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1

Closed-circuit TV: an effective patient education tool.  

PubMed

Patient education is well accepted to be an integral component of professional nursing practice. Although most nurses value patient teaching, the reality of the nursing shortage demands that innovative strategies be utilized to plan, implement and evaluate in-hospital patient education programs. Advances in computer technology have made closed-circuit television (CCTV) an attractive option for hospitals to fulfil their patient education mandate. As a delivery system, CCTV can be of considerable value. But as is true of other instructional media used to supplement educational efforts, CCTV also provides many traps that can limit its effectiveness. The biggest danger is the misuse of the tool by attempting to replace rather than supplement human interaction during the education process. This paper provides practical suggestions for the creative use of CCTV as a teaching tool to enhance patient education efforts. Pitfalls inherent in planning and implementing a CCTV system will be discussed. PMID:1463759

Chan, V

2

Educating Patient Educators: Enhancing Instructional Effectiveness in Physical Therapy for Low Back Pain Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the effectiveness of a training program designed for physical therapists (N=19) to aid them in the enhancement of patient education. Five therapist-skills were tested. After the training only a minority of the trained skills appeared to have improved. Results show that the training program was not very effective. (Author/MKA)

Kerssens, Jan J.; Sluijs, Emmy M.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Knibbe, Hanneke J.; Hermans, Irma M. J.

1999-01-01

3

Effect of Patient Education on Postcolposcopy Follow-Up  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of patient education on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and abnormal Pap smears for women scheduled for colposcopy and their compliance to treatment recommendations. A convenience sample of 60 women was included in the study. The experimental group included 30 women scheduled for colposcopy who received education prior to procedure. Thirty

Kathleen M. Olbrys

2011-01-01

4

Effect of education on self-efficacy of Turkish patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to compare the effect of structured education on self-efficacy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study was carried out with an experimental group on which a structured education was provided, and a control group on which only educational advice was provided. There were 30 patients in both groups. Control and experimental group measurements

Ma?firet Kara; Türkinaz A?TI

2004-01-01

5

Patient and relative education in community psychiatry: a randomized controlled trial regarding its effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Family psychoeducation has a well-documented effect on the short-term prognosis in schizophrenia. Less is known about the\\u000a effectiveness of shorter programmes with the main focus on information for patients (patient education) or for patients and\\u000a relatives (family education). Methods: A randomized study of the effectiveness of an eight-session psychoeducational programme for patients with schizophrenia\\u000a and for their relatives was

L.-B. Merinder; A. G. Viuff; H. D. Laugesen; K. Clemmensen; S. Misfelt; B. Espensen

1999-01-01

6

Effects on incident reporting after educating residents in patient safety: a controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Medical residents are key figures in delivering health care and an important target group for patient safety education. Reporting incidents is an important patient safety domain, as awareness of vulnerabilities could be a starting point for improvements. This study examined effects of patient safety education for residents on knowledge, skills, attitudes, intentions and behavior concerning incident reporting.Methods: A controlled

J. D. Jansma; C. Wagner; R. W. ten Kate; A. B. Bijnen

2011-01-01

7

Patient Education Strategies in Dermatology  

PubMed Central

Patient education is an important aspect of patient care in dermatology. Successful education increases patient satisfaction and results in improved outcomes and adherence. This article individually evaluates several patient-education strategies: verbal education, written information, group-based learning, audiotapes, videotapes, computer-assisted education, and the internet. The review presents the strengths and limitations of each strategy based on recognized barriers to effective patient education that were discussed in Part 1. Additionally, a summary of recommendations for effective patient education is provided.

Holder, Jessica L.

2009-01-01

8

Symptom clusters among cancer patients and effects of an educational symptom control intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary An abundance of research has observed that patients with cancer experience multiple concurrent symptoms, and recent research suggests that certain clusters of symptoms may have a synergistic effect on one another and on future patient outcomes. In this study we first identified relevant symptom clusters for a sample of cancer patients, and then tested the effectiveness of an educational

Margot E. Kurtz; J Cleo Kurtz; Charles W. Given; Barbara Given

2007-01-01

9

[Development and short-term effects of a standardized patient education program for in-patient cardiologic rehabilitation].  

PubMed

Patient education is an essential part in the treatment of coronary heart disease in medical rehabilitation. In the German-speaking area, no standardized and evaluated patient education program for coronary heart disease is available so far. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of a quality assured patient education program based on a health-education program of the German statutory pension insurance scheme.In a multi-level approach, an existing program was modified concerning treatment evidence, practical guidelines, theories of health and illness behavior and quality criteria for patient education as well as clinical experience and thereafter manualized. In a formative evaluation, feasibility and patient acceptance of this modified program were assessed using evaluation questionnaires of patients and trainers. Afterwards, effects of the patient education program as compared to a traditional education program were assessed on a short-term (at discharge), medium-term (6-month follow-up) and long-term (12-month follow-up) basis in a multicenter quasi-experimental control group study of patients with coronary heart disease (n=434).Results of the formative evaluation demonstrate an overall good acceptance and a good feasibility of the manualized program. Short-term results show a significant small treatment effect in the primary outcome variable patients' knowledge (p=0.001, ?2 =0.028). Furthermore, small effects were also observed among some secondary outcomes, such as attitude towards medication, planning of physical activity, psychological quality of life and satisfaction with the education program.A standardized education program for patients with coronary heart disease has been developed in a systematic process based on established quality standards. Depending on the outstanding medium and long-term effects, the program may be recommended for general use in medical rehabilitation. The manual provides the prerequisites allowing for a successful transfer into clinical practice. PMID:23749622

Seekatz, B; Haug, G; Mosler, G; Schwaab, B; Altstidl, R; Worringen, U; Faller, H; Meng, K

2013-06-07

10

Strategies for selecting effective patient nutrition education materials.  

PubMed

Nutrition and diet therapy are at the center of health promotion activities and self-management of chronic diseases. To assist an individual in making informed decisions regarding his or her diet and increase adherence to dietary recommendations or treatments, healthcare professionals must select health information that is appropriate to the client's level of understanding. A systematic approach in the evaluation of patient education material, whether in print or on the World Wide Web, must focus on the information's content, literacy level, graphical displays, layout and typography, motivating principles, cultural relevance, and feasibility. Additional criteria should be evaluated when accessing Web sites and include source, site credibility, conflict of interest, disclaimer, disclosure, navigation, and interactivity information. PMID:20962303

Clayton, Laura H

2010-10-01

11

Effects of Education and Relaxation Training with Essential Hypertension Patients.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Thirty subjects with essential hypertension were randomly assigned to either a control, education, or education with relaxation training group. Independent blood pressure recordings were collected by medical staff a pretest, and 8-week follow-up. Results ...

R. LaGrone T. B. Jeffrey C. L. Ferguson G. Greenfield

1987-01-01

12

The Effects of PostRadiation Education Pamphlet On Self-efficacy in Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy often experience anxiety and a sense of loss of control immediately after completion of their active treatment. This study aims to evaluate, using a cross-sectional survey, the effects of a post-radiation education pamphlet on the self-efficacy of cancer patients in terms of seeking\\/understanding medical information, seeking support, and coping with radiation side effects. Forty-eight patients from

Kevin Lian; Caroline Davey; Michele Wake; Angela Cashell

2011-01-01

13

Audit-based education: a potentially effective program for improving guideline achievement in CKD patients.  

PubMed

The achievement of treatment guidelines in patients with chronic kidney disease is poor, and more efforts are needed to improve this. Audit-based education is a program that may contribute to this improvement. de Lusignana et al. investigated whether audit-based education is effective in lowering systolic blood pressure in a primary-care setting. Although the program is inventive and promising, several adjustments are needed before it can be applied as an effective strategy. PMID:23989357

de Goeij, Moniek C M; Rotmans, Joris I

2013-09-01

14

[Patient education in France].  

PubMed

Patient education is an increasingly important component of therapeutic strategies, especially for chronic illnesses, which currently affect about 12% of the French population and will undoubtedly increase in coming years. Patient education aims to enhance patients' personal responsibility and participation in their therapeutic management and quality of life. Article 84 of French health legislation passed in 2009 inscribes patient education in the Public Health Code for the first time. It distinguishes personalized therapeutic education, patient accompaniment, and learning programs. Direct links between patients and drug companies are prohibited. However, the notion of patient accompaniment remains to be defined, along with the evaluation of patient education, funding sources and practical modalities. PMID:22812156

Bertrand, Dominique

2011-10-01

15

A study on the effect of patient and community education in prevention of disability programme.  

PubMed

The effect of self-care learning by leprosy patients in prevention of disabilities was studied by adapting two strategies in two subcentres of a project in South India, one through patient education by trained field staff and the other through community education involving trained animators and health committees. One of the subcentres was taken as control where neither of the strategies was employed. In terms of results, though both the strategies were found to be effective in containing occurrence of new deformities among high risk patients and healing of trophic ulcers in hands and feet, strategy I i.e. self-care education of patients by concerned field personnel without prejudice to their routine work is recommended because of ease in diffusion of strategy. PMID:8849920

Ethiraj, T; Antony, P; Krishnamurthy, P; Reddy, N B

16

Educating surgical patients to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism: an audit of an effective strategy  

PubMed Central

Objectives Venous thromboembolism (VTE) causes approximately 25,000 deaths each year from hospital-acquired thrombosis in the UK. Patient understanding of risk factors and preventive measures is important in preventing VTE. This audit was designed to assess surgical patient awareness and understanding of VTE risk factors and prophylaxis. Design A questionnaire was designed to assess preoperative patient understanding of components of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Leaflets were designed to address gaps in understanding and junior doctors were given guidance on patient education. A second group of patients completed the same questionnaire after introduction of the education system. Setting Worthing Hospital, UK. Participants One hundred and twenty-one patients due to undergo major general surgery. Seventy-one participants completed the questionnaire prior to implementation of the education system, and 50 after. Main outcome measures Improvement in patient awareness of VTE, its risk factors and its preventative measures (in response to the education system). Results Following the introduction of a targeted VTE education system, there was a significant improvement in the awareness of VTE to 90% (P < 0.01), its signs to 80% (P < 0.01), and its preventative measures to 84% (P < 0.01). Conclusions Patient education is of paramount importance in reducing the risks of VTE perioperatively. A simple method of introducing patient education at pre-assessment clinic and as part of their discharge planning, for major elective surgery, is an effective system in improving patient understanding of VTE, its risk factors and the importance of prophylaxis. It may also increase compliance.

Sadideen, Hazim; O'Callaghan, John M; Navidi, Maziar; Sayegh, Mazin

2011-01-01

17

The effect of education given to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on self-care.  

PubMed

This research was performed as a single group pretest--posttest experimental design to determine the effect of education given to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on self-care. The research was performed between October 2007 and June 2008 in the Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinics located in A and B Blocks of Erzincan State Hospital. The research population included 100 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who attended the above mentioned units between the specified dates and met the inclusion criteria. Patients were subjected to a pretest using a patient identification form, Diabetes Self-Care Scale (DSCS) form in Turkish language and metabolic control parameters. A statistically significant difference was found between the mean values of pre-education and posteducation DSCS scores with an increase in mean posteducation scores. These results demonstrate that the education given to patients improves their self-care and metabolic control variables. PMID:22435981

Karakurt, Papatya; Ka??kç?, Ma?firet Kara

2012-04-01

18

The effect of educational intervention on the disease knowledge of diabetes mellitus patients.  

PubMed

The prevention of diabetes and its complications is a challenge for the healthcare team. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of educational action on the disease knowledge of patients with type 2 diabetes. A randomized clinical trial was conducted with 62 patients registered in a service of reference in the treatment of hypertension in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire applied to the Intervention (IG) and Control (CG) groups at the beginning and at the end of the study. The IG participated in group educational activities, using problematization methodology. The results showed a significant increase in knowledge about diabetes in the patients of the IG, in all the topics (p<0.05). In the CG, some changes were observed in knowledge, however, these were fewer when compared with the IG. In conclusion, it was possible to increase disease knowledge through the performance of educational activities. Clinical trial identifier: RBR-58n26h. PMID:22991109

Pereira, Dalma Alves; Costa, Nilce Maria da Silva Campos; Sousa, Ana Luíza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; Zanini, Cláudia Regina de Oliveira

19

Effects of patient education on compliance with basic treatment regimens and health in recent onset active rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo determine the effects of patient education on compliance and on health in patients with active, recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA).METHODSA randomised, controlled, assessor blinded, one year trial. The experimental group followed an education programme. All patients started on sulphasalazine therapy. Compliance with sulphasalazine was measured by pill counting. Compliance rates with regimens of physical exercise, endurance activities, and energy

Herman L M Brus; Martin A F J van de Laar; Erik Taal; Johannes J Rasker; Oene Wiegman

1998-01-01

20

A patient education program is cost-effective for preventing failure of endoscopic procedures in a gastroenterology department  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:The growing use and complexity of endoscopy procedures in GI units has increased the need for good patient preparation. Earlier studies in this area have focused on the psychological benefits of patient education programs. The present study was directed at determining cost-effectiveness of a patient education program.METHODS:A prospective, randomized, controlled design was used. The patient population consisted of 142 patients

G. Abuksis; M. Mor; N. Segal; I. Shemesh; I. Morad; S. Plaut; E. Weiss; J. Sulkes; G. Fraser; Y. Niv

2001-01-01

21

The effects of patient education in COPD in a 1-year follow-up randomised, controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims were to explore the effects and health economic consequences of patient education in patients with COPD in a 12-month follow-up. Sixty-two patients with mild to moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were at our out-patient clinic randomly allocated to an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group participated in a 4h group patient education, followed by

Frode Gallefoss

2004-01-01

22

Effects on caregiver burden of education related to home care in patients undergoing hemodialysis.  

PubMed

Caring for a patient undergoing hemodialysis is highly stressful and can negatively affect a caregiver's physical and psychological well-being. This study was conducted to examine the effect of educational support concerning caregiver burden and given to the caregivers of hemodialysis patients. This experimental study was performed with 122 caregivers. Patients' data were collected by means of Personal Information Form and Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale (ZCBS). Characteristics of caregivers of hemodialysis patients were analyzed descriptively in terms of frequencies and percentages for categorical data, means, and standard deviations. Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskall-Wallis test, and percentages were used in the data analysis. The mean ZCBS score was 52.1?±?8.6 (range, 0-88). Among the caregivers, the mean score of the ZCBS was significantly higher in women, single, young, family relatives as "daughter/sister/brother/daughter-in-law and town/district, high educational level (P?educational needs of home-based such as nutrition (35.2%), dialysis (27.8%), fistula care (20.4%), catheter care (18.8%), the information about chronic kidney disease (18.0%), blood pressure (17.2%), weight control (17.2%), hygiene (3.1%), and travel/exercise (6.5%). The post-educational mean scores (55.0?±?7.6) of caregiver burden were observed to be lower than the pre-educational scores (43.9?±?5.2), and the difference was found to be statistically significant. The home-based educational program demonstrated a decrease in the burden of hemodialysis caregivers. PMID:23279118

Mollao?lu, Mukadder; Kayata?, Mansur; Yürügen, Birsen

2012-12-27

23

Effect of Sleep Skills Education on Sleep Quality in Patients Attending a Psychiatry Partial Hospitalization Program  

PubMed Central

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I)–informed sleep skills education on sleep quality and initial sleep latency in patients attending a psychiatry partial hospitalization program. Method: This retrospective chart review was conducted in a psychiatry partial hospitalization program of a teaching Veterans Affairs medical center located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Patients typically attend the program for 1 month. Data were collected from a continuous improvement project from November 2007 to March 2009. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was administered to the patients at the time of entry into the program and at their discharge. Patients who completed both PSQI assessments were included in the study. Results: A total of 183 patients completed both PSQI assessments. Of those, 106 patients attended CBT-I–informed sleep skills education and 77 did not (all patients completed the psychiatry partial hospitalization program). For all patients, the mean ± SD baseline PSQI score was 12.5 ± 4.8. PSQI scores improved by a mean of 3.14 points (95% CI, 2.5–3.8; P < .001) in all patients who completed the psychiatry partial hospitalization program. For all patients, there were significant reductions in sleep latency (17.6 minutes) (t183 = 6.58, P < .001) and significant increases in overall sleep time, from 6.1 to 6.7 hours (t183 = 4.72, P < .001). There was no statistically significant difference in PSQI scores of patients who attended CBT-I–informed sleep skills education and those who did not during their stay in the partial hospitalization program. Conclusions: The quality of sleep and initial sleep latency improved in patients who completed the psychiatry partial hospitalization program regardless of whether they attended CBT-I–informed sleep skills education or not. In this study, a structured psychiatry partial hospitalization program improved perceived sleep quality and initial sleep latency. Additional randomized controlled trials with a higher intensity of CBT-I–informed sleep skills education are needed.

Dieperink, Michael E.; Thuras, Paul; Kunisaki, Ken M.; Schumacher, Marianne M.; Germain, Anne; Amborn, Becky; Hurwitz, Thomas D.

2013-01-01

24

The Effects of Pre-Coronary Angioplasty Education and Counselling on Patients and Their Spouses: A Preliminary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The effect of a precoronary angioplasty education and counseling program on knowledge and psychological status of patients and on knowledge and quality of life/coping status of their spouses was evaluated. Knowledge, psychological status, and coping status of patients (N=40), their spouses, and controls were assessed. Results show that education

Tooth, Leigh; McKenna, Kryss; Maas, Frikkie; McEniery, Paul

1997-01-01

25

The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

2012-01-01

26

The Effects of an Information Specialist On Patient Care and Medical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A medical librarian joined the pulmonary medicine health care team at Cook County Hospital in order to provide a quick response to information needs regarding patient care, graduate medical education, continuing education, and research. (Author)

Roach, Agnes A.; Addington, Whitney W.

1975-01-01

27

Effect of an education programme for patients with osteoarthritis in primary care - a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease, considered to be one of the major public health problems. Research suggests that patient education is feasible and valuable for achieving improvements in quality of life, in function, well-being and improved coping. Since 1994, Primary Health Care in Malmö has used a patient education programme directed towards OA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of this education programme for patients with OA in primary health care in terms of self-efficacy, function and self-perceived health. Method The study was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the EuroQol-5D and Arthritis self-efficacy scale were used to measure self-perceived health and self-efficacy and function was measured with Grip Ability Test for the upper extremity and five different functional tests for the lower extremity. Results We found differences between the intervention group and the control group, comparing the results at baseline and after 6 months in EuroQol-5D (p < 0.001) and in standing one leg eyes closed (p = 0.02) in favour of the intervention group. No other differences between the groups were found. Conclusion This study has shown that patient education for patients with osteoarthritis is feasible in a primary health care setting and can improve self-perceived health as well as function in some degree, but not self-efficacy. Further research to investigate the effect of exercise performance on function, as well as self-efficacy is warranted. Trial registration The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov. Registration number: NCT00979914

2010-01-01

28

Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

2013-01-01

29

Patient Education: An Annotated Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The topics included are: (1) Background on development of patient education programs; (2) Patient education interventions; (3) References for health professionals; and (4) Research and evaluation in patient education.

J. J. Simmons

1975-01-01

30

Effectiveness of Therapeutic Education and Respiratory Rehabilitation Programs for the Patient with Asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asthma is a chronic complex and heterogeneous disease, with great variability and has a huge impact, not only on patients who suffer the disease but also their families and society in general. Educating asthmatic patients and their families is essential for therapeutic intervention. Through continuous, dynamic and adaptive education, changes in attitudes and behaviours of the patient and family can

Roberto Cano-De La Cuerda; Ana Isabel Useros-Olmo; Elena Muñoz-Hellín

2010-01-01

31

[Management of type 2 diabetes: patient education].  

PubMed

Patient education emerged initially as an essential component of the management of type 1 diabetes. Patient education has also been for long an integral part of the recommendations for managing type 2 diabetes. Studies about patient education and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated the effectiveness of patient education by studying the evolution of bioclinic markers including HbA1c. However, if we return to the foundations of patient education definition, we cannot summarize the effectiveness of patient education on the only decrease of HbA1c. So, if the aim of patient education is to support patients to take better care of themselves, it might be interesting to use other types of evaluation methodology, including qualitative studies, to reflect the different dimensions of patient education, especially psychosocial. PMID:23523080

Meillet, Lucie; Combes, Jérôme; Penfornis, Alfred

2013-03-21

32

Postoperative Patient Education: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Knowledge of the effects of the specific approach, mode of delivery, and dose of educational interventions is essential to develop and implement effective postoperative educational interventions. Understanding the relationships of patient characteristics to outcomes is important for educational interventions. Purpose and method: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine who would most benefit from postoperative education, given

Suzanne Fredericks; Sepali Guruge; Souraya Sidani; Teresa Wan

2010-01-01

33

Developing patient education in community pharmacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians? patient education behavior\\u000aand the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities\\u000ain the pharmacy. This summary reports about the research methodology and the results.\\u000aResearch methodology\\u000aThe studied patient education behavior concerned

A. T. G. Blom

1996-01-01

34

Effect of an education programme for patients with osteoarthritis in primary care - a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease, considered to be one of the major public health problems. Research suggests that patient education is feasible and valuable for achieving improvements in quality of life, in function, well-being and improved coping. Since 1994, Primary Health Care in Malmö has used a patient education programme directed towards OA. The aim of this study

Eva Ekvall Hansson; Malin Jönsson-Lundgren; Anne-Marie Ronnheden; Eva Sörensson; Åsa Bjärnung; Leif E Dahlberg

2010-01-01

35

The effectiveness of nutritional education on the knowledge of diabetic patients using the health belief model  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Patients have a major role in the control and treatment of type 2 diabetes. So, knowledge of different aspects of this disease especially diet therapy is very important for these patients. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Health Belief Model (HBM) on nutrition education in type 2 diabetic patients. METHOD: Eighty eight type 2 diabetic patients attending Iranian Diabetes Association seminars were randomly selected to participate in the study (44 in intervention group and 44 in control group). The intervention was consisted of two educational sessions each one for 80 minutes. Data were collected by a validated and reliable questionnaire (58 questions) before intervention and one month after intervention. RESULTS: After intervention, knowledge scores increased in the intervention group compared to the control group (Mean differences in the intervention and test group: 22.68 ± 15.90 vs - 2.27 ± 17.30, P < 0.001). Perceived susceptibility increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group (27.5 ± 18.5 vs 3.9 ± 17.2, P < 0.001). The result was the same for perceived severity, perceived threatened and perceived benefits (P < 0.001). In contrast perceived barriers reduced in the intervention group compared to the control diet (-14.7 ± 13.3 vs 0.9 ± 13.9, P < 0.001). In the intervention group, behavior grades increased more than control group (34.61 ± 14.93 vs -0.23 ± 8.52, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The efficacy of the health belief model in nutritional education to the diabetic patients was confirmed in the present study.

Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Entezari, Mohammad Hasan; Kamran, Aziz; Azadbakht, Leila

2009-01-01

36

Randomized trial of self-management education in asthmatic patients and effects of depressive symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Self-management education is a cornerstone of routine asthma care. Objectives To improve asthma knowledge and self-efficacy and to assess effects in patients with depressive symptoms. Methods In a randomized trial, controls received asthma brochures and social support through frequent follow-up visits. Intervention patients made a contract to adopt a behavior to improve asthma and received a workbook, weekly reinforcements for 12 weeks, and frequent follow-up visits. Outcomes were Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores and emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for asthma. Results Ninety patients were randomized to each group. Mean age was 43 years, 84% were women, and mean study time was 27 months. Intervention patients had more improvement in AQLQ scores at 5 months, but this difference was not sustained. For the entire period, AQLQ scores improved by a clinically important difference from 4.1 to a mean of 5.1 in both groups (P < .001) with no difference between groups (P = .91). In multivariate analysis, younger age, more education, better enrollment AQLQ score, more asthma self-efficacy and knowledge, and fewer depressive symptoms were associated with more improvement (P < .05 for all). Similar results were found for the SF-36. Thirty-one percent of patients had an ED visit, and 9% were hospitalized, with no differences between groups. In multivariate analysis, female sex, expecting to be cured of asthma, less asthma knowledge, and more depressive symptoms were associated with ED visits. Being in the intervention group attenuated the effects of depressive symptoms for all outcomes. Conclusions Quality of life improved in both groups, with particular benefit in intervention patients with depressive symptoms.

Mancuso, Carol A.; Sayles, Wendy; Allegrante, John P.

2010-01-01

37

Patient Education Thesaurus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood…

Cooper, Lynn

38

Effects of patient education on compliance with basic treatment regimens and health in recent onset active rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To determine the effects of patient education on compliance and on health in patients with active, recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA).?METHODS—A randomised, controlled, assessor blinded, one year trial. The experimental group followed an education programme. All patients started on sulphasalazine therapy. Compliance with sulphasalazine was measured by pill counting. Compliance rates with regimens of physical exercise, endurance activities, and energy conservation were measured by questionnaires. Compliance with prescriptions of joint protection was scored using a test for joint protection performance. Health was measured by a Disease Activity Score (function of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Ritchie score, and number of swollen joints), C reactive protein, Dutch-AIMS scores, and M-HAQ scores, range of motion of shoulder, elbow, and knee joints. Parameters were scored at baseline and after three, six, and 12 months.?RESULTS—Sixty of 65 patients gave informed consent, five of them withdrew from follow up. Compliance with sulphasalazine exceeded 80% with no differences between groups. Compliance with physical exercise (at three months), energy conservation (at three and at 12 months), and joint protection (at three months) improved significantly more in the experimental group. The improvements of health were not different in the groups.?CONCLUSION—Compliance with sulphasalazine among patients with active, recent onset RA is high, whether formal patient education is followed or not. Compliance with physical exercise, energy conservation, and joint protection was increased by patient education. Formal patient education did not improve health status.?? Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; compliance; health status; patient education

Brus, H.; van de Laar, M. A F J; Taal, E.; Rasker, J.; Wiegman, O.

1998-01-01

39

Comparison of Patient Education Methods: Effects on Knowledge of Cardiac Rehabilitation Principles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Patient education programs for persons undergoing cardiac surgery related to knowledge of cardiac rehabilitation principles were conducted with either traditional (n=49) or collaborative (n=47) educational interventions. The two methods produced similar levels of knowledge, but significant differences appeared depending on whether subjects had…

Thomas, Julie Jepsen

1996-01-01

40

The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

2012-01-01

41

The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

2012-01-01

42

An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective

Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

2011-01-01

43

A Supportive-Educational Intervention for Heart Failure Patients in Iran: The Effect on Self-Care Behaviours  

PubMed Central

Background. Chronic heart failure is a major health and social problem. The promotion of self-care behaviours can potentially assist patients to effectively manage this chronic condition and prevent worsening of the disease. Formal personalized educational interventions that provide support and take into consideration the cultural context are needed. Objective. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of a supportive-educational intervention on self-care behaviours of heart failure patients in Iran. Methods. This research was a prospective, randomized trial of a supportive-educational intervention. Eighty heart failure patients were randomly assigned to receive the supportive-educational intervention or usual care. The intervention consisted of a one-hour, nurse-led, in-person education session and postdischarge followup by telephone over three months. Data were collected at baseline, one, two, and three months. Results. The control and intervention groups did not differ in self-care scores at baseline (P > 0.05). Each of the self-care scores was significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group at 1, 2, and 3 months (P < 0.001). There were significant differences in self-care behaviours over the three months, among participants in the intervention group. Conclusion. This study provides support for the effectiveness of a supportive-educational intervention to increase self-care behaviours among Iranian patients suffering from chronic heart failure.

Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Howard, A. Fuchsia; Jamshidi, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

44

Patient education: compliance or emancipation?  

PubMed

What is patient education? How do nurses teach? What is the meaning of patient education in the secondary care setting to people who have a chronic illness such as asthma? What is the meaning of patient education to nurses in the secondary care setting? How do the political, economic, social and cultural contexts of secondary care and nursing education influence education of people with a chronic illness? PMID:8634502

Parmee, R

1995-07-01

45

Group education for rheumatoid arthritis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the effectiveness of group education programs in improving the knowledge, behavior, and health status of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and evaluates to what extent various programs fulfill certain criteria for educational self-management programs. Thirty-one studies are reviewed: in 12, patients with various rheumatic diseases including RA were included, and in 19, only RA patients were studied.

Erik Taal; Johannes J. Rasker; Oene Wiegman

1997-01-01

46

The effect of pharmacist education on asthma treatment plans for simulated patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine if an educational program designed for community pharmacists to help patients self manage their asthma could\\u000a improve pharmacists abilities to facilitate asthma treatment plans. Setting Hamilton and Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Method A randomized controlled trial involving volunteer community pharmacists who received either an asthma education program (AEP;\\u000a intervention group) or a delayed AEP (control group). The AEP

Lisa Dolovich; Mona Sabharwal; Karen Agro; Gary Foster; Annie Lee; Lisa McCarthy; Andrew R. Willan

2007-01-01

47

Creating an anticoagulant patient education class.  

PubMed

A patient education workgroup was developed on a progressive care medical/vascular surgical unit. The workgroup identified patient education needs regarding discharge education for postsurgical patients and those discharging with oral anticoagulants (OAC). Staff surveys aided the workgroup in identifying a need for additional discharge education for patients and families. After various methods of patient education were explored, it was determined the workgroup could best meet the needs of the patient population through a class format providing group discussion and interaction. Logistical details and class formatting were configured to meet both the needs of the patients and the nursing staff. Current institutional patient education pamphlets were used to develop the content for the class. Physician review and input were obtained during the development of the content. A patient education specialist was also consulted to ensure proper literacy levels were used. To meet the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal regarding anticoagulant safety, the content focused on home management, which included the following: knowledge of INR goal range, dietary factors, when to call the provider and safety precautions. Other topics to promote self-efficacy in anticoagulation therapy were also included in the content. Postclass evaluations completed by patients and families provided useful feedback for continuous improvement and patient satisfaction. Preliminary survey results indicate high patient satisfaction with the class. Plans include a quality improvement project to evaluate the effectiveness of the patient education class on OAC. PMID:21074115

Eickhoff, Jennifer S; Wangen, Tina M; Notch, Katie B; Ferguson, Tanya J; Nickel, Travis W; Schafer, Amy R; Bush, Diana L

2010-12-01

48

The Effect of Educational Program Based on BASNEF Model for Eye Care in Non-insulin Dependent Diabetic Patients.  

PubMed

Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of educational program based on the BASNEF (Belief, Attitude, Subjective Norm, and Enabling Factors) Model on eye care among patients with insulin independent diabetes mellitus in Shiraz City, Fars Province, Iran. Methods: We enrolled 100 patients with non-insulin independent diabetes mellitus (Type II) fulfilling the inclusion criteria of this experimental study. The participants were randomly divided into two groups, one experimental, and one control group. All groups completed the questionnaires based on the BASNEF Model, a checklist related to patient's practice including patients' HbA1c and FBS levels, the pre-test results of an ophthalmologist's eyes examination and the results of three months follow-up. The experimental group participated in eight educational sessions during the interventional. The data analysis used including chi square-test, t-test, and ANOVA. Results: The knowledge and all BASNEF Model components were significantly increased in the experimental group compared to the control group after intervention. In addition, behavioral eye care, such as physical activities, regular taking medicine, having eye examination, FBS checking, having appropriate diet, HbA1c level , and fasting blood sugar levels improved significantly among the experimental group compared to the control group. Conclusion: Applying the BASNEF Model is very effective for developing an educational program for diabetic patients, in order to control their blood sugar and enhancing behavioral eye care. Besides such programs, follow up education on controlling and monitoring is highly recommended. PMID:22911929

Hazavehei, Seyyed Mohammad Mehdi; Khani Jeihooni, Ali; Hasanzadeh, Akbar; Amini, Shahrzad

2010-12-18

49

Teaching, training or educating patients? Influence of contexts and models of education and care on practice in patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the rationale, theoretical developments and operationalization of the role of contexts of care and education in practice, choice of methods and effects of patient education in chronic diseases. Starting from a review on the evolution of models of care, education and health education, and on the influence of characteristies of organization of care, it proposes an analysis

Alain Deccache

1995-01-01

50

The effect of preoperative education on anxiety of open cardiac surgery patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative teaching method on anxiety levels of the patients. This study consisted of 100 patients having open cardiac surgery. Of 100 patients 50 were placed in the intervention group while the remaining 50 were in the control group. The patients in the intervention group were given a planned

Kezban Asilioglu; Sevilay Senol Celik

2004-01-01

51

Patient education in Dutch hospitals.  

PubMed

Studies among patients, nurses, and doctors in Dutch hospitals reveal the need for health education. Patients are dissatisfied with the information received and feel that nurses and doctors fail to meet their expectations regarding health education. More attention needs to be given to older, alienated, and low socioeconomic-status patients. The exclusive use of health-education media (like booklets and videotapes) is limited. It is recommended that hospitals and nursing departments pay greater attention to the in-service training of personnel, appoint specialized health educators, and organize efforts at ward level to create a positive climate for educating patients about various diseases. The policy of the Dutch government and the activities of private organizations (eg, patient movements, radio and TV broadcasts) support the development of patient education in Dutch hospitals. PMID:10299840

Visser, A P

1984-01-01

52

The effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregiver burden of patients with mental disorders  

PubMed Central

Background Brief family intervention may have a positive impact on family caregivers for patients with mental disorders. We assessed the effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregivers for patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial was performed on 100 caregivers for patients with mental disorders attending the Isfahan Behavioral Sciences Research Center (IBSRC), in Isfahan, Iran. One hundred family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia (n?=?50) and mood disorders (n?=?50) were selected and assigned randomly to either a psycho-educational group intervention or routine care in each diagnosis category. The caregivers were followed for 3 months. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview Results The mean scores of the Zarit caregiver burden decreased significantly for the group that participated in the psycho-educational program, while scores in the control group did not change significantly. Conclusions This group intervention program was effective to reduce the caregiver burden for both categories of mental disorders in the Iranian population. This group intervention program may improve the quality of life of patients and caregivers by improving the standards of care giving. Trial registration RCT registration number: IRCT138804272200N

2012-01-01

53

Implementing patient education in the CKD clinic.  

PubMed

The passage of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA) encouraged education for Stage 4 CKD patients by reimbursing qualified providers for formal instruction. This marked the first time Medicare reimbursed for kidney disease education. Although the law lays out specific requirements, it leaves much of the structure and content of the instruction up to the providers. The CKD clinic staffed by advanced practitioners (physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and/or clinical nurse specialists) provides a natural fit for patient education. Educated patients choose home modalities more frequently; more often start dialysis with a permanent vascular access; and generally score higher on tests measuring mood, mobility, and anxiety. However, sufficient research into the effects of CKD patient education is lacking. PMID:23809284

Davis, Jane S; Zuber, Kim

2013-07-01

54

The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients

Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

2012-01-01

55

Educating Stroke Patient Families. Volume III.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The third volume of a project to demonstrate the effectiveness of family counseling in stroke patient rehabilitation (January 1967-December 1971) presents reviews of four films on or related to strokes considered as having the most potential for educating...

R. P. Overs J. R. Healy

1971-01-01

56

Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators

Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

2010-01-01

57

Effective Teaching Strategies and Methods of Delivery for Patient Education: A Systematic Review and Practice Guideline Recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to determine effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education (PE).\\u000a A systematic review was conducted and reviews with or without meta-analyses, which examined teaching strategies and methods\\u000a of delivery for PE, were included. Teaching strategies identified are traditional lectures, discussions, simulated games,\\u000a computer technology, written material, audiovisual sources, verbal recall, demonstration,

Audrey Jusko Friedman; Roxanne Cosby; Susan Boyko; Jane Hatton-Bauer; Gale Turnbull

2011-01-01

58

Long-term effects of asthma education for physicians on patient satisfaction and use of health services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term effects of asthma education for physicians on patient satisfaction and use of health services. N.M. Clark, M. Gong, M.A. Schork, N. Kaciroti, D. Evans, D. Roloff, M. Hurwitz, L.A. Maiman, R.B. Mellins. #ERS Journals Ltd 2000. ABSTRACT: This randomized clinical trial evaluated the long-term impact of an interactive seminar for physicians based on principles of self-regulation on clinician behaviour,

N. M. Clark; M. Gong; M. A. Schork; N. Kaciroti; D. Evans; D. Roloff; M. Hurwitz; L. A. Maiman; R. B. Mellins

2000-01-01

59

Effects of a web-based stroke education program on recurrence prevention behaviors among stroke patients: a pilot study.  

PubMed

The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were 36 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke within 12 months post-stroke and their primary caregivers. The participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. The primary measures included blood chemistry, self-reported health behaviors, sense of control, and health motivation for stroke patients, and caregiver mastery for caregivers. To test the feasibility of the intervention program, the rates of participation and occurrence of technical problems were calculated. The experimental group tended to improve significantly more than the control group in terms of exercise, diet, sense of control and health motivation for the stroke patients and in terms of caregiver mastery for the primary caregivers. The rate of participation in the web-based program was 63.1%. This program, which focuses on recurrence prevention in stroke patients and caregivers, has the potential to improve health behaviors for stroke patients. PMID:23515115

Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

2013-03-19

60

The effects on knowledge of the systematic education of patients with joint diseases treated with NSAIDs and diuretics.  

PubMed

In a randomised, controlled trial, patients with joint diseases and concomitant treatment with NSAIDs and diuretics received systematic education. The intervention group was given information by a self-conducted, interactive Kodak Photo-CD program in addition to personal drug information and non-commercial drug leaflets. Awareness of drug interactions and encouragement of self-adjustment of treatment was focused on. Control patients received conventional information. Three months after randomisation, knowledge was tested by means of a questionnaire. At 3 months there was a significant difference in attained score between the intervention group and the control group. Greater knowledge was achieved, especially on drug interaction, in the intervention group. In conclusion, less than 1 h of systematic education significantly improved patients' knowledge on essential issues of concomitant treatment with NSAIDs and diuretics. Knowledge of effects, side-effects and interactions of drugs is essential for self-adjustment of treatment. The method employed, which is standardised and produces a reproducible quantity of education, might be applicable to several other medical conditions. PMID:11118782

Linné, A B; Liedholm, H; Jacobsson, L

2001-02-01

61

Patient satisfaction with healthcare in asthmatics and patients with COPD before and after patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient satisfaction with general practitioners (GP) and pulmonary outpatient clinics has not been previously compared in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in addition to the effect of patient education on this satisfaction.We randomly allocated 78 asthmatics and 62 patients with COPD after ordinary outpatient management to a control or an intervention group. Intervention consisted of educational

F. GALLEFOSS; P. S. BAKKE

2000-01-01

62

Patient education in arthritis: helping people change.  

PubMed

Systematic reviews of education for arthritis patients have emphasized behavioural approaches are effective in facilitating behaviour change and improving psychological and health status. This article discusses how a range of patient education and motivational approaches could be integrated into clinical practice to help people make behavioural changes to benefit their health. These include information giving, counselling, motivational interviewing, behaviour-orientated self-management therapy and cognitive-behavioural approaches. PMID:20217669

Hammond, Alison

2003-09-01

63

Couple-Oriented Education and Support Intervention for Osteoarthritis: Effects on Spouses' Support and Responses to Patient Pain  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a couple-oriented education and support intervention for osteoarthritis was more efficacious than a similar patient-oriented intervention in terms of enhancing spouses’ support of patients and their positive and negative responses to patient pain. Repeated-measures analyses of covariance with the completers sample (N = 103 dyads) showed that at the postintervention assessment, patients in the couple-oriented intervention reported a greater decrease in their spouses’ punishing responses (e.g., anger, irritation) than did patients in the patient-oriented intervention. In addition, a trend effect was observed in regard to the advantage of couple-oriented intervention for increasing spouses’ attempts to distract patients from their pain. At the 6-month follow-up, patients in the couple-oriented intervention reported greater increased spouse support than those in the patient-oriented intervention. Findings illustrate the value of examining change in specific types of marital interactions targeted in a couples intervention, and the need to strengthen the impact of future couple-oriented interventions.

Martire, Lynn M.; Schulz, Richard; Keefe, Francis J.; Rudy, Thomas E.; Starz, Terence W.

2009-01-01

64

Expanding the physician care team: its effect on patient care, resident function, and education.  

PubMed

Recent attempts to improve surgical resident working conditions have taken many forms. We evaluated a system in which a well-trained physician extender had been hired to assist residents taking call on a busy cardiothoracic teaching service. The physician extender ("night nurse," NN) helped with perioperative care using well-defined protocols. The NN, who was in-house Sunday-Friday, 7 pm-7 am, rounded with the residents at the beginning of the evening. Concerns were discussed and care plans formulated. Thereafter, all pages (except codes and extreme emergencies) were directed to the NN, freeing the residents to complete work-ups, patient assessments, or study. The NN assessed patients and initiated care plans including orders that followed either care protocols or plans previously arranged with the resident. For unanticipated concerns, the resident was notified for input and/or patient assessment. For 30 consecutive nights, the patient load and acuity were evaluated. Residents and NN kept diaries of all pages received. The residents also documented time slept and times awakened. Residents received 10 times fewer calls when the NN was available (21.8 +/- 10.5 vs 2.9 +/- 2.4) and slept an average of 2.5 hr more (135 +/- 106.1 vs 286.2 +/- 68.2 min). Care was maintained as judged by morbidity and mortality statistics. Such a system has allowed us to avoid cross coverage, thereby maintaining resident continuity of care and involvement in meaningful care plans, while providing increased time for patient evaluation, self-education, and increased uninterrupted sleep. PMID:7912293

Holzman, M D; Elkins, C C; Neuzil, D F; Williams, L F

1994-06-01

65

[Education of heart failure patients].  

PubMed

Therapeutic patient education (TPE) has proved to be beneficial in a number of chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, chronic kidney failure. A TPE unit has been set up in Marie-Madeleine hospital in Forbach. In order to improve the actions carried out with patients with heart failure undergoing treatment, a satisfaction survey was carried out with this group of patients. PMID:22641945

Giroux, Valerie

2012-04-01

66

Effects of the characteristics of teaching on the outcomes of heart failure patient education interventions: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundLimited research has examined the specific approach, mode of delivery, and dose of educational interventions. Yet such knowledge is essential to develop effective heart failure educational interventions.

Suzanne Fredericks; Heather Beanlands; Karen Spalding; Monica Da Silva

2010-01-01

67

Accurate Monitoring Leads to Effective Control and Greater Learning of Patient Education Materials  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Effective management of chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes) can depend on the extent to which patients can learn and remember disease-relevant information. In two experiments, we explored a technique motivated by theories of self-regulated learning for improving people's learning of information relevant to managing a chronic disease. Materials were…

Rawson, Katherine A.; O'Neil, Rochelle; Dunlosky, John

2011-01-01

68

Evidence-based development of interactive patient education programs: a guide for achieving optimal computer-based patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

In daily plastic surgery practise, patient education is of great importance. Computer-based patient education can be a helpful tool, as we described in this journal in 2004. In this paper, we describe the key elements of building effective computer-based patient education programs, based on the existing literature. We hope that plastic surgeons will use this paper as a guide in

Bram J. Keulers; Miel J. Keulers; Marc R. M. Scheltinga; Paul H. M. Spauwen

2006-01-01

69

Evaluation of the effect of patient education on rates of falls in older hospital patients: Description of a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Accidental falls by older patients in hospital are one of the most commonly reported adverse events. Falls after discharge are also common. These falls have enormous physical, psychological and social consequences for older patients, including serious physical injury and reduced quality of life, and are also a source of substantial cost to health systems worldwide. There have been a limited number of randomised controlled trials, mainly using multifactorial interventions, aiming to prevent older people falling whilst inpatients. Trials to date have produced conflicting results and recent meta-analyses highlight that there is still insufficient evidence to clearly identify which interventions may reduce the rate of falls, and falls related injuries, in this population. Methods and design A prospective randomised controlled trial (n = 1206) is being conducted at two hospitals in Australia. Patients are eligible to be included in the trial if they are over 60 years of age and they, or their family or guardian, give written consent. Participants are randomised into three groups. The control group continues to receive usual care. Both intervention groups receive a specifically designed patient education intervention on minimising falls in addition to usual care. The education is delivered by Digital Video Disc (DVD) and written workbook and aims to promote falls prevention activities by participants. One of the intervention groups also receives follow up education training visits by a health professional. Blinded assessors conduct baseline and discharge assessments and follow up participants for 6 months after discharge. The primary outcome measure is falls by participants in hospital. Secondary outcome measures include falls at home after discharge, knowledge of falls prevention strategies and motivation to engage in falls prevention activities after discharge. All analyses will be based on intention to treat principle. Discussion This trial will examine the effect of a single intervention (specifically designed patient education) on rates of falls in older patients in hospital and after discharge. The results will provide robust recommendations for clinicians and researchers about the role of patient education in this population. The study has the potential to identify a new intervention that may reduce rates of falls in older hospital patients and could be readily duplicated and applied in a wide range of clinical settings. Trial Registration ACTRN12608000015347

Hill, Anne-Marie; Hill, Keith; Brauer, Sandra; Oliver, David; Hoffmann, Tammy; Beer, Christopher; McPhail, Steven; Haines, Terry P

2009-01-01

70

Effects of education and support on self-care and resource utilization in patients with heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims To test the eVect of education and support by a nurse on self-care and resource utilization in patients with heart failure. Methods A total of 179 patients (mean age 73, 58% male, NYHA III-IV) hospitalized with heart failure were evalu- ated prospectively. Patients were randomized to the study intervention or to 'care as usual'. The supportive educative intervention consisted

T. Jaarsma; R. Halfens; H. Huijer Abu-Saad; K. Dracup; T. Gorgels; J. van Ree; J. Stappers

1999-01-01

71

Effectiveness of an education programme by a general practice assistant for asthma and COPD patients: results from a randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study a randomised controlled trial was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of an education programme for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). All asthma and COPD patients using medication and experiencing pulmonary symptoms were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=139) or usual-care group (n=137). The intervention consisted of taylor-made education conducted by a general

Arlette E. Hesselink; Brenda W. J. H. Penninx; Danielle A. W. M. van der Windt; Barend J. van Duin; Peter de Vries; Jos W. R. Twisk; Lex M. Bouter; Jacques Th. M. van Eijk

2004-01-01

72

Cost effectiveness of patient education for the prevention of falls in hospital: economic evaluation from a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are one of the most frequently occurring adverse events that impact upon the recovery of older hospital inpatients. Falls can threaten both immediate and longer-term health and independence. There is need to identify cost-effective means for preventing falls in hospitals. Hospital-based falls prevention interventions tested in randomized trials have not yet been subjected to economic evaluation. Methods Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken from the health service provider perspective, over the period of hospitalization (time horizon) using the Australian Dollar (A$) at 2008 values. Analyses were based on data from a randomized trial among n = 1,206 acute and rehabilitation inpatients. Decision tree modeling with three-way sensitivity analyses were conducted using burden of disease estimates developed from trial data and previous research. The intervention was a multimedia patient education program provided with trained health professional follow-up shown to reduce falls among cognitively intact hospital patients. Results The short-term cost to a health service of one cognitively intact patient being a faller could be as high as A$14,591 (2008). The education program cost A$526 (2008) to prevent one cognitively intact patient becoming a faller and A$294 (2008) to prevent one fall based on primary trial data. These estimates were unstable due to high variability in the hospital costs accrued by individual patients involved in the trial. There was a 52% probability the complete program was both more effective and less costly (from the health service perspective) than providing usual care alone. Decision tree modeling sensitivity analyses identified that when provided in real life contexts, the program would be both more effective in preventing falls among cognitively intact inpatients and cost saving where the proportion of these patients who would otherwise fall under usual care conditions is at least 4.0%. Conclusions This economic evaluation was designed to assist health care providers decide in what circumstances this intervention should be provided. If the proportion of cognitively intact patients falling on a ward under usual care conditions is 4% or greater, then provision of the complete program in addition to usual care will likely both prevent falls and reduce costs for a health service. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register: ACTRN12608000015347.

2013-01-01

73

Bone Quality: Educational Tools for Patients, Physicians, and Educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Defining bone quality remains elusive. From a patient perspective bone quality can best be defined as an individual’s likelihood\\u000a of sustaining a fracture. Fracture risk indicators and performance measures can help clinicians better understand individual\\u000a fracture risk. Educational resources such as the Web can help clinicians and patients better understand fracture risk, communicate\\u000a effectively, and make decisions concerning diagnosis and

Junaid Shams; Allison B. Spitzer; Ann M. Kennelly; Laura L. Tosi

74

EFFECT OF A HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM ON QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS SURGERY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quality of life has emerged as an important concept and outcome in health and health care. This study was performed to evaluate the ability of the health education program to improve quality of life of patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In pre operation period, 70 patients were randomized in two groups, experimental and control group (35 patients

G. Babaee; M. Keshavarz; A. Hidarnia; M. Shayegan

75

Synergy for patient safety and quality: academic and service partnerships to promote effective nurse education and clinical practice.  

PubMed

Responding to the growing concern about medical error and patient harm, nurse educators are seeking innovative strategies to ensure that nursing students develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that enable them to safely and effectively manage patient care. A nursing school and hospital affiliate engaged in a partnership to increase opportunities for students to acquire these competencies. The Synergy Partnership Model aligns agency safety and quality initiatives with the school's student outcome competencies. The partnership model establishes participant commitment, clarifies professional actions and accountabilities, and structures the integration of student learning with the clinical practice of agency nurses and physicians. A collection of evidence-based, best-practices resources provides students, faculties, and staff the tools to implement the partnership paradigm. A descriptive pilot study design with a convenience sample of students (N = 24) enrolled in a third-semester, prelicensure clinical nursing course measured students' safety and quality knowledge and the students' perceptions of team behaviors and communication effectiveness. Survey data reveal moderate to large effect sizes in gains for safety and quality knowledge and for students' increased confidence in their impact on patient care outcomes. PMID:22261605

Debourgh, Gregory A

76

Effects of SBIRT Education and Training on Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward Working with Patients Who Use Alcohol and Drugs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) can reduce alcohol use and negative outcomes in patients with risky substance use. However, negative attitudes that some healthcare professionals have toward patients who use substances are a barrier to implementing SBIRT. The University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, in partnership with the Institute for Research, Education, and Training in Addictions (IRETA),

Kathryn Puskar; Heather J. Gotham; Lauren Terhorst; Holly Hagle; Ann Mitchell; Betty Braxter; Marie Fioravanti; Irene Kane; Kimberly S. Talcott; Gail R. Woomer; Helen K. Burns

2013-01-01

77

Creating a patient education tool.  

PubMed

Developing a patient education tool based on low literacy levels, behavioral theories, role modeling, and The Joint Commission's standards was the primary objective of this project. The initial goal was merely to develop a population-appropriate patient education tool. This led to a process whereby significant knowledge was gained by all to enrich overall professional development. An interdisciplinary team developed a low-literacy, self-management book for patients who had suffered a stroke. Team experts were responsible for the development of specific subject matter. Editing addressed the message, readability, typeface and font size, and charts and illustrations. Collaboration with the National Stroke Association guided the didactic pedagogical content presented. A well-known cartoonist who was a U.S. military veteran was willing to work with the team to develop the illustrations. PMID:19831328

Stonecypher, Karen

2009-10-01

78

Computer-based Approaches to Patient Education  

PubMed Central

All articles indexed in MEDLINE or CINAHL, related to the use of computer technology in patient education, and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1971 and 1998 were selected for review. Sixty-six articles, including 21 research-based reports, were identified. Forty-five percent of the studies were related to the management of chronic disease. Thirteen studies described an improvement in knowledge scores or clinical outcomes when computer-based patient education was compared with traditional instruction. Additional articles examined patients' computer experience, socioeconomic status, race, and gender and found no significant differences when compared with program outcomes. Sixteen of the 21 research-based studies had effect sizes greater than 0.5, indicating a significant change in the described outcome when the study subjects participated in computer-based patient education. The findings from this review support computer-based education as an effective strategy for transfer of knowledge and skill development for patients. The limited number of research studies (N = 21) points to the need for additional research. Recommendations for new studies include cost-benefit analysis and the impact of these new technologies on health outcomes over time.

Lewis, Deborah

1999-01-01

79

[Patient education of gestational diabetes].  

PubMed

Gestational diabetes is hyperglycaemia detected during pregnancy. Recent studies have shown the benefit of the intensive management of this form of diabetes in limiting the repercussions on the mother and foetus. Therapeutic education is an integral part of the support given to these patients. Based on a self-assessment of its educational practices, the diabetologyteam at the University Hospital of Besançon has focused on a management of the condition centred on technical and dietary aspects. For every issue, areas of improvement were suggested, implemented and assessed. PMID:23785963

Filiatre, Caroline; Zimmermann, Cécile

2013-05-01

80

Therapeutic Patient Education: From Classroom to Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Therapeutic education of patients plays an immense role in the efficacy of treatments. Thanks to sound psychosocial and educational approaches to patients, there is a significant decrease of acute episodes of many chronic diseases. But these proofs often seem weak in the presence of the disbelief the many clinicians have: how can therapeutic patient education compete with pharmacological agents and

J. Assal

2005-01-01

81

Investigating the impact of socioeconomic status on the effectiveness of a pamphlet on achieving and maintaining bone health in breast cancer survivors: a patient education resource development primer.  

PubMed

Considerable need exists to raise awareness of breast cancer (BC) treatment-induced bone loss and provide management and preventative strategies. We describe the development and evaluation process of an educational pamphlet for BC survivors on achieving and maintaining bone health. A Participatory Design approach was used. The pamphlet was first critically evaluated by interdisciplinary healthcare professionals and less vulnerable members of the target audience prior to evaluation by 45 BC survivors, who completed two questionnaires inquiring about demographics and pamphlet evaluation and satisfaction. Pamphlet effectiveness was correlated with income and education to determine differences between socioeconomic groups. Perceived knowledge increased significantly after reading the brochure for all groups. Socioeconomic status had no impact on pamphlet effectiveness. This methodological approach is presented as a blueprint to promote knowledge translation in cancer patient education contexts aiming to provide cancer patients with the best possible resources for effective self-management of their conditions. PMID:21748475

Adirim, Tara; Chafranskaia, Aleksandra; Nyhof-Young, Joyce

2012-03-01

82

Is health education effective?  

PubMed

Primary health care (PHC) workers from 20 hospitals, PHC nurses, community health care nurses, and other PHC workers attended a session on health education and effectiveness in South Africa in September 1991. Discussion is directed to an overview of health education as presented in the day's session, the effectiveness of health education, and recommendations for improving health education. The first session on health education aimed to explore the breadth of possibilities for health education, and to emphasize some important problems, such as inconsistency in messages. Role plays were enacted within different groups: the 1991 Tintswalo PHC nurses class, the Tintswalo People's Awareness of Disability Issues group, and the Nkhensani PHC nurses group. The second session involved a panel discussion with 4 speakers. The first speaker directed attention to the need for an adequate education as insurance for effective health education. Modern trends have been responsible for the destruction of black culture. There is a problem of victim blaming, when in fact the problem of rural mortality is the system. Socioeconomic conditions and politics must be changed before health education can be effective. Health personnel as representatives of the middle class may be viewed as part of the problem. The second speaker spoke of the ineffectiveness of teaching someone what ought to be eaten but not providing the means to acquire the food. Oppression has led to blaming the oppressed. The third speaker noted that health workers were indeed part of the problem, e.g., health workers do not practice the advice given out and many times are junior personnel who are not evaluated. There are requirements for tracking what nurses do, but little on evaluation of appropriate messages. Appearance replaces substance. The fourth speaker felt health education is about training people and satisfying the educator and the system. Politics and health were related and too much time was misdirected to fighting with the community. Situation analysis was recommended before action was taken. Recommendations involved, for instance, building rapport with the community, and the need for a greater grasp of health knowledge by health educators. PMID:1356228

McKenzie, A; Ngobeni, O; Bonongo, F

1992-07-01

83

Effects of a continuing education program on nurses' practices of cancer pain assessment and their acceptance of patients' pain reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hospital-based quasi-experimental (pretest and post-test) study was conducted in Kaohsiung Veteran General Hospital, Taiwan. This study was to evaluate a continuing education program (CEP) on nurses' practices of cancer pain assessment and their acceptance of patients' pain reports with respect to four types of misconceptions. A questionnaire was sent to on-duty nurses or head nurses with patient care responsibilities

Luo-Ping Ger; Ching-Ying Chang; Shung-Tai Ho; Ming-Chien Lee; Hsien-Hsien Chiang; Co-Shi Chao; Kwok-Hung Lai; Jui-Mei Huang; Shih-Chun Wang

2004-01-01

84

The Effect of Face-to-Face Education and Educational Booklet on Heart Health Indexes of the Hospitalized Patients with Myocardial Infarction  

PubMed Central

Management of risk factors and heart health indexes in the patients who have been diagnosed with myocardial infarction will result in prevention of secondary myocardial infarction, reduction of postimprovement mortality, increase of life span and improvement of life quality. Patient education has been found to be one of the most fundamental and essential care programs on the basis of identification and control of the patients' health criteria. The study is a quasi-experimental research consisting of two groups. In this study, 112 patients with myocardial infarction who were below the age of 70 were selected randomly and divided into two groups (case group and control group) after being matched based on age and sex. The researcher first measured the health indexes including smoking, cholesterol level, body mass, level of anxiety, and amount of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients who have been diagnosed with myocardial infarction for the first time. He performed education program in case group and analyzed the said variables after four months. He also compared the behaviors in the two groups after being educated. The data was analyzed by SPSS software, version 15 (This product is licensed to FeFDBi, ABiComputer, 1337), and the two groups were compared by using appropriate statistical tests. According to the results, after education period, systolic blood pressure of the case group improves compared with control group (P < 0.05/P = 0.022), case group tends to quit smoking more than control group does (P = 0.013), cholesterol level of case group improves compared with control group (P < 0.0001), changes of body mass are more positive in case group compared with control group (P = 0.012), and anxiety of case group reduces compared with control group (P < 0.0001).

Esmaeili Vardanjani, Safar Ali; Fanisaberi, Laleh; Alirezaee Shahraki, Firozeh; Khalilzadeh, Ahmad; Tavakoli Vardanjani, Abdolazim; Ghani Dehkordi, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

85

Effect of a Clinical Pharmacy Education Program on Improvement in the Quantity and Quality of Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis for Medically Ill Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) recommends unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in medically ill patients. Despite these recommendations, a previous analysis at our institution revealed a low utilization of VTE prophylaxis in medically ill patients. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of a pharmacy-driven education program on the

PAUL P. DOBESH; ZACHARY A. STACY

2005-01-01

86

Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

1998-01-01

87

Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration.  

PubMed

Treatment of diabetic foot ulceration is very challenging, costly and often needs to be of long duration. This leads to substantial economic burden. Population-based research suggests that a meaningful reduction of the incidence of amputations caused by diabetes mellitus has already been achieved since the St. Vincent resolution in 1989. Still, it cannot be inferred from these studies that the current preventive efforts are (cost-)effective because reduction of amputation incidence can also be the result of improvements in ulcer treatment. Nevertheless, education of people with diabetes is widely advocated and implemented in standard practice. Despite the fact that preventive interventions are often combined in daily practice, there is little scientific evidence demonstrating the effect of those efforts. In systematically reviewing the evidence, there is insufficient evidence that limited patient education alone is effective in achieving clinically relevant reductions in ulcer and amputation incidence. To date, high quality evidence that more complex interventions including patient education can prevent diabetic foot ulceration is not available either. This, however, should be interpreted as lack of evidence rather than evidence of no effect. Future directions for research and practice may be to concentrate preventive effort on those patients who appear to be at highest risk of foot ulceration after careful screening and selection. PMID:22271733

Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Valk, Gerlof D

2012-02-01

88

Dyads Affected by Chronic Heart Failure: A Randomized Study Evaluating Effects of Education and Psychosocial Support to Patients With Heart Failure and Their Partners  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) causes great suffering for both patients and their partners. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an integrated dyad care program with education and psychosocial support to patients with CHF and their partners during a postdischarge period after acute deterioration of CHF. Methods One hundred fifty-five patient-caregiver dyads were randomized to usual care (n = 71) or a psychoeducation intervention (n = 84) delivered in 3 modules through nurse-led face-to-face counseling, computer-based education, and other written teaching materials to assist dyads to develop problem-solving skills. Follow-up assessments were completed after 3 and 12 months to assess perceived control, perceived health, depressive symptoms, self-care, and caregiver burden. Results Baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of dyads in the experimental and control groups were similar at baseline. Significant differences were observed in patients’ perceived control over the cardiac condition after 3 (P < .05) but not after 12 months, and no effect was seen for the caregivers. No group differences were observed over time in dyads’ health-related quality of life and depressive symptoms, patients’ self-care behaviors, and partners’ experiences of caregiver burden. Conclusions Integrated dyad care focusing on skill-building and problem-solving education and psychosocial support was effective in initially enhancing patients’ levels of perceived control. More frequent professional contact and ongoing skills training may be necessary to have a higher impact on dyad outcomes and warrants further research.

AGREN, SUSANNA; EVANGELISTA, LORRAINE S.; HJELM, CARINA; STROMBERG, ANNA

2012-01-01

89

Effects of educational intervention on nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions toward supplying artificial nutrition and hydration to terminal cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  This study aimed to investigate the effects of educational intervention on nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions\\u000a regarding supplying artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) to terminal cancer patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A quasi-experimental design was adopted. A structured questionnaire evaluated the effects of educational intervention. From\\u000a April to June 2005, 88 nurses were enrolled in the gastroenterology, general surgery, and intensive

Li-Shan Ke; Tai-Yuan Chiu; Wen-Yu Hu; Su-Shun Lo

2008-01-01

90

Effect of a psycho-educational intervention for family members on caregiver burdens and psychiatric symptoms in patients with schizophrenia in Shiraz, Iran  

PubMed Central

Background This study explored the effectiveness of family psycho-education in reducing patients’ symptoms and on family caregiver burden. Methods Seventy Iranian outpatients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia disorder and their caregivers were randomly allocated to the experimental (n?=?35) or control groups (n?=?35). Patients in the experimental group received antipsychotic drug treatment and a psycho-educational program was arranged for their caregivers. The psycho-educational program consisted of ten 90-min sessions held during five weeks (two session in each week). Each caregiver attended 10 sessions (in five weeks) At baseline, immediately after intervention, and one month later. Validated tools were used to assess patients’ clinical status and caregiver burden. Results Compared with the control group, the case group showed significantly reduced symptom severity and caregiver burden both immediately after intervention and one month later. Conclusions These results suggest that even need based short-term psycho-educational intervention for family members of Iranian patients with schizophrenic disorder may improve the outcomes of patients and their families. Trial registration IRCT Number:138809122812?N1`

2012-01-01

91

Can a patient educational book change behavior and reduce pain in chronic low back pain patients?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background contextThis study was prompted by 1) the almost universal use of patient education as an initial or at least an ancillary step in the treatment of patients presenting with low back pain, 2) the relative dearth of studies evaluating the effectiveness of patient education and 3) the complete lack of support in the few existing studies for the efficacy

Brian E Udermann; Kevin F Spratt; Ronald G Donelson; John Mayer; James E Graves; John Tillotson

2004-01-01

92

Patient Education and Involvement in Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health…

Andiric, Linda Reynolds

2010-01-01

93

Effects of self-management, education and specific exercises, delivered by health professionals, in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: An education self-management program for people with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee was designed to be delivered by health professionals, incorporating their knowledge and expertise. Improvement in quality of life, health status and pain in response to this program has previously been demonstrated in an uncontrolled pilot study. To more rigorously test the effectiveness of the program we will

S Coleman; NK Briffa; Graeme J Carroll; C Inderjeeth; N Cook; J McQuade

2008-01-01

94

[Therapeutic patient education in diabetes management].  

PubMed

Late complications of type 1 and type 2 diabetes can also be effectively avoided or delayed using active intervention and available therapies. Despite these facts, the percentage of people with diabetes following the therapy proposed by health care professionals is quite low. People with diabetes or any other chronic disease have to be involved in their own treatment. Basic knowledge is very important for the patient but the reinforcement of appropriate attitudes and a continuous process of motivation is fundamental in changing habits and behaviour. We need to educate patients, giving them the tools and skills to manage their disease, allowing them to become autonomous, empowering them. In the Therapeutic Patient Education model the patient is no longer the object but instead one of the actors in the process. He becomes part of the team and part of the solution. Goals are agreed as a result of input of the patient's desires, details of his daily life, his perceptions and the HCP's biomedical objectives. The patient takes care of himself and will, step by step, become aware of the consequences of his actions, in collaboration with his health team. PMID:23721977

Boavida, José Manuel

2013-04-01

95

Effect of an oral health assessment education program on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in skilled nursing facilities.  

PubMed

This pilot intervention study measured the impact of an oral health education intervention on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in regard to oral assessments of institutionalized elders. Two 1-hour education sessions were completed over a 3-week period; a pretest and a posttest were administered immediately preceding the first session and immediately following the second session. Medical records were reviewed prior to and after the intervention to assess practices including completeness of oral health assessment and congruency with the Minimum Data Set 2.0 (MDS). Nine nurses attended the education intervention. Retrospectively, 176 records were reviewed preintervention and 80 postintervention. There was no significant change in knowledge from the pre- to posttest (p= .262). Completeness of all oral health assessment variables increased significantly (p= .001) as did the congruency of data between the nursing assessment (NA) and MDS assessments (p= .002). Providing nurses with education on oral health assessments in skilled nursing facilities has a positive impact on completeness of data and congruency between the NA and the MDS. PMID:19573046

Munoz, Nancy; Touger-Decker, Riva; Byham-Gray, Laura; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan

96

Student's experience with developing patient education materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing education to healthy\\/ill individuals and their families as part of both clinical and field practice is an important element in the training of nursing students. Developing educational materials is a key component of patient education that nurses should learn during school training. This investigation was conducted definitively, to determine the views of second-year students of School of Nursing concerning

Sevil Güler Demir; Hülya Bulut; Ümran Dal

2009-01-01

97

Education and Outreach for Breast Imaging and Breast Cancer Patients.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In October 2003, we completed data collection on 123 subjects for the research project: Evaluating the Effect of Inormed Consent and Procedure Scheduling on Breast biopsy Patient Outcomes. This project evaluated the impact of visual educational aids durin...

D. M. Farria

2003-01-01

98

Patients Postoperatively Forget Aspects of Preoperative Patient Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Preoperative patient education is critically important to the success of any bariatric operation. In our clinic,\\u000a we perform extensive preoperative education and informed consent. Part of the informed consent process includes a preoperative\\u000a true\\/false quiz. This study tests the hypothesis that postoperative patients do not recall key components of their preoperative\\u000a education. Methods: Preoperatively, all patients were required to

Atul K. Madan; David S. Tichansky

2005-01-01

99

Group education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and their partners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the effects of group education followed by booster sessions for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to determine whether participation of a significant other influenced the effects. - \\u000aMethods: A total of 218 RA patients, each of them with a partner, took part in the study. Two-thirds of the patients received a 5-week group self-management education program,

Robert P. Riemsma; Erik Taal; Johannes J. Rasker

2003-01-01

100

Patient Education for the Mentally Ill.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the philosophy of the rehabilitation services department at McLean Hospital on patient education for the mentally ill, noting patient library collection and recommended resources on marital problems, sex education, drug manuals, and diagnostic and research findings. A list of magazines subscribed to, color code classification, and 23…

Russell, Louise Harding

1982-01-01

101

Patient and Family Education, Nursing 190.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A description is presented of a course, "Patient and Family Education," designed to provide second-year baccalaureate nursing students with the skills and knowledge necessary to educate patients about health care and treatment. Following a rationale for and general information about the course, a glossary of terms and a list of instructional…

Vander Plaats, Sharon Q.

102

Comparison between videotape and personalized patient education for anticoagulant therapy.  

PubMed

To assess the effectiveness of videotape patient education, 22 patients were randomized to receive either videotape or personalized teaching for oral anticoagulant (warfarin) therapy. Both groups scored significantly higher on a questionnaire designed to assess knowledge gained after instruction, with no significant difference between the two groups. Videotape instruction required substantially less nursing time. A second questionnaire assessed patient satisfaction with respect to both methods, which were rated equally effective and worthwhile. Videotape teaching is an effective and well-accepted alternative form of patient education requiring significantly less personnel time. PMID:2738549

Stone, S; Holden, A; Knapic, N; Ansell, J

1989-07-01

103

Preparing patients for threatening medical treatments: effects of a chemotherapy educational DVD on anxiety, unmet needs, and self-efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals of work  Based on meta-analyses regarding the preparation of patients for potentially threatening medical procedures, a DVD, incorporating\\u000a behavioral role modelling, was developed to prepare patients for chemotherapy and assist them to self-manage side effects.\\u000a It was hypothesized that patients who watched the DVD (vs those who did not) would report (1) lower anxiety; (2) higher self-efficacy\\u000a related to coping

Penelope Schofield; Michael Jefford; Mariko Carey; Kathryn Thomson; Melanie Evans; Carl Baravelli; Sanchia Aranda

2008-01-01

104

Asthma education tailored to individual patient needs can optimise partnerships in asthma self-management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper studies the effects of patient education, tailored to individual needs of patients as part of an asthma self-management program. A tailored education program was designed which took into account individual information needs of patients by using a feedback instrument. Totally 98 steroid dependent asthmatics entered the tailored education program, 95 patients received usual care. Outcome measures were information

Bart P. A Thoonen; Tjard R. J Schermer; Margreet Jansen; Ivo Smeele; Annelies J. E Jacobs; Richard Grol; Onno C. P van Schayck

2002-01-01

105

Patient Referrals: A Behavioral Outcome of Continuing Medical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|One method for evaluating an aspect of physician practice behavior, patient referrals, resulting from continuing medical education programs on cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch is described. Data presented provide strong support for the effectiveness of continuing education in modifying physician practice behavior. (LBH)|

Mahan, J. Maurice; And Others

1978-01-01

106

E-Learning Virtual Patients for Geriatric Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-based virtual patients (VPs) are an emerging medium for medical education that addresses barriers faced by geriatrics educators. Research has shown VPs to be as effective in changing knowledge and behavior as more traditional forms of teaching. This paper presents a descriptive study of the development of the University of Iowa's…

Orton, Eric; Mulhausen, Paul

2008-01-01

107

Medication education of acutely hospitalized older patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To determine the amount of time spent providing medication education to older patients, the impact of medication education\\u000a on patients’ knowledge and satisfaction, and barriers to providing medication education.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Telephone survey of patients within 48 hours of hospital discharge and direct survey of physicians and pharmacists.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Internal medicine ward in a tertiary care teaching hospital.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PARTICIPANTS: Patients

Shabbir M. H. Alibhai; Ra K. Han; Gary Naglie

1999-01-01

108

A patient education MAP: an integrated, collaborative approach for rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Because Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation has been faced with decreasing patient lengths of stay, increasing patient acuity, and changes in the nurse staffing mix, nurses wanted to ensure that patients and their families were receiving appropriate education and learning the skills required to provide safe and competent self-care in the home. As a result, they developed a patient education action plan. This multidiscipline action plan (MAP) involved changing from a multidisciplinary to an interdisciplinary approach toward patient and family education. This plan provides a framework that is linked to expected outcomes for education during a patient's stay, reduces the redundancy of patient education by professionals from different disciplines, and increases collaboration. Teaching modules that outline and provide all of the information an educator needs to effectively teach a patient or group of patients make up the basis for the MAP system. This article describes the MAP system and the related continuous quality improvement activities, offers documentation forms, and identifies a structural path. PMID:10205557

North, M C; Harbin, C B; Clark, K G

109

Adherence to ocular hypotensive therapy: patient health education needs and views on group education  

PubMed Central

Background In this study the authors sought both to understand the health education needs of patients with glaucoma, with particular regard to adherence to glaucoma treatment, and to examine these patients’ views of group education. Methods Using a health promotion approach to health education, 27 qualitative interviews with new and established patients receiving glaucoma treatment were conducted. Health promotion is defined as a way of strengthening people’s capacities to control and optimize their own health. The interviews were transcribed and were then analyzed thematically Results Nine categories of health education needs were identified from the transcripts: (1) to understand glaucoma; (2) to understand their diagnosis or understand the difficulties in giving a diagnosis; (3) to understand the implications of eye drops, their side effects, and how to renew the eye drops; (4) to feel confident to put in eye drops; (5) to put the condition into perspective - to know how to manage their risk; (6) to be able to ask questions of clinicians; (7) to be able to navigate the health care system; (8) to understand and be able to manage own adherence behavior; and (9) to know where to access other sources of information. The majority of patients had something positive to say about group education, and about half of the patients said they would attend group education if they were offered the opportunity. Conclusion A health promotion approach identified a wide range of patient-centered health education needs regarding adherence to glaucoma treatment. Group education will be attractive to some patients. Clinicians could use the health education needs identified in this study to guide the development of either individual or group-based educational intervention to improve adherence to glaucoma treatment. However, clinicians need to be aware that when developing a group intervention, attention will need to be given to making the education relevant to the circumstances of each patient.

Waterman, Heather; Brunton, Lisa; Fenerty, Cecilia; Mottershead, Jane; Richardson, Cliff; Spencer, Fiona

2013-01-01

110

Combining Software Games with Education: Evaluation of its Educational Effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer games are very popular among children and adolescents. In this respect, they could be exploited by educational software designers to render educational software more attractive and motivating. However, it remains to be explored what the educational scope of educational software games is. In this paper, we explore several issues concerning the educational effectiveness, appeal and scope of educational software

Maria Virvou; George Katsionis; Konstantinos Manos

2005-01-01

111

Evaluation of an educational programme for socially deprived asthma patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of an educational programme for socially deprived asthma patients. M. Alenita de Oliveira, S.M. Faresin, V.F. Bruno, A.R. de Bittencourt, A.L.G. Fernandes. # ERS Journals Ltd 1999. ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an asthma education programme in moderate and severe asthma patients in a longitudinal, prospective and randomized study with a control

M. A. de Oliveira; S. M. Faresin; V. F. Bruno; A. R. de Bittencourt; A. L. G. Fernandes

1999-01-01

112

Evaluation of Cancer Patient Education and Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

On their first visit to the Regional Cancer Program, all patients are provided with the “Information for Patients and Families”\\u000a binder that was designed by an interdisciplinary cancer patient education team. Patients were asked to complete a survey to\\u000a evaluate the usefulness of this binder. Timely delivery of the “Information for Patients and Families” binder validates a\\u000a higher level of

Denise Gauthier-Frohlick; Susan Boyko; Michael Conlon; Sheila Damore-Petingola; Nancy Lightfoot; Terry Mackenzie; Carole Mayer; Elaine Reed; Shawn Steggles

2010-01-01

113

A cluster-randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of culturally-appropriate hypertension education among Afro-Surinamese and Ghanaian patients in Dutch general practice: study protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Individuals of African descent living in western countries have increased rates of hypertension and hypertension-related complications. Poor adherence to hypertension treatment (medication and lifestyle changes) has been identified as one of the most important modifiable causes for the observed disparities in hypertension related complications, with patient education being recommended to improve adherence. Despite evidence that culturally-appropriate patient education may

Joke A Haafkens; Erik JAJ Beune; Eric P Moll van Charante; Charles O Agyemang

2009-01-01

114

Primary Nursing: Can It Improve Patient Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Primary nursing is examined as a practice mode and as an organizational innovation that can foster patient education within inpatient units. Originating at the University of Minnesota Hospital in 1969, primary nursing is basically a return to the case met...

1977-01-01

115

Effects of educational intervention on joint angles of the trunk and lower extremity and on muscle activities during patient-handling tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The objective of this study was to examine the effects of educational intervention on joint angles of the trunk and lower\\u000a extremity and on muscle activities during patient-handling task.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Thirty-two subjects (17 males and 15 females) volunteered for the study. They were classified into three groups: intervention\\u000a group 1, comprised of first grade physical therapist students; control group, which included

Toru Akebi; Masaiwa Inoue; Noriaki Harada

2009-01-01

116

Formal Patient Education Improves Patient Knowledge of Hepatitis C in Vulnerable Populations  

PubMed Central

Background Hepatitis C (HCV) knowledge is limited in injection drug users (IDU). Vulnerable populations including IDUs are disproportionally affected by HCV. Effective HCV education can potentially reduce disparity in HCV prevalence and its outcome in this population. Aim This study aimed to assess the impact of formal HCV education and factors associated with improved HCV knowledge in the vulnerable population. Methods Over 18 months, 201 HCV-infected patients underwent a 2-h standardized education and completed demographic and pre- and post-education questionnaires. Results Patient characteristics were: 69% male, mean age 49 ± 10, 49% White (26% AA, 10% Latino), 75% unemployed, 83% high school education and above, 64% were IDU, and 7% were HIV co-infected. On multivariate analysis, baseline knowledge scores were higher in patients with at least a high school education (coef 7.1, p = 0.045). Baseline knowledge scores were lower in African Americans (coef ?12.3, p = 0.004) and older patients (coef ?0.7, p = 0.03). Following HCV education, the overall test scores improved significantly by 14% (p = 0.0001) specifically in the areas of HCV transmission (p = 0.003), general knowledge (p = 0.02), and health care maintenance (p = 0.004). There was a high compliance with liver specialty clinic attendance following education. Conclusions Formal HCV education is effective in improving HCV knowledge. Although White race, younger age, and higher education were predictors of having more HCV knowledge prior to education, all patients independent of racial background had a significant improvement in their knowledge after education. Therefore, promoting effective HCV education among vulnerable populations may be an important factor in reducing the disparities in HCV disease.

Surjadi, Miranda; Torruellas, Cara; Ayala, Claudia; Yee, Hal F.

2010-01-01

117

Does patient education modify behaviour in the management of COPD?  

Microsoft Academic Search

With respect to the beneficial health effects of patient education in the treatment of asthma it might be expected that the active participation of COPD-patients in the management of their disease may reduce the burden of the disease. Self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) includes sufficient coping behaviour, compliance with inhaled medication, attention to changes in the severity of

H. Worth; Y. Dhein

2004-01-01

118

Health literacy and ophthalmic patient education  

PubMed Central

In 1997, Ebrahimzadeh, Davalos and Lee wrote in this journal that only 32% of the ophthalmic patient educational materials reviewed were written at or below the recommended eighth grade reading level. Since that time, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy found that more than one third of adult Americans possess only basic or below basic health literacy skills, defined as the ability to understand written information in a healthcare setting. Subsequently, investigators have shown that poor health literacy skills are associated with poor prescription medication adherence, increased hospital admissions and increased mortality. We review the readability of currently available ophthalmic educational materials, with particular attention to the health literacy status of the patient population for which the materials are intended. Examples of prose at various readability levels are provided. Optimizing patient education and improving clinical outcomes requires understanding the attributes that the patient brings to the patient–physician relationship, including health literacy.

Muir, Kelly W.; Lee, Paul P.

2010-01-01

119

Educating patients: staff response to patient misunderstanding.  

PubMed

Members of a dentist's staff may be the best allies in promptly identifying patient misunderstandings related to their dental care. The doctor and his team should discuss the various ways in which patients may indicate misunderstandings about the dental practice's clinical or business policies. A staff member's prompt and thoughtful response can go a long way toward preventing patients' suspicion, non-compliance, and dissatisfaction. PMID:18630849

Roman, Kathleen M

120

[Hilarein, a patient education game for kidney transplant patients].  

PubMed

At Nice university hospital, an educational board game has been designed by the kidney transplant team for patients suffering from kidney failure. Hilarein is a tool to support therapeutic education which demonstrates that it is possible to learn while having fun. PMID:23593797

Césarini, Carole; Callens, Cécile

2013-03-01

121

Matthew Effects in Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test the hypothesized cumulative advantages of educative factors, the science-achievement scores on a 69-item test of science knowledge of 1,284 young adults, ages 26 to 35, surveyed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in 1977, were regressed on three composite independent variables: motivation and prior and current educative experiences. The test scores were related significantly to prior

Herbert J. Walberg; Shiow-Ling Tsai

1983-01-01

122

[Patient education and regional healthcare requirements].  

PubMed

In the Pays de la Loire, only 3% of patients suffering from a long-term condition have access to a therapeutic education programme (TEP), mainly implemented in hospitals. A campaign is underway to promote the development of therapeutic education programmes on a regional level, notably by raising awareness of its benefits and coordinating the offer in cooperation with primary care workers and those working in the social sector. The aim is to improve patients' quality of life and to reduce repeated hospitalisations by providing "keys" for the preservation of patients' health status. PMID:22641942

Devineau, Véronique

2012-04-01

123

Can face-to-face patient education be replaced by computer-based patient education?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In plastic surgery patient education is important but time consuming. It can be performed face-to-face or it can be computer based. In order to examine the merits of computer-based patient education, a research of the literature was carried out. The results of this search show that computer-based education is of great potential benefit. Especially in retaining information, informed consent and

B. J. Keulers; P. H. M. Spauwen

2003-01-01

124

Patient education in pain control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients' concerns about reporting pain and using analgesics have been cited as major contributors to the problem of inadequate pain management. The purpose of this paper is to describe a program of research in which we have focused on these patient concerns, or as we refer to them, \\

S. Ward; S. Hughes; H. Donovan; R. Serlin

2001-01-01

125

Computers in patient education and monitoring.  

PubMed

Computing technologies offer much promise in the field of medicine. Every discipline in medicine has been affected by the proliferation of computerized technology. Clinicians face challenges in balancing constraints of time and personnel resources when caring for and educating patients. The potential value of computer technology is tremendous and expectations run high among providers and patients. Computers can help patients to synthesize knowledge from information and to retain information about diseases. Computer and communication technologies can extend the caregiver's reach with remote patient monitoring. Health care providers' roles are changing because of the availability of health information on the Internet. Computer-based patient education can help improve the patient's awareness and understanding of his or her disease(s), which can help make the patient more of a partner in the patient-physician relationship. Currently, there are some limitations to and issues about using computers for patient education and monitoring, but I expect those limitations and issues to be substantially mitigated in the future. PMID:15107136

Belda, Thomas E

2004-05-01

126

Use of technology for educating melanoma patients.  

PubMed

We evaluated the feasibility of using technology for melanoma patient education in a clinic setting. We assessed technology skill level and preferences for education. Data were collected using an adapted version of the Use of Technology Survey. Most participants owned a computer and DVD player and were skilled in the use of these devices, along with Internet and e-mail. Participants preferred the option of using in-clinic and at-home technology versus in-clinic only use. Computer and DVD applications were preferred because they were familiar and convenient. Using technology for patient education intervention is a viable option; however, patients' skill level and preferences for technology should be considered. PMID:20336399

Marble, Nicole; Loescher, Lois J; Lim, Kyung Hee; Hiscox, Heather

2010-09-01

127

Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a…

Rosenberg, Stanley G.

128

Impact of patient education and self-management on morbidity in asthmatics and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of patient education on morbidity in asthmatics and COPD patients has not previously been investigated in a single study.We randomized 78 asthmatics and 62 COPD patients after ordinary outpatient management. Intervention consisted of educational group sessions and individual sessions administered by a trained nurse and physiotherapist. A self-management plan was developed. The utilization of health resources and absenteeism

FRODE GALLEFOSS; PER SIGVALD BAKKE

2000-01-01

129

Beyond Informed Consent: Educating the Patient  

PubMed Central

The informed consent doctrine was conceived as a basis for allowing patients to meaningfully participate in the decision-making process. It has evolved into a formal, legal document that reflects a desire by physicians and surgeons to have patients execute “waivers of liability.” In the process it has lost its educational value by shifting the emphasis to obtaining a “preoperative release” from an exchange of information upon which a patient can make important decisions about their healthcare choices. This is unfortunate because, in the process, both patients and physicians have suffered. Patients have become alienated from the informed consent process and, paradoxically, physicians and surgeons may have created more liability exposure through this alienation. We propose that by returning to an educational model, the patients will develop a greater sense of control, become more compliant, and potentially experience improved healthcare outcomes. There may also develop an alliance between the patient and the physician or surgeon, such that the seeds of an antagonistic or litigious relationship will not be planted before treatment begins. Liability reduction, therefore, may more likely arise from the educational model.

Brenner, Alison Tytell; Horowitz, Daniel

2008-01-01

130

Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and…

Bell, Edith E.

2009-01-01

131

The crucial role of patient education in heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Deterioration of heart failure causes and complicates many hospital admissions in people aged over 65 years. Frequent readmissions cause an immense burden on the individual, the family and the health care system. Heart failure management programmes, in which patient education is an important component, have been shown to be effective in improving self-care and reducing readmissions. Aim: This paper

Anna Strfmberg

2005-01-01

132

Evaluating the effectiveness of educational interventions to prevent delirium.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to combine knowledge about how clinicians learn with a review of educational interventions to prevent delirium in hospitalised patients. The primary aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of approaches to delirium education. A detailed search of educational and medical databases was undertaken. The type of intervention used was classified according to the PRECEED model of Green and colleagues, using factors relevant to behaviour change in health promotion. The effectiveness of the intervention was determined by assessing changes in staff performance and patient outcomes. Nineteen studies of variable design and quality were identified. Studies using predisposing, enabling and reinforcing strategies together were more often effective in producing changes in staff behaviour and patient outcomes. Education and guidelines used together or in combination have little effect. When strategies to enable and reinforce changes in clinical practice are used together with education sessions, outcomes for patients are more positive. PMID:22176561

Wand, Anne Pamela Frances

2011-05-03

133

Postprocedural effects of gastrointestinal endoscopy performed as a day case procedure in children: implications for patient and family education.  

PubMed

A prospective design that included a survey tool, nursing care records, and telephone interview was used to determine postprocedural effects experienced by children and families following gastrointestinal endoscopy performed as a day procedure. One hundred twenty-one children attending a pediatric gastroenterology unit for endoscopy under general anesthesia participated in the study. Physical symptoms, day care/school attendance, behavioral issues, and economic factors in the 72 hours post procedure were identified. Over half the children (n = 69, 57%) experienced pain in the hospital post procedure. Pain was reported by 73 children (60%) at home on the day of the procedure, by 55 children (45%) on Day 1 post procedure, and by 37 children (31%) on Day 2 post procedure. The throat was the most common site of pain. Nausea or vomiting was experienced by 37 children (31%) at some time following their procedure but was not associated with procedure type, age, or fasting time. Over half the children (n = 53, 51%) who usually attended day care or school did not attend the day following their procedure. Twenty-four parents (40%) who would normally have worked on the day after the procedure did not attend employment. These findings have been used to improve the preprocedural information and discharge management of patients treated in a pediatric gastroenterology ambulatory setting. PMID:18156960

Melville, Diane; da Silva, Mary Soares; Young, Jeanine; McCann, Damhnat; Cleghorn, Geoffrey

134

Research Paper: Effect of CPOE User Interface Design on User-Initiated Access to Educational and Patient Information during Clinical Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveAuthors evaluated whether displaying context sensitive links to infrequently accessed educational materials and patient information via the user interface of an inpatient computerized care provider order entry (CPOE) system would affect access rates to the materials.DesignThe CPOE of Vanderbilt University Hospital (VUH) included “baseline” clinical decision support advice for safety and quality. Authors augmented this with seven new primarily educational

S. Trent Rosenbloom; Antoine J Geissbuhler; William D. Dupont; Dario A. Giuse; Douglas A. Talbert; William M. Tierney; W. Dale Plummer; William W. Stead; Randolph A. Miller

2005-01-01

135

Effectiveness of early educational intervention.  

PubMed

Early educational intervention has been proposed to partially offset the impacts of poverty and inadequate learning environments on child development and school success. A broad range of early educational interventions are found to produce meaningful, lasting effects on cognitive, social, and schooling outcomes. However, all interventions are not equally effective. Two major U.S. programs perform relatively poorly. Research provides some guidance regarding the features of highly effective programs, but much remains to be learned. New experimental studies of key program features would have a high payoff. PMID:21852490

Barnett, W S

2011-08-19

136

Efficacy of a Single Educative Intervention in Patients with Chronic Plaque Psoriasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: An effective patient-physician relationship is important in the management of psoriatic patients. Objective: Our purpose was to investigate the efficacy of an educational intervention for patients with psoriasis in improving disease knowledge and attitude towards physicians and systemic treatments. Methods: The intervention consisted of a single, 2-hour educational programme conducted either by a dermatologist or by a dermatologist and

Viviana Lora; Paolo Gisondi; Anna Calza; Mauro Zanoni; Giampiero Girolomoni

2009-01-01

137

Effective Showcase Projects: Office of Indian Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Indian Education Programs supplement state, local, and tribal education efforts to improve the quality of Indian education and assure parental and community participation. Each year, the Office of Indian Education, assisted by the six regional Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers, selects effective projects to be showcased at the…

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC. Indian Education Programs.

138

[Functional re-education, self-education, and education of patients with leg arthrosis].  

PubMed

EXPERT OPINIONS: Functional rehabilitation, self-rehabilitation in the patient's home and patient education are the basis of non-drug management of patients with osteoarthritis. This approach helps reduce pain and the frequency of consultations, and improves physical activity and quality of life. FUNCTIONAL REHABILITATION: The objective is to limit pain, to maintain joint mobility and muscle force, and to learn how to manage one's disease. Evidence in the literature demonstrates the efficacy of functional rehabilitation. SELF-REHABILITATION: The objective of self-rehabilitation is the same as functional rehabilitation and data in the literature indicate positive results on pain and functional symptoms. PATIENT EDUCATION PROGRAMS: Presented in the form of advise booklet or videos (CD-Room Arthemus), patient education programs improve non-drug management of osteoarthritis. COMPLEMENTARITY: It is logical to associate the different modalities of non-drug management of osteoarthritis since their objectives are complementary and synergetic. PMID:11826588

Rouillon, O

2002-01-12

139

The social in medicine: social techniques in patient education.  

PubMed

The article investigates the role of the social in medicine through an empirical study of social technologies in Diabetes 2 and COPD patient education in Denmark. It demonstrates how the social at the same time is the cause of disease but also functions as a solution to the problem. Furthermore it suggests that the patient groups have an ambiguous role in medicine; they appear to be organized as communities of empowerment, critical of the individualizing effects of medicine, but at the same time these groups are embedded in medical practices, transferring responsibility for illness and health to the level of the citizens. The article provides an empirical analysis of how the social in patient education works. The empirical analysis challenges an existing understanding that patient groups automatically support healthy lifestyle changes. We point out the multiple ways in which the social works. PMID:21859675

Ljungdalh, Anders Kruse; Møller, Jane Ege

2011-08-22

140

[Psychotherapy and education of anxious patients].  

PubMed

Psychotherapy and education are and main component of the management of anxious patient. Psychoanalysis and cognitive behaviour therapies are the most indicate in anxiety. Because of the formation and the time required by their practice, they are a specialist field. A formation may be an help for the practitioner in the daily practice. Psychological care of anxiety is an important objective of public health to reduce the medical and social cost of this affection. PMID:10887617

Servant, D

1999-09-15

141

Readability of Educational Materials for Endodontic Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionVocabulary and writing style have been shown to affect the readability of patient-education materials. Readability is generally defined as the ease of understanding or comprehension because of the style of writing. Microsoft Word software (Microsoft Corporation, Bellevue, WA) can quantify and report readability statistics, providing both the Flesch Reading Ease score and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level score of selected documents.

Karl Woodmansey

2010-01-01

142

Creating Patient and Family Education Web Sites  

PubMed Central

This article gives details about the methods and processes used to ensure that usability and accessibility were achieved during development of the Home Parenteral Nutrition Family Caregivers Web site, an evidence-based health education Web site for the family members and caregivers of chronically ill patients. This article addresses comprehensive definitions of usability and accessibility and illustrates Web site development according to Section 508 standards and the national Health and Human Services’ Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines requirements.

YADRICH, DONNA MACAN; FITZGERALD, SHARON A.; WERKOWITCH, MARILYN; SMITH, CAROL E.

2013-01-01

143

Tender Beginnings program: an educational continuum for the maternity patient.  

PubMed

The Tender Beginnings program demonstrates a comprehensive educational plan for maternity patients that can be extended throughout pregnancy, the birth process, and into the postpartum period. In today's healthcare environment, where the maternity patient continues to experience a shortened stay structure, the hurried learning process that is absorbed over a 48-hour stay is often ineffectual. This program provides a strategy and framework for effective teaching that can be successfully implemented all through the peripartum period. Budgetary constraints have given way to an innovative approach and opportunity for the healthcare specialist to explore an entrepreneurial relationship within the structure of the program. The Tender Beginnings program has proven to be a true integration of community educational outreach, nurse entrepreneurship, hospital-based education, and postpartum/neonatal follow-up. PMID:16915052

Brown, Susan E H

144

Patient-centered diabetes self-management education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes self-management education (DSME) has been shown to improve health outcomes. Yet, relatively little is known about\\u000a how DSME has its effects. Literature reviewed from the past 3 years indicates that if DSME is to become more effective interventions\\u000a need to be theory-based, to increase patient involvement in their care, and to encompass a broader array of evidenced-based\\u000a outcomes. Outcomes

Geoffrey C. Williams; Allan Zeldman

2002-01-01

145

Effective educators are culturally competent communicators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective formal education or schooling is not simply a matter of teaching and learning curriculum content. It is also about values, assumptions, feelings, perceptions and relationships. No education can take place without interpersonal communication. Effective teaching can thus be qualié ed in terms of relating effectively in the classroom. Effective education thus also presupposes effective communication skills. Communication as the

Johann le Roux

2002-01-01

146

Simulated patients in audiology education: student reports.  

PubMed

Background: Despite increased attention in recent years to audiology counseling education, students remain concerned about their abilities to interact with patients in challenging situations, such as when breaking difficult news. Simulated patients, or actors trained to portray patients in clinical scenarios, have been used for many years in medical schools to teach and assess students' interpersonal skills, and are just beginning to be used in audiology programs. Although research suggests that medical students value simulated patient experiences, little is known about whether the same is true for audiology students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to survey audiology students who had completed a simulated patient counseling experience as part of their graduate coursework at Central Michigan University, to learn about their experiences and views of this instructional format. Research Design: This study used descriptive and comparative statistics to report student observations and to determine if student responses to evaluative questions differed from chance. Study Sample: Study participants included 29 audiology students who had completed a "breaking difficult news" simulated patient experience as part of their required graduate coursework in patient counseling. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants completed an online survey that included seven evaluative five-point Likert-scale questions about their simulated patient counseling experience. Participants also completed one multiple-choice question on suggestions for future simulated-patient sessions. Results: For each of the seven evaluative questions, a majority of participants (76-100%) responded positively, agreeing or strongly agreeing that the experience was helpful to their learning. For each of these evaluative questions, a ?² analysis revealed that the distribution of positive (i.e., strongly agree and agree) to nonpositive (i.e., neutral, disagree, and strongly disagree) responses differed significantly from chance (p < .0001, df = 1). The results also indicated that when asked which of several suggested clinical scenarios would be helpful for future sessions, simulations of challenging patient types (i.e., hostile, rambling, and noncommunicative patients) were supported by most (62-90%) respondents. Conclusions: The results of the present study are consistent with findings of medical students' positive perceptions of simulated patient experiences as well as those previously reported for audiology students. Together, these data support the continued use of simulated patients as a method of instruction for audiology counseling education for breaking difficult news, and suggest a potential value of using simulated patient interactions for training counseling skills in other clinical situations and scenarios. PMID:24131609

Naeve-Velguth, Susan; Christensen, Sara A; Woods, Suzanne

2013-09-01

147

Effects of patient teaching, educational materials, and coaching using telephone on dyspnea and physical functioning among persons with heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heart failure (HF) is a major cause of death in Thailand and other developing countries. This study shows that a coaching using telephone program is an accessible and feasible strategy that helps patients with HF to self-manage HF symptoms, decrease dyspnea, and improve physical functioning at home.

Apinya Wongpiriyayothar; Ubolrat Piamjariyakul; Phoebe D. Williams

2010-01-01

148

Drug Education Effects. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is a research project that was intended to study the effects of a factual drug education program on the attitudes on high school and junior high students toward the use of psychoactive drugs. The approximately 250 eighth and twelfth grade students involved in the study filled out a number of questionnaires designed to measure a variety of…

Mason, Michael L.

149

Drug Education Effects. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a research project that was intended to study the effects of a factual drug education program on the attitudes on high school and junior high students toward the use of psychoactive drugs. The approximately 250 eighth and twelfth grade students involved in the study filled out a number of questionnaires designed to measure a variety of…

Mason, Michael L.

150

Effectiveness of PRECEDE model for health education on changes and level of control of HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background Individual health education is considered to be essential in the overall care of patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), although there is some uncertainty regarding its metabolic control benefits. There have been very few randomized studies on the effects of individual education on normal care in DM2 patients with a control group, and none of these have assessed the long-term results. Therefore, this study aims to use this design to assess the effectiveness of the PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, Enabling, Causes in Educational Diagnosis, and Evaluation) education model in the metabolic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods An open community effectiveness study was carried out in 8 urban community health centers in the North-East Madrid Urban Area (Spain). Six hundred patients with DM2 were randomized in two groups: PRECEDE or conventional model for health promotion education. The main outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin A1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids and control criteria during the 2-year follow-up period. Results Glycated hemoglobin A1c and systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels decreased significantly in the PRECEDE group (multivariate analysis of covariance, with baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c, SBP, and variables showing statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visits). The decrease levels in diastolic blood pressure (DBP), triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were nonsignificant. PRECEDE increased compliance in all control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. BMI did not change during the study in either of the two models analyzed. Conclusions PRECEDE health education model is a useful method in the overall treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, which contributes to decrease glycated hemoglobin A1c and SBP levels and increase the compliance in all the control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01316367

2011-01-01

151

Effects of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass or Diabetes Support and Education on Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion in Morbidly Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE:: The long-term changes in insulin sensitivity and ?-cell function in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who undergo Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery or standard medical care remain unclear. We prospectively studied longitudinal changes of glucostatic parameters in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus undergoing RYGB surgery or diabetes support and education (DSE). RESEARCH METHODS AND DESIGN:: Sixty-one morbidly obese subjects (41.7 ± 0.6 kg/m) with type 2 diabetes mellitus were assigned to RYGB surgery (n = 30) or DSE (n = 31). They were matched for sex, age, and body weight. Insulin sensitivity index (Si) and acute insulin response (AIR) were derived from frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Body composition was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. General linear model with repeated measures was used to examine the longitudinal changes (baseline, 6 months, 12 months) in these parameters. RESULTS:: At 12-month follow-up, significant improvement in obesity measures, body composition, glucose homeostasis, Si, and AIR was observed after RYGB surgery and weight loss. These outcomes were not influenced by preoperative insulin use. Although there were no significant changes in the body composition among DSE subjects, they experienced a decline in the Si and AIR, along with an increase in fasting glucose and HbA1c. The between-group differences in Si and AIR at 12-month follow-up were completely attenuated with adjustment to changes in body weight. CONCLUSIONS:: The long-term effects of RYGB surgery on glucostatic parameters are partly dependent on weight loss. In morbidly obese patients with diabetes who were offered DSE, a progressive decline in the glucose homeostasis and glucostatic parameters is observed despite absence of weight gain. (NCT00787670). PMID:23732262

Khoo, Chin Meng; Chen, Jiegen; Pamuklar, Zehra; Torquati, Alfonso

2013-05-31

152

Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education  

PubMed Central

A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual’s competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been promoted as one such potential approach.

Adams, Robert John

2010-01-01

153

Current perspectives of therapeutic patient education in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Therapeutic patient education is a well-defined branch of health education aimed at patient empowerment. It consists of helping the patient to understand his own disease and its treatment, actively collaborating to its fulfillment and to take care of his own health status in order to maintain and improve his life quality. The correct implementation of both communication and therapeutic patient

Renzo Marcolongo; Elisa Rossato; Valentina Pavan; Francesco Laveder; Leopoldo Bonadiman; Angela Maria Rigoli

2001-01-01

154

The Patient as a Declining Resource in Dental Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The role of the patient in dental education is examined from several perspectives, including factors influencing the patient population within dental school clinics, the role that patient care plays in schools, and opportunities for attracting and maintaining sufficient patients to provide educational experiences for students. (Author/MLW)|

Colman, Harvey L.

1981-01-01

155

Putting the 'patient' back into patient-centred care: an education perspective.  

PubMed

Patient-centred care is a value espoused by most healthcare systems and a concept taught in nursing education programs as a fundamental concept of patient care. In this study, we focused on the patient's experience of patient-centredness, interviewing eighteen patients and eight family members about their experiences as patients on an in-patient acute care medical unit in a large hospital in Canada. Approximately half of the patients expressed satisfaction with their experiences and their involvement in decisions about their healthcare. The remainder expressed concerns about their care that jeopardized their experiences of patient-centredness. These areas concerned issues of communication with and among healthcare professionals, relationships with these care providers, trust and respect in the professional relationships, and general satisfaction with care. Participants provided advice to professional students about ways to interact more effectively with their patients to establish caring, empathetic, patient-centred relationships as the basis for care. We address patient recommendations to support learner understanding of the patient experience both in classrooms and clinical experiences throughout educational programs as a means to enhance their patient-centredness. PMID:23602696

Ferguson, Linda M; Ward, Heather; Card, Sharon; Sheppard, Suzanne; McMurtry, Jane

2013-04-18

156

COPD patient's education and self-management teaching: a worthwhile effort?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient-focused educational interventions are usually designed to support patients in seeking and obtaining appropriate, effective, safe, and efficient health care and to involve patients and families in clinical care and optimal management of chronic diseases (1). Such interventions can achieve posi- tive effects in many chronic diseases although with the actual results may differ in terms of efficacy and effectiveness

M. Neri

2008-01-01

157

Computer-based patient education : its potential in general and plastic surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis discusses the advantages of computer-based patient education. Tools for designing an effective education program and its applicability are presented. The array of informational domains that patients need to know before they agree to a specific (operative) treatment is investigated. Steps that can be used to improve the informed consent procedure are presented. Hopefully this thesis will inspire other

Bram Jacques Keulers

2008-01-01

158

The Educational Effectiveness of Bilingual Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Shows that of the 300 bilingual program evaluations studied only 72 were methodologically acceptable and of that 72 only 22% found traditional bilingual education better than regular classroom instruction when the outcome is reading, 7% when the outcome is language, and 9% when the outcome is math. Suggests that findings do not favor transition…

Rossell, Christine H.; Baker, Keith

1996-01-01

159

Evaluations of Patient Education ProgramsA Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A literature search located 23 evaluations of patient education programs that utilized a randomly selected control group (i.e., an experimental design) or a non- equivalent control group (i.e., a quast experimental design). Meta-analysis pro cedures were used to combine the findings of these studies The effect size for each of 102 dependent variables was derived from the mean of an

Emil J. Posavac

1980-01-01

160

Professional views on patient education in osteoporosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The aim of this study was to investigate patient education in osteoporosis, with a consensus-building Delphi survey. The results\\u000a showed that the purposes of osteoporosis schools are to reduce the risk of falling, facilitate empowerment, increase levels\\u000a of function and activity and teach participants to master or reduce pain.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  According to the World Health Organization, osteoporosis is a major health

Angela Bångsbo; Anita Björklund

2010-01-01

161

A personal perspective: at the crossroads of heart attack care: designing an effective nationwide public education program to hasten patient hospital arrival.  

PubMed

This report presents a field-tested approach to the greatest health care problem facing our country, the fact that two-thirds of the deaths from acute myocardial infarction occur before hospital admission. Scores of fundraising appearances for the Missouri Heart Association during the 1950s and 1960s throughout the 1,000,000 population rural/urban Southwest Missouri region gave an ideal setting for teaching the public the early symptoms of heart attack. Audiences were advised that if any of these appeared they should immediately call their doctor or quickly get to the nearest hospital emergency room. These presentations led to a steady increase in hospital admissions. The Missouri Heart Association responded by launching the Early Warning Signs of Heart Attack Public and Professional Education Program in July 1971, incorporating these messages in radio, TV, and newspaper Public Service Announcements. In less than 6 months, analysis of consecutive admissions to the cardiovascular intensive care unit of the base hospital showed that the median time from the onset of symptoms to starting to the hospital was reduced from 4 to 2.2 hours; 64% of those patients called their doctor as their first step in seeking help and 58% went to the hospital by car. This message content was carried through the 1980s and 1990s under other auspices. The methods of the successful Missouri program are contrasted with others that have failed, establishing essential features in designing a nationwide program effective in hastening acute myocardial infarction patient hospital arrival. PMID:19952554

Turner, Glenn O

2009-12-01

162

Nurses' attitude to patient education barriers in educational hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ attitudes to the barriers of patient education as a right for getting information based on work situation of nurses, educational facilities in hospitals, and patients’ situation. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted using a cross-sectional design. The populations consisted of 240 nurses affiliated in the Educational Hospitals. The data were gathered by a questionnaire. Demographic variables and three domains were studied. Twenty questions were about their working situation, 4 questions about hospital educating facilities, and 12 questions were about patients’ situation in hospital. The type and frequency of education barriers were evaluated, and variables associated with reporting an obstacle were analyzed. Findings: In our questionnaire, we used a Likert scale for determining severity of three domains as the barriers of patient education that ranged from 0 to 4. Generally, it was obvious that educational condition in our hospitals was not good and most of the nurses believed that patient education is not their duties, facilities in hospitals are not sufficient and shortness of time is the most important cause of insufficiency of patient education Conclusions: The interactions of patient, physician and systemic factors have implications for the implementation of patient education. The failure of adequate patient education may be attributed to the lack of patient adherence, the failure of nurses’ knowledge and skill level or the insufficient funding and organization of necessary programs in the current health care system.

Aghakhani, Nader; Nia, Hamid Sharif; Ranjbar, Hadi; Rahbar, Narges; Beheshti, Zahra

2012-01-01

163

An initial, qualitative investigation of patient-centered education in dentistry.  

PubMed

Patient education plays an important role in the delivery of dental care. Current evidence suggests that the emergence of the Internet and other electronic resources are significantly influencing how patients learn about their healthcare. We conducted a qualitative inquiry using a combination of interviews with patients and clinicians, and direct observation of patient education episodes, to begin identifying requirements for customized, patient-centered approaches to education at the point of care. Most patients in our study felt comfortable with the amount and method of education during the dental visit, but 38% sought additional information on the Internet. Dentists and their team members provided patient education mostly verbally, supported by media such as radiographs, images and models. Electronic means, especially the Internet, were little used. Patient education occupied a significant portion of the time of initial comprehensive examination (29%) and routine (7%) dental visits. A deeper understanding of patient knowledge deficits and information needs will be needed to design effective educational interventions. Patient education should be meaningfully integrated into the workflow shared by dentists, their team members and patients, in order to maximize its outcomes. PMID:23388305

Clayton, Marc; Borromeo, Chuck; Hess, Sherry; Hochheiser, Harry; Schleyer, Titus

2013-01-01

164

Disease knowledge after an educational program in patients with GERD - a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Patient education has proved beneficial in several but not all chronic disease. Inconsistent findings may rely on varying educational effects of various programs and differential effects on subgroups of patients. Patients' increase in disease knowledge may serve as a feedback to the educator on how well the education program works – but may not be associated to relevant clinical outcomes like quality of life (QoL). This study aimed to investigate the effects of a group based education program for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on disease knowledge and the association between knowledge and QoL. Methods Patients with GERD were randomly allocated to education (102 patients) or control (109 patients). The education program was designed as a structured dialogue conveying information about pathophysiology, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of GERD, patients' rights and use of healthcare. Outcomes were a 24 item knowledge test on GERD (score 0 – 24) 2 and 12 months after the educational program and disease specific and general QoL (Digestive symptoms and disease impact, DSIQ, and General Health Questionnaire, GHQ). Results Patients allocated to education achieved higher knowledge test scores than controls at 2 months (17.0 vs. 13.1, p < 0.001) and at 12 months (17.1 vs. 14.0, p < 0.001) follow-up. Knowledge test score was positively associated with having completed advanced school and inversely related to psychiatric illness and poor QoL as perceived by the patients at the time of inclusion. Overall, changes in knowledge test score were not associated with change in QoL. Conclusion A group based education program for patients with GERD designed as a structured dialogue increased patients' disease knowledge, which was retained after 1 year. Changes in GERD-knowledge were not associated with change in QoL. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT0061850

Urnes, Jorgen; Petersen, Hermod; Farup, Per G

2008-01-01

165

Does Stage of Change Modify the Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention to Improve Diet among Family Members of Hospitalized Cardiovascular Disease Patients?  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether effectiveness of a special intervention (SI) to improve diet versus a control intervention (CI) differs by readiness to reduce dietary saturated fat based on the Transtheoretical Model stages of change among family members of hospitalized CVD patients. Methods Stage of change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance) was assessed by standardized questionnaire. Diet was measured by Block 98 Food Frequency Questionnaire at baseline and one-year in participants in the Family Intervention Trial for Heart Health (n=501; 36% racial/ethnic minorities; 66% female). Therapeutic Lifestyle Change diet education was provided to each SI subject tailored to baseline stage of change. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine whether the effect of the intervention was modified by stage of change. Results Baseline saturated fat and cholesterol intakes were lower among those in maintenance stage vs. others [(9.9% vs. 11.2% kcals; p<.0001) and (112.2 vs. 129.7 mg/1000kcal; p=.0003) respectively]. Overall, change in the percentage of calories from saturated fat from baseline to one-year was ?0.7 in the SI vs. ?0.4 in the CI (p=.18). Among participants in contemplation greater reductions in saturated fat (?2.1% vs. +0.3% kcals; p=.04) and cholesterol (?34.0 vs. +32.6 mg/1000kcal; p=.01) were seen in the SI vs. CI. The SI was more likely than CI to achieve new adherence to a diet <10% saturated fat /<300mg cholesterol at one-year among those not in maintenance stage (30% vs. 15%; p=.03). CI participants were more likely than SI to revert to lower levels on the stage of change continuum from baseline to one-year (17% vs. 7%; p=.002). Conclusion Effectiveness of an intervention to lower saturated fat varies by baseline stage of change among family members of hospitalized CVD patients. This may be important to consider when designing research or clinical diet interventions.

Mochari, Heidi; Terry, Mary Beth; Mosca, Lori

2010-01-01

166

Nutrition education tools used in phenylketonuria: clinician, parent and patient perspectives from three international surveys.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Three international surveys were developed aiming to identify the current nutrition educational tools used in the management of phenylketonuria (PKU) and the perceived effectiveness of these tools by clinicians, parents and patients. METHODS: The first two surveys were distributed through the Metabolic Dietitians ListServe (pno-metabl@listserv.cc.emory.edu), and the third survey was distributed by international clinics and the National PKU Alliance website (www.npkua.org). A total of 888 responses (S1, n = 88; S2, n = 81; S3, n = 719) were collected from all three surveys. The surveys represent participants from 17 countries, in Europe; North America (USA and Canada); Mexico; Argentina; Turkey; Australia; and Africa (Tunisia). RESULTS: A consistent decline in 'parents as role models' as an educational tool was observed starting at age 10 years. Patients responded they feel their families are the most effective form of education, whereas handouts were selected as the least effective educational tool by patients. Parents responded they feel the most effective educational tool is one-on-one counselling. Patients and parents show a desirable trend in wanting to attend group clinic, even in centres where this type of educational tool is not offered. CONCLUSIONS: There was a discrepancy between clinicians and patient views regarding the perceived effectiveness of the nutrition education tools. Future research is needed surrounding the impact nutrition education may have on improved dietary compliance in patients with PKU. PMID:23607595

Bernstein, L E; Helm, J R; Rocha, J C; Almeida, M F; Feillet, F; Link, R M; Gizewska, M

2013-04-23

167

Differences between physical therapists in attention paid to patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes differences between physical therapists in terms of the attention they pay to educating patients. The differences between therapists were identified from audiotaped treatment sessions of 1837 patients, recorded by physical therapists in non-institutional care in the Netherlands. Trained judges assessed the quantity and the quality of the education by means of a checklist. Therapists' opinions about patient

Emmy M. Sluijs; Jouke van der Zee; Gerjo J. Kok

1993-01-01

168

Cancer patient education in Iran: a descriptive study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was carried out to examine the status of cancer patient education in Iran. Using the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer's (MASCC) patient education questionnaire, 310 individuals - a sample of heterogeneous cancer patients (n=167) and their relatives (n=143) - were enrolled in the study. The pooled results indicated that only 15% of respondents believed more than

Ali Montazeri; Mariam Vahdani; Mehregan Haji-Mahmoodi; Soghra Jarvandi; Mandana Ebrahimi

2002-01-01

169

Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

Pazirandeh, Mahmood

2002-01-01

170

Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

(Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

Courville, Keith

2011-01-01

171

[Patient education, the time on the another side of nursing].  

PubMed

The law of 21st July 2009 known as the "Hospital, patients, health and territories" law integrates therapeutic education for the patient into the public health code. Patients must therefore be able to make adapted choices with regard to their health. Patient therapeutic education takes place at the heart of nursing care within a specific time for the patient and the nurse, giving rise to a new identity process for the nurse. PMID:23167126

Maguéro, Stéphanie

2012-10-01

172

A meta-analysis of trials evaluating patient education and counseling for three groups of preventive health behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine the overall effectiveness of patient education and counseling on preventive health behaviors and to examine the effects of various approaches for modifying specific types of behaviors. Data sources: Computerized databases (Medline, Healthline, Dissertation Abstracts, and Psychological Abstracts), bibliographies 1971–1994. Search terms (patient education, patient compliance, and self care) with modifiers (evaluation and specific preventive behaviors). Study selection:

Patricia Dolan Mullen; Denise G Simons-Morton; Gilbert Ram??rez; Ralph F Frankowski; Lawrence W Green; Douglas A Mains

1997-01-01

173

A Patient Safety Curriculum for Graduate Medical Education: Results From a Needs Assessment of Educators and Patient Safety Experts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graduate medical education (GME) has traditionally focused on the diagnosis and management of disease with little attention devoted to patient safety and systems thinking. In this article, we describe the results of a needs assessment conducted to develop a patient safety curriculum for GME. Eight program directors, 10 patient safety experts, and 9 experts in education technology were interviewed for

Prathibha Varkey; Sudhakar Karlapudi; Steven Rose; Steve Swensen

2009-01-01

174

A Comparative Evaluation of the Traditional Versus a Systems Approach for Hypertensive Patient Education. Final Report, October 1975-March 1977.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study was conducted to evaluate the traditional method (physician, nurse) versus a systems approach method of providing health education. The objectives included the following: identify cost-effective and feasible ways of delivering patient education; guarantee an important resource for the professional in fulfilling his/her patient education

Kucha, Deloros H.

175

Education by general practitioners or education and exercises by physiotherapists for patients with whiplash-associated disorders? A randomized clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of education and advice given by general practitioners (GPs) with education, advice, and active exercise therapy given by physiotherapists (PTs) for patients with whiplash-associated disorders. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Available evidence from systematic reviews has indicated beneficial effects for active interventions in patients with whiplash-associated disorders. However, it remained unclear

Gwendolijne G. M. Scholten-Peeters; Catharina W. M. Neeleman-van der Steen; Erik J. M. Hendriks; Arianne P. Verhagen; Rob A. B. Oostendorp

2006-01-01

176

Gerogogy in patient education--revisited.  

PubMed

Gerogogy in Patient Education was first printed in Home Healthcare Nurse, Volume 14, Number 8, (1996), Lippincott. Writers Mary Pearson, M.Ed, RN- BC and Joan Wessman, MA. have revisited and updated the material to meet the needs of a new generation of health care professionals. Baby Boomers are retiring; they will reach their peak in 2030, with an estimated 72 million drawing social security. With these numbers comes an increase in services to the elderly, mostly in the form of medical expenditure. The problem will not only impact the financial system of Medicare but will have a great toll on families. How will the retirees remain independent in their homes? How will they learn new medical information? Will new health care professions be able to teach them while taking into consideration the physical and psychological alterations that occur with aging and illness? Gerogogy takes into account the person's disease process, age-related changes, educational level and motivation. Then incorporates these factors into practice, utilizing the same foundations found within the nursing process: assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation. As stated, the methods for teaching the elderly are unique and require modifications. Gerogogy meets these needs so individuals can remain at home while also reducing unnecessary medical costs. PMID:21874787

Pearson, Mary

177

INFLUENCING HEALTHCARE QUALITY: EDUCATING PATIENTS, NURSES, AND STUDENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

65 Education is a critically important enterprise to the healthcare system and is presumed to directly affect the quality of patient care, systems functions, and institutional efficiency. It can be expensive to develop quality educa- tion programs and also expensive to educate poorly. High costs associated with a failure to educate include the select liabilities associated with fail- ures in

Patti Rager Zuzelo

178

Pilot educational program to enhance empowering patient education of school-age children with diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background Nurses have a crucial role in patient education of children with type 1 diabetes, but they often exhibit lack of knowledge of the patient education process. This study aimed to describe an educational program to enhance empowering patient education process for the blood glucose monitoring education of school-age children and nurses’ perceptions of using empowering techniques. Methods An empowering patient education process for the diabetes education of school-age children was developed. The researcher collected nurse’s perceptions of managing the educational program by semi-structured interviews. Ten nurses carried out the diabetes education, and 8 of them participated in the interview. Three nurses implemented the diabetes education twice and were interviewed twice. The data consisted of 11 descriptions of the blood glucose monitoring education. The interviewer analyzed the data deductively and inductively by content analysis. Results Nurses described successful managing of the empowering patient education process. The need assessment consisted of using multiple methods and clarifying the capabilities and challenges of children and their parents. Planning manifested itself in adequate preparation and multiple objectives stated together with the family. Implementation comprised the relevant content, and the use of suitable teaching materials and methods. Evaluation was performed with various methods and documented accurately. Nurses also faced some challenges related to management and leadership, ambivalence with traditional and empowering patient education, and families’ overall situation. Conclusion An example of developing evidence-based patient education program is presented, but besides education other factors supporting changes in work practices should be considered in further development.

2013-01-01

179

Using information technology for patient education: realizing surplus value?  

PubMed

Computer-based patient information systems are introduced to replace traditional forms of patient education like brochures, leaflets, videotapes and, to a certain extent, face-to-face communication. In this paper, we claim that though computer-based patient information systems potentially have many advantages compared to traditional means, the surplus value of these systems is much harder to realize than often expected. By reporting on two computer-based patient information systems, both found to be unsuccessful, we will show that building computer-based patient information systems for patient education requires a thorough analysis of the advantages and limitations of IT compared to traditional forms of patient education. When this condition is fulfilled, however, these systems have the potential to improve health status and to be a valuable supplement to (rather than a substitute for) traditional means of patient education. PMID:15288913

Stoop, Arjen P; van't Riet, Annemarie; Berg, Marc

2004-08-01

180

Quality assurance processes for designing patient education web sites.  

PubMed

In the future, more nurses and other healthcare professionals will be providing patient education on the Internet. Having knowledge of processes that lead to quality patient education Web site design is essential. These quality assurance processes include determining the site's purpose, selecting the user population, establishing the expected clinical and learning outcomes, providing an educational framework, incorporating specific design principles, and multiple and ongoing site evaluation. Therefore, Web site development processes designed to undergird quality patient education are presented, and an example Web site is used to illustrate them. PMID:12352105

Smith, Carol E; Cha, Jennifer; Puno, Florence; Magee, Jon D; Bingham, James; Van Gorp, Mark

181

CEP's Eleven Principles of Effective Character Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is no single script for effective character education, but there are some important basic principles. This document presents eleven principles that schools and other groups can use to plan a character education effort and to evaluate available character education programs: (1) Promotes core ethical values and supportive performance values as…

Lickona, Tom; Schaps, Eric; Lewis, Catherine

2007-01-01

182

Asthma patient education opportunities in predominantly minority urban communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disenfranchised ethnic minority communities in the urban United States experience a high burden of asthma. Conventional office-based patient education often is insufficient to pro- mote proper asthma management and coping practices responsive to minority patients' envi- ronments. This paper explores existing and alternative asthma information and education sources in three urban minority communities in western New York State to help

Luis E. Zayas; Don McLean

2007-01-01

183

Students Learning from Patients: Let's Get Real in Medical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of…

Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

2008-01-01

184

Compliance in rheumatoid arthritis and the roleof formal patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:This study was performed to determine the compliance with the basic treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA; medication, physical therapy, and ergonomic measures), to study psychological factors that influence compliance in light of the social learning theory, to learn whether patient education positively influences compliance and health, and to find an approach to patient education that improves compliance.

Herman Brus; Martin van de Laar; Erik Taal; Johannes Rasker; Oene Wiegman

1997-01-01

185

Improved Patient Safety Through Web-Based Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the project is to develop, evaluate and disseminate web-based, population-specific education modules on patient safety under the direction of the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF). In order to accomplish this, education modules on p...

W. R. Hendee A. Sorensen D. Cummins P. Sokol H. Burt S. Krogull C. Keating-Christensen M. Foley T. Harwood J. Cooper

2004-01-01

186

Non-Specific Effects in Psycho-Educational Intervention Research  

PubMed Central

Randomized clinical trials support the efficacy of a wide range of psycho-educational interventions. However, the mechanisms through which these interventions improve outcomes are not always clear. At times, the theoretically specified factors within interventions have been shown to have specific effects on patient outcomes. But it has also been argued that other factors not identified in the intervention theory (e.g. “non-specific” factors such as patient expectations and therapeutic patient-clinician alliances) have powerful “non-specific” effects that account for most, if not all, of the observed efficacy of psycho-educational interventions. This paper describes important concepts in this debate and discusses key issues in distinguishing between specific and non-specific effects of psycho-educational nursing interventions. Four examples are used to illustrate potential methods of identifying and controlling for non-specific effects in clinical intervention trials.

Donovan, Heidi S.; Kwekkeboom, Kristine L.; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q.; Ward, Sandra E.

2009-01-01

187

[Education of patients with arterial hypertension. State of art and prospects].  

PubMed

Training of hypertensive patients is a widely disputable problem. It is shown that education of hypertensive patients and population at risk can effectively prevent hypertension both at population and individual levels. The authors believe that programs designed for the education of hypertensive patients and population have marked drawbacks as they lack consistency, vary in strategy (group or individual learning), methods of teaching (interactive multimedia presentation of the material, self-education according to certain recommendations, video- and audio materials), evaluation of short- and long-term effects (6 and 24 months), patients management, etc. This explains the necessity of further studies into the problem of the approaches to education of the patients and population concerning hypertension. PMID:15106514

Baksheev, V I; Kolomoets, N M; Danilov, Iu A

2004-01-01

188

Effects of special educator peer coaching on general educator effectiveness in inclusive classroom settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation investigated the effects of a peer coaching relationship between a special education teacher and two general education teachers. More specifically, a two-tier multiple baseline design across subjects was used to evaluate the effects of peer coaching on the general education teachers' use of effective instructional practices (EIPs) and subsequent effects on the engagement rate and academic performance of

Alexis Moreno

2000-01-01

189

Impact of educational differences as measure of socioeconomic status on survival for breast cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Aim of the study Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women. Some reports suggest the influence of socioeconomic status, including education, on survival rates for cancer patients. This report analyzes the effect of patientseducation level on their survival. Material and methods A retrospective analysis of the group of 810 breast cancer patients treated in single center in Poland was performed. The analyzed group included women with elementary education (24%), vocational training (19%), secondary (38%) or higher education (16%). Overall, recurrence-free and metastasis free survival times were analyzed. Results The actuarial 5-year overall survival was 72% (median 4.7 years), 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 84%, whereas metastasis-free survival 76%. Multivariate Cox model has shown that lower education had independent significantly negative influence on local recurrence-free survival time (p = 0.024). The highest risk of recurrence was found for patients with elementary education (p = 0.009). The same was confirmed for distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.001), with the highest risk of metastases in patients with vocational education and stage IIIB breast cancer (p < 0.001). Education level had significant impact on overall survival. The patients with higher-level education lived longer (p = 0.042). Conclusions Shorter recurrence-free survival time among women attaining lowest education level and longer overall survival time for women with higher education level suggest the necessity for intensified cancer awareness educational effort and screening among less-educated healthy Polish women.

Suwinski, Rafal

2012-01-01

190

Coordinated individual education with an arthritis passport for patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the effects of a program for individual education in combination with the use of an arthritis passport. - \\u000aMethods: We studied 3 groups of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The first experimental group received educational materials and followed the program under the guidance of their regular providers of health care whose activities were coordinated through arthritis passports. The

Robert P. Riemsma; Erik Taal; Herman L. M. Brus; Johannes J. Rasker; Oene Wiegman

1997-01-01

191

Health education in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack: a comprehensive review.  

PubMed

Health education aims at the acquisition of skills and attitudes to modify behaviour that influences health, leads to a modification of risk factors and ultimately to a decrease in disability and case fatality from stroke. Health education is an underdeveloped but important aspect of stroke care. Health education could promote compliance and healthy behaviour, improve patients' understanding of their health status and treatment options and facilitate communication. We reviewed the effect of health education in stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients, aiming at feasibility, effectiveness at the level of knowledge, attitude and skills, health behaviour changes and stroke outcome. We also describe the current status of health education for patients with recent coronary artery disease and public health education in stroke. Basic knowledge of stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients of their disease and associated risk factors is not sufficient. This is also observed in patients with coronary artery disease and in the general population. A beneficial effect of health education in stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients on health behaviour, risk reduction or stroke outcome has not been proven. Trials in patients with coronary artery disease, however, have shown that health education could result in a change of lifestyle. No specific method is superior, although the individualised, repetitive and active methods appear more successful. More intervention studies of health education in stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients are needed. Future trials should be large, have a long follow-up, should use an intensive and repetitive approach and involve patients' relatives to induce and maintain a healthy lifestyle. PMID:21205243

Maasland, Lisette; Brouwer-Goossensen, Dorien; den Hertog, Heleen M; Koudstaal, Peter J; Dippel, Diederik W J

2011-02-01

192

The Art and Science of Cancer Education and Evaluation: Toward Facilitating Improved Patient Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer education is a constantly evolving field, as science continues to advance both our understanding of cancer and its\\u000a effects on patients, families, and communities. Moving discoveries to practice expeditiously is paramount to impacting cancer\\u000a outcomes. The continuing education of cancer care professionals throughout their practice life is vital to facilitating the\\u000a adoption of therapeutic innovations. Meanwhile, more general educational

Lenora Johnson; Anita Ousley; Jeffrey Swarz; Raymond J. Bingham; J. Bianca Erickson; Steven Ellis; Terra Moody

2011-01-01

193

EDUC'AVK: Reduction of Oral Anticoagulant-related Adverse Events After Patient Education: A Prospective Multicenter Open Randomized Study  

PubMed Central

Background Long-term oral anticoagulation treatment is associated with potential morbidity. Insufficient patient education is linked to poorly controlled anticoagulation. However the impact of a specific educational program on anticoagulation related morbidity remains unknown. Objective To evaluate the effect of an oral anticoagulation patient education program in reducing both hemorrhagic and recurrent thrombotic complications. Design/Participants We conducted a prospective, multicenter open randomized study, comparing an interventional group who received a specific oral anticoagulation treatment educational program with a control group. Eligible patients were older than 18 and diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism requiring therapy with a vitamin K antagonist for 3 months or more. Our primary outcome was the occurrence of hemorrhagic or thromboembolic events. Results During the 3-month follow-up the main outcome criteria were observed 20 times (6.6% of patients), 5 (3.1%) in the experimental and 15 (10.6%) in the control group. Consequently, in multivariate analysis, the cumulative risk reduction in the experimental group was statistically significant (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.1 – 0.7, ?Patient education using an educational program reduced VKA-related adverse event rates.

Labarere, Jose; Yver, Jacqueline; Satger, Bernadette; Allenet, Benoit; Berremili, Touffek; Fontaine, Michele; Franco, Guy; Bosson, Jean Luc

2008-01-01

194

Intensive Patient Education Improves Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Setting and participants. Patients were recruited from pri- mary care clinics at a single Veterans Affairs hospital in New York City. Patients were eligible if they were aged 50 years or older, had a FOBT ordered by their health care provider, and had a referral to primary care nursing for patient education and distribution of FOBT kits. Patients were excluded

Stokamer CL; Chaudhuri J

195

Implementing a surgery–patient education program as a routine practice: a study conducted in two Dutch hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of existing patient education practices has shown a lack of sufficient preoperative training, despite evidence that such training benefits patients facing surgery. In close cooperation with their respective medical and nursing staffs, a surgery–patient education program was developed and implemented in two Dutch hospitals. The program was based on empirical findings regarding the effectiveness of various methods used to

Patricia Mullen; Bart van den Borne; Bert Breemhaar

2000-01-01

196

Principles for Effective Teaching in Developmental Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews six principles for effective developmental education teaching, including commitment to teaching underprepared students, command of the subject matter, and ability to teach a diverse student population. Integrates research findings from successful developmental education programs and general principles for effective teaching in…

Smittle, Patricia

2003-01-01

197

Profile of an Effective Urban Music Educator  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of an effective urban music educator in an effort to provide strategies for university teacher training programs to prepare students to teach in urban schools. The study examined urban music teachers' (N = 158) educational background, effective and ineffective characteristics, perceived…

Baker, Vicki D.

2012-01-01

198

Developing Effective Drug Education Programs. Fastback 332.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet discusses obstacles to effective drug education programs and suggests components that should be included in order to ensure effective programs. The first section presents six questions to ask of one's drug education program, noting that a poorly conceived program can do more harm than good. The second section focuses on convincing…

Horton, Lowell

199

Long-term effects of ethics education on the quality of care for patients who have do-not-resuscitate orders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the long-term clinical impact of a broad-based ethics education program for medical houseofficers with specific\\u000a emphasis on appropriate care for patients who have do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design: Prospective, with an initial randomized phase.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Setting: The medical service of a university teaching hospital.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Participants: Medical houseofficers and their inpatients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Interventions: A pilot program in 1988, and a full

Daniel P. Sulmasy; Peter B. Terry; Ruth R. Faden; David M. Levine

1994-01-01

200

Development and validation of the Patient Opioid Education Measure  

PubMed Central

Background Although there are screening tools to aid clinicians in assessing the risk of opioid misuse, an instrument to assess opioid-related knowledge is not currently available. The purpose of this study was to develop a content-valid, understandable, readable, and reliable Patient Opioid Education Measure (POEM). Methods Using concept mapping, clinicians caring for patients with chronic pain participated in brainstorming, sorting, and rating need-to-know information for patients prescribed opioids. Concept mapping analyses identified seven clusters addressing knowledge and expectations associated with opioid use, including medicolegal issues, prescribing policies, safe use and handling, expected outcomes, side effects, pharmacology, and warnings. Results The 49-item POEM was verbally administered to 83 patients (average age 51.3 ± 9.8 years, 77.1% female, 47.1% African American) taking opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. Patients averaged in total 63.9% ± 14.3% (range 23%–91%) correct responses on the POEM. The POEM demonstrated substantial test-retest reliability (interclass correlation coefficient 0.87). The POEM had a mean readability Lexile (L) score of 805.9 ± 257.3 L (equivalent to approximately a US fifth grade reading level), with individual items ranging from 280 L to 1370 L. Conclusion The POEM shows promise for rapidly identifying patients’ opioid-related knowledge gaps and expectations. Correcting misunderstandings and gaps could result in safer use of opioids in a clinical care setting.

Wallace, Lorraine S; Wexler, Randell K; Miser, W Frederick; McDougle, Leon; Haddox, J David

2013-01-01

201

Success with men's educational group appointments (MEGA): subjective improvements in patient education.  

PubMed

Men have a higher age-adjusted death rate from many of the leading causes of death, compared with women. Avoidance of health care and unhealthy behavior contribute to premature death among men. The Lahey Clinic recently initiated a program, the Men's Educational Group Appointment (MEGA), which capitalizes on the potential benefits of group dynamics in an effort to educate men about preventative health. We hypothesized that putting men into a group setting for the educational portion of the visit would improve information exchange and patient learning. During 12 months, 261 men between the ages of 22 and 67 were evaluated. A survey designed to address both patient satisfaction and patients' perceptions regarding how much they learned was administered to all patients following the MEGA session. We identified high patient satisfaction with the MEGA model. This study illustrates the potential utility of the group model for improving patient education regarding health maintenance among men. PMID:19477730

Campbell, Bruce B; Shah, Sunny; Gosselin, Daniel

2008-09-23

202

Education, Learned Effectiveness and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Education forms a unique dimension of social status with qualities that make it especially important to health. Educational attainment marks social status at the beginning of adulthood, functioning as the main bridge between the status of one generation and the next, and also as the main avenue of upward mobility. It precedes the other achieved…

Mirowsky, John; Ross, Catherine E.

2005-01-01

203

[A fun tool for educating patients with heart failure].  

PubMed

Therapeutic education is an integral part of the care provided to patients with heart failure. It encourages patients to think about their knowledge, as well as their behaviour in the face of given symptoms. At Wissembourg hospital in Alsace, the design and creation of an informative and fun assessment tool has helped to maximise patients' understanding. PMID:22606780

Hiebel, Thérèse

2012-04-01

204

Incontinence patient education: strategies to enhance the teachable moment.  

PubMed

Patient education is one challenge many nurses face during their hectic work day. However, through the use of innovative teaching strategies and techniques, new learning experiences can be created for patients. This article will explore the learning process of adult patients and provides a review of various teaching strategies. PMID:19579407

LeCroy, Cheryl

205

[The transfer of nursing expertise in patient education].  

PubMed

Patient therapeutic education reinforces the quality of the management of heart diseases. Its complexity is a reality in many situations and specific skills need to be developed. The nurses coordinating the therapeutic education programme of a cardiac rehabilitation department have formalised a system to transfer expertise based on the development of clinical and pedagogical tools and the analysis of professional practices. PMID:23301337

Duquenne, Irène; Le Moguen, Catherine

2012-11-01

206

Chairside Psychology in Patient Education. A Self-Instruction Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The self-instructional course in patient education has been prepared for the practicing dentist; however, dental hygiene and dental assisting students also may find the information useful. Section 1 explores steps within the educational process and relationships to learning factors, individual needs, motivation, goal orientation, psychological…

Weiss, Robert L.; Swearingen, Roger V.

207

Facilitating Behavior Change with Low-Literacy Patient Education Materials  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods: We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder…

Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

2007-01-01

208

[Interest of a specific programme in patient education for dialysis in out-center patients].  

PubMed

The development of therapeutic patient education for dialysis patients is recent and concerns mainly out-center patients. To our knowledge, only two papers centred on therapeutic education with out-center patients have been published. The particularities of this dialysis modality (unit close to the home, more autonomy, a nurse for six patients, organisation of unit, better quality of life and psychological status) highlight the interest to develop specific educational programs for patients treated in out-center sitting. The example of a program in Aquitaine (France) composed of mainly collective sessions (representations of the disease, dietetic recommendations, hygiene and protection of the vascular access, drugs compliance…) allows to propose several practical implications to initiate the development of specific programs in therapeutic education for out-center dialysis: educative sessions during the sessions of dialysis, group patients, multidisciplinary team, evaluation of the program from a medical and psychosocial point of view… PMID:21962639

Idier, Laëtitia; Larroumet, Nicole; Trolonge, Stanislas; Untas, Aurélie; Bildet, Jacques; Lespinasse, Lucile; Rascle, Nicole; Combe, Christian; Chauveau, Philippe

2011-10-01

209

Patient Education through Pregnancy Counseling: A Preventive Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Gynecology Clinic, Wilce Health Center, Ohio State University, is putting into operation a comprehensive family planning service program that includes (1) patient education, (2) medical care, (3) pregnancy counseling, and (4) reproductive and sexuality counseling. (Author)

Meeks, Linda; And Others

1978-01-01

210

Hepatitis C: are you confused?: Issues related to patient education.  

PubMed

More than 4 million Americans are infected with the hepatitis C virus. Although overshadowed by acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the hepatitis C epidemic is now recognized as a major health problem. Prevalence is estimated to be anywhere from 1.2% to 10% in specific populations. Nurses continue to express confusion in understanding the disease process; therefore, many opportunities are missed to counsel patients and families who may be at risk or who have hepatitis C. Many patient questions go unanswered because nurses mistakenly assume the medical provider will educate these patients and families. However, nurses have more contact with patients, and one of the nurse's roles is to provide health education. The Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations agree it is the nurse's role to educate patients. Accurate hepatitis C virus information helps nurses guide patients and families in understanding this disease process. PMID:15976556

Kerbleski, Marian

211

Patient education in Switzerland: from diabetes to chronic diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Division of Therapeutic Education for Chronic Diseases at the University Hospital of Geneva has been playing an important role in the field of therapeutic patient education for more than 25 years. More than 16,000 patients have been hospitalised and an excess of 75,000h have been spent with a rather novel interdisciplinary approach involving doctors, nurses, dieticians, psychologists, podiatrists and

Jean-Philippe Assal; Alain Golay

2001-01-01

212

Does cancer nursing education influence patient care planning?  

PubMed

Specialist post-registration education is available for cancer nurses. But to what extent does it help them improve the care that patients receive? A focus group-based study of nurses, along with an audit of patient notes, found nurses in one trust are reluctant to carry out some aspects of care, even after receiving education, which is reflected in documentation and care plans. PMID:12518616

Howell, Mandy; Walton, Gill; Henderson, Kath

2002-12-01

213

Creating educational objectives for patient education using the new Bloom's Taxonomy.  

PubMed

Whenever the nurse encounters a patient or a patient's family, there is a transfer of information that is expected to be incorporated into the patient's overall outcome. Objectives help guide the transfer of knowledge and provide a basis by which to evaluate the extent of the patient's understanding. Bloom's Taxonomy has been a cornerstone for the development of objectives in academe for over half of a century. The Revised Bloom's Taxonomy is a tool that can be used by nurses who educate patients to ensure the education session is focused, clear, has standards for evaluation, and is well documented. PMID:21791265

Krau, Stephen D

2011-09-01

214

Guidance on delivering effective group education.  

PubMed

Group education is increasingly being advocated in place of the traditional one to one approach in health care. Using the example of diabetes, this article describes why group education is effective, and outlines a process that can help shape a group education programme. Identifying the purpose of a programme, understanding how people learn, and behaviour change techniques, all help the educator identify what are the important elements to include. Planning the process of a programme to enhance its success, and developing an evaluation strategy to measure success, are also included. PMID:17170648

Rodgers, Jill

2006-11-01

215

Educational Effects of Magnet High Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper contributes to the knowledge about the effects that magnet schools have on improving educational quality. The history of magnet schools in American education is examined, linking it with several recent movements to reform and reorganize schooling. A synthesis of research findings from 12 district studies of magnet schools and various…

Blank, Rolf K.

216

Improving School Effectiveness. Fundamentals of Educational Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph reviews various strands of research on school effectiveness in developed and developing countries. It addresses a central theme of educational planning: how deliberate actions by policymakers, school administrators, teachers, and parents can help in the attainment of educational goals. Chapter 1, "Conceptualization: Perspectives on…

Scheerens, Jaap

217

A new approach for patient education: beyond constructivism.  

PubMed

Over the last ten years, research developed in science education, especially at the University of Geneva, has demonstrated that education must be centered on interactions between the learner's conceptions and a systemic educational environment. Transposed to a medical knowledge, this new model, originally conceived by the authors and called the 'allosteric learning model', offers new ways of considering patient education. After criticizing the 'grand theories' of learning, mainly the latest ones called constructivist models, the authors suggest a new set of micromodels designed to explain thoroughly the functioning of the patient's thought process (questions, frame of references, semantic network,...) and his understanding of medical information on his own disease. For health care providers, these models also offer a series of new pedagogical approaches both efficient and original to regulate the act of education based on confrontation, mobilisation, integration, etc. PMID:14528572

Giordan, A; Jacquemet, S; Golay, A

1999-09-01

218

Predischarge education improves adherence to a healthy lifestyle among Jordanian patients with acute coronary syndrome.  

PubMed

Risk factor reduction and modification of patient lifestyle have become the focus of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation programs. Considering the scarcity of resources in developing countries, nurses can potentially provide great benefit to acute coronary syndrome patients by utilizing hospital time to teach the patients how to lower their risk for recurrence and adopt healthier lifestyles after discharge. The purpose of this study was to identify the effectiveness of a predischarge education on acute coronary syndrome patients' lifestyles. Quasi-experimental pretest-post-test design was used. The patients assigned to the experimental group were offered predischarge education that stimulates lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthier lifestyle. The experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group in three lifestyle components - health responsibilities, nutrition, and interpersonal relations. In conclusion, predischarge education helps motivate acute coronary syndrome patients to adhere to a healthy lifestyle postdischarge. Therefore, nurses must be educated and prepared to be qualified health educators, and health education should continue as one of the most important daily nursing practices, thus it is invested in the preparation of acute coronary patients' discharge plan. PMID:23302042

Eshah, Nidal F

2013-01-10

219

Authoring and Generation of Individualized Patient Education Materials  

PubMed Central

Although the pre-surgical patient-surgeon encounter is the opportunity to educate the patient, it is essential that the patient be given educational materials to complement the face-to-face exchange. This is virtually impossible to do well with brochures, because many combinations of procedures are possible, different patients have different concerns, and patients have varying levels of literacy and knowledge. In the extreme, a patient would either be given a set of brochures selected from 100s of variants, or all patients would be given the same set of brochures without regard for differing needs. We have been developing an information brochure generator that customizes material for every individual patient regardless of the complexity of the surgical intervention.

Di Marco, C.; Bray, P.; Covvey, H.D.; Cowan, D.D.; Di Ciccio, V.; Hovy, E.; Lipa, Joan; Yang, C.

2006-01-01

220

HDBuzz: empowering patients through accessible education.  

PubMed

Research and patient communities are firmly interdependent. Engaged patient communities provide biological samples and data that drive discoveries which, in turn, fuel the development of novel therapies. Historically, Huntington's disease (HD) has benefited from trusting interactions between scientists and patients. However, even for HD, communication between the research and patient communities is suboptimal. The web platform HDBuzz was created to rectify this situation by providing accurate, accessible information on the latest HD research to patients and their supporters. PMID:22018672

Wild, Edward J; Carroll, Jeffrey B

2011-10-21

221

Patient information and education with modern media: the Spine Society of Europe Patient Line  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of the patient as an active partner in health care, and not just a passive object of diagnostic testing and medical\\u000a treatment, is widely accepted. Providing information to patients is considered a crucial issue and the central focus in patient\\u000a educational activities. It is necessary to educate patients on the nature of the outcomes and the benefits and

Ferran Pellisé; P. Sell

2009-01-01

222

Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on improving clinical diagnosis and treatment of the traumatized refugee patient.

2013-01-01

223

Educating the cardiac surgery patient and family.  

PubMed

Preoperative, discharge, and follow-up instruction of cardiac surgical patients is considered essential to the recovery of these patients. However, increasing patient acuity and decreasing length of stay compromise patient learning ability and minimize the time available for teaching. This article reviews the research on preoperative, discharge, and postdischarge instruction. Suggestions for application in the clinical setting are based on experience from Brigham and Women's Hospital. Detailed strategies for improving learning are discussed. PMID:2467968

Goulart, D T

1989-05-01

224

Spa treatment for primary fibromyalgia syndrome: a combination of thalassotherapy, exercise and patient education improves symptoms and quality of life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To study the effect of a combination of thalassotherapy, exercise and patient education in people with fibromyalgia. -\\u000aMethods: Patients with fibromyalgia, selected from a rheumatology out-patient department and from members of the Dutch fibromyalgia patient association, were pre-randomized to receive either 2 weeks of treatment in a Tunisian spa resort, including thalassotherapy, supervised exercise and group education (active

T. R. Zijlstra; Laar van de M. A. F. J; H. J. Bernelot Moens; E. Taal; L. Zakraoui; J. J. Rasker

2005-01-01

225

The social in medicine: Social techniques in patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article investigates the role of the social in medicine through an empirical study of social technologies in Diabetes 2 and COPD patient education in Denmark. It demonstrates how the social at the same time is the cause of disease but also functions as a solution to the problem. Furthermore it suggests that the patient groups have an ambiguous role

Anders Kruse Ljungdalh; Jane Ege Møller

2012-01-01

226

The Use of Standardized Patients in Athletic Training Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Context: Standardized patients are widely used in health care programs to both teach and evaluate the communication and clinical skills of students. Although athletic training education programs (ATEPs) commonly use simulations, little information exists related to the use and implementation of standardized patients (SPs). Objective: To provide…

Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.

2010-01-01

227

Evaluation of an education program for hypertensive patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1998 until mid 1999 an intensive hypertension training program developed by the IPM was running in collaboration with general practitioners. The goal was to achieve a better blood pressure (BP) control to reduce other cardiovascular risk factors, strengthen health related behaviour and to educate patients in blood pressure measurement and non-pharmacological strategies.We included 146 hypertensive patients in the training

A. Friedrich; K. Gallert; E. Danzer; M. Schneider; H. Walter

2000-01-01

228

Patient literacy and the readability of smoking education literature.  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to determine if primary care clinic patients read at a level congruent to the reading grade level of available smoking literature. Reading estimates of smoking education literature (N = 49) ranged from grade 3 to college level (median = 9.5). Reading skills of 258 smoking patients were estimated by reported years of schooling (median = 10), and by scores on the Wide-Range Achievement Test (median = 6). A serious disparity existed between the reading estimates of smoking education literature and the literacy skills of patients in our sample.

Meade, C D; Byrd, J C

1989-01-01

229

Draping Education to Promote Patient Dignity: Canadian Physiotherapy Student and Instructor Perceptions  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the perceptions of educators and students in Canadian entry-level professional physiotherapy programmes with respect to the current draping curriculum and the methods of delivery of that content and to determine if there is a need for additional draping education time and resources in these programmes. Methods: Canadian university physiotherapy students (n=127) and educators (n=183) completed questionnaires designed by the authors. Data were collected via Survey Monkey, exported as Excel files, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson chi-square analysis. Results: Students and educators agreed that dignity as a concept and draping as a skill to protect patient dignity are both important and should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. Respondents also agreed that students often have difficulty with draping. Educators identified barriers to teaching draping while students identified components of an effective educational resource on draping. Conclusions: To enhance the development of effective draping skills among entry-level physiotherapists, draping education should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. An effective draping educational resource should be developed for educators and students.

Wilson, Nicole; Lusty, Christopher; Averns, Henry; Hopman, Wilma

2012-01-01

230

The Effect of a Structured Education Program on Knowledge and Psychomotor Skills of Patients Using Beclomethasone Dipropionate Aerosol for Steroid Dependent Asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a structured education program on knowledge and psychomotor skills of subjects using inhaled beclometh asone dipropionate. The sample was comprised of 26 male outpatients with a mean age of sixty years (range 49 - 69 yrs) and mean educational level of 11 years (range 7 - 18 yrs). Subjects

Pat Heringa; Lauren Lawson; Domenic Reda

1987-01-01

231

Impact of an Interactive Online Nursing Educational Module on Insulin Errors in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of an online module for reducing insulin administration errors by nurses caring for hospitalized pediatric patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Pediatric nursing staff completed a mandatory online educational module teaching insulin pharmacokinetics and the insulin order form, using diluted insulin and finishing with 15 interactive cases. A chart audit to determine all possible insulin errors of patients receiving insulin was done before and 2–6 months after the educational module. RESULTS All of the medical center's 283 pediatric nurses successfully completed the educational module. A total of 24 charts were audited in the preintervention phase and 22 in the postintervention phase. The preintervention insulin error rate was 14.8%, reduced to 1.7% (P < 0.001) postintervention. Improvement occurred in correct insulin dosing and type, timing of administration, and timely blood glucose monitoring and documentation. CONCLUSIONS An interactive online educational module can be an effective strategy for reducing pediatric nurses' insulin administration errors.

Sullivan, Mary M.; O'Brien, Colette R.; Gitelman, Stephen E.; Shapiro, Susan E.; Rushakoff, Robert J.

2010-01-01

232

A problem-solving education intervention in caregivers and patients during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in informal caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. Patient/caregiver teams attended three 1-hour problem-solving education sessions to help cope with problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Primary measures included the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale-transplant and Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Active caregivers reported improvements in self-efficacy (p < 0.05) and distress (p < 0.01) post-problem-solving education; caregiver responders also reported better health outcomes such as fatigue. The effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation caregivers supports its inclusion in future interventions to meet the multifaceted needs of this population. PMID:23471761

Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Castro, Kathleen; Prince, Patricia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R

2013-03-01

233

Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported…

Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

2012-01-01

234

Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported…

Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

2012-01-01

235

Efficacy of Behavioral Management and Patient Education on Vascular Access Cleansing Compliance in Hemodialysis Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared four treatment conditions to test their ability to enhance compliance with vascular access cleansing (VAC) procedures in a group of 56 hemodialysis patients. The conditions were patient education, behavioral management with monetary incentive, patient education\\/behavioral management, and attention control. Behavioral observers rated VAC behavior at pretreatment, posttreatment, 1-month follow-up, and 1-year follow-up. Knowledge of VAC procedures was also assessed

Phillip J. Brantley; Thomas H. Mosley; Barbara K. Bruce; G. Tipton McKnight; Glenn N. Jones

1990-01-01

236

Improving Cancer Pain Management Through Patient and Family Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if continued access to information following a baseline pain education program would increase knowledge and positive beliefs about cancer pain management, thus resulting in improved pain control during a 6-month follow-up period. Patients with cancer-related pain and their primary caregivers received a brief pain education program, and were then randomized into one

Nancy Wells; Joseph T Hepworth; Barbara A Murphy; Debra Wujcik; Rolanda Johnson

2003-01-01

237

Improving the Efficiency of Educational Systems. Indicators of Educational Effectiveness and Efficiency,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the monograph is to identify appropriate quantitative indicators of educational effectiveness and efficiency and to discuss how such indicators should be used in assessing education at multiple levels of the educational system. The statisti...

D. M. Windham

1988-01-01

238

Research promoting better patient education on reproductive health after cancer.  

PubMed

Although research on cancer survivors' experiences and attitudes about infertility is relatively new, existing literature suggests that only about half of men and women of childbearing age receive the information they need from their health care providers at the time of diagnosis and treatment planning. Thus, better patient education strategies are needed. Although the ideal would be to have oncologists conduct detailed discussions of options to preserve or restore fertility with all interested patients, this standard is unrealistic. A more practical alternative is to train nonphysician providers such as nurses and social workers to address this topic. In addition, innovative strategies of direct patient education could be helpful, including use of computerized media, peer counseling, or special educational modules tailored to a particular age group or cancer site. PMID:15784835

Canada, Andrea L; Schover, Leslie R

2005-01-01

239

Utilization of blood glucose data in patient education.  

PubMed

Many studies have tested clinical and behavioral approaches for improving glycemic control in people with diabetes. We reviewed studies to identify how blood glucose (BG) values have been used in patient-focused clinical research and interventions. We sought to describe the frequency that BG values have been the focus of patient education research and to characterize the different methods to integrate BG into an intervention, the approaches implemented to support patient education, and behavior change, and the nature of communication about BG values. Thirty-four eligible studies were identified that included patient education using BG values. Information regarding the study and intervention characteristics include: (1) characteristics of the study sample, (2) how BG values were obtained, (3) use of a graphical interface for BG values, (4) use of a BG log, (5) BG interpretation and regimen adjustments, (6) recommended actions to patient, (7) modality of intervention, and (8) intervention communication schedule. The review demonstrated that new BG technologies provide outstanding opportunities for greater access to BG data, and for patient support and intervention. However, it also indicated a need to improve and expand support for people with diabetes in their daily use of BG values to maintain and improve glycemic control. In order to make the most sustainable impact on behavior, generalizable skills such as problem solving need to be integrated into BG education. PMID:24057927

Kumah-Crystal, Yaa; Mulvaney, Shelagh

2013-12-01

240

Parity: (im) possible? Interplay of knowledge forms in patient education.  

PubMed

A central purpose is to examine the kind of knowledge that patient experience represents; its origin, properties and tenability. We will use the term insider knowledge to designate the knowledge, beliefs and viewpoints constructed by patients about their own illnesses and predicaments more generally. It is our contention that an analysis of insider knowledge is necessary if the value of such knowledge for patient education is to be reasonably assessed. We discuss the epistemological status of professional knowledge and insider knowledge and what it might mean to afford them parity. Basically, we argue that patient-oriented programmes must give insider knowledge a status that acknowledges its privileged access to the insider's own intentions, perceptions, evaluations, decisions, reasons, notions and feelings, and thus yields distinctive insight into these areas. At the same time, patient education will be stunted if the fallibility of such knowledge is not openly addressed. PMID:21564390

Strøm, Anita; Kvernbekk, Tone; Fagermoen, May S

2011-06-01

241

Best strategies for patient education about anticoagulation with warfarin: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Patient education is an essential component in quality management of the anticoagulated patient. Because it is time consuming for clinicians and overwhelming for patients, education of the anticoagulated patient is often neglected. We surveyed the medical literature in order to identify the best patient education strategies. METHODS: Study Selection: Two reviewers independently searched the MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases

James L Wofford; Megan D Wells; Sonal Singh

2008-01-01

242

Measuring educational needs among patients with rheumatoid arthritis using the Dutch version of the Educational Needs Assessment Tool (DENAT)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Educational Needs Assessment Tool (ENAT) was developed in the United Kingdom (UK) to systemat- ically assess the educational needs of patients with arthritis. The aim of the present study was to describe the educational needs of Dutch patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by using the Dutch version of the ENAT (DENAT). The original UK version of the ENAT, comprising

Jorit J. L. Meesters; Theodora P. M. Vliet Vlieland; Jackie Hill; Mwidimi E. Ndosi

2009-01-01

243

Collaborative Education To Ensure Patient Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a joint meeting between national advisory councils in medicine and nursing on physician-nurse collaboration to enhance patient safety are reported. Recommendations on which participants reached consensus are organized by these Institute of Medicine (IOM) themes: establish a national focus to create leadership through research and…

National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

244

Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

245

Does patient education facilitate diabetic patients' possibilities to reach national treatment targets?  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe how patient education is arranged in Swedish primary healthcare (PHC) and to assess whether the type of patient education and individual goal setting have an impact on diabetic patients’ possibilities of reaching national treatment targets. Design A Swedish national survey. Setting Swedish PHC. Subjects Data from 485 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) and 91 637 diabetic patients reported by the PHCCs to the National Diabetes Register in 2006. Main outcome measures Description of how patient education is arranged, HbA1c, body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, and physical activity. Results Of the PHCCs that reported how they performed the individual counselling, 50% reported checklist-driven counselling and 8% individualized counselling based on patients’ needs. A total of 105 PHCCs reported that they arranged group education. Of these, 67% used pre-planned programmes and 9% individualized the programme to the patients’ needs. The majority of PHCCs (96%) reported that they set individual goals (HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and lifestyle). A minority of the PHCCs (27%) reported that the patients were involved in the final decision concerning their goals. Individual goal-setting facilitated patients’ possibilities of reaching treatment targets. Goal-setting, list size of PHCCs, and personnel resources explained a variance of 2.1–5.7%. Neither individual counselling (checklist-driven or individualized to patients’ needs) nor group education had an impact on patients’ possibilities of reaching the targets. Conclusion The current study indicates that improvement is needed in patient education in PHC to facilitate diabetic patients’ possibilities of reaching national treatment targets.

Adolfsson, Eva Thors; Smide, Bibbi; Rosenblad, Andreas; Wikblad, Karin

2009-01-01

246

[Patient education, from implicit nursing practice to structured programs].  

PubMed

Therapeutic patient education, which with the "Hospital, patients, health and territories" law became a priority of the healthcare system, notably for chronic diseases, has been rooted in nursing training and practice since the 1960s. Following in the steps of the World Health Organisation and the International Council of Nurses, successive laws relating to the profession have continuously emphasised it. Now that it has an official and general framework in France, it should develop within nursing practice. PMID:22641939

Le Boeuf, Dominique

2012-04-01

247

Patient Education Cards for Skin Cancer Detection and Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over 1.3 million cases of skin cancer occur annually in the USA, but no uniform or evidence-based screening guidelines exist.\\u000a During a 1-year intervention, a patient education tool was distributed to patients. Billing records were utilized to compare\\u000a detection and treatment rates for cancerous and precancerous skin lesions during the intervention to a historical control.\\u000a No significant change in detection

Ryan D. Kauffman; Mrunal S. Shah; Ross M. Kauffman

2010-01-01

248

Patient Education to Prevent Falls Among Older Hospital Inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Falls are a common adverse event during hospitalization of older adults, and few interventions have been shown to prevent hem.\\u000aMethods: This study was a 3-group randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of 2 forms of multimedia patient education compared with usual care for the prevention of in-hospital falls. Older hospital patients (n = 1206) admitted to a mixture

Terry P Haines; Anne-Marie Hill; Keith D Hill; Steven McPhail; David Oliver; Sandra Brauer; Tammy Hoffmann; Christopher Beer

2011-01-01

249

The effect of peer-led education on the life quality of mastectomy patients referred to breast cancer-clinics in Shiraz, Iran 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer among women is a relatively common with a more favorable expected survival rates than other forms of cancers. This study aimed to determine the improved quality of life for post-mastectomy women through peer education. METHODS: Using pre and post test follow up and control design approach, 99 women with stage I and II of breast cancer diagnosis

Farkhondeh Sharif; Narjes Abshorshori; Sedigheh Tahmasebi; Maryam Hazrati; Najaf Zare; Sarah Masoumi

2010-01-01

250

Combining Software Games with Education: Evaluation of its Educational Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computer games are very popular among children and adolescents. In this respect, they could be exploited by educational software designers to render educational software more attractive and motivating. However, it remains to be explored what the educational scope of educational software games is. In this paper, we explore several issues…

Virvou, Maria; Katsionis, George; Manos, Konstantinos

2005-01-01

251

Patient education in nursing—Polish literature condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the review is to present the results of an analysis and evaluation of the state of research on patient education based on the Polish nursing literature. A review and analysis of 139 research works was carried out, which during the years of 1990–2001 appeared in Polish nursing journals as well as in post-conference and convention proceedings and

Barbara ?lusarska; Danuta Zarzycka; Mariusz Wysoki?ski; Agnieszka Sadurska

2004-01-01

252

Standardized Patients in Art Therapy Education: A Phenomenological Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Simulation is used widely in medical and health professions educational programs. Standardized patients (SPs) are individuals who are trained to simulate specific symptoms or conditions as part of a structured learning experience with students. In this qualitative, phenomenological study the researcher interviewed 8 first-year graduate art…

Johnson, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Helen; Deaver, Sarah; Johansson, Mark; Calisch, Abby

2013-01-01

253

The Use of Readability Formulas in Patient Education Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to determine the SMOG readability formula scores of currently available patient education materials. It was hypothesized that the reading level of the materials would be higher than 7.5, the reading level of the average American citizen; and that there would be a significant reduction in the measured document reading levels…

Mathews, Paul J.; And Others

254

Effective primate conservation education: gaps and opportunities.  

PubMed

Conservation education goals generally include influencing people's conservation awareness, attitudes, and behaviors. Effective programs can help foster sustainable behavior, improve public support for conservation, reduce vandalism and poaching in protected areas, improve compliance with conservation regulations, increase recreation carrying capacities, and influence policies and decisions that affect the environment. Primate conservation problems cut across many disciplines, and primate conservation education must likewise address cross-disciplinary issues. Conservation educators must incorporate both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to develop effective programs, and the skill set must stretch beyond pedagogy. Expertise needed comes from the areas of planning, collaboration, psychology, entertainment, and evaluation. Integration of these elements can lead to greater program success. PMID:20041471

Jacobson, Susan K

2010-05-01

255

Alcohol education provided to opioid treatment program patients: results of a nationwide survey.  

PubMed

Alcohol-related problems are especially common among opioid treatment program (OTP) patients, suggesting that educating OTP patients about alcohol and its harmful effects needs to be a priority in OTPs. Using data collected in interviews with a nationwide U.S. sample of OTP directors (N = 200) in 25 states, we identified factors that differentiate OTPs that provided this education to all OTP patients from those that did not. Findings indicate that these factors include (1) providing this education in a greater variety of ways, (2) having a larger percent of staff knowledgeable about alcohol-related issues, (3) having a director who views alcohol issues as a high priority, and (4) having a written OTP policy. PMID:21381464

Strauss, Shiela M; Harris, Gavin; Katigbak, Carina; Rindskopf, David M; Singh, Sheena; Greenblum, Ilana; Brown, Lawrence S; Kipnis, Steven; Kritz, Steven A; Parrino, Mark W

2010-01-01

256

Designing Procedural Graphics for Surgical Patient-Education Modules: An Experimental Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To understand how readers approach mechanical procedural instructions, this study tested surgical patient-education modules for the effectiveness of route and survey spatial perspectives in text. The results showed that subjects' ability to comprehend an intricate procedural action in surgery varies with learning styles and task approach along with different text-graphic perspectives. Overall, survey perspective worked better than route perspective in

Debopriyo Roy

2008-01-01

257

Band versus bypass: influence of an educational seminar and surgeon visit on patient preference  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundLaparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding are 2 common weight loss procedures. This investigation examined the effect of a preoperative educational seminar (ES) and surgeon visit (SV) on patients’ choice of bariatric procedure.

Raymond J. Taddeucci; Atul K. Madan; David S. Tichansky

2007-01-01

258

Effective Civic Education: An Educational Effectiveness Model for Explaining Students' Civic Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this study, a comprehensive educational effectiveness model is tested in relation to student's civic knowledge. Multilevel analysis was applied on the dataset of the IEA Civic Education Study (CIVED; Torney-Purta, Lehmann, Oswald, & Schulz, 2001), which was conducted among junior secondary-school students (age 14), their schools, and their…

Isac, Maria Magdalena; Maslowski, Ralf; van der Werf, Greetje

2011-01-01

259

Improving Physician-Patient Communication About Cancer Pain With a Tailored Education-Coaching Intervention  

PubMed Central

Objective This study examined the effect of a theoretically grounded, tailored education-coaching intervention to help patients more effectively discuss their pain-related questions, concerns, and preferences with physicians. Methods Grounded in social-cognitive and communication theory, a tailored education coaching (TEC) intervention was developed to help patients learn pain management and communication skills. In a RCT, 148 cancer patients agreed to have their consultations audio-recorded and were assigned to the intervention or a control group. The recordings were used to code for patients’ questions, acts of assertiveness, and expressed concerns and to rate the quality of physicians’ communication. Results Patients in the TEC group discussed their pain concerns more than did patients in the control group. More active patients also had more baseline pain and interacted with physicians using participatory decision-making. Ratings of physicians’ information about pain were higher when patients talked more about their pain concerns. Conclusions The study demonstrates the efficacy of a theoretically grounded, coaching intervention to help cancer patients talk about pain control. Practice implications Coaching interventions can be effective resources for helping cancer patients communicate about their pain concerns if they are theoretically grounded, can be integrated within clinical routines, and lead to improve health outcomes.

Street, Richard L.; Slee, Christina; Kalauokalani, Donna K; Dean, Dionne Evans; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kravitz, Richard L.

2009-01-01

260

Role of health care providers in educational training of patients with diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is a high prevalence chronic disease, in which several health care providers are involved in the treatment of patients. Multifaceted professional and organizational interventions that facilitate structured and regular review of patients are effective in improving the process of care. Moreover, patient education and enhancement of role of nurses improve clinical outcomes and process of care. As diabetic management requires strict commitment of the patients, their educational therapy is mandatory. Therapeutic Patient Education (TPE) is a continous process, integrated in health care; it is a permanent care process, patient-centred, that must be adapted to the evolution of illness and to the patient's lifestyle; TPE must be structured and organized and it should receive benefits from the appropriate pedagogic means. Since the publication of DCCT data it was clear that intensive insulin therapy had been successfully applied only in centers where a diabetologist, a specialized nurse, a dietician, a psycologist and a motivated patient worked all together, i.e. where there was a "team". The team has to follow a pedagogic, multidisciplinary and patient-centred methodology of care. Well structured integration between health care providers may help to avoid the burn-out syndrome. PMID:16915801

Rabbone, Ivana; De Vito, B; Sacchetti, Carla; Cerutti, Franco

2005-01-01

261

Educational Needs for Improving Self-care in Heart Failure Patients with Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Purpose To explore the need for self-monitoring and self-care education in heart failure patients with diabetes (HF-DM patients) by describing cognitive and affective factors to provide guidance in developing effective self- management education. Method A cross-sectional correlation design was employed using baseline patient data from a study testing a 12 week patient and family dyad intervention to improve dietary and medication-taking self-management behaviors in HF patients. Data from 116 participants recruited from metropolitan Atlanta area were used. Demographic and co-morbidities, physical function, psychological distress, relationship with health care provider, self-efficacy (medication taking and low sodium diet), and behavioral outcomes (medications, dietary habits) were assessed. Descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square tests, t-tests or Mann Whitney tests were performed to compare HF patients with and without DM. Results HF-DM patients were older, heavier, had more co- morbidities, and took more daily medications than HF patients. High self-efficacy on medication and low sodium diet was reported in both groups with no significant difference. Although HF-DM patients took more daily medications than HF, both groups exhibited high HF medication taking behaviors. The HF-DM patients consumed significantly lower total sugar than HF patients, but clinically higher levels of sodium. Conclusions Diabetes educators need to be aware of potential conflicts of treatment regimens to manage two chronic diseases. Special and integrated diabetes self-management education programs which incorporate principles of HF self-management should be developed to improve self-management behavior in HF-DM patients.

Cha, Eun Seok; Clark, Patricia C.; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Lobb, Maureen; Smith, Andrew L.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

2013-01-01

262

Effects of Government Regulations on Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a self-study conducted by Western Michigan University on the effects of government regulations on higher education are presented. The self-study, conducted with the aid of questionnaires, followup visits, or telephone calls, addressed the following main concerns: (1) academic programs; (2) maintenance, buildings, physical plant, and…

Bernhard, John T.; Hannah, Robert W.

263

A Pilot Project to Develop and Assess a Health Education Programme for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The current research was designed to develop a health education programme for type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the Taba-Tyler model and to evaluate its effect. Design: The study was quasi-experimental in design. Setting: Fifty-five patients from the Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, University Hospital of Ankara. Method: An education

Atak, Nazli; Arslan, Umit

2005-01-01

264

Drug-food interaction information: a file card for patient education.  

PubMed

In order to minimize hazards and maximize effectiveness of a medication, patients need to be informed of potential drug-food interactions. Patient education of drug-food interactions is often a perplexing task for health professionals. At Pocatello Regional Medical Center, representatives from the pharmacy and dietary services have developed a method using a 3 X 5 file card to aid in this teaching process. A review of responsibilities and procedures is described. Examples for warfarin and tetracycline are illustrated. PMID:10278988

Driver, P S; Helton, C

1986-09-01

265

Patient education methods to support quality of life and functional ability among patients with schizophrenia: a randomised clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The aim of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of patient education methods on quality of life and functional impairment\\u000a of patients with schizophrenia.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A multicentre, randomized controlled trial was carried out in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland from March 2005 to October\\u000a 2007. A total of 311 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder or delusional disorder

Anneli PitkanenMaritta; Maritta Välimäki; Lauri Kuosmanen; Jouko Katajisto; Marita Koivunen; Heli Hätönen; Anita Patel; Martin Knapp

266

Educating patients about warfarin therapy using information technology: A survey on healthcare professionals' perspectives  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore healthcare professionals' views about the benefits and challenges of using information technology (IT) resources for educating patients about their warfarin therapy. Methods A cross-sectional survey of both community and hospital-based healthcare professionals (e.g., doctors, pharmacists and nurses) involved using a purpose-designed questionnaire. The questionnaires were distributed using a multi-modal approach to maximise response rates. Results Of the total 300 questionnaires distributed, 109 completed surveys were received (43.3% response rate). Over half (53.2%) of the healthcare participants were aged between 40-59 years, the majority (59.5%) of whom were female. Fifty nine (54.1%) participants reported having had no access to warfarin-specific IT-based patient education resources, and a further 19 (38.0%) of the participants who had IT-access reported that they never used such resources. According to the healthcare participants, the main challenges associated with educating their patients about warfarin therapy included: patient-related factors, such as older age, language barriers, cognitive impairments and/or ethnic backgrounds or healthcare professional factors, such as time constraints. The healthcare professionals reported that there were several aspects about warfarin therapy which they found difficult to educate their patients about which is why they identified computers and interactive touch screen kiosks as preferred IT devices to deliver warfarin education resources in general practices, hospital-based clinics and community pharmacies. At the same time, the healthcare professionals also identified a number of facilitators (e.g., to reinforce warfarin education, to offer reliable and easily comprehensible information) and barriers (e.g., time and costs of using IT resources, difficulty in operating the resources) that could impact on the effective implementation of these devices in educating patients about their warfarin therapy. Conclusions The findings of the study suggest that there is a need for improving healthcare professionals' use of, and access to IT-based warfarin education resources for patients. The study findings also suggest addressing the concerns raised by the healthcare professionals when implementing such IT resources successfully to help educate patients about their warfarin therapy.

Nasser, Sayeed; Mullan, Judy; Bajorek, Beata

267

A Meta-Analysis of Trials Evaluating Patient Education and Counseling for Three Groups of Preventive Health Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The overall effectiveness of patient education and counseling on preventive health behaviors was examined across published clinical trials, 1971-1994. The effectiveness of various approaches for modifying specific types of behaviors among patients without diagnosed disease was assessed. Multiple regression models indicated differences among…

Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Simons-Morton, Denise G.; Ramirez, Gilbert; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Green, Lawrence W.; Mains, Douglas A.

1997-01-01

268

BBC Education: the effectiveness and evaluation of educational broadcasting  

Microsoft Academic Search

BBC Education provides educational broadcasts for people of all ages?? for young children, for pupils and for students in educational institutions including the Open University, as well as for adult learners in more informal groups and for those who are listening or viewing at home. All these broadcasts are supported by printed materials of various kinds and, in many cases,

H. Sumner

1991-01-01

269

Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: patient education, information and ethical issues.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) are implanted increasingly frequently. CIEDs are indicated for the treatment of bradycardia, tachycardia and heart failure and therefore improve quality of life and life expectancy. CIED can treat ventricular arrhythmias that would be fatal without immediate care. However, CIEDs raise several patient education, medico-legal, and ethical questions that will be addressed in this article. Information is a patient's right, and necessary for informed consent. When implanting a CIED, the patient must be educated about the need for the device, the function of the device, any restrictions that apply postimplant, and postimplant follow-up methods and schedules. This transfer of information to the patient makes the patient responsible. The occupational physician can determine whether a patient wearing a CIED is able to work. Under current French law, patients are not prohibited from working while wearing a CIED. However, access to certain job categories remains limited, such as jobs involving mechanical stress to the chest, exposure to electromagnetic fields, or jobs requiring permanent vigilance. Pacemakers and defibrillators are medical treatments and are subject to the same ethical and clinical considerations as any other treatment. However, stopping a pacemaker or a defibrillator raises different ethical issues. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator shocks can be considered to be equivalent to resuscitation efforts and can be interpreted as being unreasonable in an end-of-life patient. Pacing is painless and it is unlikely to unnecessarily prolong the life of a patient with a terminal disease. Patients with a CIED should live as normally as possible, but must also be informed about the constraints related to the device and must inform each caregiver about the presence of the device. The forensic and ethical implications must be assessed in relation to current legislation. PMID:23248837

Manaouil, Cécile; Gignon, Maxime; Traulle, Sarah

2012-09-01

270

Sex education: a review of its effects.  

PubMed

This paper reviewed 33 empirical studies which assessed the effectiveness of sex education. Methodological issues were considered within six sections: (a) populations, (b) instructors, (c) program formats, (d) time format, (e) program goals, and (f) outcome measures. College students were the most frequently assessed population, followed by educators and counselors, and then medical-school populations. Most investigators did not include control subjects. In the studies which included them, they were usually nonequivalent to the experimental subjects. The results were almost exclusively dependent upon questionnaire data. Only a few studies included a follow-up. In general, the subjects reported gains in sexual knowledge and shifts toward more tolerant and liberal sexual attitudes. However, it was not clear whether or to what extent these changes affected the subjects' behavior. The surprising lack of studies evaluating the effects of sex education on elementary, junior high, and high school students was noted in light of the controversy surrounding the presentation of sex-related information to these populations. In addition to the recommendation that sex education presented to "normal" students who are below the college level should be evaluated, suggestions for future research included the use of equivalent experimental and control subjects, the reporting of instructor characteristics, the specification of program goals, and the inclusion of follow-up evaluations. PMID:7018463

Kilmann, P R; Wanlass, R L; Sabalis, R F; Sullivan, B

1981-04-01

271

Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of…

Griffith, Jennifer M.; Sorenson, James R.; Bowling, J. Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

2005-01-01

272

Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of…

Griffith, Jennifer M.; Sorenson, James R.; Bowling, J. Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

2005-01-01

273

Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of the tool. Time in various prenatal visit activities was

Jennifer M. Griffith; James R. Sorenson; J. Michael Bowling; Tracey Jennings-Grant

2005-01-01

274

Impact of Educational Mailing on the Blood Pressure of Primary Care Patients with Mild Hypertension  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To assess the effectiveness of mailed hypertension educational materials. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, controlled single-blind trial. SETTING Primary care practice–based research network in which 9 clinics located in Portland, Oregon participated. PARTICIPANTS Patients with mildly uncontrolled hypertension as defined as a last blood pressure of 140 to 159/90 to 99 mmHg from query of an electronic medical record database. INTERVENTIONS Patients randomized to intervention were mailed 2 educational packets approximately 3 months apart. The first mailer included a letter from each patient's primary care provider. The mailer included a booklet providing an overview of hypertension and lifestyle modification and a refrigerator magnet noting target blood pressure. The second mailing also included a letter from the patient's primary care provider, a second educational booklet focused on medication compliance and home blood pressure monitoring, and a blood pressure logbook. The control group consisted of similar patients receiving usual care for hypertension. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Patients from each group were randomly selected for invitation to participate in a study visit to measure blood pressure and complete a survey (intervention n = 162; control n = 150). No significant difference was found in mean blood pressure between intervention and control patients (135/77 mmHg vs 137/77 mmHg; P = .229). Patients in the intervention arm scored higher on a hypertension knowledge quiz (7.48 ± 1.6 vs 7.06 ± 1.6; P = .019), and reported higher satisfaction with several aspects of their care. No significant difference was seen in the prevalence of home blood pressure monitoring ownership or use. CONCLUSIONS In patients with mildly uncontrolled hypertension, educational mailers did not yield a significant decrease in blood pressure. However, significant improvement in patient knowledge, frequency of home monitoring, and satisfaction with care were demonstrated.

Hunt, Jacquelyn S; Siemienczuk, Joseph; TouchetteDan, Dan; Payne, Nicola

2004-01-01

275

Improvement of patient education and information: development of a patient's information dossier.  

PubMed

The demand for patient information in modern medical care is increasing and sound information for patients is becoming a necessity. For haemophilia patients, information about their disease and its complications is already widely available. In order to increase the organization of this information, a 'Patient Information Dossier' (PID) and communication check lists were developed at the Dutch National Hemophilia Center, the Van Creveldkliniek, in cooperation with the Department of Patient Education of the University Medical Center Utrecht. The PID has an unique double function: (1) it contains patient tailored information about the practical facts of hospital care; and (2) it provides a communication checklist used by various members of the comprehensive care team, in order to supply patients with more uniform information. In order to gain a better insight of the gaps in information supply, according to patients and healthcare workers, the Department of Patient Education formulated a questionnaire. The PID itself was written by a study group consisting of members of the comprehensive care team. The entire process was developed, edited and coordinated by an advisor of the Department of Patient Education. The above-mentioned study group developed a specific PID on haemophilia care. Its 10 chapters provide information and guidelines, and advise patients where to find more information about this subject. Each chapter includes a checklist for patients, enabling them to prepare subjects for discussion during clinical visits. The team also developed a communication checklist to be used by various team members during a patient's visit to the clinic, as well as specific checklists covering the possible problem subjects of the PID. The PID is the lifelong property of the patient, and can be used during each visit to the clinic. The PID was implemented in February 2000, and within 4 months, was distributed among 200 patients visiting the Van Creveldkliniek. Evaluation by use of a questionnaire showed that most patients found the information in the PID sufficient and in accordance with that which they had received previously. PMID:11442645

Mauser-Bunschoten, E P; Hamers, M J; De Roode, D; Terlingen-Van Baaren, G; De Kleijn, P; Bos, R; Van Den Berg, H M

2001-07-01

276

A health/patient education database for family practice.  

PubMed Central

Using pilot project funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation (AAFP/F) developed a program by which health/patient education print materials were reviewed. Favorably reviewed materials were entered into a database accessible through the AAFP/F's Huffington Library. The review service and resulting database were designed to help the busy clinician identify scientifically accurate, reliable materials for use in patient education. The review process developed for the project is described, as is the database and its use by family physicians. Research findings from the pilot project are discussed, some of which assisted in planning the self-supporting second phase of the program.

Gibson, P A; Ruby, C; Craig, M D

1991-01-01

277

Hospital-based patient education programs and the role of the hospital librarian.  

PubMed

This paper examines current advances in hospital-based patient education, and delineates the role of the hospital librarian in these programs. Recently, programs of planned patient education have been recognized by health care personnel and the public as being an integral part of health care delivery. Various key elements, including legislative action, the advent of audiovisual technology, and rising health care costs have contributed to the development of patient education programs in hospitals. As responsible members of the hospital organization, hospital librarians should contribute their expertise to patient education programs. They are uniquely trained with skills in providing information on other health education programs; in assembling, cataloging, and managing collections of patient education materials; and in providing documentation of their use. In order to demonstrate the full range of their skills and to contribute to patient care, education, and research, hospital librarians should actively participate in programs of planned patient education. PMID:418835

Harris, C L

1978-04-01

278

[Implementing a patient education program in an outpatient health center].  

PubMed

Freelance health professionals have been brought together around a healthcare project which they created forming an outpatient multi-disciplinary team and health centre. This new organisation favours the recognition and remuneration of a new field of skills: the therapeutic education of patients suffering from chronic diseases.This new care is only provided after the professionals have received relevant training and in accordance with various constraints defined by law. PMID:22641943

Alvino, Isabelle

2012-04-01

279

Special Education: A Systematic Approach to Efficiency and Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and the efficacy of regional special education programs. Focus groups were conducted in an independent school district and two special education cooperatives. Focus groups were conducted with general education teachers, special education teachers, principals, paraprofessionals,…

Haar, Jean M.; Robicheau, Jerry W.; Palladino, John

2008-01-01

280

Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs" was written to assist adapted and general physical educators who are dedicated to ensuring that the physical and motor needs of all their students are addressed in physical education. While it is anticipated that adapted physical educators, where available, will typically…

Kelly, Luke E.

2011-01-01

281

Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment.  

PubMed

The aims were to explore dentists' skills in dental fear, current strategies when treating fearful adult patients, and the possible need for additional education among dentists working in Sweden. A sample of 1,293 members of the Association of Public Health Dentists in Sweden were asked to respond to a Web survey concerning dental fear. The response rate was 69% (n = 889); 91% trained in Sweden and 9% trained in another country. The most frequently used pharmacological anxiety-reducing techniques were medication with a midazolame mixture (72%) and benzodiazepine tablets (77%), and the most commonly used psychological techniques were relaxation (68%), distraction (66%), and Tell-Show-Do (86%). A larger proportion of dentists trained in Sweden, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries, reported that they had received undergraduate training in dental fear. Dentists trained in Sweden more often reported competence in pharmacological and psychological anxiety-reducing techniques, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries. Higher levels of self-rated efficacy in treating fearful patients accompanied additional education in dental fear after graduation. In conclusion, Swedish dentists use a variety of techniques to meet the needs of fearful dental patients. Competence in anxiety-reducing techniques is associated with self-efficacy and the site of education. PMID:23659263

Brahm, Carl-Otto; Lundgren, Jesper; Carlsson, Sven G; Nilsson, Peter; Hultqvist, Johanna; Hägglin, Catharina

2013-01-19

282

Assessing Readability of Patient Education Materials: Current Role in Orthopaedics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Health literacy is the single best predictor of an individual’s health status. It is important to customize health-related\\u000a education material to the individual patient’s level of reading skills. Readability of a given text is the objective measurement\\u000a of the reading skills one should possess to understand the written material.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes  In this article, some of the commonly used readability assessment tools

Sameer Badarudeen; Sanjeev Sabharwal

2010-01-01

283

The Educational Effectiveness of a Simulation/Game in Sex Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the educational effectiveness of a game named POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE for sex education in a Japanese high school. Compares the effectiveness of educational videos with game conditions and discusses results that show the value of playing the game in the role of the opposite sex. (Author/LRW)

Kashibuchi, Megumi; Sakamoto, Akira

2001-01-01

284

Influence of diabetic education on patient metabolic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted for the purpose of examining the effect of planned education given to persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) on their metabolic control. The method of the study was a randomly controlled clinical trial. A sample of 50 individuals participated, of which 25 were in the Experimental group (E), and 25 were in the Control group

Mukadder Mollao?lu; Emel Beyaz?t

2009-01-01

285

Promoting patient safety through informatics-based nursing education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Quality of Health Care in America identified the critical role of information technology in designing safe and effective health care. In addition to technical aspects such as regional or national health information infrastructures, to achieve this goal, healthcare professionals must receive the requisite training during basic and advanced educational programs. In this article,

Suzanne Bakken; Sarah Sheets Cook; Lesly Curtis; Karen S. Desjardins; Sookyung Hyun; Melinda L. Jenkins; Ritamarie John; W. Ted Klein; Jossie Paguntalan; W. Dan Roberts; Michael Soupios

2004-01-01

286

Patient-centered competency-based education in fixed prosthodontics.  

PubMed

Revision of a traditional fixed prosthodontic curriculum was undertaken in response to observed private practice patterns, recent literature in fixed prosthodontics, and an increasingly crowded dental school curriculum. The revision was further motivated by the commitment of the faculty to become patient-centered in all components of instruction. The resultant preclinical and clinical curriculum emphasizes patient care activities and minimizes student-generated laboratory products. This program is characterized as patient-driven, competency-based, and criterion-referenced, and it places heavy reliance on validated pedagogical strategies, which include evaluation of self and peers. The curriculum requires the development of good communication skills with peers, faculty, and commercial laboratories and creates time for the student to develop critical patient care skills without requiring more curriculum time. The new fixed prosthodontic curriculum appears to be consistent with current private general practice, national licensing examinations, and the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's report to dental education. PMID:9028216

Nimmo, A; Knight, G W

1996-06-01

287

Patient confidentiality: implications for teaching in undergraduate medical education.  

PubMed

Respect for patient confidentiality is one of the core concepts of professionalism and should have high priority in medical education. Confidentiality should be introduced early in the curriculum so that students understand their ethical, professional, and legal obligations throughout their medical studies and later professional career. Anatomists have important opportunities for teaching professional values including confidentiality and should be major contributors to a multidisciplinary teaching on professionalism. Students should make a formal commitment to and be assessed on patient confidentiality in the context of professionalism. A Faculty development program on confidentiality and data protection will inform and support teachers in delivering these objectives. It is recommended that medical schools have a policy on patient confidentiality and a disciplinary procedure for the management of students who breach patient confidentiality. PMID:16683240

Graham, Helen J

2006-07-01

288

The Effectiveness of a Parent Education Programme Offered through Distance Education about Independent Autistic Children Education Centre (IACEC)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a parent education program on parents' awareness about the Independent Autistic Children Education Centre (ACEC: in Turkish OCEM). The program was offered through a distance education program. Participants of the study included parents of 72 children with autism who were receiving…

Yucel, Gamze M. A.; Cavkaytar, Atilla

2007-01-01

289

Development of a brief multidisciplinary education programme for patients with osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent progressive musculoskeletal disorder, leading to pain and disability. Patient information and education are considered core elements in treatment guidelines for OA; however, there is to our knowledge no evidence-based recommendation on the best approach, content or length on educational programmes in OA. Objective: to develop a brief, patient oriented disease specific multidisciplinary education programme (MEP) to enhance self-management in patients with OA. Method Twelve persons (80% female mean age 59 years) diagnosed with hand, hip or knee OA participated in focus group interviews. In the first focus group, six participants were interviewed about their educational needs, attitudes and expectations for the MEP. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thereafter condensed. Based on results from focus group interviews, current research evidence, clinical knowledge and patients' experience, a multidisciplinary OA team (dietist, nurse, occupational therapist, pharmacist, physical therapist and rheumatologist) and a patient representative developed a pilot-MEP after having attended a work-shop in health pedagogics. Finally, the pilot-MEP was evaluated by a second focus group consisting of four members from the first focus group and six other experienced patients, before final adjustments were made. Results The focus group interviews revealed four important themes: what is OA, treatment options, barriers and coping strategies in performing daily activities, and how to live with osteoarthritis. Identified gaps between patient expectations and experience with the pilot-programme were discussed and adapted into a final MEP. The final MEP was developed as a 3.5 hour educational programme provided in groups of 6-9 patients. All members from the multidisciplinary team are involved in the education programme, including a facilitator who during the provision of the programme ensures that the individual questions are addressed. As part of an ongoing process, a patient representative regularly attends the MEP and gives feedback concerning content and perceived value. Conclusion A MEP has been developed to enhance self-management in patients with OA attending a multidisciplinary OA outpatient clinic. The effectiveness of the MEP followed by individual consultations with members of the multidisciplinary team is currently evaluated in a randomised controlled trial with respect to patient satisfaction and functioning.

2011-01-01

290

The effect of nanotechnology on education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The research objective was to study 1) the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology and 2) to propose the plans, the strategies and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the system. The data collection was done by 4 methods: 1) documentary study, 2) observation, 3) informal interviews, and 4) group discussion. The findings revealed that: 1. William Wresch's Theory (1997) was used in this research to study of the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology. 1) Getting connected to nanotechnology by search engine websites, libraries, magazines, books, and discussions with experts. 2) Curriculum integration: nanotechnology should be integrated in many branches of engineering, such as industrial, computer, civil, chemical, electrical, mechanical, etc. 3) Resources for educators: nanotechnology knowledge should be spread in academic circles by publications and the Internet websites. 4) Training and professional resources for teachers: Teachers should be trained by experts in nanotechnology and researchers from the National Nanotechnology Center. This will help trainees get correct knowledge, comprehension, and awareness in order to apply to their professions and businesses in the future. 2. As for the plans, the strategies, and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the present system, I analyzed the world nanotechnology situation that might have an effect on Thai society. The study is based on the National Plan to Develop Nanotechnology. The goal of this plan is to develop nanotechnology to be the national strategy within 10 years (2004-2013) and have it integrated into the Thai system. There are 4 parts in this plan: 1) nanomaterials, 2) nanoelectronics, 3) nanobiotechnology, and 4) human resources development. Data for human resource development should be worked with the present technology and use the country's resources to produce many products of nanotechnology, such as 1) handicrafts, decorations, and gifts, 2) agricultural products and food, 3) beverages, such as alcoholic and non- alcoholic drinks, and 5) textiles.

Viriyavejakul, Chantana

2008-04-01

291

Impact of a kiosk educational module on HIV screening rates and patient knowledge.  

PubMed

We assessed the effect of a kiosk educational module on HIV screening rates and patient knowledge about HIV testing. The evaluation was performed in a walk-in clinic offering routine HIV screening. During alternating two-week periods, patients were referred either to view a kiosk-based, educational module prior to receiving usual care, or the kiosk module was turned off and no alterations to care processes were made. The primary outcome was HIV testing rate. The secondary outcome was knowledge about HIV rapid screening, as measured with a questionnaire. There were 71 patients in the kiosk periods and 79 patients in the usual-care periods. The overall HIV testing rate was 41%. The kiosk period was not associated with greater odds of HIV testing (OR 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4-1.4). In 44 patients who completed the knowledge survey, the kiosk group was strongly associated with increased knowledge (predicted increase in knowledge score: 1.3; 95% CI: 036-2.1). The brief kiosk educational module did not improve HIV screening rates, but it increased overall patient knowledge about HIV testing. PMID:21967998

Saifu, Hemen N; Shamouelian, Albert; Davis, Lisa G; Santana-Rios, Elizabeth; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Asch, Steven M; Sun, Benjamin C

2011-10-03

292

Community health education at student-run clinics leads to sustained improvement in patients' hepatitis B knowledge.  

PubMed

While student-run clinics are often important healthcare safety nets for underserved populations, their efficacy for improving patient health knowledge has not been thoroughly explored. From September 2011 to April 2012, we assessed patients' retention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) knowledge after receiving student-led education at two student-run HBV screening and vaccination clinics. Patient education was provided by trained first and second-year medical, nursing, and pharmacy students, aided by a script and interpreters. Patient knowledge of HBV was evaluated at three points: before education, after the initial visit, and at one-month follow-up. Student-led education produced improved knowledge of HBV transmission, prevention, and management, which was retained 1 month after education for 52 patients tracked through time. Mean scores on an HBV knowledge survey improved from 56.4 % (SD = 15.2 %) at baseline to 66.6 % (SD = 15.1 %) after education, and 68.3 % (SD = 15.2 %) after one month. There was a statistically significant difference between the first and second (paired T test, p < 0.001) and the first and third tests (paired T test, p < 0.001), but no difference between the second and third tests (paired T test, p = 0.45). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that retention was correlated with patient educational background but independent of patient age, gender, income, primary language and number of years lived in the United States. Our study suggests that trained health professional students can effectively impart health knowledge that is retained by patients for at least 1 month. These results warrant consideration of student-led educational sessions at SRCs as a promising community health education model. PMID:23161212

Ouyang, David; Yuan, Neal; Sheu, Leslie; Lau, Gary; Chen, Cheng; Lai, Cindy J

2013-06-01

293

Disentangling the effect of education on emergency department utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since Grossman’s seminal paper in 1972, there have been a number of studies concerning the effect of education on health and health care demand. Though several studies have distinguished between preventive and curative care, no study has investigated the effects of general education on the utilization of unnecessary emergency department use. We test whether general education reduces “potentially unnecessary” emergency

Clara E. Dismuke; F. Michael Kunz

2004-01-01

294

Oral cancer chemotherapy: the critical interplay between patient education and patient safety.  

PubMed

Currently, 10% of cancer chemotherapy is prescribed to patients by means of an oral formulation, but, by 2013, this percentage is predicted to increase to 25%. Oral chemotherapy offers many advantages, including no need for sometimes painful intravenous access, no intravenous drug administration fees, more time at home for patients, and a greater sense of patient autonomy. However, oral cancer chemotherapy also poses challenges, many of which revolve around adherence and safety. These challenges are discussed here. There are few other circumstances in which patient education and the maintenance of institutional safety infrastructure play such an integral role in sustaining favorable cancer clinical outcomes. PMID:20437116

Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Jatoi, Aminah

2010-07-01

295

A process evaluation model for patient education programs for pregnant smokers  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo describe and apply a process evaluation model (PEM) for patient education programs for pregnant smokers.METHODSThe preparation of a process evaluation plan required each program to define its essential “new” patient assessment and intervention procedures for each episode (visit) of patient–staff contact. Following specification of these core implementation procedures (p) by each patient education program, the PEM, developed by the

Richard A Windsor; H Pennington Whiteside; Laura J Solomon; Susan L Prows; Rebecca J Donatelle; Paul M Cinciripini; Helen E McIlvain

2000-01-01

296

Readability of Online Patient Education Materials From the AAOS Web Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the goals of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) is to disseminate patient education materials that suit the readability skills of the patient population. According to standard guidelines from healthcare organizations, the readability of patient educa- tion materials should be no higher than the sixth-grade level. We hypothesized the readability level of patient education materials available on

Sanjeev Sabharwal; Sameer Badarudeen MBBS; Unes Kunju MBBS

297

Designing Effective Educational Programs: The Attitudinal Basis of Marine Littering.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The worldwide concern with marine and coastal debris has sparked recommendations for various abatement interventions. Popular among them have been educational programs. Effectiveness of educational interventions directed toward changing environmental atti...

S. Laska

1989-01-01

298

Using a competency-based approach to patient education: achieving congruence among learning, teaching and evaluation.  

PubMed

Millions of Americans are living with, and managing, their chronic health problems. Patient education plays an essential role in promoting safe self-management practice. To ensure that patients attain the required abilities, patient education needs to be competency-based. When developing and applying a competency-based patient education lesson/program, each nurse must answer questions concerning essential competencies, optimal teaching methods, best method to evaluate patient achievement, and documentation of evidence. This article describes how the authors used these questions as a guide to achieve congruence among intended learning, instruction, and evaluation to design and implement a patient education program, Managing Heart Failure, at a local hospital. PMID:21791264

Su, Whei Ming; Herron, Bobbi; Osisek, Paul J

2011-09-01

299

Expanding patient involvement in care. Effects on patient outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

An intervention was developed to increase patient involvement in care. Using a treatment algorithm as a guide, patients were helped to read their medical record and coached to ask questions and negotiate medical decisions with their physicians during a 20-minute session before their regularly scheduled visit. In a randomized controlled trial we compared this intervention with a standard educational session

Sheldon Greenfield; Sherrie H. Kaplan; Ware John E. Jr

1985-01-01

300

[Patient education and treatment documentation - law to improve the rights of patients].  

PubMed

The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the German Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should acquaint themselves with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23888409

Meltendorf, Gerhard; Meltendorf, Christian

2013-07-25

301

[Patient education and treatment documentation - Law to Improve the Rights of Patients].  

PubMed

The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the (German) Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should themselves acquaint with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23824480

Meltendorf, G; Meltendorf, C

2013-07-03

302

Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

2012-01-01

303

Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

2012-01-01

304

Effects of Multicultural Education Courses and Biblical Education Courses in Changing Attitudes and Prejudice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study showed selected effects on students from a Southern Regional Christian University taking multicultural education courses and Biblical education courses. Besides quantitative data, qualitative data were used. Qualitative data were gathered from student interviews from multicultural and Biblical education courses. The students completed…

Harrell, D. Clark

2011-01-01

305

Community-Based Eco-Education: Sound Ecology and Effective Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on the development of a college-level eco-educational course that attempts to capitalize on the ecological and educational strengths of ecotourism by establishing a partnership with a local community. Makes suggestions for establishing community partnerships for effective international eco-educational program development. (Contains 15…

Niesenbaum, Richard A.; Gorka, Barbara

2001-01-01

306

The Effects of Parental Education and Household Resources on Children's Education in Ghana  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses cross-sectional data from the 1992 and 1999 Ghana living standards surveys to examine the effects of parental education and household resources on the education of children. The results show that parental education and household resources exert positive impacts on children's school attendance. While parental schooling impact appears to have fallen over time, the impact of school quality

Harry A. Sackey

2004-01-01

307

The Effect of a State Education Reform Act on Environmental Education and Interpretative Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental education and interpretive facilities in Texas were surveyed to determine the effects on their attendance, management, and programming of a state education reform bill. The bill potentially restricted the ability of public school teachers to take classes on field trips to off-campus educational centers. Findings indicated that facility attendance did decline during the twelve months following passage of the

Kathleen L. Andereck; James H. Gramann

1989-01-01

308

Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education. Teacher Education Yearbook VIII.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This yearbook addresses the nation's need to train and retain good teachers, exploring exemplary practices in teacher education. There are four sections divided into 12 chapters. The book begins with a forward, "Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education: Powerful Teacher Education Programs" (E.M. Guyton). Section 1, "Models for Enhancing…

McIntyre, D. John, Ed.; Byrd, David M., Ed.

309

Community-Based Eco-Education: Sound Ecology and Effective Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports on the development of a college-level eco-educational course that attempts to capitalize on the ecological and educational strengths of ecotourism by establishing a partnership with a local community. Makes suggestions for establishing community partnerships for effective international eco-educational program development. (Contains 15…

Niesenbaum, Richard A.; Gorka, Barbara

2001-01-01

310

Perceptions of primary healthcare professionals towards their role in type 2 diabetes mellitus patient education in Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of the current study was to analyze the perceptions, knowledge, and practices of primary healthcare professionals in providing patient education to people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A total of 23 health professionals working in primary healthcare units in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, participated in a focus group in order to discuss their patient education practices and the challenges for effective patient education in diabetes self-management. Results The results were categorized as follows: 1) lack of preparation and technical knowledge among the health professionals on some aspects of diabetes mellitus and the health professionals' patient education practices; 2) work conditions and organization; 3) issues related or attributed to the clientele themselves; and 4) diabetes care model. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of reorienting the patient education practices, health professionals' skills and work goals, and evaluation of the educational interventions, in order to establish strategies for health promotion and prevention and control of the disease. Descriptors Health Education; Prevention of Diabetes Mellitus; Primary Healthcare

2010-01-01

311

Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n?=?540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a comprehensive self-management educational program by a cluster randomized trial within inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Furthermore, subgroup-related treatment effects will be explored. Study results will contribute to a better understanding of both the effectiveness and mechanisms of a self-management group program as part of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00004841; WHO International Clinical Trials: = DRKS00004841

2013-01-01

312

Interprofessional continuing health education for diabetic patients in an urban underserved community.  

PubMed

The CPD(iQ) Saskatchewan Project (ICEC(4)) is directed by the Inter-Professional Continuing Education for Collaborative Client Centered Care Committee, representing the disciplines of medicine, nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy, kinesiology and dentistry at the University of Saskatchewan. It was designed to serve two target audiences: the urban underserved community that would access services at the West Winds Primary Care Centre; and health professionals at the West Winds who would deliver educational modules to those in need. The main objectives were to identify the learning needs of health professionals related to working collaboratively in urban underserved community settings; identify and develop relevant educational modules to address needs identified, implement the program, and evaluate participants' experience with the educational modules. Evaluation consisted of debriefing after each educational session and the completion of a self administered questionnaire. Findings from this pilot study. The results of the study suggest the modules as a useful approach to addressing some of the barriers to effective inter-professional collaborative care. Common themes from the evaluation included satisfaction with learning other professionals' contributions to patient care. The module format may serve useful in an inter-professional case-based clinical educational setting. PMID:19005954

Davis, Penny; Clackson, Jody; Henry, Carol; Bobyn, Joan; Suveges, Linda

2008-01-01

313

Education and implementing evidence-based nursing practice for diabetic patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Foot ulceration is one of the most common complications associated with diabetes that needs to be managed. In Iran, prevalence of diabetes foot ulcer is 3%. According to studies, evidence-based nursing (EBN) is an effective alternative to facilitate clinical decision making in patient care and may lead to quality improvement in nursing practice. The aims of this study are to assess the effects of EBN education on the knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses who take care of patient with diabetes foot ulcer. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental study (based on IOWA model as a framework to improve nursing practice) was conducted using a before-and-after design. All of nurses (consisted of 19 baccalaureate nurses) who are working in an endocrinology ward were chosen and taught using EBN approach through different workshops. Before and after educational intervention, the data about nurses’ knowledge, attitude, and practice were gathered by questionnaire and then compared. The nurses’ performance in patient care was evaluated in 3 months by one checklist. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There were statistically significant differences in knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses before and after intervention (P = 0.001). The nurses’ performance in caring for patient with diabetes foot ulcer, based on clinical guideline, showed the improvement in clinical practice. Conclusion: Education of EBN can improve the nurse's knowledge and attitude to EBN, and be used as a basis on which to influence the professional practice of nursing.

Varaei, Shokoh; Salsali, Mahvash; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Tehrani, Mohammad Reza Mohajeri; Heshmat, Ramin

2013-01-01

314

Readability of Online Patient Education Materials From the AAOS Web Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the goals of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) is to disseminate patient education materials that\\u000a suit the readability skills of the patient population. According to standard guidelines from healthcare organizations, the\\u000a readability of patient education materials should be no higher than the sixth-grade level. We hypothesized the readability\\u000a level of patient education materials available on the

Sanjeev Sabharwal; Sameer Badarudeen; Shebna Unes Kunju

2008-01-01

315

Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients.  

PubMed

This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact and efficacy of the education were measured over a 1-year period through changes in diabetes clinical markers, including hemoglobin A(1c), lipid profiles, glucose levels, patients' energy levels, and sense of well-being. Six patients were initially enrolled in the pilot study, with only three patients completing the intervention phase and the 3-month follow-up. Two patients were followed-up at the 1-year mark for their diabetes, although neither continued participation in the study beyond the 3-month mark. Marginal improvements in clinical markers at 3 months were found. However, due to the small sample size, changes in the clinical profiles may have occurred because of variables unrelated to the nutritional intervention. Further research is indicated for the control of these variables. PMID:21311697

Zipp, Christopher; Roehr, Jessica Terrone; Weiss, Lucia Beck; Filipetto, Frank

2010-12-30

316

Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients  

PubMed Central

This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact and efficacy of the education were measured over a 1-year period through changes in diabetes clinical markers, including hemoglobin A1c, lipid profiles, glucose levels, patients’ energy levels, and sense of well-being. Six patients were initially enrolled in the pilot study, with only three patients completing the intervention phase and the 3-month follow-up. Two patients were followed-up at the 1-year mark for their diabetes, although neither continued participation in the study beyond the 3-month mark. Marginal improvements in clinical markers at 3 months were found. However, due to the small sample size, changes in the clinical profiles may have occurred because of variables unrelated to the nutritional intervention. Further research is indicated for the control of these variables.

Zipp, Christopher; Roehr, Jessica Terrone; Weiss, Lucia Beck; Filipetto, Frank

2011-01-01

317

The current and future role of the internet in patient education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet technology known as the World Wide Web is rapidly emerging as the most powerful medium of mass communication this century and it can be harnessed to dispense global, cost-effective, high-quality, multimedia patient education material. This paper reviews how the Internet has progressed from delivering simple static, text-based material to sophisticated interactive Web sites based on CGI Technology. Interactive

Bernard Richards; Andrew W Colman; Robert A Hollingsworth

1998-01-01

318

Promoting Early Literacy Skills: Effects of In-Service Education for Early Childhood Educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of in-service education on educators' use of story comprehension utterances, narrative models, and print\\/sound references during interactive book reading. Participants included sixteen early childhood educators with groups of four typically-developing children, aged 18 to 67 months. Eight educators in the experimental group were taught to engage in story-related discussion to promote children's early literacy skills.

Heather Flowers; Luigi Girolametto; Elaine Weitzman; Janice Greenberg

319

School Effects and Teacher Effects in Dutch Elementary Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present article it is investigated to what extent teacher effects can account for differences between schools. A data set is analyzed which contains information about students who were followed during their last two years in elementary education. One group of students had been taught by one and the same teacher during these two years, whereas the other group

Hans Luyten; Tom A. B. Snijders

1996-01-01

320

Patient education on the internet: opportunities and pitfalls.  

PubMed

The Internet, an increasingly pervasive part of our culture, has vastly increased the rate at which information is disseminated. Unfortunately, a substantial portion of medical information on the Internet is false or misleading. Realizing this, many patients would like their physicians to help guide their online searches for medical information, but most physicians do not feel comfortable enough with the Internet to provide this service. A recent poll by Cyberdialogue (2000) found that 70% of all patients would like their physicians to recommend a health care web site for their condition, but that only 4% of patients receive such a recommendation. In recommending medical web sites, physicians need to consider the quality of the web site, the quality of the content, and especially the ethics of the site. The most important ethical standard a web site must meet is the clear separation of its editorial comment from promotional material. Patients do not have enough knowledge to distinguish unbiased information from information designed to push a product or service. There are organizations such as the Health on the Net Foundation and the E-Health Code of Ethics that have established clear quality and ethical criteria, but very few resources exist for these organizations to use in policing the sites that claim to adhere to their criteria. The National Institutes of Health recently started a consumer web site (www.medlineplus.gov) that takes web sites that adhere to their stringent criteria and places them on their web site, thus ensuring proper compliance. Patient education from sources other than face-to-face contact with a physician should be seen as an adjunct to the medical practice of physicians, and not as competition. Information is a form of therapy, and should lead to better referrals, more realistic outcome expectations, better treatment compliance, and better outcomes. As long as patients are referred to information that is unbiased, well-written, and not proprietary, their decision making should be enhanced, bringing them into the decision-making loop. This allows the patient to be much more involved with his or her care. As the medical profession changes from a "gatekeeper" model to a patient choice model, patient education will take on a much greater role. PMID:11923675

Ullrich, Peter F; Vaccaro, Alexander R

2002-04-01

321

Disabled patients and oral health in Rome, Italy: long-term evaluation of educational initiatives  

PubMed Central

Summary This study is concerned with the educational intervention layout proposed as a possible answer for the disparities in healthcare services for disabled persons. Material and methods The data sampling was performed on individuals in Rome, affected by psychophysical disabilities, living in residential care facilities. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: Study and Control Group, consisting of patients who did or did not participate in the Educational Phase. All the caregivers participated in an educational course. Screening period: September 2008 – March 2009. Examinations were performed using Visible Plaque Index (VPI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) and Microbiological Analysis. Results The total number of patients utilized for the study was 36 (18 in each group). The final sample amounted to 70% (14/20) in the Study Group and to 75% (15/20) in the Control Group. In both examined groups Oral Hygiene, Gingival Health State and Microbiological Analysis show an overall improvement of the indices, compared with the initial status, mostly at a follow-up after 4 weeks. However, Study Group show a significantly better improvement. Conversely, after 6 months the overall clinical indices worsened again. Conclusion The difference in the significant improvements of the groups, even if only over a short-time evaluation, endorses that the participation of the patients as well as tutors in the educational phase is an effective strategy for the short-term.

Avenali, Laura; Guerra, Fabrizio; Cipriano, Luigi; Corridore, Denise; Ottolenghi, Livia

2012-01-01

322

The need for effective biomedical imaging education  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are several challenges to producing high-quality BMI education programs. These include limited opportunities for hands-on education; a dearth of textbooks targeted toward engineers, especially undergraduate engineers; and, like many fields, advancements so rapid that textbooks and other educational resources become out of date quickly, often before being released. Although there are many challenges to BMI education, there are many

CYNTHIA B. PASCHAL

2003-01-01

323

Patient and organizational factors related to education and support use by Veterans with Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Patient education and support services are recognized in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as important to the patient-centered treatment of Parkinson's disease. Indeed, educating patients is one of the missions of the VA's six specialty Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Centers (PADRECCs). We compared VA education/support services utilization by whether or not a patient's VA Medical Center (VAMC) contained a PADRECC. Our sample included Parkinson's disease patients from VAMCs with (n = 882) and without (n = 1,448) PADRECCs. Patients completed surveys that asked about demographic/individual characteristics, health status/function, and education/support utilization. Results showed that 15.8% (n = 354) of all patients utilized education/support services. Patients at PADRECC VAMCs were generally healthier and more educated than other VAMC patients. After statistically controlling for these differences, however, being a patient at a PADRECC VAMC site and using only VA providers (as compared to a combination of VA and non-VA providers) were significant predictors of education/support utilization. Further, proportionally more PADRECC VAMC site patients reported higher satisfaction and receiving a broad range of information from different modalities as compared to other VAMC patients. These findings suggest that PADRECC VAMCs are providing educational/support activities consistent with these specialty centers' goals. PMID:19606487

Pogoda, Terri K; Cramer, Irene E; Meterko, Mark; Lin, Hai; Hendricks, Ann; Holloway, Robert G; Charns, Martin P

2009-10-15

324

Culture-Bound and Sensory Barriers to Communication with Patients: Strategies and Resources for Health Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is a resource for health education practitioners that can lead to improved delivery of health education for various cultural groups. In addition, consideration of two other special groups of patients has also been included because they often...

1984-01-01

325

Survey of Infection Control Policies within Dental/Educational Patient Treatment Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article describes a survey of 36 dental education programs to identify educators' reactive policies and procedures in their patient treatment centers to minimize dental contamination and cross-contamination. (Author/CT)

Dickey, Keith Winfield

1986-01-01

326

The effect of motivational interviewing after ischemic stroke on patient knowledge and patient satisfaction with care: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Knowledge of the warning signs of stroke may reduce the incidence of having a second stroke by receiving medical intervention in a timely manner. The need for stroke education is paramount to empower stroke patients to recognize the signs and symptoms of an impending stroke. The purpose of this pilot study was to develop and to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational method of providing stroke education in an acute care setting. Twenty patients were recruited and randomized to two groups. Group 1 received the standard of care: verbal and written education at the time of discharge by the discharge nurse. Group 2 received individualized protocol-driven verbal and written education with their caregiver present within the context of the Therapeutic Alliance Model using motivational interviewing techniques. Each group was sent a Stroke Knowledge Test and a patient satisfaction survey at 1 month. Results indicate that the enhanced education group received improved scores on the Stroke Knowledge Test and had better patient satisfaction scores regarding stroke education. An enhanced educational method using motivational interviewing and an individualized protocol-driven education intervention given to both the patient and a caregiver enhance stroke knowledge and patient satisfaction after discharge from the acute care setting. PMID:21207769

Byers, Ann Marie; Lamanna, Lenore; Rosenberg, Antonieta

2010-12-01

327

The effect of motivational interviewing on glycaemic control and perceived competence of diabetes self-management in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus after attending a group education programme: a randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims\\/hypothesis  The aim of this study was to measure the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) compared with usual care on changes in\\u000a glycaemic control and competence of diabetes self-management in patients with diabetes mellitus.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Patients were eligible if they had type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, were over 18 years of age and had participated in a 4 day\\u000a group education programme offered

L. K. Rosenbek Minet; L. Wagner; E. M. Lønvig; J. Hjelmborg; J. E. Henriksen

2011-01-01

328

Interventions to Improve Patient Education Regarding Multifactorial Genetic Conditions: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

The careful education of patients with complex genetic disease is essential. However, healthcare providers often have limited time to spend providing thorough genetic education. Furthermore, the number of healthcare professionals possessing strong genetics training may be inadequate to meet increasing patient demands. Due to such constraints, several interventions have been investigated over the past decade to identify potential resources for the facilitation of this specific type of patient education. This systematic literature review of these interventions for patient education attempts to elucidate the answer to the question: is there sufficient evidence for best practice for delivering genetic information to patients with multifactorial conditions? The various interventions (CD-ROM, group counseling, video/decision aid, and miscellaneous) were analyzed in terms of quality criteria and achievement of specific outcomes and were rated according to the Stetler model for evidence based practice. Seven main outcomes were evaluated: 1. objective and subjective knowledge assessment 2. psychological measures (general anxiety, depression, stress, cancer worry) 3. satisfaction/effectiveness of intervention 4. time spent in counseling (time spent on basic genetic information vs. specific concerns) 5. decision making/intent to undergo genetic testing 6. treatment choice and value of that choice, and, finally 7. risk perception. Overall, the computer interventions resulted in more significant findings that were beneficial than any other category followed by the video category, although the group and miscellaneous categories did not measure all of the outcomes reported by the other two categories. Nevertheless, while these groups had neutral or negative findings in some of the outcomes, the computer intervention group showed significant improvement in genetics knowledge, psychological measures, satisfaction/effectiveness, time spent with counselor, and decision/intent to undergo testing.

Meilleur, Katherine G.; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T.

2009-01-01

329

Sexual Outcomes and Satisfaction with Hysterectomy: Influence of Patient Education  

PubMed Central

Introduction Many women experience improved sexual function after hysterectomy. However, a sizeable minority of women report worsened sexual function after the surgery, and concerns about the effect of surgery on sexual function are common among women planning to undergo hysterectomy. Aim The present study examined the role of education about the potential sexual consequences of hysterectomy in predicting self-reported outcomes and satisfaction with the procedure. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 204 women who had undergone simple hysterectomy in the preceding 3–12 months. Participants volunteered in response to a Web-based advertisement. Main Outcome Measures Participants indicated their current sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and reported positive and negative sexual outcomes experienced after hysterectomy using a checklist. Participants also completed questionnaire items regarding satisfaction with hysterectomy and education from their physicians about sexual risks and benefits prior to surgery. Results Current sexual function scores were related to self-reports of positive and negative sexual outcomes following hysterectomy and overall satisfaction with hysterectomy. Education from a physician about possible adverse sexual outcomes was largely unrelated to self-reports of having experienced those outcomes. However, education about possible negative sexual outcomes predicted overall satisfaction with hysterectomy when controlling for self-reports of positive and negative sexual outcomes. Conclusion Education about potential negative sexual outcomes after surgery may enhance satisfaction with hysterectomy, independent of whether negative sexual outcomes were experienced. Including a discussion of potential sexual changes after surgery may enhance the benefits of presurgical counseling prior to hysterectomy.

Bradford, Andrea; Meston, Cindy

2010-01-01

330

Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the…

Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

2012-01-01

331

The Effect of Veterans Benefits on Veterans' Education and Earnings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of armed forces veterans make use of the subsidized training and educational benefits provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The effect of veterans benefits on educational attainment am civilian earnings is estimated here using the Census Bureau's 1987 Survey of Veterans. Two identification strategies are employed to control for unobserved characteristics that are correlated with educational attainment

Joshua D. Angrist

1990-01-01

332

Effective Technology Integration Shows New Frontiers in Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this ever-changing world, technology is affecting how people view learning and the overall educational process. For an educator, the successful implementation of technology can be one of the most effective tools in the classroom. The introduction of virtual simulations of real life situations into what was once considered a teacher-centered classroom, allows the educator to meet the complex differentiated

Franco Paoletti; Lisa Marie Carlucci

2007-01-01

333

Sexuality Education: An Evaluation of Programs and Their Effects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is the first volume of a six-volume report on sexuality education. This volume summarizes the structure and content of sexuality education in the United States, reviews the literature on the effects of sexuality education, describes the evaluation methods, provides a description of and the evaluation data for each program, and…

Kirby, Douglas

334

Prenatal Breastfeeding Education: Its Effect on Breastfeeding Among WIC Participants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of prenatal breastfeeding education on breastfeeding incidence and duration was determined among 31 prenatal WIC participants. The subjects, assigned to a control group (n= 17) or experimental group (n= 14), received prenatal nutrition education through the WIC program. The experimental group received at least one breastfeeding education class. There was no significant difference in breastfeeding incidence between the

Elizabeth Reifsnider; Donna Eckhart

1997-01-01

335

Effects of family background characteristics on educational participation in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study family background effects on participation in primary and secondary education of children in Turkey using large representative data sets. Educational participation, especially of girls, is found to be still a major concern, with non-enrollment being especially high in the countryside and the eastern part of the country. Parental education, number of siblings, household income, occupation of the father,

Jeroen Smits; Ay?e Gündüz Ho?gör

2006-01-01

336

Two Instructional Designs for Dialogic Citizenship Education: An Effect Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Despite the renewed interest in citizenship education, relatively little is known about effective ways to realize citizenship education in the classroom. In the literature on citizenship education, dialogue is considered to be a crucial element. However, there is very little, if any, empirical research into the different ways to…

Schuitema, Jaap; Veugelers, Wiel; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; ten Dam, Geert

2009-01-01

337

Development of a Group Educational Intervention for Sexual Functioning and Intimacy Concerns in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sexual functioning problems are disproportionately frequent among individuals with multiple sclero- sis (MS) and are associated with reduced sexual activity and satisfaction. Although effective treatments are available, patients often do not communicate with physicians or partners as openly and frequently as needed to optimize sexual functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a group-level educational

Dustin E. Wright; Lara M. Stepleman; Kimberly N. Davis; Mary D. Hughes

338

Incomplete equalization: The effect of tracking in secondary education on educational inequality.  

PubMed

This paper tests whether the existence of vocationally oriented tracks within a traditionally academically oriented upper education system reduces socioeconomic inequalities in educational attainment. Based on a statistical model of educational transitions and data on two entire cohorts of Danish youth, we find that (1) the vocationally oriented tracks are less socially selective than the traditional academic track; (2) attending the vocationally oriented tracks has a negative effect on the likelihood of enrolling in higher education; and (3) in the aggregate the vocationally oriented tracks improve access to lower-tier higher education for low-SES students. These findings point to an interesting paradox in that tracking has adverse effects at the micro-level but equalizes educational opportunities at the macro-level. We also discuss whether similar mechanisms might exist in other educational systems. PMID:24090843

Holm, Anders; Jæger, Mads Meier; Karlson, Kristian Bernt; Reimer, David

2013-06-21

339

Assessment of a therapeutic education programme for asthma patients: “un souffle nouveau”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a new patient education programme on adults with asthma. This self-management programme included an individual assessment of patient’s needs and two educational group sessions. Teaching methods and session content are described as well as caregivers training programme. The training sessions included a written asthma action plan based on symptoms

Yves Magar; Daniel Vervloet; François Steenhouwer; Sylvie Smaga; Hubert Mechin; Jean-Paul Rocca Serra; Claire Marchand; Jean-François d’Ivernois

2005-01-01

340

Patient education in Western European hospitals: a comparison of the Netherlands, Flanders and England  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: This research describes the organization of patient education in hospitals and the conditions that influence this in the Netherlands, Flanders and England. METHODS: The research consists of document analysis and interviews. RESULTS: On the organizational level, there can be a patient information desk (England and the Netherlands) and\\/or a specialized officer on patient education (the Netherlands and England). In

A. Albada; E. Elbers; A. Visser

2008-01-01

341

Translating patient education theory into practice: Developing material to address the cardiovascular education needs of people with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis paper describes the rationale and design of a theory-informed patient education programme addressing cardiovascular disease for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to illustrate how theory can explicitly be translated into practice.

Holly John; Elizabeth D. Hale; Paul Bennett; Gareth J. Treharne; Douglas Carroll; George D. Kitas

2011-01-01

342

Towards Effective Technology Education in New Zealand.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Sketches the history of the New Zealand educational system and the ways in which the English and Welsh technology education curriculum model was revised to reflect indigenous conditions and culture. (SK)|

Reid, Maxwell S.

2000-01-01

343

Patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of cancer-related fatigue randomized controlled feasibility study  

PubMed Central

Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a prominent clinical problem. There are calls for multi-modal interventions. Methods We assessed the feasibility of delivering patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of CRF in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with breast cancer survivors using usual care as control. Social cognitive and integrative medicine theories guided integration of patient education with acupuncture into a coherent treatment protocol. The intervention consisted of two parts. First, patients were taught to improve self-care by optimizing exercise routines, improving nutrition, implementing some additional evidence-based cognitive behavioral techniques such as stress management in four weekly 50-minute sessions. Second, patients received eight weekly 50-minute acupuncture sessions. The pre-specified primary outcome, CRF, was assessed with the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Secondary outcomes included three dimensions of cognitive impairment assessed with the FACT-COGv2. Results Due to difficulties in recruitment, we tried several methods that led to the development of a tailored recruitment strategy: we enlisted oncologists into the core research team and recruited patients completing treatment from oncology waiting rooms. Compared to usual care control, the intervention was associated with a 2.38-point decline in fatigue as measured by the BFI (90% Confidence Interval from 0.586 to 5.014; p <0.10). Outcomes associated with cognitive dysfunction were not statistically significant. Conclusions Patient education integrated with acupuncture had a very promising effect that warrants conducting a larger RCT to confirm findings. An effective recruitment strategy will be essential for the successful execution of a larger-scale trial. Trial registration NCT00646633

2011-01-01

344

Simultaneous patient/family education regarding schizophrenia: the Nebraska model.  

PubMed

A course entitled "How to Enter the World of Schizophrenia ... a Family Educational Perspective" was developed to simultaneously educate individuals with schizophrenia and their families regarding the psychiatric diagnosis, treatment, and management of schizophrenia. The course was developed and implemented by psychiatric-mental health nursing clinical specialists utilizing an eclectic approach. The complexity of this endeavor required the incorporation of five theoretical models to effect the delivery of health education in a multigeneration family situation complicated with a serious mental illness. It was essential that the leaders possess working knowledge of the aforementioned theories as well as advanced knowledge of the medical diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia to include neuroanatomy, physiology, and biochemistry; therapeutic nutrition; and psychopharmacology. Equally important were the leaders' abilities to conduct groups using the style of coleadership, as each class averaged 30 to 50 people, including individuals with schizophrenia, siblings, parents, and grandparents, which represented segments of families or the entire family. The leaders must display open, honest communication techniques while developing self-esteem and self-worth among the family members. Use of here-and-now material facilitates self-disclosure of emotionally painful material and leaders role-model problem-solving techniques, which aid families in coping with problems occurring with serious mental illness. The class has been taught 12 times since 1985 to over 500 persons. PMID:2635584

Moller, M D; Wer, J E

1989-12-01

345

An educational and behavioral approach toward increasing patient activation in hypertension management.  

PubMed

The shift in patterns of disease toward chronic illness necessitates greater patient participation in its management and their own rehabilitation, and they require greater social support over longer periods. Patient activation, or the enhancement of patient and support group involvement in personal health care through teaching management techniques and problem-solving skills, has emerged in healthy education in response to this need. This paper will examine combined educational and behavioral approaches to increasing social support and patient activation in hypertension management. Activation in this study involves increased feelings of personal control over the contingencies surrounding the management of medical regimens. Both family support intervention and small group sessions oriented to changing compliance behavior by changing expectancy frames were offered to a randomized sample of 200 inner city, black, hypertensive patients who were part of a larger study. Patients were examined within a pretest-posttest randomized factorial design on measures of locus of control, belief in seriousness, efficacy of treatment, medication compliance, and blood pressure control. This combined approach showed small differences on the attitude and behavioral measures but displayed a significant effect on the program outcome variable blood pressure control (62% in control among intervention groups versus 46% in nonintervention groups). PMID:7076881

Morisky, D E; Bowler, M H; Finlay, J S

1982-01-01

346

Effective Inclusive Education: Equipping Education Professionals with Necessary Skills and Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As a result of educational reforms, students with disabilities are educated in inclusive settings to a greater degree than ever before. Regrettably, many teachers report that they feel unprepared to work effectively with these students. Because teacher effectiveness is strongly linked to student outcomes, these perceptions of inadequacy are…

Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Tyler, Naomi Chowdhuri

2011-01-01

347

A model for educational simulation of the effect of oxytocin on uterine contractions.  

PubMed

Fetal oxygenation is sometimes compromised due to hyperstimulation of uterine contractions (UC) following labor augmentation with oxytocin. We present a model for educational simulation that incorporates the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic properties of oxytocin, reproducing the effect of this drug on UC features. Six UC tracings were generated, reflecting different relevant situations. Three independent experts identified correctly the simulated situations in all tracings and attributed an average realism score of 9.4 (0-10). The model presented for simulation of the effect of oxytocin on UC provides sufficiently realistic results to be used in healthcare education and can easily be adapted to different patients and educational scenarios. PMID:22835435

Lobo, Mariana Fernandes; Bastos, Luísa Ferreira; van Meurs, Willem L; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo

2012-07-25

348

The Social Effectiveness of Internet Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A system of education is a unique social institution, the purpose of which is to develop and multiply human capital. Based on the education system it is possible to judge the situation in the country and society not only at the present time but also in the future. A system of education also should be seen as an ideological institution: it…

Ovsiannikov, A. A.; Monakhov, S. V.

2007-01-01

349

The Social Effectiveness of Internet Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A system of education is a unique social institution, the purpose of which is to develop and multiply human capital. Based on the education system it is possible to judge the situation in the country and society not only at the present time but also in the future. A system of education also should be seen as an ideological institution: it produces…

Ovsiannikov, A. A.; Monakhov, S. V.

2007-01-01

350

Meta-Analysis of Patient Education Interventions to Increase Physical Activity among Chronically Ill Adults  

PubMed Central

Objective This meta-analysis integrates primary research testing the effect of patient education to increase physical activity (PA) on behavior outcomes among adults with diverse chronic illnesses. Methods Extensive literature searching strategies located published and unpublished intervention studies that measured PA behavior outcomes. Primary study results were coded. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analytic procedures included moderator analyses. Results Data were synthesized across 22,527 subjects from 213 samples in 163 reports. The overall mean weighted effect size for two-group comparisons was 0.45 (higher mean for treatment than control). This effect size is consistent with a difference of 48 minutes of PA per week or 945 steps per day. Preliminary moderator analyses suggest interventions were most effective when they targeted only PA behavior, used behavioral strategies (vs. cognitive strategies), and encouraged PA self-monitoring. Differences among chronic illnesses were documented. Individual strategies unrelated to PA outcomes included supervised exercise sessions, exercise prescription, fitness testing, goal setting, contracting, problem solving, barriers management, and stimulus/cues. PA outcomes were unrelated to gender, age, ethnicity, or socioeconomic distribution among samples. Conclusion These findings suggest that some patient education interventions to increase PA are effective, despite considerable heterogeneity in the magnitude of intervention effect. Practice Implications Moderator analyses are preliminary and provide suggestive evidence for further testing of interventions to inform practice.

Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Brown, Sharon A.; Brown, Lori M.

2008-01-01

351

Effect of health education on compliance in asthma.  

PubMed

Non-compliance is a major problem in the treatment of any chronic disease. Asthma is one such chronic disease where non-compliance is a major problem. Several factors for non-compliance like cost of the drugs and relief of symptoms on taking medications for a short time are common to all chronic diseases but in asthma, inhalational therapy especially in elderly because of senile changes, economic factors and comorbidities is an added factor. Health education can improve the compliance. So a study was undertaken to observe the causes of non-compliance in asthmatics, to compare these causes in elderly and young asthmatics and to see the effect of health education on non-compliance in asthmatics. One hundred patients of bronchial asthma, group A consisting 50 patients > or = 65 years old and group B 50 patients < 40 years attending tuberculosis and chest diseases hospital, Patiala were studied. Initial compliance and reasons for non-compliance, initial usage of inhalational devices and their techniques of inhalation were studied. Patients were educated on asthma and inhalational techniques.These patients were followed up at 15th day, 1st, 2nd and 3rd months for changes in compliance and lung functions. At the initial stage, non-compliance was observed in 30 patients (60%) amongst elderly and only 15 patients (30%) amongst the young. Cause for non-compliance was cost in 6, memory in 11, both cost and memory in 7 and relief of symptoms in 6 in elderly and 4, 0, 0 and 11 in young respectively. Only 23 patients (40%) amongst the elderly and 33 patients (66%) amongst the young were put on inhalational therapy. There were statistically significant differences between elderly and young with respect to all the above factors. Out of these 23 elderly, only 7 (30.4%) were confident of the technique of inhalation and demonstrated it correctly.The health education resulted in significant improvement in compliance in both the groups, but more so in the young. The compliance for medications improved from a baseline of 40% to 88% amongst elderly and from 70% to 96% amongst young. There was an improvement in the confidence and technique of inhalation from 44% to 86% amongst elderly and from 64% to 98% amongst young at follow-ups. Mean PEFR improved statistically significantly from 75.25% to 81.13% in elderly and 84.38% to 89.74% in young asthmatics. However, during the follow-up at 2nd month, it was realised that 7 patients amongst elderly and 1 amongst young could not be sustained on inhalational medications because of the cost factor, therefore they were put on only oral medications which were supplied free of cost to them and thus at followup at 3rd month, these patients were not on inhalational medications any more. PMID:23738402

Kishan, Jai; Garg, Kranti

2012-10-01

352

Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review  

PubMed Central

Background Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing on surgical subspecialities. Methods Studies that assessed the effects of the work-hour regulation published following the implementation of ACGME guidelines (2003) were searched using PubMed database. The following search modules were selected: work-hours, 80-hour work week, quality of life, work satisfaction, surgical education, residency training, patient care, continuity of care. Publications were included if they were completed in the United States and covered the subject of our review. Manuscrips were analysed to identify authors, year of publication, type of study, number of participants, and the main outcomes. Review Findings Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Studies demonstrate that the residents quality of life has improved. The effects on surgical education are still unclear due to inconsistency in studies. Furthermore, according to several objective studies there were no changes in mortality and morbidity following the implementation. Conclusion Further studies are necessary addressing the effects of surgical education and studying the objective methods to assess the technical skill and procedural competence of surgeons. In addition, patient surveys analysing their satisfaction and concerns can contribute to recent discussion, as well.

Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pfeifer, Roman

2009-01-01

353

The Effects of a Genetic Counseling Educational Program on Hereditary Breast Cancer for Korean Healthcare Providers  

PubMed Central

Purpose Systematic educational programs and genetic counseling certification courses for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) have not yet been introduced in Korea. We provided and evaluated the effects of genetic counseling education on Korean healthcare providers' knowledge, awareness, and counseling skills for patients at high risk of HBOC. Methods A 3-day educational program was conducted for healthcare providers who were interested in genetic counseling for patients at high risk of HBOC. Participants who completed a knowledge test and satisfaction questionnaire were included in the present sample. Pre-post comparisons were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention. Results Significant differences between preprogram and postprogram knowledge scores were observed (p=0.002). Awareness (p<0.001) and confidence (p<0.001) regarding genetic counseling significantly increased after the training. Doctors and participants with fewer years of work experience performed well on the knowledge test. Previous educational experience was correlated with increased confidence in knowledge and counseling skills. Conclusion Genetic counseling education regarding HBOC improved knowledge and awareness of HBOC and enhanced confidence in the counseling process. The effects varied according to occupation and participants' previous education. The implementation of systematic educational programs that consider participant characteristics may improve the effects of such interventions.

Lee, Jihyoun; Cho, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Han-Wook; Park, Sue K.; Yang, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Lee, Soo-Jung; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Moon, Nan Mo

2013-01-01

354

Corticosteroid therapy and intercurrent illness: the need for continuing patient education.  

PubMed Central

In patients receiving long-term therapeutic or replacement corticosteroids, delayed or inappropriate adjustment of steroid dosage during intercurrent illness may be fatal. We used a questionnaire to assess current levels of patient knowledge, awareness of the need for action during intercurrent illness and the frequency with which steroid warning cards and Medic Alert pendants were carried, in 61 patients on long-term replacement corticosteroids and in 40 patients receiving long-term therapeutic corticosteroids. Only 67 of the 101 patients taking corticosteroids were carrying a steroid warning card. Eleven of the 21 Medic Alert owners wore their pendants. Only 18 of the 41 patients in the therapeutic group and 41 of the 60 patients in the replacement group would take appropriate action during an intercurrent illness (P < 0.001). Lack of patient knowledge in this important area emphasizes the need for continuing and effective education of these groups of patients during follow-up. An information sheet detailing the exact changes to be made during intercurrent illness may help reinforce verbal advice.

Peacey, S. R.; Pope, R. M.; Naik, K. S.; Hardern, R. D.; Page, M. D.; Belchetz, P. E.

1993-01-01

355

Impact of sex education on medical students' projections of patients' attitudes.  

PubMed

Although previous studies have indicated that sex education courses in medical school improved students' sexual knowledge and personal sexual attitudes, response bias and lack of control groups led to erroneous interpretations of course effectiveness. Using a modified form of the Sex Knowledge and Attitude Test (SKAT), the sexual attitudes and knowledge of sophomores were tested before and after a medical school sex education course, with a group of senior students who had not had the course as a control group. The students were asked not only to give their own personal responses to the questions, but to project how they thought a "typical patient" might respond. A group of patients were also given the SKAT test. Postcourse sophomores responded much as the seniors did, and pre-and postcourse sophomores and seniors all erroneously perceived patients as highly conservative sexually. In reality, although patients were somewhat more conservative than students on several dimensions of the test, their conservativeness was neither as pervasive nor as profound as the students anticipated. Medical students' stereotypes of patients' sexual attitudes were also highly resistant to change. PMID:7345155

Schnarch, D M

1981-01-01

356

Competence in Patient Safety: A Multifaceted Experiential Educational Intervention for Resident Physicians  

PubMed Central

Background The need to provide efficient, effective, and safe patient care is of paramount importance. However, most physicians receive little or no formal training to prepare them to address patient safety challenges within their clinical practice. Methods We describe a comprehensive Patient Safety Learning Program (PSLP) for internal medicine and medicine-pediatrics residents. The curriculum is designed to teach residents key concepts of patient safety and provided opportunities to apply these concepts in the “real” world in an effort to positively transform patient care. Residents were assigned to faculty expert-led teams and worked longitudinally to identify and address patient safety conditions and problems. The PSLP was assessed by using multiple methods. Results Resident team-based projects resulted in changes in several patient care processes, with the potential to improve clinical outcomes. However, faculty evaluations of residents were lower for the Patient Safety Improvement Project rotation than for other rotations. Comments on “unsatisfactory” evaluations noted lack of teamwork, project participation, and/or responsiveness to faculty communication. Participation in the PSLP did not change resident or faculty attitudes toward patient safety, as measured by a comprehensive survey, although there was a slight increase in comfort with discussing medical errors. Conclusions Development of the PSLP was intended to create a supportive environment to enhance resident education and involve residents in patient safety initiatives, but it produced lower faculty evaluations of resident for communication and professionalism and did not have the intended positive effect on resident or faculty attitudes about patient safety. Further research is needed to design or refine interventions that will develop more proactive resident learners and shift the culture to a focus on patient safety.

Lukela, Michael P; Parekh, Vikas I; Gosbee, John W; Purkiss, Joel A; Valle, John Del; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S

2011-01-01

357

Civic Returns to Higher Education: A Note on Heterogeneous Effects  

PubMed Central

American educational leaders and philosophers have long valued schooling for its role in preparing the nation’s youth to be civically engaged citizens. Numerous studies have found a positive relationship between education and subsequent civic participation. However, little is known about possible variation in effects by selection into higher education, a critical omission considering education’s expressed role as a key mechanism for integrating disadvantaged individuals into civic life. I disaggregate effects and examine whether civic returns to higher education are largest for disadvantaged low likelihood or advantaged high likelihood college goers. I find evidence for significant effect heterogeneity: civic returns to college are greatest among individuals who have a low likelihood for college completion. Returns decrease as the propensity for college increases.

Brand, Jennie E.

2011-01-01

358

The Problem-Oriented Medical Record: Implications and Potential for Improving Patient Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A review of the literature concerning the problem-oriented medical record (POMR) identifies sources that indicate the advantages of the POMR in improving patient education efforts. The POMR approach is a means by which the patient's records are restructur...

1975-01-01

359

Using evidence to improve satisfaction with medication side-effects education on a neuro-medical surgical unit.  

PubMed

Patient satisfaction is viewed as a significant indicator of quality of care. More specifically, improving patient satisfaction related to communication about medications and potential side effects can improve healthcare outcomes. Patient satisfaction scores related to medication side effects on a neuro-medical surgical unit were monitored following a quality improvement program. These patients frequently experience cognitive impairment and functional difficulties that can affect the way they understand and handle medications. The purpose of this quality improvement practice change was to (a) develop an educational approach for post acute neurosurgical patients and (b) evaluate whether the use of the approach is successful in improving patient satisfaction scores related to medication education on side effects. The quality improvement program interventions included (a) patient informational handouts inserted into admission folders, (b) nurse education about the importance of providing education on side effects to patient and discussion of their involvement with the program, (c) unit flyers with nurse education, and (d) various communications with bedside nurses through personal work mail and emails. The primary focus was for nurses to employ the "teach back" method to review and reinforce the medication side-effect teaching with patients. Evaluation of the data showed an increase in patient satisfaction after the implementation of the "Always Ask" program. PMID:24025467

Ahrens, Susan L; Wirges, Ashley M

2013-10-01

360

Neighbourhood Effects, Preference Heterogeneity and Immigrant Educational Attainment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates differences between the educational attainment immigrants and native born individuals in Australia by using Australian Youth Survey (AYS) data combined with aggregate Australian Census data. We decompose differences in educational attainment into: (i) typical demographic and socio-economic sources common to all ethnic groups, (ii) unobserved region of residence and region of origin effects, and (iii) neighbourhood effects

Buly A. Cardak; James Ted McDonald

2002-01-01

361

Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The issue of teacher effectiveness has risen rapidly to the top of the education policy agenda, and the federal government and states are considering bold steps to improve teacher and leader effectiveness. One place to look for ideas is the experiences of high-performing education systems around the world. Finland, Ontario, and Singapore all have…

Darling-Hammond, Linda, Ed.; Rothman, Robert, Ed.

2011-01-01

362

Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As adult learners and educators pioneer the use of technology in the new century, attention has been focused on developing strategic approaches to effectively integrate adult learning and technology in different learning environments. "Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches" provides innovative…

Wang, Victor C. X.

2010-01-01

363

Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As adult learners and educators pioneer the use of technology in the new century, attention has been focused on developing strategic approaches to effectively integrate adult learning and technology in different learning environments. "Integrating Adult Learning and Technologies for Effective Education: Strategic Approaches" provides innovative…

Wang, Victor C. X.

2010-01-01

364

ENRICHING GLOBAL MARKETING EDUCATION WITH VIRTUAL CLASSROOMS: AN EFFECTIVENESS STUDY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global marketing education is embedded in an increasingly global high-tech business environment. Business practices and marketing education are strongly influenced by these developments. New technologies are successfully implemented in university curricula to improve the effectiveness of teaching and the cooperation between universities in management teaching. This paper deals with the usage and effectiveness of virtual classrooms in the global marketing

Bernd Simon; Parissa Haghirian; Bodo B. Schlegelmilch

365

Long-term adherence to CPAP treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: importance of educational program  

PubMed Central

Background Lack of adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the major cause of treatment failure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. We evaluated the effectiveness of our intensive educational program on adherence in the short term and the long term. Methods The educational program consisted of: intensive training, whereby each patient performed individual and collective sessions of three hours receiving information about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, familiarizing themselves with CPAP tools, on six consecutive days; long-term training; and support meetings, with reassessment at three months and one year. Results In 202 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, the mean (standard deviation) apnea/hypopnea index was 45 ± 22, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 14 ± 5, and the average titration pressure was 10 ± 2 cm H2O. At three months, 166 patients (82%) used CPAP for an average of 7.3 hours per night. At one year, 162 (80%) used CPAP for about seven hours per night. At two years, 92 patients (43%) used CPAP for about five hours per night. The level of satisfaction remained higher in patients in ventilation. Conclusion Our data show strong adherence to CPAP at three months and one year, with a decrease at two years. The initial educational program seems to play an important role in adherence. This effect is lost in the long term, suggesting that periodic reinforcement of educational support would be helpful.

La Piana, Giuseppe Emanuele; Scartabellati, Alessandro; Chiesa, Lodovico; Ronchi, Luca; Raimondi, Paola; Carro, Miriam A; Zibetti, Silvia; Aiolfi, Stefano

2011-01-01

366

Patient Education in the Doctor's Office: A Trial of Audiovisual Cassettes  

PubMed Central

Audiovisual tapes for patient education are now available in Canada. This paper summarizes the utilization of 12 tapes in an urban solo family practice over one year. Evaluation of this learning experience by both the physician and the patient showed positive results, in some cases affecting the outcome of the patient's condition. This patient education aid is intended to provide information only and is not subject to learning analysis.

Bryant, William H.

1980-01-01

367

Patient Educational Media Preferences for Information About Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose To identify the educational media preferences of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods The IBS-Patient Education Questionnaire (PEQ) was administered to a national sample of IBS patients. Frequencies of item\\u000a endorsements were compared and meaningful clinical differences were used to identify differences among subgroups. Results 1,242 patients completed the survey, mean age 39.3 years, 85% female, IBS duration 6.9 years,

Albena Halpert; Christine B. Dalton; Olafur Palsson; Carolyn Morris; Yuming Hu; Shrikant Bangdiwala; Jane Hankins; Nancy Norton; Douglas A. Drossman

2008-01-01

368

The educated patient: new challenges for the medical profession.  

PubMed

The medical profession is facing significant changes in the way the rest of society relates to it. Mass education, mass media and mass consumerism have boomed in the 20th century, putting an increasing amount of pressure on professionals to meet rising public expectations. If doctors are to continue to provide a service that meets the demands of citizens and taxpayers, they need to develop a new relationship with patients, acting not as instructors but as guides, to help people make decisions about their own health. They will have to be more accountable for the quality of care they provide and work with a wider range of health and non-health professionals to meet patients' needs. Doctors need not only to accept the consumer society but also, I will argue, to encourage it. They can work to ensure that the benefits of the information revolution are felt by people excluded from consumerism because of poverty and social isolation, working to create an empowered, informed public whose members are given the best opportunity to look after their own health. PMID:10672125

Neuberger, J

2000-01-01

369

The diffusion process of patient education in Dutch community pharmacy: an exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient education activities in pharmacies are receiving much attention. These activities are relatively new and implementation requires individual and organisational change in pharmacies. The aim of this study is to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and to classify these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers’ ‘Innovations in Organisations’ model

M. C. M. Pronk; A. Th. G Blom; R. Jonkers; A Van Burg

2001-01-01

370

EVALUATION OF LITERACY LEVEL OF PATIENT EDUCATION PAGES IN HEALTH-RELATED JOURNALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reading level of patient education material from selected current health care journals. Ten patient education pages from a variety of health care journals were entered into a Microsoft Word program. Applying the Flesch–Kincaid readability formula available from Microsoft Word, a reading level for each page was established and compared to recommended

Nancy Cotugna; Connie E. Vickery; Kara M. Carpenter-Haefele

2005-01-01

371

A Semantic Social Network Service for Educating Saudi Breast Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking services are presented as enablers in health and health care. This paper presents the idea of building social network system for educating breast cancer patients in Saudi Arabia. The system will blend the general features of social networks along with the power of semantic Web technologies to leverage the use of Web applications for educating breast cancer patients

Alaa M. Al-abad; Basma A. Al-sahail; Batool A. Al-henaki; Deema A. Al-zaid; Ghada A. Al-andas; Razan M. Al-mazroo; Reem M. Al-ogaiel

2009-01-01

372

Educational Effects of Practical Education Using a Debate Exercise on Engineering Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The educational effects of practical education using a debate exercise are investigated using questionnaires. For the group-work composed of discussion and debate, students understand thoroughly various engineering ethical topics, such as factors preventing ethical decision-making. Students enhance their abilities to make a rational and logical decision by themselves such as a judgment based on correct information. Mutual evaluation by students

Masato Takanokura; Shigeo Hayashi

2008-01-01

373

Value Added as an Indicator of Educational Effectiveness in Dutch Senior Secondary Vocational Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates the possibilities of estimating value added as a performance indicator in senior secondary vocational education. Value added is interesting in this context because it is considered as a reliable tool for comparing the effectiveness of educational institutions. Although value added indicators have been developed since the…

Timmermans, Anneke C.; Bosker, Roel J.; Doolaard, Simone; de Wolf, Inge

2012-01-01

374

Arts Education Advocacy: The Relative Effects of School-Level Influences on Resources for Arts Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to investigate advocacy influences that may impact school arts programs using data from the 2009-10 National Center for Education Statistics elementary and secondary school surveys on arts education. Regression models were employed to assess the relative effectiveness of variables representing community support,…

Miksza, Peter

2013-01-01

375

Bridging the Gap Between Ocean Science and Education: Creating Effective Partnerships With Informal Science Education Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many scientists would describe an effective E&O partnership as one that did not take up too much of their time. The California Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (CA COSEE), educators at the Ocean Institute (OI), Dana Point, and researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) have collaborated to develop a highly efficient, productive and rewarding approach to crafting

C. Peach; S. Franks; H. Helling; E. Solomon; N. Driscoll; J. Babcock

2003-01-01

376

Effective Teacher Education: From Student-Teacher Candidates to Novice Teachers Prepared for Urban Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to examine to what extent a teacher education program prepares teacher candidates to be effective urban educators who are reflective, innovative, and committed to diversity based on the perceptions and insight from students. As the nation grapples with an extreme range of outputs from our public schools, an…

Jackson, Chavon L.

2011-01-01

377

Effective teacher education: from student-teacher candidates to novice teachers prepared for urban education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine to what extent a teacher education program prepares teacher candidates to be effective urban educators who are reflective, innovative, and committed to diversity based on the perceptions and insight from students. As the nation grapples with an extreme range of outputs from our public schools, an investigation into such an integral component

Chavon Latrece Jackson

2011-01-01

378

Effective teacher education: From student-teacher candidates to novice teachers prepared for urban education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine to what extent a teacher education program prepares teacher candidates to be effective urban educators who are reflective, innovative, and committed to diversity based on the perceptions and insight from students. As the nation grapples with an extreme range of outputs from our public schools, an investigation into such an integral component

Chavon L Jackson

2011-01-01

379

The Educational Kanban: promoting effective self-directed adult learning in medical education.  

PubMed

The author reviews the many forces that have driven contemporary medical education approaches to evaluation and places them in an adult learning theory context. After noting their strengths and limitations, the author looks to lessons learned from manufacturing on both efficacy and efficiency and explores how these can be applied to the process of trainee assessment in medical education.Building on this, the author describes the rationale for and development of the Educational Kanban (EK) at Children's Hospital Boston--specifically, how it was designed to integrate adult learning theory, Japanese manufacturing models, and educator observations into a unique form of teacher-student collaboration that allows for continuous improvement. It is a formative tool, built on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies, that guides educational efforts to optimize teaching and learning, promotes adult learner responsibility and efficacy, and takes advantage of the labor-intensive clinical educational setting. The author discusses how this model, which will be implemented in July 2009, will lead to training that is highly individualized, optimizes faculty and student educational efforts, and ultimately conserves faculty resources. A model EK is provided for general reference.The EK represents a novel approach to adult learning that will enhance educational effectiveness and efficiency and complement existing evaluative models. Described here in a specific graduate medical setting, it can readily be adapted and integrated into a wide range of undergraduate and graduate clinical educational environments. PMID:19550191

Goldman, Stuart

2009-07-01

380

Effective leadership - The way to excellence in health professions education.  

PubMed

The current times are witnessing an explosion of new knowledge in medicine. The demographic profile, geographic distribution of many diseases is changing, there have been dramatic shifts in the health care delivery, healthcare professionals are more socially and professionally accountable, patients have become more consumerist in their attitude. These factors coupled with the increasing demand for trained health care professionals has led to, firstly, a rapid increase in the health professionals education institutions and secondly curricular changes and adoption of newer teaching learning methodologies, to equip the graduates with the desirable outcomes. The scene in health professions education is one characterized by rapid activity and change. A time which demands effective leadership at these institutions for achieving excellence. Drawing from a decade long experience, at different medical schools in the gulf region, the author opines that it is effective leadership, as observed at the institutions where he worked, which is responsible for realization of institutional vision, rapid development and achievement of excellence. PMID:23924363

Osmani, Syed Suhail Naser

2013-08-07

381

Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

Health Education Journal, 2011

2011-01-01

382

Definition and Yield of Inclusion Criteria for a Meta-Analysis of Patient Education Studies in Clinical Preventive Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because selection of studies for a literature review influences conclusions, inclusion criteria are of utmost importance. For a metaanalysis of studies testing effects of patient education on preventive behaviors, we present the framework and concepts used for setting inclusion criteria for primary studies. We also present the yield in terms of number and distribution of studies that resulted from the

Ellen R. Tabak; Patricia D. Mullen; Denise G. Simons-Morton; Lawrence W. Green; Douglas A. Mains; Shirli Eilat-Greenberg; Ralph F. Frankowski; Marianna C. Glenday

1991-01-01

383

Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

Health Education Journal, 2011

2011-01-01

384

Fishing and Vygotsky's Concept of Effective Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Relates Vygotsky's concept of zone of proximal development to a fishing story, thereby providing a scaffold allowing preservice students to better understand the educational concept. Concludes that educators should use the right bait (determined by how engaged children are), technique, and progress at the right pace (evidenced by children's…

Vinson, Beth McCulloch

2001-01-01

385

Enhancing the Educational Effectiveness of Zoos.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study addressed whether the educational impact of a zoo visit can be enhanced through the provision of appropriate instructional supports such as preparatory trainings or orientations. One important function of the educational process, in contrast to providing direct information or skill development, is to make the learner more sensitive to…

Braverman, Marc T.; Yates, Mary Ellen

386

Educational Effects of Multilingualism in Guatemala.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The educational deficit in Guatemala, reflected in a high, chronic level of illiteracy, is only partly due to the existence of a large, multilingual Indian population. The high proportion of rural population and the ineffectiveness of the rural education program must be addressed to increase literacy in Guatemala. (Author/CB)

del Aguila, Walter

1987-01-01

387

Fishing and Vygotsky's Concept of Effective Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relates Vygotsky's concept of zone of proximal development to a fishing story, thereby providing a scaffold allowing preservice students to better understand the educational concept. Concludes that educators should use the right bait (determined by how engaged children are), technique, and progress at the right pace (evidenced by children's…

Vinson, Beth McCulloch

2001-01-01

388

Assessment of an interactive computer-based patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education tool.  

PubMed

The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of the tool. Time in various prenatal visit activities was collected prior to and after the introduction of the education tool. Providers completed an assessment of their experiences with patients who had used the program. Results indicate that patient knowledge significantly increased from pre to post (p = .0001) with no increase in anxiety (p = .31). Time in clinic activities, including overall visit time, increased. A majority of providers indicated that the program disrupted clinic flow. This assessment suggests that the program increases patient knowledge and does not increase patient anxiety. However, challenges remain to using this program in a clinic setting. PMID:16148208

Griffith, Jennifer M; Sorenson, James R; Bowling, J Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

2005-10-01

389

Exposing shame and its effect on clinical nursing education.  

PubMed

Shame is identified as a universal dynamic in education. Brain-based learning theory suggests negative emotions like shame have a powerfully detrimental effect on learning. Shame theory may explain why students have difficulty identifying with professional nursing culture. Yet shame has neither been directly described nor referred to in the context of clinical nursing education. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to raise awareness among nurse educators about shame and its potential effect on students' ability to learn in clinical nursing education. This article examines shame in its many manifestations; the power to shame inherent in the clinical context; the consequences of shame on students' ability to learn; and, finally, the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by nurse educators to heal and prevent shaming in clinical nursing education. PMID:19297963

Bond, Mary Ellen

2009-03-01

390

Educating diabetes camp counselors with a human patient simulator: A pilot study  

PubMed Central

Objective To pilot test a novel method of teaching camp counselors hypoglycemia management. Methods During orientation counselors were assigned to the experimental (n=21) or control (n=15) group, and received hypoglycemia education. The experimental group received supplemental education with a human patient simulator (HPS). Results Baseline demographics, knowledge and self-efficacy were similar between groups. The experimental group had a significantly larger gain in diabetes knowledge than the control group. Within-participant change in self-efficacy did not differ by group. We observed (small n) a significant effect modification, with larger treatment-related differences in the subgroup with no previous diabetes exposure. Conclusions We demonstrated the ease of teaching diabetes management to camp counselors using HPS.

Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Crawford, Sybil; Johnson, Kimberly; Huston, Bonny; Lee, Mary M.

2013-01-01

391

Exploring the self-learning experiences of patients with depression participating in a multimedia education program.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to explore the self-learning experiences of depression patients on interactive multimedia education program. Qualitative in-depth interviews were employed. Fourteen patients with a first episode of major depression were recruited from a psychiatric outpatient department. Explanations of the purposes of the exercise and on-the-spot teaching were provided by the researcher before the study began. A tape-recorded, semi-structured interview format was employed after two weeks. Data analysis was performed in the framework of line-by-line content, contextual and thematic analysis. Eight subjects successfully completed the entire learning activities. Content analysis revealed 4 main aspects of successful self-learning experiences: the triggering of learning motivation, the enjoyment of self-paced learning, support for the effects of learning materials, and the gaining of self- awareness and changes. The factors influencing learning performance were related to: environmental impact, the degree of familiarity with traditional learning, possession or non-possession of the necessary computer operation skills, and good computer support. However, the findings provide a preliminary understanding of the application of interactive multimedia education programs in terms of self-learning outcomes and recognizing key elements of learning impediments among the study sample. A larger sample size with different clinical contexts is recommended to determine the effect and generalizability for future research. Furthermore, the creation of a computerized learning environment with different educational styles is crucial to patients' success in obtaining depression-related information and understanding effective adaptive skills. PMID:15619180

Chou, Mei-Hsien; Lin, Mei-Feng; Hsu, Mei-Chi; Wang, Yao-Hua; Hu, Huei-Fan

2004-12-01

392

Use of Topic Modeling for Recommending Relevant Education Material to Diabetic Patients  

PubMed Central

The need for and challenges of educating and informing patients are well known and these are even greater for patients with low levels of literacy. Furthermore, as the population ages and with the increase in prevalence of chronic diseases where patient self-management is essential to holding disease in abeyance, patient education becomes increasingly important. With the advent of electronic medical records, there is an opportunity for automated tools to assist in addressing these challenges. In this paper we report on one approach to recommending relevant educational articles to patients. We attempt to infer the patient’s information needs from his/her electronic medical records and use topic modeling to identify and match topics. A manual evaluation of the articles recommended by the proposed method showed that these articles are significantly more relevant (p < 0.01) to the patient’s disease state than articles selected at random from within the same disease domain.

Kandula, Sasikiran; Curtis, Dorothy; Hill, Brent; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

2011-01-01

393

The immediate and long-term effects of exercise and patient education on physical, functional, and quality-of-life outcome measures after single-level lumbar microdiscectomy: a randomized controlled trial protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain remains a costly quality-of-life-related health problem. Microdiscectomy is often the surgical procedure of choice for a symptomatic, single-level, lumbar disc herniation in younger and middle-aged adults. The question of whether a post-microdiscectomy exercise program enhances function, quality of life, and disability status has not been systematically explored. Thus, the overall purpose of this study is to assess immediate and long-term outcomes of an exercise program, developed at University of Southern California (USC), targeting the trunk and lower extremities (USC Spine Exercise Program) for persons who have undergone a single-level microdiscectomy for the first time. Methods/design One hundred individuals between the ages of 18 and 60 who consent to undergo lumbar microdiscectomy will be recruited to participate in this study. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1) one session of back care education, or 2) a back care education session followed by the 12-week USC Spine Exercise Program. The outcome examiners (evaluators), as well as the data managers, will be blinded to group allocation. Education will consist of a one-hour "one-on-one" session with the intervention therapist, guided by an educational booklet specifically designed for post-microdiscectomy care. This session will occur four to six weeks after surgery. The USC Spine Exercise Program consists of two parts: back extensor strength and endurance, and mat and upright therapeutic exercises. This exercise program is goal-oriented, performance-based, and periodized. It will begin two to three days after the education session, and will occur three times a week for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures include the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, SF-36® quality of life assessment, Subjective Quality of Life Scale, 50-foot Walk, Repeated Sit-to-Stand, and a modified Sorensen test. The outcome measures in the study will be assessed before and after the 12-week post-surgical intervention program. Long-term follow up assessments will occur every six months beginning one year after surgery and ending five years after surgery. Immediate and long-term effects will be assessed using repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). If significant interactions are found, one-way ANOVAs will be performed followed by post-hoc testing to determine statistically significant pairwise comparisons. Discussion We have presented the rationale and design for a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a treatment regimen for people who have undergone a single-level lumbar microdiscectomy.

Selkowitz, David M; Kulig, Kornelia; Poppert, Elizabeth M; Flanagan, Sean P; Matthews, Ndidiamaka D; Beneck, George J; Popovich, John M; Lona, Jose R; Yamada, Kimiko A; Burke, Wendy S; Ervin, Carolyn; Powers, Christopher M

2006-01-01

394

Development of self-care educational material for patients with heart failure in Japan: a pilot study.  

PubMed

This study assessed the need for information regarding heart failure and self-care, developed self-care educational material, and investigated the feasibility of the material. A total of 22 hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 63 years) completed a self-administered questionnaire. We found that more than 90% of patients desired information, particularly about heart failure symptoms, time to notify healthcare providers, prognosis, and exercise/physical activity. After examining the eight existing brochures for Japanese heart failure patients, we developed self-care educational material. This was based on heart failure guidelines and on the results of our inquiry regarding information needs. Finally, a pilot study was conducted in nine hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 57 years). None of the patients had difficulty reading or understanding the educational material. The self-administrated questionnaire survey revealed that comprehension of the following improved after the educational sessions with the material: heart failure symptoms, medication, weighing, sodium intake, and fluid intake (P < 0.05). In conclusion, heart failure patients have a great need for information about heart failure. Our pilot study suggests that the material was readable and had a beneficial effect on heart failure comprehension. PMID:22339764

Kato, Naoko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Sano, Miho; Seki, Satomi; Kogure, Asuka; Kobukata, Kihoko; Ochiai, Ryota; Wakita, Sanae; Kazuma, Keiko

2012-02-17

395

The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program as an Educational Tool and Service.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program provides early clinical education for pharmacy students and clinical services for patients. Six students were assigned to visit 12-15 hemodialysis patients monthly under preceptor supervision. Topics covered include approach to patient, medical information retrieval, pharmaceutical care philosophy,…

Grabe, Darren W.; Bailie, George R.; Manley, Harold J.; Yeaw, Barbara F.

1998-01-01

396

Perceived knowledge and self-confidence of pediatric nurses as patient educators.  

PubMed

Patient education is an integral component of nursing care. Patient education has been associated with favorable patient outcomes but may be difficult if resources are unavailable, "teachable moments" are unrecognized, or if self-confidence of the nurses providing the education is low. Using the theoretical model developed by the authors and focusing on the delivery of patient/family education, we examined pediatric nurses' perceptions about patient/family education in the hospital setting. A 20-item questionnaire that explored factors affecting teaching behaviors of 54 pediatric nurses in an acute care hospital setting was completed. Results from this study suggest that pediatric nurses' confidence was disorder-specific. Nurses were confident providing education about common disorders (asthma, pneumonia, and bronchiolitis) and less confident providing education about less common disorders (oncology, cardiac). The barrier to providing education identified most often was lack of written materials. Findings from this study can be used to develop teaching resources for nurses and to plan educational programs specific to less common pediatric problems. PMID:23748991

Lahl, Meredith; Modic, Mary Beth; Siedlecki, Sandra

397

Health, economic, psychological and social impact of educating carers of patients with advanced pulmonary disease (protocol).  

PubMed

People with advanced pulmonary disease (APD), such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, have markedly impaired quality of life. Home Oxygen Therapy (HOT) itself is burdensome, although it often improves survival duration and quality of life in these patients. The exact burdens on informal caregivers of these patients are unknown. The central purpose of the pragmatic randomized controlled study described in this protocol is to determine the effectiveness of improving the skills and knowledge of carers of patients with APD who use HOT. Specifically we aimed to estimate the incremental impact of this carer intervention above usual care on health, economic, psychological and social domains for patient and carer dyads relative to the level of current burden. Eligible patients and their carers were recruited through three major hospitals, and randomized to an intervention or control group. The carers in the intervention group received two home-delivered education sessions based on the principles of academic detailing. Participants are currently being followed over 12 months. The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients surviving without a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related readmission / residential (non respite) care over 12 months. Carer secondary outcomes include perceived caregiver burden, level of expected and received social support, perceived level of mastery, self esteem, health related quality of life and disability, and ability to conduct domestic chores and household maintenance, social activities and provide service to others, and fatigue. Secondary patient outcomes include health related quality of life and disability, and current respiratory health status. PMID:21616171

Sladek, R M; Jones, T; Phillips, P A; Luszcz, M; Rowett, D; Eckermann, S; Woodman, R J; Frith, P

2011-05-16

398

A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the characteristics of gout patient education resources.  

PubMed

Patient education is an important aspect of gout management, but there is evidence that many patients lack adequate knowledge of their condition. Our aim was to examine the characteristics of gout patient education resources. Ten gout patient information resources were examined for readability (Flesch-Kincaid reading level, the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook measure and the Flesch Reading Ease Score), qualitative characteristics such as figure and jargon use and whether they included information on the major points of gout. The median readability grade level of the examined resources was 8.5. The difference in readability grade level between the highest and the lowest education resource was 6.3 grade levels. The information content of the resources was high with an average of only 3.9 proposed criteria of 19 (19 %) absent from the resources. Jargon use was low and concepts were usually explained. However, important information regarding acute flare prophylaxis during urate-lowering therapy initiation and titration and treating serum uric acid to target was absent from 60 % of the patient education resources. There was poor use of key messages at the start. Gout patient resources have a wide range of readability. Thirty percent of resources were above the average reading level of rheumatology outpatients reported in previous studies. Sixty percent of gout patient resources omit education items that could impact on patient adherence and in turn patient outcomes. Further research is needed into the literacy levels and education requirements of patients with gout. PMID:23322247

Robinson, Philip C; Schumacher, H Ralph

2013-01-16

399

Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Germany: patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status, by education level  

PubMed Central

Background After the acute hospital stay, most cardiac patients in Germany are transferred for a 3–4-week period of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. We aim to describe patient characteristics and risk factor management of cardiac rehabilitation patients with a focus on drug treatment and control status, differentiated by education level (low level, elementary school; intermediate level, secondary modern school; high level, grammar school/university). Methods Data covering a time period between 2003 and 2008 from 68,191 hospitalized patients in cardiac rehabilitation from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline- Oriented Risk Factor Management) were analyzed descriptively. Further, a multivariate model was applied to assess factors associated with good control of risk factors. Results In the total cohort, patients with a manifestation of coronary artery disease (mean age 63.7 years, males 71.7%) were referred to cardiac rehabilitation after having received percutaneous coronary intervention (51.6%) or coronary bypass surgery (39.5%). Statin therapy increased from 76.3% at entry to 88.9% at discharge, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dL rates increased from 31.1% to 69.6%. Mean fasting blood glucose decreased from 108 mg/dL to 104 mg/dL, and mean exercise capacity increased from 78 W to 95 W. Age and gender did not differ by education. In contrast with patients having high education, those with low education had more diabetes, hypertension, and peripheral arterial disease, had lower exercise capacity, and received less treatment with statins and guideline-orientated therapy in general. In the multivariate model, good control was significantly more likely in men (odds ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.30–1.46), less likely in patients of higher age (0.99; 0.99–0.99), with diabetes (0.90; 0.85–0.95), or peripheral arterial disease (0.88; 0.82–0.95). Compared with a low level education, a mid level education was associated with poor control (0.94; 0.89–0.99), while high education did not have a significant effect (1.08; 0.99–1.17). Conclusion Patients with different levels of education treated in cardiac rehabilitation did not differ relevantly in terms of demographics, but did differ in some clinical aspects. With respect to the ultimate goal of cardiac rehabilitation, ie, optimal control of risk factors, education level does not play an important role.

Bestehorn, Kurt; Jannowitz, Christina; Horack, Martin; Karmann, Barbara; Halle, Martin; Voller, Heinz

2011-01-01

400

Development of a Computer-Aided Clinical Patient Education System to Provide Appropriate Individual Nursing Care for Psychiatric Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lot of researches have proven that health education can help patients to maintain and improve their health. And it also\\u000a shortens the time staying in hospital to save medication resource. Because the patients are willing to get healthcare knowledge\\u000a to enhance the ability of self-care, they pay more attention to the health education. In Taiwan, the clinical nurses play

Kuan-Jui Tseng; Tsan-Hon Liou; Hung-Wen Chiu

401

[The paradoxical effect of persuasive communication in health education sessions].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the communication dynamics leading to the adoption of new attitudes and cognitions in health education sessions. We examined the verbal interactions at work in persuasive communication in 16 health education sessions. The study found that the medical expertise of the educator and the initial level of commitment of the participants had a positive effect on adherence to recommendations. However, persuasive communication in health education sessions appears to involve a paradoxical process in which criticism of the message can go hand in hand with the expression of an intention to implement new risk-reducing behaviors. PMID:23473047

Piperini, Marie-Christine

402

The effects of educational intervention on perceptions of sexual harassment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of educational intervention upon perceptions of sexual harassment was investigated. Also investigated was whether gender differences in perceptions would be altered by educational intervention. Participants were 51 female and 45 male undergraduates (36% Caucasian, 31% Asian, 17% Hispanic, 14% African American, 2% unspecified) randomly assigned to three groups: one group viewed a video of vignettes about sexual harassment;

Diana L. Bonate; John C. Jessell

1996-01-01

403

The (Adverse) Effects of Expanding Higher Education: Evidence from Italy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Over the period 1995-1998 Italy experienced an expansion of its higher education supply with the aim of reducing regional differences in educational attainment. This paper evaluates the effects of this policy on enrolment, drop out and academic performance. The paper combines differences across provinces in the number of campuses constructed with…

Oppedisano, Veruska

2011-01-01

404

Neighbourhood effects, preference heterogeneity and immigrant educational attainment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates differences between the educational attainment of immigrants, children of immigrants and native-born individuals in Australia by using Australian Youth Survey (AYS) data combined with aggregate Australian Census data. Differences in educational attainment are decomposed into: (i) typical demographic and socio-economic sources common to all ethnic groups; (ii) unobserved region of residence and region of origin effects; and

Buly A. Cardak; James Ted McDonald

2004-01-01

405

Sheepskin or Prozac: The causal effect of education on depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low achievers tend to be more depressed individuals. This correlation may be the consequences of childhood characteristics and some unobservable characteristics explaining both educational attainment and mental health. We rely on a rich data set that allows us to control for depression at a young age and several estimation strategies to identify the causal effect of educational attainment on adult

ARNAUD CHEVALIER; LEON FEINSTEIN

406

Using CASES in Measuring Effects of Compensatory Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines the effectiveness of an open classroom socialization process employed in an experimental compensatory education program in terms of one of its objectives. The five-year Education Improvement Program (EIP) used behavior modification treatments to promote a style of pupil behavior described as self-directed, independent, and…

Papageorgiou, Mary R.

407

The Learning Effects of Computer Simulations in Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article reviews the (quasi)experimental research of the past decade on the learning effects of computer simulations in science education. The focus is on two questions: how use of computer simulations can enhance traditional education, and how computer simulations are best used in order to improve learning processes and outcomes. We report…

Rutten, Nico; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van der Veen, Jan T.

2012-01-01

408

Effective Vocational Education for Students with Special Needs: A Framework.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study focused on the development and preliminary validation of a framework for effective vocational education programs serving students with special needs. An initial framework composed of 20 program components was posited from an analysis of recent, rigorous studies of vocational education programs serving disabled, disadvantaged, and limited…

Phelps, L. Allen; Wermuth, Thomas R.

409

The (Adverse) Effects of Expanding Higher Education: Evidence from Italy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the period 1995-1998 Italy experienced an expansion of its higher education supply with the aim of reducing regional differences in educational attainment. This paper evaluates the effects of this policy on enrolment, drop out and academic performance. The paper combines differences across provinces in the number of campuses constructed with…

Oppedisano, Veruska

2011-01-01

410

Learning about the Effectiveness of Teacher Education: A Chilean Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article reviews some of the problems faced by teacher education in general and in Chile specifically, and on this basis, presents the results of a study focused on the effects of six teacher education programmes on future primary level teachers' learning of mathematics and mathematics pedagogy. The study describes the programmes and presents…

Avalos, Beatrice; Tellez, Francisco; Navarro, Silvia

2010-01-01

411

Vernacular Education in Papua New Guinea: Is It Really Effective?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper is based on an observational study concerning the effectiveness of elementary education. It was conducted in a rural area near Alotau, the provincial capital of the Milne Bay Province, with a special focus on the Maiwala Elementary School. In this paper, the author first briefly describes what elementary education is and how it has…

Nagai, Yasuko

2004-01-01

412

Lexical processing in illiteracy: effect of literacy or education?  

PubMed

Difficulties in phonological processing in illiterates have been attributed to their limited phonological awareness, a consequence of their lack of literacy. We sought to explore the potential influence of education on auditory lexical processing above and beyond literacy per se. In order to achieve this goal, we compared a lexical decision making paradigm with a repetition paradigm using words and pseudo-words. We based this choice of tasks on previous research, which has shown that pseudo-word repetition is dependent on the phonological loop; such studies have thus demonstrated a literacy effect on repetition. Instead, lexical decision making is known to depend on the size of one's vocabulary, which is influenced by the level of education attained. Our sample comprised three groups: illiterate no education, literate/low education and literate/high education, individuals. The pattern of our findings confirmed that literacy has an effect on the capacity of the phonological loop, as our illiterate group alone had difficulty with repetition, as compared with both literate/educated groups. Also, our findings suggested an education effect on lexical decision making, as we found a gradation in the performance of the three groups. Therefore, we succeeded in dissecting the effect of literacy and education on auditory lexical processing through the application and comparison of two simple paradigms. PMID:17172182

Kosmidis, Mary H; Tsapkini, Kyrana; Folia, Vasiliki

2006-10-01

413

Classroom Behaviour Management: Educational Psychologists' Views on Effective Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The behaviour of children and young people in schools is a perennial concern to educators and the wider public alike. It also represents a significant focus for the work of educational psychologists (EPs). Research evidence has identified a number of strategies that teachers, students and school inspectors believe contribute to effective

Hart, Robert

2010-01-01

414

Sibling Resemblance and Intersibling Effects in Educational Attainment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes M. H. Benin and D. R. Johnson's data concerning reciprocal influence between siblings' educational attainment. Finds unusually low similarity between older sisters and younger brothers. Uses Michael R. Olneck's data to model reciprocal effects between brothers' educational attainments. Finds evidence of reciprocal influence on brothers'…

Hauser, Robert M.; Wong, Raymond Sin-Kwok

1989-01-01

415

Effects of a Television Distance Education Course in Computer Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents an analysis of the learning outcomes pertaining to one unit of the undergraduate television distance-education course, Information Technology, in the computer science program at University Laval (Quebec, Canada). Investigates the relative effects of television distance education versus tradition classroom teaching on learning…

Boulet, Marie-Michele; Boudreault, Serge; Guerette, Louis

1998-01-01

416

Effects of Family Background Characteristics on Educational Participation in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We study family background effects on participation in primary and secondary education of children in Turkey using large representative data sets. Educational participation, especially of girls, is found to be still a major concern, with non-enrollment being especially high in the countryside and the eastern part of the country. Parental…

Smits, Jeroen; Hosgor, Ayse Gunduz

2006-01-01

417

Effect of Secondary School Fees on Educational Attainment  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractIn this study, the heterogeneity of the fee abolition process in West German secondary schools is used to identify the effect of school fees on educational attainment and to obtain an estimate of the price elasticity of upper secondary education. The analysis is based on representative individual?level data from three annual surveys of the German Mikrozensus. While coefficients cannot be

Regina T. Riphahn

2012-01-01

418

Investigating the educational effectiveness of multiplayer online games for children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiplayer games are becoming an important part of Internet use, and have been the subject of many theoretical and empirical studies. Still, relatively few researches investigate multiplayer Internet games that are designed for young children and for educational purposes. This paper focuses on the educational effectiveness of this class of systems, and introduces some heuristics for its evaluation. We also

Franca Garzotto

2007-01-01

419

The Concept of Vision in Educational Effectiveness Theory and Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Educational effectiveness theory and research have developed considerably in recent years. Despite the advances, several problems\\u000a remain, such as the inability of effectiveness characteristics to explain variance in student outcomes satisfactorily and\\u000a consistently. In this article, we introduce the concept of vision as a potential solution for these problems. Educational\\u000a effectiveness has focused heavily on behavioural factors, but the ideas

Bert P. M. Creemers; Gerry J. Reezigt

1999-01-01

420

The educational effectiveness of computer-based instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although numerous studies have shown that computer-based education is effective for enhancing rote memorization, the impact of these tools on higher-order cognitive skills, such as critical thinking, is less clear. Existing methods for evaluating educational effectiveness, such as surveys, quizzes and pre- or post-interviews, may not be effective for evaluating impact on critical thinking skills because students are not always

Carl E Renshaw; Holly A Taylor

2000-01-01

421

Development and Validation of a Novel Patient Educational Booklet to Enhance Colonoscopy Preparation  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:The success of colonoscopy depends on high-quality bowel preparation by patients; yet inadequate preparation is common. We developed and tested an educational booklet to improve bowel preparation quality.METHODS:We conducted patient cognitive interviews to identify knowledge and belief barriers to colonoscopy preparation. We used these interviews to create an educational booklet to enhance preparatory behaviors. We then prospectively randomized patients scheduled

Brennan M R Spiegel; Jennifer Talley; Paul Shekelle; Nikhil Agarwal; Bradley Snyder; Roger Bolus; Nicole Kurzbard; Michael Chan; Andrew Ho; Marc Kaneshiro; Kristina Cordasco; Hartley Cohen

2011-01-01

422

HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HealthDoc project aims to provide a comprehensive approach to the customization of patient-information and health-education materials through the development of so- phisticated natural language generation systems. We adopt a model of patient education that takes into account patient information ranging from simple medical data to complex cul- tural beliefs, so that our work provides both an impetus and testbed

Chrysanne DiMarco; Graeme Hirst; Leo Wanner; John Wilkinson

1995-01-01

423

The effect of multifactorial, multidisciplinary educational interventions on appropriate use of teicoplanin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of multifactorial, multidisciplinary educational interventions over a 3-year period on the appropriate use of teicoplanin. Teicoplanin was considered a valid surrogate marker of good antibiotic use in clinical practice owing to its peculiar pharmacokinetics (i.e. necessity for an initial loading dose regardless of the patient's renal function for early achievement

Federico Pea; Pierluigi Viale; Federica Pavan; Marcello Tavio; Donatella Poz; Anna Beltrame; Mario Furlanut

2006-01-01

424

Improvement of Young and Elderly Patient's Knowledge of Heart Failure After an Educational Session  

PubMed Central

Background: Interest in the role of patient education sessions for optimizing the management of heart failure (HF) is increasing. We determined whether improvements in young and elderly patients’ knowledge of HF and self-care behavior could be analyzed by administering a knowledge test before and after an educational session. Methods: Stable heart failure patients (n = 115) were enrolled in a prospective cohort study from our Heart Failure educational centre in a university hospital. Patient knowledge of six major HF-related topics was assessed via a questionnaire distributed once before an educational session and twice afterward. Each answer was assigned a numerical value and the final score for each topic could range from 0 to 20. Scores ? 15/20 were considered representative of a good level of knowledge. Results: The level of knowledge was low (9.7/20) before the educational session but was significantly higher (16.3/20) during the 1st quarter after the session, and this benefit was maintained for up to 12 months (16.6/20). Knowledge levels increased in both younger and elderly patients, and the number of patients who had a good level of knowledge also increased after the educational session. Conclusion: This study confirms that an HF knowledge test is feasible and that educational sessions improve the knowledge and self-management of both younger and elderly patients.

Roncalli, Jerome; Perez, Laurence; Pathak, Atul; Spinazze, Laure; Mazon, Sandrine; Lairez, Olivier; Curnier, Daniel; Fourcade, Joelle; Elbaz, Meyer; Carrie, Didier; Puel, Jacques; Fauvel, Jean-Marie; Galinier, Michel

2009-01-01

425

Effects of Asthma Education on Children's Use of Acute Care Services: A Meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute clinical practice guidelines strongly recommend that health professionals educate children with asthma and their caregivers about self-management. We conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the effects of pediatric asthma education on hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and urgent physician visits for asthma. PATIENTS AND METHODS Inclusion criteria included enrollment of children aged 2 to 17 years with a clinical diagnosis of asthma who resided in the United States. Pooled standardized mean differences and pooled odds ratios were calculated. Random-effects models were estimated for all outcomes assessed. RESULTS Of the 208 studies identified and screened, 37 met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-seven compared educational interventions to usual care, and 10 compared different interventions. Among studies that compared asthma education to usual care, education was associated with statistically significant decreases in mean hospitalizations and mean emergency department visits and a trend toward lower odds of an emergency department visit. Education did not affect the odds of hospitalization or the mean number of urgent physician visits. Findings from studies that compared different types of asthma education interventions suggest that providing more sessions and more opportunities for interactive learning may produce better outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Providing pediatric asthma education reduces mean number of hospitalizations and emergency department visits and the odds of an emergency department visit for asthma, but not the odds of hospitalization or mean number of urgent physician visits. Health plans should invest in pediatric asthma education or provide health professionals with incentives to furnish such education. Additional research is needed to determine the most important components of interventions and compare the cost-effectiveness of different interventions.

Coffman, Janet M.; Cabana, Michael D.; Halpin, Helen Ann; Yelin, Edward H.

2010-01-01

426

Effectiveness of Nutrition Intervention Through a Group Class for Eating Disorder Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literature suggests that nutrition intervention through group education is an effective tool in the treatment of eating disorder patients. A retrospective case series study of a 6 week eating disorder class instructed by a Registered Dietitian (RD) was conducted. Nine patients with anorexia nervosa. 8 with bulimia nervosa, and 1 eating disorder, not specified, patient were enrolled in the class.

L. DelRoso; C. DiVincenzo

1999-01-01

427

Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

2008-01-01

428

Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

2008-01-01

429

The effect of inquiry science activity in educational productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a study the effect of inquiry science activity on the science achievement of junior high school students. Since the post-sputnik curriculum improvement project, science educators have supported the effect of inquiry activities. In terms of the effect of laboratory activity, however, the literature review indicated that the controlled experimental studies have failed to present the effect of laboratory

Kinya Shimizu

1998-01-01

430

[Patient education, facilitating its implementation and its assessment].  

PubMed

Therapeutic education, facilitating its implementation and its assessment. Therapeutic education programmes (TEP) must conform to national specifications and be self-assessed each year by the teams which implement them. On the basis of its previous work, the French national authority for health has published a guide, tested in the field, which specifies the framework of this approach. PMID:22641940

Pauchet-Traversat, Anne-Françoise

2012-04-01

431

Mild cognitive impairment: effect of education on the verbal and nonverbal tasks performance decline.  

PubMed

We sought to longitudinally evaluate the potential association of educational level with performance on verbal and nonverbal tasks in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated patients with MCI, age >50 years, no medication intake, absent vascular risk factors, and no lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each patient underwent a clinical assessment packet and a series of neuropsychological tests of the language and constructional praxis subtests of Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMGOG) and the Boston naming test (BNT), at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Educational levels were defined taking into account the total years of education, the school level, and diplomas. MCI patients with low education level showed a stepwise reduction in scores of naming objects (NO; P = 0.009), definition (DF; P = 0.012), language (LT; P = 0.021), constructional praxis (CD; P = 0.022), confrontation naming skills (BXB; P = 0.033), phonemic help (BFB; P = 0.041), and BNT (P = 0.002). Analysis of covariance, controlling for baseline scores, showed that education was associated with NO score (P = 0.002), DF score (P = 0.005), LT (P = 0.008), CD score (P = 0.008), BXB score (44.36 ± 1.84, P = 0.0001), BFB (P = 0.022), and BNT (P = 0.004). Our findings indicate that education appeared to affect verbal and nonverbal task performance in MCI patients. Despite the fact that higher educated patients are more acquainted with the tasks, slower deterioration in consecutive follow-up examinations could be explained by the cognitive reserve theory. The potential association of this protective effect with delayed onset of symptoms deserves further investigation. PMID:23139907

Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Tsiakiri-Vatamidis, Anna; Tripsianis, Grigorios; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Serdari, Aspasia; Heliopoulos, John; Livaditis, Miltos; Piperidou, Charitomeni

2012-08-22

432

Effective educational process: a data-mining approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a holistic model for educational purposes using data-mining techniques for exploring the effects of probable changes in processes related to admissions, course delivery and recruitments. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper proposes a framework for an effective educational process using data-mining techniques to uncover the hidden trends and patterns and making accuracy

Jayanthi Ranjan; Kamna Malik

2007-01-01

433

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Caregiving Education and Support Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The purpose of this chapter is to describe effective methods for conducting ­evaluation research about caregiver education\\u000a and support programs. We considered a different focus, reviewing, and evaluating the existing literature. However, a large\\u000a and growing body of literature already exists about the effectiveness of caregiver education and support programs and it seemed\\u000a to us that another review would be

Ronald W. Toseland; Tamara L. Smith; Kimberly P. McClive-Reed

434

PADS (Patient Archiving and Documentation System): a computerized patient record with educational aspects.  

PubMed

Rapid acquisition and analysis of information in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) setting is essential, even more so the documentation of the decision making process which has vital consequences for the lives of ICU patients. We describe an Ethernet based local area network (LAN) with clinical workstations (Macintosh fx, ci). Our Patient Archiving and Documentation System (PADS) represents a computerized patient record presently used in a university hospitals' ICU. Taking full advantage of the Macintosh based graphical user interface (GUI) our system enables nurses and doctors to perform the following tasks: admission, medical history taking, physical examination, generation of problem lists and follow up notes, access to laboratory data and reports, semiautomatic generation of a discharge summary including full word processor capabilities. Furthermore, the system offers rapid, consistent and complete automatic encoding of diagnoses following the International Classification of Disease (ICD; WHO, [1]). For educational purposes the user can also view disease entities or complications related to the diagnoses she/he encoded. The system has links to other educational programs such as cardiac auscultation. A MEDLINE literature search through a CD-ROM based system can be performed without exiting the system; also, CD-ROM based medical textbooks can be accessed as well. Commercially available Macintosh programs can be integrated in the system without existing the main program thus enabling users to customize their working environment. Additional options include automatic background monitoring of users learning behavior, analyses and graphical display of numerous epidemiological and health care related problems. Furthermore, we are in the process of integrating sound and digital video in our system. This system represents one in a line of modular departmental models which will eventually be integrated to form a decentralized Hospital Information System (HIS). PMID:1431475

Hohnloser, J H; Pürner, F

1992-01-01

435

Randomised controlled trial of an education and support package for stroke patients and their carers  

PubMed Central

Objective Tailoring stroke information and providing reinforcement opportunities are two strategies proposed to enhance the effectiveness of education. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of an education package which utilised both strategies on the knowledge, health and psychosocial outcomes of stroke patients and carers. Design Multisite, randomised trial comparing usual care with an education and support package. Setting Two acute stroke units. Participants Patients and their carers (N=138) were randomised (control n=67, intervention n=71) of which data for 119 participants (control n=59, intervention n=60) were analysed. Intervention The package consisted of a computer-generated, tailored written information booklet and verbal reinforcement provided prior to, and for 3?months following, discharge. Outcome measures Outcome measures were administered prior to hospital discharge and at 3-month follow-up by blinded assessors. The primary outcome was stroke knowledge (score range: 0–25). Secondary outcomes were: self-efficacy (1–10), anxiety and depression (0–21), ratings of importance of information (1–10), feelings of being informed (1–10), satisfaction with information (1–10), caregiver burden (carers) (0–13) and quality of life (patients) (1–5). Results Intervention group participants reported better: self-efficacy for accessing stroke information (adjusted mean difference (MD) of 1.0, 95% CI 0.3 to 1.7, p=0.004); feeling informed (MD 0.9, 95% CI 0.2 to 1.6, p=0.008); and satisfaction with medical (MD 2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.8, p<0.001); practical (MD 1.1, 95% CI 0.3 to 1.9, p=0.008), services and benefits (MD 0.9, 95% CI 0.1 to 1.8, p=0.036) and secondary prevention information (MD 1.7, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.5, p<0.001). There was no significant effect on other outcomes. Conclusions Intervention group participants had improved self-efficacy for accessing stroke information and satisfaction with information, but other outcomes were not significantly affected. Evaluation of a more intensive intervention in a trial with a larger sample size is required to establish the value of an educational intervention that uses tailoring and reinforcement strategies. ACTRN12608000469314

Eames, Sally; Hoffmann, Tammy; Worrall, Linda; Read, Stephen; Wong, Andrew

2013-01-01

436

Evaluation of a postgraduate educational programme for occupational physicians on work rehabilitation guidelines for patients with low back pain  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—The postgraduate educational programme for occupational physicians on guidelines for work rehabilitation of patients with low back pain was evaluated as to what extent did knowledge of the guidelines increase, and did the workers improve their performance at work.?METHODS—An experimental group (n=25) attended an educational programme and a reference group did so (n=20) 6 months later. Knowledge and performance were assessed for both groups, before and after education of the experimental group. Knowledge was assessed for the reference group after education.?RESULTS—Knowledge increased significantly more in the experimental group. The reference group's score increased further after education. The experimental group's adjusted gain score for performance indicators was significantly positive. Analysis of covariance also showed a significant effect for the experimental group for increased performance score.?CONCLUSIONS—The educational programme improved the quality of care because knowledge and performance of occupational physicians improved and complied better with practice guidelines.???Keywords: evaluation; postgraduate education; occupational physicians; low back pain; guidelines

Smits, P; Verbeek, J; van Dijk, F J H; Metz, J; ten, C

2000-01-01

437

The effect of embedded Adventure Education in physical education at Far East University  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to investigate the effect of embedded AE(Adventure Education) course in physical education at Fat East University. The participants were 1418 first-year students at Far East University. 1418 surveys were distributed after two-week implementation of AE course. 1395 surveys were considered valid after 23 surveys were discarded for incompletion. This represented a 98% return rate. 923 male (66.2%),

Hsiao-Man Liu; Chih-Hao Chen; Chun-Ling Wang

2010-01-01

438

The Increasing Effects of Computers on Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Predicting that the teaching-learning process in American higher education is about to change drastically because of continuing innovations in computer-assisted technology, this paper argues that this change will be driven by inexpensive but powerful computer technology, and that it will manifest itself by reducing the traditional timing of…

Gannon, John F.

439

Distance Education: An Assessment of Its Effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distance Learning (DL) education is defined as a planned teaching and learning experience that uses a wide spectrum of technologies to reach learners at a distance and is designed to encourage learner interaction (Filipczak, B., 1994).. The developments in telecommunications already available or currently under development will result in a useful and friendly workstation in every home within the next

David Lewis

440

Digit Span: Effect of education and culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Digit Span test is one of the most commonly used measures of immediate verbal recall, attentional capacity, and working memory in neuropsychological research and clinical evaluations. This test comprises two modalities, digits forward and digits backward. It has been established that age, education, and culture are important variables that affect performance on this test. The purposes of this study

Asucena Lozano

2006-01-01

441

The Effects of Technology on Educational Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A long-standing question in educational research and policy discussion turns on whether technology-based instruction can improve academic performance. Finding a convincing answer to this question is important because school systems across the country have invested and continue to invest very large sums on new instructional hardware and software.…

Strickland, LaVada A.

2011-01-01

442

Globalisation Theories and Their Effect on Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globalisation is a relatively new concept in social sciences, especially in educational research and there is no agreement on its essence. The article presents three stances within globalisation theory – the hyperglobalist , the sceptical and the transformational, which reflect disputes concerning new global trends. The discussion highlights social, economic and political aspects globalization theory deals with. The article focuses

Nikoloz Parjanadze

2009-01-01

443

Elements of Effective Environmental Education Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

While said more than 30 years ago, the importance of this statement has not lessened. Amidst numerous, growing and complex environmental problems, the need for the preparation of world problem solvers is as great as ever (Wisconsin DPI, 1994). Environmental educators have globally accepted this role of preparing students to be- come critical thinkers, informed decision-makers and able communicators -

Julie A. Athman; Martha C. Monroe

444

Developing Effective Partnerships To Support Local Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes the vision and goals of the School Communities That Work task force. This group envisions a new kind of school district: the local education support system. It marshals all of a city's resources to provide schools, students, and teachers with needed support and timely interventions; ensures that schools have the power and…

Foley, Ellen

445

Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper studies whether structural properties of friendship networks affect individual outcomes in education. We first develop a model that shows that, at the Nash equilibrium, the outcome of each individual embedded in a network is proportional to her Katz-Bonacich centrality measure. This measure takes into account both direct and indirect friends of each individual but puts less weight to

Antoni Calvó-Armengol; Eleonora Patacchini; Yves Zenou

446

Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper studies whether structural properties of friendship networks affect individual outcomes in education. We first develop a model that shows that, at the Nash equilibrium, the outcome of each individual embedded in a network is proportional to her Katz-Bonacich centrality measure. This measure takes into account both direct and indirect friends of each individual but puts less weight to

Antoni Calvó-Armengol; Eleonora Patacchini; Yves Zenou

2008-01-01