analyses of the German versions of the JSPE-S and the IRI. Data for this analyses is based on a cross-sectional pilot-survey in N=44 medical students and N=63 students of other disciplines from the University of Cologne. Results: PE includes the understanding of the patient as well as verbal and non-verbal communication, which should result in a helpful therapeutic action of the physician. Patients’ health outcomes in different healthcare settings can be improved considerably from a high quality empathic encounter with their clinician. Basic psychometric results of the German JSPE-S and IRI measures show first promising results. Conclusion: PE as an essential and outcome-relevant element in the patient-physician relationship requires more consideration in the education of medical students and, thus, in medical education research. The German versions of the JSPE-S and IRI measures seem to be promising means to evaluate these education aims and to conduct medical education research on empathy. PMID:22403596

  14. The Other Mozart Effect: An Open Letter to Music Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on five observations of children and adults involved in music activities and discusses three issues related to experimental research. Argues against the Mozart Effect, stating that the effects of music instruction seen within the classroom everyday are more significant. Discusses the results of Mozart Effect studies and educational

  15. Revealing the effects of cognitive education programmes through Dynamic Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Tzuriel

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of dynamic assessment (DA) in revealing outcomes of cognitive education programmes. Three programmes based on mediated learning experience theory are reviewed: Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment, Bright Start, and Peer Mediation with Young Children. In all three programmes DA was more effective than standardised tests in revealing their effects. The paper

  16. Effectiveness of Implanted Defibrillators May Depend on Patient's Age

    MedlinePLUS

    ... JavaScript. Effectiveness of Implanted Defibrillators May Depend on Patient's Age They extended survival in those at high ... Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) prolong survival among heart patients who face a high risk for sudden cardiac ...

  17. Depo-Provera Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    an abortion procedure. The shot is given in the buttocks or upper arm. Most women experience minimal every 3 months · Does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases · Possible side effects, which

  18. The Effectiveness of Environmental Education: Can

    E-print Network

    as a manage- ment strategy for nature-based tourism (reported examples include: Pope, 1981; Price, 1985; Beck Scholarships Contract grant sponsor: Royal Geographical Society of Queensland PROGRESS IN TOURISM of education as a possible solution which assists in minimising risks and maximis- ing benefits in nature

  19. Information security awareness: educating your users effectively

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Thomson; Rossouw Von Solms

    1998-01-01

    This article investigates the evolution of computing, with specific reference to the security issues involved. These issues are then taken further to determine the need for education in the workplace through an information security awareness program. Techniques borrowed from the field of social psychology, which have been largely ignored in current awareness programs, are highlighted in order to show how

  20. WASC EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS REVIEW GRADUATE GROWTH

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    on investing now in graduate education. California's economy depends upon it." Commission on the Growth goals. In parts three, four and five of the essay, we are ever mindful of the difficulties ­ financial-90; and a more steady development beginning in 1998-99 and projected to continue into the future. · Graduate

  1. The Educational Effects of Language Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radnai, Zsofia

    1994-01-01

    Examines the linguistic isolation of 11 million Magyar-speaking Hungarians in a context of political, economic, and educational change. Changes in foreign language learning since 1989 are outlined, and the declining popularity of Russian and increasing interest in studying the languages of Western Europe are discussed. (Contains 13 references.)…

  2. EFFECTIVE EDUCATION FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED CHILD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOLBURNE, LUMA LOUIS

    DRAWING ON 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN TEACHING AND LIVING WITH RETARDED CHILDREN AND ADULTS, THE AUTHOR PRESENTS A SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM AND SOME OF THE METHODS WHICH HE HAS FOUND MOST USEFUL. METHODS AND PRINCIPLES ARE TREATED IN A PRACTICAL AND SPECIFIC MANNER. DEFINITIONS AND THE NATURE OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE CONSIDERED. THE FOLLOWING…

  3. Gender Effects in Children's Development and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper attempts to clarify several lines of research on gender in development and education, inter-relating findings from studies on intuitive/informal knowledge with those from research on achievements and attitudes in science. It acknowledges the declining proportions of male teachers world-wide and examination successes which indicate a…

  4. Advancing interprofessional education through the use of high fidelity human patient simulators

    PubMed Central

    Smithburger, Pamela L.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.; Kloet, Megan A.; Lohr, Brian; Seybert, Amy L.

    Background Modern medical care increasingly requires coordinated teamwork and communication between healthcare professionals of different disciplines. Unfortunately, healthcare professional students are rarely afforded the opportunity to learn effective methods of interprofessional (IP) communication and teamwork strategies during their education. The question of how to best incorporate IP interactions in the curricula of the schools of health professions remains unanswered. Objective We aim to solve the lack of IP education in the pharmacy curricula through the use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) to allow teams of medical, pharmacy, nursing, physician assistant, and social work students to work together in a controlled environment to solve cases of complex medical and social issues. Methods Once weekly for a 4-week time period, students worked together to complete complex simulation scenarios in small IP teams consisting of pharmacy, medical, nursing, social work, and physician assistant students. Student perception of the use of HFS was evaluated by a survey given at the conclusion of the HFS sessions. Team communication was evaluated through the use of Communication and Teamwork Skills (CATS) Assessment by 2 independent evaluators external to the project. Results The CATS scores improved from the HFS sessions 1 to 2 (p = 0.01), 2 to 3 (p = 0.035), and overall from 1 to 4 (p = 0.001). The inter-rater reliability between evaluators was high (0.85, 95% CI 0.71, 0.99). Students perceived the HFS improved: their ability to communicate with other professionals (median =4); confidence in patient care in an IP team (median=4). It also stimulated student interest in IP work (median=4.5), and was an efficient use of student time (median=4.5) Conclusions The use of HFS improved student teamwork and communication and was an accepted teaching modality. This method of exposing students of the health sciences to IP care should be incorporated throughout the curricula. PMID:24155851

  5. Designing Effective K-12 Educational Initiatives for Grant Proposals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Marion

    2009-11-01

    The National Science Foundation requires that grantees make an effort to extend the reach of academic research to communities beyond the laboratory and address the work's possible ``Broader Impacts'' to society. NSF CAREER awards and many of the NSF Research Center grant solicitations are even more explicit, requiring that grantees craft educational initiatives that are based in best practices, bring the academic research to the broader community, and positively impact the pipeline of students pursuing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. For new faculty, and even veteran faculty, these requirements for creative educational initiatives that significantly affect a community outside the confines of the laboratory can be very daunting. This presentation addresses how to design an effective educational plan that incorporates K-12 educational outreach, that will have a real impact on the target audience, and that can realistically be accomplished by a science faculty member.

  6. The effect of embedded Adventure Education in physical education at Far East University

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsiao-Man Liu; Chih-Hao Chen; Chun-Ling Wang

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of embedded AE(Adventure Education) course in physical education at Fat East University. The participants were 1418 first-year students at Far East University. 1418 surveys were distributed after two-week implementation of AE course. 1395 surveys were considered valid after 23 surveys were discarded for incompletion. This represented a 98% return rate. 923 male (66.2%),

  7. Real-world evaluation of the effects of counseling and education in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Mehul R; Robinson, Scott B; Sullivan, Sean D

    2014-11-01

    Background. Patient education has long been recognized as a component of effective diabetes management, but the impact of counseling and education (C/E) interventions on health care costs is not fully understood. Objectives. To identify the incidence and type of diabetes C/E received by type 2 diabetes patients and to evaluate associated economic and clinical outcomes. Methods. This retrospective cohort study used the Premier-Optum Continuum of Care database (2005-2009) to compare adult patients with type 2 diabetes receiving C/E to those not receiving C/E (control). The index date was the first C/E date or, in the control cohort, a randomly assigned date on which some care was delivered. Patients had at least 6 months' pre-index and 12 months' post-index continuous health plan coverage. Health care costs and glycemic levels were evaluated over 12 and 6 months, respectively, with adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics using propensity score matching (PSM). Results. Of 26,790 patients identified, 9.3% received at least one C/E intervention (mean age 53 years, 47% men) and 90.7% received no C/E (mean age 57 years, 54% men). Standard diabetes education was the most common form of C/E (73%). After PSM, C/E patients had some improvements in glycemic levels (among those with laboratory values available), without increased risk for hypoglycemia, and incurred $2,335 per-patient less in diabetes-related health care costs, although their total health care costs increased. Conclusions. Despite the low uptake of C/E services, C/E interventions may be associated with economic and clinical benefits at 12 months. Further analyses are needed to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of such initiatives. PMID:25647045

  8. Patient loyalty and the social media effect.

    PubMed

    Verkamp, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    In a changing healthcare environment, patient loyalty has never been more important. However, creating patient loyalty can mean more than providing quality health services within the four walls of the medical office. With patients turning to online sources and social media in search of advice and a better patient experience, we must now ensure that patients have meaningful engagements with us across the continuum of care, from the phone, to the office, to social media tools like Facebook and YouTube as we look to build loyalty and grow our referral volumes. PMID:24228370

  9. Reported Sildenafil Side Effects in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siehr, Stephanie L.; McCarthy, Elisa K.; Ogawa, Michelle T.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sildenafil, a phosphodiestase type 5 inhibitor, was approved in 2005 for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adults and is commonly used off-label for pediatric patients. Little is known, however, about sildenafil’s side effects in this population. Methods: Single institution, longitudinal survey-based study performed in an outpatient pediatric cardiology clinic. Pediatric patients on sildenafil [alone or in combination with other pulmonary hypertension (PH) therapies] completed questionnaires regarding frequency of vascular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and hematologic side effects. Results: Between January 2011 and May 2014, 66 pediatric patients with PH on sildenafil filled out 214 surveys, 32 patients (96 surveys) on monotherapy, and 43 patients (118 surveys) on sildenafil plus an endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) (bosentan or ambrisentan) and/or a prostacyclin (epoprostenol or treprostinil). Overall, 30% of respondents identified at least one side effect. For all patients on sildenafil, incidence of side effects by system was 37% gastrointestinal, 35% vascular, and 22% neurologic. For patients on sildenafil monotherapy, incidence of side effects by system was 24% gastrointestinal, 21% vascular, and 18% neurologic compared to patients on combination therapy who reported an incidence of 48% gastrointestinal, 45% vascular, and 25% neurologic. Conclusion: Incidence of vascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic side effect in pediatric patients on sildenafil therapy for PAH was 30%. Side effects were more common in patients on combination therapy with an ERA and/or prostacyclin than in patients on sildenafil monotherapy.

  10. A survey of patients acceptability of diabetes education programmes in Italy.

    PubMed

    Porta, M; Rudelli, G; Colarizi, R; Santoro, F; Molinatti, G M

    1988-01-01

    When planning diabetes education programmes it would be useful to know in advance the patients' demands and expectations. To this purpose, a questionnaire was circulated throughout Italy. Eight hundred and forty-five forms were returned from 487 men and 358 women of age 49 +/- 18 (SD) residing in all regions of Italy. Fifty percent were on insulin, 37% on oral agents and 13% on diet only. Forty-seven percent believed they had a satisfactory knowledge of diabetes, 49% thought it fair or poor and 4% judged it non-existent. Such knowledge derived from diabetic clinics, mass media, specialized publications and family doctors. Only 11% had previously attended education programmes. The vast majority (83%) believed that better information would help to improve their diabetes care and were willing to attend education courses. Printed material and group learning were preferred to audiovisual aids and individual education. Doctors were preferred as teachers (83%) to other patients or paramedical staff. Patients were mostly interested in learning about complications (84%), diet (74%), control (63%), intercurrent illnesses (61%) and inheritance (59%). The least requested subjects were CSII (20%), the artificial pancreas (22%), insulin preparations (22%), pancreatic transplant (26%) and oral agents (31%). PMID:3410150

  11. Upper Respiratory Infections Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    is killed by your immune system. Antibiotics are not effective in treating the common cold. Cold symptoms infection affecting the alveoli (small air sacs) in the lung. Treatment Recommendations Following a warm, moist towel over your face. Do not smoke, and avoid second hand smoke. For PAIN, FEVER, CHILLS

  12. Education and ethnic prejudice in Europe : explanations for cross-national variances in the educational effect on ethnic prejudice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evelyn Hello; Peer Scheepers; Mérove Gijsberts

    2002-01-01

    Education is often found to be a strong determinant of ethnic pre judice. However, there is preliminary evidence that this educational effect varies across countries. Moreover, there are also theoretical arguments to expect cross-national variances in the educational effect on ethnic pre judice. From both a cultural and structural perspective, we set out to explain these cross-national variances in the

  13. Late effects of radiotherapy on patients with cerebellar medulloblastoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Silverman; H. Palkes; B. Talent; E. Kovnar; J. W. Clouse; Prm Thomas

    1984-01-01

    Nine long-term survivors of cerebellar medulloblastoma treated with surgery and irradiation were retrospectively examined with a complete battery of neuropsychological tests and the results compared with their nonirradiated siblings. Significant decreased scores were found in the full-scale intelligence quotients (IQ), performance IQ, and verbal IQ with all nine irradiated patients scoring below their siblings. Also, educational quotients (EQ) of the

  14. The effect of post-discharge educational intervention on patients in achieving objectives in modifiable risk factors six months after discharge following an episode of acute coronary syndrome, (CAM-2 Project): a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether an intervention mainly consisting of a signed agreement between patient and physician on the objectives to be reached, improves reaching these secondary prevention objectives in modifiable cardiovascular risk factors six-months after discharge following an acute coronary syndrome. Background There is room to improve mid-term adherence to clinical guidelines' recommendations in coronary heart disease secondary prevention, specially non-pharmacological ones, often neglected. Methods In CAM-2, patients discharged after an acute coronary syndrome were randomly assigned to the intervention or the usual care group. The primary outcome was reaching therapeutic objectives in various secondary prevention variables: smoking, obesity, blood lipids, blood pressure control, exercise and taking of medication. Results 1757 patients were recruited in 64 hospitals and 1510 (762 in the intervention and 748 in the control group) attended the six-months follow-up visit. After adjustment for potentially important variables, there were, between the intervention and control group, differences in the mean reduction of body mass index (0.5 vs. 0.2; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (1.6 cm vs. 0.6 cm; p = 0.05), proportion of patients who exercise regularly and those with total cholesterol below 175 mg/dl (64.7% vs. 56.5%; p = 0.001). The reported intake of medications was high in both groups for all the drugs considered with no differences except for statins (98.1% vs. 95.9%; p = 0.029). Conclusions At least in the short term, lifestyle changes among coronary heart disease patients are achievable by intensifying the responsibility of the patient himself by means of a simple and feasible intervention. PMID:21092191

  15. Dental hygiene education about patients with special needs: a survey of U.S. programs.

    PubMed

    Dehaitem, Maryam J; Ridley, Karen; Kerschbaum, Wendy E; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore how dental hygiene programs in the United States educate their students about treating patients with special needs. Data were collected from 102 U.S. dental hygiene programs (response rate=49 percent) with a web-based survey. Nearly all programs (98 percent) reported that they present this material in lectures. However, only 42 percent of the programs required students to gain clinical experiences with patients with special needs. Most programs covered the treatment of patients with physical/sensory impairments such as hearing impairments (93.1 percent), psychopathologies (89.2 percent), and adult onset neurological disorders (89.2 percent). Outcome assessments were usually done in a written exam (97.1 percent), while objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) (9.8 percent) and standardized patient experiences (4.9 percent) were less frequently used. Respondents identified "curriculum overload" as the biggest challenge to addressing special patient needs. Nevertheless, 29.4 percent of the respondents indicated that they support an increase in clinical experiences for students to give them increased opportunities to work with patients with special needs. Recent changes in accreditation standards require graduating dental hygiene students to be competent in assessing the treatment needs of special needs patients. Based on the program directors' responses, recommendations can be made to increase the opportunities for students to have clinical experiences with patients with special needs and to address the needs of patients with special needs more comprehensively in dental hygiene curricula. PMID:18768443

  16. Patient and Medical Education on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Leffler

    Millions of Americans use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies, often in the absence of scientific evidence\\u000a of their safety and effectiveness and, in many cases, with-out including a medical professional in the decision-making process\\u000a (1). Depending on how broadly one defines it, between 36 and 62% of the US population now relies on some form of CAM (2). Although

  17. Effects of estazolam as a premedication in mentally retarded patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuichi Kanmura; Mutumi Kamihashi

    1997-01-01

    In anesthesia for mentally retarded patients, adequate preoperative sedation is important. We have investigated the sedative\\u000a effects of estazolam in 16 mentally retarded patients who were given 0.1 mg·kg?1 orally; its sedative effects were compared with those of hydroxyzine (50 mg intramuscularly, 6 patients). Estazolam was observed\\u000a to be significantly more effective as a sedative than hydroxyzine throughout the period

  18. Benoxaprofen: side-effect profile in 300 patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J P Halsey; N Cardoe

    1982-01-01

    Out of 300 patients who had taken benoxaprofen for a mean of 6.4 months, 196 (65.3%) reported side effects, resulting in 104 patients (34.6%) having the drug withdrawn. Out of 42 patients aged over 70, 35 (83.3%) had side effects and 29 (69.0%) had the drug withdrawn because of them. cutaneous side effects accounted for 180 (69.5%) of all 259

  19. Responding to a Significant Recruitment Challenge within Three Nationwide Psycho-Educational Trials for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Annette L.; Morra, Marion E.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Slevin-Perocchia, Rosemarie; Raich, Peter C.; Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang-Yi; Tran, Zung Vu; Mohamed, Nihal E.; George, Roshini; Bright, Mary Anne; Marcus, Alfred C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose When faced with a significant recruitment challenge for three nationwide psycho-educational trials targeting prostate and breast cancer patients, the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium initiated outreach efforts to increase accrual. Recruitment is reported by major outreach strategy to inform the use of similar campaigns, either as primary recruitment efforts or to supplement “in-reach” recruitment within oncology settings. Methods During a 33-month period, recruitment was tracked from the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Information Service (CIS), the American Cancer Society (ACS), Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation’s Love/Avon Army of Women (AOW), Internet advertising, press releases, radio/television interviews, recruitment materials in community venues, and outreach to churches and cancer support organizations. Results Across projects, the majority (89%) of recruited participants (N = 2,134) was obtained from the CIS (n = 901, 19 months of recruitment), AOW (n = 869, 18 months), and ACS (n = 123, 12 months). Other efforts showed minimal gain in recruitment. Conclusions Cancer information programs (e.g., CIS, ACS) and registries of individuals willing to participate in cancer-related research (e.g., AOW) can represent exceptional resources for outreach recruitment of cancer patients, especially when the eligibility criteria are highly restrictive. However, these resources do not yield samples representative of the larger population of adults diagnosed with cancer, and conclusions from such trials must be tempered accordingly. Implications for cancer survivors Inadequate recruitment to randomized controlled trials limits the creation of useful interventions for cancer survivors. By enrolling in cancer registries and taking part in research, cancer survivors can contribute to the development of effective resources for the survivor population. PMID:23595235

  20. Predictors of skin self-examination before and after a melanoma diagnosis: the role of medical advice and patient’s level of education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous melanoma is the fastest growing tumor of the skin and the median life span of patients with advanced disease is less than a year. Melanoma-related mortality can be reduced through early detection via clinical skin exams and patient self-examination. Despite the potential to reducing the medical burden associated with clinical skin exams, systematic and regular skin self-examinations (SSE) are rarely performed. The current study examined psychosocial predictors of SSE and changes in SSE behavior from pre- to post-diagnosis in order to guide future melanoma prevention initiatives. Findings A consecutive sample of 47 melanoma survivors was drawn from a tertiary care clinic. Most melanomas had been detected by patients, spouses and other laypersons. Higher education was related to more frequent SSE at pre-diagnosis, more thorough SSE at post-diagnosis, and more frequent reports of having been advised to perform SSE at post-diagnosis. SSE behaviors increased significantly from pre- to post-diagnosis. Conclusions These findings suggest that different patient subgroups display varied knowledge base, readiness for change, and receptiveness for medical advice. Thus, interventions seeking to enhance skin self-exam practice may be most effective when the individual’s psychosocial characteristics are taken into account. PMID:23446040

  1. The effectiveness of a participatory program on fall prevention in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-04-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study, 68 participants were recruited at a medical centre in Taiwan. A 20-min fall prevention program was given to patients. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the effectiveness of program after on day 3 of intervention. The data of fall incidence rates were collected from hospital record. Fall incidences with and without the program were used to compare the effectiveness of intervention. The patients' knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention are better than after intervention. A statistically significant difference in fall incidence rate was observed with (0.0%) and without (19.3%) the program. Our findings suggest that the fact of the bedside is that the most risk for falling in hospital must be communicated to the hospitalized patients. Educating patients about fall prevention and activities associated with falling increases their awareness of the potential of falling and promoting patient safety. PMID:25492057

  2. Effectiveness of Educational Programs on Nutritional Behavior in Addicts Referring to Baharan Hospital, Zahedan (Eastern of IR Iran)

    PubMed Central

    Karajibani, Mansour; Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Dashipour, Alireza; Lashkaripour, Kobra; Abery, Maryam; Salari, Sajedeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are many factors which affect nutritional status of addicted such as lack o f knowledge, incorrect attitude toward modification of food pattern, and careless to food intake. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational program on nutritional behavior in addicts referring to Baharan hospital in Zahedan. Patients and Methods: Thirty-six addict patients were selected randomly. After recording general demographic data of patients, nutritional behaviors were determined. To determine the effectiveness of nutritional educational program, pre and post-tests were performed. Evaluation of nutritional behavior was determined as poor, fair and satisfactory levels. Statically analysis was performed by SPSS software. Results: Most addict patients had a medium level of education. Improvement in knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of patients after intervention was observed as follows; decreasing KAP in poor level (2.8% vs. 30.6%), (3% vs. 50%), (25% vs. 80.6%), respectively; also, increasing KAP in fair level (7% vs. 55.6 %), (15% vs. 15%), (19% vs. 7%), respectively and increasing KAP in satisfactory levels (77.8% vs. 13.8%), (50% vs. 8.3%), and (22.2% vs. 0%), respectively (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference regarding the grade of KAP in patients based on gender, marital status, and education level after education (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study showed that nutritional KAP was improved in addicts. After intervention, there was a significant difference in the score of knowledge, attitude, and practice scores in patients in the current study. KAP was improved in patients after intervention including; decreased KAP in poor level and increased KAP in fair and satisfactory levels. This finding indicates that addict patients would like to modify their life style. PMID:25032162

  3. The Intergenerational Effects of Changes in Women's Educational Attainments

    PubMed Central

    Mare, Robert D.; Maralani, Vida

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the socioeconomic characteristics in one generation on the socioeconomic achievement of the next generation is the central concern of social stratification research. Researchers typically address this issue by analyzing the associations between the characteristics of parents and offspring. This approach, however, focuses on observed parent–offspring pairs and ignores that changes in the socioeconomic characteristics of one generation may alter the numbers and types of intergenerational family relationships created in the next one. Models of intergenerational effects that include marriage and fertility as well as the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status yield a richer account of intergenerational effects at both the family and population levels. When applied to a large sample of Indonesian women and their families, these models show that the effects of women's educational attainment on the educational attainments of the next generation are positive. However, the beneficial effects of increases in women's schooling on the educational attainment of their children are partially offset at the population level by a reduction in the overall number of children that a more educated population of women bears and enhanced by the more favorable marriage partners of better educated women.

  4. Education and survival: Birth cohort, period, and age effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane S. Lauderdale

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have found that educational differences in mortality are weaker among the elderly. In this study I examine whether either cohort or period effects may have influenced the interpretation of age effects. Six 10-year birth cohorts are followed over 30 years through decennial censuses. Differential survival is inferred from changes in the relative proportions of a cohort in each

  5. The Educative Effects of Ballot Initiatives on Voter Turnout

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caroline J. Tolbert; Daniel A. Smith

    2005-01-01

    Scholars have begun examining what Progressive reformers called the educative effects of direct democracy, especially the effect ballot initiatives have on voter turnout. Research based on aggregate-level voter age population (VAP) turnout data indicates that ballot measures increase turnout in low-information midterm elections but not in presidential elections. We analyze the impact of ballot initiative use on voter turnout from

  6. Effects of Grading on Achievement in College Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Youxiang; Zakrajsek, Dorothy B.

    1994-01-01

    Study examined the effects of three grading systems on college physical education students' outcome measures in table tennis using skill tests, written tests, game play variables, class attendance, student behaviors, and attitudes toward the systems. Positive effects of the three grading systems were demonstrated on most process and outcome…

  7. The Effect of Zinc Supplements in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Van Biervliet; S. Vande Velde; J. P. Van Biervliet; E. Robberecht

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of Zn supplements in cystic fibrosis (CF) on disease evolution. Methods: A retrospective study of all CF patients treated with Zn supplements (January 2002 to December 2004). Data from patient files for the year before and the first year of supplementation were compared. The controls were CF patients with normal serum Zn and without Zn

  8. Towards a conceptual framework demonstrating the effectiveness of audiovisual patient descriptions (patient video cases): a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Technological advances have enabled the widespread use of video cases via web-streaming and online download as an educational medium. The use of real subjects to demonstrate acute pathology should aid the education of health care professionals. However, the methodology by which this effect may be tested is not clear. Methods We undertook a literature review of major databases, found relevant articles relevant to using patient video cases as educational interventions, extracted the methodologies used and assessed these methods for internal and construct validity. Results A review of 2532 abstracts revealed 23 studies meeting the inclusion criteria and a final review of 18 of relevance. Medical students were the most commonly studied group (10 articles) with a spread of learner satisfaction, knowledge and behaviour tested. Only two of the studies fulfilled defined criteria on achieving internal and construct validity. The heterogeneity of articles meant it was not possible to perform any meta-analysis. Conclusions Previous studies have not well classified which facet of training or educational outcome the study is aiming to explore and had poor internal and construct validity. Future research should aim to validate a particular outcome measure, preferably by reproducing previous work rather than adopting new methods. In particular cognitive processing enhancement, demonstrated in a number of the medical student studies, should be tested at a postgraduate level. PMID:23256787

  9. The hidden curriculum of the medical care for elderly patients in medical education: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Meiboom, Ariadne; Diedrich, Chantal; Vries, Henk De; Hertogh, Cees; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-01-01

    Despite more attention being given to geriatrics in medical curricula, few new physicians are seeking training in this field. So far, there has been no exploration of factors in the hidden curriculum that could potentially influence the persisting lack of interest in this field of medicine. To study this hidden curriculum in medical education in relation to medical care of elderly patients, the authors used a qualitative research design including participant observations on two internal medicine wards in a teaching hospital and semistructured interviews. The results showed that elderly patients with multiple problems are seen as frustrating and not interesting. Medical students were not stimulated to go into the totality of medical problems of elderly patients. They picked up a lot of disparaging remarks about these patients. The mainly negative attitudes demonstrated by role models, in particular the residents, may potentially influence the development of future doctors and their choice of career. PMID:25288267

  10. Inpatient Diabetes Education Is Associated With Less Frequent Hospital Readmission Among Patients With Poor Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Sara J.; Black, Dawn; Harris, Cara; Lorenz, Andrew; Dungan, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the relationship between inpatient diabetes education (IDE) and hospital readmissions in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients with a discharge diagnosis of diabetes (ICD-9 code 250.x) and HbA1c >9% who were hospitalized between 2008 and 2010 were retrospectively identified. All-cause first readmissions were determined within 30 days and 180 days after discharge. IDE was conducted by a certified diabetes educator or trainee. Relationships between IDE and hospital readmission were analyzed with stepwise backward logistic regression models. RESULTS In all, 2,265 patients were included in the 30-day analysis and 2,069 patients were included in the 180-day analysis. Patients who received IDE had a lower frequency of readmission within 30 days than did those who did not (11 vs. 16%; P = 0.0001). This relationship persisted after adjustment for sociodemographic and illness-related factors (odds ratio 0.66 [95% CI 0.51–0.85]; P = 0.001). Medicaid insurance and longer stay were also independent predictors in this model. IDE was also associated with reduced readmissions within 180 days, although the relationship was attenuated. In the final 180-day model, no IDE, African American race, Medicaid or Medicare insurance, longer stay, and lower HbA1c were independently associated with increased hospital readmission. Further analysis determined that higher HbA1c was associated with lower frequency of readmission only among patients who received a diabetes education consult. CONCLUSIONS Formal IDE was independently associated with a lower frequency of all-cause hospital readmission within 30 days; this relationship was attenuated by 180 days. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this association. PMID:23835695

  11. [Effectiveness of halotherapy of chronic bronchitis patients].

    PubMed

    Abdrakhmanova, L M; Farkhutdinov, U R; Farkhutdinov, R R

    2000-01-01

    The chemoluminescence test in 49 patients with lingering inflammatory chronic bronchitis has revealed inhibition of generation of active oxygen forms in the whole blood, intensification of lipid peroxidation in the serum, depression of local immunity. Administration of halotherapy to the above patients results in correction of disturbances of free-radical oxidation, improves local immunity and clinical course of the disease. PMID:11197648

  12. The Effectiveness of a Patient Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Harue J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports data from three consecutive classes of first- year optometry students at the Southern California College of Optometry, who were tested preceding and following completion of a patient communication course. Findings indicated that students improved their ability to respond to patients and were better able to discriminate among various levels…

  13. Assessment of printed patient-educational materials for chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuot, Delphine S; Davis, Elizabeth; Velasquez, Alexandra; Banerjee, Tanushree; Powe, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Background Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is suboptimal among patients with CKD, perhaps due to poor readability of patient education materials (PEMs). We reviewed the suitability and readability of common PEMs that focused on 5 content areas: basics of CKD, risk factors for CKD development, risk factors for CKD progression, complications of CKD and self-management strategies to improve kidney health. Methods Three reviewers (nephrologist, primary care physician, patient) used the Suitability Assessment of Materials to rate PEMs on message content/stimulation of learning, typography, visuals and layout and determined literacy level. Mean ratings were calculated for each PEM by content area and overall (Superior=70–100; Adequate=40–69; Inadequate=<40). Linear regression was used to determine the impact of literacy level on mean rating. Results We reviewed 69 PEMs from 19 organizations, divided into 113 content area sections. Most (79%) PEM sections were “Adequate” (mean rating, 58.3%). Inclusion of patient-centered content and opportunities for patient interaction were associated with “Superior” ratings. Mean ratings (SD) were similar across content areas: basics of CKD, 58.9% [9.1]; risk factors for CKD development, 57.0% [12.3]; risk factors for CKD progression, 58.5% [12.0]; CKD complications, 62.3% [15.7] and self-management strategies, 62.2% [12.3]. ? 6th grade literacy level (vs >6th grade) was associated with an 11.7 point higher mean rating. Conclusion Most PEMs for kidney disease were adequate. Outstanding PEMs shared characteristics of patient centeredness, a low literacy level, and patient interaction. Providers should be aware of strengths and limitations of PEMs when educating their patients about CKD. PMID:23970127

  14. Participation in outpatient diabetes education programs: how many patients take part and how representative are they?

    PubMed

    Glasgow, R E; Toobert, D J; Hampson, S E

    1991-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the role of participation in programs that teach diabetes self-management skills. This paper reviews recent studies on diabetes educational programs to determine what is known about participation, and then reports our experience in recruiting patients for a program that teaches diabetes self-care skills to persons age 60 and older. Few studies have reported data on participation rates in such programs, and only one study provided information on characteristics of patients who participated versus those who did not. In our study, patients over age 70, and those with whom we initiated contact by means of a letter from their health care provider, were less likely to participate than were younger patients and those who initiated contact with us. It is recommended that future research include information on the percentage and representativeness of patients who participate in diabetes education programs. Studies should also describe their target population, procedures used to recruit participants, and program characteristics that might affect participation. PMID:1879279

  15. Importance of therapeutic patient education in ichthyosis: results of a prospective single reference center study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of rare genodermatoses. Patients and their families face difficulties related to daily care and management that may be aggravated by social isolation. Objectives To evaluate the impact of therapeutic educational programs in improving the knowledge of ichthyosis patients, and their relatives, about their disease. Patients and methods We organized a two sessions-program of “know-how” dedicated to the overall management of ichthyoses. These sessions were conducted based on a tool specifically designed for the study, which addressed our various areas of expertise through a collective game. The participants (patients and their parents and siblings) were divided into groups, and the questions were tailored according to the participants’ age. The program was conceived as a knowledge reinforcement program that took place during a weekend of education and rest, organized away from healthcare structures. Our aim was to facilitate the program in a neutral place to encourage respite care and to ensure the availability of a multidisciplinary healthcare team. Results After the reinforcement session, children aged from 6 to 12 years and their families acquired the targeted know-how and social skills. Conclusion Benefits of TPE in the management of ichthyoses are the following: (1) the trust between patients their families and the caregivers was strengthened; (2) the context of the program encouraged self-expression, answered questions and provided mutual aid; and (3) the more self-sufficient families could better manage emergencies. PMID:23902898

  16. Comparison of neurological healthcare oriented educational resources for patients on the internet.

    PubMed

    Punia, Vineet; Dagar, Anjali; Agarwal, Nitin; He, Wenzhuan; Hillen, Machteld

    2014-12-01

    The internet has become a major contributor to health literacy promotion. The average American reads at 7th-8th grade level and it is recommended to write patient education materials at or below 6th grade reading level. We tried to assess the level of literacy required to read and understand online patient education materials (OPEM) for neurological diseases from various internet resources. We then compared those to an assumed reference OPEM source, namely the patient education brochures from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world's largest professional association of neurologists. Disease specific patient education brochures were downloaded from the AAN website. OPEM for these diseases were also accessed from other common online sources determined using a predefined criterion. All OPEM were converted to Microsoft Word (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, USA) and their reading level was analyzed using Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1 (Oleander Software, Vandalia, OH, USA). Descriptive analysis and analysis of variance were used to compare reading levels of OPEM from different resources. Medline Plus, Mayo clinic and Wikipedia qualified for OPEM analysis. All OPEM from these resources, including the AAN, were written above the recommended 6th grade reading level. They were also found to be "fairly difficult", "difficult" or "confusing" on the Flesch Reading Ease scale. AAN OPEM on average needed lower reading level, with Wikipedia OPEM being significantly (p<0.01) more difficult to read compared to the other three resources. OPEM on neurological diseases are being written at a level of reading complexity higher than the average American and the recommended reading levels. This may be undermining the utility of these resources. PMID:25194822

  17. Continuing Medical Education Effect on Practice Performance: Effectiveness of Continuing Medical Education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dave Davis; Robert Galbraith

    2009-01-01

    Background: There has been sizable debate and widespread skepticism about the effect of continuing medical education (CME) on the performance of physicians in the practice setting. This portion of the review was undertaken to examine that effect. Methods: The guideline panel used data from a comprehensive review of the effectiveness of CME developed by The Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center,

  18. Effectiveness of oral health education programs: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nakre, Priya Devadas; Harikiran, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, attention has been drawn toward assessing the effectiveness of oral health education programs. This is in line with demand for evidence based research and will help to inform policy makers on how to allocate resources. (1) Collect and collate all information on oral health education programs. (2) Assess the programs based on various coding criteria. (3) Assess effectiveness of oral health education programs on oral health status and knowledge, attitude and practice. A search of all published articles in Medline was done using the keywords “oral health education, dental health education, oral health promotion”. The resulting titles and abstracts provided the basis for initial decisions and selection of articles. Out of the primary list of articles, a total number of 40 articles were selected as they fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: (1). Articles on oral health programs with an oral health education component (2). Articles published after the year 1990 (3). Articles published in English. The full text of the articles was then obtained from either the internet or libraries of dental research colleges and hospitals in and around Bangalore. A set of important variables were identified and grouped under five headings to make them amenable for coding. The coding variables were then described under various subheadings to allow us to compare the chosen articles. Oral health education is effective in improving the knowledge attitude and practice of oral health and in reducing plaque, bleeding on probing of the gingiva and caries increment. This study identifies a few important variables which contribute to the effectiveness of the programs. There is an indication in this review that the most successful oral health programs are labor intensive, involve significant others and has received funding and additional support. A balance between inputs and outputs and health care resources available will determine if the program can be recommended for general use. PMID:24778989

  19. Points of View: Effective Partnerships Between K12 and Higher Education

    E-print Network

    science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in the United States. However, the waysFeature Points of View: Effective Partnerships Between K­12 and Higher Education Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Science Education Partnerships: Being Realistic About Meeting Expectations Nancy Moreno

  20. Can patient flow be effectively controlled?

    PubMed

    Adini, Bruria; Cohen, Robert; Laor, Daniel; Israeli, Avi

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND Emergency department (ED) overcrowding may affect the ability to provide quality care and maximize patient flow. Study objectives To analyse the impact of the control of the patient flow during a conflict on ED overcrowding. METHODS During a recent military conflict in Israel the Ministry of Health issued a directive aimed at redirecting the patient flow to EDs in a metropolitan area. The admissions were monitored to identify trends and determine if any changes occurred after the policy change. RESULTS Medical admissions in the only level I trauma centre decreased by 6.5% after the notification, while rising in two other level II hospitals by 3.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Pre- and post-conflict trauma admissions in the level I trauma centre dropped by 2.2% and increased by 6.4% and 1.8%, respectively, in the other hospitals. CONCLUSIONS It is possible to direct the flow of patients to EDs and rationalize the use of resources, making it possible for patients to be admitted to EDs best able to care for them. These findings are especially relevant to emergency situations, but also to non-emergent situations in which control of patient flow may be required. Direct communication with the public is recommended to minimize the implementation time of directives regarding patient flow. PMID:21278076

  1. Educational Effects of Practical Education Using a Debate Exercise on Engineering Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanokura, Masato; Hayashi, Shigeo

    The educational effects of practical education using a debate exercise are investigated using questionnaires. For the group-work composed of discussion and debate, students understand thoroughly various engineering ethical topics, such as factors preventing ethical decision-making. Students enhance their abilities to make a rational and logical decision by themselves such as a judgment based on correct information. Mutual evaluation by students through group interaction elevates positive educational effects. However, students answer fewer questions related to the understanding of professional duties and cooperate social responsibility because of the group-work using failure cases. Students also show less progress in their abilities to communicate with others and to express their opinions to audiences. A more suitable number of group members solves the latter problem.

  2. A virtual patient educational activity to improve interprofessional competencies: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Michael J; de Voest, Margaret; Booth, Andrew; Meny, Lisa; Victor, Justin

    2014-11-21

    Abstract The purpose of the present study was to determine whether an interprofessional virtual patient educational activity improved interprofessional competencies in pharmacy, physician assistant, and physical therapy graduate students. Seventy-two fifth semester pharmacy (n?=?33), fourth semester physician assistant (n?=?27) and fourth semester physical therapy (n?=?12) graduate students participated in the study. Participants were stratified by discipline and randomized into control (n?=?38) and experimental groups (n?=?34). At baseline and at study completion, all participants completed an original, investigator-developed survey that measured improvement in selected Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). The experimental group had statistically significantly greater odds of improving on a variety of IPEC competencies and RIPLS items. The use of a single, interprofessional educational activity resulted in having a greater awareness of other professions' scopes of practice, what other professions have to offer a given patient and how different professions can collaborate in patient care. PMID:25412759

  3. Effects of a Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program on Patient Self-Care Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shiyko, Mariya; Margulis, Heather; Campo, Marc

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program on patient self-care outcomes. METHOD. We used a retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of 1,292 patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. Self-care scores from the FIM™ for patients who participated in rehabilitation before implementation of an SPHM program were compared with the scores of patients who participated after implementation of the program. RESULTS. Patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program. CONCLUSION. SPHM programs may not affect self-care performance in adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. However, more work must be done to define specific and effective methods for integrating patient handling technologies into occupational therapy practice. PMID:25184472

  4. Effect of weather conditions on rheumatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, D; Weinberger, A

    1990-01-01

    In a one month prospective study of 62 rheumatic patients--16 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 24 with osteoarthritis (OA), 11 with inflammatory arthritis, 11 with fibromyalgia joint pain--swelling and everyday activity was compared with changes in daily weather conditions. In most patients weather changes increased arthritic symptoms. Women were more sensitive to weather than men (62% v 37%). Pain was affected positively by barometric pressure and temperature in RA, by temperature, rain, and barometric pressure in OA, and by barometric pressure in fibromyalgia. These results support the belief of most rheumatic patients that weather conditions significantly influence their day to day symptoms. PMID:2322026

  5. Bioterrorism education effect on knowledge and attitudes of nurses

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Nahid; Nesami, Masoumeh Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Context: The most important way against bioterrorism is reinforcement of knowledge of health and medical team to diagnose and rapid reaction during these events. Aims: To assess the effect of bioterrorism education on knowledge and attitudes of nurses. Settings and Design: the setting of study was one of the infectious disease wards, emergency rooms or internal wards of the hospitals under supervision of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this pre-experimental study, 65 nurses who had all inclusion criteria are selected by accessible sampling method. Data on nurses knowledge and attitudes toward bioterrorism were collected using a self-administered questionnaire before and after two two-h sessions education. After a month of education, the units responded to questionnaire again. Statistical Analysis Used: A descriptive statistics Wilcoxon tests and Spearman correlation coefficient were used. Results: Before education, the majority of units (96.9%) had low knowledge about bioterrorism (0-33.3% score of 100%),whereas after education, the majority of them (100%) had good knowledge(well done) (66.7-100% score of 100%). And majority of units (96.9%) before education had indifferent attitude toward bioterrorism (33.4-66.6% score of 100%), whereas a majority of them (98.5%) after education had positive attitude (66.7-100% score of 100%). Conclusions: The education has a positive effect on nurses’ knowledge and attitudes and it can be a guideline for administrators of the Ministry of Health and medicine for planning to achieve the goals of preventive and defense against bioterrorism. PMID:23723614

  6. Patients with early breast cancer benefit from effective axillary treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay R. Harris; Robert T. Osteen

    1985-01-01

    Summary We have reviewed the available clinical data on the benefit of axillary treatment in patients with early breast cancer. The results of these studies suggest that perhaps 5–10% of patients are cured by effective axillary treatment. We conclude that effective axillary treatment should still be considered an essential aspect of primary treatment.

  7. Pre?service Teacher Education Programmes for Information Technology: an effective education?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martyn Wild

    1995-01-01

    This paper argues for a new perspective on information technology programmes in pre?service education, suggesting that the majority of such programmes are constructed on weak and sometimes ill?defined premises. It provides an assessment of the nature and relative effectiveness of current information technology programmes, as well as noting those factors and characteristics which are likely to impact significantly on the

  8. The Future of Engineering Education. V. Assessing Teaching Effectiveness and Educational Scholarship

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Felder, Richard M., 1939-

    An article which discusses methods for determining the effectiveness of instruction in individual courses and curricula (learning outcomes assessments, ratings from students, peers, and alumni, teaching portfolios) and determining the quality of educational scholarship. Target Audience: 2-4 year College Faculty/Administrators

  9. Cost-Effectiveness and Educational Policy. Yearbook of the American Education Finance Association, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M., Ed.; McEwan, Patrick J., Ed.

    This collection of papers provides decision-makers with tools to improve resource allocation. The two primary tools, or modes, are cost-effective analysis and cost-benefit analysis, which researchers in education have devised and refined. This volume has three main goals, all intended to help decision-makers construct a useful research program:…

  10. Building An Effective and Aligned P-16 Education System: What Should Higher Education do to Enhance Student Access and Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Business Council (Texas), 2002

    2002-01-01

    On May 7, 2002, the Governor's Business Council of Texas was honored to host a number of state and national education leaders who came together to discuss higher education's role in creating an effective and aligned P-16 education system. The State of Texas faces a daunting challenge in improving our P-16 system and increasing rates of college…

  11. Effectiveness and Sustainability of Education about Incident Reporting at a University Hospital in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yuichi; Tanihara, Shinichi; Maeda, Chiemi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of educational interventions to encourage incident reporting. Methods This was a quasi-experimental design. The study involved nurses working in two gastroenterology surgical wards at Fukuoka University Hospital, Japan. The number of participants on each ward was 26 nurses at baseline. For the intervention group, we provided 15 minutes of education about patient safety and the importance of incident reporting once per month for six months. After the completion of the intervention, we compared incident reporting in the subsequent 12 months for both groups. Questionnaires about reasons/motives for reporting were administered three times, before the intervention, after the intervention, and six months after the intervention for both the intervention group and the control group. Results For the intervention group, incident reporting during the 6 months after the intervention period increased significantly compared with the baseline. During the same period, the reasons and motives for reporting changed significantly in the intervention group. The increase in reported incidents during the 6- to 12-month period following the intervention was not significant. In the control group, there was no significant difference during follow-up compared with the baseline. Conclusions A brief intervention about patient safety changed the motives for reporting incidents and the frequency of incidents reported by nurses working in surgical wards in a university hospital in Japan. However, the effect of the education decreased after six months following the education. Regular and long-term effort is required to maintain the effect of education. PMID:25152834

  12. Computing & Interpreting Effect Sizes in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on using effect sizes in research. A small heuristic data set is used in order to make the discussion concrete. Additionally, various admonitions for best practice in reporting and interpreting effect sizes are presented. Among these is the admonition to not use Cohen's benchmarks for "small," "medium," and…

  13. The Greenhouse Effect and Built Environment Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenall Gough, Annette; Gough, Noel

    The greenhouse effect has always existed. Without the greenhouse effect, Earth could well have the oven-like environment of Venus or the deep-freeze environment of Mars. There is some debate about how much the Earth's surface temperature will rise given a certain amount of increase in the amount of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous…

  14. Education, Social Capital and the Accordion Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorhaus, John

    2014-01-01

    The "accordion effect" is an effect of language which allows us to describe one and the same thing more or less narrowly. Social capital has been conceived in terms of our access to institutional resources, but also in terms that extend to the levels of trust and related resources found in the social networks we are embedded in. The…

  15. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  16. Effective Nurse Communication With Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Bob C; Lokhorst, Anne Marike; Rutten, Guy E H M; van Woerkum, Cees M J

    2014-04-22

    Many type 2 diabetes mellitus patients have difficulties reaching optimal blood glucose control. With patients treated in primary care by nurses, nurse communication plays a pivotal role in supporting patient health. The twofold aim of the present review is to categorize common barriers to nurse-patient communication and to review potentially effective communication methods. Important communication barriers are lack of skills and self-efficacy, possibly because nurses work in a context where they have to perform biomedical examinations and then perform patient-centered counseling from a biopsychosocial approach. Training in patient-centered counseling does not seem helpful in overcoming this paradox. Rather, patient-centeredness should be regarded as a basic condition for counseling, whereby nurses and patients seek to cooperate and share responsibility based on trust. Nurses may be more successful when incorporating behavior change counseling based on psychological principles of self-regulation, for example, goal setting, incremental performance accomplishments, and action planning. PMID:24757047

  17. Evaluation of Patient Education Materials: The Example of Circulating cell free DNA Testing for Aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Kloza, Edward M; Haddow, Paula K; Halliday, Jacquelyn V; O'Brien, Barbara M; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn M; Palomaki, Glenn E

    2014-09-10

    Informed consent is the process by which the treating health care provider discloses appropriate information to a competent patient so that the patient may make a voluntary choice to accept or refuse treatment. When the analysis of circulating cell free DNA (ccfDNA) became commercially available in 2011 through the Prenatal Diagnostic Laboratory at Women & Infants Hospital of Providence, Rhode Island to "high-risk" women, it provided an opportunity to examine how commercial laboratories informed potential consumers. We identified, via an internet search, four laboratories offering such testing in the United States and one in Europe. We evaluated patient educational materials (PEMs) from each using the Flesch Reading Ease method and a modified version of the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) criteria. Pamphlets were also reviewed for their inclusion of content recommendations from the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis, the National Society of Genetic Counselors, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists jointly with the Society of Maternal Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Genetics and Genomics. Reading levels were typically high (10th-12th grade). None of the pamphlets met all SAM criteria evaluated nor did any pamphlet include all recommended content items. To comply with readability and content recommendations more closely, Women & Infants Hospital created a new pamphlet to which it applied the same criteria, and also subjected it to focus group assessment. These types of analyses can serve as a model for future evaluations of similar patient educational materials. PMID:25204423

  18. Development Of An Educational Video To Improve Patient Knowledge And Communication With Their Healthcare Providers About Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Katz, Mira L; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D

    2009-07-01

    BACKGROUND: Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider and system level barriers. PURPOSE: To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. METHODS: Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of an educational video and focus groups of patients provided initial feedback about the developed CRC screening educational video. Medical personnel reviewed the video and made recommendations prior to final editing of the video. RESULTS: Patients identified CRC screening barriers and made suggestions about the information to include in the educational video. Their suggestions included using a healthcare provider to state the importance of completing CRC screening, demonstrate how to complete the fecal occult blood test, and that men and women from diverse ethnic groups and races could be included in the same video. Participants reviewed the developed video and mentioned that their suggestions were portrayed correctly, the video was culturally appropriate, and the information presented in the video was easy to understand. Medical personnel made suggestions on ways to improve the content and the delivery of the medical information prior to final editing of the video. DISCUSSION: Participants provided valuable information in the development of an educational video to improve patient knowledge and patient-provider communication about CRC screening. The educational video developed was based on the Protection Motivation Theory and addressed the colon cancer screening barriers identified in this mostly minority and low-income patient population. Future research will determine if CRC screening increases among patients who watch the educational video. TRANSLATION TO HEALTH EDUCATION PRACTICE: Educational videos can provide important information about CRC and CRC screening to average-risk adults. PMID:20209024

  19. [A national framework for educational programs in epileptic patients, children and adults].

    PubMed

    Prévos-Morgant, M; Petit, J; Grisoni, F; André-Obadia, N; Auvin, S; Derambure, P

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease with a wide range of presentations occurring at any age. It affects the patient's quality of life, implying a need for numerous healthcare services. Therapeutic education programs (TEPs) are designed to match patient age, disease course, and individual learning abilities. In France, these programs are proposed by the national health authorities (Superior Health Authority), and authorized by the Regional Health Agencies. Two years ago, a Therapeutic Education Programs Commission (TEPC), supported by the French League against Epilepsy (FLAE), was created. The goal was to bring together representative healthcare professionals in a working group in order to standardize practices. This led to the creation of a national reference of healthcare skills specific for children and adults with epilepsy. Five tables, for five "life periods", outline the framework of this professional reference tool. Program personalization, an essential part of TEPs, is necessary to develop a creative atmosphere. This slow process is specific to the various stages of life and can be influenced by the occurrence of various handicaps. Family and caregivers make key contributions to the process. The national framework for therapeutic education in epilepsy serves as a central crossroad where professions can find essential information to create or adapt their own TEPs. In the near future, regional experiences will be documented and collected for regular updates. This professional therapeutic education network will help promote therapeutic education programs and facilitate standard practices. Finally, several TEP files and tools will be shared on the FLAE website available for professional access. Today, the group's goal is to achieve national deployment of this "referential" framework. PMID:24947486

  20. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  1. Effect of education and clinical assessment on the accuracy of post partum blood loss estimation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This research aimed to assess the effect of health care provider education on the accuracy of post partum blood loss estimation. Methods A non-randomized observational study that was conducted at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2011. Hundred and twenty three health care providers who are involved in the estimation of post partum blood loss were eligible to participate. The participants were subjected to three research phases and an educational intervention. They have assessed a total of 30 different simulated blood loss stations, with 10 stations in each of the research phases. These phases took place before and after educational sessions on how to visually estimate blood loss and how to best utilize patient data in clinical scenarios. We have assessed the differences between the estimated blood loss and the actual measure. P-values were calculated to assess the differences between the three research phases estimations. Results The participants significantly under-estimated post partum blood loss. The accuracy was improved after training (p-value?patient’s clinical information (p-value?=?0.042). The overall results were not affected by the participants’ clinical backgrounds or their years of experience. Under-estimation was more prominent in cases where more than average-excessive blood losses were simulated while over-estimations or accurate estimations were more prominent in less than average blood loss incidents. Conclusion Simple education programmes can improve traditional findings related to under-estimation of blood loss. More sophisticated clinical education programmes may provide additional improvements. PMID:24646156

  2. The effects of a physician-nurse patient care team on patient satisfaction in an academic ED

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel DeBehnke; M. Chris Decker

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to investigate the effects of a RN\\/MD patient care team operational change on ED patient satisfaction. In period 1, RNs had standard room assignments and MDs evaluated patients based upon physician availability and perceived patient load. In period 2, RNs and MDs were organized into 2 patient care “teams” and patients were assigned to teams on an

  3. Patient education and intrauterine contraception: a study of two package inserts.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, H; Gordon, L; Mitchell, C; Place, V

    1977-01-01

    In July 1975 the Food and Drug Administration proposed a patient information package insert for all women considering use of an intrauterine device. In the same year we also prepared a brochure to be given to women considering use of a specific intrauterine contraceptive, the PROGESTASERT system. To compare these information sources for the patient, we surveyed by mail 253 women who are or had been PROGESTASERT system users. Each woman received either the FDA or our own prepared version. Comprehension of the two inserts was generally comparable, but readers of our insert found its informational content more complete. The survey findings affirmed the desirability of providing the patient with an educational brochure to be read prior to IUD insertion. PMID:855889

  4. Late effects of radiotherapy on patients with cerebellar medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, C.L.; Palkes, H.; Talent, B.; Kovnar, E.; Clouse, J.W.; Thomas, P.R.

    1984-09-01

    Nine long-term survivors of cerebellar medulloblastoma treated with surgery and irradiation were retrospectively examined with a complete battery of neuropsychological tests and the results compared with their nonirradiated siblings. Significant decreased scores were found in the full-scale intelligence quotients (IQ), performance IQ, and verbal IQ with all nine irradiated patients scoring below their siblings. Also, educational quotients (EQ) of the irradiated patients were 12 to 17 points below the nonirradiated siblings with arithmetic EQ significantly decreased. Most severely affected were those children younger than 8 years at time of irradiation. No correlation was found with whole-brain dose, or objective physical or neurologic findings.

  5. Effect of yogic education system and modern education system on memory

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, R; Nagendra, HR; Bhat, G Ramachandra

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: Memory is more associated with the temporal cortex than other cortical areas. The two main components of memory are spatial and verbal which relate to right and left hemispheres of the brain, respectively. Many investigations have shown the beneficial effects of yoga on memory and temporal functions of the brain. This study was aimed at comparing the effect of one Gurukula Education System (GES) school based on a yoga way of life with a school using the Modern Education System (MES) on memory. Materials and Methods: Forty nine boys of ages ranging from 11-13 years were selected from each of two residential schools, one MES and the other GES, providing similar ambiance and daily routines. The boys were matched for age and socioeconomic status. The GES educational program is based around integrated yoga modules while the MES provides a conventional modern education program. Memory was assessed by means of standard spatial and verbal memory tests applicable to Indian conditions before and after an academic year. Results: Between groups there was matching at start of the academic year, while after it the GES boys showed significant enhancement in both verbal and visual memory scores than MES boys (P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney test). Conclusions: The present study showed that the GES meant for total personality development adopting yoga way of life is more effective in enhancing visual and verbal memory scores than the MES. PMID:20842265

  6. Secondary prevention of diabetic foot infections in a Caribbean nation: a call for improved patient education.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shariful; Harnarayan, Patrick; Cawich, Shamir; Mahabir, Vijai; Budhooram, Steve; Bheem, Vinoo; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2013-09-01

    Most countries have instituted measures to limit the complications of diabetes. We evaluate secondary prevention strategies for diabetic foot infections in a Caribbean country. We performed a prospective questionnaire study evaluating all patients admitted to tertiary care hospitals across Trinidad and Tobago from July 2011 to June 2012. Primary study end points were the number of patient-detected injuries and the time interval between injury and presentation. Secondary end points included the practice of regular foot inspection (?2 foot examinations per week) for early detection and the use of self-directed nonmedical therapies to treat foot infections. There were 446 patients admitted with diabetic foot infections at an average age of 56.9 ± 12.4 years. Three hundred and fifty-six (80%) were previously hospitalized with foot infections and 226 (51%) had already sustained end organ injury from diabetes. There were 163 (36.6%) patients walking barefoot at the time of injury and 189 (42.4%) had footwear-related injuries. In 257 (57.6%) cases, patients identified their foot injury shortly after the event. Despite early detection, they presented to hospital after a mean interval of 6.2 ± 5.03 days, with 78 (30.4%) having tried some form of home therapy first. Overall, 190 (42.6%) patients did not practice regular foot examinations. There is room for improvement in secondary preventative measures for diabetic foot infections in this setting. Educational campaigns may be beneficial to educate diabetics on the dangers of walking barefoot, the importance of appropriate footwear, regular foot inspection, and the importance of seeking immediate medical attention instead of experimenting with home remedies. PMID:23667105

  7. Music Educators' Perceived Effectiveness of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWeelden, Kimberly; Whipple, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to examine whether music teachers' perceptions of effectiveness of inclusion, curriculum adaptations/modifications, or student achievement had altered from previous research findings 20 years before. A survey based on that used by Gfeller, Darrow, and Hedden was sent to music educators through the…

  8. Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Lounsbery, Monica A. F.

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of physical activity are well documented, and the important role that schools and physical education (PE) can play in reducing sedentary behavior and contributing to population health has been identified. Although effective teaching is ultimately judged by student achievement, a major component of teacher and school…

  9. Characteristics of Effective Interpreter Education Programs in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Lisa Ann Boegner

    2010-01-01

    The general purpose of this study was to investigate effective practices of interpreting education programs in the United States as measured by the readiness to credential gap. The increasing demand for interpreters has created an environment with under-credentialed interpreters and this is compounded by the fact that the field of interpreter…

  10. Effect of Single-Sex Education on Progress in GCSE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malacova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was carried out on national value-added data to study the effects of single-sex education on the progress of pupils from 2002 Key Stage 3 to 2004 GCSE. The analysis suggests that pupils in a selective environment achieve higher progress in single-sex schools; however, the advantage of single-sex schooling seems to decrease with…

  11. Aid Effectiveness, Transaction Costs and Conditionality in the Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford, Richard; Biswas, Shampa

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of transaction costs is a commonly mentioned yet rarely elaborated goal for aid effectiveness in educational development. The casual use of the concept of transaction costs conceals which costs may be reduced, which costs are required and, indeed, what transaction costs actually are. Examining issues related to harmonizing the…

  12. Monitoring the Effects of the Global Crisis on Education Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Gwang-Chol

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience and findings from the monitoring work carried out by UNESCO throughout 2009 to examine and assess the possible effects of the global financial and economic crisis on education provision in its Member States. The findings showed that although it was too early to ascertain the full extent of the impact of the…

  13. The Effects of Dance Education on Motor Performance of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldemir, Gulay Yasemin; Ramazanoglu, Nusret; Camliguney, Asiye Filiz; Kaya, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    This research has been aimed to demonstrate the effects of dance education on preadolescent children. A total of 114 students (56 of whom in dance group/58 in control group) at preadolescent (aged 11 [plus or minus] 0.0 year) and adolescent (aged 14 [plus or minus] 0.0 year) stages participated in the research. Prior to dance classes a variety of…

  14. The Effect of Migraine Headache on Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Daniel I.; Sabia, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that migraine headaches are common and debilitating, little is known about their effect on educational attainment. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the relationship between migraine headache and three outcomes: high school grade point average, the probability of graduating…

  15. The effect of veterans' benefits on education and earnings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua D. Angrist

    1993-01-01

    Veterans benefits that subsidize education and training constitute the largest federal program for student aid. Using data from the 1987 Survey of Veterans, the author presents estimates of the effect of veterans benefits on schooling completed since entering the military and on subsequent earnings. Veterans benefits are estimated to increase schooling by roughly 1.4 years, which implies annual earnings approximately

  16. Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences. Educational Practices Series-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    This booklet is a synthesis of research on social sciences teaching that has been shown to have a positive effect on a range of desirable student outcomes: cognitive, skills, participatory and affective outcomes. Education in the social sciences plays an important role in developing students' sense of identity and influencing the ways in which…

  17. Virtual Classroom Participants' Views for Effective Synchronous Education Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaman, Selcuk; Aydemir, Melike; Kucuk, Sevda; Yildirim, Gurkan

    2013-01-01

    Virtual classroom (VC) is the preferred application in distance education since it provides simultaneous interaction and a communication environment between the student and the instructor. The aim of this study is to determine the key components which make VC sessions effective in terms of environment and method. Determination of these components…

  18. Direct and Indirect Effects of Online Learning on Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Namin; Chan, Jason K. Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study that investigates the effects of online learning on distance education students in an open university context. Two hypotheses are posited: (1) a direct relationship exists between students involvement in online learning and distance learning outcomes, and (2) an indirect relationship exists between these…

  19. The Effects of College Type and Characteristics on Educational Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kristine L.

    The effects of institutional types and their structural and compositional characteristics on students entering two- or four-year academic programs were examined, with a focus on students' educational attainment. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972. Individual student variables were considered,…

  20. Effective Practices and Structures for Middle Grades Education. Policy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Douglas

    This document draws upon theory and research about early adolescence and about the effects of middle grades structures and practices on student outcomes. The purpose is to identify specific problem areas and promising innovations that should be considered by policymakers as they establish guidelines for the restructuring of education in the middle…

  1. Revealing the Effects of Cognitive Education Programmes through Dynamic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzuriel, David

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of dynamic assessment (DA) in revealing outcomes of cognitive education programmes. Three programmes based on "mediated learning experience" theory are reviewed: "Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment", "Bright Start", and "Peer Mediation with Young Children". In all three…

  2. Effect of Sexual Education on Sexual Health in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnam, Farnaz; Pakgohar, Minoo; Mirmohamadali, Mandana; Mahmoodi, Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a special sex education program in sexual health on Iranian newly-wed couples. A sample of 64 couples referred to three health centers of Tehran Medicine University, a few months prior to their marriage, were divided into case and control groups. The case group received three lecture sessions…

  3. [Internet-based continuing medical education: as effective as live continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Hervé; Chabot, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    E-learning consists in using new multimedia and Internet technologies to improve the quality of learning activities by facilitating access to resources and services, as well as exchanges and remote collaboration. The Internet is used for adult education in most professional domains, but its use for continuing medical education is less developed. Advantages are observed for teachers (e.g., permanent updating, interactive links, illustrations, archiving, and collective intelligence) and for the learners (e.g., accessibility, autonomy, flexibility, and adaptable pace). Research and meta-analyses have shown that e-CME is as effective as live events for immediate and retained learning. English-language educational medical websites that grant CME credits are numerous; few such French-language sites can currently grant credits. Accreditation of websites for CME, in its infancy in Europe, is common in North America. PMID:19679430

  4. National survey addressing the information needs of primary care physicians: Side effect management of patients on androgen deprivation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Soeyonggo, Tony; Locke, Jennifer; Giudice, Maria Elizabeth Del; Alibhai, Shabbir; Fleshner, Neil Eric; Warde, Padraig

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a common treatment for prostate cancer with numerous side effects. We assess primary care physicians’ (PCPs) knowledge of ADT side effects and their interest in increasing their knowledge in this area. Methods: A list of active Canadian PCPs was obtained using the Canadian Medical Directory. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 600 randomly selected physicians. We collected PCPs’ demographic information, experience with ADT management, knowledge regarding ADT side effects and desired sources for obtaining knowledge on ADT management. Results: In total, we received 103 completed questionnaires. Of these, 89% of PCPs had patients on ADT. One-third of respondents prescribed ADT and over half of them administered ADT annually. Thirty-eight percent felt their knowledge of ADT side effects was inadequate and 50% felt uncomfortable counselling patients on ADT. Many PCPs were less familiar with the incidence of functional side effects of ADT (i.e., hot flashes, fatigue and erectile dysfunction) compared to life-threatening side effects (i.e., cardiovascular events, metabolic syndrome, fractures). In terms of increasing their knowledge of ADT side effects, 82% of PCPs would use educational resources if they were available (52% and 32% preferred continued medical education [CME] events and educational pamphlets, respectively). Conclusions: PCPs play an important role in managing ADT side effects. There is poor awareness of the prevalence of ADT side effects, and many are uncomfortable in managing these side effects. These areas may be addressed through CME programs and educational pamphlets. PMID:24839488

  5. When does education matter? The protective effect of education for cohorts graduating in bad times.

    PubMed

    Cutler, David M; Huang, Wei; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2015-02-01

    Using Eurobarometer data, we document large variation across European countries in education gradients in income, self-reported health, life satisfaction, obesity, smoking and drinking. While this variation has been documented previously, the reasons why the effect of education on income, health and health behaviors varies is not well understood. We build on previous literature documenting that cohorts graduating in bad times have lower wages and poorer health for many years after graduation, compared to those graduating in good times. We investigate whether more educated individuals suffer smaller income and health losses as a result of poor labor market conditions upon labor market entry. We confirm that a higher unemployment rate at graduation is associated with lower income, lower life satisfaction, greater obesity, more smoking and drinking later in life. Further, education plays a protective role for these outcomes, especially when unemployment rates are high: the losses associated with poor labor market outcomes are substantially lower for more educated individuals. Variation in unemployment rates upon graduation can potentially explain a large fraction of the variance in gradients across different countries. PMID:25113567

  6. Effects of isolation on patients and staff.

    PubMed

    Lupión-Mendoza, Carmen; Antúnez-Domínguez, María J; González-Fernández, Carmen; Romero-Brioso, Concepción; Rodriguez-Bano, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    A matched case-control study and a qualitative investigation were used to identify adverse events in diverse dimensions associated with isolation. Overall satisfaction with care was similar among patients in isolation, but staff was found to be less responsive. Isolation was also associated with depression, but not with increased anxiety. PMID:25721058

  7. A hairy tale: successful patient education strategies to reduce prehospital hair removal by patients undergoing elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Ng, W; Alexander, D; Kerr, B; Ho, M F; Amato, M; Katz, K

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate hair removal is a risk factor for postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs). A series of obstetric patient awareness interventions were introduced regarding hair self-removal before presentation at hospital. Active inpatient and outpatient surveillance of SSIs following caesarean section was undertaken prospectively. The rate of hair self-removal decreased significantly from 41% (2008) to 27% (2011) after implementation of posters and enhanced prenatal education (P = 0.048). Concurrently, a 51% reduction was seen in the SSI rate following caesarean section. This multi-faceted strategy proved successful in reducing prehospital hair self-removal overall, particularly shaving. Other simultaneous SSI prevention interventions are also likely to have contributed to the reduction in SSI rate. PMID:23103244

  8. Planning and implementing a systems-based patient safety curriculum in medical education.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David A; Cowan, James; Holzmueller, Christine; Wu, Albert W; Bass, Eric; Pronovost, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Using a successful 6-step approach to medical curriculum development, a multidisciplinary systems-based safety curriculum for first-year medical students was developed and implemented. A targeted needs assessment was completed based on students' perceptions of patient safety. Goals and objectives identified were the following: (1) provide a practical framework to identify defects, (2) identify patient hazards, (3) investigate an adverse event, (4) understand incident reporting, (5) understand the impact of teamwork and communication in safety, (6) acquire skills to improve teamwork and communication, and (7) learn to disclose medical mistakes. Students were able to identify many of the teamwork and communication problems entrenched in our current health care culture. Interactive learning was important to the learning process and, on evaluation, deemed a valuable experience. The findings indicate that this is an effective curriculum development strategy and that systems-based patient safety was effective in changing perceptions of patient harm and the provider's role in patient safety. PMID:18658100

  9. Combating effects of racism through a cultural immersion medical education program.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Peter; Dowell, Anthony; Parkin, Chris; Thompson, Caroline

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective from New Zealand on the role of medical education in addressing racism in medicine. There is increasing recognition of racism in health care and its adverse effects on the health status of minority populations in many Western countries. New Zealand nursing curricula have introduced the concept of cultural safety as a means of conveying the idea that cultural factors critically influence the relationship between carer and patient. Cultural safety aims to minimize any assault on the patient's cultural identity. However, despite the work of various researchers and educators, there is little to suggest that undergraduate medical curricula pay much attention yet to the impact of racism on medical education and medical practice. The authors describe a cultural immersion program for third-year medical students in New Zealand and discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses of such an approach. The program is believed to have great potential as a method of consciousness raising among medical students to counter the insidious effects of non-conscious inherited racism. Apart from the educational benefits, the program has fostered a strong working relationship between an indigenous health care organization and the medical school. In general, it is hoped that such programs will help medical educators to engage more actively with the issue of racism and be prepared to experiment with novel approaches to teaching and learning. More specifically, the principles of cultural immersion, informed by the concept of cultural safety, could be adapted to indigenous and minority groups in urban settings to provide medical students with the foundations for a lifelong commitment to practicing medicine in a culturally safe manner. PMID:12805038

  10. Education and survival: Birth cohort, period, and age effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane S. Lauderdale

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have found that educational differences in mortality are weaker among the elderly. In this study I examine\\u000a whether either cohort or period effects may have influenced the interpretation of age effects. Six 10-year birth cohorts are\\u000a followed over 30 years through decennial censuses. Differential survival is inferred from changes in the relative proportions\\u000a of a cohort in each

  11. Practice Education: Teaching Instrumentalists to Practice Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oare, Steve

    2011-01-01

    To practice effectively, one must first know how to practice. The practice process is affected by one's ability to set goals, design strategies, self-assess, and to have an aural image of the music being learned. The author proposes a model reflecting the factors involved in practice and proposes a number of strategies that can be used to…

  12. An Evaluation Of The Effectiveness Of A Diversity Educational Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonya Annette Berkley

    2010-01-01

    \\u000aAN EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A DIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM\\u000aby\\u000aSONYA A. BERKLEY\\u000aMay 2010\\u000aAdvisor: Mary Cay Sengstock\\u000aMajor: Sociology\\u000aDegree: Doctor of Philosophy\\u000aAdministrators and educators have been given the responsibility of working towards improving racial and social interactions in their school settings. It is important to note that most of the literature on diversity programming suggests

  13. Does Targeted Education of Emergency Physicians Improve Their Comfort Level in Treating Psychiatric Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Reetta; Mullis, Diana M.; Jauch, Edward C.; Carr, Christine M.; Raney, Larry; Martin, Renee’ H.; Walker, Brenda J.; Saef, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We determined if targeted education of emergency physicians (EPs) regarding the treatment of mental illness will improve their comfort level in treating psychiatric patients boarding in the emergency department (ED) awaiting admission. Methods: We performed a pilot study examining whether an educational intervention would change an EP’s comfort level in treating psychiatric boarder patients (PBPs). We identified a set of psychiatric emergencies that typically require admission or treatment beyond the scope of practice of emergency medicine. Diagnoses included major depression, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar affective disorder, general anxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and criminal behavior. We designed equivalent surveys to be used before and after an educational intervention. Each survey consisted of 10 scenarios of typical psychiatric patients. EPs were asked to rate their comfort levels in treating the described patients on a visual analogue scale. We calculated summary scores for the non intervention survey group (NINT) and intervention survey group (INT) and compared them using Student’s t-test. Results: Seventy-nine percent (33/42) of eligible participants completed the pre-intervention survey (21 attendings, 12 residents) and comprised the NINT group. Fifty-five percent (23/42) completed the post-intervention survey (16 attendings, 7 residents) comprising the INT group. A comparison of summary scores between ‘NINT’ and ‘INT’ groups showed a highly significant improvement in comfort levels with treating the patients described in the scenarios (P = 0.003). Improvements were noted on separate analysis for faculty (P = 0.039) and for residents (P = 0.012). Results of a sensitivity analysis excluding one highly significant scenario showed decreased, but still important differences between the NINT and INT groups for all participants and for residents, but not for faculty (all: P = 0.05; faculty: P = 0.25; residents: P = 0.03). Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that the comfort level of EPs, when asked to treat PBPs, may be improved with education. We believe our data support further study of this idea and of whether an improved comfort level will translate to a willingness to treat. PMID:23359642

  14. Digital Photography as an Educational Food Logging Tool in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Lessons Learned from A Randomized, Crossover Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ehrmann, Brett J.; Anderson, Robert M.; Piatt, Gretchen A.; Funnell, Martha M.; Rashid, Hira; Shedden, Kerby; Douyon, Liselle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study is to investigate the utility of, and areas of refinement for, digital photography as an educational tool for food logging in obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Thirty-three patients aged 18-70 with T2DM, BMI at least 30 kg/m2, and A1C 7.5-9% were recruited from an endocrinology clinic and randomized to a week of food logging using a digital camera (DC) or paper diary (PD), crossing over for week two. Patients then viewed a presentation about dietary effects on blood glucose, using patient DC and blood glucose entries. Outcomes of adherence (based on number of weekly entries), changes in mean blood glucose and frequency of blood glucose checks, and patient satisfaction were compared between methods. Patient feedback on the DC intervention and presentation was also analyzed. Results Thirty patients completed the study. Adherence was identical across methods. The mean difference in number of entries was not significant between methods. This difference increased and neared statistical significance (favoring DC) among patients who were adherent for at least one week (21 entries, with 2 entries per day for 5 of 7 days, n=25). Mean blood glucose did not significantly decrease in either method. Patient satisfaction was similar between interventions. Feedback indicated concerns over photograph accuracy, forgetting to use the cameras, and embarrassment using them in public. Conclusion Though comparable to PD in adherence, blood glucose changes, and patient satisfaction in this pilot trial, patient feedback suggested specific areas of refinement to maximize utility of DC-based food logging as an educational tool in T2DM. PMID:24168836

  15. Levodopa effect upon functional balance of Parkinson's disease patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabella C. Nova; Mônica R. Perracini; Henrique B. Ferraz

    2004-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate functional balance in PD patients taking levodopa during their ‘on’ and ‘off’ phases.Design. We evaluated 23 PD patients who were manifesting fluctuations of levodopa effect. All patients were assessed by Hoehn–Yahr, UPDRS-III and Schwab–England rating scales and by the Berg functional balance scale during a practically defined ‘off’ (at least after

  16. Haemodynamic effects of prenalterol in patients with coronary heart disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I Hutton; R G Murray; R N Boyes; A P Rae; W S Hillis

    1980-01-01

    The haemodynamic effects of prenalterol, a new selective beta-1 adrenoreceptor agonist, have been studied in patients with coronary heart disease. The drug was administered intravenously in a dosage of 0.5 to 2.5 micrograms\\/kg body weight to 20 patients undergoing coronary angiography and to 10 patients with a recent myocardial infarction, who had clinical evidence of left ventricular dysfunction. Left ventricular

  17. Study of the impacts of patient-educators on the course of basic sciences in dental studies.

    PubMed

    Renard, E; Alliot-Licht, B; Gross, O; Roger-Leroi, V; Marchand, C

    2015-02-01

    Ever since 2006, Nantes University dental educators have started organising lectures led by the mother of a young patient suffering from ectodermic dysplasia (patient-educator) to help second-year students to better understand how important it is for their future dental work to better understand basic sciences. In this study, we have analysed this training experience on students' motivation. For this purpose, students were asked to complete questionnaires 10 days after the patient-educator's lecture (early assessment; n = 193) and 4 years later, during the last year of their dental studies (delayed assessment; n = 47). Moreover, 3 years after the first lecture, we analysed the ability of students to diagnose a mother carrying the ectodermic dysplasia genetic disorder, using a case-based learning exercise with a patient showing dental features similar to those exposed by the patient-educator (measure of knowledge; n = 42). Ten days after the lecture, the early assessment shows that all the students were interested in the lecture and 59% of the students declared being motivated to find out more about genetics whilst 54% declared the same thing about embryology courses. Moreover, 4 years later, 67% of the students remembered the patient-educator's lecture a little or very well. Three years after the course, 83% of the students diagnosed ectodermal dysplasia whilst studying the case-based example that listed typical dental phenotypes. In conclusion, this study shows that this original educational approach enhances dental students' motivation in learning basic sciences and that patient-educators could offer many benefits for students and patients. PMID:24628743

  18. Electronic health record training in undergraduate medical education: bridging theory to practice with curricula for empowering patient- and relationship-centered care in the computerized setting.

    PubMed

    Wald, Hedy S; George, Paul; Reis, Shmuel P; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2014-03-01

    While electronic health record (EHR) use is becoming state-of-the-art, deliberate teaching of health care information technology (HCIT) competencies is not keeping pace with burgeoning use. Medical students require training to become skilled users of HCIT, but formal pedagogy within undergraduate medical education (UME) is sparse. How can medical educators best meet the needs of learners while integrating EHRs into medical education and practice? How can they help learners preserve and foster effective communication skills within the computerized setting? In general, how can UME curricula be devised for skilled use of EHRs to enhance rather than hinder provision of effective, humanistic health care?Within this Perspective, the authors build on recent publications that "set the stage" for next steps: EHR curricula innovation and implementation as concrete embodiments of theoretical underpinnings. They elaborate on previous calls for maximizing benefits and minimizing risks of EHR use with sufficient focus on physician-patient communication skills and for developing core competencies within medical education. The authors describe bridging theory into practice with systematic longitudinal curriculum development for EHR training in UME at their institution, informed by Kern and colleagues' curriculum development framework, narrative medicine, and reflective practice. They consider this innovation within a broader perspective-the overarching goal of empowering undergraduate medical students' patient- and relationship-centered skills while effectively demonstrating HCIT-related skills. PMID:24448045

  19. Using the PRACTICE mnemonic to apply cultural competency to genetics in medical education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P Preston; Kamei, Robert K; Sundquist, Janet; Khanna, Niharika; Palmer, Elissa J; Palmer, Trish

    2005-12-01

    Medical education curricula increasingly are incorporating courses on cultural competency and skills development in working with ethnically diverse patient populations as well as courses on genetics and genomics. The authors support these efforts and believe the next step is integration of genetics into cultural competency programs and similarly, cultural competency into genetics curricula. In this paper, the authors describe the work of the Genetics in Primary Care Faculty Development Working Group on Cultural Competency, a federally-funded initiative to prepare generalist faculty to teach genetics as part of ambulatory education. Over a 12-month period, this team wrote a module on cultural competency and nine new clinical cases, and developed the PRACTICE mnemonic (prevalence, risk, attitude, communication, testing, investigation, consent, empowerment) to help health care professionals integrate cultural competency skills in genetics into primary care. More specifically, the PRACTICE mnemonic integrates information emerging from experts in health disparities and doctor-patient communication to build a comprehensive model for addressing the relevance of culture and ethnicity in the delivery of genetic services. Lastly, this paper illustrates a systematic method of covering key areas of cultural competency through discussion of a patient with a genetic disorder as well as presents an argument as to why cultural competency is highly relevant to the delivery of genetic services especially as part of generalists' clinical practice. PMID:16306282

  20. Patient safety in nursing education: contexts, tensions and feeling safe to learn.

    PubMed

    Steven, Alison; Magnusson, Carin; Smith, Pam; Pearson, Pauline H

    2014-02-01

    Education is crucial to how nurses practice, talk and write about keeping patients safe. The aim of this multisite study was to explore the formal and informal ways the pre-registration medical, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy students learn about patient safety. This paper focuses on findings from nursing. A multi-method design underpinned by the concept of knowledge contexts and illuminative evaluation was employed. Scoping of nursing curricula from four UK university programmes was followed by in-depth case studies of two programmes. Scoping involved analysing curriculum documents and interviews with 8 programme leaders. Case-study data collection included focus groups (24 students, 12 qualified nurses, 6 service users); practice placement observation (4 episodes=19 hrs) and interviews (4 Health Service managers). Within academic contexts patient safety was not visible as a curricular theme: programme leaders struggled to define it and some felt labelling to be problematic. Litigation and the risk of losing authorisation to practise were drivers to update safety in the programmes. Students reported being taught idealised skills in university with an emphasis on 'what not to do'. In organisational contexts patient safety was conceptualised as a complicated problem, addressed via strategies, systems and procedures. A tension emerged between creating a 'no blame' culture and performance management. Few formal mechanisms appeared to exist for students to learn about organisational systems and procedures. In practice, students learnt by observing staff who acted as variable role models; challenging practice was problematic, since they needed to 'fit in' and mentors were viewed as deciding whether they passed or failed their placements. The study highlights tensions both between and across contexts, which link to formal and informal patient safety education and impact negatively on students' feelings of emotional safety in their learning. PMID:23726756