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Sample records for effective patient education

  1. Choosing effective patient education materials

    MedlinePLUS

    ... best. Keep your assessment of the patient in mind. Consider factors such as literacy and culture as you develop a plan. Avoid fear tactics. Focus instead on the benefits of education. Tell your patient what to pay special attention ...

  2. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients’ Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento e Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Fernandes, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n?=?102) over 9?months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In the latter, a psycho-educational program was implemented and 6?months later measured adherence to HAART. Knowledge about the infection, CD4 T lymphocytes and HIV-ribonucleic acid values were measured before and after this program. The sample was predominantly male (70%), heterosexual (78%), with a mean age of 49 (SD?=?12.7) years, and 48% of participants were not adhering to HAART. After the program, non-adherence decreased to 21.6%. Knowledge about the infection increased from 79 to 97%. A significant increase in CD4 T lymphocytes (mean 540–580) and a decrease in viral load (mean 5411–3052) were observed, the latter of statistical significance. This program seems to be feasible and efficient, improving adherence to HAART. PMID:25642197

  3. Effect of standard versus patient-targeted in-patient education on patients' anxiety about self-care after discharge from cardiovascular surgery clinics.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Tülin; Gürkan, Selami; Gür, Özcan; Ünsal, Cüneyt; Gökta?, Sonay Baltac?; Özen, Yücel

    2014-01-01

    We compared standard and patient-targeted in-patient education in terms of their effect on patients' anxiety. One hundred and ninety-eight patients who were hospitalised for coronary artery bypass surgery were given standard education (group 1) or individualised education (group 2) on the management of their healthcare after discharge. Patients in group 2 were assessed on the patient learning needs scale and were given education according to their individual needs. The level of anxiety was measured by the state-trait anxiety inventory. Anxiety scores were significantly lower in group 2 than group 1 after education (p < 0.001). While state anxiety did not change after education in group 1 (p = 0272), it decreased significantly in group 2 (p < 0.001). For cardiovascular surgery patients, patient-targeted in-patient education was more effective than standard education in decreasing anxiety levels, therefore the content of the education should be individualised according to the patient's particular needs. PMID:25363789

  4. Strategies for selecting effective patient nutrition education materials.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Laura H

    2010-10-01

    Nutrition and diet therapy are at the center of health promotion activities and self-management of chronic diseases. To assist an individual in making informed decisions regarding his or her diet and increase adherence to dietary recommendations or treatments, healthcare professionals must select health information that is appropriate to the client's level of understanding. A systematic approach in the evaluation of patient education material, whether in print or on the World Wide Web, must focus on the information's content, literacy level, graphical displays, layout and typography, motivating principles, cultural relevance, and feasibility. Additional criteria should be evaluated when accessing Web sites and include source, site credibility, conflict of interest, disclaimer, disclosure, navigation, and interactivity information. PMID:20962303

  5. Caring for Dying Patients: Attitude of Nursing Students and Effects of Education

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mojtaba; Rafiei, Hossein; Nassehi, Asra; Soleimani, Farzaneh; Arab, Mansuor; Noormohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Education about caring for dying patients could be effective in changing nursing students’ attitude toward caring for dying patients. Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students’ attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude. Materials and Methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method with using one-group pre-test/post-test design conducted in Bam in southeast of Iran. The attitude of nursing students was measured using Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale before and after an educational intervention. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 18 software. Results: Of 32 students, 30 participated in this study (response rate of 94%). Only 20% of the students reported previous experience of dying patients in their clinical courses. Students showed moderately negative to neutral attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Education has improved students’ attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 ± 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 ± 0.33) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Educational programs about death and caring for dying patients should be added to undergraduate nursing curricula. Further research recommended examining nursing students’ knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge. PMID:26009673

  6. Effect of education on self-efficacy of Turkish patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ma?firet; A?ti, Türkinaz

    2004-10-01

    This study was designed to compare the effect of structured education on self-efficacy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study was carried out with an experimental group on which a structured education was provided, and a control group on which only educational advice was provided. There were 30 patients in both groups. Control and experimental group measurements were obtained on the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). There was a significant difference between control group and experimental group scores on the CSES. Self-efficacy, as it affects managing or avoiding breathing difficulty, was measured before and after the structured education program and the nursing care. Patients' self-efficacy scores significantly improved after the structured education and remained significantly improved 1-month later. Standard nursing care alone was also effective in significantly improving self-efficacy scores, but patients' scores 1-month later were not significantly better than pre-program scores. This study indicates that a planned education program that is more effective in improving self-efficacy in patients with COPD. PMID:15476998

  7. Patient Education on Pain

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    ... People with Pain Press Room Position Statements Patient Education on Pain AAPM Past President, Perry G. Fine, ... Member Center Patient Center Research Advocacy Practice Management Education Annual Meeting Contact Us Privacy Policy Sitemap Close ...

  8. Mail Education Is as Effective as In-Class Education in Hypertensive Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miyong T.; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Hae-Ra; Jeong, Seonghee; Lee, Jong Eun; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kim B.; Hill, Martha N.

    2010-01-01

    Many Korean American persons have hypertension, but competing life priorities often prevent them from attending health-promotion educational activities. Using principles of community-based participatory research, the authors conducted a prospective clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of a mailed vs an in-class culturally tailored education intervention. A total of 380 hypertensive Korean American persons from the Baltimore/Washington area were assigned to a more intense in-class education group or a less intensive mail education group. Evaluation of postintervention blood pressure (BP) outcomes revealed that significant reductions in systolic BP (13.3 mm Hg and 16.1 mm Hg, respectively) and diastolic BP (9.5 mm Hg and 10.9 mm Hg) and increases in BP control rates (42.3% and 54.3%) were achieved in both groups. No significant differences in BP outcomes between groups, however, were found. In conclusion, education by mail was an effective strategy for improving BP control and may be a viable approach for other immigrant groups if the education materials address their cultural needs. PMID:18326962

  9. Psychological effects of a cosmetic education programme in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, H Y; Kim, J H; Choi, S; Kang, E; Oh, S; Kim, J Y; Kim, S W

    2015-07-01

    Treatments for breast cancer often include interventions related to psychosocial issues such as negative body image, loss of femininity, and low self-esteem. We identified the psychological effects of a cosmetics education programme in patients with breast cancer. Cosmetic programme is a specific care designed to help patients handle appearance-related side effects. Thirty-one women with breast cancer at a university hospital in South Korea who received a cosmetics education programme were compared with 29 subjects in a control group who received the treatment as usual. Psychological factors including distress, self-esteem, and sexual functioning were assessed three times (before and after the programme, and at the 1-month follow-up). After the programme, patients in the treatment group were significantly less likely than those in the control group to rely on distress (P?=?0.038) and avoidance coping (P?education programme for reducing distress and reliance on negative coping strategies. Implementing a cosmetics programme for patients with breast cancer may encourage patients to control negative psychological factors. PMID:25651297

  10. The effect of video-based education on patient anxiety in men undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Tarhan, Huseyin; Cakmak, Ozgur; Unal, Elif; Akarken, Ilker; Un, Sitki; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Konyalioglu, Ersin; Isoglu, Cemal Selcuk; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We assess the effect of video-based education on patient anxiety during transrectal prostate biopsy. Methods: A total of 246 patients who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy were prospectively enrolled in the study. Group 1 included 123 patients who received both written and video-based education, while Group 2 included 123 patients who received only written instructions regarding prostate biopsies. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used to assess state and trait anxiety (STAI-S/T) After completing the STAI-S and STAI-T questionnaires, all patients in Group 1 received written information and video-based education and they again completed STAI-S before the biopsy. On the contrary, after completing the STAI-S and STAI-T questionnaires, the patients in Group 2 received only written information and then they completed the STAI-S before the biopsy. Moreover, a visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess pain scores during digital rectal examination, probe insertion, periprostatic local anesthesic infiltration, and biopsy. Results: No difference was noted between 2 groups regarding VAS scores. Comparing the 2 groups on baseline anxiety, we found that trait anxiety scores (STAI-T) were similar (p = 0.238). Pre-information STAI-S scores were similar in both groups (p = 0.889) and they both indicated high anxiety levels (score ?42). While post-information STAI-S scores remained high in Group 2, post-information STAI-S scores significantly decreased in Group 1 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Undergoing a prostate biopsy is stressful and may cause anxiety for patients. Video-based education about the procedure can diminish patient anxiety. PMID:25553162

  11. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  12. How important is patient education?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, C; Salcedo-Rocha, A L; Prieto-Parra, R E; Galvan-Villegas, F

    2000-12-01

    The prevalence and disability rate of rheumatic diseases are increasing. It seems that non-medical causes play an important role in the morbidity, disability and mortality of these patients. Efforts to reduce their impact are extremely important. Patient education is thought to be one way to limit disability in rheumatic diseases and to achieve an improvement in quality of life. In this chapter, we review the influence of non-medical causes of morbidity on disease outcome, some basic aspects of education and the evidence of the effectiveness of patient education in diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia syndrome. PMID:11092796

  13. Meta-analysis: The effect of patient education on bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chen-Wang; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Wang, Horng-Yuan; Chu, Cheng-Hsin; Wang, Tsang-En; Hung, Chien-Yuan; Shieh, Tze-Yu; Lin, Yang-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The proportion of outpatients with inadequate bowel preparation before colonoscopy is high owing to patient unawareness of its importance and poor adherence to instructions. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation before colonoscopy. Patients and methods: A comprehensive literature review identified randomized controlled trials measuring the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation. Two reviewers independently screened relevant articles, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. The primary outcome was the quality of each bowel preparation before colonoscopy, using a particular assessment scale. The secondary outcomes were polyp detection rates during the procedure and the need for a repeat colonoscopy due to incomplete examination. Results: Nine randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis. In all, 2885 patients were enrolled, with 1458 receiving education and 1427 assigned to the control group.?An educational intervention before colonoscopy significantly improved bowel preparation (relative risk [RR]?=?1.22; 95?% confidence interval [CI], 1.10?–?1.36), however, no significant differences were identified in polyp detection rates (RR?=?1.14; 95?%CI 0.87?–?1.51) or the need for repeat colonoscopy (RR?=?0.52; 95?%CI 0.25?–?1.04) between the groups. Asymmetry in the appearance of the funnel plot and the result of Egger test (P?patients before colonoscopy ensures better bowel preparation. However, evidence is insufficient to assess improvements in polyp detection rate and avoidance of a repeat colonoscopy. Despite these encouraging observations, this meta-analysis had some limitations, including potential publication bias and significant heterogeneity of the types of bowel purgatives. These results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:26716129

  14. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  15. The Effects of Health Education on Patients with Hypertension in China: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, L. J.; Meng, Q.; He, S. W.; Yin, X. L.; Tang, Z. L.; Bo, H. Y.; Lan, X. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study collected on from all research relating to health education and hypertension in China and, with the aid of meta-analysis tools, assessed the outcomes of such health education. The analysis provides a basis for the further development of health-education programmes for patients with hypertension. Methods: Literature searches…

  16. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational program for improving quality of life of fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Rita; Peñarubia, Maria T; Luciano, Juan V; Blanco, Maria E; Jiménez, Mónica; Montesano, Adrián; Verduras, Camino; Ruiz, José M; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background Most fibromyalgia patients are seen in primary care (PC). However, the effectiveness of the treatments prescribed by general practitioners is usually minimal. The main objective of the present research is to assess the efficacy of structured psycho-educational intervention, combined with relaxation, developed to improve the quality of life of patients suffering fibromyalgia (FM). The second objective is to assess the cost-effectiveness of this multimodal intervention. Method/Design Design. Randomized controlled trial with a 12-month follow-up involving two groups, one of which is the intervention group that includes patients receiving a psychoeducational program and the other the control group consisting of patients treated for FM in the usual way. Setting. Three urban PC centers in the province of Barcelona (Spain). Sample. The total sample comprises 218 patients (over 18 years of age) suffering FM, selected from a database (Rheumatology service-Viladecans Hospital) of patients with this illness. Only those patients introduced in the database between the years 2005 and 2007 were included in the selection. Selected patients will be asked for written informed consent to participate in the study. Intervention. Multi-component program including information about the illness, counselling about physical exercise and training in autogenic relaxation. The intervention consists of nine 2-hour sessions delivered during a two-month period. The pharmacological treatment prescribed by the physician was maintained in both groups. Main variables. Sociodemographic characteristics, quality of life, use and cost of healthcare and social services. Measures. Quality of life is to be measured with the FIQ and the EuroQol-5D, and the use of healthcare services with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI). These variables will be measured before the beginning of the program (baseline) and 1, 2, 6 and 12 months later. Discussion This research project is an attempt to demonstrate that a psycho-educational program implemented in the context of PC can produce a significant increase in the quality of life for patients with FM, as well as a decrease in the use of healthcare and social services, compared with usual care. Trial registration NCT00550966

  17. Patient Education Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn

    This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood and…

  18. The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

  19. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective

  20. Comparing the Effect of Two Educational Programs on the Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Shahram; Zarea, Kourosh; Dashtbozorgi, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various researchers have shown that the health level, performance status, and quality of life (QOL) are often less than expected especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of the two methods of educational programs on health- related QOL (HRQOL) in Iranian HD patients. Patients and Methods: In this quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest interventional study, we employed each subject as his/her own control. The study was conducted at the dialysis units in three major general hospitals affiliated with Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. A total of 90 HD patients were randomly allocated to two 45-patient groups of oral and video education programs, respectively. The educational programs included dietary and fluid regimens, the care of fistula and skin, and stress management. HRQOL was assessed in both groups using a Farsi version of the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) before and after the educational programs. Repeated measures analysis of variance and ANOVA were used for data analysis through SPSS. Results: SF-36 domains of physical functioning (P < 0.021), role physical (P < 0.031), social functioning (P < 0.001) and mental health (P < 0.001) were significantly increased in both oral and vide education groups after the interventions. There was no difference in the effectiveness of the two educational programs. Conclusions: Appropriate interventions may potentially lead to improvement in the HRQOL of these patients. Therefore, video education as an effective, inexpensive, simple, and attractive method is recommended for HD patients. PMID:25389489

  1. Comparison of the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction, walking, and patient education in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee Young; Lee, Haejung; Park, Jina

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction (K-MBSR), walking, and patient education regarding diabetes mellitus (DM) on stress response, glycemic control, and vascular inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A cluster randomized trial including 56 adults with diabetes mellitus (K-MBSR group?=?21, walking group?=?18, patient education group?=?17) was conducted between 13 July and 14 September 2012. The questionnaire included the Diabetes Distress Scale and Perceived Stress Response Inventory. Fasting blood samples were used to measure levels of cortisol, blood glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on stress, glycemic control, or vascular inflammation. However, in the K-MBSR and walking groups, significant reductions in the levels of serum cortisol and PAI-1 were observed. A significant reduction in psychological responses to stress was observed in the walking and patient education groups. Longitudinal studies could provide better insight into the impact of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on health outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26275164

  2. Vocal Hygiene Education, Voice Production Therapy, and the Role of Patient Adherence: A Treatment Effectiveness Study in Women with Phonotrauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Alison; Rutledge, John; Hembree, Amanda; Sheridan, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of vocal hygiene education (VHE) and voice production therapy (VP) in altering patient perception of vocal handicap in adult women with benign, bilateral phonotraumatic vocal fold lesions and the role of adherence in that perception. Method: Sixty-two women were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of VP (n = 31) or…

  3. Effect of Diet Education on Blood Pressure Changes and Interdialytic Weight in Hemodialysis Patients Admitted in Hajar Hospital in Shahrekord

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Fatemeh; Mobasheri, Mahmoud; Mirzaeian, Razieh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Nutrition is a key factor in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease because kidney burden decrease causes uremic reduction and its side effects. The aim of this research is to examine the effect of diet education on blood pressure changes and interdialytic weight in Hemodialysis patients admitted to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital in Shahrekord. Methods: This quasi-experimental and interventional study of 100 dialysis patients referred to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital was performed in a pre-test and post-test in 2011. Diet education, including face to face training with instruction booklets, were conducted in the two sessions. Having carried out the educational program, blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain were measured and recorded one month before and during three stages and after the educational program by researcher-designed checklists. The data were analyzed through SPSS 16 software by Paired t-test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that mean of primary weight of the patients increase from 66.15±15.10 to 64.43±14.67. Mean of Systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients in three stages were reduced to 6.65±1.51 mmg 2.24±1.82 mmg respectively. There was a significant difference between the creatinine amount in patients before and after of training (p?0.01) but no meaningful difference was observed between the BUN amount before and after of training (p?0.031). Conclusion: training to patients underwent hemodialysis in order to observe diet and its effects on improvement in treatment are of significant importance. PMID:25395881

  4. Effect of Diet Education on Blood Pressure Changes and Interdialytic Weight in Hemodialysis Patients Admitted in Hajar Hospital in Shahrekord

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Fatemeh; Mobasheri, Mahmoud; Mirzaeian, Razieh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Nutrition is a key factor in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease because kidney burden decrease causes uremic reduction and its side effects. The aim of this research is to examine the effect of diet education on blood pressure changes and interdialytic weight in Hemodialysis patients admitted to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital in Shahrekord. Methods: This quasi-experimental and interventional study of 100 dialysis patients referred to Hemodialysis ward of Hajar hospital was performed in a pre-test and post-test in 2011. Diet education, including face to face training with instruction booklets, were conducted in the two sessions. Having carried out the educational program, blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain were measured and recorded one month before and during three stages and after the educational program by researcher-designed checklists. The data were analyzed through Spss16 software by Paired t-test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that mean of primary weight of the patients increase from 66.15±15.10 to 64.43±14.67. Mean of Systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients in three stages were reduced to 6.65±1.51 mmg 2.24±1.82 mmg respectively. There was a significant difference between the creatinine amount in patients before and after of training (p?0.01) but no meaningful difference was observed between the BUN amount before and after of training (p?0.031). Conclusion: Training to patients underwent hemodialysis in order to observe diet and its effects on improvement in treatment are of significant importance. PMID:25568630

  5. [The "Patient Anxiety Seminar" as a graduate education program--effectiveness and use in general practice].

    PubMed

    Perkonigg, A; Wittchen, H U; Winkler, S

    1995-08-01

    This article describes results of an evaluation study of a seminar for patients with anxiety, an education program for primary care physicians. Before and after the two seminars, 109 participants filled out a questionnaire about their opinion on the program as well as their attitudes, experience and knowledge in dealing with anxiety patients. They were compared with a control group which did not take part in the program. After 3 and 12 months, a part of the participants was interviewed again. It was found that anxiety patients call for a lot of attention from general practitioners and that diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge is not sufficient. The educational program was highly rated by the participants. The seminars were conducted in the practice by most of the participants in groups as well as on single patients. It became evident that in spite of high expenses there is a wide acceptance of such seminars and that the variables examined up to now indicate a surprisingly high efficiency of the educational programme. PMID:7571737

  6. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients

  7. Behavioral health integration: Transforming patient care, medical resident education, and physician effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health care into the family medicine residency has had a dramatic impact on patient care, resident training, and physician effectiveness. With a cursory glance, it may seem that integrated behavioral health providers spend their days exclusively having 30-min office visits with patients. A full exploration, however, reveals that well-integrated behavioral health offers not only brief and effective visits with patients but also increased collaboration, better patient comanagement, and multiple opportunities for resident learning. Behavioral health integration transforms the way in which medical providers at all levels of training work, teach, and conceptualize their future practice. In an internal survey of 33 medical providers in an integrated family medicine residency, 97% of respondents report they value behavioral health integration to such a degree that they are more likely to accept a job in a setting that offers integrated behavioral health. PMID:26142288

  8. The Effect of Physician Continuing Medical Education on Patient-Reported Outcomes for Identifying and Optimally Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara S.; Castle, Patricia H.; Van Marter, Deborah; Roc, Anne; Neubauer, David; Auerbach, Sanford; DeAguiar, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effect of continuing medical education (CME) activities on patient reported outcomes with regard to (1) screening for excessive sleepiness (ES) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and (2) appropriate referral and treatment. Methods: A total of 725 patients were recruited from 75 providers who either participated or did not participate in Transtheoretical Model (TTM)-based OSA CME activities. Patient reported outcomes from participating (n = 36) and non-participating providers (n = 39) were compared using generalized estimating equations examining random effects of provider as unit of assignment. Results: Patients' reports demonstrate that participating physicians were 1.7 times more likely to initiate discussion of sleep problems than non-participating physicians (t1,411 = 3.71, p = 0.05) and 2.25–2.86 times more likely to administer validated measures for OSA (Epworth Sleepiness Scale and STOP-BANG). Patient reports also indicated that participating clinicians (79.9%) were significantly more likely to recommend seeing a sleep specialist compared to non-participating clinicians (60.7%; t1,348 = 9.1, p < 0.01, OR = 2.6). Furthermore, while 89.4% of participating clinicians recommended a sleep study, only 73.2% of the non-participating physicians recommended one (t1,363 = 11.46, p < 0.001, OR = 3.1). Conclusions: Participation in TTM-based OSA CME activities was associated with improved patient reported outcomes compared to the non-participating clinicians. Citation: Johnson SS, Castle PH, Van Marter D, Roc A, Neubauer D, Auerbach S, DeAguiar E. The effect of physician continuing medical education on patient-reported outcomes for identifying and optimally managing obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):197–204. PMID:25845903

  9. Educating future leaders in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Leotsakos, Agnès; Ardolino, Antonella; Cheung, Ronny; Zheng, Hao; Barraclough, Bruce; Walton, Merrilyn

    2014-01-01

    Education of health care professionals has given little attention to patient safety, resulting in limited understanding of the nature of risk in health care and the importance of strengthening systems. The World Health Organization developed the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multiprofessional Edition to accelerate the incorporation of patient safety teaching into higher educational curricula. The World Health Organization Curriculum Guide uses a health system-focused, team-dependent approach, which impacts all health care professionals and students learning in an integrated way about how to operate within a culture of safety. The guide is pertinent in the context of global educational reforms and growing recognition of the need to introduce patient safety into health care professionals' curricula. The guide helps to advance patient safety education worldwide in five ways. First, it addresses the variety of opportunities and contexts in which health care educators teach, and provides practical recommendations to learning. Second, it recommends shared learning by students of different professions, thus enhancing student capacity to work together effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Third, it provides guidance on a range of teaching methods and pedagogical activities to ensure that students understand that patient safety is a practical science teaching them to act in evidence-based ways to reduce patient risk. Fourth, it encourages supportive teaching and learning, emphasizing the need to establishing teaching environments in which students feel comfortable to learn and practice patient safety. Finally, it helps educators incorporate patient safety topics across all areas of clinical practice. PMID:25285012

  10. The effect of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Duty Hours Policy on plastic surgery resident education and patient care: an outcomes study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Chandrasekhar Bob; Chen, Li-Mei; Hollier, Larry H; Shenaq, Saleh M

    2004-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Work-Hours Duty Policy became effective on July 1, 2003, mandating the reduction of resident duty work hours. The Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program instituted a resident duty work-hours policy on July 1, 2002 (1 year ahead of the national mandate). Outcomes data are needed to facilitate continuous improvements in plastic surgical residency training while maintaining high-quality patient care. To assess the effect of this policy intervention on plastic surgery resident education as measured through the six core competencies and patient/resident safety, the investigators surveyed all categorical plastic surgery residents 6 months after implementation of the policy. This work represents the first empiric study investigating the effect of duty hours reduction on plastic surgery training and education. The categorical plastic surgery residents at the Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program completed a 68-item survey on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree). Residents were asked to rate multiple parameters based on the ACGME six core competencies, including statements on patient care and clinical/operative duties, resident education, resident quality of life, and resident perceptions on this policy. All surveys were completed anonymously. The sample size was n = 12 (program year 3 through program year 6), with a 100 percent response rate. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis was conducted with SPSS version 10.0 statistical software. Specifically, interquartile deviations were used to find consensus among resident responses to each statement. Descriptive statistics indicated higher percentages of agreement on a majority of statements in three categories, including patient care and clinical/operative duties, academic duties, and resident quality of life. Using interquartile deviation, the highest levels of consensus among the residents were found in positive statements addressing resident alertness (both in and out of the operative environment), time to read/prepare for cases/conferences, efficacy of the didactic curriculum, and overall satisfaction with this policy for surgery resident education. Residents also felt that their patients favored this work hours policy. In addition, there was high consensus that this policy improved overall patient care. The majority of residents identified a negative effect of this policy through an increase in cross-coverage responsibilities, however, and half of the residents perceived that faculty negatively viewed their unavailability postcall. In addition, no consensus among the residents was achieved regarding perceptions on overall weekly operative experience. Plastic surgery residents perceived that the reduction of resident work hours through adherence to the ACGME guidelines has beneficial effects on patient care and clinical/operative duties, academic duties, and resident quality of life. Residents felt, however, that these benefits may increase cross-coverage workloads. Furthermore, residents were concerned about faculty perception of their changes in postcall duties. In contrast to previously published findings in the general surgery literature, the current results indicate that residents do not believe that this policy negatively affects continuity of patient care. In fact, the current findings suggest that adherence to this policy improves patient care on multiple levels. The effect on the operative experience remains to be elucidated. Further large-scale and longitudinal research design and analysis is warranted to better assess the results of the ACGME resident duty work-hours policy in plastic surgery resident education. PMID:15577363

  11. Accurate Monitoring Leads to Effective Control and Greater Learning of Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.; O'Neil, Rochelle; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes) can depend on the extent to which patients can learn and remember disease-relevant information. In two experiments, we explored a technique motivated by theories of self-regulated learning for improving people's learning of information relevant to managing a chronic disease. Materials were…

  12. Effect that an educational program for cystic fibrosis patients and caregivers has on the contamination of home nebulizers*

    PubMed Central

    Zuana, Adriana Della; Garcia, Doroti de Oliveira; Juliani, Regina Célia Turola Passos; da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the pathogens found in home nebulizers and in respiratory samples of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and to evaluate the effect that a standardized instruction regarding cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers has on the frequency of nebulizer contamination. METHODS: We included 40 CF patients (22 males), all of whom used the same model of nebulizer. The median patient age was 11.2 ± 3.74 years. We collected samples from the nebulizer mouthpiece and cup, using a sterile swab moistened with sterile saline. Respiratory samples were collected by asking patients to expectorate into a sterile container or with oropharyngeal swabs after cough stimulation. Cultures were performed on selective media, and bacteria were identified by classical biochemical tests. Patients received oral and written instructions regarding the cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers. All determinations were repeated an average of two months later. RESULTS: Contamination of the nebulizer (any part) was detected in 23 cases (57.5%). The nebulizer mouthpiece and cup were found to be contaminated in 16 (40.0%) and 19 (47.5%), respectively. After the standardized instruction had been given, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of contaminated nebulizers (43.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In our sample of CF patients, nebulizer contamination was common, indicating the need for improvement in patient practices regarding the cleaning and disinfection of their nebulizers. A one-time educational intervention could have a significant positive impact. PMID:24831395

  13. [Empowerment by patient education in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Faller, H; Ehlebracht-König, I; Reusch, A

    2015-09-01

    Due to the chronic course, rheumatic diseases may be associated with both long-lasting pain and movement limitations. Those afflicted by these disorders thus face continuous challenges regarding both adapting to their illness as well as changing their lifestyle habits, for example increasing the physical activity levels. However, patient education may provide patients with the competencies they need to cope with their illness and modify their behavior. Therefore, patient education programs are core elements of rehabilitation in rheumatology. The German Society for Rheumatology has performed pioneering work concerning conceptualization and evaluation of standardized educational programs. In this article some more recent developments and up to date standards for contents and didactics of self-management programs are presented. Empowerment may be considered the overriding aim of these programs, i.e. enabling patients to make informed decisions in situations where their health is involved. Patient-centered didactic methods as used in state of the art concepts mirror the empowerment approach. To foster sustainability of lifestyle changes, detailed planning of behavioral modifications is recommended, thus increasing the chance of transferring changes adopted during rehabilitation into everyday living. Such methods have been proven to be effective and are employed in the updated education concept for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome, which is described here as an example. The Centre for Patient Education offers support in updating and evaluating patient education concepts. PMID:26224532

  14. Effect of zoledronic acid on serum calcium in Paget’s disease patients after educational strategies to improve calcium and vitamin D supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Henry G.; Su, Guoqin; Tan, Monique; Ozturk, Zafer E.; Aftring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Bisphosphonates are the most effective therapeutic agents in patients with Paget’s disease of bone. As a result of their inhibition of osteoclastic activity, hypocalcemia of variable frequency and severity following intravenous bisphosphonate therapy has been reported. The present study assessed the effect of physician and patient education on adequate supplementation of calcium and vitamin D to reduce the potential risk of developing hypocalcemia following infusion of 5 mg zoledronic acid. Methods: This was an open-label, multicenter, controlled registry trial in which patients with Paget’s disease were treated with a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid. Physicians were provided with educational materials focusing on optimization of calcium and vitamin D supplementation following zoledronic infusion that they used to educate their patients. The primary safety variable was the percentage of patients with serum calcium level <2.07mmol/l 9–11 days after zoledronic acid infusion. Results: A total of 75 patients were evaluable in the post dose hypocalcemia safety analysis. Of these, only 1 patient had treatment-emergent hypocalcemia, with a serum calcium level of 1.92 mmol/l 4 days following therapy. Hypocalcemia-related symptoms were not reported in this patient and the serum calcium returned to normal range at 2.17 mmol/l within 1 week on oral calcium supplementation. Conclusions: These results suggest that, with optimization of calcium and vitamin D supplementation by physician and patient education, hypocalcemia is an infrequent occurrence following zoledronic acid infusion. PMID:26301065

  15. Patient education resource assessment: project management.

    PubMed

    Patyk, M; Gaynor, S; Verdin, J

    2000-01-01

    To thrive in today's health care environment, hospitals are constantly striving to exceed their customers' expectations in delivering quality care in a cost-effective manner. Meeting the patient educational needs of the consumer is one well-recognized aspect of quality care. Delivering quality care does not happen by chance; rather, it requires intense planning. Our academic medical center formalized this process by empowering professional staff from Nursing Development to develop and implement a patient education strategic plan. This article outlines the project management for the assessment phase of this strategic planning process. The findings were instrumental in outlining the future direction for patient education initiatives that will benefit both the patient and the organization. PMID:10646297

  16. Advances in patient education in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Daltroy, L H; Liang, M H

    1991-01-01

    Education of patients with arthritis began with an emphasis on conveying knowledge, grew to include behaviour change, compliance, and more general coping and management of disease and then progressed to consider physical and psychosocial health outcomes. Research continues in all these areas. Control, in many forms (locus of control, self perceived efficacy, learned helplessness), is now suggested to be a central mediating variable. Evaluation of programmes is moving away from programme v usual care towards comparison of alternative methods of delivery and matching of method to learner. The first generation of researchers in arthritis education tended to be care givers with little formal education in behavioural sciences and evaluation methodology; the programmes they designed were often empirically based. The current generation, nurtured in large part by funds from the Arthritis Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, is better trained in designing programmes grounded in behavioural sciences and educational theory. In the long run, collaborations with care givers and patients will considerably strengthen the effectiveness of education programmes for patients. A variety of educational strategies have been shown to change the knowledge, behaviour, and health of patients with arthritis for the better. Many methods seem to work, so long as the programme is planned, has a goal, and is accountable. There is much work still to be done to teach care givers to be better teachers, and patients to be better managers of their diseases, in concert with their doctors, and to focus on high risk groups. Although most work has been done with patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, many of these findings can and should be safely generalised to less studied rheumatic diseases. Finally, we need to consider the patient first as a person, and to provide education through all avenues, not just the medical care system. PMID:2059091

  17. A Study of Professional Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum, Julie; Ridenour, Maureen; Shaff, Gaye; Hammons, Mary; Taylor, Monica

    2002-01-01

    Of 124 acute care nurses, 97% felt that patient education was a priority. Inhibiting factors were time, staffing, and patient receptiveness. Enhancers included having time to teach, receiving effective teaching guidance materials, and having access to teaching resources. (SK)

  18. Effects of a Short Educational Program for the Prevention of Foot Ulcers in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Matteo; Zannoni, Stefania; Gaias, Marianna; Nreu, Besmir; Marchionni, Niccolò; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Patient education is capable of reducing the risk for diabetic foot ulcers. However, specific education on foot ulcer prevention was either included in broader programs addressing different parts of diabetes care or provided with time- and resource-consuming curricula. The aim of the study is to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a brief educational program for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. Methods. The study was performed on type 2 diabetic patients, randomized in a 1?:?1 ratio either to intervention or to control group. The principal endpoint was the incidence of foot ulcers. The intervention was a two-hour program provided to groups of 5–7 patients, including a 30-minute face-to-face lesson on risk factors for foot ulcers, and a 90-minute interactive session with practical exercises on behaviors for reducing risk. Results. The study was prematurely terminated due to a highly significant difference in outcome between the two treatment groups. The final sample was therefore composed of 121 patients. Six patients, all in the control group, developed ulcers during the 6-month follow-up (10% versus 0%, p = 0.012). Conclusions. A brief, 2-hour, focused educational program is effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. PMID:26448748

  19. Effectiveness of an educational intervention on the management of type 2 diabetic patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine: results from the FADOI-DIAMOND study.

    PubMed

    Gulli, Giovanni; Frasson, Stefania; Borzì, Vito; Fontanella, Andrea; Grandi, Marco; Marengo, Claudio; Nicolucci, Antonio; Pastorelli, Ruggero; Solerte, Bruno; Gatti, Adriano; Raimondo, Francesco Cristiano; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Gussoni, Gualberto; Mazzone, Antonino; Ceriello, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Appropriate management of hyperglycemia is crucial for patients with type 2 diabetes. Aim of the FADOI-DIAMOND study was to evaluate real-world management of type 2 diabetic patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine wards (IMW) and the effects of a standardized educational intervention for IMW staff. DIAMOND has been carried out in 53 Italian IMW, with two cross-sectional surveys interspersed with an educational program (PRE phase and POST phase). In PRE phase, each center reviewed the charts of the last 30 hospitalized patients with known type 2 diabetes. An educational program was conducted in each center by means of the "outreach visit," a face-to-face meeting between IMW staff and a trained external expert. Six months after, each center repeated the data collection (POST phase), specular to the PRE. A total of 3,167 patients were enrolled (1,588 PRE and 1,579 POST). From PRE phase to POST, patients with registered anthropometric data (54.1 vs. 74.9 %, p < 0.001) and in-hospital/recent measurement of glycated hemoglobin (48.2 vs. 61.4 %, p < 0.005) increased significantly. After educational program, more patients received insulin during hospitalization (68.3 vs. 63.6 %, p = 0.005). A more relevant variation in glycemia during hospitalization was observed in POST phase than PRE (-22.2 vs. -15.5 mg/dL, p < 0.001), without differences as for occurrence of hypoglycemia (12.3 vs. 11.9 %). A one-shot educational intervention led to persistent improvement in the management of hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes and to significant better glycemic control. Further studies might evaluate the effectiveness of a more aggressive educational program, on both management and outcomes. PMID:24722913

  20. The Effects on Knowledge of the Systematic Education of Patients with Joint Diseases Treated with NSAIDs and Diuretics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linne, Agneta Bjorck; Liedholm, Hans; Jacobsson, Lennart

    2001-01-01

    In a randomized, controlled trial, patients with joint diseases and concomitant treatment with NSAIDs and diuretics received systematic education. The intervention group was given information focusing on awareness of drug interactions and encouragement of self-adjustment of treatment. Results reveal that the intervention group achieved greater…

  1. Arthritis Self-Management: A Study of the Effectiveness of Patient Education for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of an Arthritis Self Management course for people aged 55-95 (N=200). Results indicated significant gains in knowledge and pain reduction. Trends toward less disability were observed for participants under age 74. (JAC)

  2. Patient Education and Involvement in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiric, Linda Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health…

  3. Comparative investigation of the effectiveness of face-to-face verbal training and educational pamphlets on readiness of patients before undergoing non-emergency surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Noorian, Cobra; Aein, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The thought of having a surgery can be stressful for everyone. Providing the necessary information to the patient can help both the patient and the treatment team. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of face-to-face verbal training and educational pamphlets on the readiness of patients for undergoing non-emergency surgeries. Materials and Methods: The study was a before–after randomized clinical trial. 90 patients scheduled to undergo non-emergency surgery who referred to Shahrekord Ayatollah Kashani Hospital in 2013 were distributed randomly and gradually into two experimental groups (group of face-to-face verbal training and group of educational pamphlet) and one control group. Dependent variable of the study was pre-surgery readiness. Data analysis was carried out by using SPSS statistical software. Statistical analysis were analysis of variance (ANOVA) and correlation test. Results: Results showed that the mean scores of pre-surgery readiness in both interventional groups were significantly higher than that in the control group after the intervention (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Each of the methods of face-to-face verbal education and using the pamphlet could be equally effective in improving the readiness of the patients undergoing surgery. Therefore, in environments where the health care providers are facing with the pressure of work and lack of sufficient time for face-to-face verbal training, suitable educational pamphlets can be used to provide the necessary information to patients and prepare them for surgery. PMID:26097859

  4. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  5. Patient Education for the Mentally Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Louise Harding

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of the rehabilitation services department at McLean Hospital on patient education for the mentally ill, noting patient library collection and recommended resources on marital problems, sex education, drug manuals, and diagnostic and research findings. A list of magazines subscribed to, color code classification, and 23…

  6. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  7. The effect of group psycho-education program on the burden of family caregivers with multiple sclerosis patients in Isfahan in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saeid; Dalvi-Isfahani, Fariba; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lack of adequate training and support of primary caregivers of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is the major factor in causing stress, anxiety, and increase of burden. Therefore, the treatment team members such as psychiatric nurses can help these vulnerable people overcome psychiatric pressures effectively not only through their care and referral role but also through their supportive characteristic, which helps the patients improve their clinical status, together with their social, familial, and work adaptation. Therefore, the researcher tried to identify the effect of a group psycho-education program on the burden family caregivers with MS patients. Materials and Methods: This is a two-group three-stage clinical trial. The researcher referred to the heads of neurology clinics to present the purpose of the study and to start the sampling. The neurology clinics of AL Zahra University Hospital, and also a Private Neurology Clinic were selected to collect the data of the study. The subjects were randomly selected, and then, assigned to two groups of study and control. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant reduction in family caregivers’ burden immediately after and 1-month after intervention in the study group, compared to control. Repeated measure ANOVA showed a significant reduction in caregivers’ burden mean score in the study group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As group psycho-education reduced family caregivers’ burden, it is recommended to develop and design other programs for the family caregivers of the patients with MS. PMID:26257794

  8. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.

    PubMed

    Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used. PMID:23394924

  9. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  10. Patient education programmes in obstructive airway disease. The Ingelheim Model for promoting health through patient education.

    PubMed

    Klein, K; Troglauer, K G; Ahlstich, G; Schunke, B; Theissen, E; Voss, H W; Clausen, V

    1992-06-01

    Chronic obstructive airway diseases (COAD) can be regarded as one of the major health problems needing environmental actions and screening programs for early detection and intensive patient education programs to cope with the needs of tertiary prevention. On the basis of our epidemiological study focused on COAD carried out in FRG (sample size August 1988: 63,000 participants) a patient education program has been developed and evaluated. In cooperation with general practitioners and pneumologists the program has been installed at practice and community level. The need for a patient education program has been assessed during the three years of the PNEUMOBIL-Project. It is not just a matter of cutting costs, but to a large extent a matter of the wellbeing of the patients and of reducing side effects to a minimum. The objective of the project can be split into three dimensions: (1) The cognitive aspect. Here significant lack of knowledge has to be overcome. At this point it has to be stated clearly that at the present time the medical community is not able to solve this problem on their own. (2) The psychomotoric aspect. Here the competent use of medication has to be trained. (3) The emotional aspect. The patient has to be motivated and integrated into the therapeutic process in a way that his compliance contributes significantly. The didactical concept consists of modules that can be used in varying sequences according to the needs of the target audience.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1497798

  11. Adaptive Patient Education Framework Featuring Personalized Cardiovascular Risk Management

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    Adaptive Patient Education Framework Featuring Personalized Cardiovascular Risk Management objectives are to generate and evaluate a web- based personalized educational intervention for the management education material to the patient. The adaptive personalization framework is based on a patient profile

  12. The Effect of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge and Adherence to Treatment in Hemodialysis Patients: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Parvan, Kobra; Hasankhani, Hadi; Seyyedrasooli, Allehe; Riahi, Seyed Mohammad; Ghorbani, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) deal with many potential problems with hemodialysis for all their life. Regarding the importance of preventing dialysis adverse effects, which are in close connection with lack of knowledge and report on how to train the patients? This study aims at comparing the impact of two methods of face to face training and training pamphlet on complying and informing of hemodialysis treatments. Methods: This clinical trial study was conducted on 58 hemodialysis patients who visited Shahid Rahnemun Teaching hospital, Yazd, Iran, and had required conditions of the research. Data were collected through a questionnaire including personal-social information, several questions to assess the level of compliance and to inform the treatment method. The quantitative analysis of this study used the Statistical Package for Social Sciences SPSS version 13 and descriptive (frequency, mean, standard deviation) and inferential (Chi-square, paired t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA) statistics were employed. Results: The mean scores for informing both groups (face to face and training pamphlet) were significantly increased. The mean score for adherence to treatments was also significant.Conclusion: In this research, face to face training was found to be more effective than training pamphlet. It seemed to have more strong effect on increasing the level of information and adherence to treatment. To train these people, face to face training should be, thus, preferred. PMID:25821762

  13. The Effect of Educating Health Promotion Strategies on Self-Care Self-Efficacy in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplantation: A Double Blind Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltannezhad, Fateme; Farsi, Zahra; Jabari Moroei, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-care self-efficacy in patients with end stage renal disease, waiting for kidney transplantation, probably decreases due to facing new conditions and side effects of treatment. Objectives: The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of educating health promotion strategies on self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: A double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 52 patients undergoing kidney transplantation in Baqiyatallah Hospital in 2012. Patients were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. The questionnaire of Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH) was employed to measure self-care self-efficacy. At first, the two groups filled the questionnaire. Then, the intervention group was trained regarding health promotion strategies within 4 sessions before the transplantation. The control group was trained according to routine protocol of the transplantation unit. Then, the two groups were followed up for two months, and reassessed at the end of the first and second months after the transplantation. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics including independent samples T test, Chi square and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In the intervention group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 106.96 ± 25.1 at first, and changed to 135.81 ± 9.65 and 111.19 ± 12.45 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). In the control group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 112.73 ± 14.33 at first, and changed to 118.58 ± 17.59 and 108.73 ± 15.93 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the first post-test regarding total score of self-care self-efficacy (P = 0.001) and dimensions of reduction of stress (P = 0.001), enjoying life (P = 0.01), and coping (P = 0.001). The mean scores of the intervention group were higher than those of the controls in all domains of self-care self-efficacy in the second post-test. However, the difference was only significant in decision-making dimension (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Educating health promotion strategies was effective in improving self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Establishment of a holistic caring program is suggested to integrate the pre-transplantation educations with a continual post discharge follow-up. PMID:25414881

  14. Effectiveness of a risk-minimization activity involving physician education on metabolic monitoring of patients receiving quetiapine: results from two postauthorization safety studies.

    PubMed

    Brody, Robert S; Liss, Charles L; Wray, Heather; Iovin, Ramon; Michaylira, Carmen; Muthutantri, Anushini; Damstetter, Philip; Datto, Catherine; Jefferies, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Following Good Pharmacovigilance Practices Module XVI, two complementary studies were performed that included process and outcome measurements of the effectiveness of physician education on metabolic monitoring of patients receiving quetiapine. A multinational survey of 800 European Union physicians was utilized to assess the receipt of educational materials and also to assess the degree of monitoring as reported by physicians. Recall of receipt of educational materials ranged from 16.0 to 69.0% across the participating countries; however, physicians reported that 64.5% of patients were being monitored, with the majority reporting performance of three or more of four key metabolic-monitoring activities. Higher rates of monitoring were reported by those who reported receiving materials. Assessment of outcomes in a separate retrospective analysis of electronic medical record data showed lower levels of monitoring performed by specialist physicians. The monitoring activities observed were assessed as acceptable on the basis of the established performance of UK physicians, who are incentivized to deliver preventive screening. PMID:26451964

  15. Effects of educational intervention on adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Erimara Dall'Agnol; Fleck, Caren Schlottefeld; Borges, Januário José Vieira; Condessa, Robledo Leal; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention on healthcare professionals' adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in intensive care unit patients. Methods A quasi-experimental study was performed to evaluate intensive care unit professionals' adherence to the tracheobronchial aspiration technical recommendations in intensive care unit patients both before and after a theoretical and practical educational intervention. Comparisons were performed using the chi-square test, and the significance level was set to p<0.05. Results A total of 124 procedures, pre- and post-intervention, were observed. Increased adherence was observed in the following actions: the use of personal protective equipment (p=0.01); precaution when opening the catheter package (p<0.001); the use of a sterile glove on the dominant hand to remove the catheter (p=0.003); the contact of the sterile glove with the catheter only (p<0.001); the execution of circular movements during the catheter removal (p<0.001); wrapping the catheter in the sterile glove at the end of the procedure (p=0.003); the use of distilled water, opened at the start of the procedure, to wash the connection latex (p=0.002); the disposal of the leftover distilled water at the end of the procedure (p<0.001); and the performance of the aspiration technique procedures (p<0.001). Conclusion There was a low adherence by health professionals to the preventive measures against hospital infection, indicating the need to implement educational strategies. The educational intervention used was shown to be effective in increasing adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration. PMID:23917976

  16. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource

    PubMed Central

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care. PMID:26557411

  17. Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stanley G.

    The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a…

  18. Health literacy and ophthalmic patient education.

    PubMed

    Muir, Kelly W; Lee, Paul P

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, Ebrahimzadeh, Davalos, and Lee wrote in this journal that only 32% of the ophthalmic patient educational materials reviewed were written at or below the recommended eighth-grade reading level. Since that time, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy found that more than one-third of adult Americans possess only basic or below basic health literacy skills, defined as the ability to understand written information in a healthcare setting. Subsequently, investigators have shown that poor health literacy skills are associated with poor prescription medication adherence, increased hospital admissions, and increased mortality. We review the readability of currently available ophthalmic educational materials, with particular attention to the health literacy status of the patient population for which the materials are intended. Examples of prose at various readability levels are provided. Optimizing patient education and improving clinical outcomes requires understanding the attributes that the patient brings to the patient-physician relationship, including health literacy. PMID:20650503

  19. Effectiveness of two interventions based on improving patient-practitioner communication on diabetes self-management in patients with low educational level: study protocol of a clustered randomized trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the last decades the presence of social inequalities in diabetes care has been observed in multiple countries, including Spain. These inequalities have been at least partially attributed to differences in diabetes self-management behaviours. Communication problems during medical consultations occur more frequently to patients with a lower educational level. The purpose of this cluster randomized trial is to determine whether an intervention implemented in a General Surgery, based in improving patient-provider communication, results in a better diabetes self-management in patients with lower educational level. A secondary objective is to assess whether telephone reinforcement enhances the effect of such intervention. We report the design and implementation of this on-going study. Methods/Design The study is being conducted in a General Practice located in a deprived neighbourhood of Granada, Spain. Diabetic patients 18 years old or older with a low educational level and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c?>?7%) were recruited. General Practitioners (GPs) were randomised to three groups: intervention A, intervention B and control group. GPs allocated to intervention groups A and B received training in communication skills and are providing graphic feedback about glycosylated haemoglobin levels. Patients whose GPs were allocated to group B are additionally receiving telephone reinforcement whereas patients from the control group are receiving usual care. The described interventions are being conducted during 7 consecutive medical visits which are scheduled every three months. The main outcome measure will be HbA1c; blood pressure, lipidemia, body mass index and waist circumference will be considered as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions will include multilevel regression analysis with three hierarchical levels: medical visit level, patient level and GP level. Discussion The results of this study will provide new knowledge about possible strategies to promote a better diabetes self-management in a particularly vulnerable group. If effective, this low cost intervention will have the potential to be easily incorporated into routine clinical practice, contributing to decrease health inequalities in diabetic patients. Trial registration Clinical Trials U.S. National Institutes of Health, NCT01849731. PMID:24153053

  20. [Therapeutic patient education in chronic hand dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Gelot, P; Avenel-Audran, M; Balica, S; Bensefa, L; Crépy, M-N; Debons, M; Ammari, H; Milpied, B; Raison, N; Vigan, M; Weibel, N; Stalder, J-F; Bernier, C

    2014-06-01

    Hand dermatitis (HD) is usually due to a combination of various interacting factors. It involves significant impairment of the quality of life with psychological and socioeconomic impact. A therapeutic education program in HD.was elaborated by 19 health professionals (dermatologists, occupational clinical physicians, nurses, psychologists, environmental medical advisor) with experience in therapeutic education or skills in HD, according to the recommendations of Haute Autorité de Santé. The program includes an individual medical consultation to perform educational diagnostic, two collective workshops and a medical evaluation consult. Two group workshops "the disease, irritant factors and its treatments" and "the experiences and feelings" were elaborated with learning objectives and educative tools. Different scores were proposed to evaluate the program and acquired skills. Therapeutic education is an efficient way to help patients to adopt skin protection measures essential to healing. We propose a guideline of therapeutic education in HD including skills and educative tools and intended for health professionals to serve as working basis. PMID:24953622

  1. [Bariatric surgery and patient therapeutic education].

    PubMed

    Mével, Katell

    2015-11-01

    Weight loss surgery or "bariatric surgery", used in cases of severe obesity, is a complex procedure aiming to reduce food intake. An increasingly accessible technique, it requires a long postoperative follow-up and a change in eating habits. Patient therapeutic education encourages the patient to become a player in their care. PMID:26548392

  2. Use of technology for educating melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Marble, Nicole; Loescher, Lois J; Lim, Kyung Hee; Hiscox, Heather

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using technology for melanoma patient education in a clinic setting. We assessed technology skill level and preferences for education. Data were collected using an adapted version of the Use of Technology Survey. Most participants owned a computer and DVD player and were skilled in the use of these devices, along with Internet and e-mail. Participants preferred the option of using in-clinic and at-home technology versus in-clinic only use. Computer and DVD applications were preferred because they were familiar and convenient. Using technology for patient education intervention is a viable option; however, patients' skill level and preferences for technology should be considered. PMID:20336399

  3. Foot health education for people with rheumatoid arthritis — some patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient education is an important component of foot health management for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The content and strategies for delivery require investigation in relation to the patients’ needs. This study explores patients’ experiences of foot health education, to inform how the patients’ needs could be identified in clinical practice and inform effective education delivery. Method A focus group was used to collect data. The dialogue was recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a structured thematic approach. Member checking and peer review added to credibility of the data. Six themes emerged; (i) content and purpose of patient education – what it should be, (ii) content of patient education – what it should not be, (iii) timing of information on foot health, (iv) method of delivery, (v) ability to engage with foot health education and (vi) the patient/practitioner relationship. Conclusions This study identified aspects of patient education considered important by this group of patients in relation to content, timing and delivery, forming the basis for further research on clinical and patient focussed outcomes of patient education. Identifying health education needs and provision of supportive verbal and written information can foster an effective therapeutic relationship, supporting effective foot health education for people with RA. PMID:22937987

  4. Effect of an Educational Program on Adherence to Therapeutic Regimen among Chronic Kidney Disease Stage5 (CKD5) Patients under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deif, Hala I. Abo; Elsawi, Khiria; Selim, Mohga; NasrAllah, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease on health care services worldwide is growing and the increased development of educational interventions which help patients to better manage their conditions is evident internationally. It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients. Adherence to fluid…

  5. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  6. Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edith E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance…

  7. Anaphylaxis avoidance and management: educating patients and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Kirsi M; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an increasingly prevalent problem in westernized countries. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the increasing numbers of patients at risk for anaphylaxis receive proper education on the etiology and risk factors as well as appropriate treatment of anaphylaxis with epinephrine. The physician’s role is crucial in order to educate the patients and care takers on effective measures to prevent anaphylaxis and empower them to take charge of early recognition and proper management of an anaphylactic reaction to prevent poor outcomes. This review summarizes the clinical presentation, triggers, avoidance, and management of anaphylaxis. PMID:25031541

  8. Upper Respiratory Infections Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Upper Respiratory Infections Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee: Reviewed 10/09/13 Page 1 of 2 Types of Upper Respiratory Infections The common cold syndrome is caused by one of many is killed by your immune system. Antibiotics are not effective in treating the common cold. Cold symptoms

  9. Health Literacy: An Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Jay, Melanie; Maness, Leslie; Zabar, Sondra; Kalet, Adina

    2015-09-01

    We have previously proposed that by identifying a set of Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcomes (ESPOs), medical education outcomes research becomes more feasible and likely to provide meaningful guidance for medical education policy and practice. ESPOs are proximal outcomes that are sensitive to provider education, measurable, and linked to more distal health outcomes. Our previous model included Patient Activation and Clinical Microsystem Activation as ESPOs. In this paper, we discuss how Health Literacy, defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions," is another important ESPO. Between one-third and one-half of all US adults have limited health literacy skills. Providers can be trained to adopt a "universal precautions approach" to addressing patient health literacy, through the acquisition of specific skills (e.g., teachback, "chunking" information, use of plain language written materials) and by learning how to take action to improve the "health literacy environment." While there are several ways to measure health literacy, identifying which measurement tools are most sensitive to provider education is important, but challenging and complex. Further research is needed to test this model and identify additional ESPOs. PMID:26173523

  10. Interprofessionalism: Educating to Meet Patient Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirch, Darrell G.; Ast, Cori

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teams in health care are showing promise in achieving the triple aim--providing better care for the individual patient, reducing costs, and improving population health. To complement current changes in health care delivery in the United States, there is a growing consensus among health professions educators that students should…

  11. Does a Preoperative Educational Class Increase Patient Compliance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kelvin; Chin, Garwin; Moore, Tyler; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-09-01

    Past studies have shown successful outcomes regarding the use of various interventional education methods in improving patient compliance. At our institution, different educational resources are offered and encouraged, including a 2-hour-long educational class, to prepare patients who are undergoing total joint arthroplasty procedures. Given the significant impact that patient compliance with preoperative instruction can have on overall outcomes of these procedures, this study was intended to assess the effects that the educational classes can have on patient compliance with this institution's 6-point preoperative total joint arthroplasty protocol. The study analyzed 2 groups, those who did and did not attend the preoperative classes, and compliance rates were compared between the 2. It was hypothesized that patients who did attend the classes would be more compliant to the protocol compared to those who did not. Although results from the study showed that there were no significant differences in adherence between the 2 groups, future quality assessment studies can build off this in order to move toward achieving optimal patient compliance with preoperative instructions. PMID:26328228

  12. The Effect of Self-Care Education on the Awareness, Attitude, and Adherence to Self-Care Behaviors in Hospitalized Patients Due to Heart Failure with and without Depression

    PubMed Central

    Navidian, Ali; Yaghoubinia, Fariba; Ganjali, Alireza; Khoshsimaee, Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are among somatic disorders and psychological factors affect their onset, exacerbation, and treatment. This study was conducted on the hospitalized patients who had heart failure with and without depression. The study criteria was to evaluate the effect of self-care education on awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors on these patients. Materials and Methods In this quasi-experimental study, seventy patients with heart failure that met the inclusion criteria were recruited through purposive sampling method. They were assigned in to two equal size groups regarding their depression status. First, the eligible patients were selected; then Beck Depression Inventory was done on the patients followed by examination by the clinical psychologist. Patients with average and higher scores were classified in the depressed group and others who got lower than average scores were classified as the non -depressed group. A questionnaire containing items related to awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors was used to collect the data. First, self-care behavior was determined and then a four-sessions of educational intervention were held individually for both groups. The second round of questionnaires were completed at patients’ home twelve weeks after the discharge. The Collected data was analyzed using independent-samples and paired-sample t tests, Chi square, and statistical analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tests through SPSS (version 21, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results After the educational sessions, the statistical analysis showed significant differences in the mean scores of awareness, attitude, and adherence to self-care behaviors between the two groups (P<0.0001). Conclusion Self-care behavior education had lower effects on the depressed patients with heart failure. Therefore, before providing education for these patients, it is necessary to consider their psychological problems such as depression. PMID:26091101

  13. Educators’ perspectives about how older hospital patients can engage in a falls prevention education programme: a qualitative process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Anne-Marie; McPhail, Steven M; Francis-Coad, Jacqueline; Waldron, Nicholas; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Flicker, Leon; Ingram, Katharine; Haines, Terry P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals. Patient and staff education delivered by trained educators significantly reduced falls and injurious falls in an older rehabilitation population. The purpose of the study was to explore the educators’ perspectives of delivering the education and to conceptualise how the programme worked to prevent falls among older patients who received the education. Design A qualitative exploratory study. Methods Data were gathered from three sources: conducting a focus group and an interview (n=10 educators), written educator notes and reflective researcher field notes based on interactions with the educators during the primary study. The educators delivered the programme on eight rehabilitation wards for periods of between 10 and 40?weeks. They provided older patients with individualised education to engage in falls prevention and provided staff with education to support patient actions. Data were thematically analysed and presented using a conceptual framework. Results Falls prevention education led to mutual understanding between staff and patients which assisted patients to engage in falls prevention behaviours. Mutual understanding was derived from the following observations: the educators perceived that they could facilitate an effective three-way interaction between staff actions, patient actions and the ward environment which led to behaviour change on the wards. This included engaging with staff and patients, and assisting them to reconcile differing perspectives about falls prevention behaviours. Conclusions Individualised falls prevention education effectively provides patients who receive it with the capability and motivation to develop and undertake behavioural strategies that reduce their falls, if supported by staff and the ward environment. PMID:26656027

  14. Differences in Perceived Difficulty in Print and Online Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Written patient education materials frequently exceed the reading ability of the general public. Patients are often intimidated by the task of reading patient education materials, perceiving the materials’ difficulty levels as prohibitive, even when they do not exceed the patients’ reading abilities. It is unclear how the delivery mechanism—print or a computer screen—affects a patient’s reading experience through his/her perception of its difficulty. Objective: To determine whether first-year college students perceived online or print-based patient education materials as more difficult to read. Design: Convenience sampling of first-year college students. Results: Some first-year college students perceived online patient education materials to be more difficult to read than print-based ones—even when the reading level of the patient education materials was similar. Demographic information about this sample’s high levels of digital literacy suggests that other populations might also perceive online patient education materials as more difficult to read than print-based equivalents. Patients’ perceptions of the difficulty of patient education materials influenced their ability to effectively learn from those materials. Conclusion: This article concludes with a call for more research into patients’ perceptions of difficulty of patient education materials in print vs on a screen. PMID:25662526

  15. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. Results: The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Conclusion: Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals. PMID:26478878

  16. Revising Selected Written Patient Education Materials Through Readability and Concreteness 

    E-print Network

    Goolsby, Rhonda Denise

    2011-10-21

    The current state of much research on written patient education materials (WPEM) suggests that they are written in a manner that is too difficult even for educated patients to understand and remember. Much of the research ...

  17. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

  18. An educational project for patients on hemodialysis to promote self-management behaviors of end stage renal disease education.

    PubMed

    Lingerfelt, Kim L; Thornton, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Patient knowledge of hemodialysis and end stage renal disease (ESRD) is crucial to effective self-management and improved outcomes. This project evaluated the effect on patient knowledge of a short-term, one-on-one educational program for patients with ESRD. Twenty-six participants completed a knowledge survey before and after the educational intervention. The structured one-on-one sessions on ESRD education improved overall knowledge scores from an average of 66% to 90% on pre- and post-test assessment, respectively. Findings showed a significant improvement in ESRD knowledge post-intervention (p < 0.000), which could lead to improved self management and better outcomes. PMID:22338941

  19. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual’s competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been promoted as one such potential approach. PMID:22312219

  20. A personal perspective: at the crossroads of heart attack care: designing an effective nationwide public education program to hasten patient hospital arrival.

    PubMed

    Turner, Glenn O

    2009-12-01

    This report presents a field-tested approach to the greatest health care problem facing our country, the fact that two-thirds of the deaths from acute myocardial infarction occur before hospital admission. Scores of fundraising appearances for the Missouri Heart Association during the 1950s and 1960s throughout the 1,000,000 population rural/urban Southwest Missouri region gave an ideal setting for teaching the public the early symptoms of heart attack. Audiences were advised that if any of these appeared they should immediately call their doctor or quickly get to the nearest hospital emergency room. These presentations led to a steady increase in hospital admissions. The Missouri Heart Association responded by launching the Early Warning Signs of Heart Attack Public and Professional Education Program in July 1971, incorporating these messages in radio, TV, and newspaper Public Service Announcements. In less than 6 months, analysis of consecutive admissions to the cardiovascular intensive care unit of the base hospital showed that the median time from the onset of symptoms to starting to the hospital was reduced from 4 to 2.2 hours; 64% of those patients called their doctor as their first step in seeking help and 58% went to the hospital by car. This message content was carried through the 1980s and 1990s under other auspices. The methods of the successful Missouri program are contrasted with others that have failed, establishing essential features in designing a nationwide program effective in hastening acute myocardial infarction patient hospital arrival. PMID:19952554

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention to improve the patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students: a cross-sectional study using a latent growth curve modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the recognition that educating healthcare students in patient safety is essential, changing already full curricula can be challenging. Furthermore, institutions may lack the capacity and capability to deliver patient safety education, particularly from the start of professional practice studies. Using senior students as peer educators to deliver practice-based education can potentially overcome some of the contextual barriers in training junior students. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-led patient safety education programme for junior pharmacy students. Design A repeat cross-sectional design utilising a previously validated patient safety attitudinal survey was used to evaluate attitudes prior to, immediately after and 1?month after the delivery of a patient safety education programme. Latent growth curve (LGC) modelling was used to evaluate the change in attitudes of first-year students using second-year students as a comparator group. Setting Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia. Participants 175 first-year and 140 second-year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy programme at the University of Sydney. Intervention An introductory patient safety programme was implemented into the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy curriculum at the University of Sydney. The programme covered introductory patient safety topics including teamwork, communication skills, systems thinking and open disclosure. The programme consisted of 2 lectures, delivered by a senior academic, and a workshop delivered by trained final-year pharmacy students. Results A full LGC model was constructed including the intervention as a non-time-dependent predictor of change (?2 (51)=164.070, root mean square error of approximation=0.084, comparative fit index=0.913, standardised root mean square=0.056). First-year students’ attitudes significantly improved as a result of the intervention, particularly in relation to internalising errors (p=0.010), questioning behaviours (p<0.001) and open disclosure (p=0.008). Conclusions Peer-led education is an effective method that can be adopted to improve junior pharmacy students’ attitudes towards patient safety. PMID:26646830

  2. Does Stage of Change Modify the Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention to Improve Diet among Family Members of Hospitalized Cardiovascular Disease Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mochari, Heidi; Terry, Mary Beth; Mosca, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether effectiveness of a special intervention (SI) to improve diet versus a control intervention (CI) differs by readiness to reduce dietary saturated fat based on the Transtheoretical Model stages of change among family members of hospitalized CVD patients. Methods Stage of change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance) was assessed by standardized questionnaire. Diet was measured by Block 98 Food Frequency Questionnaire at baseline and one-year in participants in the Family Intervention Trial for Heart Health (n=501; 36% racial/ethnic minorities; 66% female). Therapeutic Lifestyle Change diet education was provided to each SI subject tailored to baseline stage of change. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine whether the effect of the intervention was modified by stage of change. Results Baseline saturated fat and cholesterol intakes were lower among those in maintenance stage vs. others [(9.9% vs. 11.2% kcals; p<.0001) and (112.2 vs. 129.7 mg/1000kcal; p=.0003) respectively]. Overall, change in the percentage of calories from saturated fat from baseline to one-year was ?0.7 in the SI vs. ?0.4 in the CI (p=.18). Among participants in contemplation greater reductions in saturated fat (?2.1% vs. +0.3% kcals; p=.04) and cholesterol (?34.0 vs. +32.6 mg/1000kcal; p=.01) were seen in the SI vs. CI. The SI was more likely than CI to achieve new adherence to a diet <10% saturated fat /<300mg cholesterol at one-year among those not in maintenance stage (30% vs. 15%; p=.03). CI participants were more likely than SI to revert to lower levels on the stage of change continuum from baseline to one-year (17% vs. 7%; p=.002). Conclusion Effectiveness of an intervention to lower saturated fat varies by baseline stage of change among family members of hospitalized CVD patients. This may be important to consider when designing research or clinical diet interventions. PMID:20630159

  3. [Functional re-education, self-education, and education of patients with leg arthrosis].

    PubMed

    Rouillon, O

    2002-01-12

    EXPERT OPINIONS: Functional rehabilitation, self-rehabilitation in the patient's home and patient education are the basis of non-drug management of patients with osteoarthritis. This approach helps reduce pain and the frequency of consultations, and improves physical activity and quality of life. FUNCTIONAL REHABILITATION: The objective is to limit pain, to maintain joint mobility and muscle force, and to learn how to manage one's disease. Evidence in the literature demonstrates the efficacy of functional rehabilitation. SELF-REHABILITATION: The objective of self-rehabilitation is the same as functional rehabilitation and data in the literature indicate positive results on pain and functional symptoms. PATIENT EDUCATION PROGRAMS: Presented in the form of advise booklet or videos (CD-Room Arthemus), patient education programs improve non-drug management of osteoarthritis. COMPLEMENTARITY: It is logical to associate the different modalities of non-drug management of osteoarthritis since their objectives are complementary and synergetic. PMID:11826588

  4. Medical Utilization of Kiosks in the Delivery of Patient Education: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yvonne Chan, Yu-Feng; Nagurka, Roxanne; Bentley, Suzanne; Ordonez, Edgardo; Sproule, William

    2014-01-01

    Background: The utilization of kiosks has previously been shown to be effective for collecting information, delivering educational modules, and providing access to health information. We discuss a review of current literature for the utilization of kiosks for the delivery of patient education. Methods: The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were: (1) study discusses the utilization of kiosks for patient health education; (2) study discusses the use of touch screens for patient health information; (3) published in English. Our review includes searches via MEDLINE databases and Google Scholar for the years 1996-2014. Results: Overall, 167 articles were screened for final eligibility, and after discarding duplicates and non-eligible studies with abstract. Full-text review of 28 articles was included in the final analysis. Conclusion: The review of available literature demonstrates the effectiveness of touch screen kiosks to educate patients and to improve healthcare, both at a performance and cost advantage over other modes of patient education. PMID:25097831

  5. The impact of a patient education bundle on neurosurgery patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kliot, Tamara; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Imershein, Sarah; Lau, Catherine; Kliot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background: As reimbursements and hospital/physician performance become ever more reliant on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) and other quality metrics, physicians are increasingly incentivized to improve patient satisfaction. Methods: A faculty and resident team at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Neurological Surgery developed and implemented a Patient Education Bundle. This consisted of two parts: The first was preoperative expectation letters (designed to inform patients of what to expect before, during, and after their hospitalization for a neurosurgical procedure); the second was a trifold brochure with names, photographs, and specialty/training information about the attending surgeons, resident physicians, and nurse practitioners on the neurosurgical service. We assessed patient satisfaction, as measured by HCAHPS scores and a brief survey tailored to our specific intervention, both before and after our Patient Education Bundle intervention. Results: Prior to our intervention, 74.6% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. After our intervention, 78.7% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. “Neurosurgery Patient Satisfaction survey” results showed that 83% remembered receiving the preoperative letter; of those received the letter, 93% found the letter helpful; and 100% thought that the letter should be continued. Conclusion: Although effects were modest, we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients’ hospital experiences and have a positive impact on physician performance scores and hospital ratings. PMID:26664909

  6. The Effects of Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David

    Although fear of death is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of death and the fear of death have only occurred for the last few decades. Death education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of death education on death anxiety by…

  7. Efficacy of DVD Technology in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Self- Management Education of Rural Patients 

    E-print Network

    Stellefson, Michael L.

    2010-01-14

    study assessed the self-management learning needs of COPD patients treated at a Certified Federal Rural Health Clinic through conducting focus group interviews (n = 2) to inform the development a targeted self-management education DVD. The effectiveness...

  8. Family Medicine Education with Virtual Patients: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sobocan, Monika; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Virtual patients (VP) have been present within the medical education process for some time. Although they are assumed to be of great benefit for student learning, very little is know about student perception and outcomes of learning, especially during the pre-clerkship years. Therefore we have decided to investigate the use of VPs during lectures, which has never been analyzed before, but could present an opportunity for more effective and holistic learning. Methods: This was a qualitative study among the 4th year undergraduate medical students at the Medical Faculty, University of Maribor, Slovenia. Students, after completing 4 virtual patient cases during the semester, were asked to participate in focus groups. Using these focus groups we asked students to provide information about their perceptions of VP cases, their learning, and suggestions for educational improvements. Data was transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory-based coding method (open coding). Results: Medical students reported having a positive attitude towards virtual patient learning. They perceived them as helpful for filling in knowledge gaps, learning appropriate patient care and clinical reasoning. However, especially within the setting of early clinical learning, students felt the need to discuss their questions with their tutors in order to achieve better learning outcomes. Conclusion: Students on teaching courses feel the need for structured instructor sessions and the integration of VPs in the course planning in order to maximize their learning outcomes. PMID:26483591

  9. Students Learning from Patients: Let's Get Real in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-01-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of…

  10. The Patient Handoff: A Comprehensive Curricular Blueprint for Resident Education to Improve Continuity of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Horwitz, Leora I.; Bass, Ellen J.; Mahar, Sean E.; Philibert, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education released its resident duty hours restrictions, requiring that faculty monitor their residents’ patient handoffs to ensure that residents are competent in handoff communications. Although studies have reported the need to improve the effectiveness of the handoff and a variety of curricula have been suggested and implemented, a common method for teaching and evaluating handoff skills has not been developed. Also in 2010, engineers, informaticians, and physicians interested in patient handoffs attended a symposium in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery, entitled Handovers and Handoffs: Collaborating in Turns. As a result of this symposium, a workgroup formed to develop practical and readily implementable educational materials for medical educators involved in teaching patient handoffs to residents. In this article, the result of that yearlong collaboration, the authors aim to provide clarity on the definition of the patient handoff, to review the barriers to performing effective handoffs in academic health centers, to identify available solutions to improve handoffs, and to provide a structured approach to educating residents on handoffs via a curricular blueprint. The authors’ blueprint was developed to guide educators in customizing handoff education programs to fit their specific, local needs. Hopefully, it also will provide a starting point for future research into improving the patient handoff. Increasingly complex patient care environments require both innovations in handoff education and improvements in patient care systems to improve continuity of care. PMID:22361791

  11. Potential Spillover Educational Effects Of Cancer-Related Direct-To-Consumer Advertising On Cancer Patients’ Increased Information Seeking Behaviors: Results From A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andy SL

    2014-01-01

    Spillover effects of exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of cancer treatments on patients’ general inquiry about their treatments and managing their illness are not well understood. This study examines the effects of cancer patients’ exposure to cancer-related DTCA on subsequent health information seeking behaviors from clinician and non-clinician sources (lay media and interpersonal contacts). Using a longitudinal survey design over three years, data was collected from cancer survivors diagnosed with colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer who were randomly sampled from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Study outcome measures include patients’ information engagement with their clinicians and information seeking from non-medical sources about cancer treatment and quality of life issues, measured in the second survey. The predictor variable is the frequency of exposure to cancer-related DTCA since diagnosis, measured at the round 1 survey. The analyses utilized lagged weighted multivariate regressions and adjusted for round 1 levels of patient-clinician engagement, information seeking from non-medical sources, and confounders. Exposure to cancer-related DTCA is associated with increased levels of subsequent patient-clinician information engagement (B=.023, 95%CI=.005 to .040, p=.012), controlling for confounders. In comparison, exposure to DTCA is marginally significant in predicting health information seeking from non-clinician sources (B=.009, 95%CI=?.001 to .018, p=.067). Cancer-related DTCA has potentially beneficial spillover effects on health information seeking behaviors among cancer patients. Exposure to DTCA predicts (a little) more patient engagement with their physicians. PMID:24254248

  12. Potential spillover educational effects of cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising on cancer patients' increased information seeking behaviors: results from a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy S L

    2014-06-01

    Spillover effects of exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of cancer treatments on patients' general inquiry about their treatments and managing their illness are not well understood. This study examines the effects of cancer patients' exposure to cancer-related DTCA on subsequent health information seeking behaviors from clinician and non-clinician sources (lay media and interpersonal contacts). Using a longitudinal survey design over 3 years, data was collected from cancer survivors diagnosed with colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer who were randomly sampled from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Study outcome measures include patients' information engagement with their clinicians and information seeking from non-medical sources about cancer treatment and quality of life issues, measured in the second survey. The predictor variable is the frequency of exposure to cancer-related DTCA since diagnosis, measured at the round 1 survey. The analyses utilized lagged-weighted multivariate regressions and adjusted for round 1 levels of patient-clinician engagement, information seeking from nonmedical sources, and confounders. Exposure to cancer-related DTCA is associated with increased levels of subsequent patient-clinician information engagement (B?=?.023, 95% CI?=?.005-.040, p?=?.012), controlling for confounders. In comparison, exposure to DTCA is marginally significant in predicting health information seeking from non-clinician sources (B?=?.009, 95% CI?=?-.001-.018, p?=?.067). Cancer-related DTCA has potentially beneficial spillover effects on health information seeking behaviors among cancer patients. Exposure to DTCA predicts (a little) more patient engagement with their physicians. PMID:24254248

  13. A dialogue-based approach to patient education

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Natasja K.; Pals, Regitze Anne Saurbrey

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the need for person-centered patient education has become evident. To translate this approach into practice, new theoretically and empirically sound methods and models are required. This brief communication introduces a newly developed toolkit that has shown promise in facilitating person-centered education and active involvement of patients. Two health education models constituting the underlying basis for the toolkit are also presented. PMID:25593847

  14. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  15. The effects of preoperative, video-assisted anesthesia education in Spanish on Spanish-speaking patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    West, Amy M; Bittner, Edward A; Ortiz, Vilma E

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of an instructional video in Spanish on self-reported anxiety, knowledge about general anesthesia procedures, and satisfaction with the preoperative anesthesia process in patients requiring a Spanish interpreter. This prospective, randomized, nonblinded pilot study took place at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a university-affiliated tertiary-care hospital. Twenty adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, scheduled for elective surgery (gynecological, orthopedic, and intrabdominal surgery) during general anesthesia were studied. Anxiety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). There was a significant reduction in anxiety score in patients who viewed the video compared with those who did not (median reduction 2 vs 0; P = 0.020). There was an increase in satisfaction score in the video group (median increase 2 vs 0; P = 0.046). There was no difference in reported knowledge-improvement scores between the two groups (3.5 vs 4; P = 0.908). In Spanish-speaking patients, the addition of an instructional video in Spanish to a preanesthesia interview decreased anxiety and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:24882604

  16. Quality of doctor-patient communication through the eyes of the patient: variation according to the patient's educational level.

    PubMed

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-10-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In this study we describe patients' perspective in doctor-patient communication according to their educational level, and to what extent these perspectives lean towards the expert opinion on doctor-patient communication. In a multi-center study (Belgium, The Netherlands, UK and Italy), focus group discussions were organised using videotaped medical consultations. A mixed methods approach was used to analyse the data. Firstly, a difference in perspective in communication style was found between the lower educated participants versus the middle and higher educated participants. Secondly, lower educated participants referred positively most to aspects related to the affective/emotional area of the medical consultation, followed by the task-oriented/problem-focused area. Middle and higher educated participants positively referred most to the task-oriented/problem-focused area. The competency of the physician was an important category of communication for all participants, independent of social background. The results indicate that the preferences of lower educated participants lean more towards the expert opinion in doctor-patient communication than the middle and higher educated participants. Patients' educational level seems to influence their perspective on communication style and should be taken into account by physicians. Further quantitative research is needed to confirm these results. PMID:25428194

  17. Effective physician-patient communication and health outcomes: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether the quality of physician-patient communication makes a significant difference to patient health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: The MEDLINE database was searched for articles published from 1983 to 1993 using "physician-patient relations" as the primary medical subject heading. Several bibliographies and conference proceedings were also reviewed. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and analytic studies of physician-patient communication in which patient health was an outcome variable. DATA EXTRACTION: The following information was recorded about each study: sample size, patient characteristics, clinical setting, elements of communication assessed, patient outcomes measured, and direction and significance of any association found between aspects of communication and patient outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of the 21 studies that met the final criteria for review, 16 reported positive results, 4 reported negative (i.e., nonsignificant) results, and 1 was inconclusive. The quality of communication both in the history-taking segment of the visit and during discussion of the management plan was found to influence patient health outcomes. The outcomes affected were, in descending order of frequency, emotional health, symptom resolution, function, physiologic measures (i.e., blood pressure and blood sugar level) and pain control. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the studies reviewed demonstrated a correlation between effective physician-patient communication and improved patient health outcomes. The components of effective communication identified by these studies can be used as the basis both for curriculum development in medical education and for patient education programs. Future research should focus on evaluating such educational programs. PMID:7728691

  18. Perpetuating 'New Public Management' at the expense of nurses' patient education: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the conditions for nurses' daily patient education work by focusing on managers' way of speaking about the patient education provided by nurses in hospital care. An explorative, qualitative design with a social constructionist perspective was used. Data were collected from three focus group interviews and analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Discursive practice can be explained by the ideology of hegemony. Due to a heavy workload and lack of time, managers could 'see' neither their role as a supporter of the patient education provided by nurses, nor their role in the development of nurses' pedagogical competence. They used organisational, financial, medical and legal reasons for explaining their failure to support nurses' provision of patient education. The organisational discourse was an umbrella term for 'things' such as cost-effectiveness, which were prioritised over patient education. There is a need to remove managerial barriers to the professional development of nurses' patient education. Managers should be responsible for ensuring and overseeing that nurses have the prerequisites necessary for providing patient education as well as for enabling continuous reflective dialogue and opportunities for learning in practice. PMID:25327764

  19. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  20. Knee Injuries Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    of a fall or the direct pressure and friction of repetitive kneeling ("housemaid's knee"). PatientsKnee Injuries Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Revised 4/11/12 Page 1 of 2 Common: This diagnosis should be suspected if the patient has suffered a knee injury, describes symptoms of looseness

  1. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  2. Identify practice gaps in medication education through surveys to patients and physicians

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhan-Miao; Zhi, Xiao-Jie; Yang, Ling; Sun, Shu-Sen; Zhang, Zhuo; Sun, Zhi-Ming; Zhai, Suo-Di

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective communication and education formats between health care providers and patients about medication use are associated with patients’ satisfaction, recall of information, and eventually their health status. Limited research exists on physician-delivered education interventions, as well as on whether the current content of medication education and delivery formats satisfies the needs of both patients and physicians. Our objective was to identify the practice gaps regarding medication education content and delivery. Methods Separate surveys were obtained from ambulatory care patients presenting to the outpatient pharmacy for medication pickups, and physicians working at the hospital clinics. Results A total of 108 patients completed the patient survey, and 116 hospital clinic physicians completed the physician survey. Female patients had a higher degree of concern regarding medication information compared with male patients (4.04±0.65 versus 3.58±0.66, P=0.001). Physicians were less likely to educate patients regarding their medications’ on drug–drug interactions (24.3%), drug–food interactions (24.3%), and what to do about their prescriptions if an adverse reaction is experienced (24.3%) during physician–patient encounters. Patients’ most desired education format was physician counseling (82.4%) and the second most desired education format was pharmacist counseling (50.9%). Medication device demonstration (7.0%) was the least used educational format delivered to patients by physicians, and patients would like to see an increased education delivery format through medication device demonstration (Method desired [MD] – Method received [MR] =12.0%). Patients would like to see expanded roles of patient focused handout (MD-MR=22.2%), telephone consultation (21.2%), pharmacist counseling (12.9%), the use of medication database embedded within the hospital information system (12.2%) and device demonstration (12.0%). Conclusion This study illustrates that there are practice gaps in current medication education both in terms of content and delivery format. The study provided valuable information in designing and implementing future education activities that are drivers of good medication use and adherence. PMID:26557752

  3. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on improving clinical diagnosis and treatment of the traumatized refugee patient. PMID:23957962

  4. Alcohol Education Provided to Opioid Treatment Program Patients: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Harris, Gavin; Katigbak, Carina; Rindskopf, David M.; Singh, Sheena; Greenblum, Ilana; Brown, Lawrence S.; Kipnis, Steven; Kritz, Steven A.; Parrino, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-related problems are especially common among opioid treatment program (OTP) patients, suggesting that educating OTP patients about alcohol and its harmful effects needs to be a priority in OTPs. Using data collected in interviews with a nationwide U.S. sample of OTP directors (N = 200) in 25 states, we identified factors that differentiate…

  5. Patient Safety in Medical Education: Students’ Perceptions, Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Nabilou, Bahram; Feizi, Aram; Seyedin, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a new and challenging discipline in the Iranian health care industry. Among the challenges for patient safety improvement, education of medical and paramedical students is intimidating. The present study was designed to assess students’ perceptions of patient safety, and their knowledge and attitudes to patient safety education. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 2012 at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, West Azerbaijan province, Iran. 134 students studying medicine, nursing, and midwifery were recruited through census for the study. A questionnaire was used for collecting data, which were then analyzed through SPSS statistical software (version 16.0), using Chi-square test, Spearman correlation coefficient, F and LSD tests. A total of 121 questionnaires were completed, and 50% of the students demonstrated good knowledge about patient safety. The relationships between students’ attitudes to patient safety and years of study, sex and course were significant (0.003, 0.001 and 0.017, respectively). F and LSD tests indicated that regarding the difference between the mean scores of perceptions of patient safety and attitudes to patient safety education, there was a significant difference among medical and nursing/midwifery students. Little knowledge of students regarding patient safety indicates the inefficiency of informal education to fill the gap; therefore, it is recommended to consider patient safety in the curriculums of all medical and paramedical sciences and formulate better policies for patient safety. PMID:26322897

  6. Residents' intentions and actions after patient safety education

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Medical residents are key figures in delivering care and an important target group for patient safety education. The objective of this study was to assess residents' intentions and actions concerning patient safety improvement after patient safety education. Methods Four multi-specialty 2-day patient safety courses were organized, in which residents from five Dutch hospitals participated. At the end of these courses participants were asked to formulate an action point to improve patient safety. Three months later semi-structured interviews were conducted to reveal actions that were taken, factors that had influenced their behaviour and reactions concerning the education. An inductive theory approach was used to analyze transcriptions. Results Out of 71 participants, sixty-nine (97%) residents were interviewed. In total they had formulated 91 action points, which mainly focused on: 'Improving organization of own work/Follow policies' and 'Improving culture/Educating colleagues about patient safety'. Sixty-two (90%) residents declared to have taken action, and 50 (55%) action points were fully carried out. Most actions taken were at the level of the individual professional, rather than at the level of their social or organizational context. Results of actions included adjusting the structure of their own work, organizing patient safety education for colleagues, communicating more efficiently and in a more structured way with colleagues, and reporting incidents. Promoters for action included: 'Awareness of the importance of the action to be taken', 'Supportive attitude of colleagues' and 'Having received patient safety education'. Barriers included: 'Impeding attitude of colleagues', 'High work-pressure', 'Hierarchy' and 'Switching of work stations'. Conclusions After patient safety training, residents reported various intentions to contribute to patient safety improvement. Numerous actions were taken, but there still is a discrepancy between intentions and actual behaviour. To increase residents' participation in patient safety improvement, educational efforts should be supplemented with actions to remove experienced barriers, most of which are related to the residents' social and organizational context. PMID:21194435

  7. Patient Education Video Series | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The free patient education website (Cancer.net) offers information about cancer and clinical trials in patient-friendly videos. The videos are produced by ASCO and posted regularly on their YouTube channel. The series includes a variety of cancer topics that patients will find helpful, including clinical trials. Information is presented by physicians and advocates and helps patients accumulate accurate information and formulate questions for their physician as they consider a clinical trial.

  8. Drug Education Effects. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Michael L.

    This is a research project that was intended to study the effects of a factual drug education program on the attitudes on high school and junior high students toward the use of psychoactive drugs. The approximately 250 eighth and twelfth grade students involved in the study filled out a number of questionnaires designed to measure a variety of…

  9. [The revelation from three international medical education standards to education of physician-patient communication].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Jia; Sun, Hui-Qiang; Shao, Qi; Deng, Yan-Nan

    2010-12-01

    The ability of manipulating physician-patient communication is of great significance in medical practice and undoubtedly needed to be developed during medical education. The importance and request of physician-patient communication in medical education has been definitely prescribed in three international standards stipulated respectively by three international medical education organizations. In this article, the author attempted to reveal the deficiency of Chinese medical education on physician-patient communication by studying the three international standards as mentioned. And some measures had also been recommended to improve the conditions: setting up physician-patient communication curriculums among students; emphasizing the training of the skills in internship during undergraduate study period; adding physician-patient communication contents in the Practice Physician Qualification Test; and so on. The improvement of communication skills in basic medical education is the primary part for the progress of whole medical area. Supported by Teaching Reform Project of Shandong University (Grant No.200954,2009174,2009226). PMID:21431271

  10. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and a nutrition education program for high risk cancer patients: strategies to improve dietary intake in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Chun; Chuang, Hui-Ju; Tsao, Li-Yen; Chen, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Chia-Fen; Lin, Hsing-Chun; Chang, Chiu-Yueh; Lin, Cheau-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Four hundred and forty-four high-risk oncology patients with malnutrition participated in this study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of nutrition education on improving an oncology patient's dietary intake. We used a nutritional risk screening to select oncology patients in need of nutritional care. Team Nutrition provides technical assistance for foodservice, nutrition education for patients and their caregivers, and support for healthy eating and physical activity to improve their diets and their lives. The average contribution of protein and total energy of each patient increased after imparting the nutritional education to them. Thus, nutritional education is an effective measure to bring about a favorable and significant change in oncology patients' nutrient intake. PMID:26264480

  11. [Health Literacy and patient education in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Eva Maria; Spörhase, U

    2015-09-01

    Medical rehabilitation in Germany has a long tradition. It is covered by the statutory sickness funds and pension schemes, and is aimed at the prevention of work disability and need for nursing care due to chronic conditions. Chronically ill but health-literate patients - patients capable of making good health-related decisions, or of participating strongly in this decision making - have better health outcomes. To enhance health literacy and participation, medical rehabilitation relies heavily on patient education. This article describes health literacy from the perspective of educational research, outlines the basics of learning principles, and draws conclusions for developing patient education programmes in medical rehabilitation. Implementing a constructivist learning paradigm promotes changes within the trainer team and within the rehabilitation institution - turning it into a health-literate health care organisation. Health literacy in medical rehabilitation is aimed at neither turning the patient into a physician nor replacing evidence-based recommendations through subjective preferences. Medical rehabilitation reaches patients best by using modern health education programmes based on findings from education research, theoretically founded and directed towards building competencies. Furthermore, an educationally qualified training team and a rehabilitation institution are essential in enabling formal and informal learning processes. PMID:26153473

  12. Effects of Lifestyle Modification on Telomerase Gene Expression in Hypertensive Patients: A Pilot Trial of Stress Reduction and Health Education Programs in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Duraimani, Shanthi; Schneider, Robert H.; Randall, Otelio S.; Nidich, Sanford I.; Xu, Shichen; Ketete, Muluemebet; Rainforth, Maxwell A.; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W.; Fagan, John

    2015-01-01

    Background African Americans suffer from disproportionately high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Psychosocial stress, lifestyle and telomere dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This study evaluated effects of stress reduction and lifestyle modification on blood pressure, telomerase gene expression and lifestyle factors in African Americans. Methods Forty-eight African American men and women with stage I hypertension who participated in a larger randomized controlled trial volunteered for this substudy. These subjects participated in either stress reduction with the Transcendental Meditation technique and a basic health education course (SR) or an extensive health education program (EHE) for 16 weeks. Primary outcomes were telomerase gene expression (hTERT and hTR) and clinic blood pressure. Secondary outcomes included lifestyle-related factors. Data were analyzed for within-group and between-group changes. Results Both groups showed increases in the two measures of telomerase gene expression, hTR mRNA levels (SR: p< 0.001; EHE: p< 0.001) and hTERT mRNA levels (SR: p = 0.055; EHE: p< 0.002). However, no statistically significant between-group changes were observed. Both groups showed reductions in systolic BP. Adjusted changes were SR = -5.7 mm Hg, p< 0.01; EHE = -9.0 mm Hg, p < 0.001 with no statistically significant difference between group difference. There was a significant reduction in diastolic BP in the EHE group (-5.3 mm Hg, p< 0.001) but not in SR (-1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.42); the between-group difference was significant (p = 0.04). The EHE group showed a greater number of changes in lifestyle behaviors. Conclusion In this pilot trial, both stress reduction (Transcendental Meditation technique plus health education) and extensive health education groups demonstrated increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP. The association between increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP observed in this high-risk population suggest hypotheses that telomerase gene expression may either be a biomarker for reduced BP or a mechanism by which stress reduction and lifestyle modification reduces BP. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00681200 PMID:26571023

  13. Facilitating Behavior Change With Low-literacy Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder input, identifying key concepts to be communicated, mapping concepts to a behavioral theory, creating a supporting behavioral intervention, designing and refining materials, and assessing efficacy. Results We describe the use of this process to develop a diabetes self-management guide. Conclusions Developing low-literacy health education materials that will activate patients toward healthier behaviors requires attention to factors beyond reading level. PMID:17931139

  14. The Use of Standardized Patients in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Standardized patients are widely used in health care programs to both teach and evaluate the communication and clinical skills of students. Although athletic training education programs (ATEPs) commonly use simulations, little information exists related to the use and implementation of standardized patients (SPs). Objective: To provide…

  15. Providing community education: lessons learned from Native Patient Navigators.

    PubMed

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities' needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research. PMID:25087698

  16. Providing Community Education: Lessons Learned from Native Patient Navigators

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U.; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities’ needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research. PMID:25087698

  17. Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported…

  18. Prostatectomy: information provision and education for patients.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Paula

    Following the diagnosis of prostate cancer, information should be imparted to ensure an informed decision regarding treatment can be made. The impact of a cancer diagnosis could lead men to opt for surgical intervention without fully understanding the consequences of treatment. Effective communication of evidence-based information can assist men to fully understand the consequences of treatment. Radical prostatectomy, whether robotically assisted laparoscopic or retropubic, will lead to quality-of-life issues with functional outcomes such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence being at the forefront. Issues should be discussed and communicated in depth so that frustration and regret following treatment are avoided. A cautious approach to information provision should be considered so the patient does not feel in a position of information overload. Advanced communication skills are of utmost importance to ensure information is tailored to suit individual needs, as no one model of information giving suits all. This article is a rapid literature search relating to post-prostatectomy functional outcomes and how communication and information giving before treatment assists with acceptance of treatment outcomes. PMID:25978470

  19. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  20. A Comparison of Face to Face and Video-Based Self Care Education on Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati Maslakpak, Masumeh; Shams, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Background End stage renal disease negatively affects the patients’ quality of life. There are different educational methods to help these patients. This study was performed to compare the effectiveness of self-care education in two methods, face to face and video educational, on the quality of life in patients under treatment by hemodialysis in education-medical centers in Urmia. Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 120 hemodialysis patients were selected randomly; they were then randomly allocated to three groups: the control, face to face education and video education. For face to face group, education was given individually in two sessions of 35 to 45 minutes. For video educational group, CD was shown. Kidney Disease Quality Of Life- Short Form (KDQOL-SF) questionnaire was filled out before and two months after the intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS software by using one-way ANOVA. Results ANOVA test showed a statistically significant difference in the quality of life scores among the three groups after the intervention (P=0.024). After the intervention, Tukey’s post-hoc test showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups of video and face to face education regarding the quality of life (P>0.05). Conclusion Implementation of the face to face and video education methods improves the quality of life in hemodialysis patients. So, it is suggested that video educational should be used along with face to face education. PMID:26171412

  1. Improving Physician-Patient Communication About Cancer Pain With a Tailored Education-Coaching Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Street, Richard L.; Slee, Christina; Kalauokalani, Donna K; Dean, Dionne Evans; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kravitz, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effect of a theoretically grounded, tailored education-coaching intervention to help patients more effectively discuss their pain-related questions, concerns, and preferences with physicians. Methods Grounded in social-cognitive and communication theory, a tailored education coaching (TEC) intervention was developed to help patients learn pain management and communication skills. In a RCT, 148 cancer patients agreed to have their consultations audio-recorded and were assigned to the intervention or a control group. The recordings were used to code for patients’ questions, acts of assertiveness, and expressed concerns and to rate the quality of physicians’ communication. Results Patients in the TEC group discussed their pain concerns more than did patients in the control group. More active patients also had more baseline pain and interacted with physicians using participatory decision-making. Ratings of physicians’ information about pain were higher when patients talked more about their pain concerns. Conclusions The study demonstrates the efficacy of a theoretically grounded, coaching intervention to help cancer patients talk about pain control. Practice implications Coaching interventions can be effective resources for helping cancer patients communicate about their pain concerns if they are theoretically grounded, can be integrated within clinical routines, and lead to improve health outcomes. PMID:19962845

  2. Educational Equity: Challenges for Educator Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Jane; Winslow, Emily

    2015-01-01

    With increasingly diverse student populations, educational equity is a bigger challenge than ever for public schools across the United States. While federal government, states, and school districts work to identify and address the root causes of equity gaps, efforts are often hampered by a limited body of research-based strategies and approaches…

  3. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  4. A Pilot Study of an Exercise-Based Patient Education Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahli, Mohammed; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Lutz, Christina; Liebherr, Magnus; Schubert, Patric; Haas, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather). Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T0) and after (T1) a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T2). Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T0 to T1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T1 to T2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients' integral constitution concerning physical and mental health. PMID:25587449

  5. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Methods/Design Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of the Home Care Program carried out in 8 Primary Care Centers (Spain). These patients are dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and have caregivers. The socioeconomic and educational characteristics of the patient and the caregiver are recorded. On a schedule of 0–6–12 months, patients are evaluated as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), food intake, dentures, degree of dependency (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), mood status (Yesavage test), and anthropometric and serum parameters of nutritional status: albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, lymphocyte count, iron, and ferritin. Prior to the intervention, the educational procedure and the design of educational material are standardized among nurses. The nurses conduct an initial session for caregivers and then monitor the education impact at home every month (4 visits) up to 6 months. The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) methodology will be used. The investigators will study the effect of the intervention with caregivers on the patient’s nutritional status using the MNA test, diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters. Bivariate normal test statistics and multivariate models will be created to adjust the effect of the intervention. The SPSS/PC program will be used for statistical analysis. Discussion The nutritional status of dependent patients has been little studied. This study allows us to know nutritional risk from different points of view: diet, anthropometry and biochemistry in dependent patients at nutritional risk and to assess the effect of a nutritional education intervention. The design with random allocation, inclusion of all patients, validated methods, caregivers’ education and standardization between nurses allows us to obtain valuable information about nutritional status and prevention. Trial Registration number Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01360775 PMID:22625878

  6. Research promoting better patient education on reproductive health after cancer.

    PubMed

    Canada, Andrea L; Schover, Leslie R

    2005-01-01

    Although research on cancer survivors' experiences and attitudes about infertility is relatively new, existing literature suggests that only about half of men and women of childbearing age receive the information they need from their health care providers at the time of diagnosis and treatment planning. Thus, better patient education strategies are needed. Although the ideal would be to have oncologists conduct detailed discussions of options to preserve or restore fertility with all interested patients, this standard is unrealistic. A more practical alternative is to train nonphysician providers such as nurses and social workers to address this topic. In addition, innovative strategies of direct patient education could be helpful, including use of computerized media, peer counseling, or special educational modules tailored to a particular age group or cancer site. PMID:15784835

  7. The Medical Education and Best Practice in Orthopedic Patient Care in Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2012-07-01

    The leadership organization focuses on education, teamwork, customer relationship and developing strategy which help in building added value, in managing activities, time and quality. Everyday orthopedic experience shows that medical education is a mixture of: specific knowledge, skills and attitudes of people working together, and that creates effective teamwork in a hospital environment. Apart from the main reason of medical education, teaching about disease treatment and health problem solving, medical education should also concentrate on human factors and behavioral aspects of patient treatment in hospital.Assessment of an organization and medical education process by cultural and teamwork criteria, offers a powerful new way to think about performance at the frontlines of healthcare and in the future it could be gold standard for assessing the success of an organization, and standards in medical education, not only in orthopedics.

  8. Educational Needs for Improving Self-care in Heart Failure Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Seok; Clark, Patricia C.; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Lobb, Maureen; Smith, Andrew L.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore the need for self-monitoring and self-care education in heart failure patients with diabetes (HF-DM patients) by describing cognitive and affective factors to provide guidance in developing effective self- management education. Method A cross-sectional correlation design was employed using baseline patient data from a study testing a 12 week patient and family dyad intervention to improve dietary and medication-taking self-management behaviors in HF patients. Data from 116 participants recruited from metropolitan Atlanta area were used. Demographic and co-morbidities, physical function, psychological distress, relationship with health care provider, self-efficacy (medication taking and low sodium diet), and behavioral outcomes (medications, dietary habits) were assessed. Descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square tests, t-tests or Mann Whitney tests were performed to compare HF patients with and without DM. Results HF-DM patients were older, heavier, had more co- morbidities, and took more daily medications than HF patients. High self-efficacy on medication and low sodium diet was reported in both groups with no significant difference. Although HF-DM patients took more daily medications than HF, both groups exhibited high HF medication taking behaviors. The HF-DM patients consumed significantly lower total sugar than HF patients, but clinically higher levels of sodium. Conclusions Diabetes educators need to be aware of potential conflicts of treatment regimens to manage two chronic diseases. Special and integrated diabetes self-management education programs which incorporate principles of HF self-management should be developed to improve self-management behavior in HF-DM patients. PMID:22722611

  9. Educating and Informing Patients Receiving Psychopharmacological Medications: Are Family Physicians in Pakistan up to the Task?

    PubMed Central

    Ganatra, Hammad Ashraf; Bhurgri, Hadi; Channa, Roomasa; Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Chaudhry, Rafia Ishfaq; Batool, Syeda Hina; Basit, Abdul; Asghar, Mehmood; Saleem, Sarah; Naqvi, Haider

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown a high prevalence of psychiatric illnesses among patients in primary health care settings. Family physicians have a fundamental role in managing psychiatric illness with psychopharmacological medications. Providing information about the disease, its management and the potential adverse effects of the medications is an important part of the management of mental illnesses. Our objective was to determine if patients who were prescribed psychopharmacological drugs by family physicians at a community health center in Karachi, Pakistan were provided adequate education about their disease and its management. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Community Health Centre (CHC), Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. Details about the prescriptions and patient education were acquired from the patients after their consultations. Results A total of 354 adult patients were interviewed during 3 days. Among them, 73 (20.6%) were prescribed psychopharmacological medications. Among patients receiving psychopharmacological medicines, 37 (50.7%) did not know their diagnosis; 50 (68.5%) were unaware of the disease process; 52 (71.2%) were unaware of alternative treatments; 63 (86.3%) were not cautioned about the potential adverse effects of the drugs; 24 (32.9%) were unaware of the duration of treatment and in 60 (82.2%) of the participants an appropriate referral had not been discussed. For all aspects of education, patients prescribed psychopharmacological medications knew less as compared to those patients that were prescribed other medications. Discussion The practice of imparting information to patients who receive psychopharmacological medications seems to be inadequate in Pakistan. We have hypothesized about the possible reasons for our findings, and identified a need for further research to determine the cause for such findings and to address them accordingly. At the same time there is a need to educate family physicians in Pakistan about the special importance of providing adequate information to such patients. PMID:19247488

  10. [The cure of type 2 diabetes and patient education].

    PubMed

    Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Correia, J C; Sittarame, F; Miganne, G; Lasserre Moutet, A; Golay, A

    2015-03-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a potentially reversible disease. Patient education encompasses a deep investment of the health care providers, who with the aid of pedagogic tools, help the pa tient commit to this path. This facilitates the learning of uncommon knowledge and skills required. Whether or not it leads to a complete remission of the disease may not be the main purpose. The main goal lies in the patient's motivation to learn and change on a long term basis. PMID:26027202

  11. ‘Changing Minds’: determining the effectiveness and key ingredients of an educational intervention to enhance healthcare professionals’ intentions to prescribe physical activity to patients with physical disabilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are vital conduits of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) information; however, few discuss LTPA with their patients with disabilities. ‘Changing Minds, Changing Lives’ (CMCL) is a nationwide, theory- and evidence-based seminar aimed at increasing LTPA-discussion among HCPs by enhancing their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control (PBC), and intentions. The purposes of the current study were to: examine the effectiveness and short- and long-term maintenance of a CMCL seminar on HCPs’ social cognitions to discuss LTPA; and explore key implementation variables that predict changes in HCPs’ social cognitions. Methods Prior-to, as well as immediately, one, and six months following a CMCL seminar, 97 HCPs (Mage ± SD = 36.23 ± 10.42; 69.0% female; 97.9% Caucasian; 38.1% rehabilitation therapists; years in profession = 11.56 ± 9.94) from five Canadian provinces completed questionnaires that assessed the Theory of Planned Behaviour constructs with regard to discussing LTPA with their patients with a physical disability. Key presenter characteristics and intervention delivery components were extracted from presenter demographic questionnaires and seminar checklists, respectively. Separate repeated-measures ANOVAs and post-hoc t-tests evaluated changes in HCPs’ social cognitions. Hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to predict intentions and to understand which implementation variables may help explain significant changes in social cognitions. Results Significant increases in HCPs’ social cognitions for discussing LTPA were reported from pre- to post-seminar (ps <0.002); however, increases were not maintained at follow-up. PBC emerged as the strongest predictor of participants’ post-CMCL intentions (? = 0.45, p <0.001). Although several implementation characteristics were related to changes in perceptions, the number of seminars the presenter delivered was the only significant negative predictor of post-seminar PBC (? = -0.18, p <0.05). Conclusions Future iterations of the CMCL intervention should include additional strategies to sustain improvements in HCPs’ social cognitions over time. Future CMCL evaluations should measure additional implementation variables so that the key ingredients for ‘Changing Minds’ can continue to be investigated. PMID:24581329

  12. Bootstrapping Results of Exercise Therapy and Education for Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witta, E. Lea; Brubaker, Craig

    2003-01-01

    When studies are conducted over a period of time, the sample size typically decreases. In a study of the effects of exercise therapy and education with recovering congestive heart failure (CHF) patients (Brubaker, Witta, & Angelopoulus, 2003), the sample size decreased from over 40 to 9 participants after an 18-month time span. Although the…

  13. Effectiveness of E-learning in pharmacy education.

    PubMed

    Salter, Sandra M; Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2014-05-15

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

  14. Effectiveness of E-learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M.; Clifford, Rhonda M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

  15. Skin Infections Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2014

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Skin Infections Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2014 Revised 02/12/14 Page 1 of 1 Types of Skin Infections Abscess: (Boil) a painful swelling and collection of pus within the skin caused by deep infection. This pus may ooze out through the skin or require minor surgery to drain. Cellulitis: A rapidly

  16. The Development of Kidney Stone Dietary Plans for Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Darwin; Mayo, M. Leah; Abraham, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Currently patient education programs and urology practices provide individuals with "lists of foods to avoid" for dietary management of kidney stones. However, "planned diets" that include daily meal plans and recipes provide structure and specificity for diet management and are preferred by many individuals. This article describes the development…

  17. Ear Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Ear Problems Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Reviewed 02/08/2012 Page 1 of 1 Otitis Media Otitis Media is an infection of the middle ear behind the eardrum. Most infections occur after does not equalize air pressure properly. Symptoms of otitis media include ear pain, fever, fullness

  18. The Use of Readability Formulas in Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Paul J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the SMOG readability formula scores of currently available patient education materials. It was hypothesized that the reading level of the materials would be higher than 7.5, the reading level of the average American citizen; and that there would be a significant reduction in the measured document reading levels…

  19. On Effecting Change in Educational Bureaucracies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantini, Mario D.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines the author's participation in several programs designed to effect change in educational institutions. Observations regarding school decentralization, community participation, and staff development programs are presented. (APM)

  20. The Accessibility of patient information leaflets concerning cervical cancer - the effect of high leaflet readability level and the reader's level of education 

    E-print Network

    Gale, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that many Patient Information Leaflets are written at too high a level for the population to understand. This study took 2 leaflets on Cervical Cancer, with their readability measured using 3 different ...

  1. The effect of peer-led education on the life quality of mastectomy patients referred to breast cancer-clinics in Shiraz, Iran 2009

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer among women is a relatively common with a more favorable expected survival rates than other forms of cancers. This study aimed to determine the improved quality of life for post-mastectomy women through peer education. Methods Using pre and post test follow up and control design approach, 99 women with stage I and II of breast cancer diagnosis were followed one year after modified radical mastectomy. To measure the quality of life an instrument designed by the European organization for research and treatment of cancer, known as the Quality of Life Question (QLQ-30) and it's breast cancer supplementary measure (QLQ-BR23) at three points in time (before, immediately and two months after intervention) for both groups were used. The participant selection was a convenient sampling method and women were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups. The experimental group was randomly assigned to five groups and peer educators conducted weekly educational programs for one month. Tabulated data were analyzed using chi square, t test, and repeated measurement multivariate to compare the quality of life differences over time. Results For the experimental group, the results showed statistically significant improvement in all performance aspects of life quality and symptom reduction (P < 0.001), while the control group had no significant differences in all aspects of life quality. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that peer led education is a useful intervention for post-mastectomy women to improves their quality of life. PMID:20653966

  2. Effects of Patient Navigation on Patient Satisfaction Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Post, Douglas M; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Young, Gregory S; Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Plascak, Jesse J; Paskett, Electra D

    2015-12-01

    Patient navigation (PN) may reduce cancer health disparities. Few studies have investigated the effects of PN on patient-reported satisfaction with care or assessed patients' satisfaction with navigators. The objectives of this study are to test the effects of PN on patient satisfaction with cancer care, assess patients' satisfaction with navigators, and examine the impact of barriers to care on satisfaction for persons with abnormal cancer-related screening tests or symptoms. Study participants included women and men with abnormal breast, cervical, or colorectal cancer screening tests and/or symptoms receiving care at 18 clinics. Navigated (n?=?416) and non-navigated (n?=?292) patients completed baseline and end-of-study measures. There was no significant difference between navigated and non-navigated patients in change in patient satisfaction with cancer care from baseline to exit. African-American (p?patients (p?patient satisfaction at baseline. A significant effect was found for change in satisfaction over time by employment status (p?=?0.04), with full-time employment showing the most improvement. The interaction between satisfaction with navigators and satisfaction with care over time was marginally significant (p?=?0.08). Baseline satisfaction was lower for patients who reported a barrier to care (p?=?0.02). Patients reporting other-focused barriers (p?=?0.03), including transportation (p?=?0.02), had significantly lower increases in satisfaction over time. Overall, results suggested that assessing barriers to cancer care and tailoring navigation to barrier type could enhance patients' experiences with health care. PN may have positive effects for healthcare organizations struggling to enhance quality of care. PMID:25510369

  3. A Pilot Project to Develop and Assess a Health Education Programme for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atak, Nazli; Arslan, Umit

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The current research was designed to develop a health education programme for type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the Taba-Tyler model and to evaluate its effect. Design: The study was quasi-experimental in design. Setting: Fifty-five patients from the Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, University Hospital of Ankara. Method: An education

  4. Educating patients about warfarin therapy using information technology: A survey on healthcare professionals’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Sayeed; Mullan, Judy; Bajorek, Beata

    Objective To explore healthcare professionals' views about the benefits and challenges of using information technology (IT) resources for educating patients about their warfarin therapy. Methods A cross-sectional survey of both community and hospital-based healthcare professionals (e.g., doctors, pharmacists and nurses) involved using a purpose-designed questionnaire. The questionnaires were distributed using a multi-modal approach to maximise response rates. Results Of the total 300 questionnaires distributed, 109 completed surveys were received (43.3% response rate). Over half (53.2%) of the healthcare participants were aged between 40-59 years, the majority (59.5%) of whom were female. Fifty nine (54.1%) participants reported having had no access to warfarin-specific IT-based patient education resources, and a further 19 (38.0%) of the participants who had IT-access reported that they never used such resources. According to the healthcare participants, the main challenges associated with educating their patients about warfarin therapy included: patient-related factors, such as older age, language barriers, cognitive impairments and/or ethnic backgrounds or healthcare professional factors, such as time constraints. The healthcare professionals reported that there were several aspects about warfarin therapy which they found difficult to educate their patients about which is why they identified computers and interactive touch screen kiosks as preferred IT devices to deliver warfarin education resources in general practices, hospital-based clinics and community pharmacies. At the same time, the healthcare professionals also identified a number of facilitators (e.g., to reinforce warfarin education, to offer reliable and easily comprehensible information) and barriers (e.g., time and costs of using IT resources, difficulty in operating the resources) that could impact on the effective implementation of these devices in educating patients about their warfarin therapy. Conclusions The findings of the study suggest that there is a need for improving healthcare professionals' use of, and access to IT-based warfarin education resources for patients. The study findings also suggest addressing the concerns raised by the healthcare professionals when implementing such IT resources successfully to help educate patients about their warfarin therapy. PMID:24155824

  5. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer H; Austin, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ). Patients and methods One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records. Results Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients’ understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this. Conclusion A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non-inferior knowledge to those seen in standard clinics. PMID:25987832

  6. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication. PMID:25847051

  7. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

  8. Aid Effectiveness in Education: Why It Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermingham, Desmond; Christensen, Olav Rex; Mahn, Timo Casjen

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue of "Prospects" on "Aid effectiveness in education". It brings together case studies of attempts in several very different contexts to improve the effectiveness of the use of aid in the education sector. By drawing on the historical evolution of the new paradigm over the last 20 years, the authors make the…

  9. Effective Online Instruction in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford-Ferre, Heather Glynn; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2012-01-01

    Online education has emerged as an effective and increasingly common alternative to face-to-face instruction in postsecondary education. This article is a summary of effective practices in online instructional methods, including course design, interaction among course participants, and instructor preparation and support.

  10. Profile of an Effective Urban Music Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of an effective urban music educator in an effort to provide strategies for university teacher training programs to prepare students to teach in urban schools. The study examined urban music teachers' (N = 158) educational background, effective and ineffective characteristics, perceived…

  11. HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal characteristics

    E-print Network

    DiMarco, Chrysanne

    HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal a comprehensive approach to the customization of patient-information and health-education materials through the development of so- phisticated natural language generation systems. We adopt a model of patient education

  12. Development of a brief multidisciplinary education programme for patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent progressive musculoskeletal disorder, leading to pain and disability. Patient information and education are considered core elements in treatment guidelines for OA; however, there is to our knowledge no evidence-based recommendation on the best approach, content or length on educational programmes in OA. Objective: to develop a brief, patient oriented disease specific multidisciplinary education programme (MEP) to enhance self-management in patients with OA. Method Twelve persons (80% female mean age 59 years) diagnosed with hand, hip or knee OA participated in focus group interviews. In the first focus group, six participants were interviewed about their educational needs, attitudes and expectations for the MEP. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thereafter condensed. Based on results from focus group interviews, current research evidence, clinical knowledge and patients' experience, a multidisciplinary OA team (dietist, nurse, occupational therapist, pharmacist, physical therapist and rheumatologist) and a patient representative developed a pilot-MEP after having attended a work-shop in health pedagogics. Finally, the pilot-MEP was evaluated by a second focus group consisting of four members from the first focus group and six other experienced patients, before final adjustments were made. Results The focus group interviews revealed four important themes: what is OA, treatment options, barriers and coping strategies in performing daily activities, and how to live with osteoarthritis. Identified gaps between patient expectations and experience with the pilot-programme were discussed and adapted into a final MEP. The final MEP was developed as a 3.5 hour educational programme provided in groups of 6-9 patients. All members from the multidisciplinary team are involved in the education programme, including a facilitator who during the provision of the programme ensures that the individual questions are addressed. As part of an ongoing process, a patient representative regularly attends the MEP and gives feedback concerning content and perceived value. Conclusion A MEP has been developed to enhance self-management in patients with OA attending a multidisciplinary OA outpatient clinic. The effectiveness of the MEP followed by individual consultations with members of the multidisciplinary team is currently evaluated in a randomised controlled trial with respect to patient satisfaction and functioning. PMID:22077985

  13. Is patient education helpful in providing care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A qualitative study involving French nurses.

    PubMed

    Fall, Estelle; Chakroun, Nadia; Dalle, Nathalie; Izaute, Marie

    2013-09-01

    This French study explored nurses' involvement in patient education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study design was qualitative. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital nurses. Data analysis was performed according to Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method, and supported by specific qualitative analysis software (Sphinx). The results showed the important role of hospital nurses in rheumatoid arthritis care. Patient education is a core part of nurses' work, allowing them to give patients information and emotional support. The interviewees displayed skills in helping patients learn to care for themselves. However, patient education mostly concerned patients who are already committed to their health care. Non-adherent patients warrant special attention; their acceptance of their disease, perceptions about disease and treatment, motivation, and autonomy should be specifically addressed. French nurses could benefit from more training, and could be aided by psychologists. Ambulatory services could also be developed for patient education in France, based on examples from other countries. PMID:23480278

  14. Effective writing that attracts patients.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Doctors today not only must communicate verbally, they must also realize that the written word is important to their ability to connect with the patients that they already have and also to attract new patients. Doctors will be expected to write blogs, to create content for their Web sites, to write articles for local publications, and even to learn to express themselves in 140 characters or less (i.e., Twitter). This article presents 10 rules for selecting the right words to enhance your communication with existing patients and potentially to attract new patients to your practice. PMID:26062324

  15. Quality Assessment of Spinal Cord Injury Patient Education Resources.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Singh, Priyanka L; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-04-01

    Study Design. Analysis of spinal cord injury patient education resources.Objective. To assess the quality of online patient education materials written about spinal cord injury.Summary of Background Data. The use of online materials by healthcare consumers to access medical information presents unique challenges. Most Americans have access to the Internet and frequently turn to it as a first-line resource.Methods. The quality of online patient education materials was evaluated via a readability analysis. Materials provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS); Centers for Disease Control (CDC); American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS); National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA); Mayo Clinic (Mayo); Department of Veterans Affairs (VA); Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (Kessler); American Academy of Neurology (AAN); Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA); and the Shepherd Center (SC) were assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level evaluations with Microsoft Office Word software. Unnecessary formatting was removed and the readability was evaluated with the Spelling and Grammar function.Results. A total of 104 sections from 10 different websites were analyzed. Overall, the average values of the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (11.9) and Flesch Reading Ease (40.2) indicated that most Americans would not be able to fully comprehend this material.Conclusion. Results indicate that the language used on materials provided by the aforementioned sites is perhaps too advanced for the average American to fully comprehend. The quality of these education resources may be improved via website revisions, which might be beneficial for improved patient utilization. PMID:24718059

  16. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

  17. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

  18. What can virtual patient simulation offer mental health nursing education?

    PubMed

    Guise, V; Chambers, M; Välimäki, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of simulation in nursing education and training, including potential benefits and barriers associated with its use. In particular, it addresses the hitherto scant application of diverse simulation devices and dedicated simulation scenarios in psychiatric and mental health nursing. It goes on to describe a low-cost, narrative-based virtual patient simulation technique which has the potential for wide application within health and social care education. An example of the implementation of this technology in a web-based pilot course for acute mental health nurses is given. This particular virtual patient technique is a simulation type ideally suited to promoting essential mental health nursing skills such as critical thinking, communication and decision making. Furthermore, it is argued that it is particularly amenable to e-learning and blended learning environments, as well as being an apt tool where multilingual simulations are required. The continued development, implementation and evaluation of narrative virtual patient simulations across a variety of health and social care programmes would help ascertain their success as an educational tool. PMID:22070549

  19. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  20. Computer Aided Instruction/Management of Nursing Protocols, Continuing Education and Patient Education for Remote Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masten, Yondell; Conover, Katherine P.

    1988-01-01

    Utilization of computer networks to provide instruction for health care providers and patients can increase knowledge for the participants and reduce the disadvantages of current methods of instruction, i.e., sporadic, inconsistent, hurried instruction patterns. Nursing protocols and nursing and patient education modules were developed as components of KARENET (Kellogg Affiliated Remote Environments Network), linking rural Morton, Texas, and the Health Sciences Center at Lubbock. Both health care providers and patient participants benefit from utilization of knowledge provided by the methodology of CAI/CMI.

  1. Does addition of 'mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study.

    PubMed

    Ba?datl?, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, R?za; Bahad?r, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdo?an, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone. PMID:25917265

  2. Behavior modification for orthodontic patients: an exploratory approach to patient education.

    PubMed

    Rich, S K

    1980-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore the usefulness of a behavior modification approach in changing oral hygiene habits of orthodontic patients. Two orthodontists identified patients in their practice who exhibited excessive plaque formation and inflammation and referred them to a health educator/dental hygienist. The health education program was subsequently presented to fifty-three patients, 8 to 18 years of age. Three counseling sessions with parental participation were scheduled approximately 2 weeks apart. The program consisted of a model for counseling, a rising and retiring survey to identify home routines, a list of "possible reinforcers" geared toward preteen interests, a monitoring card to record toothbrushing behavior, and a contract signed by both parent and child. Behavioral change in oral hygiene habits was measured through general assessment of toothbrushing technique, plaque accumulation, and soft-tissue appearance. Change in frequency of brushing was measured by patient self-monitoring. Patient and parental comments, as well as educator reactions, were considered in the over-all evaluation of the project. PMID:6933851

  3. Online virtual patients - A driver for change in medical and healthcare professional education in developing countries?

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, David; Borgstein, Eric; Grant, Mary E; Begg, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The development of online virtual patients has proved to be an effective vehicle for pedagogical and technological skills transfer and capacity building for medical and healthcare educators in Malawi. A project between the University of Edinburgh and the University of Malawi has delivered more than 20 collaboratively developed, virtual patients, contextualised for in-country medical and healthcare education and, more significantly, a cadre of healthcare professionals skilled in developing digital resources and integrating these into their emerging curricula. The process of engaging with new approaches to teaching and delivering personalised, context sensitive content via a game-informed, technology-supported process has contributed to the ability of healthcare educators in Malawi to drive pedagogical change, meet the substantial challenges of delivering new curricula, cope with increasing student numbers and promote teacher professional development. This initial phase of the project has laid the foundation for a broader second phase that focuses on promoting curriculum change, developing educational infrastructure and in-country capacity to create, and integrate digital resources into education and training across multi-professional groups and across educational levels. PMID:19811208

  4. Designing Educational Social Machines for Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee-King, Matthew; Krivenski, Maria; Brenton, Harry; Grimalt-Reynes, Andreu; d'Inverno, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report on our development of an educational social machine based on the concept that feedback in communities is an effective means to support the development of communities of learning and practice. Key challenges faced by this work are how best to support educational and social interactions, how to deliver personalised tuition, and how to…

  5. Patient Education Self-Management During Surgical Recovery: Combining Mobile (iPad) and a Content Management System

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S. Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Fischer, Erin N.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and “just-in-time” education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods: Patients were provided with iPad® (Apple®, Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily “to do” list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. Results: A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. Conclusions: We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and “just-in-time” education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models. PMID:24443928

  6. Multimedia Psychoeducation or Print Education in Preparing Patients With Cancer for Decision Making About Clinical Trial Participation | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized clinical trial compares multimedia psychoeducation to print education in preparing patients with cancer for decision making about clinical trial participation. Multimedia psychoeducation includes a DVD and written materials with a combined focus on knowledge and attitude change, and may be an effective method to help patients prepare for decision making about clinical trial participation. It is not yet known whether a multimedia psychoeducation is more effective than print education in preparing patients for decision making about clinical trials.

  7. Role of physiotherapy and patient education in lymphedema control following breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hong, Rong-Bin; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether education in combination with physiotherapy can reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods We analyzed 1,217 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2011 who underwent tumor resection and axillary lymph node dissection. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A (n=415), who received neither education nor physiotherapy postsurgery; Group B (n=672), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery; and Group C (n=130), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery, followed by a physiotherapy program. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether BCRL developed. BCRL risk factors were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During the follow-up, 188 patients (15.4%) developed lymphedema, including 77 (18.6%) in Group A, 101 (15.0%) in Group B, and 10 (7.7%) in Group C (P=0.010). The median period from surgery to lymphedema was 0.54 years (interquartile range =0.18–1.78). The independent risk factors for BCRL included positive axillary lymph node invasion, a higher (>20) number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, and having undergone radiation therapy, whereas receiving an educational program followed by physiotherapy was a protective factor against BCRL (hazard ratio =0.35, 95% confidence interval =0.18–0.67, P=0.002). Conclusion Patient education that begins within the first week postsurgery and is followed by physiotherapy is effective in reducing the risk of BCRL in women with breast cancer. PMID:25750536

  8. Quality Physical Education: A Commentary on Effective Physical Education Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term "quality teaching" rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the…

  9. A Survey of the Practice of Patient Education with Spinal Cord Injured Patients in Rehabilitation Centers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, June B.; Bendel, Judith G.

    Practices in patient education for spinal cord injured persons in 10 hospital rehabilitation centers were examined. Surveys revealed that a majority of the centers conducted patient education (designed to provide facts about the injury as well as psychological support). Findings revealed a large number of staff involved, but a wide difference in…

  10. The Future of Graduate Medical Education: A Systems-Based Approach to Ensure Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Bagian, James P

    2015-09-01

    In the past 15 years, there has been growing recognition that improving patient safety must be more systems based and sophisticated than the traditional approach of simply telling health care providers to "be more careful." Drawing from his own experience, the author discusses barriers to systems-based patient safety initiatives and emphasizes the importance of overcoming those barriers. Physicians may be slow to adopt standardized patient safety initiatives because of a resistance to standardization, but faculty in training institutions have a responsibility to model safe, effective, systems-based approaches to patient care in order to instill these values in the residents they teach. Importantly, graduate medical education (GME) is well positioned to influence not only how future physicians provide care to patients but also how today's physicians and health care systems improve patient safety and care. The necessary systems-based knowledge and skills are rooted in both understanding and proficiently identifying threats to patient safety, their underlying causes, the development and implementation of effective countermeasures, and the measurement of whether the threat has been successfully addressed. This knowledge and its application is notably absent in the operation of most institutions that sponsor GME training programs in terms of didactic instruction and everyday demonstrated proficiency. Most important of all, faculty must model the behavior and competencies that are desirable in future physicians and not fall into the trap of the "do as I say, not as I do" mentality, which can have a corrosive deleterious effect on the next generation of physicians. PMID:26312603

  11. Interventions to Improve Patient Education Regarding Multifactorial Genetic Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Meilleur, Katherine G.; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T.

    2009-01-01

    The careful education of patients with complex genetic disease is essential. However, healthcare providers often have limited time to spend providing thorough genetic education. Furthermore, the number of healthcare professionals possessing strong genetics training may be inadequate to meet increasing patient demands. Due to such constraints, several interventions have been investigated over the past decade to identify potential resources for the facilitation of this specific type of patient education. This systematic literature review of these interventions for patient education attempts to elucidate the answer to the question: is there sufficient evidence for best practice for delivering genetic information to patients with multifactorial conditions? The various interventions (CD-ROM, group counseling, video/decision aid, and miscellaneous) were analyzed in terms of quality criteria and achievement of specific outcomes and were rated according to the Stetler model for evidence based practice. Seven main outcomes were evaluated: 1. objective and subjective knowledge assessment 2. psychological measures (general anxiety, depression, stress, cancer worry) 3. satisfaction/effectiveness of intervention 4. time spent in counseling (time spent on basic genetic information vs. specific concerns) 5. decision making/intent to undergo genetic testing 6. treatment choice and value of that choice, and, finally 7. risk perception. Overall, the computer interventions resulted in more significant findings that were beneficial than any other category followed by the video category, although the group and miscellaneous categories did not measure all of the outcomes reported by the other two categories. Nevertheless, while these groups had neutral or negative findings in some of the outcomes, the computer intervention group showed significant improvement in genetics knowledge, psychological measures, satisfaction/effectiveness, time spent with counselor, and decision/intent to undergo testing. PMID:19291763

  12. Rathmann Family Foundation Medical Education Faculty Fellowship in Patient-Centered Care

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Rathmann Family Foundation Medical Education Faculty Fellowship in Patient-Centered Care The Stanford School of Medicine Office of Medical Education is pleased to announce the annual call for applications to the Rathmann Family Foundation Medical Education Faculty Fellowship in Patient-Centered Care

  13. The Process of Breast Augmentation with Special Focus on Patient Education, Patient Selection and Implant Selection.

    PubMed

    Adams, William P; Small, Kevin H

    2015-10-01

    Breast augmentation remains one of the most commonly performed plastic surgical procedures worldwide; however, Food and Drug Administration clinical trials have suggested that this procedure has a reoperation rate of 14% to 24% after 3 years. Recent literature has proposed that breast augmentation should not only be a surgical procedure but ultimately a surgical process to reduce postoperative complications and enhance patient satisfaction. The process of breast augmentation has been documented to optimize postsurgical outcomes and includes the following 4 steps: patient education, tissue-based planning, refined surgical techniques, and defined postoperative management. PMID:26408433

  14. [Current state of training in pharmacy education using a problem-based learning/tutorial model with simulated patients and standardized patients at National University Corporation].

    PubMed

    Irie, Tetsumi; Nitta, Atsumi; Akaike, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Simulated/standardized patient-based (SP) education and problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial education become a powerful tool to heighten the pharmacy students' will to learn in order to cultivate the responsibility to contribute to public health and welfare as a clinical professional and to facilitate students' competences to solve problems by themselves. What this program is trying to do is: 1) to establish the system to train, educate and supply SP who are effective in the training and education of pharmacy students in close cooperation with the medical schools and their affiliated hospitals; 2) to improve the quality of the current PBL tutorial education and thereby establish it as an advanced education program in the education of senior students. We carried out the questionnaire to National University Corporation which establishes a school of pharmacy, as to the training and education of SP. The analysis of the answers to the questionnaire revealed the present status of SP in the Pharmaceutical Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in the Pharmaceutical Common Achievement Test, and the existence of the problems on how to standardize SP as well as how to cover such expenses. Furthermore, the activity of the first year consisted of the exchange and sharing of information regarding the existing method of training and education of SP and PBL tutorial education and the identification of the problems to be solved in order to improve the quality of the educational program. PMID:22382843

  15. Effective Fall 2011 HIGHER EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    A Guide for the Intern, Supervisor, and Advisor in the Internship Education Doctorate (Ed in the Internship: 1) the Student, 2) the On-site Supervisor, and 3) the Advisor. Student: The Internship Student, with consultation with his or Academic Advisor, completing the internship, and providing evidence of having met

  16. Decreasing pediatric patient anxiety about radiology imaging tests: prospective evaluation of an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Annette J; Steele, Jennifer; Russell, Gregory B; Moran, Rhonda; Fredericks, Kirsten P; Jennings, S Gregory

    2009-12-01

    This trial investigated anxiety levels and effect of an educational coloring book (CB) among pediatric patients about to undergo radiology imaging tests. Control group (N = 101) and intervention group (N = 175) children ages 3-10 years and their parents were surveyed to determine anxiety levels before the imaging test, with the intervention group being surveyed after patient and parental review of the CB. Anxiety was low for all subjects overall compared with findings from previously published literature, perhaps related to systemic measures to make children's hospitals more child friendly in recent years. Review of the CB was not associated with decreased anxiety among patients or parents. However, among a subgroup with higher baseline parental anxiety, there was a trend toward lower patient anxiety in the intervention group. Most parents indicated that the CB was informative and helped them and their child be less worried, and that they were pleased to have received the CB. PMID:19833667

  17. Leading Educationally Effective Family-Centered Bedside Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Amonpreet K.; Amin, Harish J.; McLaughlin, Kevin; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    Background Family-centered bedside rounds (family-centered rounds) enable learning and clinical care to occur simultaneously and offer benefits to patients, health care providers, and multiple levels of learners. Objective We used a qualitative approach to understand the dimensions of successful (ie, educationally positive) family-centered rounds from the perspective of attending physicians and residents. Methods We studied rounds in a tertiary academic hospital affiliated with the University of Calgary. Data were collected from 7 focus groups of pediatrics residents and attendings and were analyzed using grounded theory. Results Attending pediatricians and residents described rounds along a spectrum from successful and highly educational to unsuccessful and of low educational value. Perceptions of residents and attendings were influenced by how well the environment, educational priorities, and competing priorities were managed. Effectiveness of the manager was the core variable for successful rounds led by persons who could develop predictable rounds and minimize learner vulnerability. Conclusions Success of family-centered rounds in teaching settings depended on making the education and patient care aims of rounds explicit to residents and attending faculty. The role of the manager in leading rounds also needs to be made explicit. PMID:24455007

  18. Patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of cancer-related fatigue randomized controlled feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a prominent clinical problem. There are calls for multi-modal interventions. Methods We assessed the feasibility of delivering patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of CRF in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with breast cancer survivors using usual care as control. Social cognitive and integrative medicine theories guided integration of patient education with acupuncture into a coherent treatment protocol. The intervention consisted of two parts. First, patients were taught to improve self-care by optimizing exercise routines, improving nutrition, implementing some additional evidence-based cognitive behavioral techniques such as stress management in four weekly 50-minute sessions. Second, patients received eight weekly 50-minute acupuncture sessions. The pre-specified primary outcome, CRF, was assessed with the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Secondary outcomes included three dimensions of cognitive impairment assessed with the FACT-COGv2. Results Due to difficulties in recruitment, we tried several methods that led to the development of a tailored recruitment strategy: we enlisted oncologists into the core research team and recruited patients completing treatment from oncology waiting rooms. Compared to usual care control, the intervention was associated with a 2.38-point decline in fatigue as measured by the BFI (90% Confidence Interval from 0.586 to 5.014; p <0.10). Outcomes associated with cognitive dysfunction were not statistically significant. Conclusions Patient education integrated with acupuncture had a very promising effect that warrants conducting a larger RCT to confirm findings. An effective recruitment strategy will be essential for the successful execution of a larger-scale trial. Trial registration NCT00646633 PMID:21703001

  19. Pediatrics Education in an AHEC Setting: Preparing Students to Provide Patient Centered Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Steven Owens

    2012-01-01

    Patient centered medicine is a paradigm of health care that seeks to treat the whole person, rather than only the illness. The physician must understand the patient as a whole by considering the patient's individual needs, social structure, socioeconomic status, and educational background. Medical education includes ways to train students in this…

  20. An educational video to increase clinical trials enrollment among lung cancer patients. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    An educational video increased patients’ self-assessed likelihood to enroll in a clinical trial. This format of patient education has potential for universal applicability because of its low cost of administration and the low demands on patient and staff time.

  1. The impact of an educational program on HCV patient outcomes using boceprevir in community practices (OPTIMAL trial)

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, Vinod; Brown, Robert S.; Patel, Vishal; Kugelmas, Marcelo; Regenstein, Fredric; Balart, Luis; LaBrecque, Douglas; Brown, Kimberly; Avila, Mark; Biederman, Michael; Freed, Glenn; Smith, Richard; Bernstein, Marc; Arnold, Hays; Cahan, Joel; Fink, Scott; Katkov, William; Massoumi, Hatef; Harrison, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although effective, direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies for genotype 1 (GT 1) hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been associated with compliance challenges. Additionally, treatment at predominantly community-based centers has been associated with low retention of patients on treatment and higher dropout rates. The OPTIMAL Phase IV interventional trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01405027) was designed to evaluate the impact of an education program for community investigator (CI) sites participating in a Chronic Liver Disease Foundation study treating chronic GT 1 HCV patients. Methods: This physician educational program was administered by 22 Hepatology Centers of Educational Expertise (HCEE) academic sites to 33 CI sites asked to participate from December 2011 to July 2012. The HCEE mentors from DAA-experienced academic sites educated those at CI sites on therapeutic management, practice, and patient outcomes through a series of four standardized educational sequence visits regarding the use of first generation HCV protease inhibitors and the overall treatment of HCV. Results: Treatment duration compliance rates for patients treated at CI sites versus those treated at HCEE academic sites were evaluable in 77 of 84 HCEE academic site patients, 102 of 113 patients treated at CI sites, and 179 of 197 overall patients. The treatment duration compliance rates for patients treated at HCEE academic sites, CI sites and overall were 85.4 ± 25.39%, 83.8 ± 27.37%, and 84.5 ± 26.48%, respectively, and did not differ statistically between the groups (p = 0.49). Almost half (47%) of the patients in the study achieved a sustained virological response for 24 weeks (SVR24) regardless of the type of site (p = 0.64). Safety profiles were similar at both HCEE and CI sites. Conclusions: These results demonstrated that education of CI sites unfamiliar with DAAs resulted in patient outcomes consistent with those observed at DAA-experienced academic sites. PMID:26327916

  2. Family-Centered Education and Its Clinical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis Short Running

    PubMed Central

    Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Asgari, Parvaneh; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Farokhnezhad Afshar, Pouya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor adherence to treatment in patients undergoing hemodialysis leads to many complications, including death of the patient. Objectives: This study was aimed to investigate the effect of family-based training on common side-effects during dialysis. Patients and Methods: The present randomized controlled trial study was conducted on 60 patients undergoing hemodialysis at hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from May 2012 to October 2012. Samples were randomly divided into two groups of patient-education (n = 30) and education of patient associated with an active member of the family (n = 30). Blood pressure, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, headaches and muscle cramps were followed with a check list and a questionnaire. The frequencies of the abovementioned complications at the mentioned intervals were recorded in three stages (before the intervention as well as two and four weeks after the intervention). Data analysis was performed using SPSS software, version 16, with chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test and independent t-test. Results: The mean ages of the patients in patient-centered and the family-oriented groups were 47.41 ± 10.31 and 48.16 ± 9.21, respectively. The result showed that some of the variables such as chest pain (P = 0.50, P = 0.01), nausea (P = 0.50, P = 0.01), headache (P = 0.81, P = 0.016), and blood pressure (P = 0.91, P = 0.016) were statistically significant before and four weeks after the intervention. Conclusions: According to the result of this study, the presence of families in a treatment plan could be essential to follow the treatment plan and subsequently reduced the complications of hemodialysis. PMID:26290749

  3. Patient education, disease activity and physical function: can we be more targeted? A cross sectional study among people with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In order to target educational needs of patients more effectively, an Austrian-German educational needs assessment tool (OENAT) was developed, the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and hand osteoarthritis (HOA) were described and the relationships between educational needs, gender, disease activity and function were explored. Methods The English ENAT was adapted into Austrian-German using Beaton's cross-cultural adaptation process. Internal construct validity was assessed by Rasch analysis. Educational needs across diagnostic groups and subgroups of patients were summarized descriptively and their relationship with disease activity and physical functioning explored. Results The sample comprised 130 RA, 125 PsA and 48 HOA patients. Their mean ages ±?SD were 56?±?14, 51?±?11 and 64?±?7 years for RA, PsA and HOA; disease duration was 11?±?9, 11?±?11 and 14?±?9 years, respectively. More than 70% in each patient group expressed interest in receiving education about their disease. The educational needs differed significantly between women and men in all 3 groups. In RA and PsA, female patients expressed significantly higher educational needs than men in 'movements’ and 'feelings’ domains (p=0.04 and p=0.03 for RA and p<0.01 and p=0.01 for PsA). Female patients in the HOA group had significantly higher scores on all domains except for the 'movements’. Older patients with PsA scored significantly higher than their younger counterparts in the 'pain’ domain (p=0.05). RA patients with disease duration >5 years), expressed higher educational needs in 'movements’ (p<0.01). Educational background had effects in the PsA group only, patients with basic education had greater scores than those with higher education on 'movements’ and 'arthritis process’ (p=0.01). In the RA group, DAS28 correlated significantly with 'movements’ (r=0.24, p=0.01), 'feelings’ (r=0.22, p=0.02), and 'treatments’ (r=0.22, p=0.03). In the PsA group, all OENAT domains correlated with disease activity (DAPSA and CDAI). Conclusions This study showed that educational needs vary with personal characteristics. Patient education may be more targeted and effective, if gender, age, educational background and disease duration are taken into account. Correlations with disease activity and function suggest that the OENAT could enable identification of 'intervention points’, which can be ideal opportunities for effective patient education. PMID:24286444

  4. Effective Teaching in Physical Education: Slovenian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pišot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; Štemberger, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However,…

  5. Theories on Educational Effectiveness and Ineffectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Following Snow's (1973) description of an "inductive" process of theory formation, this article addresses the organization of the knowledge base on school effectiveness. A multilevel presentation stimulated the conceptualization of educational effectiveness as an integration of system-level, school-level, and classroom-level…

  6. [Patient safety in education and training of healthcare professionals in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Barbara; Siebert, H; Euteneier, A

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve patient safety, healthcare professionals who care for patients directly or indirectly are required to possess specific knowledge and skills. Patient safety education is not or only poorly represented in education and examination regulations of healthcare professionals in Germany; therefore, it is only practiced rarely and on a voluntary basis. Meanwhile, several training curricula and concepts have been developed in the past 10 years internationally and recently in Germany, too. Based on these concepts the German Coalition for Patient Safety developed a catalogue of core competencies required for safety in patient care. This catalogue will serve as an important orientation when patient safety is to be implemented as a subject of professional education in Germany in the future. Moreover, teaching staff has to be trained and educational and training activities have to be evaluated. Patient safety education and training for (undergraduate) healthcare professional will require capital investment. PMID:25394354

  7. Development of SMOG-Cro readability formula for healthcare communication and patient education.

    PubMed

    Brangan, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Effective communication shows a positive impact on patient satisfaction, compliance and medical outcomes, at the same time reducing the healthcare costs. Written information for patients needs to correspond to health literacy levels of the intended audiences. Readability formulas correlate well with the reading and comprehension tests but are considered an easier and quicker method to estimate a text difficulty. SMOG readability formula designed for English language needs to be modified if used for texts in other languages. The aim of this study was to develop a readability formula based on SMOG, that could be used to estimate text difficulty of written materials for patients in Croatian language. Contras- tive analysis of English and Croatian language covering a corpus of almost 100,000 running words showed clear linguis- tic differences in the number of polysyllabic words. The new formula, named SMOG-Cro, is presented as an equation: SMOG-Cro = 2 + ?4+ syllables, with the score showing the number of years of education a person needs to be able to understand a piece of writing. The presented methodology could help in the development of readability formulas for other languages. We hope the results of this study are soon put into practice for more effective healthcare communication and patient education, and for development of a health literacy assessment tool in Croatian language. PMID:26040062

  8. Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pfeifer, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Background Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing on surgical subspecialities. Methods Studies that assessed the effects of the work-hour regulation published following the implementation of ACGME guidelines (2003) were searched using PubMed database. The following search modules were selected: work-hours, 80-hour work week, quality of life, work satisfaction, surgical education, residency training, patient care, continuity of care. Publications were included if they were completed in the United States and covered the subject of our review. Manuscrips were analysed to identify authors, year of publication, type of study, number of participants, and the main outcomes. Review Findings Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Studies demonstrate that the residents quality of life has improved. The effects on surgical education are still unclear due to inconsistency in studies. Furthermore, according to several objective studies there were no changes in mortality and morbidity following the implementation. Conclusion Further studies are necessary addressing the effects of surgical education and studying the objective methods to assess the technical skill and procedural competence of surgeons. In addition, patient surveys analysing their satisfaction and concerns can contribute to recent discussion, as well. PMID:19232105

  9. Health, economic, psychological and social impact of educating carers of patients with advanced pulmonary disease (protocol).

    PubMed

    Sladek, R M; Jones, T; Phillips, P A; Luszcz, M; Rowett, D; Eckermann, S; Woodman, R J; Frith, P

    2011-09-01

    People with advanced pulmonary disease (APD), such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, have markedly impaired quality of life. Home Oxygen Therapy (HOT) itself is burdensome, although it often improves survival duration and quality of life in these patients. The exact burdens on informal caregivers of these patients are unknown. The central purpose of the pragmatic randomized controlled study described in this protocol is to determine the effectiveness of improving the skills and knowledge of carers of patients with APD who use HOT. Specifically we aimed to estimate the incremental impact of this carer intervention above usual care on health, economic, psychological and social domains for patient and carer dyads relative to the level of current burden. Eligible patients and their carers were recruited through three major hospitals, and randomized to an intervention or control group. The carers in the intervention group received two home-delivered education sessions based on the principles of academic detailing. Participants are currently being followed over 12 months. The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients surviving without a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related readmission / residential (non respite) care over 12 months. Carer secondary outcomes include perceived caregiver burden, level of expected and received social support, perceived level of mastery, self esteem, health related quality of life and disability, and ability to conduct domestic chores and household maintenance, social activities and provide service to others, and fatigue. Secondary patient outcomes include health related quality of life and disability, and current respiratory health status. PMID:21616171

  10. Computerization of the surgical intensive care unit: improvement of patient care via education.

    PubMed

    Greenburg, A G; McClure, D K; Fink, R; Stubbs, J A; Peskin, G W

    1975-06-01

    For the past 18 months we have been evaluating and developing a computerized patient-monitoring system in our surgical intensive care unit. Despite the enormous potential for use of such systems, we have been impressed with its underutilization and its failure to yield objective improvement in patient care at our institution and many others. The output of the system was ignored because the decision maker was unable or unwilling to integrate the more sophisticated data presented to him. The computer was relegated to the position of "redundant secretary". In an attempt to reverse this situation, we have developed a multilevel, multigoal educational system employing the computer. We have implemented brief educational programs for use by all unit personnel to explain deviant monitored variables. Given a physiologic subsystem and a particular variable, personnel can: (1) inquire whether or not the variable is deviant; (2) obtain a list of probable causes for the deviation; (3) obtain an explanation of the pathophysiology of particular deviants as well as instruction on how to identify a most probable cause; and (4) inquire how to correct specific deviants. When we monitored the system utilization after implementation of the educational programs, we found all of the system had improved utilization. As a result we have a better educated staff who communicate more effectively, deal with more sophisticated information, and make better decisions with resultant improved patient care. Additionally, the staff is eager to help improve the system. We believe the full potential of such systems can be obtained only through education. PMID:1096346

  11. [Vocational preparation and education of adolescent patients with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Lipinski, C G

    1990-04-13

    Often young epileptics cannot begin a regular apprenticeship immediately after leaving school. Many cases show some somatic and psychointellectual retardation and delayed social development and maturation. Impairment of learning and concentration due to drug-side effects aggravates gaps in basic knowledge which result from frequent school absences due to epileptic illness. Attendance of a vocational training scheme for one year ensures that educational and social deficiencies can be reduced and the practice of daily work can be obtained. The epileptologist should pay particular attention to good compliance. The large variety of psycho-social and behavioural problems can be improved by event-orientated group psychotherapy. A vocational testing period can follow. Time and type of seizures have to be respected in vocational counselling. The vocational training centre for handicapped adolescents offers a comprehensive education by vocational instructors, epileptologists and psychologists. PMID:2343588

  12. Educational disparities in health behaviors among patients with diabetes: the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J; Stevens, Mark R; Brown, Arleen F; Duru, O Kenrik; Gregg, Edward W; Gary, Tiffany L; Beckles, Gloria L; Tseng, Chien-Wen; Marrero, David G; Waitzfelder, Beth; Herman, William H; Piette, John D; Safford, Monika M; Ettner, Susan L

    2007-01-01

    Background Our understanding of social disparities in diabetes-related health behaviors is incomplete. The purpose of this study was to determine if having less education is associated with poorer diabetes-related health behaviors. Methods This observational study was based on a cohort of 8,763 survey respondents drawn from ~180,000 patients with diabetes receiving care from 68 provider groups in ten managed care health plans across the United States. Self-reported survey data included individual educational attainment ("education") and five diabetes self-care behaviors among individuals for whom the behavior would clearly be indicated: foot exams (among those with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy or a history of foot ulcers); self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG; among insulin users only); smoking; exercise; and certain diabetes-related health seeking behaviors (use of diabetes health education, website, or support group in last 12 months). Predicted probabilities were modeled at each level of self-reported educational attainment using hierarchical logistic regression models with random effects for clustering within health plans. Results Patients with less education had significantly lower predicted probabilities of being a non-smoker and engaging in regular exercise and health-seeking behaviors, while SMBG and foot self-examination did not vary by education. Extensive adjustment for patient factors revealed no discernable confounding effect on the estimates or their significance, and most education-behavior relationships were similar across sex, race and other patient characteristics. The relationship between education and smoking varied significantly across age, with a strong inverse relationship in those aged 25–44, modest for those ages 45–64, but non-evident for those over 65. Intensity of disease management by the health plan and provider communication did not alter the examined education-behavior relationships. Other measures of socioeconomic position yielded similar findings. Conclusion The relationship between educational attainment and health behaviors was modest in strength for most behaviors. Over the life course, the cumulative effect of reduced practice of multiple self-care behaviors among less educated patients may play an important part in shaping the social health gradient. PMID:17967177

  13. The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program as an Educational Tool and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabe, Darren W.; Bailie, George R.; Manley, Harold J.; Yeaw, Barbara F.

    1998-01-01

    The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program provides early clinical education for pharmacy students and clinical services for patients. Six students were assigned to visit 12-15 hemodialysis patients monthly under preceptor supervision. Topics covered include approach to patient, medical information retrieval, pharmaceutical care philosophy,…

  14. Patient education and self-management programs in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Richard H; Spinks, Jean M; Wicks, Ian P

    2004-03-01

    Arthritis self-management programs (ASMPs) are integrated into many clinical practice guidelines and policies, and are the core business of Arthritis Foundations. Australian Arthritis Foundations are embarking on a National Quality Assurance Program which should raise awareness and improve confidence in such programs. ASMPs aim to empower people, improve quality of life while living with chronic disease, increase healthy activities and improve self-monitoring - each of which can assist with clinical management, but can be difficult to evaluate. Although there is modest high-quality evidence of traditional "clinical outcomes" from ASMPs, these programs are strongly endorsed by consumers, are being used as a vehicle for healthcare reform, and have the potential to substantially improve public health. Coordinated national delivery of patient education programs has the potential to improve healthcare and outcomes for people with arthritis. PMID:14984359

  15. The Delivery of Sexuality-related Patient Education to Adolescent Patients: A Preliminary Study of Family Practice Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Brey, Rebecca A.; Banter, Amy E.; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2012-01-01

    Background: Risky sexual behavior among adolescents is one of the leading health behaviors most associated with mortality, morbidity, and social problems. Adolescents need reliable sources of information to help them promote healthy sexual behaviors. Physicians in the United States are often seen by adolescents as a reliable and trustworthy source of accurate sexual information. However, many physicians feel uncomfortable or ill-prepared to deal with sexuality issues among their adolescent patients. Purpose: This study examined the impact of family resident physicians’ sexual attitudes, knowledge, and comfort, on the delivery of sexuality-related patient education to their adolescent patients. Materials and Methods: Pre-post-test scales were administered to 21 physicians. Data were also collected for patient (n=644) charts. Factors that determined the delivery of sexuality-related patient education were analyzed. Results: Results indicate that sexuality-related patient education was rarely provided to adolescent patients. Conclusions: Adolescent sexuality education is not a high priority for physicians. Professional medical organizations should play a leadership role in training physicians on delivering sexuality education to adolescent patients. PMID:24478998

  16. Annual Review: Educational Psychology and the Effectiveness of Inclusive Education/Mainstreaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    Background: Inclusive education/mainstreaming is a key policy objective for the education of children and young people with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities. Aims: This paper reviews the literature on the effectiveness of inclusive education/mainstreaming. The focus is on evidence for effects in terms of child outcomes with…

  17. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  18. Educational Innovation, Quality, and Effects: An Exploration of Innovations and Their Effects in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the extensive literature on educational innovations, there is only limited empirical research available into the impact of innovations on student achievement. In this article, the following research questions will be answered: What form do innovations in secondary education take, are there types of innovative schools, and what effect do…

  19. Models of Effective Migrant Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattera, Gloria

    Intended to encourage both migrant and non-migrant educators to explore the possibilities of adopting and/or adapting the cited programs or appropriate components into their own units, this volume updates the 1974 description of some of the many programs that have proven effective in serving migrant students. Chapter I summarizes seven programs…

  20. Competencies for Effective Leadership in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spendlove, Marion

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to set out to investigate the role of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Rector, or Principal of a university, and the competencies (attitudes, knowledge and behaviour) that are needed for effective leadership in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were held with…

  1. Multilevel Design Efficiency in Educational Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cools, Wilfried; De Fraine, Bieke; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Onghena, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    In educational effectiveness research, multilevel data analyses are often used because research units (most frequently, pupils or teachers) are studied that are nested in groups (schools and classes). This hierarchical data structure complicates designing the study because the structure has to be taken into account when approximating the accuracy…

  2. A Study of the Effectiveness on Parental Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yen-Chin; Chu, Yuan-Hsiang; Lin, Helene H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the effectiveness of sexuality education training on the parents in the group regarding their sex knowledge, awareness of sexuality education, attitude towards sexuality education, self-efficacy in sexuality education, communication effectiveness and communication behavior in the hope that they would be…

  3. Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012 Revised 02 occurs in the duodenum. Upper Digestive Disorders Reflux with Esophagitis: The flowing back (or reflux Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 2 of 2

  4. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  5. Parental educational program: effectiveness and retention.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, W

    1996-06-01

    55 parents of adolescent children were asked to rate the effectiveness of their communication with their adolescents before and after a 10-wk. parent educational program encouraging authoritative parent-adolescent interactions. Parents reported improved effectiveness of communication from the pre- to post-program assessment times. Retention was compared across groups receiving high and low support in attendance of meetings, but retention did not differ across the two groups. PMID:8816050

  6. Influence of Education on the Pattern of Cognitive Deterioration in Ad Patients: The Cognitive Reserve Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carret, N.L.; Auriacombe, S.; Letenneur, L.; Bergua, V.; Dartigues, J.F.; Fabrigoule, C.

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated

  7. Barrier Factors to the Completion of Diabetes Education in Korean Diabetic Adult Patients: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Tae; Jung, Se Young; Oh, Seung-Min; Jeong, Su-Min; Choi, Yoon-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a disease with high social burdens and is expected to increase gradually. A long-term management is essential for the treatment of diabetes, requiring patient self-cares. Diabetes education is important for such self-cares, but it does not sufficiently take place. In addition, little studies have been conducted on the barriers to the completion of diabetes education. This study, thus, aimed to analyze the factors related to the completion of diabetes education and investigate its barriers. Methods Of 50,405 respondents to the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 3,820 were selected for the analysis, excluding those aged 29 or younger and those with missing values. The completion of diabetes education was set as a dependent variable and an analysis was made on the factors that affect the dependent variable. A multivariable logistic regression was employed for the analysis. Results Lower educational level was associated with less diabetes education, and the degree of diabetes education was lower in the group with male, the group that didn't have a family history or was not aware of a family history, the group that was not currently aware of diabetes and the group without a spouse. There was no difference in the completion of diabetes education by underlying diseases, family income level, age, residing area, economic activity status, insurance coverage, smoking, and drinking. Conclusion Diabetes education is of importance for the treatment and management of diabetes. Currently, however, diabetes education is not sufficiently carried out in Korea. The completion rate of diabetes education was low in male, patients without or not knowing a family history, patients who were not currently aware of their diabetes, patients without a spouse, and patients with low educational level. Therefore, encouraging these patients to take the education will be a more effective approach to increase the completion rate of diabetes education. PMID:26435809

  8. Combining Software Games with Education: Evaluation of its Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virvou, Maria; Katsionis, George; Manos, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01

    Computer games are very popular among children and adolescents. In this respect, they could be exploited by educational software designers to render educational software more attractive and motivating. However, it remains to be explored what the educational scope of educational software games is. In this paper, we explore several issues concerning…

  9. [Therapeutic patient education--method of optimizing treatment in chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Vulpoi, Carmen; Ungureanu, Gabriel; Stoica, Ortansa

    2007-01-01

    The technological revolution of the 20th century has changed not only the life style but also the human interrelations, including the physician-patient relationship. The old, primarily patriarchal, system (in which the patient trusted completely the physician and followed religiously his commandments) evolved into the current system in which the patient is an active partner in medical care. Patient education is increasingly recognized as an integral part of the therapy. The objectives of therapeutical education rely essentially in the improvement of the patient knowledge and skills concerning the disease and its treatment in order to harmonize his life style with the restrains of the illness. Therapeutical education must be complex, individualized, repeated, motivating, and controlled. In chronic diseases, both the health provider and the patient are in front of a permanent challenge. The educational process is in continuous movement, liable to permanent improvement. PMID:17595841

  10. Alopecia areata and its effects on patients.

    PubMed

    McGettigan, Maureen L

    2013-12-01

    The onset of alopecia areata creates a roller coaster of emotions. Like the disease, a patient's emotions are unpredictable. The lack of control over one's body is both frightening and intimidating. Alopecia areata not only impacts an individual but it also has a halo effect, impacting family and friends, thereby increasing the number of people affected by the disease. PMID:24326550

  11. The problems of anticholinergic adverse effects in older patients.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, M

    1993-01-01

    The old saying 'red as a beet, dry as a bone, blind as a bat, hot as a hare, mad as a hatter' is often quoted when describing the autonomic effects of drugs that block the muscarinic cholinergic system. These effects may be subtle or dramatic, yet can be overlooked or discounted as a natural consequence of old age. Elderly patients can be particularly sensitive to the anticholinergic action of drugs because of physiological and pathophysiological changes that often accompany the aging process. The use of multiple drugs, a common finding in older patients, may result in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions that heighten anticholinergic effects. While the classic anticholinergic problems of decreased secretions, slowed gastrointestinal motility, blurred vision, increased heart rate, heat intolerance, sedation and possibly mild confusion, may be uncomfortable for a younger patient in relatively good health, these effects can be disastrous for older patients. Even the most common peripheral anticholinergic complaint of dry mouth can reduce the ability to communicate, predispose to malnutrition, promote mucosal damage, denture misfit or dental caries, and increase the risk of serious respiratory infection secondary to loss of antimicrobial activity of saliva. Mydriasis and the inability to accommodate will impair near vision and may precipitate narrow angle glaucoma in predisposed patients, but less obviously could lead to an increased risk of accidents, including falls. Somatic complaints of constipation and urinary hesitancy, could, in the presence of anticholinergic challenge, result in faecal impaction or urinary retention. Cardiac effects may be poorly tolerated. Increases in heart rate may precipitate or worsen angina. Finally, thermoregulatory impairment induced by anticholinergics, which block the ability to sweat, may lead to life threatening hyperthermia. Central anticholinergic effects range from sedation, mild confusion and inability to concentration to frank delirium. Even mild effects can reduce function and increase dependency. At any level of care, the loss of independence increases the caregiver burden, costs, and most importantly, can negatively affect quality of life. Many age-related and disease-related conditions may predispose elderly patients to anticholinergic drug toxicity. Careful attention to anticholinergic effects when prescribing drugs, patient education, regular review of the entire drug regimen, and familiarity with the signs and symptoms of anticholinergic toxicity will help to reduce the risk of drug-induced problems. PMID:8369593

  12. In Sickness and in Health--Till Education Do Us Part: Education Effects on Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendt, Jacob Nielsen

    2008-01-01

    This study provides the first estimates of the causal impact of education on hospitalization. It improves upon existing studies on health and education by using a larger data set and more efficient estimation methods. Using a Danish school reform to identify a causal effect of education on hospitalization, we find that education has a substantial…

  13. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  14. Comparison of Two Educational Methods on Nurses' Adoption of Safe Patient Handling Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folami, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries caused by patient lifting and transfers are a concern to health care workers. The Safe Patient Handling Act calls for all health care organizations to move to mechanical assistance from previous manual methods of transfers. This research analyzed two different educational programs that addressed safe patient handling for…

  15. Special considerations in the care of the physician-patient: a lesson for medical education.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sherrell T

    2014-10-01

    In the field of medicine, there is strong emphasis on the healing of others, but not as much on the healing of self. It is therefore not surprising that physicians may be ill-equipped to not only care for other physicians, but to be treated as patients. Multiple studies indicate that relatively few physicians have their own primary physicians and often rely on self-treatment, rather than obtaining comprehensive care from other physicians. Through the lens of a personal struggle with serious illness, the author develops a discussion about potential barriers physicians face in seeking care, the downstream effects of physicians' perceptions of health care, and ways to make changes to prevailing physician health attitudes. Potential changes at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education levels are considered, in order to help physicians both to embrace their roles as patients and also better serve their colleagues who are under their care. PMID:24823487

  16. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

  17. A Model of More Culturally Inclusive and Educationally Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs, Carlton South (Australia).

    Conscious that the achievement of educational equality for Australia's Indigenous peoples is a national priority, Australia's ministers of education, at a March 2000 meeting, committed themselves to a model of more culturally inclusive and educationally effective schools. The model is based on findings from recent work to improve educational

  18. Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.

    2011-01-01

    "Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs" was written to assist adapted and general physical educators who are dedicated to ensuring that the physical and motor needs of all their students are addressed in physical education. While it is anticipated that adapted physical educators, where available, will typically…

  19. Effective May 2014 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Effective May 2014 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION EDUCATION SPECIALIST DEGREE READING FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 3 01.630 Educating Diverse Populations SPECIALIZATION IN READING AND LANGUAGE 18 06.610 Reading in the Content Area 06.522 Young Adult Literature 06.527 Language Acquisition 06.528 Assessment

  20. The immediate and long-term effects of exercise and patient education on physical, functional, and quality-of-life outcome measures after single-level lumbar microdiscectomy: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Selkowitz, David M; Kulig, Kornelia; Poppert, Elizabeth M; Flanagan, Sean P; Matthews, Ndidiamaka D; Beneck, George J; Popovich, John M; Lona, Jose R; Yamada, Kimiko A; Burke, Wendy S; Ervin, Carolyn; Powers, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Background Low back pain remains a costly quality-of-life-related health problem. Microdiscectomy is often the surgical procedure of choice for a symptomatic, single-level, lumbar disc herniation in younger and middle-aged adults. The question of whether a post-microdiscectomy exercise program enhances function, quality of life, and disability status has not been systematically explored. Thus, the overall purpose of this study is to assess immediate and long-term outcomes of an exercise program, developed at University of Southern California (USC), targeting the trunk and lower extremities (USC Spine Exercise Program) for persons who have undergone a single-level microdiscectomy for the first time. Methods/design One hundred individuals between the ages of 18 and 60 who consent to undergo lumbar microdiscectomy will be recruited to participate in this study. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1) one session of back care education, or 2) a back care education session followed by the 12-week USC Spine Exercise Program. The outcome examiners (evaluators), as well as the data managers, will be blinded to group allocation. Education will consist of a one-hour "one-on-one" session with the intervention therapist, guided by an educational booklet specifically designed for post-microdiscectomy care. This session will occur four to six weeks after surgery. The USC Spine Exercise Program consists of two parts: back extensor strength and endurance, and mat and upright therapeutic exercises. This exercise program is goal-oriented, performance-based, and periodized. It will begin two to three days after the education session, and will occur three times a week for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures include the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, SF-36® quality of life assessment, Subjective Quality of Life Scale, 50-foot Walk, Repeated Sit-to-Stand, and a modified Sorensen test. The outcome measures in the study will be assessed before and after the 12-week post-surgical intervention program. Long-term follow up assessments will occur every six months beginning one year after surgery and ending five years after surgery. Immediate and long-term effects will be assessed using repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). If significant interactions are found, one-way ANOVAs will be performed followed by post-hoc testing to determine statistically significant pairwise comparisons. Discussion We have presented the rationale and design for a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a treatment regimen for people who have undergone a single-level lumbar microdiscectomy. PMID:16934143

  1. DIFFERENTIAL PATIENT RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION, COUNSELING, AND DENTAL TREATMENT. PAPER PRESENTED AT A NATIONAL SEMINAR ON ADULT EDUCATION RESEARCH (CHICAGO, FEBRUARY 11-13, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LUPTON, DANIEL E.

    RESEARCH (1) ANALYZED SPECIFIC OUTCOMES OF COUNSELING, INSTRUCTION, AND DENTAL THERAPY, AND (2) DETERMINED THE RELATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF PATIENT EDUCATION FOR RELIEF OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT (TMJ) DYSFUNCTION. SIXTY ADULT PATIENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS TMJ RESEARCH CENTER WERE RANDOMLY ASSIGNED TO ONE OF THREE PROGRAMS--DENTISTRY,…

  2. NSAID-Avoidance Education in Community Pharmacies for Patients at High Risk for Acute Kidney Injury, Upstate New York, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Min; Cerulli, Jennifer; Grabe, Darren W.; Fox, Chester; Vassalotti, Joseph A.; Prokopienko, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently associated with community-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI), a strong risk factor for development and progression of chronic kidney disease. Using access to prescription medication profiles, pharmacists can identify patients at high risk for NSAID-induced AKI. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of a community pharmacy–based patient education program on patient knowledge of NSAID-associated renal safety concerns. Methods Patients receiving prescription medications for hypertension or diabetes mellitus were invited to participate in an educational program on the risks of NSAID use. A patient knowledge questionnaire (PKQ) consisting of 5 questions scored from 1 to 5 was completed before and after the intervention. Information was collected on age, race, sex, and frequency of NSAID use. Results A total of 152 participants (60% women) completed both the pre- and post-intervention questionnaire; average age was 54.6 (standard deviation [SD], 17.5). Mean pre-intervention PKQ score was 3.3 (SD, 1.4), and post-intervention score was 4.6 (SD, 0.9) (P = .002). Participants rated program usefulness (1 = not useful to 5 = extremely useful) as 4.2 (SD, 1.0). In addition, 48% reported current NSAID use and 67% reported that the program encouraged them to limit their use. Conclusion NSAID use was common among patients at high risk for AKI. A brief educational intervention in a community pharmacy improved patient knowledge on NSAID-associated risks. Pharmacists practicing in the community can partner with primary care providers in the medical home model to educate patients at risk for AKI. PMID:25523351

  3. Effect of yoga on patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Andréanne; Daneault, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether therapeutic yoga improves the quality of life of patients with cancer. Data sources Search of MEDLINE database (1950–2010) using key words yoga, cancer, and quality of life. Study selection Priority was given to randomized controlled clinical studies conducted to determine the effect of yoga on typical symptoms of patients with cancer in North America. Synthesis Initially, 4 randomized controlled clinical studies were analyzed, then 2 studies without control groups were analyzed. Three studies conducted in India and the Near East provided interesting information on methodologies. The interventions included yoga sessions of varying length and frequency. The parameters measured also varied among studies. Several symptoms improved substantially with yoga (higher quality of sleep, decrease in symptoms of anxiety and depression, improvement in spiritual well-being, etc). It would appear that quality of life, or some aspects thereof, also improved. Conclusion The variety of benefits derived, the absence of side effects, and the cost-benefit ratio of therapeutic yoga make it an interesting alternative for family physicians to suggest to their patients with cancer. Certain methodologic shortcomings, including the limited size of the samples and varying levels of attendance on the part of the subjects, might have reduced the statistical strength of the studies presented. It is also possible that the measurement scales used did not suit this type of situation and patient population, making it impossible to see a significant effect. However, favourable comments by participants during the studies and their level of appreciation and well-being suggest that further research is called for to fully understand the mechanisms of these effects. PMID:22972739

  4. A prospective study of nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common clinical manifestation that may have clinical significance. Objectives To evaluate if there is a difference between nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation on nutritional status in patients with AD. Methods A randomized, prospective 6-month study which enrolled 90 subjects with probable AD aged 65 years or older divided into 3 groups: Control Group (CG) [n = 27], Education Group (EG) [n = 25], which participated in an education program and Supplementation Group (SG) [n = 26], which received two daily servings of oral nutritional supplementation. Subjects were assessed for anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI, TSF, AC and AMC), biochemical data (total protein, albumin, and total lymphocyte count), CDR (Clinical Dementia Rating), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination), as well as dependence during meals. Results The SG showed a significant improvement in the following anthropometric measurements: weight (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), BMI (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), AC (H calc = 12.99, p =< 0.002), and AMC (H calc = 8.67, p =< 0.013) compared to the CG and EG. BMI of the EG was significantly greater compared to the CG. There were significant changes in total protein (H calc = 6.17, p =< 0.046), and total lymphocyte count in the SG compared to the other groups (H cal = 7.94, p = 0.019). Conclusion Oral nutritional supplementation is more effective compared to nutrition education in improving nutritional status. PMID:21943331

  5. The effect of nanotechnology on education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriyavejakul, Chantana

    2008-04-01

    The research objective was to study 1) the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology and 2) to propose the plans, the strategies and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the system. The data collection was done by 4 methods: 1) documentary study, 2) observation, 3) informal interviews, and 4) group discussion. The findings revealed that: 1. William Wresch's Theory (1997) was used in this research to study of the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology. 1) Getting connected to nanotechnology by search engine websites, libraries, magazines, books, and discussions with experts. 2) Curriculum integration: nanotechnology should be integrated in many branches of engineering, such as industrial, computer, civil, chemical, electrical, mechanical, etc. 3) Resources for educators: nanotechnology knowledge should be spread in academic circles by publications and the Internet websites. 4) Training and professional resources for teachers: Teachers should be trained by experts in nanotechnology and researchers from the National Nanotechnology Center. This will help trainees get correct knowledge, comprehension, and awareness in order to apply to their professions and businesses in the future. 2. As for the plans, the strategies, and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the present system, I analyzed the world nanotechnology situation that might have an effect on Thai society. The study is based on the National Plan to Develop Nanotechnology. The goal of this plan is to develop nanotechnology to be the national strategy within 10 years (2004-2013) and have it integrated into the Thai system. There are 4 parts in this plan: 1) nanomaterials, 2) nanoelectronics, 3) nanobiotechnology, and 4) human resources development. Data for human resource development should be worked with the present technology and use the country's resources to produce many products of nanotechnology, such as 1) handicrafts, decorations, and gifts, 2) agricultural products and food, 3) beverages, such as alcoholic and non- alcoholic drinks, and 5) textiles.

  6. Using Webcasts in Education: Evaluation of its Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakos, Michail N.; Vlamos, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    Educational webcasts are nowadays widely used by many organizations and institutions all over the world. However, the educational effectiveness of webcasts when used as an autonomous method is yet to be explored. In this paper, the clarification of certain issues concerning their educational effectiveness is attempted. Following specific…

  7. Effective Teaching in Distance Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Dan

    Distance education is an alternative method for delivering academic course work to students unable to attend traditional campus-based classes. This Digest presents information on the many forms of distance education and keys to successful teaching with distance education. Distance education is a method of education in which the learner is…

  8. The therapeutic effects of the physician-older patient relationship: Effective communication with vulnerable older patients

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; DiMatteo, M Robin

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the outcomes of health care for seniors are dependent not only upon patients’ physical health status and the administration of care for their biomedical needs, but also upon care for patients’ psychosocial needs and attention to their social, economic, cultural, and psychological vulnerabilities. Even when older patients have appropriate access to medical services, they also need effective and empathic communication as an essential part of their treatment. Older patients who are socially isolated, emotionally vulnerable, and economically disadvantaged are particularly in need of the social, emotional, and practical support that sensitive provider-patient communication can provide. In this review paper, we examine the complexities of communication between physicians and their older patients, and consider some of the particular challenges that manifest in providers’ interactions with their older patients, particularly those who are socially isolated, suffering from depression, or of minority status or low income. This review offers guidelines for improved physician-older patient communication in medical practice, and examines interventions to coordinate care for older patients on multiple dimensions of a biopsychosocial model of health care. PMID:18044195

  9. Students or Patients? Provision of Education in the Mental Health Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter; Godding, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    British government proposals for community care of psychiatric patients require a response from adult educators about the need for learning opportunities both inside and outside institutions for people with mental health problems. (SK)

  10. 77 FR 46069 - Request for Information on Effective Financial Education

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...435-7937. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The CFPB's OFE seeks...identified by the Financial Literacy and Education Commission in...savings and borrowing? What information on these and other topics...effectively disseminate financial literacy and education resources...

  11. Five-Year Blood Pressure Control and Mortality Following Health Education for Hypertensive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Three health education interventions for urban poor hypertensive patients were introduced in a randomized factorial design. Two-year data on compliance with therapy and five-year mortality data indicate the success of such educational programs in the long-term management and control of high blood pressure. (Author/GC)

  12. Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saksena, Anuraag

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional…

  13. Exploring Interprofessional Education through a High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation Scenario: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossler, Kelly Lynn

    2013-01-01

    High-fidelity human patient simulation has emerged as a valuable medium to reinforce educational content within programs of nursing. As simulation learning experiences have been identified as augmenting both didactic lecture content and clinical learning, these experiences have expanded to incorporate interprofessional education. Review of…

  14. My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App (MyIDEA): Patient-Centered Design Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Adhir; Groo, Vicki; Dickens, Carolyn; Field, Jerry; Baumann, Matthew; Welland, Betty; Gutowski, Gerry; Flores Jr, Jose D; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Bahroos, Neil; Hynes, Denise M; Wilkie, Diana J

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient adherence to medication regimens is critical in most chronic disease treatment plans. This study uses a patient-centered tablet app, “My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App (MyIDEA).” This is an educational program designed to improve patient medication adherence. Objective Our goal is to describe the design, methodology, limitations, and results of the MyIDEA tablet app. We created a mobile technology-based patient education app to improve dual antiplatelet therapy adherence in patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention and received a drug-eluting stent. Methods Patient advisers were involved in the development process of MyIDEA from the initial wireframe to the final launch of the product. The program was restructured and redesigned based on the patient advisers’ suggestions as well as those from multidisciplinary team members. To accommodate those with low health literacy, we modified the language and employed attractive color schemes to improve ease of use. We assumed that the target patient population may have little to no experience with electronic tablets, and therefore, we designed the interface to be as intuitive as possible. Results The MyIDEA app has been successfully deployed to a low-health-literate elderly patient population in the hospital setting. A total of 6 patients have interacted with MyIDEA for an average of 17.6 minutes/session. Conclusions Including patient advisers in the early phases of a mobile patient education development process is critical. A number of changes in text order, language, and color schemes occurred to improve ease of use. The MyIDEA program has been successfully deployed to a low-health-literate elderly patient population. Leveraging patient advisers throughout the development process helps to ensure implementation success. PMID:26139587

  15. Highlighting Specific Patient Education Needs in an Aging Cardiac Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Abby C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article describes how, by using a paper-and-pencil, multiple-risk-factor assessment instrument referred to as the Heart Health Assessment Questionnaire, the specific educational needs of an aging veteran population were more clearly identified. Findings are discussed in relation to the pivotal role of the health education professional for…

  16. Introducing Physical Education to Hospital Learning--Can Patients Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issaka, Ayuba; Hopkins, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Children and young people with chronic health conditions are at greater risk of school absence and poorer educational achievement than their healthy peers. A range of strategies are implemented in home, school and hospital settings to improve the connection of these children and young people to their educational pathways, yet gaps in provision…

  17. Effective Compensatory Education Sourcebook. Volume I: A Review of Effective Educational Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Philip A.; And Others

    Intended for teachers and administrators who work with Chapter 1, Education Consolidation and Improvement Act programs, this report describes elements identified by researchers as essential features of successful schooling. After discussing the impact of schools and teachers and the interrelatedness of their effectiveness, it presents 13…

  18. The Relationship Between Educational Years and Phonemic Verbal Fluency (PVF) and Semantic Verbal Fluency (SVF) Tasks in Spanish Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    García-Laredo, Eduardo; Maestú, Fernando; Castellanos, Miguel Ángel; Molina, Juan D; Peréz-Moreno, Elisa

    2015-09-01

    Semantic and verbal fluency tasks are widely used as a measure of frontal capacities. It has been well described in literature that patients affected by schizophrenic and bipolar disorders present a worse execution in these tasks. Some authors have also noted the importance of educational years. Our objective is to analyze whether the effect of cognitive malfunction caused by apathology is superior to the expected effect of years of education in phonemic verbal fluency (PVF) and semantic verbal fluency (SVF) task execution.A total of 62 individuals took part in this study, out of which 23 were patients with schizophrenic paranoid disorder, 11 suffered from bipolar disorder with psychotic symptomatology, 13 suffered from bipolar disorder without psychotic symptomatology, and 15 participants were nonpathological individuals. All participants were evaluated with the PVF and SVF tests (animals and tools). The performance/execution results were analyzed with a mixed-model ANCOVA, with educational years as a covariable.The effect of education seems to be more determined by PVF FAS tests than by SVF. With PVF FAS tasks, the expected effect of pathology disappears when the covariable EDUCATION is introduced. With SVF tasks, the effect continues to be significant, even though the EDUACTION covariable dims such effect.These results suggest that SVF tests (animals category) are better evaluation tools as they are less dependent on the patients' education than PVF FAS tests. PMID:26426640

  19. The Relationship Between Educational Years and Phonemic Verbal Fluency (PVF) and Semantic Verbal Fluency (SVF) Tasks in Spanish Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    García-Laredo, Eduardo; Maestú, Fernando; Castellanos, Miguel Ángel; Molina, Juan D.; Peréz-Moreno, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Semantic and verbal fluency tasks are widely used as a measure of frontal capacities. It has been well described in literature that patients affected by schizophrenic and bipolar disorders present a worse execution in these tasks. Some authors have also noted the importance of educational years. Our objective is to analyze whether the effect of cognitive malfunction caused by apathology is superior to the expected effect of years of education in phonemic verbal fluency (PVF) and semantic verbal fluency (SVF) task execution. A total of 62 individuals took part in this study, out of which 23 were patients with schizophrenic paranoid disorder, 11 suffered from bipolar disorder with psychotic symptomatology, 13 suffered from bipolar disorder without psychotic symptomatology, and 15 participants were nonpathological individuals. All participants were evaluated with the PVF and SVF tests (animals and tools). The performance/execution results were analyzed with a mixed-model ANCOVA, with educational years as a covariable. The effect of education seems to be more determined by PVF FAS tests than by SVF. With PVF FAS tasks, the expected effect of pathology disappears when the covariable EDUCATION is introduced. With SVF tasks, the effect continues to be significant, even though the EDUACTION covariable dims such effect. These results suggest that SVF tests (animals category) are better evaluation tools as they are less dependent on the patientseducation than PVF FAS tests. PMID:26426640

  20. Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education. Teacher Education Yearbook VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, D. John, Ed.; Byrd, David M., Ed.

    This yearbook addresses the nation's need to train and retain good teachers, exploring exemplary practices in teacher education. There are four sections divided into 12 chapters. The book begins with a forward, "Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education: Powerful Teacher Education Programs" (E.M. Guyton). Section 1, "Models for Enhancing…

  1. Community-Based Eco-Education: Sound Ecology and Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niesenbaum, Richard A.; Gorka, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the development of a college-level eco-educational course that attempts to capitalize on the ecological and educational strengths of ecotourism by establishing a partnership with a local community. Makes suggestions for establishing community partnerships for effective international eco-educational program development. (Contains 15…

  2. Effects of Welfare Reform on Vocational Education and Training

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Dhaval M.; Reichman, Nancy E.; Corman, Hope; Das, Dhiman

    2011-01-01

    Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, this study estimates the effects of welfare reform on an important source of human capital acquisition among women at risk for relying on welfare: vocational education and training. The results suggest that welfare reform reduced enrollment in full-time vocational education and had no significant effects on part-time vocational education or participation in other types of work-related courses, though there appears to be considerable heterogeneity across states with respect to the strictness of educational policy and the strength of work incentives under welfare reform. In addition, we find evidence of heterogeneous effects by prior educational attainment. We find no evidence that the previously-observed negative effects of welfare reform on formal education (including college enrollment), which we replicated in this study, have been offset by increases in vocational education and training. PMID:22125356

  3. Effects of Welfare Reform on Vocational Education and Training.

    PubMed

    Dave, Dhaval M; Reichman, Nancy E; Corman, Hope; Das, Dhiman

    2011-12-01

    Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, this study estimates the effects of welfare reform on an important source of human capital acquisition among women at risk for relying on welfare: vocational education and training. The results suggest that welfare reform reduced enrollment in full-time vocational education and had no significant effects on part-time vocational education or participation in other types of work-related courses, though there appears to be considerable heterogeneity across states with respect to the strictness of educational policy and the strength of work incentives under welfare reform. In addition, we find evidence of heterogeneous effects by prior educational attainment. We find no evidence that the previously-observed negative effects of welfare reform on formal education (including college enrollment), which we replicated in this study, have been offset by increases in vocational education and training. PMID:22125356

  4. The Impact of Two Educational Techniques on Physician Knowledge, Performance and Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Larrie W.; Jewett, Leslie S.

    1984-01-01

    The cognitive knowledge, performance, and patient care of 23 pediatricians who participated in continuing medical education sessions were measured by pre-, post-, and six- to nine-month follow-up tests. In general, the knowledge and performance factors and patient behavior were better for those attending case presentations as opposed to…

  5. Firearm patient education and firearm regulation: health care providers' attitudes and practices.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D C; Herstein, P R

    1996-12-01

    A survey of two large HMOs was conducted to assess health care providers' attitudes and practices regarding firearm patient education, firearm patient counselling, and firearm regulation. Survey results were intended to provide background data on barriers to be addressed and opportunities to be used in developing day-to-day office practice interventions to reduce enrollees' risk of firearm injury. PMID:10163833

  6. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

  7. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  8. Effects of Program and Patient Characteristics on Retention of Drug Treatment Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Joshi, Vandana; Maglione, Margaret; Chou, Chih Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effects of program and patient characteristics on patient retention in residential, out-patient, and methadone maintenance drug treatment programs. Data for 26,047 patients in 87 programs show that threshold retention rates were generally low for all 3 program types, although program practice and service provision played important…

  9. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  10. Effect of Medical Education on Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry and Individuals with Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Marzellus; Harendza, Sigrid; Meyer, Jelka; Drabik, Anna; Reimer, Jens; Kuhnigk, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the effect of medical education on students' attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatric patients, and examined the usefulness of a new evaluation tool: the 6-item Psychiatric Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge (PEAK-6). Method: Authors studied the attitudes of 116 medical students toward psychiatry…

  11. Using self-efficacy theory to educate patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Y K; Shimmel, S

    1996-01-01

    The predominant debilitating symptom in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is shortness of breath. Self-efficacy theory has been used in a case study approach to begin examining the expectations of a patient with COPD who attended a pulmonary education program. Mr. M. was selected for the case study because his condition typifies many of the problems encountered by patients with COPD. Mr. M.'s self-confidence in managing his breathing difficulty was measured by using the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) before an educational program began and again 1 month and 6 months after the program. The CSES measures patients' confidence in their ability to manage or avoid breathing difficulty in a variety of situations. Mr. M.'s scores on the CSES improved in most areas. Incorporating programs to increase patients' self-efficacy may have implications for rehabilitation nurses who help patients with COPD manage their breathing difficulty. PMID:8868758

  12. Effective Mathematics Teaching in Finnish and Swedish Teacher Education Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmi, Kirsti; Ryve, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores effective mathematics teaching as constructed in Finnish and Swedish teacher educators' discourses. Based on interview data from teacher educators as well as data from feedback discussions between teacher educators and prospective teachers in Sweden and Finland, the analysis shows that several aspects of the recent…

  13. Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the…

  14. Personal Finance Education: Effective Practice Guide for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielhofer, Thomas; Kerr, David; Gardiner, Clare

    2010-01-01

    This document provides guidance on effective practice in delivering personal finance education in secondary schools. It is based on the findings from research carried out by NFER (the National Foundation for Educational Research) on behalf of pfeg (Personal Finance Education Group) as part of an evaluation of Learning Money Matters (LMM). This…

  15. The Effects of Age on Player Behavior in Educational Games

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    The Effects of Age on Player Behavior in Educational Games Eleanor O'Rourke, Eric Butler, Yun behavior. This is particularly impor- tant when developing educational games for children, since research serious goals, such as education [11], health [26], or scientific discovery [8]. Serious games must appeal

  16. The Effect of Community Colleges on Changing Students' Educational Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Duane E.; Gill, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    The education literature provides numerous estimates of community college diversion and democratization effects measured in terms of educational attainment. Kane and Rouse [J Econ Pers 13 (1999) 64] suggest testing for diversion by comparing the impacts of two-year and four-year colleges on the changes in educational aspirations that underlie…

  17. The Effect of Hardiness Education on Hardiness and Burnout on Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jaye

    2015-01-01

    Nurse leaders need to be aware of the costly implications of staff retention, unit finances, and patient satisfaction caused by unmanaged stress and burnout as well as staff disengagement. It is vital to the organizational behavior of the health care facility for nurse managers to promote, educate, and screen for hardiness in their staff. Hardiness education can lessen the effects of stress and burnout. Nurse managers and executives can give their staff valuable tools and resources to enhance hardiness and coping abilities through hardiness education. PMID:26477118

  18. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction in Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinics: Findings of the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Maureen D.; Warm, Eric; Julian, Katherine A.; Rosenblum, Michael; Thomas, Kris; Drake, Sean; Gwisdalla, Keri Lyn; Langan, Michael; Nabors, Christopher; Pereira, Anne; Smith, Amy; Sweet, David; Varney, Andrew; Francis, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many internal medicine programs have reorganized their resident continuity clinics to improve the ambulatory care experience for residents. The effect of this redesign on patient satisfaction is largely unknown. Methods Our multi-institutional, cross-sectional study included 569 internal medicine residents from 11 programs participating in the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative. An 11-item patient satisfaction survey from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems was used to assess patient satisfaction, comparing patient satisfaction in traditional models of weekly continuity clinic with 2 new clinic models. We then examined the relationship between patient satisfaction and other practice variables. Results Patient satisfaction responses related to resident listening and communication skills, knowledge of medical history, perception of adequate visit time, overall rating, and willingness to refer to family and friends were significantly better in the traditional and block continuity models than the combination model. Higher ambulatory workload was associated with reduced patient perception of respect shown by the physician. The percentage of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin?patients with low density lipoprotein?Patient satisfaction was similar in programs using block design and traditional models for continuity clinic, and both outperformed the combination model programs. There was a delicate balance between workload and patient perception of the physician showing respect. Care outcome measures for diabetic patients were associated with aspects of patient satisfaction. PMID:26279771

  19. Knowledge, instruction and behavioural change: building a framework for effective eczema education in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deryn Lee; Thompson, Murray John

    2014-01-01

    Aims A discussion on the reasons educational interventions about eczema, by nurses, are successful, with the subsequent development of a theoretical framework to guide nurses to become effective patient educators. Background Effective child and parent education is the key to successful self-management of eczema. When diagnosed, children and parents should learn to understand the condition through clear explanations, seeing treatment demonstrations and have ongoing support to learn practical skills to control eczema. Dermatology nurses provide these services, but no one has proposed a framework of the concepts underpinning their successful eczema educational interventions. Design A discussion paper. Data Sources A literature search of online databases was undertaken utilizing terms ‘eczema OR atopic dermatitis’, ‘education’, ‘parent’, ‘nurs*’, ‘framework’, ‘knowledge’, motivation’, in Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Medline and Pubmed. Limits were English language and 2003–2013. Implications for Nursing The framework can inform discussion on child and parent education, provide a scaffold for future research and guide non-specialist nurses, internationally, in providing consistent patient education about eczema. Conclusion Founded on an understanding of knowledge, the framework utilizes essential elements of cognitive psychology and social cognitive theory leading to successful self-management of eczema. This framework may prove useful as a basis for future research in child and parent education, globally, in the healthcare community. A framework has been created to help nurses understand the essential elements of the learning processes at the foundation of effective child and parent education. The framework serves to explain the improved outcomes reported in previous nurse-led eczema educational interventions. PMID:25312442

  20. [Chronic noncancer pain and patient education: a place for e-learning?].

    PubMed

    Braillard, Olivia; Cedraschi, Christine; Jesaimani, Ameena; Piguet, Valérie

    2015-06-24

    Chronic non cancerous pain considerably limits the patients' quality of life. Yet, chronic non cancerous pain has a prevalence as high as 25% to 35%, Therapeutic education allows to work on the knowledge and know-how about the disease, the treatment, the management of health resources and health behaviors. E-learning uses new technologies of communication to improve the quality of learning by facilitating access to the resources and favoring the interactivity. It is attractive by its wide accessibility and its limited logistic needs. The level of proof of its efficacy is weak, mainly because of methodological limitations. Some good quality studies are promising, with a positive effect of e-learning programs on pain intensity, disability, autonomy and medication misuse. PMID:26267947

  1. The Nurse as Patient Advocate: Implications for Nurse Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banja, John D.

    This essay examines ethical considerations in the nurse patient relationship, in particular the relationship between "professional morality" and the nurse's professional identity in the role of advocate for doctors, patients, and hospitals. A discussion of ethics and professionals explores professional ethics, the need for such ethics, and their…

  2. Interviewing the Adolescent Patient: An Educational Program for Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leff, Marilyn; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The University of Colorado School of Medicine's curriculum for primary care physician's assistants in pediatrics includes a unit on interviewing the adolescent patient. Teaching methods include lectures, videotapes and role-playing. Videotapes of the students with simulated patients are used as an evaluation technique. (JMD)

  3. From theory to pamphlet: the 3Ws and an H process for the development of meaningful patient education resources.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Christine Tina; Papadakos, Janet; Catton, Pamela; Houston, Patricia; McKernan, Patricia; Jusko Friedman, Audrey

    2014-06-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of patient education given the prevalence and consequences of low health literacy in Canada and the USA. Research has shown that in addition to plain language, the use of theories of learning can contribute to the effectiveness of patient education resources, and as such, various guidelines and toolkits have been put together to help healthcare providers utilize these theories. Despite these efforts, this knowledge is not consistently applied in practice. To address this gap, we describe a new theory-based protocol, the "3Ws and an H," that is designed to guide healthcare providers in the production of effective patient education resources. Adult learning theory underpins each step of the process, and by using the "3Ws and an H," relevant theories are applied as the steps of the protocol are followed. To facilitate the adoption of this process, we describe it using a resource development project for survivors of endometrial cancer as an example. PMID:24420003

  4. Lessons learned from two consecutive cleft lip and palate missions and the impact of patient education.

    PubMed

    Schönmeyr, Björn; Restrepo, Carolina; Wendby, Lisa; Gillenwater, Justin; Campbell, Alex

    2014-09-01

    Two consecutive cleft missions were conducted in Guwahati, northeastern India in December 2010 and January 2011. In the later mission, a standardized patient education program for postoperative care was introduced. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of the patient education program on cleft lip complications in terms of wound infection and dehiscence. Two hundred ninety-eight cleft lip repairs were performed in the first mission and 220 (74%) returned for early follow-up. In the second mission, 356 patients were operated on and 252 (71%) returned for follow-up. From the first mission, 8 patients (3.7%) were diagnosed with lip wound infection and 21 patients (9.6%) with lip dehiscence. After the second mission, only 1 patient (0.4%) returned with a wound infection and 16 (6.4%) were diagnosed with dehiscence.Using binary logistic regression including age, cleft type, postoperative antibiotics, surgeon, and patient education program as covariates, the patient education program stood out as the only variable with a statistically significant impact on the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Even though the incidence of lip dehiscence was reduced by one third when the patient education program was utilized, our regression model singled out the surgeons as the only factor significantly related to this type of complication. Moreover, no benefits of postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis were found. Further analysis of the data also implied that the use of tissue adhesive as a compliment to sutures does not reduce the risk of dehiscence. PMID:25148620

  5. Effect of Psycho-Educational Training Program for Parent's Having Child with Leukemia on Their Experience and Psychological Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmoud, Sahar; Elaziz, Nahla Ahmed Abd

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is a significant public health and life-threatening problem for pediatric cancer patients. Family caregivers of cancer patients receive little preparation, information, or support to perform their care giving role. This study aims to assess the effect of psycho-educational training program to enhancing practice and psychosocial adaptation…

  6. The Effectiveness of Microcomputers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploeger, Floyd D.

    This in-depth review of the literature synthesizes articles and abstracts identified as education-oriented microcomputer research studies published since 1979. A brief, historic overview of educational computing is followed by a review of the Becker (1983) survey, which concerned the distribution of microcomputers in education in the United…

  7. The effect of educational intervention on intercultural communication: results of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Harmsen, Hans; Bernsen, Roos; Meeuwesen, Ludwien; Thomas, Siep; Dorrenboom, Govert; Pinto, David; Bruijnzeels, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Background Due to worldwide migration to Western countries, physicians are increasingly encountering patients with different ethnic backgrounds. Communication problems can arise as a result of differences in cultural backgrounds and poor language proficiency. Aims To assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on intercultural communication aimed to decrease inequalities in care provided between Western and non-Western patients. Design of study A randomised controlled trial with randomisation at the GP level and outcome measurements at the patient level. Setting General practice in Rotterdam. Method Thirty-eight Dutch GPs in the Rotterdam region, with at least 25% of inhabitants of non-Western origin, and 2407 visiting patients were invited to participate in the study. A total of 986 consultations were finally included. The GPs were educated about cultural differences and trained in intercultural communication. Patients received a videotaped instruction focusing on how to communicate with their GP in a direct way. The primary outcome measure was mutual understanding and the secondary outcomes were patient's satisfaction and perceived quality of care. The intervention effect was assessed for all patients together, for the ‘Western’ and ‘non-Western’ patients, and for patients with different cultural backgrounds separately. Results An intervention effect was seen 6 months after the intervention, as improvement in mutual understanding (and some improvement in perceived quality of care) in consultations with ‘non-Western’ patients. Conclusions A double intervention on intercultural communication given to both physician and patient decreases the gap in quality of care between ‘Western’ and ‘non-Western’ patients. PMID:15904552

  8. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part I: Patient-centered communication.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien V; Hong, Judith; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    The motivation for developing patient-centered communication stems from a desire to enhance the quality of patient care, fulfill professional competency requirements, reduce medical errors, and improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction. Patient-centered communication skills can optimize the physician-patient relationship without significantly prolonging office visits. We propose a series of practical and generally effective techniques for verbal and nonverbal communication. We also suggest a targeted approach for specific difficult conversations that may occur frequently in the practice of dermatology. PMID:23394923

  9. Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients actively participating in students’ learning and they both experience it as a joint action. An attending relationship is based on a one-way relationship between patients and students resulting in patients passively participating by letting students to practice on their bodies but without engaging in a learning dialogue with the students. PMID:24989155

  10. Hospital pharmacy practice in Saudi Arabia: Drug monitoring and patient education in the Riyadh region

    PubMed Central

    Alsultan, Mohammed S.; Mayet, Ahmed Y.; Khurshid, Fowad; Al-jedai, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this national survey is to evaluate hospital pharmacy practice in the Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia. The results of the survey pertaining to the monitoring and patient education of the medication use process were presented. Methods We have invited pharmacy directors from all 48 hospitals in the Riyadh region to participate in a modified-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) survey questionnaire. The survey was conducted using similar methods to those of the ASHP surveys. Results The response rate was 60.4% (29/48). Most hospitals (23, 79%) had pharmacists regularly monitor medication therapy for patients. Of these hospitals, 61% had pharmacists monitoring medication therapy daily for less than 26% of patients, 17% monitored 26–50% of patients and 22% monitored more than half of patients daily. In 41% of hospitals, pharmacists routinely monitored serum medication concentrations or their surrogate markers; 27% gave pharmacists the authority to order initial serum medication concentrations, and 40% allowed pharmacists to adjust dosages. Pharmacists routinely documented their medication therapy monitoring activities in 52% of hospitals. Overall, 74% of hospitals had an adverse drug event (ADE) reporting system, 59% had a multidisciplinary committee responsible for reviewing ADEs, and 63% had a medication safety committee. Complete electronic medical record (EMR) systems were available in 15% of hospitals and 81% had a partial EMR system. The primary responsibility for performing patient medication education lays with nursing (37%), pharmacy (37%), or was a shared responsibility (26%). In 44% of hospitals, pharmacists provided medication education to half or more inpatients and in a third of hospitals, pharmacists gave medication education to 26% or more of patients at discharge. Conclusion Hospital pharmacists in the Riyadh region are actively engaged in monitoring medication therapy and providing patient medication education, although there is considerable opportunity for further involvement. PMID:24227955

  11. Readability of Patient Education Materials on the American Association for Surgery of Trauma Website

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam E. M.; Ghanian, Soha; Adams, Charles A.; Born, Christopher T.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because the quality of information on the Internet is of dubious worth, many patients seek out reliable expert sources. As per the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommendations, readability of patient education materials should not exceed a sixth-grade reading level. The average reading skill of U.S. adults is at the eighth-grade level. Objectives: This study evaluates whether a recognized source of expert content, the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) website’s patient education materials, recommended readability guidelines for medical information. Materials and Methods: Using the well-validated Flesch-Kincaid formula to analyze grade level readability, we evaluated the readability of all 16 of the publicly-accessible entries within the patient education section of the AAST website. Results: Mean ± SD grade level readability was 10.9 ± 1.8 for all the articles. All but one of the articles had a readability score above the sixth-grade level. Readability of the articles exceeded the maximum recommended level by an average of 4.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 4.0-5.8; P < 0.0001). Readability of the articles exceeded the eighth-grade level by an average of 2.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 2.0-3.8; P < 0.0001). Only one of the articles had a readability score below the eighth-grade level. Conclusions: The AAST’s online patient education materials may be of limited utility to many patients, as the readability of the information exceeds the average reading skill level of adults in the U.S. Lack of patient comprehension represents a discrepancy that is not in accordance with the goals of the AAST’s objectives for its patient education efforts. PMID:25147778

  12. Returns to Education: Accounting for Enrolment and Completion Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hérault, Nicolas; Zakirova, Rezida

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature by separately analysing the course enrolment and completion effects of vocational education and training (VET) as well as higher education. Moreover, we investigate the persistence of these wage effects over time while controlling for two potential selection biases. We take advantage of the Longitudinal…

  13. Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Victor C. X.

    2010-01-01

    As adult learners and educators pioneer the use of technology in the new century, attention has been focused on developing strategic approaches to effectively integrate adult learning and technology in different learning environments. "Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches" provides innovative…

  14. Effectiveness of foot care education among people with type 2 diabetes in rural Puducherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Saurabh, Suman; Sarkar, Sonali; Selvaraj, Kalaiselvi; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Roy, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Background: The burden of diabetes and its foot complications is increasing in India. Prevention of these complications through foot care education should be explored. The objective of our study was to assess the risk factors of poor diabetic foot care and to find the effectiveness of health education in improving foot care practice among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to the outpatients of a rural health center with type 2 diabetes. Awareness regarding diabetes, care of diabetes and foot care practice ware assessed and scored. Individual and group health education focusing on foot care was performed. Foot care practice was reassessed after 2 weeks of education. Results: Only 54% were aware that diabetes could lead to reduced foot sensation and foot ulcers. Nearly 53% and 41% of the patients had good diabetes awareness and good diabetes care respectively. Only 22% of the patients had their feet examined by a health worker or doctor. The patients with poor, satisfactory and good practice scores were 44.7%, 35.9% and 19.4% respectively. Low education status, old age and low awareness regarding diabetes were the risk factors for poor practice of foot care. Average score for practice of foot care improved from 5.90 ± 1.82 to 8.0 ± 1.30 after 2 weeks of health education. Practice related to toe space examination, foot inspection and foot wear inspection improved maximally. Conclusion: Foot care education for diabetics in a primary care setting improves their foot care practice and is likely to be effective in reducing the burden of diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:24701439

  15. The relevance of educating doctors, pharmacists and older patients about potentially inappropriate medications.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Mohd Shahezwan Abd

    2015-12-01

    Providing appropriate pharmacotherapy to older people can be difficult since older people are more at risk of developing adverse drug reactions due to age-related physiological changes. The use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) among older people is common throughout the globe, and is a cause for concern due to their clinical, humanistic and economic implications. Nevertheless, it appears that doctors and pharmacists have limited knowledge regarding PIMs. Moreover, uninformed older patients may use PIMs without considering their potential negative consequences. There is a need, therefore, to educate doctors, pharmacists and older patients about PIMs. Geriatric pharmacotherapy education with an emphasis on appropriate prescribing, and PIMs, should be included in the medical and pharmacy teachings at the undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing education levels. Moreover, older patients should be informed about PIMs and the possible risks that they may pose. PMID:26415737

  16. A virtual patient educational activity to improve interprofessional competencies: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Michael J; de Voest, Margaret; Booth, Andrew; Meny, Lisa; Victor, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether an interprofessional virtual patient educational activity improved interprofessional competencies in pharmacy, physician assistant, and physical therapy graduate students. Seventy-two fifth semester pharmacy (n?=?33), fourth semester physician assistant (n?=?27) and fourth semester physical therapy (n?=?12) graduate students participated in the study. Participants were stratified by discipline and randomized into control (n?=?38) and experimental groups (n?=?34). At baseline and at study completion, all participants completed an original, investigator-developed survey that measured improvement in selected Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). The experimental group had statistically significantly greater odds of improving on a variety of IPEC competencies and RIPLS items. The use of a single, interprofessional educational activity resulted in having a greater awareness of other professions' scopes of practice, what other professions have to offer a given patient and how different professions can collaborate in patient care. PMID:25412759

  17. Embodied Learning and Patient Education: From Nurses' Self-Awareness to Patient Self-Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ann L.

    2012-01-01

    This article is intended as a clear and practical introduction to use of a scientific perspective on embodied learning. It looks to embodied cognition and embodied cognitive science to explore education for self-care. The author presents a neurobiologic understanding of embodied learning to bridge adult education to the science-driven world of…

  18. The effectiveness of continuing medical education for specialist recertification

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran; Wang, Tim T.; Ashrafian, Hutan; Layer, Graham T.; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    Evolving professional, social and political pressures highlight the importance of lifelong learning for clinicians. Continuing medical education (CME) facilitates lifelong learning and is a fundamental factor in the maintenance of certification. The type of CME differs between surgical and non-surgical specialties. CME methods of teaching include lectures, workshops, conferences and simulation training. Interventions involving several modalities, instructional techniques and multiple exposures are more effective. The beneficial effects of CME can be maintained in the long term and can improve clinical outcome. However, quantitative evidence on validity, reliability, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of various methods is lacking. This is especially evident in urology. The effectiveness of CME interventions on maintenance of certification is also unknown. Currently, many specialists fulfil mandatory CME credit requirements opportunistically, therefore erroneously equating number of hours accumulated with competence. New CME interventions must emphasize actual performance and should correlate with clinical outcomes. Improved CME practice must in turn lead to continuing critical reflection, practice modification and implementation with a focus towards excellent patient care. PMID:24032064

  19. Lumbar Disk Herniation in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT): Does Educational Attainment Impact Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Patrick R.; Lurie, Jon D.; Frymoyer, John; Walsh, Thomas; Zhao, Wenyan; Abdu, William A.; Weinstein, James N.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Randomized trial with concurrent observational cohort. 1171 patients were divided into subgroups by educational attainment: high school or less, some college, and college degree or above. Objective To assess the influence of education level on outcomes for treatment of lumbar disk herniation. Summary of Background Data Educational attainment has been demonstrated to have an inverse relationship with pain perception, co-morbidities, and mortality. Methods The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial enrolled surgical candidates (imaging-confirmed disk herniation with at least 6 weeks of persistent signs and symptoms of radiculopathy) from 13 multidisciplinary spine clinics in 11 US states. Treatments were standard open diskectomy vs. non-operative treatment. Outcomes were changes from baseline for SF-36 bodily pain (BP) and physical function (PF) scales and the modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and yearly through 4 years. Results Substantial improvement was seen in all patient cohorts. Surgical outcomes did not differ by level of education. For non-operative outcomes, however, higher levels of education were associated with significantly greater overall improvement over 4 years in BP (p=0.007), PF (p=0.001) and ODI (p=0.003). At 4 years a “dose-response” type relationship was shown for BP (high school or less 25.5; some college 31; college graduate or above 36.3; p= 0.004); results were similar for PF and ODI. The success of non-operative treatment in the more educated cohort resulted in an attenuation of the relative benefit of surgery. Conclusions Patients with higher educational attainment demonstrated significantly greater improvement with non-operative treatment while educational attainment was not associated with surgical outcomes. PMID:21311402

  20. Patient loyalty and the social media effect.

    PubMed

    Verkamp, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    In a changing healthcare environment, patient loyalty has never been more important. However, creating patient loyalty can mean more than providing quality health services within the four walls of the medical office. With patients turning to online sources and social media in search of advice and a better patient experience, we must now ensure that patients have meaningful engagements with us across the continuum of care, from the phone, to the office, to social media tools like Facebook and YouTube as we look to build loyalty and grow our referral volumes. PMID:24228370

  1. How Effectively Are We Preparing Teacher Educators in Special Education? The Case of Deaf Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirmer, Barbara R.

    2008-01-01

    The study assessed how well the field of teacher education in special education is preparing the next generation of teacher educators to be stewards of the discipline by exploring the particular case of deaf education. Assuming that preparing doctoral graduates who are able to conduct valuable and quality research requires mentoring by faculty who…

  2. Pilot project "Patient-Safety" in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Rosentreter, Michael; Groß, Dominik; Schäfer, Gereon

    2011-01-01

    Since the summer term 2009 the study project "Patientensicherheit - Der klinische Umgang mit Patienten- und Eingriffsverwechslungen sowie Medikationsfehlern" (Patient Safety - the clinical handling of patients - and mistaking of procedures as well as medication errors) is offered within the Modellstudiengang Medizin. Seminars on patient safety in Germany so far mainly address trained doctors and health economists. In contrast, this study project on patient safety should at an early stage contribute to a "culture of discussing and preventing mistakes" - an aspect that is little established in clinical medicine, but also in medical training. For this purpose, a broad variety of courses was developed, which - relying on problem-oriented learning - enables the students to analyse so-called adverse events (AE) and develop adequate prevention measures on the basis of the insights gained by this analysis. Therefore, theoretical lessons are complemented by discussing prototypical clinical cases. These discussions are moderated by experienced clinicians. After completing the seminar, students showed a significant increase (comparison of means) in the self-assessed qualifications "Wissen zu Patientensicherheit" (Knowledge of Patient Safety) and "Wahrnehmung von Risikosituationen" (Appreciation of Risk Situations). All in all, the students rated their training success with a grade of 1.5 (good). PMID:21818227

  3. Effecting change in elementary school science education

    SciTech Connect

    Parravano, C.

    1994-12-31

    The mission of the Merck Institute for Science Education is to improve the quality of science education during the formative years of kindergarten through eighth grade. To accomplish this mission, the Institute has three primary goals: Transform the teaching of science to communicate the excitement and relevance of science; Reform the education of teachers to instill in tomorrow`s teachers an understanding and appreciation of science; and Create a consensus on the importance of elementary science education among leaders in education, business, and science. Merck has made a minimum ten year commitment of funding and resources to the Institute. The Institute will work very closely with faculty, administration, and community leaders in target school districts to enhance science education in the elementary grades of their schools. Once the Institute`s goals have been achieved in these initial partner districts, the Institute will replicate its programs in other districts.

  4. A comparison of face to face and video-based education on attitude related to diet and fluids: Adherence in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Hasanzadeh, Farzaneh; Shamsoddini, Somayyeh; Emamimoghadam, Zahra; Ebrahimzadeh, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence to diet and fluids is the cornerstone of patients undergoing hemodialysis. By informing hemodialysis patients we can help them have a proper diet and reduce mortality and complications of toxins. Face to face education is one of the most common methods of training in health care system. But advantages of video- based education are being simple and cost-effective, although this method is virtual. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five hemodialysis patients were divided randomly into face to face and video-based education groups. A training manual was designed based on Orem’s self-care model. Content of training manual was same in both the groups. In the face to face group, 2 educational sessions were accomplished during dialysis with a 1-week time interval. In the video-based education group, a produced film, separated to 2 episodes was presented during dialysis with a 1-week time interval. An Attitude questionnaire was completed as a pretest and at the end of weeks 2 and 4. SPSS software version 11.5 was used for analysis. Results: Attitudes about fluid and diet adherence at the end of weeks 2 and 4 are not significantly different in face to face or video-based education groups. The patients’ attitude had a significant difference in face to face group between the 3 study phases (pre-, 2, and 4 weeks postintervention). The same results were obtained in 3 phases of video-based education group. Conclusion: Our findings showed that video-based education could be as effective as face to face method. It is recommended that more investment be devoted to video-based education. PMID:23853648

  5. Patient Demonstration Videos in Predoctoral Endodontic Education: Aspects Perceived as Beneficial by Students.

    PubMed

    Edrees, Hadeel Y; Ohlin, Johan; Ahlquist, Michael; Tessma, Mesfin K; Zary, Nabil

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the perceived benefits of video-mediated demonstrations in learning endodontics. Participants in the study were 75 third-year students enrolled in the undergraduate dentistry program at Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. After the endodontic preclinical course, the students were introduced to the treatment protocol in the clinic by watching two live patient-demonstrated videos. The first video demonstrated how to communicate with the patient and perform diagnosis and root canal instrumentation. The second video illustrated how to perform bacterial sampling and root canal filling. After the students watched each video, a questionnaire was used to evaluate their opinions about various steps of the endodontic treatment protocol and the benefit of such educational material for their practice. Of the total 75 students, 72 completed the first questionnaire (96% response rate), and 65 completed the second questionnaire (87% response rate). The results showed that the students perceived high value in the video demonstrations related to treatment procedure. A statistically significant difference was observed between the perceived benefits of the first and second sessions in communication and treatment procedure (p<0.001). Further studies are needed to assess improvement in the design and delivery format for video demonstrations to enhance their effectiveness as a teaching modality for endodontics. PMID:26246531

  6. Surgical nurses' attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer - a pilot study of an educational intervention on existential issues.

    PubMed

    Udo, C; Melin-Johansson, C; Henoch, I; Axelsson, B; Danielson, E

    2014-07-01

    This is a randomised controlled pilot study using a mixed methods design. The overall aim was to test an educational intervention on existential issues and to describe surgical nurses' perceived attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer. Specific aims were to examine whether the educational intervention consisting of lectures and reflective discussions, affects nurses' perceived confidence in communication and to explore nurses' experiences and reflections on existential issues after participating in the intervention. Forty-two nurses from three surgical wards at one hospital were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Nurses in both groups completed a questionnaire at equivalent time intervals: at baseline before the educational intervention, directly after the intervention, and 3 and 6 months later. Eleven face-to-face interviews were conducted with nurses directly after the intervention and 6 months later. Significant short-term and long-term changes were reported. Main results concerned the significant long-term effects regarding nurses' increased confidence and decreased powerlessness in communication, and their increased feelings of value when caring for a dying patient. In addition, nurses described enhanced awareness and increased reflection. Results indicate that an understanding of the patient's situation, derived from enhanced awareness and increased reflection, precedes changes in attitudes towards communication. PMID:24471991

  7. Evaluation of literacy level of patient education pages in health-related journals.

    PubMed

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E; Carpenter-Haefele, Kara M

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reading level of patient education material from selected current health care journals. Ten patient education pages from a variety of health care journals were entered into a Microsoft Word program. Applying the Flesch-Kincaid readability formula available from Microsoft Word, a reading level for each page was established and compared to recommended standards. Only 2 of 10 patient education pages fell within the recommended reading levels for health-related materials, and 5 of 10 were above the estimated mean U.S. reading level of 8th grade. A 5th to 6th grade level is recommended for patient education materials. This study suggests that although it is known that low health literacy is a widespread problem, it is not always considered when patient-targeted materials are developed. Health care professionals need to become more active in addressing the literacy needs of the intended receiver of written health-related information. PMID:15847246

  8. Using Standardized Patients to Educate Medical Students about Organ Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas Hugh; Anker, Ashley E.; Soriano, Rainier; Friedman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Medical students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine participated in an intervention designed to promote knowledge and improved communication skills related to cadaveric organ donation. The intervention required students to interact with a standardized patient for approximately 10 minutes and respond to questions posed about organ donation in a…

  9. Readability and Content of Patient Education Material Related to Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Patricia H.; de Laat, Sonya; Carroll, Sandra L.; Schwartz, Lisa; Vaandering, Katie; Toor, Gurjit K.; Arthur, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are increasingly offered to patients for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Candidates for ICD receive ICD-related patient education material when they make decisions to consent or decline a primary prevention ICD. Printed patient education material directed at ICD candidates has not been the focus of direct appraisal. Objective We evaluated the readability and content of ICD-related print education materials made available to patients who were enrolled in a study involving patient decision making for ICD from 3 ICD sites in southern Ontario, Canada. Methods All ICD print materials referred to during interviews and/or that were available in ICD site waiting rooms were collected for analysis. Readability testing was conducted using the SMOG (“simple measurement of gobbledygook”) and Fry methods. The material was evaluated according to selected plain-language criteria, thematic content analysis, and rhetoric analysis. Results Twenty-one print materials were identified and analyzed. Documents were authored by device manufacturers, tertiary care hospitals, and cardiac support organizations. Although many documents adhered to plain-language recommendations, text-reading levels were higher than recommended. Twelve major content themes were identified. Content focused heavily on the positive aspects of living with the device to the exclusion of other possible information that could be relevant to the decisions that patients made. Conclusions Print-based patient education materials for ICD candidates are geared to a highly literate population. The focus on positive information to the exclusion of potentially negative aspects of the ICD, or alternatives to accepting 1, could influence and/or confuse patients about the purpose and implications of this medical device. Development of print materials is indicated that includes information about possible problems and that would be relevant for the multicultural and debilitated population who may require ICDs. The findings are highly relevant for nurses who care for primary prevention ICD candidates. PMID:21926915

  10. Health Education: A Process for Human Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedworth, David A.; Bedworth, Albert E.

    The major emphasis of this book is upon the psychological and sociological implications, rather than the biological and pathological foundations, of health education. It is divided into three major parts. Part One, "Philosophical Foundations of Health Education," consists of four chapters that emphasize the necessity for the development of a…

  11. Effectiveness of Mobile Learning in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yousuf, Muhammad Imran

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this research is to better understand and measure students' attitudes and perceptions towards the importance of mobile learning in distance education. Results of this survey clearly indicate that facilitating mobile learning can improve the entire distance education by enhancing ways of communication among distance learners, tutors…

  12. Interpreting Community Effects on Youth Educational Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South, Scott J.; Baumer, Eric P.; Lutz, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Used longitudinal data from the National Survey of Children to examine factors explaining the higher school dropout and lower high school graduation rates in socioeconomically distressed communities. Results suggest that educational performance of peers is a key mechanism linking neighborhood disadvantage to youth educational attainment. Some of…

  13. The Effectiveness of Environmental Education: Can

    E-print Network

    dolphins which visit the shallow waters adjacent to the resort's beach. The education programme, which uses techniques derived from cognitive psychology and learning theory, attempted to prompt increased enjoyment. of Figures: 2 No. of Tables: 6 No. of Refs: 36 Keywords: environmental education, wildlife, dolphins

  14. Income Redistribution Effects of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, W. Lee

    This paper examines the redistribution impact of public higher education in California and Wisconsin. The focus is on state, rather than federal, subsidies and the undergraduate level. A study of the operation of the California higher education system indicates that income from poor and lower-middle income families is redistributed to upper-middle…

  15. Partnering for Effective Educational Researching for Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onuka, Adams O. U.

    2012-01-01

    That research is a veritable tool for rapid social and economic development is undoubtedly well known globally. That educational researching is fraught with multi-dimensional challenges cannot be over-stressed. That multi-disciplinary approach and public-private, public-public, private-private partnership in educational researching for better and…

  16. Fishing and Vygotsky's Concept of Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinson, Beth McCulloch

    2001-01-01

    Relates Vygotsky's concept of zone of proximal development to a fishing story, thereby providing a scaffold allowing preservice students to better understand the educational concept. Concludes that educators should use the right bait (determined by how engaged children are), technique, and progress at the right pace (evidenced by children's…

  17. Development of Smartphone Educational Application for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Jung; Sim, Jae Lan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to develop a smartphone application (app) as an educational learning instrument for coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and to assess the users' level of satisfaction. Methods This methodological research involves elicited learning content for CAD patients to develop a learning instrument using the smartphone app. The app was developed according to the steps of Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation, which is a systematic instructional design model. The levels of satisfaction with the developed smartphone app among 30 outpatients with CAD were assessed via a questionnaire during their visits to a cardiology outpatient department. Results A smartphone app 'Strong Heart' was developed through reviewing the literature associated with education for CAD patients under professional supervision and searching for medical smartphone apps that are already available. The learning contents include six main sections containing essential learning issues in managing CAD and additional information to attract the user's attention, such as patient cases and quizzes. After modification with feedback from experts, the app was finally developed and evaluated by patients who reported that they were satisfied with the usefulness of the app. Conclusions The developed smartphone app is available on both the iPhone App Store and the Android Play Store. Patients with CAD may utilize the app for supporting educational material without limitations of time and space. PMID:24872910

  18. The effects of self-care training on quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sahebalzamani, Mohammad; Zamiri, Maryam; Rashvand, Farnoosh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and progressive disease of the central nervous system with debilitating symptoms and complications. Therefore, education and appropriate interventions, including self-care education, are necessary to increase the quality of life in these patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of self-care education on quality of life in MS patients affiliated to Iranian MS Association. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study assessed a single group of MS patients before and after training. Totally, 50 MS patients were selected non-randomly from the patients referring to Iranian MS Association. A two-part questionnaire was used to collect data. The first part included demographic information and the second part consisted of a quality of life questionnaire (MSQOL-54) including 54 items in 3 sections and 14 subgroups. The scores ranges from zero to a hundred in each subgroup. The reliability of the questionnaire has been confirmed (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96). The questionnaires were filled out by the patients before training. After at least six 50-minute training sessions during three months, the same questionnaire was again completed by the participants. Statistical analyses, including absolute and relative frequency tables and mean and standard deviation for descriptive analysis, and t-test and Pearson correlation for descriptive analysis, were performed by SPSS. Findings: The mean values of quality of life in physical health, pain, fatigue, health conception, changes in health status, sexual activities, as well as overall quality of life scores differed significantly after training. Moreover, except for cognitive activity, there were significant differences in values of mental health before and after training. Conclusions: Designing and applying the self-care programs based on the educational needs of MS patients has a positive effect on physical and psychological aspects of their quality of life. PMID:23493483

  19. [Communication and interaction in psychosomatic education: use of standardized patients].

    PubMed

    Nikendei, Christoph; Zipfel, Stephan; Roth, Christiane; Löwe, Bernd; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana

    2003-11-01

    An amendment to the German medical curriculum in April 2002 will place communication and social skills at the centre of medical training. In addition to providing cognitive knowledge, psychosomatic courses offer the opportunity to integrate affective learning, with a focus on communication and interaction processes. In winter term 2001/2002 a training with standardised patients was implemented and evaluated as part of the psychosomatic internship of the Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine at the Medical Hospital of the University of Heidelberg. Quantitative and qualitative results showed that training with standardised patients is well accepted and that acceptance is independent of student gender, career choice, or interests. These training units are easy to integrate into psychosomatic practical courses. The results discussed here will focus on the role and importance of various elements of medical training. PMID:14600846

  20. Effectiveness of Musculoskeletal Education Interventions in People With Low Literacy Levels: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Wendy; Ballinger, Claire; Protheroe, Jo; Lueddeke, Jill; Nutbeam, Don; Armstrong, Ray; Falzon, Louise; Edwards, Chris; Russell, Cynthia; McCaffery, Kirsten; Adams, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of patient education interventions delivered or directed by health professionals for people with musculoskeletal conditions who also have lower levels of literacy. Methods Electronic databases were searched from 1946 to May 2012. Randomized controlled trials with primary interventions designed specifically for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions and lower levels of literacy were eligible for inclusion. The quality of the study was determined by assessing method of randomization, allocation concealment, creation and maintenance of comparable groups, blinding of patients and providers, control of confounding, and the validity and reliability of outcome measures. Results Of the 2,440 studies located using the search strategy, 6 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three public health community studies and 3 rheumatology clinic-based studies delivered educational programs to people with musculoskeletal conditions who also had lower levels of literacy. Three moderate quality studies suggest that musculoskeletal educational interventions had a small short-term effect on knowledge and 2 moderate quality studies suggest musculoskeletal interventions had a small effect on self-efficacy (although results on self-efficacy were conflicting in 1 of these studies). Only 1 moderate quality study showed a small effect on anxiety and 1 on self-perceived health and well-being in people with lower literacy. Conclusion High quality evidence is lacking on the effectiveness of musculoskeletal education interventions for people with lower literacy levels. Research programs that test the effectiveness of patient education interventions for arthritis must recruit and engage people with lower levels of literacy. PMID:23925869

  1. The Effectiveness of a Patient Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Harue J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports data from three consecutive classes of first- year optometry students at the Southern California College of Optometry, who were tested preceding and following completion of a patient communication course. Findings indicated that students improved their ability to respond to patients and were better able to discriminate among various levels…

  2. For Effective Use of Multimedia in Education, Teachers Must Develop Their Own Educational Multimedia Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiker, Mohd. Elmagzoub A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes the strong claim that for multimedia to have any significant effect on education, the educational multimedia applications must be designed by the teachers of those classes. The arguments supporting this claim are presented in the headlines: curriculum, software, hardware and evaluation. The paper begins with an introduction which…

  3. Value Added as an Indicator of Educational Effectiveness in Dutch Senior Secondary Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Anneke C.; Bosker, Roel J.; Doolaard, Simone; de Wolf, Inge

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the possibilities of estimating value added as a performance indicator in senior secondary vocational education. Value added is interesting in this context because it is considered as a reliable tool for comparing the effectiveness of educational institutions. Although value added indicators have been developed since the…

  4. A process evaluation model for patient education programs for pregnant smokers

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, R.; Whiteside, H; Solomon, L.; Prows, S.; Donatelle, R.; Cinciripini, P.; McIlvain, H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To describe and apply a process evaluation model (PEM) for patient education programs for pregnant smokers.?METHODS—The preparation of a process evaluation plan required each program to define its essential "new" patient assessment and intervention procedures for each episode (visit) of patient-staff contact. Following specification of these core implementation procedures (p) by each patient education program, the PEM, developed by the Smoke-Free Families (SFF) National Program Office, was applied. The PEM consists of five steps: (1) definition of the eligible patient sample (a); (2) documentation of patient exposure to each procedure (b); (3) computation of procedure exposure rate (b/a = c); (4) specification of a practice performance standard for each procedure (d); (5) computation of an implementation index (c/d = e) for each procedure. The aggregate of all indexes (e) divided by the number of procedures (Pn) produced a program implementation index (PII = ?e/Pn).?PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS—Data from four SFF studies that represent different settings were used to illustrate the application of the PEM.?RESULTS—All four projects encountered moderate to significant difficulty in program implementation. As the number and complexity of procedures increased, the implementation index decreased. From initial procedures that included patient recruitment, delivery of the intervention components, and conducting patient follow ups, a variety of problems were encountered and lessons learned.?CONCLUSION—This process evaluation provided specific insight about the difficulty of routine delivery of any new methods into diverse maternity care setting. The importance of pilot testing all procedures is emphasised. The application of the PEM to monitor program progress is recommended and revisions to improve program delivery are suggested.???Keywords: process evaluation model; patient education program; pregnancy; smoking cessation PMID:10982902

  5. Nurses’ Knowledge and Education about Oral Care of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Radhika R; Ongole, Ravikiran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Oral health awareness and oral care are crucial aspects of oncology nursing practice. However very few studies concentrate on the oral care of cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment and nursing practice in the Indian subcontinent. Most of the published studies have been conducted in the Western and European countries. Aim: This study aimed to determine the nurses’ knowledge and education about oral care in cancer patient undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Setting and design: A cross sectional descriptive survey was conducted among 158 staff nurses working in oncology related areas from 4 different hospitals of Dakshina Kannada district and Udupi district of Karnataka state, India. Statistical Analysis: descriptive and inferential statistics was used by using SPSS 16 version. Results: Majority 81 (51.3%) of the staff nurses had poor knowledge of oral care in cancer patients whereas 87 (55.1%) reported that knowledge acquired through basic education in oral care is not sufficient. Most of the staff nurses 115 (72.8%) did not receive basic education in oral care of cancer patients. There was significant association between knowledge and variables such as designation (.005), years of work experience (.040) and years of experience in cancer wards (.000) at 0.05 levels. Conclusion: Lack of knowledge suggest the need to develop and implement continuing nursing education programs on oral care specifically for patients receiving cancer treatments, for improving knowledge of staff nurses’ in order to render comprehensive care to the patients. This study also recommends the importance of inclusion of cancer patient specific oral care in the curriculum which can enhance competency of the qualified nurses in cancer wards. PMID:26009678

  6. Continuing Medical Education for European General Practitioners in Doctor-Patient Relationship Skills and Psychosocial Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, L. Randol

    1998-01-01

    Most of the 23 European providers of continuing medical education (CME) surveyed reported programming on the doctor-patient relationship and psychosocial issues. Visits to programs in France, the Netherlands, and Spain identified the formats used most often in small group instruction, intensive individual learning, and national-level CME. (SK)

  7. Tuberculosis and Latent TB Treatment Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Tuberculosis and Latent TB Treatment Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Revised 02/13/2013 Page 1 of 3 TB (tuberculosis) is a serious illness that most commonly affects the lungs, but can involve any major organ system. The cause is a bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Symptoms Symptoms

  8. Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Revised 5/18/10 Page 1 of 1 Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, is a common allergic skin reaction often affecting the face, elbows. Identifying the cause of the itch is essential in relieving the dermatitis. Common triggers include allergens

  9. Educating Healthcare Providers Regarding LGBT Patients and Health Issues: The Special Case of Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, David A.; Whitehead, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Much is written about the availability of healthcare services among elements of the U.S. population, with a large proportion of the literature focusing on access. Although physical access is an overarching issue for many, educators must remember that a key factor in providing complete and competent healthcare is to understand the patient and any…

  10. Birth Control for Women Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    The Pill Birth Control for Women Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2 Revised 04/09/2014 The birth control pill is a combined hormonal contraceptive containing two hormones · skin changes Special Warnings with birth control pills containing the progestin Drospirenone: REGULAR

  11. Cinemeducation in Psychiatry: A Seminar in Undergraduate Medical Education Combining a Movie, Lecture, and Patient Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhnigk, Olaf; Schreiner, Julia; Reimer, Jens; Emami, Roya; Naber, Dieter; Harendza, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric educators are often faced with students' negative attitudes toward psychiatry. A new type of seminar has been established in order to enable students to gain a deeper understanding of psychiatric illness. Method: A "cinemeducation seminar," combining a movie, a lecture, and a patient interview, has been established as part…

  12. Tension Headaches Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Tension Headaches Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 2 Reviewed 04/11/12 The two most common types are: Tension headaches ­ Tension headaches cause pressure or tightness on both toward your ears. Tense and relax your neck by pushing your head back, then again by bringing your chin

  13. IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2012

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) Approved by Patient Education Committee: 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 1 of 3 OVERVIEW -- Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic condition of the digestive system diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome; if constipation is more common, the condition is called

  14. Sleep Hygiene Rules for Insomnia Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Sleep Hygiene Rules for Insomnia Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee Page 1 of 1 Revised 04/11/12 Sleep hygiene refers to "cleaning up" sleep habits that interfere with good sleep. These habits often develop in response to insomnia, but are counterproductive. Practicing good sleep hygiene

  15. (Mis)Perceptions of Continuing Education: Insights from Knowledge Translation, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon C.; Bell, Mary; Goldman, Joanne; Peller, Jennifer; Silver, Ivan; Sargeant, Joan; Reeves, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Minimal attention has been given to the intersection and potential collaboration among the domains of continuing education (CE), knowledge translation (KT), quality improvement (QI), and patient safety (PS), despite their overlapping objectives. A study was undertaken to examine leaders' perspectives of these 4 domains and their…

  16. Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Judy; Taylor, Maurice C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how Canadian adults living with limited literacy and chronic illness made meaning of their patient education experiences. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological research design and employed three data sources over a nine-month period. Data was interpreted and analyzed as it was collected,…

  17. The Sports Participation Effect on Educational Attainment of Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the direct, indirect, and total effects of high school sports participation on educational attainment for Black males using the Educational Longitudinal Study (2002/2006), a large, nationally representative, database. A path analysis procedure for determining underlying causal relationships between variables…

  18. What Research Indicates about the Educational Effects of "Sesame Street."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.

    This paper reviews the results of several studies that examined the educational effects of Sesame Street. Three studies by the Educational Testing Service on Sesame Street's first two seasons determined that among children who watched Sesame Street, those who watched the most scored highest on an achievement measure; frequent viewers made more…

  19. Effect of Geographic Distance on Distance Education: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Heng; Robinson, Anthony C.; Detwiler, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of geographic distance on students' distance learning experience with the aim to provide tentative answers to a fundamental question--does geographic distance matter in distance education? Using educational outcome data collected from an online master's program in Geographic Information Systems, this…

  20. Designing and Implementing Effective Professional Development in Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontz, Thomas S.; Leming, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    Becoming a competent civic educator--one who can inspire and prepare students for informed, responsible, and humane participation in civic and political life--requires ongoing study of the content, pedagogy, and resources of civic education. Many elementary, middle, and high school teachers (and their students) would benefit from effective

  1. ICT as an Effective Tool for Internationalization of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzan, Masha; Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela

    2009-01-01

    Globalization and new technologies have opened up a global market for education pressuring many institutions to be internationalized. Within mainly descriptive mode of analysis, this study investigates how internationalization of higher education can be facilitated by the effective use of information and communication technologies. Reporting…

  2. Educating Hispanic Students: Effective Instructional Practices. Practitioner Brief #5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padron, Yolanda N.; Waxman, Hersh C.; Rivera, Hector H.

    2002-01-01

    Effective instructional practices are crucial to addressing the educational crisis facing many Hispanic students in the United States. The number of Hispanic students attending public schools has increased dramatically in recent decades, yet Hispanic students as a group have the lowest levels of education and the highest dropout rate of any…

  3. Vernacular Education in Papua New Guinea: Is It Really Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Yasuko

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on an observational study concerning the effectiveness of elementary education. It was conducted in a rural area near Alotau, the provincial capital of the Milne Bay Province, with a special focus on the Maiwala Elementary School. In this paper, the author first briefly describes what elementary education is and how it has been…

  4. Orchestrating Effective Change: How Youth Organizing Influences Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Jerusha; Zaino, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Although research demonstrating the effectiveness of youth organizing for educational reform has expanded rapidly in the last two decades, the field remains substantially undertheorized. This article outlines a theoretical framework, based on 30 interviews with leading figures in education reform, that illuminates how a youth organizing group has…

  5. A Quantitative Synthesis of the Effects of Open Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzel, Donna C.; And Others

    By employing meta-analysis procedures to build on the reviews of Horwitz and Peterson, specific effects of open education are quantified and related to school and student characteristics. From the 45 studies located in ERIC, the Education Index, and Horwitz's monograph, student, setting, and research design characteristics were coded. Twenty-three…

  6. Cost-Effects Analysis of Year-Round Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, David; And Others

    This feasibility study was designed to gather and analyze data to determine the potential cost-effectiveness of year-round education (YRE) compared to traditional-schedule education in California. An expanded version of the Stanford Research Institute's cost model was used to fit a broad conceptualization that enabled school districts with…

  7. Vision Effects: A Critical Gap in Educational Leadership Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantabutra, Sooksan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although leaders are widely believed to employ visions, little is known about what constitutes an "effective" vision, particularly in the higher education sector. This paper seeks to proposes a research model for examining relationships between vision components and performance of higher education institutions, as measured by financial…

  8. 77 FR 46069 - Request for Information on Effective Financial Education

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    .... 165, pp. 52596- 52597 (Thursday, August 26, 2010) (avail. at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-08... PROTECTION Request for Information on Effective Financial Education AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial... Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (``Dodd-Frank'') established the Office of Financial Education...

  9. The (Adverse) Effects of Expanding Higher Education: Evidence from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppedisano, Veruska

    2011-01-01

    Over the period 1995-1998 Italy experienced an expansion of its higher education supply with the aim of reducing regional differences in educational attainment. This paper evaluates the effects of this policy on enrolment, drop out and academic performance. The paper combines differences across provinces in the number of campuses constructed with…

  10. The Learning Effects of Computer Simulations in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Nico; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van der Veen, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the (quasi)experimental research of the past decade on the learning effects of computer simulations in science education. The focus is on two questions: how use of computer simulations can enhance traditional education, and how computer simulations are best used in order to improve learning processes and outcomes. We report on…

  11. Preparing Performers and Composers for Effective Educational Work with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Music education programs stand to gain important benefits from the collaborative work of performing musicians with specialist music teachers and classroom teachers. To be effective, performers and composers must have their knowledge and skills for education cultivated within the context of their essential identities as musicians. Given…

  12. Online Pedagogy: Principles for Supporting Effective Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Stephanie B.; Terry, Krista P.; Doolittle, Peter E.; Hicks, David

    2004-01-01

    Distance education has become a major form of education in the United States. This surge in popularity has launched a plethora of scholarship emphasizing the distillation of those strategies which inform effective, learning experiences in the distance environment. A growing consensus among researchers recognizes the need for a holistic approach to…

  13. Images, femininity and cancer: an analysis of an international patient education programme.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article is an analysis of a cancer patient education programme run by cosmetic companies. I focus on an analysis of imagery, arguing that there are particular discursive elements that the cosmetic companies use in order to make productive the relationship between femininity and cancer. I contextualize this education programme by presenting the controversies regarding cosmetics as they relate to the growth of breast tumours. In doing so, I conclude that conversations and questions about a link between chemicals and cancer are subverted by both ;horror' narratives of cancer and the provocative use of standards of beauty. Such discursive dominance in patient education programmes makes it difficult to engage in a more public understanding of cancer growth as affected by cosmetic chemicals. PMID:19103716

  14. Resource development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery: an analysis on patient education resource development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need for educational tools in the consenting process of otolaryngology-head and neck procedures. A development strategy for the creation of educational tools in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, particularly pamphlets on the peri-operative period in an adenotonsillectomy, is described. Methods A participatory design approach, which engages key stakeholders in the development of an educational tool, is used. Pamphlets were created through a review of traditional and grey literature and then reviewed by a community expert in the field. The pamphlets were then reviewed by an interdisciplinary team including educational experts, and finally by less vulnerable members of the target population. Questionnaires evaluating the pamphlets’ content, layout, style, and general qualitative features were included. Results The pamphlets yielded high ratings across all domains regardless of patient population. General feedback was provided by a non-vulnerable patient population and final pamphlets were drafted. Conclusions By using a participatory design model, the pamphlets are written at an appropriate educational level to incorporate a broad audience. Furthermore, this methodology can be used in future resource development of educational tools. PMID:25022351

  15. The Educational Kanban: promoting effective self-directed adult learning in medical education.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    The author reviews the many forces that have driven contemporary medical education approaches to evaluation and places them in an adult learning theory context. After noting their strengths and limitations, the author looks to lessons learned from manufacturing on both efficacy and efficiency and explores how these can be applied to the process of trainee assessment in medical education.Building on this, the author describes the rationale for and development of the Educational Kanban (EK) at Children's Hospital Boston--specifically, how it was designed to integrate adult learning theory, Japanese manufacturing models, and educator observations into a unique form of teacher-student collaboration that allows for continuous improvement. It is a formative tool, built on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies, that guides educational efforts to optimize teaching and learning, promotes adult learner responsibility and efficacy, and takes advantage of the labor-intensive clinical educational setting. The author discusses how this model, which will be implemented in July 2009, will lead to training that is highly individualized, optimizes faculty and student educational efforts, and ultimately conserves faculty resources. A model EK is provided for general reference.The EK represents a novel approach to adult learning that will enhance educational effectiveness and efficiency and complement existing evaluative models. Described here in a specific graduate medical setting, it can readily be adapted and integrated into a wide range of undergraduate and graduate clinical educational environments. PMID:19550191

  16. Patient Education on Prostate Cancer Screening and Involvement in Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.; Woolf, Steven H.; Johnson, Robert E.; Kerns, J. William

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Many clinicians lack resources to engage patients in shared decision making for prostate cancer screening. We sought to evaluate whether previsit educational decision aids facilitate shared decision making. METHODS This randomized controlled study compared a Web-based and a paper-based decision aid with no previsit education. Men aged 50 to 70 years undergoing a health maintenance examination at a large family practice were enrolled. The primary outcome was patient-reported level of control over the decision to be screened. Secondary outcomes included frequency of screening, patient knowledge, decisional conflict, and time spent discussing screening. RESULTS A total of 497 men participated (75 control, 196 brochure, 226 Web site). Patients exposed to either aid were no more likely than control patients to report a collaborative decision: 36% of patients in each group reported equally sharing decision responsibility. Exposure to either decision aid increased patients’ involvement in decision making compared with the control condition (Web site, P = .03; brochure, P = .03). Only 46% of control patients reported an active decision-making role, compared with 56% of Web site and 54% of brochure patients. Patients exposed to a decision aid answered a greater percentage of knowledge questions correctly (54% control vs 69% Web site, P <.001, and vs 69% brochure, P <.001) and were less likely to be screened (94% control vs 86% Web site, P = .06, and vs 85% brochure, P = .04). CONCLUSIONS Patients in the decision aid groups were more informed and more engaged in the screening decision than their control counterparts. Exposure did not promote shared decision-making control, however. Whether shared decision making is the ideal model and how to measure its occurrence are subjects for further research. PMID:17389534

  17. Effect of aspirin in "aspirin sensitive" patients.

    PubMed Central

    Asad, S I; Kemeny, D M; Youlten, L J; Frankland, A W; Lessof, M H

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen patients with a history of urticaria or asthma, or both, induced by aspirin were studied before and after provocation of symptoms with aspirin. The plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha concentration, which was characteristically raised before challenge, fell significantly at the time of adverse reactions. Repeated administration of aspirin up to a dose of 650 mg daily induced tolerance in most of the patients, and several developed bronchodilator responses to aspirin. Although median total IgE concentrations may be raised in patients with aspirin sensitivity, it appears likely that pharmacological rather than immunological mechanisms are chiefly responsible for the phenomena of aspirin sensitivity and desensitisation. PMID:6423060

  18. Effective Learning & Teaching in Medical, Dental & Veterinary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, John, Ed.; Huttly, Sharon, Ed.; Taylor, Ian, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes: (1) "Opportunities in Medical, Dental and Veterinary (MDV) Educational Development" (John Sweet); (2) "Culture, Collegiality, and Collaborative Learning" (George Brown, Madeline Rohin, and Michael Manogue); (3) "Communication Skills: On Being Patient-Centered" (Jeff Wilson); (4) "Curriculum" (John Sweet); (5)…

  19. Educational needs of home caregivers of terminally ill patients: literature review.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, P

    2000-01-01

    Hospice care continues to be a rapidly growing philosophy of care at the end of life. One of the fundamental principles of hospice is the role of a primary caregiver to provide for the needs of the terminally ill loved one. Typically, a spouse, adult child, sibling, close friend, or significant other fills this role. Usually, the caregiver has no formal training in caregiving and is learning all aspects of providing for all the needs of the patient. This is an awesome responsibility and quite overwhelming for most caregivers. A research synthesis was completed to assess the educational needs of caregivers of terminally ill patients. The computerized literature search of several databases found very few studies on the educational needs of caregivers. The few studies that have been done have used both quantitative and qualitative approaches, using a variety of assessment tools, looking at several different populations, over varied time periods. In spite of the variety of methods and populations studied, all the studies came to similar conclusions. The needs of the studied caregivers fall into three main categories: needing information on meeting the physical needs of the patients, community resources, and the patient's illness. The findings provide a basis for further research to build a comprehensive educational program that maximizes the role of the caregivers of terminally ill patients. PMID:11883801

  20. Comparative Readability of Shoulder and Elbow Patient Education Materials within Orthopaedic Websites.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Danna, Natalie R; Melamed, Eitan; Capo, John T

    2015-12-01

    There is growing concern that the readability of online or - thopaedic patient education materials are too difficult for the general public to fully understand. It is recommended that this information be at the sixth grade reading level or lower. This study compared the readability of shoulder and elbow education articles from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) websites. Seventy-six patient education articles from the AAOS and ASSH concerning shoulder and elbow disorders were evaluated. Each article was assessed for the number of years since its last update, word count, percentage of passive sentences, Flesch Reading Ease score, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) grade, and New Dale-Chall grade level. Only one article was at or below the sixth grade read - ing level. The AAOS and ASSH articles had the following respective scores: a mean Flesch Reading Ease score of 54.3 and 51.8, Flesch-Kincaid grade level of 9.4 and 10.3, SMOG grade of 8.5 and 9.4, and New Dale-Chall grade of 10.4 and 11.0. Articles from the AAOS were longer (p < 0.001), had a lower percentage of passive sentences (p < 0.001), and were more recently updated (p = 0.02) than their ASSH counterparts. Higher percentages of passive sentences were found to correlate with more difficult read - ability. Patient education materials regarding the shoulder and elbow on the AAOS and ASSH websites have readability scores above the recommended reading level. These may be too challenging for the majority of patients to read and consequently serve as a barrier to proper patient education. Reducing the percentage of passive sentences may serve as a novel target for improving readability. PMID:26630468

  1. Towards a conceptual framework demonstrating the effectiveness of audiovisual patient descriptions (patient video cases): a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Technological advances have enabled the widespread use of video cases via web-streaming and online download as an educational medium. The use of real subjects to demonstrate acute pathology should aid the education of health care professionals. However, the methodology by which this effect may be tested is not clear. Methods We undertook a literature review of major databases, found relevant articles relevant to using patient video cases as educational interventions, extracted the methodologies used and assessed these methods for internal and construct validity. Results A review of 2532 abstracts revealed 23 studies meeting the inclusion criteria and a final review of 18 of relevance. Medical students were the most commonly studied group (10 articles) with a spread of learner satisfaction, knowledge and behaviour tested. Only two of the studies fulfilled defined criteria on achieving internal and construct validity. The heterogeneity of articles meant it was not possible to perform any meta-analysis. Conclusions Previous studies have not well classified which facet of training or educational outcome the study is aiming to explore and had poor internal and construct validity. Future research should aim to validate a particular outcome measure, preferably by reproducing previous work rather than adopting new methods. In particular cognitive processing enhancement, demonstrated in a number of the medical student studies, should be tested at a postgraduate level. PMID:23256787

  2. Utilizing Teach-Back to Reinforce Patient Education: A Step-by-Step Approach.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Marcy; Saunders, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Teach-back is a health literacy tool that can be used by orthopaedic nurses to assess their patients' understanding of what has been taught and immediately clarify and review concepts that were misunderstood. Research supports the use of teach-back to engage patients in the learning process, thereby reducing hospital readmissions, and improving self-management, safety, patient satisfaction, and patient outcomes. Nursing journals, however, lack articles that take nurses through the steps of implementing teach-back in their practice. This article describes the four stages of teach-back and takes you step by step through the process of integrating this health literacy tool in your patient education practices. PMID:26575509

  3. The effect of post-discharge educational intervention on patients in achieving objectives in modifiable risk factors six months after discharge following an episode of acute coronary syndrome, (CAM-2 Project): a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether an intervention mainly consisting of a signed agreement between patient and physician on the objectives to be reached, improves reaching these secondary prevention objectives in modifiable cardiovascular risk factors six-months after discharge following an acute coronary syndrome. Background There is room to improve mid-term adherence to clinical guidelines' recommendations in coronary heart disease secondary prevention, specially non-pharmacological ones, often neglected. Methods In CAM-2, patients discharged after an acute coronary syndrome were randomly assigned to the intervention or the usual care group. The primary outcome was reaching therapeutic objectives in various secondary prevention variables: smoking, obesity, blood lipids, blood pressure control, exercise and taking of medication. Results 1757 patients were recruited in 64 hospitals and 1510 (762 in the intervention and 748 in the control group) attended the six-months follow-up visit. After adjustment for potentially important variables, there were, between the intervention and control group, differences in the mean reduction of body mass index (0.5 vs. 0.2; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (1.6 cm vs. 0.6 cm; p = 0.05), proportion of patients who exercise regularly and those with total cholesterol below 175 mg/dl (64.7% vs. 56.5%; p = 0.001). The reported intake of medications was high in both groups for all the drugs considered with no differences except for statins (98.1% vs. 95.9%; p = 0.029). Conclusions At least in the short term, lifestyle changes among coronary heart disease patients are achievable by intensifying the responsibility of the patient himself by means of a simple and feasible intervention. PMID:21092191

  4. Effectiveness of antidepressants and predictors of treatment response for depressed HIV patients in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Victoria K; Wagner, Glenn J; Nakasujja, Noeline; Dickens, Akena; Aunon, Frances; Musisi, Seggane

    2015-12-01

    Antidepressant medication is well established for the treatment of depression but little is known about its effectiveness for HIV populations in sub-Saharan Africa. This study examined the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment and predictors of treatment response among depressed HIV patients in Uganda. Data were obtained from two open-label trials in which 184 HIV patients were diagnosed with depression and started on antidepressants. Data at treatment baseline and month 6 were compared to assess treatment response, and baseline predictors of response were assessed. A total of 154 completed month 6, of whom 122 (79%) had responded to treatment and were no longer depressed (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, score?education, CD4 count, general health functioning, physical health, pain, quality of life and social support variables were associated with antidepressant treatment response; however, only secondary education and social support independently predicted treatment response in logistic multiple regression analysis. Baseline depression severity was not associated with treatment response. In conclusion, antidepressants are effective in treating both moderate and more severe depression among persons living with HIV in Uganda, and education [OR (95% CI)?=?4.33 (1.33-14.11)] and social support [OR (95% CI)?=?1.54 (1.03-2.30)] were most predictive of treatment response. PMID:25525053

  5. [The role of the nurse in the patient education of young epileptic patients].

    PubMed

    Danse, Marion; Goujon, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    An epileptic seizure in a child is a major source of anxiety and turns the family's everyday life upside down. Through therapeutic education, the nurse guides the families towards the autonomous management of the seizures, antiepileptic treatments, adaptations to daily life and potential comorbidities. PMID:26100481

  6. Examining the efficacy of DVD technology compared to print-based material in COPD self-management education of rural patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2013-01-01

    A pilot study (n = 41) was conducted to test the effects of three educational treatments (DVD vs. Pamphlet vs. DVD + Pamphlet) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), COPD information needs and self-efficacy among a referred sample of Certified Federal Rural Health Clinic patients (mean age = 61.51 years ± 6.29 years; ~61% female) suffering from COPD using a randomly-assigned, multiple-group pretest-posttest design with a control group. A MANCOVA testing planned multivariate contrasts determined patients receiving a DVD reported statistically significant higher levels of lung-specific physical functioning as compared to patients receiving a Pamphlet. Additionally, DVD patients reported clinically significant improvements on two dimensions of lung-specific HRQoL. No such improvements occurred within the Pamphlet and Control groups. The provision of self-management education as compared to usual care, however, did not improve the outcome variables examined. PMID:24163639

  7. Measuring Effectiveness for Best Evidence Medical Education: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfield, Clive; Thomas, Hywel; Bullock, Alison; Eynon, Rebecca; Wall, David

    2001-01-01

    Identifies five levels of effectiveness: outcomes, behavior, learning, reaction, and participation, and discusses these levels within the context of research evidence for education within the medical profession. (Contains 33 references.) (Author/YDS)

  8. The protective effect of education on cognition in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-02-01

    Education has a protective effect against cognitive deficits following various forms of brain insult. Professional fighting (boxing and mixed martial arts) provides a model for assessing the impact of cumulative brain injuries on cognition and brain health. In the current cross-sectional observational study, we explore whether education would be protective against cognitive loss in fighters. We tested 141 professional fighters using a computerized neurocognitive battery, in addition to structural MRI. We used automated segmentation software to compute the volumes of various brain structures. We found fighters with high school education or less to show more associations between fight exposure and cognitive test scores. The relationship between brain structure volume and exposure did not differ based on education. These results are interpreted as putatively showing a protective effect of education on functional integrity in fighters, although longitudinal data and a larger sample size are required to further understand this relationship. PMID:24191967

  9. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff. PMID:25763258

  10. 5-year followup of the effect on optometrists of continuing education about hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstein, R N; Gordon, A; Wayne, J; Charles, E

    1985-01-01

    All 319 participants of an intensive continuing education course on optometric hypertension screening at the University of Alabama at Birmingham were surveyed 5 years after completion of the course. Almost 85 percent of 211 responding optometrists reported that they were continuing to screen for hypertension in their practices. They estimated that 24 percent of their patients had hypertension and that of these 11 percent were previously undetected. The criteria used by these optometrists for tentative diagnosis and referral were consistent with currently accepted guidelines. Hypertension screening by optometrists is cost-effective, and this survey suggests that continuing education courses providing intensive didactic and clinical instruction may be an effective method for changing clinicians' behavior. For most optometrists who participated in this continuing education program, the program appears to have positively changed their clinical behavior. PMID:3927378

  11. A Picture of Health and Education. Higher Education in Focus: Professors and Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Our universities are an indispensible part of the UK's healthcare system. This publication is the first in a series of Universities UK reports depicting the vital connections between higher education and healthcare. It illustrates the virtuous partnership between health providers and universities in supplying and developing the healthcare…

  12. The study circle as a tool in multiple sclerosis patient education in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Lang, Cecilia; Flensner, Gullvi

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patient education plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases that can cause disability and predictable psychosocial problems. Quality of life assessment in multiple sclerosis (MS) has confirmed that psychosocial complications related to working life, marriage/partnership, and the family often occur. Furthermore, symptoms such as fatigue, pain, and sexual dysfunction have a great impact. We wanted to develop and implement study circles to promote the patients’ abilities to meet such common problems and to provide a network where they can be autonomous and develop appropriate strategies in self-care and existential problems. Methods Together with the MS patient organization and a study association, we have arranged study circles for patients with MS, thus providing structured information according to a pedagogic model. The patients are encouraged to work together in groups to learn about the disease and its key symptoms, to develop strategies to master these symptoms in everyday life, and to make necessary changes, ie, self-care management. The programme also contains handicap policies. Results Fifteen study circles with a total of 105 patients started during the first year. Fifteen circle leaders were approved. A focus interview showed that the patients are highly satisfied but also revealed some problems in interactions with health care professionals. The study circles were included in a wider project from a newly started multidisciplinary centre for health education for a variety of chronic diseases causing disability, which aims at becoming a regional interface between the health care system, patient organizations, and educational services. Conclusion The study circles have an important role to play in the management of MS. Good organization is required to make such a project work since health care services do not normally work so closely with patient organizations and educational services. Practice implications Study circles that are permanently established and function well are of great help for the patients and the work at the MS clinic is substantially facilitated. Health care professionals also gain from the arrangement by learning more about the self-perceived impact of the disease. PMID:19920967

  13. Effect of Hurricane Katrina on the mortality of dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kutner, Nancy G; Muntner, Paul; Huang, Yijian; Zhang, Rebecca; Cohen, Andrew J; Anderson, Amanda H; Eggers, Paul W

    2009-10-01

    To investigate whether Hurricane Katrina's landfall in August 2005 resulted in excess mortality, we conducted a cohort study of patients who started dialysis between January 2003 and late August 2005 and who received treatment at 94 Katrina-affected clinics in the area. Survival, regardless of patient location after the storm, was followed through February 2006. In adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, Hurricane Katrina (time-varying indicator) was not significantly associated with mortality risk for patients from regions of the Gulf Coast affected by Katrina or those from a subset of 40 New Orleans clinics. Subgroup analyses indicated no significant increased mortality risk by race, income status, or dialysis modality. Sensitivity analyses indicated no significant increased mortality risk for patients from clinics closed for 10 days or longer, patients in their first 90 days of dialysis, or patients not evacuated from the affected areas. Patients remaining in the New Orleans area may have been more vulnerable due to age and comorbidities; however, the change in their mortality risk in the month following the storm was not statistically significant. We suggest that disaster-related education for patients must be ongoing, and that each disaster may present a different set of circumstances and challenges that will require unanticipated response efforts. PMID:19657326

  14. Effects of music on Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Lord, T R; Garner, J E

    1993-04-01

    From a large nursing care facility, 60 elderly patients diagnosed as having Alzheimer disease were randomly separated into three groups of equal size and given tests to measure their mood and mental state. For music Group 1, "Big Band" music from the 1920s and 1930s was played during their daily recreation period while Group 2 were given puzzle exercises during their activity sessions. Members of Group 3 participated in the standard recreational activities of drawing and painting. After six months, the questionnaire was again given to all participants. Analysis of variance showed the individuals in Group 1 were more alert, happier, and had higher recall of past personal history than patients in the other two groups. This suggests that music can be of therapeutic value to Alzheimer patients. PMID:8483655

  15. Neighbourhood effects on educational attainment of adolescents, buffered by personality and educational commitment.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Jaap; Hooimeijer, Pieter; Meeus, Wim

    2015-03-01

    Research has repeatedly shown that neighbourhood disadvantage negatively influences individual educational outcomes. However, the great variation in outcomes indicates substantial unobserved heterogeneity. Looking at the rates of obtaining a basic educational qualification, the hypothesis is that individual traits of adolescents can buffer neighbourhood effects. First, adolescents with a more resilient personality may be better able to cope with neighbourhood adversity. And second, educational commitments might buffer adolescents from negative neighbourhood influences. These hypotheses are tested employing survival analysis, using six wave panel data, containing information on ten years of adolescents' lives. The results show that resilients experience no negative influence of neighbourhood disadvantage, while both undercontrollers and overcontrollers do. And, the stronger adolescents' educational commitments, the less they experience the negative effect of neighbourhood adversity. In sum, neighbourhood effects are found, but not for everybody. PMID:25592923

  16. The Effects of Varicocelectomy on the Patients With Premature Ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Asadpour, Amir Abbas; Aslezare, Mohammad; Nazari Adkani, Lina; Armin, Mohsen; Vojdani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Premature ejaculation is one of the most problems in clinical practice. The association between varicocele and premature ejaculation was poorly understood. The effects of varicocelectomy on premature ejaculation in varicocele patient was studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the impacts of varicocelectomy on patients with both premature ejaculation and varicoceles. Patients and Methods: This was a clinical trial study, conducted on 124 patients (20-35 years old), with varicoceles and premature ejaculation (PE), since March 2011 to April 2013. Inguinal and sub inguinal varicocelectomy were performed for them. All patients had both impairment of spermiogram and PE. These patients were followed up for about 2 years and evaluated for PE, in addition to parameters of spermiogram, before and after the surgery. Results: A total number of 124 patients with varicoceles and PE were enrolled into the study. Following the surgery 46 patients (37%) were fully treated (P < 0.001), 78 patients (63%) had improvements in PE symptoms changed to early ejaculation (P < 0.05) and 89 patients (72%) had improved parameters of spermiogram (P < 0.002). Conclusions: In a significant number of patients who had clinical varicocele and not well responded to medical treatments for PE, varicocelectomy could effectively improve PE and spermiogram parameters. PMID:25032134

  17. The Other Mozart Effect: An Open Letter to Music Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on five observations of children and adults involved in music activities and discusses three issues related to experimental research. Argues against the Mozart Effect, stating that the effects of music instruction seen within the classroom everyday are more significant. Discusses the results of Mozart Effect studies and educational

  18. Responding to a Significant Recruitment Challenge within Three Nationwide Psycho-Educational Trials for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Annette L.; Morra, Marion E.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Slevin-Perocchia, Rosemarie; Raich, Peter C.; Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang-Yi; Tran, Zung Vu; Mohamed, Nihal E.; George, Roshini; Bright, Mary Anne; Marcus, Alfred C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose When faced with a significant recruitment challenge for three nationwide psycho-educational trials targeting prostate and breast cancer patients, the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium initiated outreach efforts to increase accrual. Recruitment is reported by major outreach strategy to inform the use of similar campaigns, either as primary recruitment efforts or to supplement “in-reach” recruitment within oncology settings. Methods During a 33-month period, recruitment was tracked from the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Information Service (CIS), the American Cancer Society (ACS), Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation’s Love/Avon Army of Women (AOW), Internet advertising, press releases, radio/television interviews, recruitment materials in community venues, and outreach to churches and cancer support organizations. Results Across projects, the majority (89%) of recruited participants (N = 2,134) was obtained from the CIS (n = 901, 19 months of recruitment), AOW (n = 869, 18 months), and ACS (n = 123, 12 months). Other efforts showed minimal gain in recruitment. Conclusions Cancer information programs (e.g., CIS, ACS) and registries of individuals willing to participate in cancer-related research (e.g., AOW) can represent exceptional resources for outreach recruitment of cancer patients, especially when the eligibility criteria are highly restrictive. However, these resources do not yield samples representative of the larger population of adults diagnosed with cancer, and conclusions from such trials must be tempered accordingly. Implications for cancer survivors Inadequate recruitment to randomized controlled trials limits the creation of useful interventions for cancer survivors. By enrolling in cancer registries and taking part in research, cancer survivors can contribute to the development of effective resources for the survivor population. PMID:23595235

  19. Effect of a Sport Education Program on Motivation for Physical Education and Leisure-Time Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Garn, Alex C.; Vidoni, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a high school sport education curriculum program on students' motivation for physical education and leisure-time physical activity. Method: Participants were 568 high school students enrolled in the required physical education programs at 2 schools, 1 taught using sport education

  20. Patient safety education - a description and evaluation of an international, interdisciplinary e-learning programme.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alison M; Ellis, Gemma; Norman, Sharon; Luke, Karl

    2014-02-01

    Patient safety is a priority within healthcare across the globe. Delivering safer healthcare demands a system wide approach and educators have a responsibility to play a full role. This article describes how e-learning can be a means of engaging and educating an international group of critical care professionals studying at Masters level. Using online tools such as blogs, wikis and discussion boards students are introduced to quality and safety subjects and tools to help them improve care at a local level. Working together as a collaborative of different professionals has engaged the student group helping them understand their role in reducing harm and has resulted in improvements to care. PMID:23597656

  1. Simplicity, flexibility, and respect: preferences related to patient education in hardly reached people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Torenholt, Rikke; Varming, Annemarie; Engelund, Gitte; Vestergaard, Susanne; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Pals, Regitze Anne Saurbrey; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with lower income and less education are two to four times more likely to develop diabetes than more advantaged individuals. In response to this, there is a need for developing health promotion activities targeting hardly reached populations. The aim of this study was to examine the perspectives of hardly reached people with type 2 diabetes on patient education, focusing on their wishes and needs regarding format and approach. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with nine individuals with type 2 diabetes with little or no education and characterized as hardly reached patients by health professionals. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed according to systematic text condensation. We identified four main categories of preferences for patient education: 1) flexibility related to start time, duration, and intensity; 2) simple and concrete education tools, with regard to design and extent; 3) being together, related to meeting people in a similar situation; and 4) respectful educators, related to constructive patient–educator relationships. Insights into the preferences of hardly reached people with diabetes can contribute to the development of appropriately tailored patient education for this patient group. PMID:26604711

  2. The Effects of Technology on Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, LaVada A.

    2011-01-01

    A long-standing question in educational research and policy discussion turns on whether technology-based instruction can improve academic performance. Finding a convincing answer to this question is important because school systems across the country have invested and continue to invest very large sums on new instructional hardware and software.…

  3. Effects of Weight on Children's Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Robert; Grossman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the association between weight and children's educational achievement, as measured by scores on Peabody Individual Achievement Tests in math and reading, and grade attainment. Data for the study came from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), which contains a large, national sample of…

  4. Gender Effects in Children's Development and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper attempts to clarify several lines of research on gender in development and education, inter-relating findings from studies on intuitive/informal knowledge with those from research on achievements and attitudes in science. It acknowledges the declining proportions of male teachers world-wide and examination successes which indicate a…

  5. Effectiveness of Educational Programs on Nutritional Behavior in Addicts Referring to Baharan Hospital, Zahedan (Eastern of IR Iran)

    PubMed Central

    Karajibani, Mansour; Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Dashipour, Alireza; Lashkaripour, Kobra; Abery, Maryam; Salari, Sajedeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are many factors which affect nutritional status of addicted such as lack o f knowledge, incorrect attitude toward modification of food pattern, and careless to food intake. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational program on nutritional behavior in addicts referring to Baharan hospital in Zahedan. Patients and Methods: Thirty-six addict patients were selected randomly. After recording general demographic data of patients, nutritional behaviors were determined. To determine the effectiveness of nutritional educational program, pre and post-tests were performed. Evaluation of nutritional behavior was determined as poor, fair and satisfactory levels. Statically analysis was performed by SPSS software. Results: Most addict patients had a medium level of education. Improvement in knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of patients after intervention was observed as follows; decreasing KAP in poor level (2.8% vs. 30.6%), (3% vs. 50%), (25% vs. 80.6%), respectively; also, increasing KAP in fair level (7% vs. 55.6 %), (15% vs. 15%), (19% vs. 7%), respectively and increasing KAP in satisfactory levels (77.8% vs. 13.8%), (50% vs. 8.3%), and (22.2% vs. 0%), respectively (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference regarding the grade of KAP in patients based on gender, marital status, and education level after education (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study showed that nutritional KAP was improved in addicts. After intervention, there was a significant difference in the score of knowledge, attitude, and practice scores in patients in the current study. KAP was improved in patients after intervention including; decreased KAP in poor level and increased KAP in fair and satisfactory levels. This finding indicates that addict patients would like to modify their life style. PMID:25032162

  6. The effects of epilepsy on child education in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Ali, Desta B; Tomek, Michal; Lisk, Durodami R

    2014-08-01

    Epilepsy is associated with a significant burden of false beliefs and social stigma in the setting of Sub-Saharan Africa. To assess the impacts of epilepsy on child education in Sierra Leone (SL), we carried out a cross-sectional descriptive study examining its effects on school attendance, participation in physical activities, and social acceptance among classmates. We also assessed the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes regarding epilepsy of both the children's caregivers and teachers. The data were collected at various epilepsy clinics and schools in Freetown, SL. A total of 50 patients were interviewed and questionnaires administered to their caregivers and teachers, making a total of 150 respondents. Fifty-one percent of the children were absent from school for >5 days per month. Ninety percent did not participate in games and sports, with the commonest reason being fear of occurrence of seizures. Thirty-six percent claimed having experienced negative attitude from their classmates. Regarding the caregivers, 48% believed that epilepsy was a medical illness, while 34% considered it a demonic manifestation. Forty-eight percent were apprehensive about sending their children to school, with 83% of these caregivers stating fear of seizures and potential injuries. Only 8% of the caregivers did not prevent their children from taking part in any physical activity at school. Regarding the teachers, 16% believed that epilepsy was a demonic manifestation, and 10% thought that it was contagious. Fourteen percent did not think that children with epilepsy should go to school, and 80% would prevent children with epilepsy from participating in games and sports. When faced with a child having a seizure, 48% would hold the child down, 12% would place a hard object in the child's mouth, and 12% would avoid any physical contact. In total, 20% of the children ceased attending school permanently; daily occurrence of seizures (p<0.05), negative attitude of classmates (p<0.001), and having an illiterate caregiver (p<0.02) all showed a significant association with permanent cessation of schooling. The study demonstrates significant negative impacts of epilepsy on child education. Notably, the reasons for permanent exclusion from school appear to be as much related to attitudes as to the medical aspects of the disease itself. The data thus highlight the need for educational programs to address the widely prevalent misconceptions among both caregivers and teachers. PMID:25108115

  7. Designing Effective K-12 Educational Initiatives for Grant Proposals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Marion

    2009-11-01

    The National Science Foundation requires that grantees make an effort to extend the reach of academic research to communities beyond the laboratory and address the work's possible ``Broader Impacts'' to society. NSF CAREER awards and many of the NSF Research Center grant solicitations are even more explicit, requiring that grantees craft educational initiatives that are based in best practices, bring the academic research to the broader community, and positively impact the pipeline of students pursuing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. For new faculty, and even veteran faculty, these requirements for creative educational initiatives that significantly affect a community outside the confines of the laboratory can be very daunting. This presentation addresses how to design an effective educational plan that incorporates K-12 educational outreach, that will have a real impact on the target audience, and that can realistically be accomplished by a science faculty member.

  8. Effective pain management of older adult hospice patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Scott A

    2013-05-01

    Pain is subjective and a unique and individual experience. For those involved in the care of hospice patients, pain management can be challenging and is not always effectively managed. This case study explores an older adult cancer patient's pain experience at the end of her life with implementation of pain management strategies from hospice. PMID:23652974

  9. Assessment of printed patient-educational materials for chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuot, Delphine S; Davis, Elizabeth; Velasquez, Alexandra; Banerjee, Tanushree; Powe, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Background Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is suboptimal among patients with CKD, perhaps due to poor readability of patient education materials (PEMs). We reviewed the suitability and readability of common PEMs that focused on 5 content areas: basics of CKD, risk factors for CKD development, risk factors for CKD progression, complications of CKD and self-management strategies to improve kidney health. Methods Three reviewers (nephrologist, primary care physician, patient) used the Suitability Assessment of Materials to rate PEMs on message content/stimulation of learning, typography, visuals and layout and determined literacy level. Mean ratings were calculated for each PEM by content area and overall (Superior=70–100; Adequate=40–69; Inadequate=<40). Linear regression was used to determine the impact of literacy level on mean rating. Results We reviewed 69 PEMs from 19 organizations, divided into 113 content area sections. Most (79%) PEM sections were “Adequate” (mean rating, 58.3%). Inclusion of patient-centered content and opportunities for patient interaction were associated with “Superior” ratings. Mean ratings (SD) were similar across content areas: basics of CKD, 58.9% [9.1]; risk factors for CKD development, 57.0% [12.3]; risk factors for CKD progression, 58.5% [12.0]; CKD complications, 62.3% [15.7] and self-management strategies, 62.2% [12.3]. ? 6th grade literacy level (vs >6th grade) was associated with an 11.7 point higher mean rating. Conclusion Most PEMs for kidney disease were adequate. Outstanding PEMs shared characteristics of patient centeredness, a low literacy level, and patient interaction. Providers should be aware of strengths and limitations of PEMs when educating their patients about CKD. PMID:23970127

  10. A Model for Effective Professional Development of Formal Science Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Jones, A. J. P.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWE) series was developed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) education team in 2010 to provide professional development on lunar science and exploration concepts for grades 6-9 science teachers. Over 300 educators have been trained to date. The LWE model incorporates best practices from pedagogical research of science education, thoughtful integration of scientists and engineer subject matter experts for both content presentations and informal networking with educators, access to NASA-unique facilities, hands-on and data-rich activities aligned with education standards, exposure to the practice of science, tools for addressing common misconceptions, follow-up with participants, and extensive evaluation. Evaluation of the LWE model via pre- and post-assessments, daily workshop surveys, and follow-up surveys at 6-month and 1-year intervals indicate that the LWE are extremely effective in increasing educators' content knowledge, confidence in incorporating content into the classroom, understanding of the practice of science, and ability to address common student misconceptions. In order to address the efficacy of the LWE model for other science content areas, the Dynamic Response of Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars (DREAM2) education team, funded by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, developed and ran a pilot workshop called Dream2Explore at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 2015. Dream2Explore utilized the LWE model, but incorporated content related to the science and exploration of asteroids and the moons of Mars. Evaluation results indicate that the LWE model was effectively used for educator professional development on non-lunar content. We will present more detail on the LWE model, evaluation results from the Dream2Explore pilot workshop, and suggestions for the application of the model with other science content for robust educator professional development.

  11. Effect of education on marital fertility in four Muslim populations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive review of literature using cross national and cross regional studies did not reveal any systematic relationship between edcuation and fertility. This analysis--based on data collected in the mid-70s as part of the World Fertility Survey program in 4 Moslem populations--Bangladesh, Java, Jordan, and Pakistan--shows an inconsistent effect of education on marital fertility. Respondents were currently married and in their 1st marriage. "Level of education" divided women into 3 groups: no education, 1-5 years, and 6+ years. An inverted U-shape relationship between female education and current fertility was noticeable in Bangladesh and Java; an inverse relationship was supported by data from Jordan and Pakistan. Cumulative fertility, after controlling for duration of marriage, was found to be inversely related to 6+ years of education of the women in 3 populations, the exception being Java, where women with 6+ years of education show higher fertility than their counterparts. Analysis of variance showed a significant effect of wife-husband education on number of children ever born in all populations, except Pakistan. Multiple classification analysis did not reveal an appreciable difference in number of children ever born among the wife-husband education groups in Bangladesh, but a significant difference was noticed in Java and Jordan. In Pakistan, the education categories showed similar levels of fertility. The differences in fertility or lack of it by wife-husband level of education in these 4 Moslem populations were, to a large extent, explained by the interplay between the duration of breast feeding and the current use of efficient contraceptive methods. PMID:12267537

  12. Trial of New Education Programs Effectively Utilizing Teaching Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Makoto; Ishida, Koji

    New education programs for undergraduates and/or high school students have been tried in which teaching opportunities are effectively utilized. First, a new style of education, “relay-teaching" from undergraduates to high school students further to elementary school students, was tried in the Science Experiments School. By providing the undergraduates and high school students with opportunities to teach and explain some knowledge to the others, it became possible to allow them to re-recognize and re-construct their own knowledge and improve their presentation-related skills. Thus, this style of teaching was found to be an effective education program. Based on results of the above-mentioned program, a project for undergraduates has been in progress in which they develop science experiment programs to be used in elementary schools. The four programs for elementary schools were already developed and actually demonstrated by the undergraduates in general study classes of some elementary schools, which were successful in attracting interests of children. Moreover, the project was found to be effective in education for the undergraduates in which they can get opportunities to improve their various skills through experiences of teaching and preparation thereof. This paper describes the above two new education programs and analyzes educational effects thereof.

  13. A Study on the Effects of Education Welfare Action Zone Policy in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hae-young

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the effects of the support programs provided in education welfare action zones. Education welfare action zone policy came into effect by government from 2003 to guarantee actual educational opportunity to disadvantaged children in urban areas by providing educational, cultural, and welfare service. Education

  14. Template of patient-specific summaries facilitates education and outcomes in paediatric cardiac surgery units

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Hemant S.; Wolfram, Karen B.; Slayton, Jennifer M.; Saville, Benjamin R.; Cutrer, William B.; Bichell, David P.; Harris, Zena L.; Barr, Frederick E.; Deshpande, Jayant K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Few educational opportunities exist in paediatric cardiac critical care units (PCCUs). We introduced a new educational activity in the PCCU in the form of of patient-specific summaries (TPSS). Our objective was to study the role of TPSS in the provision of a positive learning experience to the multidisciplinary clinical team of PCCUs and in improving patient-related clinical outcomes in the PCCU. METHODS Prospective educational intervention with simultaneous clinical assessment was undertaken in PCCU in an academic children's hospital. TPSS was developed utilizing the case presentation format for upcoming week's surgical cases and delivered once every week to each PCCU clinical team member. Role of TPSS to provide clinical education was assessed using five-point Likert-style scale responses in an anonymous survey 1 year after TPSS provision. Paediatric cardiac surgery patients admitted to the PCCU were evaluated for postoperative outcomes for TPSS provision period of 1 year and compared with a preintervention period of 1 year. RESULTS TPSS was delivered to 259 clinical team members including faculty, fellows, residents, nurse practitioners, nurses, respiratory therapists and others from the Divisions of Anesthesia, Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Critical Care, and Pediatrics working in the PCCU. Two hundred and twenty-four (86%) members responded to the survey and assessed the role of TPSS in providing clinical education to be excellent based on mean Likert-style scores of 4.32 ± 0.71 in survey responses. Seven hundred patients were studied for the two time periods and there were no differences in patient demographics, complexity of cardiac defect and surgical details. The length of mechanical ventilation for the TPSS period (57.08 ± 141.44 h) was significantly less when compared with preintervention period (117.39 ± 433.81 h) (P < 0.001) with no differences in length of PCICU stay, hospital stay and mortality for the two time periods. CONCLUSIONS Provision of TPSS in a paediatric cardiac surgery unit is perceived to be beneficial in providing clinical education to multidisciplinary clinical teams and may be associated with improved clinical outcome. PMID:23832839

  15. Foot massage: effectiveness on postoperative pain in breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ucuzal, Meral; Kanan, Nevin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of foot massage on pain after breast surgery, and provide guidance for nurses in nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief. This was a quasiexperimental study with a total of 70 patients who had undergone breast surgery (35 in the experimental group and 35 in the control group). Patients in the control group received only analgesic treatment, whereas those in the experimental group received foot massage in addition to analgesic treatment. Patients received the first dose of analgesics during surgery. As soon as patients came from the operating room, they were evaluated for pain severity. Patients whose pain severity scored ?4 according to the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were accepted into the study. In the experimental group, pain and vital signs (arterial blood pressure, pulse, and respiration) were evaluated before foot massage at the time patients complained about pain (time 0) and then 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after foot massage. In the control group, pain and vital signs were also evaluated when the patients complained about pain (time 0) and again at 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, in sync with the times when foot massage was completed in the experimental group. A patient information form was used to collect descriptive characteristics data of the patients, and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to determine pain severity. Data were analyzed for frequencies, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, Student t, Pillai trace, and Bonferroni test. The results of the statistical analyses showed that patients in the experimental group experienced significantly less pain (p ? .001). Especially notable, patients in the experimental group showed a decrease in all vital signs 5 minutes after foot massage, but patients in the control group showed increases in vital signs except for heart rate at 5 minutes. The data obtained showed that foot massage in breast surgery patients was effective in postoperative pain management. PMID:24882025

  16. Effects of Federal Aid to Higher Education on Social and Educational Inequality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Murray

    This report examines the effects of federal aid to higher education on (1) class inequality, (2) racial inequality, (3) inequality of opportunity, (4) social mobility, and (5) the distribution of degrees. Chapter 1 defines the terms used and presents a preliminary sketch of the argument. Chapter 2 focuses on the effects of socioeconomic background…

  17. Building Effective Scientist-Educator Communities of Practice: NASA's Science Education and Public Outreach Forums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerin, T. G.; Peticolas, L. M.; Shipp, S. S.; Smith, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1993, NASA has embedded education and public outreach (EPO) in its Earth and space science missions and research programs on the principle that science education is most effective when educators and scientists work hand-in-hand. Four Science EPO Forums organize the respective NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics, Earth Science, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science EPO programs into a coordinated, efficient, and effective nationwide effort. The result is significant, evaluated EPO impacts that support NASA's policy of providing a direct return-on-investment for the American public, advance STEM education and literacy, and enable students and educators to participate in the practices of science and engineering as embodied in the 2013 Next Generation Science Standards. This presentation by the leads of the four NASA SMD Science EPO Forums provides big-picture perspectives on NASA's effort to incorporate authentic science into the nation's STEM education and scientific literacy, highlighting tools that were developed to foster a collaborative community and examples of program effectiveness and impact. The Forums are led by: Astrophysics - Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI); Earth Science - Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES); Heliophysics - University of California, Berkeley; and Planetary Science - Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI).

  18. Usability of a Patient Education and Motivation Tool Using Heuristic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mohit; Dai, Liwei; Price, Kathleen; Vizer, Lisa; Sears, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background Computer-mediated educational applications can provide a self-paced, interactive environment to deliver educational content to individuals about their health condition. These programs have been used to deliver health-related information about a variety of topics, including breast cancer screening, asthma management, and injury prevention. We have designed the Patient Education and Motivation Tool (PEMT), an interactive computer-based educational program based on behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic learning theories. The tool is designed to educate users and has three key components: screening, learning, and evaluation. Objective The objective of this tutorial is to illustrate a heuristic evaluation using a computer-based patient education program (PEMT) as a case study. The aims were to improve the usability of PEMT through heuristic evaluation of the interface; to report the results of these usability evaluations; to make changes based on the findings of the usability experts; and to describe the benefits and limitations of applying usability evaluations to PEMT. Methods PEMT was evaluated by three usability experts using Nielsen’s usability heuristics while reviewing the interface to produce a list of heuristic violations with severity ratings. The violations were sorted by heuristic and ordered from most to least severe within each heuristic. Results A total of 127 violations were identified with a median severity of 3 (range 0 to 4 with 0 = no problem to 4 = catastrophic problem). Results showed 13 violations for visibility (median severity = 2), 38 violations for match between system and real world (median severity = 2), 6 violations for user control and freedom (median severity = 3), 34 violations for consistency and standards (median severity = 2), 11 violations for error severity (median severity = 3), 1 violation for recognition and control (median severity = 3), 7 violations for flexibility and efficiency (median severity = 2), 9 violations for aesthetic and minimalist design (median severity = 2), 4 violations for help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors (median severity = 3), and 4 violations for help and documentation (median severity = 4). Conclusion We describe the heuristic evaluation method employed to assess the usability of PEMT, a method which uncovers heuristic violations in the interface design in a quick and efficient manner. Bringing together usability experts and health professionals to evaluate a computer-mediated patient education program can help to identify problems in a timely manner. This makes this method particularly well suited to the iterative design process when developing other computer-mediated health education programs. Heuristic evaluations provided a means to assess the user interface of PEMT. PMID:19897458

  19. Comparison of neurological healthcare oriented educational resources for patients on the internet.

    PubMed

    Punia, Vineet; Dagar, Anjali; Agarwal, Nitin; He, Wenzhuan; Hillen, Machteld

    2014-12-01

    The internet has become a major contributor to health literacy promotion. The average American reads at 7th-8th grade level and it is recommended to write patient education materials at or below 6th grade reading level. We tried to assess the level of literacy required to read and understand online patient education materials (OPEM) for neurological diseases from various internet resources. We then compared those to an assumed reference OPEM source, namely the patient education brochures from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world's largest professional association of neurologists. Disease specific patient education brochures were downloaded from the AAN website. OPEM for these diseases were also accessed from other common online sources determined using a predefined criterion. All OPEM were converted to Microsoft Word (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, USA) and their reading level was analyzed using Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1 (Oleander Software, Vandalia, OH, USA). Descriptive analysis and analysis of variance were used to compare reading levels of OPEM from different resources. Medline Plus, Mayo clinic and Wikipedia qualified for OPEM analysis. All OPEM from these resources, including the AAN, were written above the recommended 6th grade reading level. They were also found to be "fairly difficult", "difficult" or "confusing" on the Flesch Reading Ease scale. AAN OPEM on average needed lower reading level, with Wikipedia OPEM being significantly (p<0.01) more difficult to read compared to the other three resources. OPEM on neurological diseases are being written at a level of reading complexity higher than the average American and the recommended reading levels. This may be undermining the utility of these resources. PMID:25194822

  20. Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patient’s adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patient’s psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psychological domains such as cognition, self-regulation, self-efficacy and behavior. Some descriptions are also provided on willpower, resilience, illness perception and proactive coping in relating execution of new behaviors, coping with future-oriented thinking and influences of illness perception on health-related behaviors. These psychological aspects are further discussed in relation to DM and interventions for patients with DM. Equipped with the understanding of the pertinent nature of psychology in patients with DM; and knowing the links between the psychological disorders, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes would hopefully encourages healthcare professionals in giving due attention to the psychological needs of patients with DM. PMID:25512782

  1. Grid Patient Appointment Template Design to Improve Scheduling Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li; Marcak, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Current outpatient delivery systems have been problematic in their ability to effectively schedule appointments and grant patients access to care. A better appointment system has demonstrated improvement on these issues. The objective of this study is to develop a grid appointment system to further improve the scheduling flexibility by determining the minimum length of appointment slots that optimizes the total costs of patient waiting, physician idling, and overtime. This minimum length is used for the patient type requiring the least amount of treatment time such as return visit (RV), and multiplications of the minimum length are for patient types with longer treatment such as new patients (NP). The results indicated that the proposed grid system adjusts to demand changes at least 15% more cost-effective when grouping two RVs into an NP or dividing an NP into two RVs compared to the base-line scheduling approaches that build around the mean treatment time. PMID:26288889

  2. Effects of an Educational Program for Parents of Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Grace J.

    Examined were the effects of an educational program for 61 mothers of elementary school aged retarded children. The Sheltering Arms Parent Interview Schedule was used to elicit responses about the specific program and its recalled influences on the mothers' personal lives; the program's effectiveness in easing family problems; and the degree to…

  3. The Effect of Education Law on the Public School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Joel; And Others

    The symposium report focuses on effects of state curriculum mandates on the social studies curriculum. Part of a larger study designed to examine the effect of state law on the introduction and implementation of law-related education, the report is presented in two sections. Section I analyzes social studies mandates in the 50 states. Five…

  4. Educational Effectiveness, Target, and Content for Prudent Antibiotic Use

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Kang, Lin-Woo; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Widespread antimicrobial use and concomitant resistance have led to a significant threat to public health. Because inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics based on insufficient knowledge are one of the major drivers of antibiotic resistance, education about prudent antibiotic use aimed at both the prescribers and the public is important. This review investigates recent studies on the effect of interventions for promoting prudent antibiotics prescribing. Up to now, most educational efforts have been targeted to medical professionals, and many studies showed that these educational efforts are significantly effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing. Recently, the development of educational programs to reduce antibiotic use is expanding into other groups, such as the adult public and children. The investigation of the contents of educational programs for prescribers and the public demonstrates that it is important to develop effective educational programs suitable for each group. In particular, it seems now to be crucial to develop appropriate curricula for teaching medical and nonmedical (pharmacy, dentistry, nursing, veterinary medicine, and midwifery) undergraduate students about general medicine, microbial virulence, mechanism of antibiotic resistance, and judicious antibiotic prescribing. PMID:25945327

  5. Effects of disinfectants in renal dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, E.

    1986-11-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis therapy risk exposure to both disinfectants and sterilants. Dialysis equipment is disinfected periodically with strong solutions of hypochlorite or formaldehyde. Gross hemolysis resulting from accidental hypochlorite infusion has led to cardiac arrest, probably as a result of hyperkalemia. Formaldehyde is commonly used in 4% solutions to sterilize the fluid paths of dialysis controllers and to sterilize dialyzers before reuse. It can react with red cell antigenic surfaces leading to the formation of anti-N antibodies. The major exposure risk is the low concentration of disinfectant found in municipal water used to prepare 450 L dialysate weekly. With thrice-weekly treatment schedules, the quality requirements for water used to make this solution must be met rigorously. Standards for water used in the preparation of dialysate have recently been proposed but not all patients are treated with dialysate meeting such standards. The introduction of sterilants via tap water is insidious and has let to more pervasive consequences. Both chlorine and chloramines, at concentrations found in potable water, are strong oxidants that cause extensive protein denaturation and hemolysis. Oxidation of the Fe/sup 2 +/ in hemoglobin to Fe/sup 3 +/ forms methemoglobin, which is incapable of carrying either O/sub 2/ or CO/sub 2/. Chloramine can form not only methemoglobin, but can also denature proteins within the red cell, thus forming aggregates (Heinz bodies). Chloramines also inhibit hexose monophosphate shunt activity, a mechanism that makes the red cell even more susceptible to oxidant damage.

  6. Effect of Sertraline on Uremic Pruritus Improvement in ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Mansor; Sanadgol, Hoshang; Azmoude, Hamid Reza; Mashhadi, Mohamad Ali; Sharifi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although uremic pruritus is a common and upsetting problem of chronic kidney disease, there is no approved treatment for it. This study was undertaken to find the efficiency of sertraline as a possible treatment for uremic pruritus. Methods. 19 ESRD patients under hemodialysis with severe chronic pruritus were randomly selected to participate in this before-after clinical trial. Before and after starting treatment with sertraline, a detailed pruritus history was obtained and pruritus graded by the 30-item inventory of pruritus that patients based on priorities grade allocated to 3 classes. Subjects were treated with sertraline 50?mg oral daily for four months, with monthly assessments of pruritus symptoms. Results. Before treatment with sertraline, the grade of pruritus in 9 (47.4%) patients was moderate and severe in 10 (52.6%) patients. After treatment, grade of pruritus in 11 (57.8%) patients was weak, 6 (31.5%) have moderate and only 2 (10.7%) patients have severe pruritus. Of 10 patients with severe pruritus, 5 (50%) patients experiencing weak pruritus, and 4 (40%) patients have moderate pruritus after treatment. Based on Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the difference between the grade of pruritus before and after treatment with sertraline was significant (P = 0.001). Conclusions. Although no definitive recommendation can be made regarding treatment of uremic pruritus, we found an increased antipruritic effect of sertraline in ESRD patients. PMID:22973512

  7. Reasons for delays in diagnosis of anal cancer and the effect on patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sharon; Joseph, Kurian; Ghosh, Sunita; Cornand, Rose-Marie; Schiller, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To quantify the time to diagnosis of anal cancer after onset of symptoms, to identify reasons for delays in diagnosis, and to identify the effect of delays on patient satisfaction. Design Retrospective questionnaire. Setting Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton, Alta. Participants Patients newly diagnosed with anal cancer on their first visit to the centre. Main outcome measures Timeline from first symptoms to first access to medical care and to diagnosis, and patient satisfaction. Results Twenty-six patients completed the survey. Although most sought medical attention promptly, 19% waited for more than 6 months. At first visits after symptom onset, a rectal examination was performed in only 54% of patients, a diagnosis of hemorrhoids was given in 27% of patients, and further investigations were ordered in only 54% of patients. If a misdiagnosis of hemorrhoids was made, substantially more visits were required to diagnose the cancer. An average of 3.2 months after the first visit to a physician and 7.4 months after onset of symptoms was needed to obtain a diagnosis. Overall, 28% of patients believed there were no diagnostic delays and 40% of patients thought they were responsible for the delay. Overall, 72% of patients were satisfied with the care they received. Patients who were dissatisfied perceived the delay in diagnosis to be because no action was taken by a physician or the wait was too long for tests or referrals. Conclusion To reduce delays in diagnosis, it might be important to educate relevant populations about symptoms of anal cancer. In addition, primary care physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion of anal cancer in high-risk populations. Finally, there must be a system-wide increase in access to further investigations through gastroenterologists and general surgeons.

  8. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Design Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. Setting 31 English NHS trusts. Participants 12?506 patients 16?years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction. Results The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Conclusions Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. PMID:26634400

  9. Effect Sizes in Gifted Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Peters, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent calls for reporting and interpreting effect sizes have been numerous, with the 5th edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (2001) calling for the inclusion of effect sizes to interpret quantitative findings. Many top journals have required that effect sizes accompany claims of statistical significance.…

  10. The Effects of TV on Speech Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gocen, Gokcen; Okur, Alpaslan

    2013-01-01

    Generally, the speaking aspect is not properly debated when discussing the positive and negative effects of television (TV), especially on children. So, to highlight this point, this study was first initialized by asking the question: "What are the effects of TV on speech?" and secondly, to transform the effects that TV has on speech in a…

  11. HC: 810 (6/12) Patient Rights & Responsibilities Health Education University of California, Santa Cruz Student Health Services

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    HC: 810 (6/12) Patient Rights & Responsibilities Health Education University of California, Santa to your race, religion, age, sex, beliefs or lifestyle. Know the names and positions of the staff members

  12. Evaluation of patient education materials: the example of circulating cell free DNA testing for aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Kloza, Edward M; Haddow, Paula K; Halliday, Jacquelyn V; O'Brien, Barbara M; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn M; Palomaki, Glenn E

    2015-04-01

    Informed consent is the process by which the treating health care provider discloses appropriate information to a competent patient so that the patient may make a voluntary choice to accept or refuse treatment. When the analysis of circulating cell free DNA (ccfDNA) became commercially available in 2011 through the Prenatal Diagnostic Laboratory at Women & Infants Hospital of Providence, Rhode Island to "high-risk" women, it provided an opportunity to examine how commercial laboratories informed potential consumers. We identified, via an internet search, four laboratories offering such testing in the United States and one in Europe. We evaluated patient educational materials (PEMs) from each using the Flesch Reading Ease method and a modified version of the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) criteria. Pamphlets were also reviewed for their inclusion of content recommendations from the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis, the National Society of Genetic Counselors, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists jointly with the Society of Maternal Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Genetics and Genomics. Reading levels were typically high (10th-12th grade). None of the pamphlets met all SAM criteria evaluated nor did any pamphlet include all recommended content items. To comply with readability and content recommendations more closely, Women & Infants Hospital created a new pamphlet to which it applied the same criteria, and also subjected it to focus group assessment. These types of analyses can serve as a model for future evaluations of similar patient educational materials. PMID:25204423

  13. Compliance and Effective Management of the Hand-Foot Syndrome in Colon Cancer Patients Receiving Capecitabine as Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Won-Suk; Yun, Seong Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Physicians and oncology nurses must continue to update their knowledge on treatment and treatment-related side effects, while searching for effective methods to prevent or manage side effects. The objective of our study was to describe the incidence and response to treatment of the hand-foot syndrome (HFS) and the compliance with treatment of patients with stage IIB, IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC colon cancer that were treated with capecitabine alone as adjuvant therapy. Materials and Methods Between September 2005 and September 2006, 84 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Results The treatment compliance rate was 90.5% (76 out of the 84 patients). The HFS developed in 65 patients (77.4%). Thirty-three patients (50.7%) had grade 1 HFS, 22 patients (33.8%) had grade 2 HFS and 10 patients (15.5%) had grade 3 HFS, as their most severe episode. For Grade 1 patients, the dose was maintained, and skin barrier cream and moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO) were applied. For Grade 2 patients, either the dose was maintained or 25% of the dose was reduced; MEBO and supportive care were provided. For Grade 3 patients, one cycle of chemotherapy was interrupted followed by dose adjustment; MEBO and supportive care were provided. Conclusion HFS is manageable if both patients and oncology care teams are educated about HFS associated with capecitabine. The HFS is treated by patient education, preventive management, ointment application, conservative management, dose reduction, and interruption of chemotherapy administration. PMID:20046420

  14. Implementation of a patient-centered approach to clinical dental education: a five-year reflection.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang E; Howell, T Howard

    2015-05-01

    The intent of the redesign of the clinical component of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) curriculum from a traditional numerical procedures-based system to a patient-based comprehensive care system was to improve both patient care and student learning. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the outcomes of and students' perspectives on this patient-centered comprehensive care model introduced in 2009. Data were obtained from the school's Office of Dental Education for a study sample consisting of 205 fourth-year dental students in the graduating classes of 2009 through 2014 at HSDM. The results showed that students were completing more than the required number of comprehensive patient cases on average. A survey given to the Class of 2014 found that the respondents (35 of 36 students) were generally satisfied with the new curriculum and the clinical experience in relation to continuation of care and perceptions of comprehensive care. The results of this study suggest that the redesigned patient-centered assessment model of the clinical component of the curriculum helped improve patient care and student learning. PMID:25941145

  15. Objectives, methods and content of patient education programmes for adults with asthma: systematic review of studies published between 1979 and 1998

    PubMed Central

    Sudre, P.; Jacquemet, S.; Uldry, C.; Perneger, T.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Education programmes for adults with asthma vary widely. Such variability suggests a lack of consensus on what works and what does not. The objectives of this paper are to describe asthma education programmes and assess their variability.?METHODS—A systematic review of reports published between 1979 and 1998 was conducted. Medline, the CINAHL database, the PsycINFO database, the Cochrane collaboration database, the Dissertation Index database, and cross referencing were used to identify educational interventions; 77 projects including 94 interventions that involved 7953 patients were analysed. A standard form was used to record characteristics of studies (design, setting, size, year, and country of publication), projects (theoretical framework, objectives), and education (methods, duration, intensity, educator, and content).?RESULTS—Most reports did not specify the general (56%) and educational objectives (60%) of the intervention. Important training characteristics were often not available: duration of education (45%) and number of sessions (22%), who delivered education (15%), whether training was conducted in groups or was individualised (28%). When this information was available there were wide variations in training methods and content: training duration ranged from 0 (self-education) to 58 hours and the number of sessions from 0 to 36; training tools such as peak flow meters, diary cards or books were used in various proportions of interventions (19%, 27%, and 23%, respectively). The content of education also differed widely between programmes.?CONCLUSIONS—Insufficient documentation of asthma education programmes for adults precludes their replication. This, together with excessive variability, reduces the possibility of identifying their most effective components. A more systematic description of asthma training programmes should be promoted.?? PMID:10413719

  16. Points of View: Effective Partnerships Between K12 and Higher Education

    E-print Network

    science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in the United States. However, the waysFeature Points of View: Effective Partnerships Between K­12 and Higher Education Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Science Education Partnerships: Being Realistic About Meeting Expectations Nancy Moreno

  17. Effectiveness of low vision services in improving patient quality of life at Aravind Eye Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Do, Anna T; Ilango, Krishanmurthy; Ramasamy, Dhivya; Kalidasan, Suriya; Balakrishnan, Vijayakumar; Chang, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Context: In India, where the heavy burden of visual impairment exists, low vision services are scarce and under-utilized. Aims: Our study was designed to survey the effectiveness of low vision exams and visual aids in improving patient quality of life in southern rural India. Subjects and Methods: The low vision quality of life (LVQOL) questionnaire measures vision-related quality of life through 25 questions on a Likert scale of 0–5 that pertain to (1) mobility, distance vision, and lighting; (2) psychological adjustment; (3) reading and fine work; and (4) activities of daily living. This tool was translated into Tamil and verbally administered to 55 new low vision referral patients before their first visit at the low vision clinic at Aravind Eye Hospital. Low vision aids (LVAs) were prescribed at the discretion of the low vision specialist. 1-month later, the same questionnaire was administered over the phone. Results: About 44 of 55 low vision patients completed baseline and follow-up LVQOL surveys, and 30 normal vision controls matched for age, gender, and education were also surveyed (average 117.34 points). After the low vision clinic visit, the low vision group demonstrated a 4.55-point improvement in quality of life (from 77.77 to 82.33 points, P = 0.001). Adjusting for age, gender, and education, the low vision patients who also received LVAs (n = 24) experienced an even larger increase than those who did not (n = 20) (8.89 points, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Low vision services and visual aids can improve the quality of life in South Indian rural population regardless of age, gender, and education level. Thus, all low vision patients who meet the criteria should be referred for evaluation. PMID:25579355

  18. Educational Effects of Practical Education Using a Debate Exercise on Engineering Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanokura, Masato; Hayashi, Shigeo

    The educational effects of practical education using a debate exercise are investigated using questionnaires. For the group-work composed of discussion and debate, students understand thoroughly various engineering ethical topics, such as factors preventing ethical decision-making. Students enhance their abilities to make a rational and logical decision by themselves such as a judgment based on correct information. Mutual evaluation by students through group interaction elevates positive educational effects. However, students answer fewer questions related to the understanding of professional duties and cooperate social responsibility because of the group-work using failure cases. Students also show less progress in their abilities to communicate with others and to express their opinions to audiences. A more suitable number of group members solves the latter problem.

  19. The Greenhouse Effect and Built Environment Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenall Gough, Annette; Gough, Noel

    The greenhouse effect has always existed. Without the greenhouse effect, Earth could well have the oven-like environment of Venus or the deep-freeze environment of Mars. There is some debate about how much the Earth's surface temperature will rise given a certain amount of increase in the amount of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous…

  20. Education, Social Capital and the Accordion Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorhaus, John

    2014-01-01

    The "accordion effect" is an effect of language which allows us to describe one and the same thing more or less narrowly. Social capital has been conceived in terms of our access to institutional resources, but also in terms that extend to the levels of trust and related resources found in the social networks we are embedded in. The…

  1. Effects of a health education campaign for the earlier diagnosis of melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, S. M.; Wroughton, M. A.; Elwood, J. M.; Davison, J.; Stewart, M.

    1989-01-01

    As part of a national campaign to combat the rising incidence of and mortality from cutaneous malignant melanoma, a programme of improved clinical services and professional and public education was set up in Nottingham in January to July 1987. The public education campaign in July led to an immediate increase in the weekly number of referrals to the pigmented lesion clinic from 10 to 54. The effect on general practitioner workload was less dramatic, the weekly number of consultations for discrete pigmented lesions rising from 0.5 to 3. In materials sent to GPs, we recommended that patients with three or more of seven specified signs should be referred for specialist opinion. Only 40% of the patients referred to the pigmented lesion clinic fulfilled this criterion, but 6% of these patients had a melanoma, compared to only 0.4% of those who did not meet the criterion. In the 6 months following the campaign, 64% of melanomas diagnosed in Nottingham residents had a Breslow thickness of less than 1.5 mm whereas only four (16%) were greater than 3.5 mm. However, this distribution was not significantly different from that seen in the three and a half years before the campaign. These results suggest that attempts to improve early diagnosis of the disease by health education are justified, but, in view of the service implications, full evaluation of such campaigns by large scale and long-term studies is essential. Future campaigns should give greater stress to referral criteria. PMID:2789953

  2. Brain Metabolism of Less-Educated Patients With Alzheimer Dementia Studied by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu Ching; Yen, Pao Sheng; Wu, Shwu Tzy; Chen, Jung Tai; Hung, Gung Uei; Kao, Chia Hung; Chen, Tai Yee; Ho, Feng Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer dementia (AD) is the commonest form of dementia. Although illiteracy is associated with high prevalence of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), their relationship is still unclear. Nevertheless, mild DAT in illiterate participants seems to be due to brain atrophy. In this study, we compared the impact of brain metabolism efficiency in healthy participants and less-educated patients with mild DAT using 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG-PET) positron emission tomography. Out of 43 eligible less-educated participants with dementia, only 23 (14 women and 9 men) met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-III-R or DSM-IV criteria for DAT and AD and were included. Participants with intracranial insults were excluded by brain magnetic resonance imaging and participants with metabolic or systemic conditions were excluded by blood sampling. In addition, 16 cognitively normal elderly (age >70 years), including 7 women and 9 men, were enrolled in the sham group. The PET imaging data were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) to determine reliability and specificity. Glucose metabolic rate was low in the DAT group, especially in the middle temporal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, angular gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, rectal gyrus, and lingual gyrus. Our results showed that DAT patients with less education not only have prominent clinical signs and symptoms related to dementia but also decreased gray matter metabolism. PMID:26222866

  3. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  4. The effect of anxiety on breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baqutayan, Shadiya Mohamed Saleh

    2012-04-01

    Cancer is a disease wherein abnormal cells divide without control and are able to attack other tissues. Most of the patients and their families face some degree of depression, anxiety, and fear when cancer becomes a part of their lives. They feel helpless and eager to find ways on how to get rid of it. The study focuses on anxiety among breast cancer patients. It aims at investigating cancer, its symptoms, and effects the disease has on the anxiety level of patients. PMID:23162185

  5. The Effectiveness of Educational Podcasts for Teaching Music and Visual Arts in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Cheung On

    2012-01-01

    Podcasting is now being used frequently in the higher education sector. Although research has been conducted into the use of podcasting in teaching business, engineering, sciences and languages, little has been done on its use in arts learning. This paper reports on a study that investigated the effectiveness of using podcasts to learn music and…

  6. Stress Producing Factors and Their Effects on Learning Disabilities Specialists, Regular Educators, and Other Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faas, Larry A.

    The extent to which various factors were stress producing, the effects of stress, and coping methods used by 274 regular and special educators and administrators were examined. Ss completed questionnaires on descriptive variables (such as age, sex, type of assignment and level of academic preparation) and indicated stress of 52 factors. They also…

  7. Cost-Effectiveness and Educational Policy. Yearbook of the American Education Finance Association, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M., Ed.; McEwan, Patrick J., Ed.

    This collection of papers provides decision-makers with tools to improve resource allocation. The two primary tools, or modes, are cost-effective analysis and cost-benefit analysis, which researchers in education have devised and refined. This volume has three main goals, all intended to help decision-makers construct a useful research program:…

  8. Effectiveness of a Satellite Educational Television Program for Ethiopian Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sung-Wan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the actual practice and effectiveness of a satellite educational TV program in Ethiopian secondary schools. Participants in the survey were 228 students and 63 teachers from secondary schools. The results of the data analysis indicate that Ethiopian students and teachers scored highly in the evaluation areas. Levels of…

  9. Ambience in the endoscopy room has little effect on patients.

    PubMed

    Stermer, E; Levy, N; Beny, A; Meisels, R; Tamir, A

    1998-06-01

    With hopes of alleviating discomfort and improving the tolerance of patients undergoing endoscopy, we have assessed the influence of various background conditions in the endoscopy room. Two hundred twenty-one candidates for upper endoscopy were randomly allocated to four groups, each with one of the following conditions in the endoscopy room: background music and conversation related to the patient's complaints (n=50); background music and conversation unrelated to the patient (n=53); background music only, with the staff maintaining silence (n=49); and complete silence (n=47). Before endoscopy patients answered a 26-item questionnaire that included an evaluation of their degree of anxiety before the examination. Conscious sedation was induced by using 3 mg midazolam. After complete recovery from sedation, patients answered another set of questions. Patients in all four groups felt quite comfortable with the atmosphere in which gastroscopy was performed. Neither music, conversation, nor silence had a great effect on patients as far as improving tolerance or diminishing anxiety. Therefore, endoscopists and nurses may have a free hand in choosing the prevailing conditions during the examination. This conclusion may be valid for both patients and the staff involved in other invasive procedures performed under light sedation. PMID:9649005

  10. Effect of extramucin pools in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Si-Hak; Choi, Cheol-Woong; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, Chang-In; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Jeon, Tae-Yong; Kim, Dong-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mucinous gastric adenocarcinoma (MGC) is defined by the World Health Organization as a gastric adenocarcinoma with >50% extracellular mucin pools within the tumors. In this study, we attempted to analyze the clinicopathologic features of patients pathologically diagnosed as gastric cancer with lower than 50% tumor volume of extracellular mucin pool adenocarcinoma (LEMPC). We compared MGC versus nonmucinous gastric adenocarcinoma (NMGC). We were used in abbreviations LEMPC for NMGC including extracellular mucin pool. Methods Files of 995 patients with gastric cancer NMGC (n = 935), MGC (n = 20), LEMPC (n = 40) who underwent curative resection at Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital from December 2008 to December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All pathologic reports after curative resection and evaluated clinicopathologic features were reviewed to identify the effect of extracellular mucin pools in gastric cancer. Results Compared with the NMGC patients, the clinicopathological features of MGC patients were as follows: more frequent open surgery, larger tumor size, more advanced T stage and N stage, more positive lymph node metastasis, and perineural invasion. LEMPC patients showed similar features compared with NMGC patients. MGC and LEMPC patients showed similar clinicopathological features, except T stage and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion LEMPC can be thought of as a previous step of MGC. It is reasonable to consider LEMPC patients in the diagnostic criteria of MGC, and to adequately treat. PMID:26576405

  11. The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients.

    PubMed

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; MacPherson, Sarah E; White, Mark; Woollett, Katherine; Turner, Martha; Robinson, Gail; Spanò, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Age is known to affect prefrontal brain structure and executive functioning in healthy older adults, patients with neurodegenerative conditions and TBI. Yet, no studies appear to have systematically investigated the effect of age on cognitive performance in patients with focal lesions. We investigated the effect of age on the cognitive performance of a large sample of tumour and stroke patients with focal unilateral, frontal (n=68), or non-frontal lesions (n=45) and healthy controls (n=52). We retrospectively reviewed their cross sectional cognitive and imaging data. In our frontal patients, age significantly predicted the magnitude of their impairment on two executive tests (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM and the Stroop test) but not on nominal (Graded Naming Test, GNT) or perceptual (Incomplete Letters) task. In our non-frontal patients, age did not predict the magnitude of their impairment on the RAPM and GNT. Furthermore, the exacerbated executive impairment observed in our frontal patients manifested itself from middle age. We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment. Lesions to specific frontal areas, or an increase in global brain atrophy or white matter abnormalities were not associated with this impairment. Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline. We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully. PMID:26102190

  12. The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients

    PubMed Central

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; MacPherson, Sarah E.; White, Mark; Woollett, Katherine; Turner, Martha; Robinson, Gail; Spanò, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Age is known to affect prefrontal brain structure and executive functioning in healthy older adults, patients with neurodegenerative conditions and TBI. Yet, no studies appear to have systematically investigated the effect of age on cognitive performance in patients with focal lesions. We investigated the effect of age on the cognitive performance of a large sample of tumour and stroke patients with focal unilateral, frontal (n=68), or non-frontal lesions (n=45) and healthy controls (n=52). We retrospectively reviewed their cross sectional cognitive and imaging data. In our frontal patients, age significantly predicted the magnitude of their impairment on two executive tests (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM and the Stroop test) but not on nominal (Graded Naming Test, GNT) or perceptual (Incomplete Letters) task. In our non-frontal patients, age did not predict the magnitude of their impairment on the RAPM and GNT. Furthermore, the exacerbated executive impairment observed in our frontal patients manifested itself from middle age. We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment. Lesions to specific frontal areas, or an increase in global brain atrophy or white matter abnormalities were not associated with this impairment. Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline. We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully. PMID:26102190

  13. Building An Effective and Aligned P-16 Education System: What Should Higher Education do to Enhance Student Access and Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Business Council (Texas), 2002

    2002-01-01

    On May 7, 2002, the Governor's Business Council of Texas was honored to host a number of state and national education leaders who came together to discuss higher education's role in creating an effective and aligned P-16 education system. The State of Texas faces a daunting challenge in improving our P-16 system and increasing rates of college…

  14. Effects of an Adapted Physical Education Teaching Model on Special Educator Teaching Approaches for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a training package, which consisted of the Flex Grid Teaching Model along with adapted physical education consultation, on special education teacher instruction of functional motor skill acquisition instruction to secondary students with low incidence disabilities. Special education teachers…

  15. Walking a mile in their patients' shoes: empathy and othering in medical students' education

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    One of the major tasks of medical educators is to help maintain and increase trainee empathy for patients. Yet research suggests that during the course of medical training, empathy in medical students and residents decreases. Various exercises and more comprehensive paradigms have been introduced to promote empathy and other humanistic values, but with inadequate success. This paper argues that the potential for medical education to promote empathy is not easy for two reasons: a) Medical students and residents have complex and mostly unresolved emotional responses to the universal human vulnerability to illness, disability, decay, and ultimately death that they must confront in the process of rendering patient care b) Modernist assumptions about the capacity to protect, control, and restore run deep in institutional cultures of mainstream biomedicine and can create barriers to empathic relationships. In the absence of appropriate discourses about how to emotionally manage distressing aspects of the human condition, it is likely that trainees will resort to coping mechanisms that result in distance and detachment. This paper suggests the need for an epistemological paradigm that helps trainees develop a tolerance for imperfection in self and others; and acceptance of shared emotional vulnerability and suffering while simultaneously honoring the existence of difference. Reducing the sense of anxiety and threat that are now reinforced by the dominant medical discourse in the presence of illness will enable trainees to learn to emotionally contain the suffering of their patients and themselves, thus providing a psychologically sound foundation for the development of true empathy. PMID:18336719

  16. Community-based dental education and dentists' attitudes and behavior concerning patients from underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Rohra, Ashok K; Piskorowski, Wilhelm A; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore how dentists with well-structured vs. not well-structured community-based dental education (CBDE) experiences differ in perceptions of their CBDE and its impact on their professional lives and in their professional attitudes and behavior related to treating patients from underserved populations. The relationships between CBDE evaluations and impact on the dentists' professional lives and professional attitudes and behavior were explored as well. Data were collected from 254 dentists who participated in CBDE before graduating from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry between 1970 and 2011. The results showed that the alumni with well-structured experiences rated the quality of their CBDE more positively and its impact on their professional lives as stronger than those with less well-structured experiences. They also had more positive attitudes concerning treating underserved patients and were more likely to treat underserved patients than their peers with less well-structured experiences. These dentists' perceptions of the quality of CBDE and impact on their professional lives correlated significantly with their attitudes and behavior concerning treating underserved patients. Their perceptions of the quality of their CBDE experiences and perceptions of benefits from these experiences were significantly related to their professional attitudes and behavior related to providing care for patients from underserved populations. PMID:24385531

  17. Evaluation of an Emergency Department Educational Campaign for Recognition of Suicidal Patients

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Glenn W; Litts, David; Walsh, Patrick; Schneider, Sandra; Richardson, Thomas; Grant, William; Triner, Wayne; Robak, Nancy; Moscati, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the impact of a simple emergency department (ED)–based educational intervention designed to assist ED providers in detecting occult suicidal behavior in patients who present with complaints that are not related to behavioral health. Methods Staff from 5 ED sites participated in the study. Four ED staff members were exposed to a poster and clinical guide for the recognition and management of suicidal patients. Staff members in 1 ED were not exposed to training material and served as a comparator group. Results At baseline, only 36% of providers reported that they had sufficient training in how to assess level of suicide risk in patients. Greater than two thirds of providers agreed that additional training would be helpful in assessing the level of patient suicide risk. More than half of respondents who were exposed to the intervention (51.6%) endorsed increased knowledge of suicide risk during the study period, while 41% indicated that the intervention resulted in improved skills in managing suicidal patients. Conclusion This brief, free intervention appeared to have a beneficial impact on providers' perceptions of how well suicidality was recognized and managed in the ED. PMID:22461920

  18. Closing the loop: action research in a multimodal hereditary cancer patient conference is an effective tool to assess and address patient needs.

    PubMed

    Espenschied, Carin R; MacDonald, Deborah J; Culver, Julie O; Sand, Sharon; Hurley, Karen; Banks, Kimberly C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the use of action research in a patient conference to provide updated hereditary cancer information, explore patient and family member needs and experiences related to genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA), elicit feedback on how to improve the GCRA process, and inform future research efforts. Invitees completed GCRA at City of Hope or collaborating facilities and had a BRCA mutation or a strong personal or family history of breast cancer. Action research activities were facilitated by surveys, round table discussions, and reflection time to engage participants, faculty, and researchers in multiple cycles of reciprocal feedback. The multimodal action research design effectively engaged conference participants to share their experiences, needs, and ideas for improvements to the GCRA process. Participants indicated that they highly valued the information and resources provided and desired similar future conferences. The use of action research in a patient conference is an innovative and effective approach to provide health education, elicit experiences, identify and help address needs of high-risk patients and their family members, and generate research hypotheses. Insights gained yielded valuable feedback to inform clinical care, future health services research, and continuing medical education activities. These methods may also be effective in other practice settings. PMID:22610836

  19. Self-Management in Daily Life with Psoriasis: An Integrative Review of Patient Needs for Structured Education

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Gitte Susanne; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this integrative review is to identify and discuss patient needs for education to support self-management in daily life with psoriasis. As psoriasis increasingly gains recognition as a serious chronic autoimmune skin disease with long-term impairment on the life course, and not mainly a cosmetic problem, nurses are highly challenged to develop efficient education to support patient self-management. The paper includes five stages: (1) problem identification, (2) literature search, (3) data evaluation, (4) data analysis and synthesis, and (5) presentation, based on theoretic scaffolding around the concept “need.” Nineteen of 164 original papers within nursing, medicine and psychology, and reflecting patient perspective were included. To capture the patients' cultural understanding of the implications of the disease and care, we developed an interlevel model indicating that self-experienced burden of disease and its visibility, personal conditions such as illness perception, and the patient's age at onset time are high-impact factors that should be addressed in future structured patient education programmes. The research on patient needs has hitherto focused on adults, but the problems and vulnerability associated with having a chronic and visible disease during adolescence must be acknowledged, and patient education initiatives designed for this young group are recommended. PMID:23304484

  20. [Effects of autogenic training in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Kircher, T; Teutsch, E; Wormstall, H; Buchkremer, G; Thimm, E

    2002-04-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a widely available relaxation method with beneficial outcome on physiological and psychological functioning. In our study, we wanted to test the effects of an AT course in cognitively impaired, frail elderly. After a 3 month waiting period (control), AT courses (intervention) of 3 months duration were offered in 2 nursing homes. Thirty-two frail elderly took part in the study, 24 of them had a psychiatric diagnosis (mean age 82.1 +/- 7.2 years, CAMCOG 75.5 +/- 15.7, MMSE 23.3 +/- 4.3, HAMD 10.0 +/- 3.6, NOSGER 57.2 +/- 18.4, AT-SYM 32.9 +/- 17.6 points). Eight participants dropped out during the waiting period, 8 during the course. From the 16 participants, 15 (94%) were able to learn the AT according to subjective, 9 (54%) according to objective criteria. The ability to practice the AT successfully correlated with the CAMCOG (p = 0.001) and the NOSGER (p = 0.01) score. Participants with a dementia syndrome had major difficulties, whereas age, depressiveness, and number of complaints (AT-SYM) had no influence on the ability to learn the AT. There was no intervention effect, measured with the HAMD, NOSGER, AT-SYM and MMSE. In the pre-post comparison of training sessions, a significant improvement in general well being was found (p < 0.001). Mentally impaired, frail elderly participants are able to learn the AT. Cognitive impairment is disadvantageous for a successful participation. PMID:12080579

  1. Education improves referral of patients suspected of having spondyloarthritis by general practitioners: a study with unannounced standardised patients in daily practice

    PubMed Central

    van Onna, Marloes; Gorter, Simone; Maiburg, Bas; Waagenaar, Gerrie; van Tubergen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the practice performance of general practitioners (GPs) and GP residents in recognising and referring patients suspected for having axial or peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to investigate the influence of education on this performance. Methods GP (residents) were visited in two rounds by standardised patients (SPs) simulating axial SpA, peripheral SpA or carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) with in between an educational intervention on SpA for part of the participants. Participants were unaware of the nature of the medical problem and study purpose. CTS was included as diversionary tactic. The primary outcome was ?40% improvement in (considering) referral of the SPs with SpA to the rheumatologist after education. Secondary outcomes included ordering additional diagnostic tests, correct recognition of SpA and identification of variables contributing to this. Results 68 participants (30 GPs and 38 GP residents) were included, of which 19 received education. The primary outcome was met. A significantly higher proportion of GP (residents) from the intervention group referred patients to the rheumatologist compared with the control group after education (change scores, axial SpA +71% vs +15% (p<0.01); peripheral SpA +48% vs 0% (p<0.001)). Participants who received education, more frequently correctly recognised SpA compared with controls (change scores, axial SpA +50% vs ?5% (p<0.001); peripheral SpA +21% vs 0% (p=0.01). Conclusions Recognition and referral of patients suspected for having SpA by GP (residents) is low, but targeted education markedly improved this. This supports the development of educational initiatives to improve recognition of SpA and hence referral to a rheumatologist. PMID:26535152

  2. Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences. Educational Practices Series-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    This booklet is a synthesis of research on social sciences teaching that has been shown to have a positive effect on a range of desirable student outcomes: cognitive, skills, participatory and affective outcomes. Education in the social sciences plays an important role in developing students' sense of identity and influencing the ways in which…

  3. Inservice Education Programs for Principals Promotes sic! Effective Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Virginia W.; Sloan, Charles A.

    1984-01-01

    Research indicates that the behavior of a school's principal is crucial to educational quality. A staff development program in the Wheeling, Illinois, school district, based on Madeline Hunter's clinical supervision model, has helped principals to become effective leaders in instructional improvement. (MCG)

  4. Aid Effectiveness, Transaction Costs and Conditionality in the Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford, Richard; Biswas, Shampa

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of transaction costs is a commonly mentioned yet rarely elaborated goal for aid effectiveness in educational development. The casual use of the concept of transaction costs conceals which costs may be reduced, which costs are required and, indeed, what transaction costs actually are. Examining issues related to harmonizing the…

  5. Media Cartoons: Effects on Issue Resolution in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, Michael A.; Yangco, Rosanelia; Espinosa, Allen A.

    2014-01-01

    The study focused on media cartoons as a teaching strategy in Environmental Education. Specifically, it sought to determine the effects of media cartoons on the issue resolution skills of first year high school students. The study was conducted in La Salle Green Hills that had eleven sections in the first year high school level for the School Year…

  6. Course Delivery: Keystones of Effective Special Education Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon-Dotson, Lisa J.; Floyd, Loury O.; Dukes, Charles; Darling, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review of the literature, the authors examined studies investigating course delivery methods for preparing special education teachers. Ultimately, 17 studies were reviewed using a constant comparative qualitative method of analysis. This analysis led to the emergence of five themes: (a) established needs, (b) effectiveness, (c) logistics,…

  7. Effective Leadership in Higher Education: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryman, Alan

    2007-01-01

    This article is a review of the literature concerned with leadership effectiveness in higher education at departmental level. The literature derives from publications from three countries: the UK, the USA and Australia. Surprisingly little systematic research has been conducted on the question of which forms of leadership are associated with…

  8. The Effects of Dance Education on Motor Performance of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldemir, Gulay Yasemin; Ramazanoglu, Nusret; Camliguney, Asiye Filiz; Kaya, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    This research has been aimed to demonstrate the effects of dance education on preadolescent children. A total of 114 students (56 of whom in dance group/58 in control group) at preadolescent (aged 11 [plus or minus] 0.0 year) and adolescent (aged 14 [plus or minus] 0.0 year) stages participated in the research. Prior to dance classes a variety of…

  9. The Effect of Migraine Headache on Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Daniel I.; Sabia, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that migraine headaches are common and debilitating, little is known about their effect on educational attainment. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the relationship between migraine headache and three outcomes: high school grade point average, the probability of graduating…

  10. Effective Multicultural Teacher Education Programs: Methodological and Conceptual Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Shaila

    2005-01-01

    To meet challenges of diversity in classrooms various multicultural teacher education programs to prepare pre-service teachers are introduced with the objective of changing beliefs, attitudes, knowledge base, and pedagogical skills. Studies reporting effectiveness of these programs used measure such as portfolio assessment, interviews, survey and…

  11. The Effects of Postsecondary Correctional Education: "Final Report"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterfield, Laura; Coggeshall, Mark; Burke-Storer, Michelle; Correa, Vanessa; Tidd, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The research presented in this report examines the effect of prison-based postsecondary education (PSE) on offenders both while incarcerated and after release. Urban Institute researchers worked with the staff of four institutions in three states to conduct inmate focus groups and stakeholder interviews to explore the motivations for enrolling in…

  12. Design Factors for Educationally Effective Animations and Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Jan L.; Homer, Bruce D.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews research on learning from dynamic visual representations and offers principles for the design of animations and simulations that assure their educational effectiveness. In addition to established principles, new and revised design principle are presented that have been derived from recent research. Our review focuses on the…

  13. Effect of Sexual Education on Sexual Health in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnam, Farnaz; Pakgohar, Minoo; Mirmohamadali, Mandana; Mahmoodi, Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a special sex education program in sexual health on Iranian newly-wed couples. A sample of 64 couples referred to three health centers of Tehran Medicine University, a few months prior to their marriage, were divided into case and control groups. The case group received three lecture sessions…

  14. Effects of Welfare Reform on Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Dhaval M.; Reichman, Nancy E.; Corman, Hope; Das, Dhiman

    2011-01-01

    Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, this study estimates the effects of welfare reform on an important source of human capital acquisition among women at risk for relying on welfare: vocational education and training. The results suggest that welfare reform reduced enrollment in…

  15. Monitoring the Effects of the Global Crisis on Education Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Gwang-Chol

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience and findings from the monitoring work carried out by UNESCO throughout 2009 to examine and assess the possible effects of the global financial and economic crisis on education provision in its Member States. The findings showed that although it was too early to ascertain the full extent of the impact of the…

  16. Effect of Single-Sex Education on Progress in GCSE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malacova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was carried out on national value-added data to study the effects of single-sex education on the progress of pupils from 2002 Key Stage 3 to 2004 GCSE. The analysis suggests that pupils in a selective environment achieve higher progress in single-sex schools; however, the advantage of single-sex schooling seems to decrease with…

  17. Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Lounsbery, Monica A. F.

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of physical activity are well documented, and the important role that schools and physical education (PE) can play in reducing sedentary behavior and contributing to population health has been identified. Although effective teaching is ultimately judged by student achievement, a major component of teacher and school…

  18. Vocational Education Demonstrations: Measuring Impact and Improving Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischman, Howard L.; Willette, JoAnne L.

    The purpose of this monograph is to assist project personnel in improving and measuring the effectiveness of vocational education demonstration projects. The first of four chapters discusses how the monograph is organized and why and how it was developed. Chapter 2 presents an evaluation model containing criteria, standards, and documentation…

  19. Effective Leadership in Vocational Education and Training. CRLRA Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ian; Smith, Tony

    The question of the extent to which effective leadership in vocational education and training (VET) depends on the specific context in which it occurs was examined. Data were collected from the following sources: an intensive literature analysis; studies of purposive sample of 12 diverse VET sites across Australia; and individual interviews with…

  20. Community Healthcare Workers’ Perception of an Educational Intervention in the Care of Patients with Sickle Cell Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ludmila Mourão Xavier; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Vieira, Elen Débora Souza; Vieira, Lara Jhulian Tolentino; Castro, Karla Patrícia Ataíde Nery; Pereira, Igor Alcântara; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite advances in the management of sickle cell disease, gaps still exist in the training of primary healthcare professionals for monitoring patients with the disease. Objective To assess the perception of community healthcare workers about the care and monitoring of patients with sickle cell disease after an educational intervention. Method This exploratory, descriptive, and the qualitative study was conducted in Montes Claros, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The intervention involved the educational training of community healthcare workers from the Family Health Program of the Brazilian Unified Health System. The focus group technique was used to collect the data. The following topics were covered in the discussion: assessment of educational workshops, changes observed in the perception of professionals after training, profile of home visits, and access to and provision of basic healthcare services to individuals with sickle cell disease. The discussions were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were subjected to content analysis and empirically organized into two categories. Results Changes in the healthcare practices of community health workers were observed after the educational intervention. The prioritization of healthcare services for patients with sickle cell disease and monitoring of clinical warning signs in healthcare units were observed. Furthermore, changes were observed in the profile of home visits to patients, which were performed using a script provided in the educational intervention. Conclusion The educational intervention significantly changed the work process of community health workers concerning patient monitoring in primary healthcare. PMID:25960859

  1. Effects of a cancer genetics education programme on clinician knowledge and practice

    PubMed Central

    Blazer, K; Grant, M; Sand, S; MacDonald, D; Uman, G; Weitzel, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Many clinicians lack adequate knowledge about emerging standards of care related to genetic cancer risk assessment and the features of hereditary cancer needed to identify patients at risk. Objective: To determine how a clinical cancer genetics education programme for community based clinicians affected participant knowledge and changed clinical practice. Methods: The effects of the programme on participant knowledge and changes in clinical practice were measured through pre and post session knowledge questionnaires completed by 710 participants and practice impact surveys completed after one year by 69 out of 114 eligible annual conference participants sampled. Results: Respondents showed a 40% average increase in specific cancer genetics knowledge. Respondents to the post course survey reported that they used course information and materials to counsel and refer patients for hereditary cancer risk assessment (77%), shared course information with other clinicians (83%), and wanted additional cancer genetics education (80%). Conclusions: There was a significant immediate gain in cancer genetics knowledge among participants in a targeted outreach programme, and subset analysis indicated a positive long term effect on clinical practice. Clinician education that incorporates evidence based content and case based learning should lead to better identification and care of individuals with increased cancer risk. PMID:15235022

  2. Learning Styles, Minority Students, and Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, Charles S.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews current research to argue that minority students do not have learning styles different from students of the dominant culture. Stresses that an understanding of cultural and gender factors will help developmental instructors become more effective teachers. Suggests use of the "Connected Teaching" model of Belenky to develop such…

  3. Effect of Part-time Practice on Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Parkerton, Patricia H; Wagner, Edward H; Smith, Dean G; Straley, Hugh L

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary care physicians are spending fewer hours in direct patient care, yet it is not known whether reduced hours are associated with differences in patient outcomes. OBJECTIVE To determine whether patient outcomes vary with physicians' clinic hours. DESIGN Cross-sectional retrospective design assessing primary care practices in 1998. SETTING All 25 outpatient-clinics of a single medical group in western Washington. PARTICIPANTS One hundred ninety-four family practitioners and general internists, 80% of whom were part-time, who provided ambulatory primary care services to specified HMO patient panels. Physician appointment hours ranged from 10 to 35 per week (30% to 100% of full time). MEASUREMENTS Twenty-three measures of individual primary care physician performance collected in an administrative database were aggregated into 4 outcome measures: cancer screening, diabetic management, patient satisfaction, and ambulatory costs. Multivariate regression on each of the 4 outcomes controlled for characteristics of physicians (administrative role, gender, seniority) and patient panels (size, case mix, age, gender). MAIN RESULTS While the effects were small, part-time physicians had significantly higher rates for cancer screening (4% higher, P = .001), diabetic management (3% higher, P = .033), and for patient satisfaction (3% higher, P = .035). After controlling for potential confounders, there was no significant association with patient satisfaction (P = .212) or ambulatory costs (P = .323). CONCLUSIONS Primary care physicians working fewer clinical hours were associated with higher quality performance than were physicians working longer hours, but with patient satisfaction and ambulatory costs similar to those of physicians working longer hours. The trend toward part-time clinical practice by primary care physicians may occur without harm to patient outcomes. PMID:12950480

  4. Effects of cannabis on cognitive function in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Kimia; Tierney, Mary C.; O'Connor, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: While neuropsychological deficits have been reported in healthy individuals who use street cannabis, data in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are lacking. Given that MS is associated with cognitive deterioration, the aim of this study was to determine the neuropsychological effects of cannabis use in this population. Methods: Two groups, each of 25 patients with MS (cannabis users and nonusers), were administered the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in MS battery of neuropsychological tests, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I). Group-matching and regression analysis were used to control for the effects of age, sex, education, premorbid intelligence, disability, and disease course and duration on cognitive function. Results: Cannabis users performed significantly more poorly than nonusers on measures of information processing speed, working memory, executive functions, and visuospatial perception. They were also twice as likely as nonusers to be classified as globally cognitively impaired. There were no between-group differences on the HADS measures of depression and anxiety or lifetime SCID-I psychiatric diagnoses. Conclusion: This cross-sectional study provides empirical evidence that prolonged use of inhaled or ingested street cannabis in patients with MS is associated with poorer performance on cognitive domains commonly affected in this population. Whatever subjective benefits patients may derive from using street cannabis (e.g., pain and spasticity relief) should be weighed against the associated cognitive side effects. PMID:21444900

  5. Cataract management: effect on patients' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Susan; Seewoodhary, Ramesh

    2015-01-27

    This article summarises the epidemiology of cataract, the normal and altered physiology of the eye's lens, and the causes of and risk factors associated with the condition. It outlines the aims of modern cataract surgery and discusses the main surgical approaches. The effects of 'cataract blindness' on the patient's quality of life are addressed, with particular reference to the negative effect of the onset of depression. The role of the nurse in promoting quality of life is explored with reference to the value of psychosocial theory in the care of and promotion of health to older patients with cataracts. PMID:25605115

  6. Effects of Welfare Reform on Education Acquisition of Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Dhaval M.; Corman, Hope; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Education beyond traditional ages for schooling is an important source of human capital acquisition among adult women. Welfare reform, which began in the early 1990s and culminated in the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act in 1996, promoted work rather than education acquisition for this group. Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, we undertake a comprehensive study of the effects of welfare reform on adult women’s education acquisition. We first estimate effects of welfare reform on high school drop-out of teenage girls, both to improve upon past research on this issue and to explore compositional changes that may be relevant for our primary analyses of the effects of welfare reform on education acquisition among adult women. We find that welfare reform significantly reduced the probability that teens from disadvantaged families dropped out of high school, by about 15%. We then estimate the effects of welfare reform on adult women’s school enrollment and conduct numerous specification checks, investigate compositional selection and policy endogeneity, explore lagged effects, stratify by TANF work incentives and education policies, consider alternative comparison groups, and explore the mediating role of work. We find robust and convincing evidence that welfare reform significantly decreased the probability of college enrollment among adult women at risk of welfare receipt, by at least 20%. It also appears to have decreased the probability of high school enrollment among this group, on the same order of magnitude. Future research is needed to determine the extent to which this behavioral change translates to future economic outcomes. PMID:23504449

  7. Planning a collaborative conference to provide interdisciplinary education with a focus on patient safety in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jennifer; Newhouse, Linda; Flora, Robert; Burkett, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration is an important component of evidence-based practice in modern health care. A number of publications have touted the benefits of "team training" to improve obstetric outcomes during emergent situations. In August 2011, the Ohio sections of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) held a joint conference that focused on interdisciplinary education to promote patient safety. This joint venture drew more than 120 attendees, 12 exhibitors and 17 poster displays. Evaluations were positive and attendees cited planned practice changes for themselves as well as for their respective institutions. PMID:24750652

  8. [The effect of Ai Chi method in fibromyalgic patients].

    PubMed

    Santana, Jacqueline Soares de; Almeida, Ana Paula Gonçalves de; Brandão, Patrícia Martins Carvalho

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this article is to show the effect of the Ai Chi method, as an alternative form of hydrotherapeutic approach in fibromyalgia syndrome patients. Ten patients were studied, four were part of the experiment group and five of the control group, with one desistance. The patients were evaluated through the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (QIF) and Scale of Intensity and Index of pain in Sensible Points. Two evaluations were performed, before and after the treatment. The patients were submitted to ten sessions of the Ai Chi method during 40 minutes. The scale of intensity of pain in sensible points presented an improvement in the intensity of pain after the intervention, while quality of life remained without alteration. Regarding the quality of life, it was observed that the groups had similar results, because of the fact that patients had not presented improvement at depressive state. It was also verified a difference in the index of the sensible points between the groups; the explanation for this difference might be because of the benefits of the immersion in warm water and the effect of the Ai Chi method. There was no significant difference between the groups, which can be attributed to its limitations. In this way, new studies referring to the application of the Ai Chi method in patients carrying fibromyalgia syndrome become relevant. PMID:20640304

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Patients Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes The full report is titled “Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes. A Cohort Study.” It ...

  10. The effects of exercise on finger extension of CVA patients.

    PubMed

    Trombly, C A; Quintana, L A

    1983-03-01

    The choice of activity to improve finger extension of post-CVA patients is based on untested assumptions and hypotheses. In this study, using electromyography of the extrinsic finger muscles and electrogoniometry of wrist and finger joints, the effects of five types of exercise on the finger extension of post-CVA patients were documented. Results indicated that resisted and rapid exercises recruited high percentages of output of all three muscles. Slow, unresisted extension exercises preferentially recruited the extensor digitorum. No exercise caused significant immediate changes in range of motion (ROM), flexor/extensor balance, time required to open the hand, or level of activity of the extensor digitorum during opening of the hand. Resisted grasp did not limit the patients' ability to extend the fingers. Variability in percent of motor output among the subjects of this study indicates the need to monitor each patient during therapy. PMID:6846482

  11. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,…

  12. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels. PMID:25337960

  13. Using tablet-based technology in patient education about systemic therapy options for early-stage breast cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E.R.; Laing, K.; McCarthy, J.; McCrate, F.; Seal, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient education in early-stage breast cancer has been shown to improve patient well-being and quality of life, but it poses a challenge given the increasingly complex regimens and time constraints in clinical practice. Technology-aided teaching in the clinic could help to improve the understanding of adjuvant systemic therapy for patients. In this prospective pilot study, we used a clinician-administered, tablet-based teaching aid to teach patients with early-stage breast cancer about adjuvant systemic therapy. Methods Participation was offered to newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer presenting for their first medical oncology visit at a provincial cancer centre. Participants were shown a tablet-based presentation describing procedures, rationales, risks, and benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy as an adjunct to a discussion with the medical oncologist. After the clinic visit, participants completed a questionnaire measuring satisfaction with the visit and knowledge of the treatment plan discussed. Results The 25 patients recruited for the study had a mean age of 57 years. An offer of upfront chemotherapy alone was made to 12 participants (48%), chemotherapy with trastuzumab to 4 (16%), and hormonal therapy to 9 (36%). Correct answers to all questions related to treatment knowledge were given by 22 patients (88%). Satisfaction with the clinic visit was high (mean satisfaction score: 4.53 ± 0.1 of a possible 5). Conclusions We found that a tablet-based presentation about adjuvant systemic therapy was satisfactory to patients with early-stage breast cancer and that knowledge retention after the clinic visit was high. Tablet-based teaching could be a feasible and effective way of educating patients in the breast oncology clinic and warrants further investigation in randomized studies. PMID:26628877

  14. Clinical and Haematological Effects of Hydroxyurea in ?-Thalassemia Intermedia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Homayon; Bahadoram, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is well known that hydroxyurea (HU) impacts on clinical and haematologic indices in thalassemia. We aimed to evaluate the effect of hydroxyurea on clinical and haematological improvement in children with thalassemia intermedia. Materials and Methods After the patients’ enrollment in the study their data such as transfusion, hospitalization, spleen size, visit, total Hb, HbF levels, MCV and MCH were compared before and after treatment with HU 10 mg/kg/day/for one year. Results In patients with thalassemia intermedia, HU significantly diminished the rate of transfusion, hospitalization, spleen size and significantly increased Hb MCH, HbF and MCV. Moreover HU was well tolerated in our patients and we got no remarkable adverse effect. Conclusion We divulged hydroxyurea 10 mg/kg/day during one year. This significantly increased HbF, total haemoglobin, MCV, MCH, without any remarkable adverse events. PMID:26557561

  15. Preventing infections during cancer treatment: development of an interactive patient education website.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Angela; Tai, Eric; Nielsen, Danielle Beauchesne; Shropshire, Sonya; Richardson, Lisa C

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in oncology care, infections from both community and healthcare settings remain a major cause of hospitalization and death among patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Neutropenia (low white blood cell count) is a common and potentially dangerous side effect in patients receiving chemotherapy treatments and may lead to higher risk of infection. Preventing infection during treatment can result in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality for patients with cancer. As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients public health campaign, a public-private partnership was formed between the CDC Foundation and Amgen, Inc. The CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control developed and launched an interactive website, www.PreventCancerInfections.org, designed for patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The site encourages patients to complete a risk assessment for developing neutropenia during their treatment. After completing the assessment, patients receive information about how to lower the risk for infection and keep themselves healthy while receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25095295

  16. The outcomes of recent patient safety education interventions for trainee physicians and medical students: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Sevdalis, Nick; Arora, Sonal; Baker, Paul; Vincent, Charles; Ahmed, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the latest evidence for patient safety education for physicians in training and medical students, updating, extending and improving on a previous systematic review on this topic. Design A systematic review. Data sources Embase, Ovid Medline and PsycINFO databases. Study selection Studies including an evaluation of patient safety training interventions delivered to trainees/residents and medical students published between January 2009 and May 2014. Data extraction The review was performed using a structured data capture tool. Thematic analysis also identified factors influencing successful implementation of interventions. Results We identified 26 studies reporting patient safety interventions: 11 involving students and 15 involving trainees/residents. Common educational content included a general overview of patient safety, root cause/systems-based analysis, communication and teamwork skills, and quality improvement principles and methodologies. The majority of courses were well received by learners, and improved patient safety knowledge, skills and attitudes. Moreover, some interventions were shown to result in positive behaviours, notably subsequent engagement in quality improvement projects. No studies demonstrated patient benefit. Availability of expert faculty, competing curricular/service demands and institutional culture were important factors affecting implementation. Conclusions There is an increasing trend for developing educational interventions in patient safety delivered to trainees/residents and medical students. However, significant methodological shortcomings remain and additional evidence of impact on patient outcomes is needed. While there is some evidence of enhanced efforts to promote sustainability of such interventions, further work is needed to encourage their wider adoption and spread. PMID:25995240

  17. Musical training as an alternative and effective method for neuro-education and neuro-rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    François, Clément; Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Duarte, Esther; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, important advances in the field of cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have largely contributed to improve our knowledge on brain functioning. More recently, a line of research has been developed that aims at using musical training and practice as alternative tools for boosting specific perceptual, motor, cognitive, and emotional skills both in healthy population and in neurologic patients. These findings are of great hope for a better treatment of language-based learning disorders or motor impairment in chronic non-communicative diseases. In the first part of this review, we highlight several studies showing that learning to play a musical instrument can induce substantial neuroplastic changes in cortical and subcortical regions of motor, auditory and speech processing networks in healthy population. In a second part, we provide an overview of the evidence showing that musical training can be an alternative, low-cost and effective method for the treatment of language-based learning impaired populations. We then report results of the few studies showing that training with musical instruments can have positive effects on motor, emotional, and cognitive deficits observed in patients with non-communicable diseases such as stroke or Parkinson Disease. Despite inherent differences between musical training in educational and rehabilitation contexts, these results favor the idea that the structural, multimodal, and emotional properties of musical training can play an important role in developing new, creative and cost-effective intervention programs for education and rehabilitation in the next future. PMID:25972820

  18. Musical training as an alternative and effective method for neuro-education and neuro-rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    François, Clément; Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Duarte, Esther; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, important advances in the field of cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have largely contributed to improve our knowledge on brain functioning. More recently, a line of research has been developed that aims at using musical training and practice as alternative tools for boosting specific perceptual, motor, cognitive, and emotional skills both in healthy population and in neurologic patients. These findings are of great hope for a better treatment of language-based learning disorders or motor impairment in chronic non-communicative diseases. In the first part of this review, we highlight several studies showing that learning to play a musical instrument can induce substantial neuroplastic changes in cortical and subcortical regions of motor, auditory and speech processing networks in healthy population. In a second part, we provide an overview of the evidence showing that musical training can be an alternative, low-cost and effective method for the treatment of language-based learning impaired populations. We then report results of the few studies showing that training with musical instruments can have positive effects on motor, emotional, and cognitive deficits observed in patients with non-communicable diseases such as stroke or Parkinson Disease. Despite inherent differences between musical training in educational and rehabilitation contexts, these results favor the idea that the structural, multimodal, and emotional properties of musical training can play an important role in developing new, creative and cost-effective intervention programs for education and rehabilitation in the next future. PMID:25972820

  19. Nutritional effects of amino acid dialysate (Nutrineal) in CAPD patients.

    PubMed

    Misra, M; Ashworth, J; Reaveley, D A; Muller, B; Brown, E A

    1996-01-01

    The use of amino acid dialysate (AAD) has been shown to improve the nutritional status of malnourished continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. We report on a randomized, prospective, cross-over study evaluating the effects of a single, daily, postprandial 2-L exchange of 1.1% AAD (Nutrineal) on a nutritionally unselected group of 18 stable CAPD patients. Patients in group A (n = 10) were randomized to receive AAD in the initial six months, whereas group B (n = 8) patients received AAD in the final six months of the study. Regular biochemical, hematological, and anthropometric measurements were made. A computerized nutrition score(1) combined anthropometry, serum albumin, and total lymphocyte count. Improved nutritional status was indicated by a decreased score. Mean serum albumin and transferrin did not show a significant rise in either group. However, patients in group A, with a mean serum albumin of less than 30 g/L, showed a significant rise at two months, which persisted at six months (26.8 g/L on entry, 29.0 g/L at two months, 30.1 g/L at six months; p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Treatment with AAD showed a trend towards improvement in midarm muscle circumference in both groups (22.9 -23.5 cm, group A; 22.9-23.7 cm, group B). The nutrition score improved in both groups but was significant only in group A (14.6 to 13.1; p = 0.02). These effects of AAD on the nutritional status of CAPD patients need validation in a long-term study to evaluate the effects on morbidity and mortality. PMID:8865926

  20. Adapting Comparative Effectiveness Research Summaries for Delivery to Patients and Providers through a Patient Portal

    PubMed Central

    McDougald Scott, Amanda M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell; Ho, Yun-Xian; Yan, Zhou; Davison, Coda; Rosenbloom, S. Trent

    2013-01-01

    Despite increases in the scientific evidence for a variety of medical treatments, a gap remains in the adoption of best medical practices. This manuscript describes a process for adapting published summary guides from comparative effectiveness research to render them concise, targeted to audience, and easily actionable; and a strategy for disseminating such evidence to patients and their physicians through a web-based portal and linked electronic health record. This project adapted summary guides about oral medications for adults with type 2 diabetes to a fifth-grade literacy level and modified the resulting materials based on evaluations with the Suitability Assessment of Materials instrument. Focus groups and individual interviews with patients, diabetes providers, and health literacy experts were employed to evaluate and enhance the adapted summary guide. We present the lessons learned as general guidelines for the creation of concise, targeted, and actionable evidence and its delivery to both patients and providers through increasingly prevalent health information technologies. PMID:24551387

  1. Who Listens to Trash Talk?: Education and Public Media Effects on Recycling Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael D.; Scicchitano, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Observes that research has shown a curvilinear relationship between education and media effects, with media having the greatest effect on people with moderate levels of education. Examines the effects of public service messages about recycling, and finds that the messages actually have greater impact on people with higher levels of education. (DSK)

  2. The effect of organisational culture on patient safety.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Gerri; McCaughan, Dorothy

    This article explores the links between organisational culture and patient safety. The key elements associated with a safety culture, most notably effective leadership, good teamwork, a culture of learning and fairness, and fostering patient-centred care, are discussed. The broader aspects of a systems approach to promoting quality and safety, with specific reference to clinical governance, human factors, and ergonomics principles and methods, are also briefly explored, particularly in light of the report of the public inquiry into care failings at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. PMID:23987721

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial of Patient Navigation for Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patients: Effects on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hendren, Samantha; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Epstein, Ronald; Humiston, Sharon; Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Winters, Paul; Sanders, Mechelle; Loader, Starlene; Fiscella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient navigation (PN) is a promising intervention to ameliorate cancer health disparities. This study objective was to measure PN effects on cancer-specific quality of life (QOL) among newly diagnosed cancer patients. Methods A randomized, controlled trial of PN was conducted in Rochester, New York. Breast cancer and colorectal cancer patients were randomly assigned to receive a PN intervention or usual care. QOL was measured at baseline and four subsequent time points, using the validated Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-B, FACT-C) instruments. Results Among 319 randomized patients (165 PN, 154 control), median age was 57 years and 32.5% were from minority race/ethnicity groups. PN and control groups were comparable on baseline factors, except home ownership v. renting (more home ownership among controls, p=0.05) and race (more whites among controls, p=0.05). Total and subscale FACT scores did not differ between groups when analyzed as a change from baseline to 3 months, or at various time points. The emotional well-being subscale change from baseline approached significance (better change among PN group, p=0.05). Time trends of QOL measures did not differ significantly between groups. Adjustment for baseline patient factors did not reveal a benefit of PN on QOL. Conclusions In this randomized trial of PN, there was no statistically significant effect on disease-specific QOL. Impact These results suggest that PN may not affect QOL during cancer treatment, that social/medical support are adequate in this study’s setting, or that the trial failed to target patients likely to experience QOL benefit from PN. PMID:23045543

  4. Effectiveness of sulpiride in adult patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Hsien; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Lin, Chia-Yin

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness among sulpiride, risperidone, olanzapine, and haloperidol by evaluating the persistence of drug use. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. Patients with schizophrenia aged 18-65 years and newly prescribed with a single oral antipsychotic medication between years 2003 and 2008 were included. The primary outcome was the persistence of antipsychotic agents by calculating the treatment duration till treatment changed. All defined treatment changes were also analyzed separately, including discontinuation, switching, augmentation, and hospitalization. A total of 1324 eligible patients were included, with an average age of 36 years old and approximately 45% of them were female. The most prevalent antipsychotic use was risperidone (42.1%), followed by sulpiride (36.0%), haloperidol (14.2%), and olanzapine (7.7%). After adjusting for patient demographics, mental illness characteristics, and propensity score, the Cox regression models found that the risk of nonpersistence was significantly higher in patients receiving risperidone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.40), haloperidol (HR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.63-2.40), and olanzapine (HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.07-1.68), as compared with sulpiride, suggesting the effectiveness of sulpiride was better than the other 3 antipsychotics. Therefore, this study would provide strong grounds for a properly conducted randomized controlled trial of the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of sulpiride vs atypical antipsychotics. PMID:22315480

  5. Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A preliminary clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Téllez-García, Mario; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, Maria; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0-10), disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia. PMID:26118519

  6. Physical Education Teacher Attitudes towards the Effectiveness of Sport Activities in Northern-East Badia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Oun, Ismael Sood

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate physical education teacher attitudes towards the effectiveness of sport activities in north-east Badia. The study population consisted of all teachers of physical education who are studying curriculum of physical education in schools affiliated to the Directorate of Education of the brigade desert…

  7. A Theoretical Assessment of Regional Development Effects on the Demand for General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwahashi, Roki

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses a prospective aspect of general education: through general education, people obtain information about returns to their future specific education, thereby enabling them to choose fields in which they excel. According to that property of education, this paper presents a theoretical framework as a basis for understanding effects

  8. Intensive Individualized Reinforcement Education Is Important for the Prevention of Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yun-Mi; Shin, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Kang-Min; Cho, Jae-Young; Ko, Sun-Hye; Yoon, Min-Hyang; Kim, Tae-Won; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Park, Yong-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated whether an intensive individualized reinforcement education program could influence the prevention of hypoglycemic events in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods From March 2013 to September 2013, patients aged 35 to 75 years with type 2 diabetes who had not previously participated in diabetes education, and treated with insulin or a sulfonylurea-containing regimen were included in the study. After structured group education, the patients assigned to the intensive individualized education group (IT) were requested to visit for reinforcement. All subjects in the IT were encouraged to self-manage dose adjustments. Participants in both groups (control group [CG, group education only; n=22] and IT [n=24]) attended follow-up visits at 2, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. At each visit, all patients were asked whether they had experienced hypoglycemia. Results The total study population consisted of 20 men (43.5%; mean age and diabetic duration of 55.9±11.0 and 5.1±7.3 years, respectively). At 24 weeks, there were no significant differences in hemoglobin A1c values between the CG and IT. The total number of hypoglycemic events per patient was 5.26±6.5 in the CG and 2.58±2.3 times in the IT (P=0.004). Adherence to lifestyle modification including frequency of exercise, self-monitoring of blood glucose, or dietary habit was not significantly different between the groups. However, adherence to hypoglycemia management, especially the dose adjustment of medication, was significantly higher in the IT compared with the CG. Conclusion Compared with the structured group education, additional IT resulted in additional benefits in terms of avoidance of hypoglycemia and treating hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25922810

  9. Adverse events analysis as an educational tool to improve patient safety culture in primary care: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a leading item on the policy agenda of both major international health organizations and advanced countries generally. The quantitative description of the phenomena has given rise to intense concern with the issue in institutions and organizations, leading to a number of initiatives and research projects and the promotion of patient safety culture, with training becoming a priority both in Spain and internationally. To date, most studies have been conducted in a hospital setting, even though primary care is the type most commonly used by the public, in our experience. Our study aims to achieve the following: - Assess the registry of adverse events as an education tool to improve patient safety culture in the Family and Community Teaching Units of Galicia. - Find and analyze educational tools to improve patient safety culture in primary care. - Evaluate the applicability of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Spanish version, in the context of primary health care. Design and methods Design Experimental unifactorial study of two groups, control and intervention. Study population Tutors and residents in Family and Community Medicine in last year of studies in Galicia, Spain. Sample From the population universe through voluntary participation. Twenty-seven tutor-resident units in each group required, randomly assigned. Intervention Residents and their respective tutor (tutor-resident pair) in teaching units on Family and Community Medicine from throughout Galicia will be invited to participate. Tutor-resident pair that agrees to participate will be sent the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Then, tutor-resident pair will be assigned to each group-either intervention or control-through simple random sampling. The intervention group will receive specific training to record the adverse effects found in patients under their care, with subsequent feedback, after receiving instruction on the process. No action will be taken in the control group. After the intervention has ended, the survey will once again be provided to all participants. Outcome measures Change in safety culture as measured by Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture CONSORT Extension for Non-Pharmacologic Treatments 2008 was applied. Discussion The most significant limitations on the project are related to selecting a tool to measure the safety environment, the training calendar of residents in Family and Community Medicine in last year of studies and the no-answer bias inherent to research conducted through self-administered surveys. The development and application of a safety culture in the health sector, specifically in primary care, is as yet limited. Thus, identifying the strengths and weaknesses in the safety environment may assist in designing strategies for improvement in the primary care health centers of our region. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN41911128 PMID:21672197

  10. The Effects of Positive Patient Testimonials on PTSD Treatment Choice

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Larry D.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.; Caldwell, Daniel; Hanson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Despite the existence of effective treatment options for PTSD, these treatments are failing to reach those that stand to benefit from PTSD treatment. Understanding the processes underlying an individual’s treatment seeking behavior holds the potential for reducing treatment-seeking barriers. The current study investigates the effects that positive treatment testimonials have on decisions regarding PTSD treatment. An undergraduate (N = 439) and a trauma-exposed community (N = 203) sample were provided with videotaped treatment rationales for prolonged exposure (PE) and sertraline treatments of PTSD. Half of each sample also viewed testimonials, detailing a fictional patient’s treatment experience. All participants then chose among treatment options and rated the credibility of- and personal reactions toward- those options. Among treatment naïve undergraduates, testimonials increased the proportion choosing PE alone; and among treatment naïve members of the trauma-exposed community sample, testimonials increased the proportion choosing a combined PE plus sertraline treatment. These effects were not observed for those with prior history of either psychotherapeutic or pharmacological treatment. Major barriers exist that prevent individuals with PTSD from seeking treatment. For a critical unreached treatment sample, those who are treatment naïve, positive patient testimonials offer a mechanism in which to make effective treatments more appealing and accessible. PMID:23103234

  11. Serum cytokines and anxiety in adolescent depression patients: Gender effect.

    PubMed

    Pallavi, Pooja; Sagar, Rajesh; Mehta, Manju; Sharma, Subhadra; Subramanium, Arulselvi; Shamshi, Farah; Sengupta, Utpal; Pandey, Ravindra M; Mukhopadhyay, Asok K

    2015-09-30

    The present study compares the serum cytokine levels between adolescent depression patients and healthy controls and assesses correlation between depression, anxiety scores and serum levels of eight cytokines. Study also checked the variation in serum levels with medication status (medication free/naïve vs. patients on medication). Following clinical and psychometric assessment of 77 adolescent (aged 13-18 years) depression patients (49 males and 28 females; 56 medication free/naïve) and 54 healthy controls (25 males, 29 females), eight cytokines (IL-1?, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-?, IFN-?, TGF-?1 and IL-17A {denoted IL-17 throughout}) were measured in serum using ELISA. Depressed adolescents had significantly high levels of IL-2 (p<0.001) and IL-6 (p=0.03) as compared to controls. The female population skewed the result of one cytokine (IL-6) in patients. Anxiety scores showed positive correlation (only in female patients) with IL-1?, IL-10 and negative correlation with TGF-?1 and IL-17. The gender effect in relationship between anxiety and cytokines was not straightforward. On comparing study groups on the medication/naïve status, IL-2 and TGF-?1 showed significant difference between the groups (p<0.001, p=0.007 higher in medicated). Depression in adolescents was associated with elevation of proinflammatory serum cytokines with a gender bias for females. Anxiety scores correlated negatively with TGF-?1 and IL-17. PMID:26163725

  12. Molecular effects of exercise in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Ingrid E; Nader, Gustavo A

    2008-11-01

    Exercise is now known to be beneficial for patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, exercise can improve physical performance, cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength, and reduce disease activity and systemic inflammation, as evidenced by reductions in erythrocyte sedimentation rate and other systemic markers of inflammation. Similar effects on physical performance and cardiorespiratory fitness have been observed in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. Improved muscle performance in these patients is associated with an increased ratio of type I : type II muscle fibers and increased cross-sectional area of type II muscle fibers, suggesting that myositis-affected muscle retains the ability to respond to exercise. In addition, resistance exercise training can reduce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and fibrosis in patients with myositis, and in vitro mechanical loading of chondrocytes can suppress the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, indicating that exercise can also reduce inflammation in the local tissue environment. Further studies of the systemic and local responses underlying exercise-associated improvement in muscle performance, soft tissue integrity and health outcomes are warranted. PMID:18839010

  13. Energy drink use and adverse effects among emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Nordt, Sean Patrick; Vilke, Gary M; Clark, Richard F; Lee Cantrell, F; Chan, Theodore C; Galinato, Melissa; Nguyen, Vincent; Castillo, Edward M

    2012-10-01

    Energy drink usage is common and contains caffeine or other stimulants. We evaluated demographics, prevalence, reasons and adverse effects with consuming energy beverages. Cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of patients recruited from two San Diego Emergency Departments from January to December 2009. One-thousand-two-hundred-ninety-eight subjects participated of which 52.6% were male. Ethnicity: Caucasian 48.3%, African American 17%, Hispanic 18%, Other 16.7%. Age ranges: 18-29 years (38.4%), 30-54 years (49.6%) and greater than 55 years (12%). Reasons for use: 57% to "increase energy", 9.5% for studying/work projects, 2.4% while prolonged driving, improve sports performance 2%, with ethanol 6.3%, "other" reasons 22.1%. Adverse reactions reported by 33.5% (429) patients. Two-hundred-eighty report feeling "shaky/jittery", insomnia 136, palpitations 150, gastrointestinal upset 82, headache 68, chest pain 39, and seizures in 6. Eighty-five patients reported co-ingestion with illicit "stimulants" including cocaine and methamphetamine. We identified one-third of patients reported at least one adverse effect. Whilst most were not severe, a small number were serious e.g., seizures. In addition, some report purposely ingesting with illicit drugs. PMID:22367607

  14. Project Based Learning with ‘Mechamo’ and Its Educative Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagihara, Yoshihiro; Hagihara, Yukari; Kurosawa, Kenzo; Hashimoto, Akira; Shimachi, Shigeyuki

    This paper describes a Project Based Learning with ‘Mechamo’ and its educative effect. ‘Mechamo’ is a remote control robot which has complex link mechanisms. A new simulation game is proposed, which simulates industrial manufacture in a factory. This simulation game is a group work. A group is composed of several persons and each group is a ‘quality control circles’ of the factory. They learn importance of skill of mechanics and control engineering through the manufacturing and history of ‘Mechamo’. A group leader is elected from the group. They learn a sense of responsibility and importance of skill of ‘technological communication’. A specific case and effectiveness are shown.

  15. The Effect of a Patient Portal With Electronic Messaging on Patient Activation Among Chronically Ill Patients: Controlled Before-and-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Linna, Miika; Rönkkö, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that providing patients with access to their medical records and secure messaging with health care professionals improves health outcomes in chronic care by encouraging and activating patients to manage their own condition. Objectives The aim was to evaluate the effect of access to a patient portal on patient activation among chronically ill patients. Further, the relationship between temporal proximity of a severe diagnosis and patient activation were assessed. Methods A total of 876 chronically ill patients from public primary care were allocated to either an intervention group receiving immediate access to a patient portal that included their medical records, care plan, and secure messaging with a care team, or to a control group receiving usual care. Patient Activation Measure (PAM) at baseline and at 6-month follow-up was obtained from 80 patients in the intervention group and 57 patients in the control group; thus, a total of 137 patients were included in the final analysis. Results No significant effect of access to patient portal on patient activation was detected in this study (F 1,133=1.87, P=.17, ?2=0.01). Patients starting at a lower level of activation demonstrated greater positive change in activation compared to patients starting at higher levels of activation in both the intervention and control groups. Further, patients diagnosed with a severe diagnosis during the intervention showed greater positive change in patient activation compared to patients whose last severe diagnosis was made more than 2 years ago. The results also suggest that the intervention had greatest effect on patients starting at the highest level of patient activation (difference in change of patient activation=4.82, P=.13), and among patients diagnosed within a year of the intervention (difference in change of patient activation=7.65, P=.12). Conclusions Time since last severe diagnosis and patient activation at baseline may affect changes in patient activation, suggesting that these should be considered in evaluation of activating chronic care interventions and in the specification of possible target groups for these interventions. This may be relevant in designing services for a heterogeneous group of patients with a distinct medical history and level of activation. PMID:25413368

  16. Long Term Follow-Up after a Randomized Integrated Educational and Psychosocial Intervention in Patient-Partner Dyads Affected by Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, contemporary heart failure care remains patient-focused, but awareness of the partners’ and families’ situation is increasing. Randomized studies have mainly evaluated the short-term effects of dyadic interventions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the 24-month effects of an intervention with psych-educational support in dyads of heart failure patients and their partners. Methods This study used a randomized study design and 155 patient-partner dyads were enrolled. The intervention included a nurse-led program of three sessions addressing psychoeducational support. Results The intervention did not have any effect on health, depressive symptoms or perceived control among the patient-partner dyads after 24 months. Furthermore, time to first event did not differ significantly between the intervention group and the control patients. Conclusion This study may be regarded as a first step in trying to understand dyads’ need for supportive care. Individualized and more targeted interventions seem necessary to achieve a higher impact on dyad outcomes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02398799 PMID:26406475

  17. Overseas Internship Education in Engineering Graduate Courses and Evaluation of the Educational Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Nakamura, Masato

    Center for Engineering Education Development, CEED, Hokkaido University was established to provide new graduate course programs more practical and concordant with the needs of industry and global society. The major program is the overseas internship, where students join some project as experiment, design, analysis, production, software making, etc, in the companies or research organizations in the foreign countries. For these three years, CEED sent over 65 students to 24 countries in the world. In this report, the CEED implementation of the internship program is described and examples of students? activities in the overseas internship are introduced. The educational effect is also stated based on the questionnaire survey. From the data, students? abilities such as, international understanding, challenging spirit, attitude to learn new things, as well as language proficiency are markedly improved.

  18. Patients’ Perceptions of Information and Education for Renal Replacement Therapy: An Independent Survey by the European Kidney Patients' Federation on Information and Support on Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Biesen, Wim; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Murphey, Mark; Loblova, Olga; Davies, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background Selection of an appropriate renal replacement modality is of utmost importance for patients with end stage renal disease. Previous studies showed provision of information to and free modality choice by patients to be suboptimal. Therefore, the European Kidney Patients’ Federation (CEAPIR) explored European patients’ perceptions regarding information, education and involvement on the modality selection process. Methods CEAPIR developed a survey, which was disseminated by the national kidney patient organisations in Europe. Results In total, 3867 patients from 36 countries completed the survey. Respondents were either on in-centre haemodialysis (53%) or had a functioning graft (38%) at the time of survey. The majority (78%) evaluated the general information about kidney disease and treatment as helpful, but 39% did not recall being told about alternative treatment options than their current one. Respondents were more often satisfied with information provided on in-centre haemodialysis (90%) and transplantation (87%) than with information provided on peritoneal dialysis (79%) or home haemodialysis (61%), and were more satisfied with information from health care professionals vs other sources such as social media. Most (75%) felt they had been involved in treatment selection, 29% perceived they had no free choice. Involvement in modality selection was associated with enhanced satisfaction with treatment (OR 3.13; 95% CI 2.72–3.60). Many respondents (64%) could not remember receiving education on how to manage their kidney disease in daily life. Perceptions on information seem to differ between countries. Conclusions Kidney patients reported to be overall satisfied with the information they received on their disease and treatment, although information seemed mostly to have been focused on one modality. Patients involved in modality selection were more satisfied with their treatment. However, in the perception of the patients, the freedom to choose an alternative modality showed room for improvement. PMID:25079071

  19. Effect of dual tasks on balance ability in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui bin; Park, Eun cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of training using dual tasks on balance ability in stroke patients. [Subjects] Forty stroke patients were divided into a dual-task training group (N = 20) and a single task training group (N = 20) randomly. [Methods] The subjects in the single-task traing group stood in a comfortable position, faced a therapist, then threw a Swiss ball back and forth. They then performed balance training in which they raised and lowered their ankles while facing forward or moved objects from one table to another. The DTG performed dual tasks, which involved performing a task on an unstable surface using a balance pad. Both groups received training 30?min per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] The DTG showed significant increases in weight distribution rate, anterior limit of stability, posterior limit of stability, and BBS scores compared with the STG. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, dual-task training and single-task training were effective in improving balance in stroke patients, dual task training is more effective for increasing balance ability. PMID:26357425

  20. Storytelling and professional learning: a phenomenographic study of students' experience of patient digital stories in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Angela

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports the findings of a phenomenographic study which sought to identify the different ways in which patient digital stories influence students' professional learning. Patient digital stories are short multimedia presentations that combine personal narratives, images and music to create a unique and often emotional story of a patients' experience of health care. While these are increasingly used in professional education little is known about how and what students learn through engagement with patient digital stories. Drawing upon interviews with 20 students within a pre-registration nursing programme in the UK, the study identifies four qualitatively different ways in which students approach and make sense of patient digital stories with implications for learning and professional identity development. Through an identification of the critical aspects of this variation valuable insights are generated into the pedagogic principles likely to engender transformational learning and patient centred practice. PMID:21074909

  1. Effects of Preoperative Clarithromycin Administration in Patients with Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Peri?, A; Baleti?, N; Milojevi?, M; Sotirovi?, J; Živi?, L; Peri?, AV; Vojvodi?, D

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: In recent years, various investigators have shown considerable interest in the use of macrolide antibiotics for treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effects of preoperative long-term, low-dose clarithromycin administration in patients with nasal polyposis. Methods: Eighty nasal polyp patients (42 non-atopic and 38 atopic) were included in this prospective, non-placebo controlled investigation and randomized equally to either the combined clarithromycin-surgical or surgical group. Forty patients received 500 mg of clarithromycin daily for eight weeks, and, after evaluation, they were treated by functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). The other 40 patients were treated only surgically. The nasal symptom scores and endoscopic scores after macrolide treatment/surgical treatment, and after six and 12 months of follow-up were evaluated. Results: After clarithromycin therapy, we found improvement in symptom scores in 25/40, and improvement in endoscopic scores in 19/40 patients. We found no significant difference in nasal symptom score between allergic and non-allergic patients regarding the outcome to macrolide (p = 0.352) or surgical treatment (p = 0.396). When we compared differences between endoscopic scores at the time points of 12 months and six months postoperatively (ESt12 minus ESt6), we found statistically lower differences in the clarithromycin-surgery group than in the surgery group (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Preoperative clarithromycin administration postponed nasal polyp relapse after FESS. Allergies have no influence on the clinical efficacy of clarithromycin therapy and on the efficacy of FESS. PMID:25867579

  2. Effect of hypnotherapy and educational intervention on brain response to visceral stimulusin the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lowén, Mats B.O.; Mayer, Emeran A.; Sjöberg, Martha; Tillisch, Kirsten; Naliboff, Bruce; Labus, Jennifer; Lundberg, Peter; Ström, Magnus; Engström, Maria; Walter, Susanna A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Gut directed hypnotherapy can reduce IBS symptoms but the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect remain unknown. Aim We determined the effect of hypnotherapy and educational intervention on brain responses to cued rectal distensions in IBS patients. Methods 44 women with moderate to severe IBS and 20 healthy controls (HCs) were included. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals were measured by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during expectation and delivery of high (45 mmHg) and low (15 mmHg) intensity rectal distensions. Twenty-five patients were assigned to hypnotherapy (HYP) and 16 to educational intervention (EDU). 31 patients completed treatments and post treatment fMRI. Results Similar symptom reduction was achieved in both groups. Clinically successful treatment (all responders) was associated with significant BOLD attenuation during high intensity distension in the dorsal and ventral anterior insula (cluster size 142, p=0.006, and cluster size 101, p=0.005, respectively). Moreover HYP responders demonstrated a pre-post treatment BOLD attenuation in posterior insula (cluster sizes 59, p=0.05) while EDU responders had a BOLD attenuation in prefrontal cortex (cluster size 60, p=0.05). Pre-post differences for expectation conditions were almost exclusively seen in the HYP group. Following treatment, the brain response to distension was similar to that observed in HCs, suggesting that the treatment had a normalizing effect on the central processing abnormality of visceral signals in IBS. Conclusions The abnormal processing and enhanced perception of visceral stimuli in IBS can be normalized by psychological interventions. Symptom improvement in the treatment groups may be mediated by different brain mechanisms. PMID:23617618

  3. The Effects of Vouchers in Higher Education: An Italian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Cappiello, Giuseppe; Catalano, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse the effect of introducing voucher schemes in higher education context. In the first part, the main economic characteristics of educational vouchers are discussed, in order to identify their expected effects on efficiency and equity in tertiary education. The second part contains the results of a case study…

  4. The Effectiveness of Private Voucher Education: Evidence from Structural School Switches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Bernardo; Mizala, Alejandra; Repetto, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors analyze the effect of private voucher education on student academic performance using new data on Chilean students and a novel identification strategy. Most schools in Chile provide either primary or secondary education. The authors analyze the effect of private voucher education on students who are forced to enroll at…

  5. [He that knows nothing doubts nothing: availability of foreign language patient education material for immigrant patients in Germany - a survey].

    PubMed

    Bungartz, Jessica; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Joos, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Patients with little knowledge of the German language have a special need for information. Due to language barriers they behave more passively in medical encounter, have a poorer knowledge about their disease and are generally less satisfied with their medical care. Foreign language patient information material could bridge the gap between medical consultation and the patients' self-responsibility and involve patients more actively in the treatment process. Based on extensive research in several areas (internet, clinic and practice leaflets, drug patient information leaflets) the present article illustrates that in all these areas foreign language patient information is very poorly available compared to German material. The reinforcement of the development of such material could lead to a higher involvement of immigrant patients' in the decision-making process, higher rates of patient safety and satisfaction and, overall, to a better quality of care for all patient groups in Germany. PMID:22176983

  6. Effects of child and adolescent health on educational progress.

    PubMed

    Lê, Félice; Diez Roux, Ana; Morgenstern, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how childhood and adolescent health may affect schooling is important for understanding the socioeconomic ramifications of poor early-life health as well as the relations between schooling and adult health. Using three waves of U.S. longitudinal data with extensive covariate information on a national sample of 2368 American children aged 5-14 at baseline, we used regression methods to investigate how patterns of general health status over a 10-year period relate to completed years of schooling at the end of follow-up. As a sensitivity analysis, we used sibling fixed effects models to help control for differences stemming from familial or community factors shared between siblings. The effect of health on years of completed schooling appeared to accumulate over time, and was more evident among children who were older at baseline. Among participants aged 5-7, 8-10, and 11-14 at baseline, average differences in years of completed schooling between participants with poor health in all 3 waves and those with good health in all 3 waves were 0.02 ([95% confidence interval] -0.31, 0.35), -0.50 (-0.88, -0.12), and -1.28 (-1.78, -0.78), respectively. Point estimates from fixed effects models were very similar. Our results document the emergence and compounding over time of health-related disparities in schooling at young ages, suggesting a vicious cycle between poor health and educational outcomes. Future research better characterizing how early-life health affects educational progress will ultimately be necessary for developing effective interventions to reduce educational and health disparities. PMID:23168177

  7. The Effects of Selected Inservice Education Methods on the Attitudes of Vocational Education Instructors Regarding Teaching Students with Physical Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Maynard J.; Davis, Paul D.

    A study determined effective inservice education methods to reduce the apprehension of experienced vocational education teachers regarding instruction of handicapped students. In order to guide the study, three null hypotheses were generated and tested. A three-group, randomized, pre- and post-test experimental design was utilized. Thirty teachers…

  8. The Effectiveness of Educational Technology Applications for Enhancing Mathematics Achievement in K-12 Classrooms: A Meta-Analysis. Educator's Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Research and Reform in Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes research on the effects of technology use on mathematics achievement in K-12 classrooms. The main research questions included: (1) Do education technology applications improve mathematics achievement in K-12 classrooms as compared to traditional teaching methods without education technology?; and (2) What study and research…

  9. Comprehensive Sexuality Education, Culture and Gender: The Effect of the Cultural Setting on a Sexuality Education Programme in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browes, Natalie C.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) is recognised as an effective method of sexual health education, with the school identified as a fitting site of implementation. Its holistic and participatory nature endeavours to develop the knowledge, attitudes and life-skills of students to help them secure their sexual and reproductive health and rights…

  10. The Effectiveness of Distance Education, Using Blended Method of Delivery for Limited-Resource Audiences in the Nutrition Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Casey; Koszewski, Wanda M.; Behrends, Donnia

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here sought to determine if the use of distance education lessons for teaching limited resource participants in a nutrition education program (NEP) is as effective as face-to-face methodology. One hundred and six participants were in the experimental group. Data was gathered at entry and examined behavior change, nutrient intake…

  11. Strengthening surgical handover: Developing and evaluating the effectiveness of a handover tool to improve patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Din, Nizar; Ghaderi, Shahrzad; O'Connell, Rachel; Johnson, Tayo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The European Working Time Directive and economic challenges have led to a paradigm of shift-work becoming common, and yet the continuation of high-quality patient care remains paramount. Effective and safe transfer of clinical information is critical as emphasised by the Royal College of Surgeons document ‘Safe handover: Guidance from the Working Time Directive working party (March 2007)’. The aim of this project was to design and implement a handover proforma in order to deliver a more efficient and safer system for patient care over the weekend. The surgical weekend handover proforma was designed following consultation with nursing and medical colleagues. It included a traffic light scoring system to alert the on-call team of the urgency of clinical review. An educational session was delivered to junior doctors on the surgical rotation to ensure accurate completion of the proforma. All trainee surgical doctors from Foundation Year 1 to Specialist Registrars were asked to complete a pre- and post-intervention questionnaire. Improvement was noted in all categories measured. 85% of the firms were using the new surgical weekend handover sheet. 78% of junior doctors were confident in understanding the patient's condition and executing the clinical jobs faster, with ward rounds lasting less than 3 hours. On average, 20% of patients were discharged per weekend during the trial period. Robust patient handover is vital to maintain patient safety and avoid adverse events. Our findings support the use of a surgical proforma to provide a consistent and structured approach to inpatient handover during the weekend.

  12. Research: Educational and Psychological Issues Effectiveness of a group diabetes education programme in under-served communities in South Africa: a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mash, R J; Rhode, H; Zwarenstein, M; Rollnick, S; Lombard, C; Steyn, K; Levitt, N

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of group education, led by health promoters using a guiding style, for people with Type 2 diabetes in public sector community health centres in Cape Town. Methods This was a pragmatic clustered randomized controlled trial with 17 randomly selected intervention and 17 control sites. A total of 860 patients with Type 2 diabetes, regardless of therapy used, were recruited from the control sites and 710 were recruited from the intervention sites. The control sites offered usual care, while the intervention sites offered a total of four monthly sessions of group diabetes education led by a health promoter. Participants were measured at baseline and 12 months later. Primary outcomes were diabetes self-care activities, 5% weight loss and a 1% reduction in HbA1c levels. Secondary outcomes were self-efficacy, locus of control, mean blood pressure, mean weight loss, mean waist circumference, mean HbA1c and mean total cholesterol levels and quality of life. Results A total of 422 (59.4%) participants in the intervention group did not attend any education sessions. No significant improvement was found in any of the primary or secondary outcomes, apart from a significant reduction in mean systolic (-4.65 mmHg, 95% CI 9.18 to -0.12; P = 0.04) and diastolic blood pressure (-3.30 mmHg, 95% CI -5.35 to -1.26; P = 0.002). Process evaluation suggested that there were problems with finding suitable space for group education in these under-resourced settings, with patient attendance and with full adoption of a guiding style by the health promoters. Conclusion The reported effectiveness of group diabetes education offered by more highly trained professionals, in well-resourced settings, was not replicated in the present study, although the reduction in participants’ mean blood pressure is likely to be of clinical significance. What’s new? The study adds to the scarce literature on diabetes education in Africa in the face of a growing public health problem in this continent. The study demonstrates a statistically and clinically significant reduction in participants’ mean blood pressure 1 year after the educational intervention. The study adds to the small amount of literature on group motivational interviewing type interventions for diabetes. The study adds to the small amount of literature on the use of lower-/mid-level health workers for diabetes education. PMID:24766179

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of the patient’s response to drug effect during general anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Clara; Tenreiro Machado, Jose; De Keyser, Robin; Decruyenaere, Johan; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2015-03-01

    In today's healthcare paradigm, optimal sedation during anesthesia plays an important role both in patient welfare and in the socio-economic context. For the closed-loop control of general anesthesia, two drugs have proven to have stable, rapid onset times: propofol and remifentanil. These drugs are related to their effect in the bispectral index, a measure of EEG signal. In this paper wavelet time-frequency analysis is used to extract useful information from the clinical signals, since they are time-varying and mark important changes in patient's response to drug dose. Model based predictive control algorithms are employed to regulate the depth of sedation by manipulating these two drugs. The results of identification from real data and the simulation of the closed loop control performance suggest that the proposed approach can bring an improvement of 9% in overall robustness and may be suitable for clinical practice.

  14. Connecting resident education to patient outcomes: the evolution of a quality improvement curriculum in an internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad A; Diers, Tiffiny; Schauer, Daniel P; Warm, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System, residency programs must connect resident-physician education to improved patient care outcomes. Residency training programs, however, face multiple obstacles in doing so. Results from residency quality improvement (QI) curricula tend to show improvement in simple process-based measures but not in more complex outcomes of care such as diabetes or blood pressure control. In this article, the authors describe the evolution of their QI educational program for internal medicine residents at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center within the structure of a novel training model called the Ambulatory Long Block. They discuss a resident-run project that led to reduced rates of patients with uncontrolled diabetes as an example of improvement in outcome measures. Despite favorable results from that particular resident group, the successful intervention did not spread practice-wide. Using this example, they detail the phases of evolution and lessons learned from their curriculum from 2006 to 2014 within a framework of previously published general principles for successful QI education, including those of exemplary care and learning sites. Successful programs require leadership, faculty expertise and mentorship, data management, learner buy-in, and patient engagement. Their experience will hopefully be of help to others as they attempt to simultaneously improve care and education. Further research and innovation are needed in this area, including optimizing strategies for strengthening resident-driven projects through partnership with nursing, allied health, and longitudinally engaged faculty members. PMID:25054419

  15. Patient-Provider Communications in Outpatient Clinic Settings: A Clinic-Based Evaluation of Mobile Device and Multimedia Mediated Communications for Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Benjamin; San Nicolas-Rocca, Tonia

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have provided evidence of the importance of quality provider-patient communications and have suggested improvements to patient understanding by using video-based instruction. Objective The objective of this study was to understand how mobile information technology assisted video and three-dimensional (3D) image instruction, provided by a health care worker, influences two categories of outcome: (1) patient understanding of information about their condition and detailed medical discharge instructions; and (2) patient perceptions and attitudes toward their health care providers, which included physicians, nurses, and staff. We hypothesize that video and 3D image instruction, provided on a mobile, tablet hardware platform, will improve patient understanding about the diagnostic testing, diagnoses, procedures, medications, and health topics provided to them. We also propose that use of the tablet/video combination will result in improved attitudinal evaluation by patients of their providers and the treatment plan. Methods This study evaluated a hospital clinic-based trial (patient N=284) of video and 3D image instruction, provided on a mobile, tablet hardware platform, and its potential to improve patient understanding about the diagnostic testing, diagnoses, procedures, medications, and health topics provided to them. Results Results showed strong evidence that the system was perceived as helpful for improving patient understanding, and that it improved communication between physicians and patients (P<.001). The advanced age of some patients had no effect on their perceptions of the tablet-based mediation. Physician comments provided useful insights on effective use of such systems in the future. Implications for further development and future research are discussed. Conclusions This study added to the body of evidence that computer-assisted video instructional systems for patients can improve patient understanding of medical instructions from their health care providers and assist with patient compliance. In addition, such systems can be appealing to both patient and provider. PMID:25583145

  16. Randomized, controlled trial of the effect of e-feedback on knowledge about radiotherapy of breast cancer patients in Finland.

    PubMed

    Siekkinen, Mervi; Kesänen, Jukka; Vahlberg, Tero; Pyrhönen, Seppo; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-11-23

    The growing number of women with breast cancer and their unmet knowledge expectations of radiotherapy pose a challenge to develop effective electronic patient education. Development efforts should be focused on e-feedback on knowledge because of its positive effects. In this study, we evaluated how an e-feedback knowledge intervention (e-Re-Know) before first radiotherapy improves breast cancer patients' knowledge of radiotherapy and identified the associations with patients' characteristics. Women with breast cancer (n?=?128) were randomized prior to the radiotherapy period either to the intervention group or control group. The outcome measured three months after the radiotherapy period was knowledge level of radiotherapy. The increase in knowledge level was higher in the intervention group after adjustment for baseline knowledge level, and a significantly higher increase in knowledge level was seen in one subdomain, side-effect self-care, compared to the control group. The results of this study indicate that the e-Re-Know can be used in patient education to support empowerment. Future research should target new applications of e-Re-Know available on the Internet for those interested in the subject. PMID:25417545

  17. Development of an Educational Video to Improve Patient Knowledge and Communication with Their Healthcare Providers about Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Mira L.; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J.; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider, and system level barriers. Purpose: To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. Methods: Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of the CRC…

  18. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Welch, Vivian A.; Trafford, Laura; Sredic, Danjiel; Pohran, Kathryn; Smoljanic, Jovana; Vukosavljevic, Ivan; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Bell, Mary; Finestone, Hillel M.; Lineker, Sydney; King, Judy; Jelly, Wilma; Casimiro, Lynn; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Laferriere, Lucie; Lambert, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objective of this article is to create guidelines for education interventions in the management of patients ([greater than] 18 years old) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group identified and synthesized evidence from comparative controlled trials using Cochrane Collaboration methods. The…

  19. To develop a world-class center for education, patient care, and research that prepares Nevada's doctors with the most

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Vision To develop a world-class center for education, patient care, and research that prepares and addiction, neuroscience, cardiology, cancer, and orthopedics · Generate a local economic impact of more than report (2011) Courtesy of Medical Media 2|17|2015 #12;Tuition and Fees

  20. The Education-Centered Medical Home is Feinberg's highly innovative version of the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Its mission is to provide students with early

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    The Education-Centered Medical Home is Feinberg's highly innovative version of the Patient organizing principle of the Education-Centered Medical Home. We aim to maximize four overlapping aspects in meaningfully incorporating the PCMH model into undergraduate medical education · Become a center of excellence