Science.gov

Sample records for effective resistance metric

  1. Comparison of mixed effects models of antimicrobial resistance metrics of livestock and poultry Salmonella isolates from a national monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Bjork, K E; Kopral, C A; Wagner, B A; Dargatz, D A

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial use in agriculture is considered a pathway for the selection and dissemination of resistance determinants among animal and human populations. From 1997 through 2003 the U.S. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) tested clinical Salmonella isolates from multiple animal and environmental sources throughout the United States for resistance to panels of 16-19 antimicrobials. In this study we applied two mixed effects models, the generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) and accelerated failure time frailty (AFT-frailty) model, to susceptible/resistant and interval-censored minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) metrics, respectively, from Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from livestock and poultry. Objectives were to compare characteristics of the two models and to examine the effects of time, species, and multidrug resistance (MDR) on the resistance of isolates to individual antimicrobials, as revealed by the models. Fixed effects were year of sample collection, isolate source species and MDR indicators; laboratory study site was included as a random effect. MDR indicators were significant for every antimicrobial and were dominant effects in multivariable models. Temporal trends and source species influences varied by antimicrobial. In GLMMs, the intra-class correlation coefficient ranged up to 0.8, indicating that the proportion of variance accounted for by laboratory study site could be high. AFT models tended to be more sensitive, detecting more curvilinear temporal trends and species differences; however, high levels of left- or right-censoring made some models unstable and results uninterpretable. Results from GLMMs may be biased by cutoff criteria used to collapse MIC data into binary categories, and may miss signaling important trends or shifts if the series of antibiotic dilutions tested does not span a resistance threshold. Our findings demonstrate the challenges of measuring the AMR

  2. Nano-artifact metrics based on random collapse of resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Mikio; Naruse, Makoto; Hanaki, Kenta; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Sekiguchi, Daiki; Tate, Naoya; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-08-01

    Artifact metrics is an information security technology that uses the intrinsic characteristics of a physical object for authentication and clone resistance. Here, we demonstrate nano-artifact metrics based on silicon nanostructures formed via an array of resist pillars that randomly collapse when exposed to electron-beam lithography. The proposed technique uses conventional and scalable lithography processes, and because of the random collapse of resist, the resultant structure has extremely fine-scale morphology with a minimum dimension below 10 nm, which is less than the resolution of current lithography capabilities. By evaluating false match, false non-match and clone-resistance rates, we clarify that the nanostructured patterns based on resist collapse satisfy the requirements for high-performance security applications.

  3. Nano-artifact metrics based on random collapse of resist

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Mikio; Naruse, Makoto; Hanaki, Kenta; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Sekiguchi, Daiki; Tate, Naoya; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-01-01

    Artifact metrics is an information security technology that uses the intrinsic characteristics of a physical object for authentication and clone resistance. Here, we demonstrate nano-artifact metrics based on silicon nanostructures formed via an array of resist pillars that randomly collapse when exposed to electron-beam lithography. The proposed technique uses conventional and scalable lithography processes, and because of the random collapse of resist, the resultant structure has extremely fine-scale morphology with a minimum dimension below 10 nm, which is less than the resolution of current lithography capabilities. By evaluating false match, false non-match and clone-resistance rates, we clarify that the nanostructured patterns based on resist collapse satisfy the requirements for high-performance security applications. PMID:25142401

  4. Inspecting baby Skyrmions with effective metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.; Goulart, E.

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper we investigate the causal structure of the baby Skyrme model using appropriate geometrical tools. We discuss several features of excitations propagating on top of background solutions and show that the evolution of high frequency waves is governed by a curved effective geometry. Examples are given for which the effective metric describes the interaction between waves and solitonic solutions such as kinks, antikinks, and hedgehogs. In particular, it is shown how violent processes involving the collisions of solitons and antisolitons may induce metrics which are not globally hyperbolic. We argue that it might be illuminating to calculate the effective metric as a diagnostic test for pathological regimes in numerical simulations.

  5. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  6. An Attentional Effect of Musical Metrical Structure.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonah; Chemla, Emmanuel; Pallier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Theories of metrical structure postulate the existence of several degrees of beat strength. While previous work has clearly established that humans are sensitive to the distinction between strong beats and weak ones, there is little evidence for a more fine grained distinction between intermediate levels. Here, we present experimental data showing that attention can be allocated to an intermediate level of beat strength. Comparing the effects of short exposures to 6/8 and 3/4 metrical structures on a tone detection task, we observe that subjects respond differently to beats of intermediate strength than to weak beats. PMID:26600180

  7. An Attentional Effect of Musical Metrical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Jonah; Chemla, Emmanuel; Pallier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Theories of metrical structure postulate the existence of several degrees of beat strength. While previous work has clearly established that humans are sensitive to the distinction between strong beats and weak ones, there is little evidence for a more fine grained distinction between intermediate levels. Here, we present experimental data showing that attention can be allocated to an intermediate level of beat strength. Comparing the effects of short exposures to 6/8 and 3/4 metrical structures on a tone detection task, we observe that subjects respond differently to beats of intermediate strength than to weak beats. PMID:26600180

  8. Metrics. [measurement for effective software development and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank

    1991-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for practical software performance measurement, or 'metrics', in which major innovations have recently occurred. Metrics address such aspects of software performance as whether a software project is on schedule, how many errors can be expected from it, whether the methodology being used is effective and the relative quality of the software employed. Metrics may be characterized as explicit, analytical, and subjective. Attention is given to the bases for standards and the conduct of metrics research.

  9. Assessment of OPC effectiveness using two-dimensional metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiaux, Vincent; Philipsen, Vicky; Jonckheere, Rik M.; Vandenberghe, Geert; Verhaegen, Staf; Hoffmann, Thomas; Ronse, Kurt G.; Howard, William B.; Maurer, Wilhelm; Preil, Moshe E.

    2002-07-01

    A complete evaluation of the optical proximity effects (OPE) and of their corrections (OPC) requires a quantitative description of two-dimensional (2D) parameters, both at resist- and at reticle-level. Because the 2D behaviour at line-ends and at line-corners can become a limiting factor for the yield, it should be taken into account when characterising a process, just as the CD- and pitch-linearity are already kept under control. This implies the measurement of 2D-metrics in a precise way. We used an SEM Image Analysis tool (ProDATA SIAM) to define and measure various OPC-relevant metrics for a C013 process. For the METAL (M1) process, we show that the overlap between line-ends of M1-trenches and underlying nominal contacts is a relevant metric to describe the effectiveness of hammerheads. Moreover, it is an interesting metric to combine with the CD process window. For the GATE process, we demonstrate that for a given set of metrics there is a degree of OPC aggressiveness beyond which it is not worth to go. We considered both line-end shortening (LES) and corner rounding affecting the poly linewidth close to a contact pad, and this on various logic circuits having received different degrees of fragmentation. Finally the knowledge of the actual line-end contour on the reticle allows one to simulate separately the printing effect of that area loss at reticle line-ends. The area loss measured by comparing the extracted contour to the target one is regarded as a combination of pull-back and area loss at corners. For our C013 gate process, and for the 130nm lines at a 1:1.25 duty cycle, those two parameters contribute together to approximetely 40% of the measured LES in the resist. This fact raises the question of specifications on 2D reticle parameters. We also find a linear correlation between the area loss at reticle line-end corners and the corresponding increase of LES on the wafer, which suggests a way towards putting specifications on the reticle line-ends.

  10. Comparative study of line roughness metrics of chemically amplified and inorganic resists for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallica, Roberto; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the roughness metrics of different resists. Dense line/space (L/S) images of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), different chemically amplified resists (CARs), and metal oxide based resists have been patterned by extreme ultraviolet interference lithography (EUV-IL). The three line width roughness metrics: r.m.s. value σLWR, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α, were measured by metrological analysis of top down SEM images and compared for the different resists imaged here. It was found, that all metrics are required to fully describe the roughness of each resist. Our measurements indicate that few of the state-of-the- art resists tested here can meet the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) requirements for σLWR. The correlation length ξ has been found to be considerably higher in polymer-based materials in comparison to non-polymers. The roughness exponent α, interpreted using the concept of fractal geometry, is mainly affected by acid diffusion in CARs where it produces line edges with a higher complexity than in non-CAR resists. These results indicate that different resists platforms show very different LWR resist metrics and roughness is not only manifested in the σLWR but in all parameters. Therefore, all roughness metrics should be taken into account in the performance comparison of the resist, since they can have a substantial impact on the device performance.

  11. Coverage Metrics for Requirements-Based Testing: Evaluation of Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staats, Matt; Whalen, Michael W.; Heindahl, Mats P. E.; Rajan, Ajitha

    2010-01-01

    In black-box testing, the tester creates a set of tests to exercise a system under test without regard to the internal structure of the system. Generally, no objective metric is used to measure the adequacy of black-box tests. In recent work, we have proposed three requirements coverage metrics, allowing testers to objectively measure the adequacy of a black-box test suite with respect to a set of requirements formalized as Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) properties. In this report, we evaluate the effectiveness of these coverage metrics with respect to fault finding. Specifically, we conduct an empirical study to investigate two questions: (1) do test suites satisfying a requirements coverage metric provide better fault finding than randomly generated test suites of approximately the same size?, and (2) do test suites satisfying a more rigorous requirements coverage metric provide better fault finding than test suites satisfying a less rigorous requirements coverage metric? Our results indicate (1) only one coverage metric proposed -- Unique First Cause (UFC) coverage -- is sufficiently rigorous to ensure test suites satisfying the metric outperform randomly generated test suites of similar size and (2) that test suites satisfying more rigorous coverage metrics provide better fault finding than test suites satisfying less rigorous coverage metrics.

  12. An unbiased metric of antiproliferative drug effect in vitro.

    PubMed

    Harris, Leonard A; Frick, Peter L; Garbett, Shawn P; Hardeman, Keisha N; Paudel, B Bishal; Lopez, Carlos F; Quaranta, Vito; Tyson, Darren R

    2016-06-01

    In vitro cell proliferation assays are widely used in pharmacology, molecular biology, and drug discovery. Using theoretical modeling and experimentation, we show that current metrics of antiproliferative small molecule effect suffer from time-dependent bias, leading to inaccurate assessments of parameters such as drug potency and efficacy. We propose the drug-induced proliferation (DIP) rate, the slope of the line on a plot of cell population doublings versus time, as an alternative, time-independent metric. PMID:27135974

  13. Effective Coverage: A Metric for Monitoring Universal Health Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Marie; Fullman, Nancy; Dieleman, Joseph L.; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Murray, Christopher J. L.; Lim, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in monitoring universal health coverage (UHC) is identifying an indicator that can adequately capture the multiple components underlying the UHC initiative. Effective coverage, which unites individual and intervention characteristics into a single metric, offers a direct and flexible means to measure health system performance at different levels. We view effective coverage as a relevant and actionable metric for tracking progress towards achieving UHC. In this paper, we review the concept of effective coverage and delineate the three components of the metric — need, use, and quality — using several examples. Further, we explain how the metric can be used for monitoring interventions at both local and global levels. We also discuss the ways that current health information systems can support generating estimates of effective coverage. We conclude by recognizing some of the challenges associated with producing estimates of effective coverage. Despite these challenges, effective coverage is a powerful metric that can provide a more nuanced understanding of whether, and how well, a health system is delivering services to its populations. PMID:25243780

  14. Defining Attributes and Metrics of Effective Research Mentoring Relationships.

    PubMed

    Pfund, Christine; Byars-Winston, Angela; Branchaw, Janet; Hurtado, Sylvia; Eagan, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Despite evidence of mentoring's importance in training researchers, studies to date have not yet determined which mentoring relationships have the most impact and what specific factors in those mentoring relationships contribute to key outcomes, such as the commitment to and persistence in research career paths for emerging researchers from diverse populations. Efforts to broaden participation and persistence in biomedical research careers require an understanding of why and how mentoring relationships work and their impact, not only to research training but also to promoting career advancement. This paper proposes core attributes of effective mentoring relationships, as supported by the literature and suggested by theoretical models of academic persistence. In addition, both existing and developing metrics for measuring the effectiveness of these attributes within mentoring relationships across diverse groups are presented, as well as preliminary data on these metrics from the authors' work. PMID:27062425

  15. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    PubMed

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species. PMID:26233026

  16. Effects of quantum fluctuations of metric on the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rongjia

    2016-09-01

    We consider a model of modified gravity from the nonperturbative quantization of a metric. We obtain the modified gravitational field equations and the modified conservational equations. We apply it to the FLRW spacetime and find that due to the quantum fluctuations a bounce universe can be obtained and a decelerated expansion can also possibly be obtained in a dark energy dominated epoch. We also discuss the effects of quantum fluctuations on inflation parameters (such as slow-roll parameters, spectral index, and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation) and find values of parameters in the comparing the predictions of inflation can also work to drive the current epoch of acceleration. We obtain the constraints on the parameter of the theory from the observation of the big bang nucleosynthesis.

  17. The effect of measurement error on surveillance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Brian Phillip; Hamada, Michael S.

    2012-04-24

    The purpose of this manuscript is to describe different simulation studies that CCS-6 has performed for the purpose of understanding the effects of measurement error on the surveillance metrics. We assume that the measured items come from a larger population of items. We denote the random variable associate with an item's value of an attribute of interest as X and that X {approx} N({mu}, {sigma}{sup 2}). This distribution represents the variability in the population of interest and we wish to make inference on the parameters {mu} and {sigma} or on some function of these parameters. When an item X is selected from the larger population, a measurement is made on some attribute of it. This measurement is made with error and the true value of X is not observed. The rest of this section presents simulation results for different measurement cases encountered.

  18. Effecting IT infrastructure culture change: management by processes and metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    This talk describes the processes and metrics used by Jet Propulsion Laboratory to bring about the required IT infrastructure culture change to update and certify, as Y2K compliant, thousands of computers and millions of lines of code.

  19. Making Metrics Matter: How to Use Indicators to Govern Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Clyde; Bacow, Lawrence S.; Trombley, Laura Skandera

    2011-01-01

    Many institutions develop specific measures or indicators--often called "dashboards"--to inform boards and top administrators about the college or university's current situation and performance and assist them in moving the institution ahead strategically. And, increasingly, institutions are using metrics not only to assess internal progress but…

  20. An effective theory of metrics with maximal proper acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego Torromé, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    A geometric theory for spacetimes whose world lines associated with physical particles have an upper bound for the proper acceleration is developed. After some fundamental remarks on the requirements that the classical dynamics for point particles should hold, the notion of a generalized metric and a theory of maximal proper acceleration are introduced. A perturbative approach to metrics of maximal proper acceleration is discussed and we show how it provides a consistent theory where the associated Lorentzian metric corresponds to the limit when the maximal proper acceleration goes to infinity. Then several of the physical and kinematical properties of the maximal acceleration metric are investigated, including a discussion of the rudiments of the causal theory and the introduction of the notions of radar distance and celerity function. We discuss the corresponding modification of the Einstein mass-energy relation when the associated Lorentzian geometry is flat. In such a context it is also proved that the physical dispersion relation is relativistic. Two possible physical scenarios where the modified mass-energy relation could be confronted against the experiment are briefly discussed.

  1. Hamiltonians for the Quantum Hall Effect on Spaces with Non-Constant Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul Francis

    2007-01-01

    The problem of studying the quantum Hall effect on manifolds with non constant metric is addressed. The Hamiltonian on a space with hyperbolic metric is determined, and the spectrum and eigenfunctions are calculated in closed form. The hyperbolic disk is also considered and some other applications of this approach are discussed as well.

  2. Think Metric

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1978-01-01

    The International System of Units, as the metric system is officially called, provides for a single "language" to describe weights and measures over the world. We in the United States together with the people of Brunei, Burma, and Yemen are the only ones who have not put this convenient system into effect. In the passage of the Metric Conversion Act of 1975, Congress determined that we also will adopt it, but the transition will be voluntary.

  3. Using community-level metrics to monitor the effects of marine protected areas on biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Soykan, Candan U; Lewison, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are used to protect species, communities, and their associated habitats, among other goals. Measuring MPA efficacy can be challenging, however, particularly when considering responses at the community level. We gathered 36 abundance and 14 biomass data sets on fish assemblages and used meta-analysis to evaluate the ability of 22 distinct community diversity metrics to detect differences in community structure between MPAs and nearby control sites. We also considered the effects of 6 covariates-MPA size and age, MPA size and age interaction, latitude, total species richness, and level of protection-on each metric. Some common metrics, such as species richness and Shannon diversity, did not differ consistently between MPA and control sites, whereas other metrics, such as total abundance and biomass, were consistently different across studies. Metric responses derived from the biomass data sets were more consistent than those based on the abundance data sets, suggesting that community-level biomass differs more predictably than abundance between MPA and control sites. Covariate analyses indicated that level of protection, latitude, MPA size, and the interaction between MPA size and age affect metric performance. These results highlight a handful of metrics, several of which are little known, that could be used to meet the increasing demand for community-level indicators of MPA effectiveness. PMID:25572325

  4. [Applicability of traditional landscape metrics in evaluating urban heat island effect].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ai-Lian; Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding

    2012-08-01

    By using 24 landscape metrics, this paper evaluated the urban heat island effect in parts of Beijing downtown area. QuickBird (QB) images were used to extract the landscape type information, and the thermal bands from Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images were used to extract the land surface temperature (LST) in four seasons of the same year. The 24 landscape pattern metrics were calculated at landscape and class levels in a fixed window with 120 mx 120 m in size, with the applicability of these traditional landscape metrics in evaluating the urban heat island effect examined. Among the 24 landscape metrics, only the percentage composition of landscape (PLAND), patch density (PD), largest patch index (LPI), coefficient of Euclidean nearest-neighbor distance variance (ENN_CV), and landscape division index (DIVISION) at landscape level were significantly correlated with the LST in March, May, and November, and the PLAND, LPI, DIVISION, percentage of like adjacencies, and interspersion and juxtaposition index at class level showed significant correlations with the LST in March, May, July, and December, especially in July. Some metrics such as PD, edge density, clumpiness index, patch cohesion index, effective mesh size, splitting index, aggregation index, and normalized landscape shape index showed varying correlations with the LST at different class levels. The traditional landscape metrics could not be appropriate in evaluating the effects of river on LST, while some of the metrics could be useful in characterizing urban LST and analyzing the urban heat island effect, but screening and examining should be made on the metrics. PMID:23189682

  5. Effective metrics in the non-minimal Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs theory

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, A.B. Dehnen, H. Zayats, A.E.

    2008-09-15

    We formulate a self-consistent non-minimal five-parameter Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs (EYMH) model and analyse it in terms of effective (associated, color and color-acoustic) metrics. We use a formalism of constitutive tensors in order to reformulate master equations for the gauge, scalar and gravitational fields and reconstruct in the algebraic manner the so-called associated metrics for the Yang-Mills field. Using WKB-approximation we find color metrics for the Yang-Mills field and color-acoustic metric for the Higgs field in the framework of five-parameter EYMH model. Based on explicit representation of these effective metrics for the EYMH system with uniaxial symmetry, we consider cosmological applications for Bianchi-I, FLRW and de Sitter models. We focus on the analysis of the obtained expressions for velocities of propagation of longitudinal and transversal color and color-acoustic waves in a (quasi)vacuum interacting with curvature; we show that curvature coupling results in time variations of these velocities. We show, that the effective metrics can be regular or can possess singularities depending on the choice of the parameters of non-minimal coupling in the cosmological models under discussion. We consider a physical interpretation of such singularities in terms of phase velocities of color and color-acoustic waves, using the terms 'wave stopping' and 'trapped surface'.

  6. Effective gravitational mass of the Ayón-Beato and García metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A. K.; Pandey, G. K.; Bhaskar, A. K.; Rai, B. C.; Jha, A. K.; Kumar, S.; Xulu, S. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the effective gravitational mass of Ayón-Beato and García (AG) regular (nonsingular) static spherically symmetric asymptotically Minkowskian metric that is a solution to Einstein’s equations coupled with a nonlinear electromagnetic field. The effective gravitational mass is negative, zero, or positive that depends on the ratio of magnitude of electric charge to the ADM mass and the ratio of the radial distance to the ADM mass. As expected, at large values of radial distance, our result gives effective gravitational mass of the Reissner-Nordström metric.

  7. Time-dependent Elastic Deformation in Crystal: Insights from Metric Description and Berry Phase Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Niu, Qian

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that elastic deformation in crystal can be described in the language of a metric. However, how the metric couples to the one-electron Hamiltonian in a deformed crystal is not very clear. By coordinate transformation from a Cartesian frame to lattice frame where all coordinates of ions are fixed, the metric emerges naturally both in the kinetic energy and potential energy of an electron. Besides, the velocity field of ions is also manifested in the Hamiltonian, which resembles the role of a vector potential. When the deformation slowly varies both in space and time, the wave-packet method can be used to study the Berry phase effect of deformation. This method applies to finite-strain cases and is accurate up to the first order of strain gradient. Different deformation effects are discussed, such as piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and curving effect of a two-dimensional material

  8. Time-Indexed Effect Size Metric for K-12 Reading and Math Education Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung; Finn, Jeremy; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    Through a synthesis of test publisher norms and national longitudinal datasets, this study provides new national norms of academic growth in K-12 reading and math that can be used to reinterpret conventional effect sizes in time units. We propose d' a time-indexed effect size metric to estimate how long it would take for an "untreated" control…

  9. On the Doppler effect for light from orbiting sources in Kerr-type metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, S.; Goedecke, G.; Beetle, C.; Engelhardt, M.

    2015-04-01

    A formula is derived for the combined motional and gravitational Doppler effect in general stationary axisymmetric metrics for a photon emitted parallel or antiparallel to the assumed circular orbital motion of its source. The same formula is derived by both the eikonal approximation and Killing vector approaches to elucidate connections between observational astronomy and modern relativity. The formula yields expected results in the limits of a moving or stationary source in the exterior Kerr and Schwarzschild metrics and is useful for broad range astrophysical analyses.

  10. Surface adhesive forces: a metric describing the drag-reducing effects of superhydrophobic coatings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Song, Mengmeng; Dong, Hongyu; Shi, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Nanomaterials with superhydrophobic properties are promising as drag-reducing coatings. However, debates regarding whether superhydrophobic surfaces are favorable for drag reduction require further clarification. A quantified water adhesive force measurement is proposed as a metric and its effectiveness demonstrated using three typical superhydrophobic coatings on model ships with in situ sailing tests. PMID:25418808

  11. Metric Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroon, Cindy D.

    2007-01-01

    Created for a Metric Day activity, Metric Madness is a board game for two to four players. Students review and practice metric vocabulary, measurement, and calculations by playing the game. Playing time is approximately twenty to thirty minutes.

  12. Effectively identifying user profiles in network and host metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, John P.; Berk, Vincent H.; Gregorio-de Souza, Ian

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a collection of methods that is used to effectively identify users of computers systems based on their particular usage of the software and the network. Not only are we able to identify individual computer users by their behavioral patterns, we are also able to detect significant deviations in their typical computer usage over time, or compared to a group of their peers. For instance, most people have a small, and relatively unique selection of regularly visited websites, certain email services, daily work hours, and typical preferred applications for mandated tasks. We argue that these habitual patterns are sufficiently specific to identify fully anonymized network users. We demonstrate that with only a modest data collection capability, profiles of individual computer users can be constructed so as to uniquely identify a profiled user from among their peers. As time progresses and habits or circumstances change, the methods presented update each profile so that changes in user behavior can be reliably detected over both abrupt and gradual time frames, without losing the ability to identify the profiled user. The primary benefit of our methodology allows one to efficiently detect deviant behaviors, such as subverted user accounts, or organizational policy violations. Thanks to the relative robustness, these techniques can be used in scenarios with very diverse data collection capabilities, and data privacy requirements. In addition to behavioral change detection, the generated profiles can also be compared against pre-defined examples of known adversarial patterns.

  13. Metrics to describe the effects of landscape pattern on hydrology in a lotic peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.; Cohen, M. J.; Kaplan, D. A.; Acharya, S.; Larsen, L.; Nungesser, M.

    2013-12-01

    Strong reciprocal interactions exist between landscape patterns and ecological processes. Hydrology is the dominant abiotic driver of ecological processes in wetlands, particularly flowing wetlands, but is both the control on and controlled by the geometry of vegetation patterning. Landscape metrics are widely used to quantitatively link pattern and process. Our goal here was to use several candidate spatial pattern metrics to predict the effects of wetland vegetation pattern on hydrologic regime, specifically hydroperiod, in the ridge-slough patterned landscape of the Everglades. The metrics focus on the capacity for longitudinally connected flow, and thus the ability of this low-gradient patterned landscape to route water from upstream. We first explored flow friction cost (FFC), a weighted spatial distance procedure wherein ridges have a high flow cost than sloughs by virtue of their elevation and vegetation structure, to evaluate water movement through different landscape configurations. We also investigated existing published flow metrics, specifically the Directional Connectivity Index (DCI) and Landscape Discharge Competence (LDC), that seek to quantify connectivity, one of the sentinel targets of ecological restoration. Hydroperiod was estimated using a numerical hydrologic model (SWIFT 2D) in real and synthetic landscapes with varying vegetation properties ( patch anisotropy, ridge density). Synthetic landscapes were constrained by the geostatistical properties of the best conserved patterned, and contained five anisotropy levels and seven ridge density levels. These were used to construct the relationship between landscape metrics and hydroperiod. Then, using historical images from 1940 to 2004, we applied the metrics toback-cast hydroperiod. Current vegetation maps were used to test scale dependency for each metric. Our results suggest that both FFC and DCI are good predictors of hydroperiod under free flowing conditions, and that they can be used

  14. Effect of respiratory and cardiac gating on the major diffusion-imaging metrics.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Tha, Khin Khin; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Shin; Fujiwara, Taro; Yoshida, Hirokazu; Takamori, Sayaka; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    The effect of respiratory gating on the major diffusion-imaging metrics and that of cardiac gating on mean kurtosis (MK) are not known. For evaluation of whether the major diffusion-imaging metrics-MK, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) of the brain-varied between gated and non-gated acquisitions, respiratory-gated, cardiac-gated, and non-gated diffusion-imaging of the brain were performed in 10 healthy volunteers. MK, FA, and MD maps were constructed for all acquisitions, and the histograms were constructed. The normalized peak height and location of the histograms were compared among the acquisitions by use of Friedman and post hoc Wilcoxon tests. The effect of the repetition time (TR) on the diffusion-imaging metrics was also tested, and we corrected for its variation among acquisitions, if necessary. The results showed a shift in the peak location of the MK and MD histograms to the right with an increase in TR (p ≤ 0.01). The corrected peak location of the MK histograms, the normalized peak height of the FA histograms, the normalized peak height and the corrected peak location of the MD histograms varied significantly between the gated and non-gated acquisitions (p < 0.05). These results imply an influence of respiration and cardiac pulsation on the major diffusion-imaging metrics. The gating conditions must be kept identical if reproducible results are to be achieved. PMID:27073115

  15. Effects of certain key metrics of hydroentanglement system on properties of nonwoven fabrics made with commercially cleaned greige cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research was conducted to determine the effects of certain key process metrics of a commercial-grade hydroentanglement system on properties of the nonwoven fabrics made with cleaned Upland greige cotton lint. The metrics studied, among others, were the hydroentangling water pressure, the strip orif...

  16. The metric comparability of meta-analytic effect-size estimators from factorial designs.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Raphael

    2003-12-01

    The primary studies in a meta-analysis of standardized mean differences generally include a mixture of single-factor t tests and multifactor analysis of variance designs. Accordingly, there is a need for effect-size measures in multifactor designs that are metrically comparable with measures in single-factor t tests. Two models, the variance-preservation model and the variance-reduction model, provide a formal description of the 2 principal routes by which a single-factor design may evolve into a higher order factorial design. New metrically comparable effect-size measures and estimators are developed for designs that contain variance-preservation factors, variance-reduction factors, or a mixture of both types of factors. A statistical test for checking the validity of model assumptions is presented. PMID:14664680

  17. Status report on aerospace metrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, A.

    1983-10-01

    Following passage of PL 94-168, the transition to the use of metric units within the United States has been very slow. The lack of a national plan with no clear understanding or agreement concerning the source of the funds required to effect the transition have been major impediments. There are international pressures from the international standards-making organizations, the ICAO and NATO, to proceed with the unification of standards. Within the commercial aviation field, the United States is resisting the pressure, but is participating in international standardization activities because of a general recognition of the need to support future market requirements and to assist in the resolution of a significant NATO logistics problem. The AIA, with the SAE and other standards-making organizations, is attempting to secure a harmonization of United States and AECMA metric standards. The future transition progress is not expected to accelerate significantly until metric standards are available.

  18. Comparing Exposure Metrics for the Effects of Fine Particulate Matter on Emergency Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Mannshardt, Elizabeth; Sucic, Katarina; Jiao, Wan; Dominici, Francesca; Frey, H. Christopher; Reich, Brian; Fuentes, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    A crucial step in an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution is to accurately quantify exposure of the population. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the health effects estimates associated with short-term exposure to fine particulate matter with respect to three potential metrics for daily exposure: ambient monitor data, estimated values from a deterministic atmospheric chemistry model, and stochastic daily average human exposure simulation output. Each of these metrics has strengths and weaknesses when estimating the association between daily changes in ambient exposure to fine particulate matter and daily emergency hospital admissions. Monitor data is readily available, but is incomplete over space and time. The atmospheric chemistry model output is spatially and temporally complete, but may be less accurate than monitor data. The stochastic human exposure estimates account for human activity patterns and variability in pollutant concentration across microenvironments, but requires extensive input information and computation time. To compare these metrics, we consider a case study of the association between fine particulate matter and emergency hospital admissions for respiratory cases for the Medicare population across three counties in New York. Of particular interest is to quantify the impact and/or benefit to using the stochastic human exposure output to measure ambient exposure to fine particulate matter. Results indicate that the stochastic human exposure simulation output indicates approximately the same increase in relative risk associated with emergency admissions as using a chemistry model or monitoring data as exposure metrics. However, the stochastic human exposure simulation output and the atmospheric chemistry model both bring additional information which helps to reduce the uncertainly in our estimated risk. PMID:23942393

  19. Color Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This booklet was designed to convey metric information in pictoral form. The use of pictures in the coloring book enables the more mature person to grasp the metric message instantly, whereas the younger person, while coloring the picture, will be exposed to the metric information long enough to make the proper associations. Sheets of the booklet…

  20. Separability of test fields equations on the C -metric background. II. Rotating case and the Meissner effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KofroÅ, David

    2016-05-01

    We present the separation of the Teukolsky master equation for the test field of arbitrary spin on the background of the rotating C -metric. We also summarize and simplify some known results about Debye potentials of these fields on type D background. The equation for the Debye potential is also separated. Solving for the Debye potential of the electromagnetic field we show that on the extremely rotating C -metric no magnetic field can penetrate through the outer black hole horizon—we thus recover the Meissner effect for the C -metric.

  1. Effects of metric change on safety in the workplace for selected occupations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefande, J. M.; Pokorney, J. L.

    1982-04-01

    The study assesses the potential safety issues of metric conversion in the workplace. A purposive sample of 35 occupations based on injury and illnesses indexes were assessed. After an analysis of workforce population, hazard analysis and measurement sensitivity of the occupations, jobs were analyzed to identify potential safety hazards by industrial hygienists, safety engineers and academia. The study's major findings were as follows: No metric hazard experience was identified. An increased exposure might occur when particular jobs and their job tasks are going the transition from customary measurement to metric measurement. Well planned metric change programs reduce hazard potential. Metric safety issues are unresolved in the aviation industry.

  2. Assessing the Effects of Data Compression in Simulations Using Physically Motivated Metrics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laney, Daniel; Langer, Steven; Weber, Christopher; Lindstrom, Peter; Wegener, Al

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines whether lossy compression can be used effectively in physics simulations as a possible strategy to combat the expected data-movement bottleneck in future high performance computing architectures. We show that, for the codes and simulations we tested, compression levels of 3–5X can be applied without causing significant changes to important physical quantities. Rather than applying signal processing error metrics, we utilize physics-based metrics appropriate for each code to assess the impact of compression. We evaluate three different simulation codes: a Lagrangian shock-hydrodynamics code, an Eulerian higher-order hydrodynamics turbulence modeling code, and an Eulerian coupled laser-plasma interaction code. Wemore » compress relevant quantities after each time-step to approximate the effects of tightly coupled compression and study the compression rates to estimate memory and disk-bandwidth reduction. We find that the error characteristics of compression algorithms must be carefully considered in the context of the underlying physics being modeled.« less

  3. Comparing Single Case Design Overlap-Based Effect Size Metrics From Studies Examining Speech Generating Device Interventions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Hyppa-Martin, Jolene K; Reichle, Joe E; Symons, Frank J

    2016-05-01

    Meaningfully synthesizing single case experimental data from intervention studies comprised of individuals with low incidence conditions and generating effect size estimates remains challenging. Seven effect size metrics were compared for single case design (SCD) data focused on teaching speech generating device use to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) with moderate to profound levels of impairment. The effect size metrics included percent of data points exceeding the median (PEM), percent of nonoverlapping data (PND), improvement rate difference (IRD), percent of all nonoverlapping data (PAND), Phi, nonoverlap of all pairs (NAP), and Tau(novlap). Results showed that among the seven effect size metrics, PAND, Phi, IRD, and PND were more effective in quantifying intervention effects for the data sample (N = 285 phase or condition contrasts). Results are discussed with respect to issues concerning extracting and calculating effect sizes, visual analysis, and SCD intervention research in IDD. PMID:27119210

  4. Primary Metrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Karen; And Others

    These 55 activity cards were created to help teachers implement a unit on metric measurement. They were designed for students aged 5 to 10, but could be used with older students. Cards are color-coded in terms of activities on basic metric terms, prefixes, length, and other measures. Both individual and small-group games and ideas are included.…

  5. Mastering Metrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrot, Annette M.

    2005-01-01

    By the time students reach a middle school science course, they are expected to make measurements using the metric system. However, most are not practiced in its use, as their experience in metrics is often limited to one unit they were taught in elementary school. This lack of knowledge is not wholly the fault of formal education. Although the…

  6. Metrics for the effectiveness and success of an Education and Public Outreach Program; the HST experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, I. P.; Eisenhammer, B.; Kakadelis, S.; Stanley, M.; Stoke, J.; Teays, T.; Villard, R.; Voit, G. M.

    2002-05-01

    The Office of Public Outreach (OPO) at the STScI was created to share the amazing discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope with the American public. During the last five years we have developed a multitude of products and programs that have capitalized on the intense interest in Hubble to inform and inspire millions of Americans and many others around the globe. Our Education and Public outreach program has five complementary strands that broadly define the communities we serve. These are News, Formal Education, Informal Science Education, Online Outreach, Origins Forum In this paper we present and discuss some of the metrics for effectiveness and success that we have developed and use in each area of our outreach program.

  7. Detecting the effects of cascade hydropower reservoirs on eco-flow metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T.; Zhao, J.

    2012-12-01

    Over evolutionary time, the natural hydrological events of floods and droughts have become an integral component of riverine ecosystems. However, human activities, particularly reservoir operations, can greatly alter the natural flow regime and pose great impacts on riverine ecosystems. This study analyses the effects of cascade hydropower reservoir operation on eco-flow metrics based on inflow and release data of reservoirs in southwest China, with a focus on the Xiaowan reservoir (upper reservoir with multi-annual storage capacity) and the Jinghong reservoir (lower reservoir with weekly storage capacity). For the upper Xiaowan Reservoir, the analysis results show that the eco-surplus and eco-deficit (Vogel, et al, 2007; Gao, et al., 2009 ) can capture its impacts of hydropower operation on eco-flow metrics very well. However, comparative analysis of the lower Jinghong reservoir based on daily and hourly data shows that eco-surplus and eco-deficit measured with flow duration curve of daily and hourly flow data are not sensitive indices, which is attributed to the small regulating capacity of the Jinghong reservoir. It is shown that the negative impacts of hydropower operation of the Jinghong reservoir can be characterized by the changing rate of flow. These results indicate that eco-surplus and eco-deficit are good representative indices for evaluating seasonal reservoir operation, but more attention should be paid to the changing rate of flow for short term hydropower reservoir operation. This study implies that coordination of cascade reservoirs can be an effective way to mitigate the negative impacts of hydropower operation on ecosystem.

  8. Metric transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes NASA's metric transition in terms of seven major program elements. Six are technical areas involving research, technology development, and operations; they are managed by specific Program Offices at NASA Headquarters. The final program element, Institutional Management, covers both NASA-wide functional management under control of NASA Headquarters and metric capability development at the individual NASA Field Installations. This area addresses issues common to all NASA program elements, including: Federal, state, and local coordination; standards; private industry initiatives; public-awareness initiatives; and employee training. The concluding section identifies current barriers and impediments to metric transition; NASA has no specific recommendations for consideration by the Congress.

  9. Do-It-Yourself Metrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klubeck, Martin; Langthorne, Michael; Padgett, Don

    2006-01-01

    Something new is on the horizon, and depending on one's role on campus, it might be storm clouds or a cleansing shower. Either way, no matter how hard one tries to avoid it, sooner rather than later he/she will have to deal with metrics. Metrics do not have to cause fear and resistance. Metrics can, and should, be a powerful tool for improvement.…

  10. Comparing Single Case Design Overlap-Based Effect Size Metrics from Studies Examining Speech Generating Device Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mo; Hyppa-Martin, Jolene K.; Reichle, Joe E.; Symons, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Meaningfully synthesizing single case experimental data from intervention studies comprised of individuals with low incidence conditions and generating effect size estimates remains challenging. Seven effect size metrics were compared for single case design (SCD) data focused on teaching speech generating device use to individuals with…

  11. Edible Metrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mecca, Christyna E.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that introduces students to scientific measurements using only metric units. At the conclusion of the exercise, students eat the experiment. Requires dried refried beans, crackers or chips, and dried instant powder for lemonade. (DDR)

  12. Evaluating Texture Compression Masking Effects Using Objective Image Quality Assessment Metrics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Wesley; Olano, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Texture compression is widely used in real-time rendering to reduce storage and bandwidth requirements. Recent research in compression algorithms has explored both reduced fixed bit rate and variable bit rate algorithms. The results are evaluated at the individual texture level using mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, or visual image inspection. We argue this is the wrong evaluation approach. Compression artifacts in individual textures are likely visually masked in final rendered images and this masking is not accounted for when evaluating individual textures. This masking comes from both geometric mapping of textures onto models and the effects of combining different textures on the same model such as diffuse, gloss, and bump maps. We evaluate final rendered images using rigorous perceptual error metrics. Our method samples the space of viewpoints in a scene, renders the scene from each viewpoint using variations of compressed textures, and then compares each to a ground truth using uncompressed textures from the same viewpoint. We show that masking has a significant effect on final rendered image quality, masking effects and perceptual sensitivity to masking varies by the type of texture, graphics hardware compression algorithms are too conservative, and reduced bit rates are possible while maintaining final rendered image quality. PMID:26357259

  13. Distributed series resistance effects in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, L. D.

    1982-05-01

    A mathematical treatment is presented of the effects of one-dimensional distributed series resistance in solar cells. A general perturbation theory is developed, including consistently the induced spatial variation of diode current density and leading to a first-order equivalent lumped resistance of one third the total sheet resistance. For the case of diode characteristics of exponential type and distributed resistance of arbitrary size, unified numerical results are presented for both illuminated and dark characteristics. At high forward dark currents, the distributed series resistance is shown to cause an effective doubling of the 'diode quality factor'.

  14. Modeling motivation three ways: effects of MI metrics on treatment outcomes among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brittany C; Stewart, David G; Arger, Chris; Athenour, Dylan R; Effinger, Jenell

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how three different measures of motivation (cognitive motivation, taking steps, and self-efficacy for change and maintenance) predict substance use outcomes after engaging in a Motivational Interviewing intervention. Participants were 225 high school students enrolled in Project Reducing the Effects of Alcohol and Drugs on Youth (Project READY), a NIDA-funded intervention initially developed with Motivational Interviewing (MI) principles for adolescents identified by schools as having problems with alcohol or other drug use. We measured motivation at multiple time points during the intervention in multiple methods. Cognitive motivation was assessed using a Decisional Balance matrix at Session 3 of treatment. We measured self-efficacy with the Situational Confidence Questionnaire, administered at 4-, 8-, 12-, and 16-week follow-ups. A measure of taking steps (SOCRATES, v. 8) was administered at intake and Session 8. We hypothesized that motivation would follow the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) pathway, and we proposed a model where cognitive motivation would predict self-confidence for change and taking steps toward change, and self-confidence and taking steps would predict substance use outcomes. We tested our model using path analysis in AMOS and found support for a motivational continuum predicting percent days abstinent at 16-week follow-up [χ(2) = 2.75, df = 7, p = .90, CFI = 1, RMSEA (90% confidence interval) = .00 - .03]. This model demonstrates that motivational metrics predict unique outcomes at different time points and serve as important components of intervention. PMID:24467198

  15. Metric qualities of the cognitive behavioral assessment for outcome evaluation to estimate psychological treatment effects

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Giorgio; Michielin, Paolo; Vidotto, Giulio; Sanavio, Ezio; Bottesi, Gioia; Bettinardi, Ornella; Zotti, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive behavioral assessment for outcome evaluation was developed to evaluate psychological treatment interventions, especially for counseling and psychotherapy. It is made up of 80 items and five scales: anxiety, well-being, perception of positive change, depression, and psychological distress. The aim of the study was to present the metric qualities and to show validity and reliability of the five constructs of the questionnaire both in nonclinical and clinical subjects. Methods Four steps were completed to assess reliability and factor structure: criterion-related and concurrent validity, responsiveness, and convergent–divergent validity. A nonclinical group of 269 subjects was enrolled, as was a clinical group comprising 168 adults undergoing psychotherapy and psychological counseling provided by the Italian public health service. Results Cronbach’s alphas were between 0.80 and 0.91 for the clinical sample and between 0.74 and 0.91 in the nonclinical one. We observed an excellent structural validity for the five interrelated dimensions. The clinical group showed higher scores in the anxiety, depression, and psychological distress scales, as well as lower scores in well-being and perception of positive change scales than those observed in the nonclinical group. Responsiveness was large for the anxiety, well-being, and depression scales; the psychological distress and perception of positive change scales showed a moderate effect. Conclusion The questionnaire showed excellent psychometric properties, thus demonstrating that the questionnaire is a good evaluative instrument, with which to assess pre- and post-treatment outcomes. PMID:26442466

  16. Cyber threat metrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Jason Neal; Veitch, Cynthia K.; Mateski, Mark Elliot; Michalski, John T.; Harris, James Mark; Trevino, Cassandra M.; Maruoka, Scott

    2012-03-01

    Threats are generally much easier to list than to describe, and much easier to describe than to measure. As a result, many organizations list threats. Fewer describe them in useful terms, and still fewer measure them in meaningful ways. This is particularly true in the dynamic and nebulous domain of cyber threats - a domain that tends to resist easy measurement and, in some cases, appears to defy any measurement. We believe the problem is tractable. In this report we describe threat metrics and models for characterizing threats consistently and unambiguously. The purpose of this report is to support the Operational Threat Assessment (OTA) phase of risk and vulnerability assessment. To this end, we focus on the task of characterizing cyber threats using consistent threat metrics and models. In particular, we address threat metrics and models for describing malicious cyber threats to US FCEB agencies and systems.

  17. Metric System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Mod System, Dover, DE.

    This autoinstructional unit deals with the identification of units of measure in the metric system and the construction of relevant conversion tables. Students in middle school or in grade ten, taking a General Science course, can handle this learning activity. It is recommended that high, middle or low level achievers can use the program.…

  18. Effects of Stream and Elevation Resolution on Riparian Metrics and Restoration Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Even though riparian areas attenuate nutrients and sediments from agricultural runoff at the field scale, best management practices and locations for restoring riparian areas should be determined at watershed scales. Riparian metrics (e.g., percent forest within 100m of stream)...

  19. Metrication of the United States Lumber Industry and Its Effects on Wood Consuming Industrial Education Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craemer, Peter J.

    A study investigated the direction United States lumber industries are moving concerning the implementation of the metric system and what implications this has concerning wood consuming industrial education courses. The procedure included a literature review and investigating the major producers of softwood dimensional lumber by a detailed survey…

  20. Effective detective quantum efficiency for two mammography systems: Measurement and comparison against established metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Salvagnini, Elena; Bosmans, Hilde; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Struelens, Lara

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was to illustrate the value of the new metric effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) in relation to more established measures in the optimization process of two digital mammography systems. The following metrics were included for comparison against eDQE: detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector, signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR), and detectability index (d′) calculated using a standard nonprewhitened observer with eye filter.Methods: The two systems investigated were the Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration and the Hologic Selenia Dimensions. The presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) required for the eDQE was measured using two geometries: a geometry containing scattered radiation and a low scatter geometry. The eDQE, SdNR, and d′ were measured for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thicknesses of 20, 40, 60, and 70 mm, with and without the antiscatter grid and for a selection of clinically relevant target/filter (T/F) combinations. Figures of merit (FOMs) were then formed from SdNR and d′ using the mean glandular dose as the factor to express detriment. Detector DQE was measured at energies covering the range of typical clinically used spectra.Results: The MTF measured in the presence of scattered radiation showed a large drop at low spatial frequency compared to the low scatter method and led to a corresponding reduction in eDQE. The eDQE for the Siemens system at 1 mm{sup −1} ranged between 0.15 and 0.27, depending on T/F and grid setting. For the Hologic system, eDQE at 1 mm{sup −1} varied from 0.15 to 0.32, again depending on T/F and grid setting. The eDQE results for both systems showed that the grid increased the system efficiency for PMMA thicknesses of 40 mm and above but showed only small sensitivity to T/F setting. While results of the SdNR and d′ based FOMs confirmed the eDQE grid position results, they were also more specific in terms of T/F selection. For the Siemens system at 20 mm PMMA

  1. Characterizing social media metrics of scholarly papers: the effect of document properties and collaboration patterns.

    PubMed

    Haustein, Stefanie; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A number of new metrics based on social media platforms--grouped under the term "altmetrics"--have recently been introduced as potential indicators of research impact. Despite their current popularity, there is a lack of information regarding the determinants of these metrics. Using publication and citation data from 1.3 million papers published in 2012 and covered in Thomson Reuters' Web of Science as well as social media counts from Altmetric.com, this paper analyses the main patterns of five social media metrics as a function of document characteristics (i.e., discipline, document type, title length, number of pages and references) and collaborative practices and compares them to patterns known for citations. Results show that the presence of papers on social media is low, with 21.5% of papers receiving at least one tweet, 4.7% being shared on Facebook, 1.9% mentioned on blogs, 0.8% found on Google+ and 0.7% discussed in mainstream media. By contrast, 66.8% of papers have received at least one citation. Our findings show that both citations and social media metrics increase with the extent of collaboration and the length of the references list. On the other hand, while editorials and news items are seldom cited, it is these types of document that are the most popular on Twitter. Similarly, while longer papers typically attract more citations, an opposite trend is seen on social media platforms. Finally, contrary to what is observed for citations, it is papers in the Social Sciences and humanities that are the most often found on social media platforms. On the whole, these findings suggest that factors driving social media and citations are different. Therefore, social media metrics cannot actually be seen as alternatives to citations; at most, they may function as complements to other type of indicators. PMID:25780916

  2. Characterizing Social Media Metrics of Scholarly Papers: The Effect of Document Properties and Collaboration Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Haustein, Stefanie; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A number of new metrics based on social media platforms—grouped under the term “altmetrics”—have recently been introduced as potential indicators of research impact. Despite their current popularity, there is a lack of information regarding the determinants of these metrics. Using publication and citation data from 1.3 million papers published in 2012 and covered in Thomson Reuters’ Web of Science as well as social media counts from Altmetric.com, this paper analyses the main patterns of five social media metrics as a function of document characteristics (i.e., discipline, document type, title length, number of pages and references) and collaborative practices and compares them to patterns known for citations. Results show that the presence of papers on social media is low, with 21.5% of papers receiving at least one tweet, 4.7% being shared on Facebook, 1.9% mentioned on blogs, 0.8% found on Google+ and 0.7% discussed in mainstream media. By contrast, 66.8% of papers have received at least one citation. Our findings show that both citations and social media metrics increase with the extent of collaboration and the length of the references list. On the other hand, while editorials and news items are seldom cited, it is these types of document that are the most popular on Twitter. Similarly, while longer papers typically attract more citations, an opposite trend is seen on social media platforms. Finally, contrary to what is observed for citations, it is papers in the Social Sciences and humanities that are the most often found on social media platforms. On the whole, these findings suggest that factors driving social media and citations are different. Therefore, social media metrics cannot actually be seen as alternatives to citations; at most, they may function as complements to other type of indicators. PMID:25780916

  3. The International Safeguards Technology Base: How is the Patient Doing? An Exploration of Effective Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schanfein, Mark J; Gouveia, Fernando S

    2010-07-01

    The term “Technology Base” is commonly used but what does it mean? Is there a common understanding of the components that comprise a technology base? Does a formal process exist to assess the health of a given technology base? These are important questions the relevance of which is even more pressing given the USDOE/NNSA initiatives to strengthen the safeguards technology base through investments in research & development and human capital development. Accordingly, the authors will establish a high-level framework to define and understand what comprises a technology base. Potential goal-driven metrics to assess the health of a technology base will also be explored, such as linear demographics and resource availability, in the hope that they can be used to better understand and improve the health of the U.S. safeguards technology base. Finally, through the identification of such metrics, the authors will offer suggestions and highlight choices for addressing potential shortfalls.

  4. When can we measure stress noninvasively? Postdeposition effects on a fecal stress metric confound a multiregional assessment.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Jennifer L; Ray, Chris; Varner, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of stress hormone metabolites in fecal samples has become a common method to assess physiological stress in wildlife populations. Glucocorticoid metabolite (GCM) measurements can be collected noninvasively, and studies relating this stress metric to anthropogenic disturbance are increasing. However, environmental characteristics (e.g., temperature) can alter measured GCM concentration when fecal samples cannot be collected immediately after defecation. This effect can confound efforts to separate environmental factors causing predeposition physiological stress in an individual from those acting on a fecal sample postdeposition. We used fecal samples from American pikas (Ochotona princeps) to examine the influence of environmental conditions on GCM concentration by (1) comparing GCM concentration measured in freshly collected control samples to those placed in natural habitats for timed exposure, and (2) relating GCM concentration in samples collected noninvasively throughout the western United States to local environmental characteristics measured before and after deposition. Our timed-exposure trials clarified the spatial scale at which exposure to environmental factors postdeposition influences GCM concentration in pika feces. Also, fecal samples collected from occupied pika habitats throughout the species' range revealed significant relationships between GCM and metrics of climate during the postdeposition period (maximum temperature, minimum temperature, and precipitation during the month of sample collection). Conversely, we found no such relationships between GCM and metrics of climate during the predeposition period (prior to the month of sample collection). Together, these results indicate that noninvasive measurement of physiological stress in pikas across the western US may be confounded by climatic conditions in the postdeposition environment when samples cannot be collected immediately after defecation. Our results reiterate the importance

  5. Probing the post-newtonian physics of semi-conservative metric theories through secular tidal effects in satellite gradiometry missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li-E.; Xu, Peng

    2016-04-01

    The existence of relativistic secular tidal effects along orbit motions will largely improve the measurement accuracies of relativistic gravitational gradients with orbiting gradiometers. With the continuous advances in technologies related to gradiometry and the improvements in their resolutions, it is feasible for future satellite gradiometry missions to carry out precision relativistic experiments and impose constraints on modern theories of gravity. In this work, we study the theoretical principles of measuring directly the secular post-Newtonian (PN) tidal effects in semi-conservative metric theories with satellite gradiometry missions. The isolations of the related PN parameters in the readouts of an orbiting three-axis gradiometer is discussed.

  6. Prediction of junior faculty success in biomedical research: comparison of metrics and effects of mentoring programs

    PubMed Central

    Houmanfar, Ramona; Candido, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Measuring and predicting the success of junior faculty is of considerable interest to faculty, academic institutions, funding agencies and faculty development and mentoring programs. Various metrics have been proposed to evaluate and predict research success and impact, such as the h-index, and modifications of this index, but they have not been evaluated and validated side-by-side in a rigorous empirical study. Our study provides a retrospective analysis of how well bibliographic metrics and formulas (numbers of total, first- and co-authored papers in the PubMed database, numbers of papers in high-impact journals) would have predicted the success of biomedical investigators (n = 40) affiliated with the University of Nevada, Reno, prior to, and after completion of significant mentoring and research support (through funded Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence, COBREs), or lack thereof (unfunded COBREs), in 2000–2014. The h-index and similar indices had little prognostic value. Publishing as mid- or even first author in only one high-impact journal was poorly correlated with future success. Remarkably, junior investigators with >6 first-author papers within 10 years were significantly (p < 0.0001) more likely (93%) to succeed than those with ≤6 first-author papers (4%), regardless of the journal’s impact factor. The benefit of COBRE-support increased the success rate of junior faculty approximately 3-fold, from 15% to 47%. Our work defines a previously neglected set of metrics that predicted the success of junior faculty with high fidelity—thus defining the pool of faculty that will benefit the most from faculty development programs such as COBREs. PMID:26421238

  7. Metricize Yourself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falbo, Maria K.

    2006-12-01

    In lab and homework, students should check whether or not their quantitative answers to physics questions make sense in the context of the problem. Unfortunately it is still the case in the US that many students don’t have a “feel” for oC, kg, cm, liters or Newtons. This problem contributes to the inability of students to check answers. It is also the case that just “going over” the tables in the text can be boring and dry. In this talk I’ll demonstrate some classroom activities that can be used throughout the year to give students a metric context in which quantitative answers can be interpreted.

  8. Handbook of aircraft noise metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. L.; Pearsons, K. S.

    1981-01-01

    Information is presented on 22 noise metrics that are associated with the measurement and prediction of the effects of aircraft noise. Some of the instantaneous frequency weighted sound level measures, such as A-weighted sound level, are used to provide multiple assessment of the aircraft noise level. Other multiple event metrics, such as day-night average sound level, were designed to relate sound levels measured over a period of time to subjective responses in an effort to determine compatible land uses and aid in community planning. The various measures are divided into: (1) instantaneous sound level metrics; (2) duration corrected single event metrics; (3) multiple event metrics; and (4) speech communication metrics. The scope of each measure is examined in terms of its: definition, purpose, background, relationship to other measures, calculation method, example, equipment, references, and standards.

  9. Handbook of aircraft noise metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. L.; Pearsons, K. S.

    1981-03-01

    Information is presented on 22 noise metrics that are associated with the measurement and prediction of the effects of aircraft noise. Some of the instantaneous frequency weighted sound level measures, such as A-weighted sound level, are used to provide multiple assessment of the aircraft noise level. Other multiple event metrics, such as day-night average sound level, were designed to relate sound levels measured over a period of time to subjective responses in an effort to determine compatible land uses and aid in community planning. The various measures are divided into: (1) instantaneous sound level metrics; (2) duration corrected single event metrics; (3) multiple event metrics; and (4) speech communication metrics. The scope of each measure is examined in terms of its: definition, purpose, background, relationship to other measures, calculation method, example, equipment, references, and standards.

  10. Conversion to the Metric System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crunkilton, John C.; Lee, Jasper S.

    1974-01-01

    The authors discuss background information about the metric system and explore the effect of metrication of agriculture in areas such as equipment calibration, chemical measurement, and marketing of agricultural products. Suggestions are given for possible leadership roles and approaches that agricultural education might take in converting to the…

  11. The metric system: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, S.M.

    1995-05-01

    On July 13, 1992, Deputy Director Duane Sewell restated the Laboratory`s policy on conversion to the metric system which was established in 1974. Sewell`s memo announced the Laboratory`s intention to continue metric conversion on a reasonable and cost effective basis. Copies of the 1974 and 1992 Administrative Memos are contained in the Appendix. There are three primary reasons behind the Laboratory`s conversion to the metric system. First, Public Law 100-418, passed in 1988, states that by the end of fiscal year 1992 the Federal Government must begin using metric units in grants, procurements, and other business transactions. Second, on July 25, 1991, President George Bush signed Executive Order 12770 which urged Federal agencies to expedite conversion to metric units. Third, the contract between the University of California and the Department of Energy calls for the Laboratory to convert to the metric system. Thus, conversion to the metric system is a legal requirement and a contractual mandate with the University of California. Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770 are discussed in more detail later in this section, but first they examine the reasons behind the nation`s conversion to the metric system. The second part of this report is on applying the metric system.

  12. The metric system: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumley, Susan M.

    On 13 Jul. 1992, Deputy Director Duane Sewell restated the Laboratory's policy on conversion to the metric system which was established in 1974. Sewell's memo announced the Laboratory's intention to continue metric conversion on a reasonable and cost effective basis. Copies of the 1974 and 1992 Administrative Memos are contained in the Appendix. There are three primary reasons behind the Laboratory's conversion to the metric system. First, Public Law 100-418, passed in 1988, states that by the end of fiscal year 1992 the Federal Government must begin using metric units in grants, procurements, and other business transactions. Second, on 25 Jul. 1991, President George Bush signed Executive Order 12770 which urged Federal agencies to expedite conversion to metric units. Third, the contract between the University of California and the Department of Energy calls for the Laboratory to convert to the metric system. Thus, conversion to the metric system is a legal requirement and a contractual mandate with the University of California. Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770 are discussed in more detail later in this section, but first they examine the reasons behind the nation's conversion to the metric system. The second part of this report is on applying the metric system.

  13. Quality metrics for product defectiveness at KCD

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, J.V.

    1993-07-01

    Metrics are discussed for measuring and tracking product defectiveness at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Three new metrics, the metric (percent defective) that preceded the new metrics, and several alternatives are described. The new metrics, Percent Parts Accepted, Percent Parts Accepted Trouble Free, and Defects Per Million Observations, (denoted by PPA, PATF, and DPMO, respectively) were implemented for KCD-manufactured product and purchased material in November 1992. These metrics replace the percent defective metric that had been used for several years. The PPA and PATF metrics primarily measure quality performance while DPMO measures the effects of continuous improvement activities. The new metrics measure product quality in terms of product defectiveness observed only during the inspection process. The metrics were originally developed for purchased product and were adapted to manufactured product to provide a consistent set of metrics plant- wide. The new metrics provide a meaningful tool to measure the quantity of product defectiveness in terms of the customer`s requirements and expectations for quality. Many valid metrics are available and all will have deficiencies. These three metrics are among the least sensitive to problems and are easily understood. They will serve as good management tools for KCD in the foreseeable future until new flexible data systems and reporting procedures can be implemented that can provide more detailed and accurate metric computations.

  14. Engineering performance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    DeLozier, R. ); Snyder, N. )

    1993-03-31

    Implementation of a Total Quality Management (TQM) approach to engineering work required the development of a system of metrics which would serve as a meaningful msinagement tool for evaluating effectiveness in accomplishing project objectives and in achieving improved customer satisfaction. A team effort was chartered with the goal of developing a system of engineering performance metrics which would measure customer satisfaction, quality, cost effectiveness, and timeliness. The approach to developing this system involved normal systems design phases including, conceptual design, detailed design, implementation, and integration. The lessons teamed from this effort will be explored in this paper. These lessons teamed may provide a starting point for other large engineering organizations seeking to institute a performance measurement system accomplishing project objectives and in achieving improved customer satisfaction. To facilitate this effort, a team was chartered to assist in the development of the metrics system. This team, consisting of customers and Engineering staff members, was utilized to ensure that the needs and views of the customers were considered in the development of performance measurements. The development of a system of metrics is no different than the development of any type of system. It includes the steps of defining performance measurement requirements, measurement process conceptual design, performance measurement and reporting system detailed design, and system implementation and integration.

  15. Engineering performance metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delozier, R.; Snyder, N.

    1993-03-01

    Implementation of a Total Quality Management (TQM) approach to engineering work required the development of a system of metrics which would serve as a meaningful management tool for evaluating effectiveness in accomplishing project objectives and in achieving improved customer satisfaction. A team effort was chartered with the goal of developing a system of engineering performance metrics which would measure customer satisfaction, quality, cost effectiveness, and timeliness. The approach to developing this system involved normal systems design phases including, conceptual design, detailed design, implementation, and integration. The lessons teamed from this effort will be explored in this paper. These lessons learned may provide a starting point for other large engineering organizations seeking to institute a performance measurement system accomplishing project objectives and in achieving improved customer satisfaction. To facilitate this effort, a team was chartered to assist in the development of the metrics system. This team, consisting of customers and Engineering staff members, was utilized to ensure that the needs and views of the customers were considered in the development of performance measurements. The development of a system of metrics is no different than the development of any type of system. It includes the steps of defining performance measurement requirements, measurement process conceptual design, performance measurement and reporting system detailed design, and system implementation and integration.

  16. Make It Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Thomas

    Measurement is perhaps the most frequently used form of mathematics. This book presents activities for learning about the metric system designed for upper intermediate and junior high levels. Discussions include: why metrics, history of metrics, changing to a metric world, teaching tips, and formulas. Activities presented are: metrics all around…

  17. Alternative ozone metrics and daily mortality in Suzhou: the China Air Pollution and Health Effects Study (CAPES).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxue; Yang, Haibing; Guo, Shu; Wang, Zongshuang; Xu, Xiaohui; Duan, Xiaoli; Kan, Haidong

    2012-06-01

    Controversy remains regarding the relationship between various metrics of ozone (O(3)) and mortality. In China, the largest developing country, there have been few studies investigating the acute effect of O(3) on death. We used three exposure metrics of O(3) (1-hour maximum, maximum 8-hour average and 24-hour average) to examine its short-term association with daily mortality in Suzhou, China. We used a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) with penalized splines to analyze the mortality, O(3), and covariate data. We examined the association by season, age group, sex and educational level. We found that the current level of O(3) in Suzhou is associated with death rates from all causes and cardiovascular diseases. Among various metrics of O(3), maximum 8-hour average and 1-hour maximum concentrations seem to be more strongly associated with increased mortality rate compared to 24-hour average concentrations. Using maximum 8-hour average, an inter-quartile range increase of 2-day average O(3) (lag 01) corresponds to 2.15% (95%CI, 0.36 to 3.93), 4.47% (95%CI, 1.43 to 7.51), -1.85% (95%CI, -6.91 to 3.22) increase in all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality, respectively. The associations between O(3) and daily mortality appeared to be more evident in the cool season than in the warm season. In conclusion, maximum 8-hour average and 1-hour maximum concentrations of O(3) are associated with daily mortality in Suzhou. Our analyses strengthen the rationale for further limiting levels of O(3) pollution in the city. PMID:22521098

  18. Terrain effects in resistivity and magnetotelluric surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, H.T.

    1982-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element computer algorithm which can accommodate arbitrarily complex topography and subsurface structure, has been developed to model the resistivity response of the earth. The algorithm has undergone extensive evaluation and is believed to provide accurate results for realistic earth models. Testing included comparison to scale model measurements, analytically calculated solutions, and results calculated numerically by other independent means. Computer modeling experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to remove the effect of topography on resistivity data under conditions where such effects dominate the response. This can be done without resorting to lengthy and costly trial and error computer modeling. After correction, the data can be interpreted with confidence that the anomalies are due only to subsurface structure. The results of case studies on resistivity field data measured in high relief topography are discussed.

  19. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast.

    PubMed

    Walkey, Helen C; Barbur, John L; Harlow, J Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R; Taylor, Julie A F

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m(-2). A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2 = 0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry. PMID:15669611

  20. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkey, Helen C.; Barbur, John L.; Harlow, J. Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R.; Taylor, Julie A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m-2. A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2=0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry.

  1. The International Safeguards Technology Base: How is the Patient Doing? An Exploration of Effective Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schanfein, Mark; Gouveia, Fernando; Crawford, Cary E.; Pickett, Chris J.; Jay, Jeffrey

    2010-07-15

    The term “Technology Base” is commonly used but what does it mean? Is there a common understanding of the components that comprise a technology base? Does a formal process exist to assess the health of a given technology base? These are important questions the relevance of which is even more pressing given the USDOE/NNSA initiatives to strengthen the safeguards technology base through investments in research & development and human capital development. Accordingly, the authors will establish a high-level framework to define and understand what comprises a technology base. Potential goal-driven metrics to assess the health of a technology base will also be explored, such as linear demographics and resource availability, in the hope that they can be used to better understand and improve the health of the U.S. safeguards technology base. Finally, through the identification of such metrics, the authors will offer suggestions and highlight choices for addressing potential shortfalls. Introduction The U.S. safeguards technology base got its start almost half a century ago in the nuclear weapons program of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and their predecessors: AEC & ERDA. Due to nuclear materials’ strategic importance and value, and the risk associated with the public’s and worker’s health and the potential for theft, significant investments were made to develop techniques to measure nuclear materials using both destructive assay (DA) and non-destructive assay (NDA). Major investment within the U.S. DOE Domestic Safeguards Program continued over the next three decades, resulting in continuous improvements in the state-of-the-art of these techniques. This was particularly true in the area of NDA with its ability to use gamma rays, neutrons, and heat to identify and quantify nuclear materials without the need to take direct samples of the material. Most of these techniques were commercialized and transferred to

  2. Effecting Change in a Resistant Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Patricia F.; Gould, Edward

    In an effort to overcome organizational resistance to change, Victor Valley College, in Victorville, California, has utilized a seven-part strategy to enable leaders to empower others and effect change. Step 1 requires the development of a visionary plan, so that changes have a meaningful context. Step 2 calls for an assessment of the campus…

  3. NASA metrication activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlannes, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's organization and policy for metrification, history from 1964, NASA participation in Federal agency activities, interaction with nongovernmental metrication organizations, and the proposed metrication assessment study are reviewed.

  4. Software Quality Assurance Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRae, Kalindra A.

    2004-01-01

    Software Quality Assurance (SQA) is a planned and systematic set of activities that ensures conformance of software life cycle processes and products conform to requirements, standards and procedures. In software development, software quality means meeting requirements and a degree of excellence and refinement of a project or product. Software Quality is a set of attributes of a software product by which its quality is described and evaluated. The set of attributes includes functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Software Metrics help us understand the technical process that is used to develop a product. The process is measured to improve it and the product is measured to increase quality throughout the life cycle of software. Software Metrics are measurements of the quality of software. Software is measured to indicate the quality of the product, to assess the productivity of the people who produce the product, to assess the benefits derived from new software engineering methods and tools, to form a baseline for estimation, and to help justify requests for new tools or additional training. Any part of the software development can be measured. If Software Metrics are implemented in software development, it can save time, money, and allow the organization to identify the caused of defects which have the greatest effect on software development. The summer of 2004, I worked with Cynthia Calhoun and Frank Robinson in the Software Assurance/Risk Management department. My task was to research and collect, compile, and analyze SQA Metrics that have been used in other projects that are not currently being used by the SA team and report them to the Software Assurance team to see if any metrics can be implemented in their software assurance life cycle process.

  5. How Robust Are Malaria Parasite Clearance Rates as Indicators of Drug Effectiveness and Resistance?

    PubMed

    Hastings, Ian M; Kay, Katherine; Hodel, Eva Maria

    2015-10-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are currently the first-line drugs for treating uncomplicated falciparum malaria, the most deadly of the human malarias. Malaria parasite clearance rates estimated from patients' blood following ACT treatment have been widely adopted as a measure of drug effectiveness and as surveillance tools for detecting the presence of potential artemisinin resistance. This metric has not been investigated in detail, nor have its properties or potential shortcomings been identified. Herein, the pharmacology of drug treatment, parasite biology, and human immunity are combined to investigate the dynamics of parasite clearance following ACT. This approach parsimoniously recovers the principal clinical features and dynamics of clearance. Human immunity is the primary determinant of clearance rates, unless or until artemisinin killing has fallen to near-ineffective levels. Clearance rates are therefore highly insensitive metrics for surveillance that may lead to overconfidence, as even quite substantial reductions in drug sensitivity may not be detected as lower clearance rates. Equally serious is the use of clearance rates to quantify the impact of ACT regimen changes, as this strategy will plausibly miss even very substantial increases in drug effectiveness. In particular, the malaria community may be missing the opportunity to dramatically increase ACT effectiveness through regimen changes, particularly through a switch to twice-daily regimens and/or increases in artemisinin dosing levels. The malaria community therefore appears overreliant on a single metric of drug effectiveness, the parasite clearance rate, that has significant and serious shortcomings. PMID:26239987

  6. How Robust Are Malaria Parasite Clearance Rates as Indicators of Drug Effectiveness and Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Katherine; Hodel, Eva Maria

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are currently the first-line drugs for treating uncomplicated falciparum malaria, the most deadly of the human malarias. Malaria parasite clearance rates estimated from patients' blood following ACT treatment have been widely adopted as a measure of drug effectiveness and as surveillance tools for detecting the presence of potential artemisinin resistance. This metric has not been investigated in detail, nor have its properties or potential shortcomings been identified. Herein, the pharmacology of drug treatment, parasite biology, and human immunity are combined to investigate the dynamics of parasite clearance following ACT. This approach parsimoniously recovers the principal clinical features and dynamics of clearance. Human immunity is the primary determinant of clearance rates, unless or until artemisinin killing has fallen to near-ineffective levels. Clearance rates are therefore highly insensitive metrics for surveillance that may lead to overconfidence, as even quite substantial reductions in drug sensitivity may not be detected as lower clearance rates. Equally serious is the use of clearance rates to quantify the impact of ACT regimen changes, as this strategy will plausibly miss even very substantial increases in drug effectiveness. In particular, the malaria community may be missing the opportunity to dramatically increase ACT effectiveness through regimen changes, particularly through a switch to twice-daily regimens and/or increases in artemisinin dosing levels. The malaria community therefore appears overreliant on a single metric of drug effectiveness, the parasite clearance rate, that has significant and serious shortcomings. PMID:26239987

  7. A Dynamic Testing Complexity Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces a dynamic metric that is based on the estimated ability of a program to withstand the effects of injected "semantic mutants" during execution by computing the same function as if the semantic mutants had not been injected. Semantic mutants include: (1) syntactic mutants injected into an executing program and (2) randomly selected values injected into an executing program's internal states. The metric is a function of a program, the method used for injecting these two types of mutants, and the program's input distribution; this metric is found through dynamic executions of the program. A program's ability to withstand the effects of injected semantic mutants by computing the same function when executed is then used as a tool for predicting the difficulty that will be incurred during random testing to reveal the existence of faults, i.e., the metric suggests the likelihood that a program will expose the existence of faults during random testing assuming faults were to exist. If the metric is applied to a module rather than to a program, the metric can be used to guide the allocation of testing resources among a program's modules. In this manner the metric acts as a white-box testing tool for determining where to concentrate testing resources. Index Terms: Revealing ability, random testing, input distribution, program, fault, failure.

  8. Measuring in Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Juanita S.

    Eight modules for an in-service course on metric education for elementary teachers are included in this document. The modules are on an introduction to the metric system, length and basic prefixes, volume, mass, temperature, relationships within the metric system, and metric and English system relationships. The eighth one is on developing a…

  9. Resistive switching effect in titanium oxides.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhensen; Chi, Yaqing; Fang, Liang; Liu, Rulin; Yi, Xun

    2014-02-01

    Resistive switching (RS) phenomena have been vigorously investigated in a large variety of materials and highlighted for its preeminent potential for the future nonvolatile semiconductor memory applications or reconfigurable logic circuits. Among the various resistive switching materials, the binary metal oxides demonstrate more advantageous for micro- or nano-electronics applications due to their simpler fabrication process and compatibility with conventional CMOS technology, though the mechanisms are controversial due to the diversity of RS effects. This review mainly focuses on the current understanding of the microscopic nature of RS in titanium oxides, in which the working mechanisms can be categorized into thermochemical metallization mechanism, valence change mechanism, and electrostatic/electronic mechanism. The approaches developed to investigate the RS and the specific switching processes related to different mechanisms are addressed. Since titanium oxides are oxygen-vacancy doped semiconductors, the role of defects is analyzed in detail and possible effective strategies to improve the performance of RS are addressed. PMID:24749437

  10. Joint learning of labels and distance metric.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Meng; Hong, Richang; Zha, Zhengjun; Hua, Xian-Sheng

    2010-06-01

    Machine learning algorithms frequently suffer from the insufficiency of training data and the usage of inappropriate distance metric. In this paper, we propose a joint learning of labels and distance metric (JLLDM) approach, which is able to simultaneously address the two difficulties. In comparison with the existing semi-supervised learning and distance metric learning methods that focus only on label prediction or distance metric construction, the JLLDM algorithm optimizes the labels of unlabeled samples and a Mahalanobis distance metric in a unified scheme. The advantage of JLLDM is multifold: 1) the problem of training data insufficiency can be tackled; 2) a good distance metric can be constructed with only very few training samples; and 3) no radius parameter is needed since the algorithm automatically determines the scale of the metric. Extensive experiments are conducted to compare the JLLDM approach with different semi-supervised learning and distance metric learning methods, and empirical results demonstrate its effectiveness. PMID:19963702

  11. The Effects of Three Instructional Strategies on Prospective Teachers' Ability to Transfer Estimation Skills for Metric Length and Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attivo, Barbara; Trueblood, Cecil R.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the nature of metric estimation skill instruction affects prospective elementary and special education teachers' abilities to estimate metric length, area, and volume. Four types of estimation skills were identified by an estimation matrix. Three instructional strategies were selected: (1) a…

  12. More Than Numbers: Effects of Social Media Virality Metrics on Intention to Help Unknown Others in the Context of Bone Marrow Donation.

    PubMed

    Lee-Won, Roselyn J; Abo, Melissa M; Na, Kilhoe; White, Tiffany N

    2016-06-01

    A bone marrow transplant is often the only key to recovery and survival for patients suffering from blood cancers. Social media platforms have allowed nonprofit organizations as well as family members and friends of patients in need of a matching donor to make their solicitation messages go viral and reach out to the broadest possible audience to increase the likelihood of finding a matching donor. Noting that social media audiences are exposed not only to the content of a social media message but also to the metrics representing the virality of the message (i.e., how many times the content has been shared), we conducted an online experiment to investigate the effects of virality metrics on perceived social norms and behavioral intention to join a bone marrow registry. In doing so, we considered the potential moderating role of perceived threat posed by blood cancers. The experiment was conducted with 152 participants who met the general eligibility guidelines set by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). The results of the experiment showed that exposure to high virality metrics led to greater perceived injunctive norms. The results also revealed that the effect of virality metrics on perceived injunctive norms was significant among those perceiving low levels of blood cancer threat. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that high virality metrics led to greater intention to join a bone marrow registry through perceived injunctive norms only when perceived threat of blood cancers was low. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27327068

  13. Multi-site study of diffusion metric variability: characterizing the effects of site, vendor, field strength, and echo time using the histogram distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, K. G.; Chou, M.-C.; Preciado, R. I.; Gimi, B.; Rollins, N. K.; Song, A.; Turner, J.; Mori, S.

    2016-03-01

    MRI-based multi-site trials now routinely include some form of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in their protocol. These studies can include data originating from scanners built by different vendors, each with their own set of unique protocol restrictions, including restrictions on the number of available gradient directions, whether an externally generated list of gradient directions can be used, and restrictions on the echo time (TE). One challenge of multi-site studies is to create a common imaging protocol that will result in a reliable and accurate set of diffusion metrics. The present study describes the effect of site, scanner vendor, field strength, and TE on two common metrics: the first moment of the diffusion tensor field (mean diffusivity, MD), and the fractional anisotropy (FA). We have shown in earlier work that ROI metrics and the mean of MD and FA histograms are not sufficiently sensitive for use in site characterization. Here we use the distance between whole brain histograms of FA and MD to investigate within- and between-site effects. We concluded that the variability of DTI metrics due to site, vendor, field strength, and echo time could influence the results in multi-center trials and that histogram distance is sensitive metrics for each of these variables.

  14. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  15. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specificallymore » designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.« less

  16. Rotational clutter metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Salem; Halford, Carl; Moyer, Steve; Gundy, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    A new approach to linear discriminant analysis (LDA), called orthogonal rotational LDA (ORLDA) is presented. Using ORLDA and properly accounting for target size allowed development of a new clutter metric that is based on the Laplacian pyramid (LP) decomposition of clutter images. The new metric achieves correlation exceeding 98% with expert human labeling of clutter levels in a set of 244 infrared images. Our clutter metric is based on the set of weights for the LP levels that best classify images into clutter levels as manually classified by an expert human observer. LDA is applied as a preprocessing step to classification. LDA suffers from a few limitations in this application. Therefore, we propose a new approach to LDA, called ORLDA, using orthonormal geometric rotations. Each rotation brings the LP feature space closer to the LDA solution while retaining orthogonality in the feature space. To understand the effects of target size on clutter, we applied ORLDA at different target sizes. The outputs are easily related because they are functions of orthogonal rotation angles. Finally, we used Bayesian decision theory to learn class boundaries for clutter levels at different target sizes.

  17. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.

  18. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  19. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  20. Effect of nonsymmetrical flow resistance upon orifice impedance resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey, J. W.; Compton, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    A nonreactive orifice in an infinite baffle is analyzed. The pressure difference delta across the orifice varies sinusoidally with amplitude 1.0 and average value -P. The orifice resistance, delta p is discontinuous at zero velocity and exhibits the constant values R sub + and R sub - for u 0 and u 0, respectively. The resultant velocity has power in all harmonics of the excitation frequency. A quasi-linear resistance is defined and found to be relatively insensitive to the presence or absence of a resonant backing cavity; however, it does vary from 1.33 R sub + to 0.67 R sub + for a resistance ratio R sub +/R sub - between 0.5 and 2.0.

  1. Mining metrics for buried treasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkowski, D. A.; Helliwell, T. M.

    2006-06-01

    The same but different: That might describe two metrics. On the surface CLASSI may show two metrics are locally equivalent, but buried beneath may be a wealth of further structure. This was beautifully described in a paper by Malcolm MacCallum in 1998. Here I will illustrate the effect with two flat metrics — one describing ordinary Minkowski spacetime and the other describing a threeparameter family of Gal'tsov-Letelier-Tod spacetimes. I will dig out the beautiful hidden classical singularity structure of the latter (a structure first noticed by Tod in 1994) and then show how quantum considerations can illuminate the riches. I will then discuss how quantum structure can help us understand classical singularities and metric parameters in a variety of exact solutions mined from the Exact Solutions book.

  2. Using Social Network Metrics to Assess the Effectiveness of Broad Based Admission Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Shane; Macfadyen, Leah; Lockyer, Lori; Mazzochi-Jones, David

    2011-01-01

    Notions of what it is to be knowledgeable and skilled in one's profession have evolved in recent decades. For instance, medical practitioners are expected to think critically and creatively, communicate effectively, and to be a professional and community leader. While these attributes have always been well regarded, it is only relatively recently…

  3. Effects of surface pressures and streamline metrics on the calculation of laminar heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.; Zoby, Vincent

    1988-01-01

    The effect of streamline geometry and pressure distributions on surface heating rates is examined for slender, spherically blunted cones. The modifications to the approximate aeroheating code include a curve fit of pressures computed by an Euler solution over a range of Mach numbers and cone angles. The streamline geometry is then found using the surface pressures and inviscid surface properties. Previously, streamlines were determined using the inviscid properties at the edge of the boundary layer when accounting for the effects of entropy-layer swallowing. Streamline calculations are now based on inviscid surface conditions rather than boundary-layer edge properties. However, the heating rates are calculated using inviscid properties at the edge of the boundary layer. Resulting heating rates compare favorably with solutions from the viscous-shock-layer equations.

  4. Chronic effects of temperature on mortality in the Southeastern USA using satellite-based exposure metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Yan; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kosheleva, Anna; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-07-01

    Climate change may affect human health, particularly for elderly individuals who are vulnerable to temperature changes. While many studies have investigated the acute effects of heat, only a few have dealt with the chronic ones. We have examined the effects of seasonal temperatures on survival of the elderly in the Southeastern USA, where a large fraction of subpopulation resides. We found that both seasonal mean temperature and its standard deviation (SD) affected long-term survival among the 13 million Medicare beneficiaries (aged 65+) in this region during 2000–2013. A 1 °C increase in summer mean temperature corresponded to an increase of 2.5% in death rate. Whereas, 1 °C increase in winter mean temperature was associated with a decrease of 1.5%. Increases in seasonal temperature SD also influence mortality. We decomposed seasonal mean temperature and its temperature SD into long-term geographic contrasts between ZIP codes and annual anomalies within ZIP code. Effect modifications by different subgroups were also examined to find out whether certain individuals are more vulnerable. Our findings will be critical to future efforts assessing health risks related to the future climate change.

  5. Chronic effects of temperature on mortality in the Southeastern USA using satellite-based exposure metrics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Yan; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kosheleva, Anna; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Climate change may affect human health, particularly for elderly individuals who are vulnerable to temperature changes. While many studies have investigated the acute effects of heat, only a few have dealt with the chronic ones. We have examined the effects of seasonal temperatures on survival of the elderly in the Southeastern USA, where a large fraction of subpopulation resides. We found that both seasonal mean temperature and its standard deviation (SD) affected long-term survival among the 13 million Medicare beneficiaries (aged 65+) in this region during 2000–2013. A 1 °C increase in summer mean temperature corresponded to an increase of 2.5% in death rate. Whereas, 1 °C increase in winter mean temperature was associated with a decrease of 1.5%. Increases in seasonal temperature SD also influence mortality. We decomposed seasonal mean temperature and its temperature SD into long-term geographic contrasts between ZIP codes and annual anomalies within ZIP code. Effect modifications by different subgroups were also examined to find out whether certain individuals are more vulnerable. Our findings will be critical to future efforts assessing health risks related to the future climate change. PMID:27436237

  6. Chronic effects of temperature on mortality in the Southeastern USA using satellite-based exposure metrics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Yan; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kosheleva, Anna; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Climate change may affect human health, particularly for elderly individuals who are vulnerable to temperature changes. While many studies have investigated the acute effects of heat, only a few have dealt with the chronic ones. We have examined the effects of seasonal temperatures on survival of the elderly in the Southeastern USA, where a large fraction of subpopulation resides. We found that both seasonal mean temperature and its standard deviation (SD) affected long-term survival among the 13 million Medicare beneficiaries (aged 65+) in this region during 2000-2013. A 1 °C increase in summer mean temperature corresponded to an increase of 2.5% in death rate. Whereas, 1 °C increase in winter mean temperature was associated with a decrease of 1.5%. Increases in seasonal temperature SD also influence mortality. We decomposed seasonal mean temperature and its temperature SD into long-term geographic contrasts between ZIP codes and annual anomalies within ZIP code. Effect modifications by different subgroups were also examined to find out whether certain individuals are more vulnerable. Our findings will be critical to future efforts assessing health risks related to the future climate change. PMID:27436237

  7. Effects of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on Colistin Resistance in Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wentao; Li, Yanjun; Guan, Jie; Zhao, Jin; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-05-01

    We tested the effects of various putative efflux pump inhibitors on colistin resistance in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Addition of 10 mg/liter cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to the test medium could significantly decrease the MICs of colistin-resistant strains. Time-kill assays showed CCCP could reverse colistin resistance and inhibit the regrowth of the resistant subpopulation, especially in Acinetobacter baumannii and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia These results suggest colistin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria can be suppressed and reversed by CCCP. PMID:26953203

  8. Using Fish Population Metrics to Compare the Effects of Artificial Reef Density

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Artificial reefs continue to be added as habitat throughout the world, yet questions remain about how reef design affects fish diversity and abundance. In the present study, the effects of reef density were assessed for fish communities and sizes of economically valuable Lutjanus campechanus 13 km off Port Mansfield, Texas, at a reef composed of more than 4000 concrete culverts. The study spanned from May to June in 2013 and 2014, and sites sampled included natural reefs, bare areas, and varying culvert patch density categories, ranging from 1–190 culverts. Abundances of adults and species evenness of juvenile populations differed between the years. Fish communities did not significantly differ among density categories; however, highest species richness and total abundances were observed at intermediate culvert densities and at natural reefs. Whereas the abundance of L. campechanus did not differ among density categories, mean total lengths of L. campechanus were greatest at the lower density. Our findings suggest that reefs should be deployed with intermediate patch density of 71–120 culverts in a 30-m radius to yield the highest fish abundances. PMID:26422472

  9. Publication Track Records as a Metric of Clinical Research Training Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Knapke, Jacqueline M.; Tsevat, Joel; Succop, Paul A.; Djawe, Kpandja; Kuhnell, Pierce; Haynes, Erin N.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical research training programs exist across the country, but no quantitative studies have been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the success of the clinical research training program at the University of Cincinnati by comparing the publication histories of pediatric fellows who graduated from the clinical and translational research master of science (MS) degree programs between 1995 and 2011 with fellows who did not pursue an MS degree. Among 296 pediatric fellows, 44 of 54 graduates (81%) published at least 1 first-authored paper, as compared with 149 of 242 (62%) fellows who did not obtain an MS degree (p<0.01). In multivariable analysis, 3-4 years after program completion, MS graduates published more papers overall (R2=0.10) and more first-authored papers than did non-MS graduates (R2=0.04). These findings suggest that graduate training in clinical and translational research is related to an increase in research productivity as assessed by publication rates. PMID:24330690

  10. Publication track records as a metric of clinical research training effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Knapke, Jacqueline M; Tsevat, Joel; Succop, Paul A; Djawe, Kpandja; Kuhnell, Pierce; Haynes, Erin N

    2013-12-01

    Clinical research training programs exist across the country, but no quantitative studies have been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the success of the clinical research training program at the University of Cincinnati by comparing the publication histories of pediatric fellows who graduated from the clinical and translational research Master of Science (MS) degree programs between 1995 and 2011 with fellows who did not pursue an MS degree. Among 296 pediatric fellows, 44 of 54 graduates (81%) published at least 1 first-authored paper, as compared with 149 of 242 (62%) fellows who did not obtain an MS degree (P < 0.01). In multivariable analysis, 3-4 years after program completion, MS graduates published more papers overall (R(2) = 0.10) and more first-authored papers than did non-MS graduates (R(2) = 0.04). These findings suggest that graduate training in clinical and translational research is related to an increase in research productivity as assessed by publication rates. PMID:24330690

  11. Metrication for the Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, John T.

    The scope of this book covers metrication management. It was created to fill the middle management need for condensed, authoritative information about the metrication process and was conceived as a working tool and a prime reference source. Written from a management point of view, it touches on virtually all aspects of metrication and highlights…

  12. Metrics in Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindbeck, John R.

    The United States is rapidly becoming a metric nation. Industry, education, business, and government are all studying the issue of metrication to learn how they can prepare for it. The book is designed to help teachers and students in career education programs learn something about metrics. Presented in an easily understood manner, the textbook's…

  13. Effect of Resistance Mechanisms on the Inoculum Effect of Carbapenem in Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates with Borderline Carbapenem Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dalak, Ma'ayan; Chmelnitsky, Ina; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to examine the effects of resistance mechanisms on several resistance phenotypes among carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates with borderline carbapenem MICs. We compared carbapenemase-negative K. pneumoniae with carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (CPKP) isolates with similar MICs. CPKP isolates exhibited a marked inoculum effect and were more resistant to the bactericidal effect of meropenem. This suggests that MIC measurements alone may not be sufficient in predicting the therapeutic efficacy of carbapenems against CPKP. PMID:25987630

  14. Effect of Resistance Mechanisms on the Inoculum Effect of Carbapenem in Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates with Borderline Carbapenem Resistance.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amos; Ben-Dalak, Ma'ayan; Chmelnitsky, Ina; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to examine the effects of resistance mechanisms on several resistance phenotypes among carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates with borderline carbapenem MICs. We compared carbapenemase-negative K. pneumoniae with carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (CPKP) isolates with similar MICs. CPKP isolates exhibited a marked inoculum effect and were more resistant to the bactericidal effect of meropenem. This suggests that MIC measurements alone may not be sufficient in predicting the therapeutic efficacy of carbapenems against CPKP. PMID:25987630

  15. NIH grant awards as a metric of clinical and translational research training effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Knapke, Jacqueline M; Haynes, Erin N; Kuhnell, Pierce; Tsevat, Joel

    2015-02-01

    The number of clinical research training programs has increased over the past 5-10 years, but few studies have quantitatively evaluated the effectiveness of these programs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical and translational research training program at the University of Cincinnati by comparing the number of National Institutes of Health grants awarded to pediatric fellows who graduated from the MS degree program between 1995 and 2013 versus fellows who did not pursue an MS degree. Among 394 pediatric fellows, 16 of 81 (20%) MS alumni were awarded at least one NIH grant, as compared with 28 of 313 (9%) fellows who did not obtain an MS degree (p < 0.02). In multivariable analysis, MS alumni were more than three times as likely to have received at least one grant than were non-MS fellows (OR = 3.5, 95% CI [1.7-7.2]; C-statistic = 0.71) and MS alumni were more likely to obtain at least one K-series (OR = 4.1, 95% CI [1.6-10.2]; C-statistic = 0.74), M-series (OR = 11.8, 95% CI [3.4-41.4]; C-statistic = 0.81), or R-series (OR = 10.1, 95% CI [2.4-42.8]; C-statistic = 0.74) grant than were non-MS fellows. These findings suggest that graduate training in clinical and translational research prepares graduates for the highly competitive field of clinical and translational research. PMID:25377275

  16. Multi-site study of diffusion metric variability: effects of site, vendor, field strength, and echo time on regions-of-interest and histogram-bin analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, K. G.; Chou, M.-C.; Preciado, R. I.; Gimi, B.; Rollins, N. K.; Song, A.; Turner, J.; Mori, S.

    2016-03-01

    It is now common for magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) based multi-site trials to include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as part of the protocol. It is also common for these sites to possess MR scanners of different manufacturers, different software and hardware, and different software licenses. These differences mean that scanners may not be able to acquire data with the same number of gradient amplitude values and number of available gradient directions. Variability can also occur in achievable b-values and minimum echo times. The challenge of a multi-site study then, is to create a common protocol by understanding and then minimizing the effects of scanner variability and identifying reliable and accurate diffusion metrics. This study describes the effect of site, scanner vendor, field strength, and TE on two diffusion metrics: the first moment of the diffusion tensor field (mean diffusivity, MD), and the fractional anisotropy (FA) using two common analyses (region-of-interest and mean-bin value of whole brain histograms). The goal of the study was to identify sources of variability in diffusion-sensitized imaging and their influence on commonly reported metrics. The results demonstrate that the site, vendor, field strength, and echo time all contribute to variability in FA and MD, though to different extent. We conclude that characterization of the variability of DTI metrics due to site, vendor, field strength, and echo time is a worthwhile step in the construction of multi-center trials.

  17. Pyrethroid resistance in Phytoseiulus macropilis (Acari: Phytoseiidae): cross-resistance, stability and effect of synergists.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Maria Cristina Vitelli; Sato, Mario Eidi

    2016-01-01

    Phytoseiulus macropilis Banks (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is an effective predator of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). The objectives of this research were to study the stability of fenpropathrin resistance and the cross-resistance relationships with different pyrethroids, and also to evaluate the effect of synergists [piperonyl butoxide (PBO), diethyl maleate (DEM) and S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF)] on fenpropathrin resistant and susceptible strains of this predaceous mite. The stability of fenpropathrin resistance was studied under laboratory conditions, using P. macropilis populations with initial frequencies of 75 and 50% of resistant mites. The percentages of fenpropathrin resistant mites were evaluated monthly for a period of up to 12 months. A trend toward decreased resistance frequencies was observed only during the first 3-4 months. After this initial decrease, the fenpropathrin resistance was shown to be stable, maintaining constant resistance frequencies (around 30%) until the end of the evaluation period. Toxicity tests carried out using fenpropathrin resistant and susceptible strains of P. macropilis indicated strong positive cross-resistance between fenpropathrin and the pyrethroids bifenthrin and deltamethrin. Bioassays with the synergists DEM, DEF and PBO were also performed. The maximum synergism ratio (SR = LC50 without synergist/LC50 with synergist) detected for the three evaluated synergists (PBO, DEM, DEF) was 5.86 (for DEF), indicating low influence of enzyme detoxification processes in fenpropathrin resistance. PMID:26530989

  18. Metric Education and the Metrics Debate: A Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappelet, Jean Loup

    A short history of the use of the metric system is given. The role of education in metrication is discussed. The metric activities of three groups of metrics advocates, the business community, private groups, and government agencies, are described. Arguments advanced by metric opponents are also included. The author compares the metric debate with…

  19. Metrics That Matter.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Julia C; Frakt, Austin B; Pizer, Steven D

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, performance metrics are seen as key components for accurately measuring and improving health care value. Disappointment in the ability of chosen metrics to meet these goals is exemplified in a recent Institute of Medicine report that argues for a consensus-building process to determine a simplified set of reliable metrics. Overall health care goals should be defined and then metrics to measure these goals should be considered. If appropriate data for the identified goals are not available, they should be developed. We use examples from our work in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) on validating waiting time and mental health metrics to highlight other key issues for metric selection and implementation. First, we focus on the need for specification and predictive validation of metrics. Second, we discuss strategies to maintain the fidelity of the data used in performance metrics over time. These strategies include using appropriate incentives and data sources, using composite metrics, and ongoing monitoring. Finally, we discuss the VA's leadership in developing performance metrics through a planned upgrade in its electronic medical record system to collect more comprehensive VHA and non-VHA data, increasing the ability to comprehensively measure outcomes. PMID:26951272

  20. Independent Metrics for Protein Backbone and Side-Chain Flexibility: Time Scales and Effects of Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Waldner, Birgit J; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-03-10

    Conformational dynamics are central for understanding biomolecular structure and function, since biological macromolecules are inherently flexible at room temperature and in solution. Computational methods are nowadays capable of providing valuable information on the conformational ensembles of biomolecules. However, analysis tools and intuitive metrics that capture dynamic information from in silico generated structural ensembles are limited. In standard work-flows, flexibility in a conformational ensemble is represented through residue-wise root-mean-square fluctuations or B-factors following a global alignment. Consequently, these approaches relying on global alignments discard valuable information on local dynamics. Results inherently depend on global flexibility, residue size, and connectivity. In this study we present a novel approach for capturing positional fluctuations based on multiple local alignments instead of one single global alignment. The method captures local dynamics within a structural ensemble independent of residue type by splitting individual local and global degrees of freedom of protein backbone and side-chains. Dependence on residue type and size in the side-chains is removed via normalization with the B-factors of the isolated residue. As a test case, we demonstrate its application to a molecular dynamics simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) on the millisecond time scale. This allows for illustrating different time scales of backbone and side-chain flexibility. Additionally, we demonstrate the effects of ligand binding on side-chain flexibility of three serine proteases. We expect our new methodology for quantifying local flexibility to be helpful in unraveling local changes in biomolecular dynamics. PMID:26579739

  1. About Using the Metric System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This booklet contains a brief introduction to the use of the metric system. Topics covered include: (1) what is the metric system; (2) how to think metric; (3) some advantages of the metric system; (4) basics of the metric system; (5) how to measure length, area, volume, mass and temperature the metric way; (6) some simple calculations using…

  2. Geoelectrical behavior of a Fault Zone: the meaning of the electrical resistivity of metric-scale segments of the Liquiñe-Ofqui and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault Systems, Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquer, T.; Arancibia, G.; Yanez, G. A.; Estay, N.; Rowland, J. V.; Figueroa, R.; Iturrieta, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    The geoelectrical behavior of blind fault zones has been studied by different authors at decametric-to-kilometric scales, and inferred to reveal the dimensions of the main structural domains of a fault zone (core vs. damage zone). However, there is still a lack in the application of electrical methods in exposed fault zones, despite the importance of validating the inferences based on electrical measurements with direct geologic observation. In this study we correlate the results of structural mapping and geoelectrical measurements in two metric-scale, very well exposed segments of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault System (ALFS), Southern Andes. The LOFS is an active dextral and dextral-normal ca. 1200-km-long Cenozoic intra-arc structure that strikes NNE to NE. Although the LOFS and the ALFS cross-cut each other, the ALFS is an apparently older basement NW-striking fault system where mainly sinistral movement is recorded. Two 22-m-long transects were mapped revealing in both examples a simple core and an assymetric damage zone with more frequency of fractures in the hanging wall than in the footwall. The LOFS outcrop showed a WNW-striking, 65°S-dipping core; the ALFS, a NW-striking, 60°SW-dipping core. A 2D direct-current electrical survey was made at each locality, orthogonal to the respective strike of the core. The field installation of the electrical survey used two electrode configurations for each outcrop: (1) electrodes were put in a vertical wall of rock, which gives a resistivity profile in plan view; and (2) electrodes were put in the ground, which gives a cross-section resistivity profile. The combined structural and electrical results suggest that: (1) it is possible to discriminate the geoelectrical response of the main metric-scale structural domains: the core and the fractured damage zones are relative conductors (20-200 ohm-m), whereas the less fractured damage zones are relative resistive volumes (500

  3. Frequency of Extreme Heat Event as a Surrogate Exposure Metric for Examining the Human Health Effects of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Romeo Upperman, Crystal; Parker, Jennifer; Jiang, Chengsheng; He, Xin; Murtugudde, Raghuram; Sapkota, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigation of the impact of climate change on human health, particularly chronic diseases, is hindered by the lack of exposure metrics that can be used as a marker of climate change that are compatible with health data. Here, we present a surrogate exposure metric created using a 30-year baseline (1960–1989) that allows users to quantify long-term changes in exposure to frequency of extreme heat events with near unabridged spatial coverage in a scale that is compatible with national/state health outcome data. We evaluate the exposure metric by decade, seasonality, area of the country, and its ability to capture long-term changes in weather (climate), including natural climate modes. Our findings show that this generic exposure metric is potentially useful to monitor trends in the frequency of extreme heat events across varying regions because it captures long-term changes; is sensitive to the natural climate modes (ENSO events); responds well to spatial variability, and; is amenable to spatial/temporal aggregation, making it useful for epidemiological studies. PMID:26641244

  4. A neural net-based approach to software metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boetticher, G.; Srinivas, Kankanahalli; Eichmann, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Software metrics provide an effective method for characterizing software. Metrics have traditionally been composed through the definition of an equation. This approach is limited by the fact that all the interrelationships among all the parameters be fully understood. This paper explores an alternative, neural network approach to modeling metrics. Experiments performed on two widely accepted metrics, McCabe and Halstead, indicate that the approach is sound, thus serving as the groundwork for further exploration into the analysis and design of software metrics.

  5. A Sensor-Independent Gust Hazard Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    2001-01-01

    A procedure for calculating an intuitive hazard metric for gust effects on airplanes is described. The hazard metric is for use by pilots and is intended to replace subjective pilot reports (PIREPs) of the turbulence level. The hazard metric is composed of three numbers: the first describes the average airplane response to the turbulence, the second describes the positive peak airplane response to the gusts, and the third describes the negative peak airplane response to the gusts. The hazard metric is derived from any time history of vertical gust measurements and is thus independent of the sensor making the gust measurements. The metric is demonstrated for one simulated airplane encountering different types of gusts including those derived from flight data recorder measurements of actual accidents. The simulated airplane responses to the gusts compare favorably with the hazard metric.

  6. Effects of atmospheric moisture on rock resistivity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.

    1973-01-01

    This study examines the changes in resistivity of rock samples as induced by atmospheric moisture. Experiments were performed on samples of hematitic sandstone, pyrite, and galena. The sandstone underwent a change in resistivity of four orders of magnitude when it was measured in a vacuum of 500 ntorr and in air of 37% relative humidity. Pyrite and galena showed no variations in resistivity when they were measured under the same conditions. These results, plus others obtained elsewhere, indicate that rocks of the resistive type are affected in their electrical properties by atmospheric moisture, whereas rocks of the conductive type are not. The experimental evidence obtained is difficult to reconcile with a model of aqueous electrolytic conduction on the sample surface. It is instead suggested that adsorbed water molecules alter the surface resistivity in a manner similar to that observed in semiconductors and insulators.

  7. Exposure effects on deep-ultraviolet resist thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluswamy, Pary; Glass, Thomas R.

    1998-06-01

    Most deep ultraviolet (DUV) resist models available today utilize the Dill parameters to characterize resist exposure. These models assume that the thickness of the resist remains constant through exposure and post-exposure bake (PEB). The thickness is only affected by development in the models when resist is removed from the exposed or unexposed regions, depending on whether it is a positive or negative resist. It has been observed that a number of DUV resists change thickness upon exposure. This effect is expected to have an impact on the post-exposure acid profile calculated for modeling purposes. In this paper, we present data on the thickness changes for different resists and the effect of exposure to PEB delay on the change.

  8. Powerful Metrics: Strategic and Transformative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    To be a valuable partner at the strategic level, human resources can and should contribute to both institutional effectiveness measurement and workforce metrics. In this article, the author examines how to link HR initiatives with key institutional strategies, clarifies essential HR responsibilities for workforce results, explores return on human…

  9. Improved contact resistance in ReSe2 thin film field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbet, Chris M.; Sonde, Sushant S.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and device characteristics of exfoliated, few-layer, ReSe2 field effect transistors (FET) and a method to improve contact resistance by up to three orders of magnitude using ultra-high-vacuum annealing (UHV). Many devices were studied in the absence of light and we found an average contact of 750 Ω . cm after UHV treatment. The median FET metrics were similar to other transition metal dichalcogenides: field effect mobility ˜6.7 cm2/V . s, subthreshold swing ˜1.2 V/decade, and Ion/Ioff ˜ 105. In devices with low Rc current saturation was observed and is attributed to injection limited transport.

  10. Effect of Ampicillin, Streptomycin, Penicillin and Tetracycline on Metal Resistant and Non-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chudobova, Dagmar; Dostalova, Simona; Blazkova, Iva; Michalek, Petr; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Sklenar, Matej; Nejdl, Lukas; Kudr, Jiri; Gumulec, Jaromir; Tmejova, Katerina; Konecna, Marie; Vaculovicova, Marketa; Hynek, David; Masarik, Michal; Kynicky, Jindrich; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2014-01-01

    There is an arising and concerning issue in the field of bacterial resistance, which is confirmed by the number of deaths associated with drug-resistant bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of antibiotics on Staphylococcus aureus non-resistant strain and strains resistant to cadmium or lead ions. Metal resistant strains were created by the gradual addition of 2 mM solution of metal ions (cadmium or lead) to the S. aureus culture. An increasing antimicrobial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, penicillin and tetracycline (0, 10, 25, 50, 75, 150, 225 and 300 µM) on the resistant strains was observed using a method of growth curves. A significant growth inhibition (compared to control) of cadmium resistant cells was observed in the presence of all the four different antibiotics. On the other hand, the addition of streptomycin and ampicillin did not inhibit the growth of lead resistant strain. Other antibiotics were still toxic to the bacterial cells. Significant differences in the morphology of cell walls were indicated by changes in the cell shape. Our data show that the presence of metal ions in the urban environment may contribute to the development of bacterial strain resistance to other substances including antibiotics, which would have an impact on public health. PMID:24651395

  11. Metric Education Evaluation Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansky, Bob; And Others

    This document was developed out of a need for a complete, carefully designed set of evaluation instruments and procedures that might be applied in metric inservice programs across the nation. Components of this package were prepared in such a way as to permit local adaptation to the evaluation of a broad spectrum of metric education activities.…

  12. What About Metric?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbrow, Louis E.

    Implications of the change to the metric system in our daily lives are discussed. Advantages of the metric system are presented, especially its decimal base and ease of calculation which are demonstrated by several worked examples. Some further sources of information are listed. A world map indicates the few remaining countries that have not yet…

  13. Metrics for Cosmetology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of cosmetology students, this instructional package on cosmetology is part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational terminology, measurement terms, and tools currently in use. Each of the…

  14. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  15. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Michael S.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A.

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  16. Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

    2006-01-01

    Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of 2…

  17. Metrics for Food Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in food distribution, this instructional package is one of five for the marketing and distribution cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  18. Metrics for Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in transportation, this instructional package is one of five for the marketing and distribution cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational terminology,…

  19. Introduction to Metrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgecomb, Philip L.; Shapiro, Marion

    Addressed to vocational, or academic middle or high school students, this book reviews mathematics fundamentals using metric units of measurement. It utilizes a common-sense approach to the degree of accuracy needed in solving actual trade and every-day problems. Stress is placed on reading off metric measurements from a ruler or tape, and on…

  20. Metrics for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of agricultural mechanics students, this instructional package is one of four for the agribusiness and natural resources occupations cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  1. The effect of resist material composition on development behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Shinya; Itani, Toshiro

    2015-03-01

    The relation between resist composition and its development behavior was evaluated. The effect of a hydrophobic unit on a resist and on its development behavior was systematically investigated. The resist was exposed to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or electron beam (EB) exposure, and the development behavior of the film was observed by high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). The introduction of a hydrophobic group in the resist resulted in diminished swelling behavior and uniform dissolution. The resist resin cluster shape was also altered by the introduction of the hydrophobic group. These behaviors imply that the resin-resin and resin-tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution interactions differ. EUV lithography suffers from the photon issue that causes stochastic uniformity; however, in this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of achieving a better uniformity of resist patterning by altering the resist formulation.

  2. SU-E-I-28: Introduction and Investigation of Effective Diameter Ratios as a New Patient Size Metric for Use in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, R; Sinclair, L; Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Bidari, S; Cormack, B; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce and investigate effective diameter ratios as a new patient metric for use in computed tomography protocol selection as a supplement to patient-specific size parameter data. Methods: The metrics of outer effective diameter and inner effective diameter were measured for 7 post-mortem subjects scanned with a standardized chest/abdomen/pelvis (CAP) protocol on a 320-slice MDCT scanner. The outer effective diameter was calculated by obtaining the anterior/posterior and lateral dimensions of the imaged anatomy at the middle of the scan range using Effective Diameter= SQRT(AP height*Lat Width). The inner effective diameter was calculated with the same equation using the AP and Lat dimensions of the anatomy excluding the adipose tissue. The ratio of outer to inner effective diameter was calculated for each subject. A relationship to BMI, weight, and CTDI conversion coefficients was investigated. Results: For the largest subject with BMI of 43.85 kg/m2 and weight of 255 lbs the diameter ratio was calculated as 1.33. For the second largest subject with BMI of 33.5 kg/m2 and weight of 192.4 lbs the diameter ratio was measured as 1.43, indicating a larger percentage of adipose tissue in the second largest subject’s anatomical composition. For the smallest subject at BMI of 17.4 kg/m2 and weight of 86 lbs a similar tissue composition was indicated as a subject with BMI of 24.2 kg/m2 and weight of 136 lbs as they had the same diameter ratios of 1.11. Conclusion: The diameter ratio proves to contain information about anatomical composition that the BMI and weight alone do not. The utility of this metric is still being examined but could prove useful for determining MDCT techniques and for giving a more in depth detail of the composition of a patient’s body habitus.

  3. Unraveling the effect of resist composition on EUV optics contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollentier, I.; Neira, I.; Goethals, A.-M.; Gronheid, R.; Tarutani, S.; Tamaoki, H.; Tsubaki, H.; Takahashi, T.

    2011-04-01

    EUV lithography is the most promising new technology for the next node of semiconductor devices. Unfortunately, the high energy photons are likely to generate more contamination than observed with ArF or KrF light which can reduce the transmission of the EUV optics. Resist outgassing is considered to be an important contamination source, however, not enough is known about the way a resist composition influences the contamination growth rate, while this information is crucial to guide the development of EUV resists. To reduce the knowledge gap, FUJIFILM and imec started a joint effort aimed at systematically exploring the contribution of the different resist components and at understanding the effect of chemical modifications of the different components on the contamination tendency of resists. The project focuses on (1) the identification and quantification of the outgassing components from resist by RGA measurements, (2) on the quantification of the resist related contamination rate by witness sample (WS) testing, and (3) on the correlation between these two results knowing the details of the resist chemistry. To explore the effect of the resist composition upon contamination growth, the following approach was followed. The focus was put on chemically amplified resists (CAR), since this chemistry is mostly used in EUV lithography. Both PAG blended as well as PAG bound systems were explored, and the following resist components are individually varied: polymer matrix, blocking groups, PAG type and concentration. In this way the total contamination of a resist can be divided into the separate contributions of the different resist components upon the contamination growth rate, which is a huge step forward in the understanding of optics contamination due to resist.

  4. Effect of Tulathromycin on Colonization Resistance, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Virulence of Human Gut Microbiota in Chemostats

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Zhou, Shengxi; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Xu; Liu, Zhenli; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate microbiological safety of tulathromycin on human intestinal bacteria, tulathromycin (0, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 μg/mL) was added into Chemostats. Before and after drug exposure, we monitored (1) population, SCFA products, antimicrobial resistance, and colonization resistance of gut microbiota, and (2) the antimicrobial resistance genes, transferability, virulent genes, pathogenicity of Enterococus faecalis. Results showed that low level of tulathromycin did not exhibit microbiological hazard on resistance selection and colonization resistance. However, high level of tulathromycin (10 and 100 μg/mL) may disturb colonization resistance of human gut microbiota and select antimicrobial resistant E. faecalis. Most of the selected resistant E. faecalis carried resistant gene of ermB, transferable element of Tn1545 and three virulence genes (esp, cylA, and ace). One of them (E. faecalis 143) was confirmed to have higher horizontal transfer risk and higher pathogenicity. The calculated no observable adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) and microbiological acceptable daily intake (mADI) in our study was 1 μg/mL and 14.66 μg/kg.bw/day, respectively. PMID:27092131

  5. Radiation Effects of Commercial Resistive Random Access Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth; Berg, Melanie; Wilcox, Edward; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Figueiredo, Marco; Buchner, Stephen; Khachatrian, Ani; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We present results for the single-event effect response of commercial production-level resistive random access memories. We found that the resistive memory arrays are immune to heavy ion-induced upsets. However, the devices were susceptible to single-event functional interrupts, due to upsets from the control circuits. The intrinsic radiation tolerant nature of resistive memory makes the technology an attractive consideration for future space applications.

  6. Neoclassical viscosity effects on resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.G.; Oh, Y.H.; Choi, D.I. ); Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The flux-surface-averaged linearized resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer equations including the compressibility, diamagnetic drift, and neoclassical viscosity terms are derived in toroidal geometry. These equations describe the resistive layer dynamics of resistive MHD modes over the collisionality regime between the banana plateau and the Pfirsch--Schlueter. From the resulting equations, the effects of neoclassical viscosity on the stability of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes are investigated numerically. Also, a study is given for the problem of how the neoclassical resistive MHD mode is generated as the collisionality is reduced. It is shown that the neoclassical viscosity terms give a significant destabilizing effect for the tearing and resistive ballooning modes. This destabilization comes mainly from the reduction of the stabilizing effect of the parallel ion sound compression by the ion neoclassical viscosity. In the banana-plateau collisionality limit, where the compressibility is negligible, the dispersion relations of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes reduce to the same form, with the threshold value of the driving force given by {Delta}{sub {ital c}}=0. On the other hand, with the finite neoclassical effect it is found that the neoclassical resistive MHD instability is generated in agreement with previous results. Furthermore, it is shown that this later instability can be generated in a wide range of the collisionality including near the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime as well as the banana-plateau regime, suggesting that this mode is a probable cause of anomalous transport.

  7. Effects of Transgenic Glyphosate-Resistant Crops on Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) is a highly effective, non-selective herbicide. Herbicide-resistant crop (HRC) has been the most successful trait used in transgenic crops throughout the world. Transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops (GRCs) have been commercialized and grown extensively in the...

  8. Metrication - Our Responsibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroner, Klaus E.

    1972-01-01

    The metric system will soon be adopted in the United States. Engineering college educators can play a major role in this revision. Various suggestions are listed for teachers, authors and others. (PS)

  9. A metric for success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, Gary P.

    1994-05-01

    The federal agencies are working with industry to ease adoption of the metric system. The goal is to help U.S. industry compete more successfully in the global marketplace, increase exports, and create new jobs. The strategy is to use federal procurement, financial assistance, and other business-related activities to encourage voluntary conversion. Based upon the positive experiences of firms and industries that have converted, federal agencies have concluded that metric use will yield long-term benefits that are beyond any one-time costs or inconveniences. It may be time for additional steps to move the Nation out of its dual-system comfort zone and continue to progress toward metrication. This report includes 'Metric Highlights in U.S. History'.

  10. An Arithmetic Metric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominici, Diego

    2011-01-01

    This work introduces a distance between natural numbers not based on their position on the real line but on their arithmetic properties. We prove some metric properties of this distance and consider a possible extension.

  11. Sustainability Indicators and Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is about preserving human existence. Indicators and metrics are absolutely necessary to provide at least a semi-quantitative assessment of progress towards or away from sustainability. Otherwise, it becomes impossible to objectively assess whether progress is bei...

  12. Effects of cost metric on cost-effectiveness of protected-area network design in urban landscapes.

    PubMed

    Burkhalter, J C; Lockwood, J L; Maslo, B; Fenn, K H; Leu, K

    2016-04-01

    A common goal in conservation planning is to acquire areas that are critical to realizing biodiversity goals in the most cost-effective manner. The way monetary acquisition costs are represented in such planning is an understudied but vital component to realizing cost efficiencies. We sought to design a protected-area network within a forested urban region that would protect 17 birds of conservation concern. We compared the total costs and spatial structure of the optimal protected-area networks produced using three acquisition-cost surrogates (area, agricultural land value, and tax-assessed land value). Using the tax-assessed land values there was a 73% and 78% cost savings relative to networks derived using area or agricultural land value, respectively. This cost reduction was due to the considerable heterogeneity in acquisition costs revealed in tax-assessed land values, especially for small land parcels, and the corresponding ability of the optimization algorithm to identify lower-cost parcels for inclusion that had equal value to our target species. Tax-assessed land values also reflected the strong spatial differences in acquisition costs (US$0.33/m(2)-$55/m(2)) and thus allowed the algorithm to avoid inclusion of high-cost parcels when possible. Our results add to a nascent but growing literature that suggests conservation planners must consider the cost surrogate they use when designing protected-area networks. We suggest that choosing cost surrogates that capture spatial- and size-dependent heterogeneity in acquisition costs may be relevant to establishing protected areas in urbanizing ecosystems. PMID:26395858

  13. Effect of flow twisting on hydraulic resistance and heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, V. Ya.; Makarov, N. A.

    1989-02-01

    On the basis of dimensional analysis through a differentiated approach to the dimensions of length we have obtained formulas for the effect of flow twisting in a circular tube on the hydraulic resistance and exchange of heat.

  14. Effect of thread pitch and frictional coefficient on the stress concentration in metric nut-bolt connections

    SciTech Connect

    Dragoni, E. . Dept. of Mechanics)

    1994-02-01

    By means of the finite element method, this paper establishes how much the stress state within standard metric nut-bolt connections is affected by variations of the thread pitch and of the frictional coefficient. Following a validated simplified approach, the actual three-dimensional geometry of each connection is replaced by an axisymmetric model which recreates the outline of the joint on an appropriate meridional section. The numerical data prove that, for prescribed nominal thread diameter and bolt load, The peak stress in the screw monotonically increases as the pitch decreases. Further, as far as complete sticking between nut and bolt is not achieved, the stress level linearly increases with the coefficient of friction, the rate of variations being higher at the lowest pitches.

  15. Marketing metrics for medical practices.

    PubMed

    Zahaluk, David; Baum, Neil

    2012-01-01

    There's a saying by John Wanamaker who pontificated, "Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don't know which half". Today you have opportunities to determine which parts of your marketing efforts are effective and what is wasted. However, you have to measure your marketing results. This article will discuss marketing metrics and how to use them to get the best bang for your marketing buck. PMID:22834190

  16. Effect of prolonged hypokinesia on resistance of resistive vessels in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltykova, V. A.

    1982-01-01

    Under the effect of prolonged hypokinesia, the perfusion pressure in resistive vessels, measured under conditions of deep anesthesia and complete denervation, increased by approximately the same degree as arterial pressure in non-anesthetized animals. The increase in arterial, perfusion pressure and the resistance of resistive vessels in animals subjected to prolonged hypokinesia was accompanied by an increase in adrenoreactivity. During prolonged hypokinesia, partial obliteration of the vascular bed of the skeletal muscles plays a significant role in the observed increase in resistance of vessels of the extremities. The increase in adrenoreactivity of the vessels during hypokinesia may be realized as a partial case of an increase in the adrenoreactivity of structures whose innervation is disturbed.

  17. Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle— Uncertainty Principle Caused byCollision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    Put two counters at origin O and particle P respectively, the wave-number difference counted by two counters at same moment is the length x between P and O (as a rod). The metrical result of known Doppler effect is: x(θ) = x0 (1+ β cos θ) (1). β= v/c, v is the velocity of counter to light-source, c = c+ = c -is the metrical one-way velocity of light, v • n = v cos θ, θ is the angle between v and unit-vector n of light-beam pointing to counter from light-source, x0 is the metrical length when v = 0. The result counted by a counter in one second is the light-wave frequency: f(θ) = f0 (1 -β cos θ) (2). f0 is the metrical frequency when v = 0. From Eq.(1) and Eq (2): x 2 (θ) = x0 2 (1+2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ); f 2 (θ) = f 0 2 (1-2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ). Define the square-difference root of the metrical results in two contrary directions: ∆x = (x 2 (0) -x 2 (π)) 1/2 = 2 x0 β 1/2 (3); ∆f = (f 2 (0) -f 2 (π))1/2 = i 2 f0 β 1/2 (4); ∆x • ∆f = i 4 x0 f0 β (5). From p = m v and the variance in absolute average value of Eq.(2) ∆f= 2 f0 ∆v/π c, Eq.(5) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π x0 p (6). Once a particle collides with CMB photon, its velocity will change as in a quasi-Brownian motion. Let S be the average space-distance between CMB photons, the time-interval between two collisions is S / v, v is the velocity of particle. Because x0 is the length of an imaginary resting rod, i.e., after every collision the origin O must be reset jumpily at a new position and the jumpy distance (S/v) • ∆v is just the displacement of particle x0 , ∆v is the variance in velocity caused by each collision. The variance in momentum of particle ∆p in each collision is the average momentum p0 of CMB photon, then we obtain: x0 = S ∆v / v = S ∆p /p = S p0 /p and Eq.(6) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π p0 S (7). The average energy and average momentum of CMB photon in 2.7K are: e0 = k T= 3.72•10-16 erg; p0 = e0 /c =1.24•10 -26 g cm s -1 . The

  18. [Effect of Three Typical Disinfection Byproducts on Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance].

    PubMed

    Lü, Lu; Zhang, Meng-lu; Wang, Chun-ming; Lin, Hui-rong; Yu, Xin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) on bacterial antibiotic resistance was investigated in this study. chlorodibromomethane (CDBM), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and chloral hydrate (CH) were selected, which belong to trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and aldehydes, respectively. After exposure to the selected DBPs, the resistance change of the tested strains to antibiotics was determined. As a result, all of the three DBPs induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to gain increased resistance to the five antibiotics tested, and the DBPs ranked as IAA > CH > CDBM according to their enhancement effects. Multidrug resistance could also be enhanced by treatment with IAA. The same result was observed in Escherichia coli K12, suggesting that the effect of DBPs on antibiotic resistance was a common phenomenon. The mechanism was probably that DBPs stimulated oxidative stress, which induced mutagenesis. And the antibiotic resistance mutation frequency could be increased along with mutagenesis. This study revealed that the acquisition of bacterial antibiotic resistance might be related to DBPs in drinking water systems. Besides the genotoxicological risks, the epidemiological risks of DBPs should not be overlooked. PMID:26489321

  19. Effects of tissue resistivities on electroencephalogram sensitivity distribution.

    PubMed

    Laarne, P; Kauppinen, P; Hyttinen, J; Malmivuo, J; Eskola, H

    1999-09-01

    The effects of tissue resistivities on EEG amplitudes were studied using an anatomically accurate computer model based on the finite difference method (FDM) and lead field analysis covering the whole brain area with 180,000 nodes. Five tissue types and three lead fields were considered for analysis. The changes in sensitivity distribution are directly comparable to changes in the potential distribution on the scalp. The results indicate that a 10% decrease in any tissue resistivity caused 3.0-4.1% differences in the sensitivity distributions of the selected EEG leads. The applied 10% decrease in the resistivity values covers only a fraction of the range of variation of 50% to 100% reported in the literature. The use of a 55% decreased skull resistivity value or a commonly applied three-compartment model increased the differences to 28% and 33%, respectively. In conclusion, both a realistic anatomy and accurate resistivity data are important in EEG head models. PMID:10723891

  20. Successful Experiences in Teaching Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Jeffrey V., Ed.

    In this publication are presentations on specific experiences in teaching metrics, made at a National Bureau of Standards conference. Ideas of value to teachers and administrators are described in reports on: SI units of measure; principles and practices of teaching metric; metric and the school librarian; teaching metric through television and…

  1. Evaluation of a Metric Booklet as a Supplement to Teaching the Metric System to Undergraduate Non-Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exum, Kenith Gene

    Examined is the effectiveness of a method of teaching the metric system using the booklet, Metric Supplement to Mathematics, in combination with a physical science textbook. The participants in the study were randomly selected undergraduates in a non-science oriented program of study. Instruments used included the Metric Supplement to Mathematics…

  2. Testing, Requirements, and Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda; Hyatt, Larry; Hammer, Theodore F.; Huffman, Lenore; Wilson, William

    1998-01-01

    The criticality of correct, complete, testable requirements is a fundamental tenet of software engineering. Also critical is complete requirements based testing of the final product. Modern tools for managing requirements allow new metrics to be used in support of both of these critical processes. Using these tools, potential problems with the quality of the requirements and the test plan can be identified early in the life cycle. Some of these quality factors include: ambiguous or incomplete requirements, poorly designed requirements databases, excessive or insufficient test cases, and incomplete linkage of tests to requirements. This paper discusses how metrics can be used to evaluate the quality of the requirements and test to avoid problems later. Requirements management and requirements based testing have always been critical in the implementation of high quality software systems. Recently, automated tools have become available to support requirements management. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), automated requirements management tools are being used on several large projects. The use of these tools opens the door to innovative uses of metrics in characterizing test plan quality and assessing overall testing risks. In support of these projects, the Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) is working to develop and apply a metrics program that utilizes the information now available through the application of requirements management tools. Metrics based on this information provides real-time insight into the testing of requirements and these metrics assist the Project Quality Office in its testing oversight role. This paper discusses three facets of the SATC's efforts to evaluate the quality of the requirements and test plan early in the life cycle, thus preventing costly errors and time delays later.

  3. Effect of wall roughness on fluid transport resistance in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Li, Yibing; Park, Taehyo; Chen, Xi

    2011-10-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of wall roughness on the transport resistance of water molecules inside modified carbon nanotubes. The effective shear stress, which characterizes the strong interaction between liquid molecules and solid wall, is a quantity that dominates the nanofluidic transport resistance. Both the effective shear stress and nominal viscosity arise with the increase of the amplitude or the decrease of the wavelength of roughness. The effect of roughness is also relatively more prominent in smaller nanotubes. The molecular mechanism is elucidated through the study of the radial density profile, hydrogen bonding, and velocity field of the confined water molecules.

  4. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of mechanical surface treatments as well as heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. Mechanical surface treatments were found to have little or no effect on the erosion resistance. This is due to the formation by particle impact of a work hardened surface layer regardless of the initial surface condition. The erosion resistance of Al single crystals is found to be independent of orientation. This is due to destruction of the surface microstructure and formation of a polycrystalline surface layer by the impact of erodant particles as observed by X-ray diffraction. While upon solution treatment of annealed 6061 aluminum the increase in hardness is accompanied by an increase in erosion resistance, precipitation treatment which causes a further increase in hardness results in slightly lower erosion resistance. Using two types of erodant particles, glass beads and crushed glass, the erosion rate is found to be strongly dependent on erodant particle shape, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass as compared to glass beads. While for erosion with glass beads heat treatment of 1045 steel had a profound effect on its erosion resistance, little or no such effect was observed for erosion with crushed glass.

  5. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of erosion by glass beads and crushed glass and by heat treatments on the erosional resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. The aluminum alloy's erosion resistance was found to be insensitive to mechanical surface treatment applied before testing, and was determined to depend on the properties of the work-hardened surface layer; this was also demonstrated for aluminum alloy single crystals. The aluminum alloy heat treatments included annealing, solution, and precipitation. Solution was found to increase erosion resistance but precipitation had the opposite effect. Hardness showed no correlation with erosion resistance for either aluminum alloy steel. The steel tests showed that crushed glass provides an order of magnitude more erosion than glass beads.

  6. A filled duration illusion in music: Effects of metrical subdivision on the perception and production of beat tempo.

    PubMed Central

    Repp, Bruno H.; Bruttomesso, Meijin

    2010-01-01

    This study replicates and extends previous findings suggesting that metrical subdivision slows the perceived beat tempo (Repp, 2008). Here, musically trained participants produced the subdivisions themselves and were found to speed up, thus compensating for the perceived slowing. This was shown in a synchronization-continuation paradigm (Experiment 1) and in a reproduction task (Experiment 2a). Participants also judged the tempo of a subdivided sequence as being slower than that of a preceding simple beat sequence (Experiment 2b). Experiment 2 also included nonmusician participants, with similar results. Tempo measurements of famous pianists’ recordings of two variation movements from Beethoven sonatas revealed a strong tendency to play the first variation (subdivided beats) faster than the theme (mostly simple beats). A similar tendency was found in musicians’ laboratory performances of a simple theme and variations, despite instruc-tions to keep the tempo constant (Experiment 3a). When playing melodic sequences in which only one of three beats per measure was subdivided, musicians tended to play these beats faster and to perceive them as longer than adjacent beats, and they played the whole sequence faster than a sequence without any subdivisions (Experiments 3b and 3c). The results amply demonstrate a filled duration illusion in rhythm perception and music performance: Intervals containing events seem longer than empty intervals and thus must be shortened to be perceived as equal in duration. PMID:20689669

  7. Effect of surface fissure on apparent resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailhac, P.; Gance, J.; Malet, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fissures are features of interest, prone to create preferential flow path, modifying locally the soil hydrogeological behavior. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a suitable tool to monitor such preferential flow path. However, this technique is not efficient in the presence of surface fissure, due to a bad resistivity recovering around the fissure vicinity during the inversion process. Therefore, we propose a description of fissure effect on raw apparent resistivity on three resistivity arrays. The purposes of the study are multiple. First, we aim at making ERT users aware of surface fissure effect, and propose a first help to interpret basically resistivity pseudo sections. Second, we propose to ERT users to automatically conduct a surface fissure survey on the studied profile, in order to consider each fissure in a forward DC model and to suppress their effect. Finally, this study is only a first step toward 2D fissure shape inversion, and time-lapse monitoring of fissure drying and filling. In this study, we create a fissure model based on different geomorphological descriptors. After describing the FEM-DC forward modeling strategy, we investigate the fissure effect on pseudo section of apparent resistivity for a Wenner-Schlumberger (WS), a dipole-dipole (DD) and a gradient (GRAD) array. We determine a fissure detectability threshold for each array and perform a sensitivity analysis on the different fissure parameters (position, width, depth, dip angles...). The crack filling or drying effect is also investigated. The possibility to remove fissure effect and to propose a first interpretation of time-lapse data is illustrated on real data. This study show again the higher sensitivity of the DD array compared to the GRAD and WS arrays. Not only the maximal amplitude in the pseudo section is higher for the DD array, but also the anomaly pattern created by the fissure is much larger for this acquisition geometry. The minimal depth detectable for the DD

  8. An Underwater Color Image Quality Evaluation Metric.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miao; Sowmya, Arcot

    2015-12-01

    Quality evaluation of underwater images is a key goal of underwater video image retrieval and intelligent processing. To date, no metric has been proposed for underwater color image quality evaluation (UCIQE). The special absorption and scattering characteristics of the water medium do not allow direct application of natural color image quality metrics especially to different underwater environments. In this paper, subjective testing for underwater image quality has been organized. The statistical distribution of the underwater image pixels in the CIELab color space related to subjective evaluation indicates the sharpness and colorful factors correlate well with subjective image quality perception. Based on these, a new UCIQE metric, which is a linear combination of chroma, saturation, and contrast, is proposed to quantify the non-uniform color cast, blurring, and low-contrast that characterize underwater engineering and monitoring images. Experiments are conducted to illustrate the performance of the proposed UCIQE metric and its capability to measure the underwater image enhancement results. They show that the proposed metric has comparable performance to the leading natural color image quality metrics and the underwater grayscale image quality metrics available in the literature, and can predict with higher accuracy the relative amount of degradation with similar image content in underwater environments. Importantly, UCIQE is a simple and fast solution for real-time underwater video processing. The effectiveness of the presented measure is also demonstrated by subjective evaluation. The results show better correlation between the UCIQE and the subjective mean opinion score. PMID:26513783

  9. Metric Style Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Council of Ministers of Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    This guide was designed to provide a measure of uniformity across Canada with respect to metric terminology and symbolism, and is designed to enable users to understand and apply Systeme International d'Unites (SI) to everyday life with ease and confidence. This document was written with the intent of being helpful to the greatest number of…

  10. Toll Gate Metrication Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzi, John

    1974-01-01

    The project director of the Toll Gate Metrication Project describes the project as the first structured United States public school educational experiment in implementing change toward the adoption of the International System of Units. He believes the change will simplify, rather than complicate, the educational task. (AG)

  11. Metrics and Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collegiate Athletic Association, Shawnee Mission, KS.

    Designed as a guide to aid the National Collegiate Athletic Association membership and others who must relate measurement of distances, weights, and volumes to athletic activity, this document presents diagrams of performance areas with measurements delineated in both imperial and metric terms. Illustrations are given for baseball, basketball,…

  12. Metrics of Scholarly Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacioppo, John T.; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Ruscio and colleagues (Ruscio, Seaman, D'Oriano, Stremlo, & Mahalchik, this issue) provide a thoughtful empirical analysis of 22 different measures of individual scholarly impact. The simplest metric is number of publications, which Simonton (1997) found to be a reasonable predictor of career trajectories. Although the assessment of the scholarly…

  13. Effects of raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance signature mutations on the barrier to dolutegravir resistance in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seki, Takahiro; Suyama-Kagitani, Akemi; Kawauchi-Miki, Shinobu; Miki, Shigeru; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Akihisa, Erika; Nakahara, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2015-05-01

    The recently approved HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) dolutegravir (DTG) (S/GSK1349572) has overall advantageous activity when tested in vitro against HIV-1 with raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG) resistance signature mutations. We conducted an in vitro resistance selection study using wild-type HIV-1 and mutants with the E92Q, Y143C, Y143R, Q148H, Q148K, Q148R, and N155H substitutions to assess the DTG in vitro barrier to resistance. No viral replication was observed at concentrations of ≥ 32 nM DTG, whereas viral replication was observed at 160 nM RAL or EVG in the mutants. In the Q148H, Q148K, or Q148R mutants, G140S/Q148H, E138K/Q148K, E138K/Q148R, and G140S/Q148R secondary mutations were identified with each INSTI and showed high resistance to RAL or EVG but limited resistance to DTG. E138K and G140S, as secondary substitutions to Q148H, Q148K, or Q148R, were associated with partial recovery in viral infectivity and/or INSTI resistance. In the E92Q, Y143C, Y143R, and N155H mutants, no secondary substitutions were associated with DTG. These in vitro results suggest that DTG has a high barrier to the development of resistance in the presence of RAL or EVG signature mutations other than Q148. One explanation for this high barrier to resistance is that no additional secondary substitution of E92Q, Y143C, Y143R, or N155H simultaneously increased the fold change in 50% effective concentration (EC50) to DTG and infectivity. Although increased DTG resistance via the Q148 pathway and secondary substitutions occurs at low concentrations, a higher starting concentration may reduce or eliminate the development of DTG resistance in this pathway in vitro. PMID:25691633

  14. The Warburg effect and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Omar, Mohd Feroz; Soong, Richie

    2016-01-01

      The Warburg effect describes the increased utilization of glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation by tumour cells for their energy requirements under physiological oxygen conditions. This effect has been the basis for much speculation on the survival advantage of tumour cells, tumourigenesis and the microenvironment of tumours. More recently, studies have begun to reveal how the Warburg effect could influence drug efficacy and how our understanding of tumour energetics could be exploited to improve drug development. In particular, evidence is emerging demonstrating how better modelling of the tumour metabolic microenvironment could lead to a better prediction of drug efficacy and the identification of new combination strategies. This review will provide details of the current understanding of the complex interplay between glucose metabolism and pharmacology and discuss opportunities for utilizing the Warburg effect in future drug development. PMID:26750865

  15. The Warburg effect and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Mohd Omar, Mohd Feroz; Soong, Richie

    2016-03-01

    : The Warburg effect describes the increased utilization of glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation by tumour cells for their energy requirements under physiological oxygen conditions. This effect has been the basis for much speculation on the survival advantage of tumour cells, tumourigenesis and the microenvironment of tumours. More recently, studies have begun to reveal how the Warburg effect could influence drug efficacy and how our understanding of tumour energetics could be exploited to improve drug development. In particular, evidence is emerging demonstrating how better modelling of the tumour metabolic microenvironment could lead to a better prediction of drug efficacy and the identification of new combination strategies. This review will provide details of the current understanding of the complex interplay between glucose metabolism and pharmacology and discuss opportunities for utilizing the Warburg effect in future drug development. PMID:26750865

  16. Origins of effective resistivity in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra

    2014-07-15

    The mechanisms that provide effective resistivity for supporting collisonless magnetic reconnection have remained unsettled despite numerous studies. Some of these studies demonstrated that the electron pressure nongyrotropy generates the resistivity (η{sub npg}) in the electron diffusion region (EDR). We derive an analytical relation for the effective resistivity (η{sub kin}) by momentum balance in a control volume in the EDR. Both η{sub npg} and η{sub kin} mutually compare well and they also compare well with the resistivity required to support reconnection electric field E{sub rec} in multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations as well as in satellite observations when reconnection occurs in an EDR. But they are about an order of magnitude or so smaller than that required when the reconnection occurred in a much wider reconnecting current sheet (RCS) of half width (w) of the order of the ion skin depth (d{sub i}), observed in the Earth magnetosphere. The chaos-induced resistivity reported in the literature is found to be even more deficient. We find that for reconnection in RCS with w ∼ d{sub i}, anomalous diffusion, such as the universal Bhom diffusion and/or that arising from kinetic Alfven waves, could fairly well account for the required resistivity.

  17. Out of band radiation effects on resist patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi A .; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Our previous work estimated the expected out-of-band (OOB) flare contribution at the wafer level assuming that there is a given amount of OOB at the collector focus. We found that the OOB effects are wavelength, resist, and pattern dependent. In this paper, results from rigorous patterning evaluation of multiple OOB-exposed resists using the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET are presented. A controlled amount of OOB is applied to the resist films before patterning is completed with the MET. LER and process performance above the resolution limit and at the resolution limits are evaluated and presented. The results typically show a negative impact on LER and process performance after the OOB exposures except in the case of single resist formulation, where resolution and performance improvement was observed.

  18. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy on insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    CĂTOI, ADRIANA FLORINELA; PÂRVU, ALINA; MIRONIUC, AUREL; GALEA, ROMEO FLORIN; MUREŞAN, ADRIANA; BIDIAN, CRISTINA; POP, IOANA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Obesity is a major risk factor for the onset of insulin resistance (IR), hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) Evidence data has proven that beyond important weight loss bariatric surgery especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) leads to significant early reduction of insulinemia and of IR calculated through the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR), independently of fat mass decrease. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is now used as a sole weight loss operation with good results. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the early changes of fasting blood glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR in a group of morbidly obese (MO) patients i.e. at 7, 30 and 90 days after SG. Methods The study included 20 MO patients (7 male and 13 female) submitted to SG. Anthropometrical (weight, body mass index –BMI, percent excess BMI loss -%EBMIL) and biochemical (plasma glucose, insulin and calculated HOMA-IR ) evaluation were performed before and at 7, 30 and 90 days after SG. In addition, a second group of 10 normal weight healthy subjects with a BMI ranging form 19 kg/m2 to 23.14 kg/m2, matched for age and gender was investigated. Results Plasma glucose (p=0.018), insulin (p=0.004) and HOMA-IR (p=0.006) values were statistically different between the studied groups. After surgery, at every follow-up point, there were statistically different weight and BMI mean values relative to the operation day (p<0.003). BMI, decreased at 7 days (estimated reduction=2.79; 95% CI:[2.12;3.45]), at 30 days (estimated reduction=5.65; 95% CI:[3.57;7.73]) and at 90 days (estimated reduction=10.88; 95% CI:[7.35;14.41]) respectively after SG. We noted a tendency toward statistical significant change of mean insulin values at 7 days after surgery (corrected p=0.075), no statistical change at 30 days (corrected p=0.327) and a significant change at 90 days (corrected p=0.027) after SG as compared to baseline. There was a

  19. Resist charging effect correction function qualification for photomasks production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorkin, Vadim; Finken, Michael; Wandel, Timo; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Cantrell, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    We quantitatively evaluate Nuflare's latest resist charging effect correction (CEC) model for advanced photomask production using e-beam lithography. Functionality of this CEC model includes the simulation of static and timedependent charging effects together with an improved calibration method. CEC model calibration is performed by polynomial fitting of image placement distortions induced by various beam scattering effects on a special test design with writing density variations. CEC model parameters can be fine tuned for different photomask blank materials facilitating resist charging compensation maps for different product layers. Application of this CEC model into production yields a significant reduction in photomask image placement (IP), as well as improving photomask overlay between critical neighbouring layers. The correlations between IP improvement facilitated by this CEC model and single mask parameters are presented and discussed. The layer design specifics, resist and blank materials, coupled with their required exposure parameters are observed to be the major influences on CEC model performance.

  20. Hypermultiplet metric and D-instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Banerjee, Sibasish

    2015-02-01

    We use the twistorial construction of D-instantons in Calabi-Yau compactifications of type II string theory to compute an explicit expression for the metric on the hypermultiplet moduli space affected by these non-perturbative corrections. In this way we obtain an exact quaternion-Kähler metric which is a non-trivial deformation of the local c-map. In the four-dimensional case corresponding to the universal hypermultiplet, our metric fits the Tod ansatz and provides an exact solution of the continuous Toda equation. We also analyze the fate of the curvature singularity of the perturbative metric by deriving an S-duality invariant equation which determines the singularity hypersurface after inclusion of the D(-1)-instanton effects.

  1. Calculating effective resistances on underlying networks of association schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Sufiani, R.; Jafarizadeh, S.

    2008-07-01

    Recently, in the work of Jafarizadeh et al. [J. Phys, A: Math. Theor. 40, 4949 (2007); e-print arXiv:0705.2480], calculation of effective resistances on distance-regular networks was investigated, where in the first paper, the calculation was based on stratification and Stieltjes functions associated with the network, whereas in the latter one a recursive formula for effective resistances was given based on the Christoffel-Darboux identity. In this paper, evaluation of effective resistances on more general networks that are underlying networks of association schemes is considered, where by using the algebraic combinatoric structures of association schemes such as stratification and Bose-Mesner algebras, an explicit formula for effective resistances on these networks is given in terms of the parameters of the corresponding association schemes. Moreover, we show that for particular underlying networks of association schemes with diameter d such that the adjacency matrix A possesses d +1 distinct eigenvalues, all of the other adjacency matrices Ai, i ≠0, 1 can be written as polynomials of A, i.e., Ai=Pi(A), where Pi is not necessarily of degree i. Then, we use this property for these particular networks and assume that all of the conductances except for one of them, say, c ≡c1=1, are zero to give a procedure for evfor a galuating effective resistances on these networks. The preference of this procedure is that one can evaluate effective resistances by using the structure of their Bose-Mesner algebra without any need to know the spectrum of the adjacency matrices.

  2. Effects produced by CDU improvement of resist pattern with PEB temperature control for wiring resistance variation reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, Masahide; Shinozuka, Shinichi; Ogata, Kunie; Morimoto, Tamotsu

    2008-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing technology has shifted towards finer design rules, and demands for critical dimension uniformity (CDU) of resist patterns have become greater than ever. One of the methods for improving CDU of resist pattern is to control the temperature of post-exposure bake (PEB). When ArF resist is used, there is a certain relationship between critical dimension (CD) and PEB temperature. By utilizing this relationship, Resist Pattern CDU can be improved through control of within-wafer temperature distribution in the PEB process. We have already applied this method to Resist Pattern CDU improvement and have achieved these results. In this evaluation, we aim at: 1. Clarifying the relationship between the improvement in Resist Pattern CDU through PEB temperature control and the improvement in Etching Pattern CDU. 2. Verifying whether Resist Pattern CDU improvement through PEB temperature control has any effect on the reduction in wiring resistance variation. The evaluation procedure is: 1. Preparation of wafers with base film of doped Poly-Si (D-Poly). 2. Creation of two sets of samples on the base, a set of samples with good Resist Pattern CDU and a set of samples with poor Resist Pattern CDU. 3. Etching of the two sets under the same conditions. 4. Measurements of CD and wiring resistance. We used Optical CD Measurement (OCD) for measurement of resist pattern and etching pattern for the reason that OCD is minimally affected by Line Edge Roughness (LER). As a result, we found that; 1. The improvement in Resist Pattern CDU leads to the improvement in Etching Pattern CDU . 2. The improvement in Resist Pattern CDU has an effect on the reduction in wiring resistance variation. There is a cause-and-effect relationship between wiring resistance variation and transistor characteristics. From this relationship, we expect that the improvement in Resist Pattern CDU through PEB temperature control can contribute to device performance improvement.

  3. Quality metrics for sensor images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, AL

    1993-01-01

    Methods are needed for evaluating the quality of augmented visual displays (AVID). Computational quality metrics will help summarize, interpolate, and extrapolate the results of human performance tests with displays. The FLM Vision group at NASA Ames has been developing computational models of visual processing and using them to develop computational metrics for similar problems. For example, display modeling systems use metrics for comparing proposed displays, halftoning optimizing methods use metrics to evaluate the difference between the halftone and the original, and image compression methods minimize the predicted visibility of compression artifacts. The visual discrimination models take as input two arbitrary images A and B and compute an estimate of the probability that a human observer will report that A is different from B. If A is an image that one desires to display and B is the actual displayed image, such an estimate can be regarded as an image quality metric reflecting how well B approximates A. There are additional complexities associated with the problem of evaluating the quality of radar and IR enhanced displays for AVID tasks. One important problem is the question of whether intruding obstacles are detectable in such displays. Although the discrimination model can handle detection situations by making B the original image A plus the intrusion, this detection model makes the inappropriate assumption that the observer knows where the intrusion will be. Effects of signal uncertainty need to be added to our models. A pilot needs to make decisions rapidly. The models need to predict not just the probability of a correct decision, but the probability of a correct decision by the time the decision needs to be made. That is, the models need to predict latency as well as accuracy. Luce and Green have generated models for auditory detection latencies. Similar models are needed for visual detection. Most image quality models are designed for static imagery

  4. Combinatorial measurements of Hall effect and resistivity in oxide films.

    PubMed

    Clayhold, J A; Kerns, B M; Schroer, M D; Rench, D W; Logvenov, G; Bollinger, A T; Bozovic, I

    2008-03-01

    A system for the simultaneous measurement of the Hall effect in 31 different locations as well as the measurement of the resistivity in 30 different locations on a single oxide thin film grown with a composition gradient is described. Considerations for designing and operating a high-throughput system for characterizing highly conductive oxides with Hall coefficients as small as 10(-10) m3/C are discussed. Results from measurements on films grown using combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy show the usefulness of characterizing combinatorial libraries via both the resistivity and the Hall effect. PMID:18377026

  5. Corrections of surface fissure effect on apparent resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, J.; Sailhac, P.; Malet, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a useful tool to detect and track water flow paths in the subsoil. However, measurements are strongly affected by subsurface heterogeneities such as fissures of different sizes and genesis (shrinking-swelling, macropores and deformation). In this work, we focus on surface fissures characterized by dimensions lower than the interelectrode spacing and correct their effect on apparent resistivity pseudo-sections by incorporating fissure geometry in the topography. We show that fissures with depths greater than 0.10 times the interelectrode spacing for a dipole-dipole array and equal to 0.16 for the gradient array and the Wenner-Schlumberger arrays create significant anomalies (greater than 5 per cent) in the pseudo-section. Surface fissure widths and dip angles have little effect with respect to the fissure depths which can increase the apparent resistivity up to 200 per cent. The clogging of the fissures with water or soil material decreases the anomaly effect linearly with the percentage of filling. The correction of apparent resistivity values is possible for relatively simple fissure geometries and only requires a manual survey of the surface fissures. It allows to improve the quality of the inverted resistivity section by mitigating the inversion artefacts and therefore a better interpretation.

  6. Note on a new class of metrics: touching metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoitov, Valery V.

    1996-09-01

    A new class of functions is studied. They are generalizations of the little-known `flower-shop distance'. We call them touching functions. Some of them are metrics, i.e. touching metrics (TM). Disks, circles and digital paths based on these metrics are also studied. The distance transform based on TMs is introduced and a scheme for the algorithm is given.

  7. Resistive switching effect and traps in partially fluorinated graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkina, Irina I.; Antonova, Irina V.; Nebogatikova, Nadezhda A.; Kapitonov, Albert N.; Smagulova, Svetlana A.

    2016-03-01

    A reversible resistive switching effect is detected in films created from the suspension of partially fluorinated graphene (more specifically, small graphene or few-layer graphene quantum dots in a fluorographene matrix), which makes them promising for resistive memory applications. This paper is focused on the investigation and comparison of the traps and transport in such films in both the low- and high-resistance state. The appearing set of traps for holes and electrons in the band gap of fluorinated graphene is revealed in the films at the low-resistance state, and their parameters (activation energy and trap density) are defined using charge spectroscopy. The minimum relaxation time of nonequilibrium carriers from different traps is found to be about 700 ns, and the energy level position of corresponding traps from the conduction band of a silicon substrate equals 0.08 eV. It has also been demonstrated that the carrier transport in the low-resistance state is determined by the same traps, and they form conductive channels in the film. Transport and non-equilibrium recharging processes in the state of high resistance are found to occur above all by means of carrier tunneling through the potential barriers in the films.

  8. Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Wayne L

    2012-01-01

    Inactive adults experience a 3% to 8% loss of muscle mass per decade, accompanied by resting metabolic rate reduction and fat accumulation. Ten weeks of resistance training may increase lean weight by 1.4 kg, increase resting metabolic rate by 7%, and reduce fat weight by 1.8 kg. Benefits of resistance training include improved physical performance, movement control, walking speed, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem. Resistance training may assist prevention and management of type 2 diabetes by decreasing visceral fat, reducing HbA1c, increasing the density of glucose transporter type 4, and improving insulin sensitivity. Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, by reducing resting blood pressure, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Resistance training may promote bone development, with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density. Resistance training may be effective for reducing low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia and has been shown to reverse specific aging factors in skeletal muscle. PMID:22777332

  9. The Kerr metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2015-06-01

    This review describes the events leading up to the discovery of the Kerr metric in 1963 and the enormous impact the discovery has had in the subsequent 50 years. The review discusses the Penrose process, the four laws of black hole mechanics, uniqueness of the solution, and the no-hair theorems. It also includes Kerr perturbation theory and its application to black hole stability and quasi-normal modes. The Kerr metric's importance in the astrophysics of quasars and accreting stellar-mass black hole systems is detailed. A theme of the review is the ‘miraculous’ nature of the solution, both in describing in a simple analytic formula the most general rotating black hole, and in having unexpected mathematical properties that make many calculations tractable. Also included is a pedagogical derivation of the solution suitable for a first course in general relativity.

  10. Quality Metrics in Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gurudu, Suryakanth R.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy has evolved in the past 4 decades to become an important tool in the diagnosis and management of many digestive diseases. Greater focus on endoscopic quality has highlighted the need to ensure competency among endoscopists. A joint task force of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy has proposed several quality metrics to establish competence and help define areas of continuous quality improvement. These metrics represent quality in endoscopy pertinent to pre-, intra-, and postprocedural periods. Quality in endoscopy is a dynamic and multidimensional process that requires continuous monitoring of several indicators and benchmarking with local and national standards. Institutions and practices should have a process in place for credentialing endoscopists and for the assessment of competence regarding individual endoscopic procedures. PMID:24711767

  11. Bibliography on metrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. R.; Powel, M. B.

    1990-08-01

    This is a bibliography on metrication, the conversion to the International System of Units (SI), compiled from citations dated from January 1977 through July 1989. Citations include books, conference proceedings, newspapers, periodicals, government and civilian documents and reports. Subject indices for each type of citation and an author index for the entire work are included. A variety of subject categories such as legislation, construction, avionics, consumers, engineering, education, management, standards, agriculture, marketing and many others are available.

  12. Metrics for Energy Resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Paul E. Roege; Zachary A. Collier; James Mancillas; John A. McDonagh; Igor Linkov

    2014-09-01

    Energy lies at the backbone of any advanced society and constitutes an essential prerequisite for economic growth, social order and national defense. However there is an Achilles heel to today?s energy and technology relationship; namely a precarious intimacy between energy and the fiscal, social, and technical systems it supports. Recently, widespread and persistent disruptions in energy systems have highlighted the extent of this dependence and the vulnerability of increasingly optimized systems to changing conditions. Resilience is an emerging concept that offers to reconcile considerations of performance under dynamic environments and across multiple time frames by supplementing traditionally static system performance measures to consider behaviors under changing conditions and complex interactions among physical, information and human domains. This paper identifies metrics useful to implement guidance for energy-related planning, design, investment, and operation. Recommendations are presented using a matrix format to provide a structured and comprehensive framework of metrics relevant to a system?s energy resilience. The study synthesizes previously proposed metrics and emergent resilience literature to provide a multi-dimensional model intended for use by leaders and practitioners as they transform our energy posture from one of stasis and reaction to one that is proactive and which fosters sustainable growth.

  13. Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

    2010-09-30

    Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

  14. Resistive Memory for Harsh Electronics: Immunity to Surface Effect and High Corrosion Resistance via Surface Modification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Teng-Han; Yang, Po-Kang; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Chen-Fang; Tsai, Meng-Lin; Chueh, Yu-Lun; He, Jr-Hau

    2014-01-01

    The tolerance/resistance of the electronic devices to extremely harsh environments is of supreme interest. Surface effects and chemical corrosion adversely affect stability and operation uniformity of metal oxide resistive memories. To achieve the surrounding-independent behavior, the surface modification is introduced into the ZnO memristors via incorporating fluorine to replace the oxygen sites. F-Zn bonds is formed to prevent oxygen chemisorption and ZnO dissolution upon corrosive atmospheric exposure, which effectively improves switching characteristics against harmful surroundings. In addition, the fluorine doping stabilizes the cycling endurance and narrows the distribution of switching parameters. The outcomes provide valuable insights for future nonvolatile memory developments in harsh electronics. PMID:24638086

  15. On Applying the Prognostic Performance Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Bhaskar; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Prognostics performance evaluation has gained significant attention in the past few years. As prognostics technology matures and more sophisticated methods for prognostic uncertainty management are developed, a standardized methodology for performance evaluation becomes extremely important to guide improvement efforts in a constructive manner. This paper is in continuation of previous efforts where several new evaluation metrics tailored for prognostics were introduced and were shown to effectively evaluate various algorithms as compared to other conventional metrics. Specifically, this paper presents a detailed discussion on how these metrics should be interpreted and used. Several shortcomings identified, while applying these metrics to a variety of real applications, are also summarized along with discussions that attempt to alleviate these problems. Further, these metrics have been enhanced to include the capability of incorporating probability distribution information from prognostic algorithms as opposed to evaluation based on point estimates only. Several methods have been suggested and guidelines have been provided to help choose one method over another based on probability distribution characteristics. These approaches also offer a convenient and intuitive visualization of algorithm performance with respect to some of these new metrics like prognostic horizon and alpha-lambda performance, and also quantify the corresponding performance while incorporating the uncertainty information.

  16. Evaluating Algorithm Performance Metrics Tailored for Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Bhaskar; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Prognostics has taken a center stage in Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) where it is desired to estimate Remaining Useful Life (RUL) of the system so that remedial measures may be taken in advance to avoid catastrophic events or unwanted downtimes. Validation of such predictions is an important but difficult proposition and a lack of appropriate evaluation methods renders prognostics meaningless. Evaluation methods currently used in the research community are not standardized and in many cases do not sufficiently assess key performance aspects expected out of a prognostics algorithm. In this paper we introduce several new evaluation metrics tailored for prognostics and show that they can effectively evaluate various algorithms as compared to other conventional metrics. Specifically four algorithms namely; Relevance Vector Machine (RVM), Gaussian Process Regression (GPR), Artificial Neural Network (ANN), and Polynomial Regression (PR) are compared. These algorithms vary in complexity and their ability to manage uncertainty around predicted estimates. Results show that the new metrics rank these algorithms in different manner and depending on the requirements and constraints suitable metrics may be chosen. Beyond these results, these metrics offer ideas about how metrics suitable to prognostics may be designed so that the evaluation procedure can be standardized. 1

  17. Metrics for Offline Evaluation of Prognostic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Bhaskar; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Prognostic performance evaluation has gained significant attention in the past few years. Currently, prognostics concepts lack standard definitions and suffer from ambiguous and inconsistent interpretations. This lack of standards is in part due to the varied end-user requirements for different applications, time scales, available information, domain dynamics, etc. to name a few. The research community has used a variety of metrics largely based on convenience and their respective requirements. Very little attention has been focused on establishing a standardized approach to compare different efforts. This paper presents several new evaluation metrics tailored for prognostics that were recently introduced and were shown to effectively evaluate various algorithms as compared to other conventional metrics. Specifically, this paper presents a detailed discussion on how these metrics should be interpreted and used. These metrics have the capability of incorporating probabilistic uncertainty estimates from prognostic algorithms. In addition to quantitative assessment they also offer a comprehensive visual perspective that can be used in designing the prognostic system. Several methods are suggested to customize these metrics for different applications. Guidelines are provided to help choose one method over another based on distribution characteristics. Various issues faced by prognostics and its performance evaluation are discussed followed by a formal notational framework to help standardize subsequent developments.

  18. Say "Yes" to Metric Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Eula Ewing; Nelson, Marvin N.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the metric system. Discusses the infrequent use of the metric measurement system in the United States, why conversion from the customary system to the metric system is difficult, and the need for change. (Contains 14 resources.) (ASK)

  19. Metrication, American Style. Fastback 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzi, John

    The purpose of this pamphlet is to provide a starting point of information on the metric system for any concerned or interested reader. The material is organized into five brief chapters: Man and Measurement; Learning the Metric System; Progress Report: Education; Recommended Sources; and Metrication, American Style. Appendixes include an…

  20. Metrication in a global environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberg, J.

    1994-01-01

    A brief history about the development of the metric system of measurement is given. The need for the U.S. to implement the 'SI' metric system in the international markets, especially in the aerospace and general trade, is discussed. Development of metric implementation and experiences locally, nationally, and internationally are included.

  1. Some References on Metric Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This resource work lists metric information published by the U.S. Government and the American National Standards Institute. Also organizations marketing metric materials for education are given. A short table of conversions is included as is a listing of basic metric facts for everyday living. (LS)

  2. Oral Antibiotics are Effective for Highly Resistant Hip Arthroplasty Infections

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1–12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70–98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32–76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19333670

  3. Microwave-Induced Resistance Oscillations as a Classical Memory Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Dyakonov, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    By numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show that the phenomenon of microwave-induced resistance oscillations can be understood as a classical memory effect caused by recollisions of electrons with scattering centers after a cyclotron period. We develop a Drude-like approach to magnetotransport in the presence of a microwave field, taking into account memory effects, and find an excellent agreement between numerical and analytical results, as well as a qualitative agreement with experiment.

  4. Ribonucleotide reductase is an effective target to overcome gemcitabine resistance in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells with dual resistant factors.

    PubMed

    Minami, Kentaro; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Takahashi, Homare; Zhang, Shaoxuan; Nishizawa, Yukihiko; Tabata, Sho; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kawahara, Kohich; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Chijiiwa, Kazuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Akiyama, Shin-ichi; Pérez-Torras, Sandra; Pastor-Anglada, Marcal; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Yasuo, Takeda

    2015-03-01

    Gemcitabine is widely used for pancreatic, lung, and bladder cancer. However, drug resistance against gemcitabine is a large obstacle to effective chemotherapy. Nucleoside transporters, nucleoside and nucleotide metabolic enzymes, and efflux transporters have been reported to be involved in gemcitabine resistance. Although most of the resistant factors are supposed to be related to each other, it is unclear how one factor can affect the other one. In this study, we established gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines. Gemcitabine resistance in these cells is caused by two major processes: a decrease in gemcitabine uptake and overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (RRM1). Knockdown of RRM1, but not the overexpression of concentrative nucleoside transporter 1 (CNT1), could completely overcome the gemcitabine resistance. RRM1 knockdown in gemcitabine-resistant cells could increase the intracellular accumulation of gemcitabine by increasing the nucleoside transporter expression. Furthermore, a synergistic effect was observed between hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase (RR) inhibitor, and gemcitabine on the gemcitabine-resistant cells. Here we indicate that RR is one of the most promising targets to overcome gemcitabine resistance in gemcitabine-resistant cells with dual resistant factors. PMID:25837929

  5. Optical metrics and projective equivalence

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Stephen; Dunajski, Maciej; Gibbons, Gary; Warnick, Claude

    2011-04-15

    Trajectories of light rays in a static spacetime are described by unparametrized geodesics of the Riemannian optical metric associated with the Lorentzian spacetime metric. We investigate the uniqueness of this structure and demonstrate that two different observers, moving relative to one another, who both see the Universe as static may determine the geometry of the light rays differently. More specifically, we classify Lorentzian metrics admitting more than one hyper-surface orthogonal timelike Killing vector and analyze the projective equivalence of the resulting optical metrics. These metrics are shown to be projectively equivalent up to diffeomorphism if the static Killing vectors generate a group SL(2,R), but not projectively equivalent in general. We also consider the cosmological C metrics in Einstein-Maxwell theory and demonstrate that optical metrics corresponding to different values of the cosmological constant are projectively equivalent.

  6. Short Lived Climate Pollutants cause a Long Lived Effect on Sea-level Rise: Analyzing climate metrics for sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterner, E.; Johansson, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change depends on the increase of several different atmospheric pollutants. While long term global warming will be determined mainly by carbon dioxide, warming in the next few decades will depend to a large extent on short lived climate pollutants (SLCP). Reducing emissions of SLCPs could contribute to lower the global mean surface temperature by 0.5 °C already by 2050 (Shindell et al. 2012). Furthermore, the warming effect of one of the most potent SLCPs, black carbon (BC), may have been underestimated in the past. Bond et al. (2013) presents a new best estimate of the total BC radiative forcing (RF) of 1.1 W/m2 (90 % uncertainty bounds of 0.17 to 2.1 W/m2) since the beginning of the industrial era. BC is however never emitted alone and cooling aerosols from the same sources offset a majority of this RF. In the wake of calls for mitigation of SLCPs it is important to study other aspects of the climate effect of SLCPs. One key impact of climate change is sea-level rise (SLR). In a recent study, the effect of SLCP mitigation scenarios on SLR is examined. Hu et al (2013) find a substantial effect on SLR from mitigating SLCPs sharply, reducing SLR by 22-42% by 2100. We choose a different approach focusing on emission pulses and analyse a metric based on sea level rise so as to further enlighten the SLR consequences of SLCPs. We want in particular to understand the time dynamics of SLR impacts caused by SLCPs compared to other greenhouse gases. The most commonly used physical based metrics are GWP and GTP. We propose and evaluate an additional metric: The global sea-level rise potential (GSP). The GSP is defined as the sea level rise after a time horizon caused by an emissions pulse of a forcer to the sea level rise after a time horizon caused by an emissions pulse of a CO2. GSP is evaluated and compared to GWP and GTP using a set of climate forcers chosen to cover the whole scale of atmospheric perturbation life times (BC, CH4, N2O, CO2 and SF6). The study

  7. Building a Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Shakira

    2007-01-01

    Launch Services Program is a Kennedy Space Center based program whose job it is to undertake all the necessary roles required to successfully launch Expendable Launch Vehicles. This project was designed to help Launch Services Program accurately report how successful they have been at launching missions on time or +/- 2 days from the scheduled launch date and also if they weren't successful, why. This information will be displayed in the form of a metric, which answers these questions in a clear and accurate way.

  8. SI (Metric) handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artusa, Elisa A.

    1994-01-01

    This guide provides information for an understanding of SI units, symbols, and prefixes; style and usage in documentation in both the US and in the international business community; conversion techniques; limits, fits, and tolerance data; and drawing and technical writing guidelines. Also provided is information of SI usage for specialized applications like data processing and computer programming, science, engineering, and construction. Related information in the appendixes include legislative documents, historical and biographical data, a list of metric documentation, rules for determining significant digits and rounding, conversion factors, shorthand notation, and a unit index.

  9. Nonlinearity of resistive impurity effects on van der Pauw measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koon, D. W.

    2006-09-15

    The dependence of van der Pauw resistivity measurements on local macroscopic inhomogeneities is shown to be nonlinear. A resistor grid network models a square laminar specimen, enabling the investigation of both positive and negative local perturbations in resistivity. The effect of inhomogeneity is measured both experimentally, for an 11x11 grid, and computationally, for both 11x11 and 101x101 grids. The maximum 'shortlike' perturbation produces 3.1{+-}0.2 times the effect predicted by the linear approximation, regardless of its position within the specimen, while all 'openlike' perturbations produce a smaller effect than predicted. An empirical nonlinear correction for f(x,y) is presented which provides excellent fit over the entire range of both positive and negative perturbations for the entire specimen.

  10. PREDICTING THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TOLUENE INHALED FOR 24 HRS IN RATS: DOSE METRICS, METABOLISM AND BEHAVIORAL TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) is improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration ( Br[ToI)] instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a...

  11. Exploring Metric Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zwart, P.H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R.W.; Adams, P.D.

    2006-07-31

    Relatively minor perturbations to a crystal structure can in some cases result in apparently large changes in symmetry. Changes in space group or even lattice can be induced by heavy metal or halide soaking (Dauter et al, 2001), flash freezing (Skrzypczak-Jankun et al, 1996), and Se-Met substitution (Poulsen et al, 2001). Relations between various space groups and lattices can provide insight in the underlying structural causes for the symmetry or lattice transformations. Furthermore, these relations can be useful in understanding twinning and how to efficiently solve two different but related crystal structures. Although (pseudo) symmetric properties of a certain combination of unit cell parameters and a space group are immediately obvious (such as a pseudo four-fold axis if a is approximately equal to b in an orthorhombic space group), other relations (e.g. Lehtio, et al, 2005) that are less obvious might be crucial to the understanding and detection of certain idiosyncrasies of experimental data. We have developed a set of tools that allows straightforward exploration of possible metric symmetry relations given unit cell parameters and a space group. The new iotbx.explore{_}metric{_}symmetry command produces an overview of the various relations between several possible point groups for a given lattice. Methods for finding relations between a pair of unit cells are also available. The tools described in this newsletter are part of the CCTBX libraries, which are included in the latest (versions July 2006 and up) PHENIX and CCI Apps distributions.

  12. Pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanho, Xián O.; Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred

    2015-09-01

    We study pure Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single Nth order Lovelock term in the action in d=2N+1,2N+2 dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. Pure Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, d=2N+1, is kinematic, i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for d=2N+1, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five- and six dimensional pure Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We also comment on a closely related family of exponential solutions and on the possibility of solutions with complex Kasner exponents. We show that the latter imply the existence of closed timelike curves in the geometry.

  13. Relating reconnection rate, exhaust structure and effective resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra

    2014-03-15

    The magnetic reconnection structure consists of a central diffusion region (CDR) and a cone or wedge shaped reconnection exhaust containing accelerated plasma flows and electromagnetic fluctuations. We predict here the relationship among the exhaust half-cone angle (θ{sub e}), the half width (w) of the CDR, the outflow velocity V{sub o}, and the effective resistivity (η{sub eff}), which includes the effects of all the nonideal terms in the generalized Ohm's law. The effective resistivity is defined as the ratio of reconnection electric field E{sub rec} to the current density J{sub y} at the X point and it essentially represents the loss of momentum from the current-carrying plasma particles due to scattering by waves, their inertia or outflux from the CDR. The relation is checked against relevant results previously reported from laboratory experiments, space observations, and simulations, showing excellent agreement. The relation can be used for estimating the ad-hoc effective resistivity often used in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of reconnection.

  14. A study for polarized illumination effects in photo resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Junjiang; Bai, Min; Shiely, Jim; Zhang, Lin

    2005-06-01

    Using a polarized illumination source is a promising RET technique for improvement of wafer printability for features of 65 nm and below. Polarization effects could be considered in several different stages of lithography modeling and simulation. For example, light propagation in thin films, wave superstition and interference in the thin film stack, and mask-induced polarization all deserve special attention and delicate treatment because TE and TM waves have different behaviors through these stages. In this paper we consider effects of polarized illumination in photo resist, using the Kirchhoff approximation for masks. We discuss some theoretical aspects of our vector modeling methods and show an example of simulation for polarized illumination effects.

  15. How inaccurate is weight as a metric for patient size? Comparing patient weight to effective diameter for size-specific dose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Tessa S.; Chadalavada, Seetharam C.; Boonn, William W.

    2013-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dose monitoring is customization of CT dose estimates to the patient. Patient size remains a highly significant variable. One metric that has previously been used for patient size is patient weight, though this is often criticized as inaccurate. In this work, we compare patients' weight to their effective diameters obtained from a CT scan of the chest or the abdomen. CT exams of the chest (N=163) and abdomen/pelvis (N=168) performed on adult patients in July 2012 were randomly selected for analysis. The effective diameter of the patient for each exam was determined using the central slice of the scan region for each exam using eXposure™ (Radimetrics, Inc., Toronto, Canada). In some cases, the same patient had both a chest and abdominopelvic CT, so effective diameters from both regions were analyzed. In this small sample size, there appears to be a linear relationship between patient weight and effective diameter when measured in the mid-chest and mid-abdomen of adult patients. However, for each weight, patient effective diameter can vary by 5 cm from the regression line in both the chest and the abdomen. A 5-cm difference corresponds to a difference of approximately 0.2 in the chest and 0.3 in the abdomen/pelvis for the correction factors recommended for size-specific dose estimation by the AAPM. This preliminary data suggests that weight-based CT protocoling may in fact be appropriate for some adults. However, more work is needed to identify those patients in whom weight-based protocoling is not appropriate.

  16. Study of parasitic resistance effects in nanowire and nanoribbon biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zeimpekis, Ioannis; Sun, Kai; Hu, Chunxiao; Thomas, Owain; de Planque, Maurits Rr; Chong, Harold Mh; Morgan, Hywel; Ashburn, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate sensor design approaches for eliminating the effects of parasitic resistance in nanowire and nanoribbon biosensors. Measurements of pH with polysilicon nanoribbon biosensors are used to demonstrate a reduction in sensitivity as the sensor length is reduced. The sensitivity (normalised conductance change) is reduced from 11% to 5.5% for a pH change from 9 to 3 as the sensing window length is reduced from 51 to 11 μm. These results are interpreted using a simple empirical model, which is also used to demonstrate how the sensitivity degradation can be alleviated by a suitable choice of sensor window length. Furthermore, a differential sensor design is proposed that eliminates the detrimental effects of parasitic resistance. Measurements on the differential sensor give a sensitivity of 15%, which is in good agreement with the predicted maximum sensitivity obtained from modeling. PMID:25852375

  17. Effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary factors in sedentary individuals

    PubMed Central

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Thayon, Methiya; Bushong, Wanwisa; Jaikla, Nussamol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects. [Subjects] Forty-two young and healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle were included in this study. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and experimental. The control group (n=21) received health education and continued with normal activities of daily living. The experimental group (n=21) underwent resistance training, health education, and continued with normal activities of daily living. The resistance exercise program consisted of 3 postural exercises: chest press, dumbbell pullover, and flat-bench dumbbell fly. The subjects received this intervention 3 times/week for 8 weeks. [Results] The baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The 6-minute-walk test score, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansions were significantly improved post-intervention in the experimental group and between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects were significantly improved with the 8-week resistance exercise program. PMID:26957760

  18. Postactivation potentiation effects after heavy resistance exercise on running speed.

    PubMed

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris E; Michailidis, Charalambos J; Giannakos, Athanasios K; Alexiou, Kostas C; Patikas, Dimitrios A; Antonopoulos, Christos B; Kotzamanidis, Christos M

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the postactivation potentiation effect after a heavy resistance stimulus (HRS) on running speed (RS). Fifteen amateur team game players (basketball, volleyball, handball, and soccer players), ages 18-23 years running the 30-m dash and the intermediate phase of 0-10 and 0-30 m sprints, were used to evaluate RS. Resistance training consisted of 10 single repetitions at 90% of 1 repetition maximum. The running tests were performed 3 times--(a) 3 minutes prior the HRS, (b) 3 minutes after the HRS, and (c) 5 minutes after the HRS--in separated training sessions. Results showed that RS was not affected 3 minutes after the resistance training, but it increased for both selected running phases (0-10 and 0-30 m) 5 minutes after the HRS (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that heavy resistance exercise improves 10- and 30-m sprint performance when performed 5 minutes after the exercise bout. PMID:18076255

  19. Application of the quantum Hall effect to resistance metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Wilfrid; Schopfer, Félicien; Guignard, Jérémie; Thévenot, Olivier; Gournay, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    The quantum Hall effect (QHE) discovery has revolutionized metrology by providing with a representation of the unit of resistance, R, that can be reproduced within a relative uncertainty of one part in 10 9 and is theoretically only linked to Planck's constant h and the electron charge e. This breakthrough also results from the development of resistance comparison bridges using cryogenic current comparator (CCC). The QHE experimental know-how now allows the realization of perfectly quantized Quantum Hall Array Resistance Standards (QHARS) by combining a large number of single Hall bars. In the context of an evolution of the Système International (SI) of units by fixing some fundamental constants of physics, the determination of the von Klitzing constant R through the use of the so-called Thompson-Lampard calculable capacitor and the realization of refined universality tests of the QHE are of prime importance. Finally, the fascinating graphene material might be a new turning point in resistance metrology.

  20. [Effect of transgenic insect-resistant rice on biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Zhen

    2011-05-01

    Rice is the most important food crops in maintaining food security in China. The loss of China's annual rice production caused by pests is over ten million tons. Present studies showed that the transgenic insect-resistant rice can substantially reduce the application amount of chemical pesticides. In the case of no pesticide use, the pest density in transgenic rice field is significantly lower than that in non-transgenic field, and the neutral insects and natural enemies of pests increased significantly, indicating that the ecological environment and biodiversity toward the positive direction. The gene flow frequency from transgenic rice is dramatically reduced with the distance increases, reaching less than 0.01% at the distance of 6.2 m. Application of transgenic insect-resistant rice in China has an important significance for ensuring food security, maintaining sustainable agricultural development, and protecting the ecological environment and biodiversity. This review summarized the research progress in transgenic insect-resistant rice and its effect on biodiversity. The research directions and development trends of crop pest controlling in future are discussed. These help to promote better use of transgenic insect-resistant rice. PMID:21586387

  1. Effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary factors in sedentary individuals.

    PubMed

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Thayon, Methiya; Bushong, Wanwisa; Jaikla, Nussamol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects. [Subjects] Forty-two young and healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle were included in this study. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and experimental. The control group (n=21) received health education and continued with normal activities of daily living. The experimental group (n=21) underwent resistance training, health education, and continued with normal activities of daily living. The resistance exercise program consisted of 3 postural exercises: chest press, dumbbell pullover, and flat-bench dumbbell fly. The subjects received this intervention 3 times/week for 8 weeks. [Results] The baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The 6-minute-walk test score, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansions were significantly improved post-intervention in the experimental group and between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects were significantly improved with the 8-week resistance exercise program. PMID:26957760

  2. The effects of solution resistance on electrochemical noise resistance measurements: A theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cottis, R.A.; Turgoose, S.; Mendoza-Flores, J.

    1996-12-31

    The theoretical basis of electrochemical noise resistance measurements in the presence of significant solution resistance is examined with a simple linear circuit model. A shot noise model of the noise generation process is assumed to develop the dependence of electrochemical potential and current noise on corrosion rate, although the conclusions in respect to electrochemical noise resistance do not depend on this. It is concluded that the electrochemical noise resistance method measures essentially the same resistance as is measured by a conventional linear polarization resistance measurement, although it is found to be capable of making measurements in higher resistance systems.

  3. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  4. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo; Kim, Moonju

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  5. The metric on field space, functional renormalization, and metric-torsion quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Martin; Schollmeyer, Gregor M.

    2016-04-01

    Searching for new non-perturbatively renormalizable quantum gravity theories, functional renormalization group (RG) flows are studied on a theory space of action functionals depending on the metric and the torsion tensor, the latter parameterized by three irreducible component fields. A detailed comparison with Quantum Einstein-Cartan Gravity (QECG), Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG), and "tetrad-only" gravity, all based on different theory spaces, is performed. It is demonstrated that, over a generic theory space, the construction of a functional RG equation (FRGE) for the effective average action requires the specification of a metric on the infinite-dimensional field manifold as an additional input. A modified FRGE is obtained if this metric is scale-dependent, as it happens in the metric-torsion system considered.

  6. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative; Mathew, Paul A.; Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Beasley, James

    2010-07-07

    Cleanrooms are among the most energy-intensive types of facilities. This is primarily due to the cleanliness requirements that result in high airflow rates and system static pressures, as well as process requirements that result in high cooling loads. Various studies have shown that there is a wide range of cleanroom energy efficiencies and that facility managers may not be aware of how energy efficient their cleanroom facility can be relative to other cleanroom facilities with the same cleanliness requirements. Metrics and benchmarks are an effective way to compare one facility to another and to track the performance of a given facility over time. This article presents the key metrics and benchmarks that facility managers can use to assess, track, and manage their cleanroom energy efficiency or to set energy efficiency targets for new construction. These include system-level metrics such as air change rates, air handling W/cfm, and filter pressure drops. Operational data are presented from over 20 different cleanrooms that were benchmarked with these metrics and that are part of the cleanroom benchmark dataset maintained by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Overall production efficiency metrics for cleanrooms in 28 semiconductor manufacturing facilities in the United States and recorded in the Fabs21 database are also presented.

  7. Evaluation metrics for bone segmentation in ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, Matthew; Fichtinger, Gabor; Ungi, Tamas

    2015-03-01

    Tracked ultrasound is a safe alternative to X-ray for imaging bones. The interpretation of bony structures is challenging as ultrasound has no specific intensity characteristic of bones. Several image segmentation algorithms have been devised to identify bony structures. We propose an open-source framework that would aid in the development and comparison of such algorithms by quantitatively measuring segmentation performance in the ultrasound images. True-positive and false-negative metrics used in the framework quantify algorithm performance based on correctly segmented bone and correctly segmented boneless regions. Ground-truth for these metrics are defined manually and along with the corresponding automatically segmented image are used for the performance analysis. Manually created ground truth tests were generated to verify the accuracy of the analysis. Further evaluation metrics for determining average performance per slide and standard deviation are considered. The metrics provide a means of evaluating accuracy of frames along the length of a volume. This would aid in assessing the accuracy of the volume itself and the approach to image acquisition (positioning and frequency of frame). The framework was implemented as an open-source module of the 3D Slicer platform. The ground truth tests verified that the framework correctly calculates the implemented metrics. The developed framework provides a convenient way to evaluate bone segmentation algorithms. The implementation fits in a widely used application for segmentation algorithm prototyping. Future algorithm development will benefit by monitoring the effects of adjustments to an algorithm in a standard evaluation framework.

  8. Product Accuracy Effect of Oblique and Vertical Non-Metric Digital Camera Utilization in Uav-Photogrammetry to Determine Fault Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrullah, C.; Suwardhi, D.; Meilano, I.

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to see the effect of non-metric oblique and vertical camera combination along with the configuration of the ground control points to improve the precision and accuracy in UAV-Photogrammetry project. The field observation method is used for data acquisition with aerial photographs and ground control points. All data are processed by digital photogrammetric process with some scenarios in camera combination and ground control point configuration. The model indicates that the value of precision and accuracy increases with the combination of oblique and vertical camera at all control point configuration. The best products of the UAV-Photogrammetry model are produced in the form of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) compared to the LiDAR DEM. Furthermore, DEM from UAV-Photogrammetry and LiDAR are used to define the fault plane by using cross-section on the model and interpretation to determine the point at the extreme height of terrain changes. The result of the defined fault planes indicate that two models do not show any significant difference.

  9. Antimicrobial Effects and Resistant Regulation of Magnolol and Honokiol on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Kim, Ju; Jeong, Seung-Il; Jahng, Kwang Yeop; Yu, Kang-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial killing activity toward methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a serious emerging global issue. In a continuing search for compounds with antibacterial activity against several microorganisms including S. aureus and MRSA, an n-hexane extract of Magnolia officinalis was found to contain magnolol. This compound exhibited potent activity against S. aureus, standard methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and MRSA as well as clinical MRSA isolates. When combined with oxacillin, the antibacterial activities of magnolol and honokiol against the MRSA strain were increased compared to single treatment without antibiotics at 10 µg/mL and 25 µg/mL, respectively. These activities of magnolol and honokiol were dose dependent. Also, magnolol showed synergistic effects with oxacillin against 13 clinical isolates of MRSA. It was determined that magnolol and honokiol had a synergistic effect with oxacillin against MRSA strain. Furthermore, the magnolol inhibited the expression of the resistant genes, mecA, mecI, femA, and femB, in mRNA. We concluded that the antibacterial activity of magnolol against MRSA strain is more related to the mecI's pathway and components of the cell wall than mecR1. Therefore, the results obtained in this study suggest that the combination of magnolol and antibiotics could lead to the development of new combination antibiotics against MRSA infection. PMID:26357651

  10. Software metrics: Software quality metrics for distributed systems. [reliability engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, J. V.

    1981-01-01

    Software quality metrics was extended to cover distributed computer systems. Emphasis is placed on studying embedded computer systems and on viewing them within a system life cycle. The hierarchy of quality factors, criteria, and metrics was maintained. New software quality factors were added, including survivability, expandability, and evolvability.

  11. Implementing the Metric System in Business Occupations. Metric Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retzer, Kenneth A.; And Others

    Addressed to the business education teacher, this guide is intended to provide appropriate information, viewpoints, and attitudes regarding the metric system and to make suggestions regarding presentation of the material in the classroom. An introductory section on teaching suggestions emphasizes the need for a "think metric" approach made up of…

  12. The effects of systematic resistance training in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wieser, M; Haber, P

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a maximal resistance training following the principles of the most effective resistance training known from sport adapted to elderly people. Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned into a training group (10 females and 4 males, age; 76.2 +/- 3.2 years) that underwent a training program and a control group (6 females and 4 males, age; 76.6 +/- 2.7 years) that did not participate in the training program. Before and after the training period, both groups were identically examined (blood and urine sample, spiroergometric testing, morphological measurements). The training group underwent a 12-week training program. Eight different exercises for the largest muscle groups of the largest joints were defined as one training circle. Training took place twice a week and commenced with two training circles per week (one circle per training session). After every four weeks, one training circle per week was added until four training circles per week were reached. Before, after every four weeks (changes in training amount) and after the training period, the maximum strength was measured. Data was analysed by the independent T-test and the analysis of variance, in case of significance, the dependent T-test and the Scheffé-test were used. In the resistance training group, the fat-free body mass was increased by approximately 2.9 +/- 0.5 kg, with no significant difference between females and males. Ergometrical fitness was increased by approximately 15 %, while the maximum oxygen uptake was increased by approximately 12 %. Maximum strength was increased between 26 % (bench pull) and 38 % (leg press). Resistance training that consisted of two training sessions per week was found to be at least as efficient as resistance training that included three training sessions per week, provided that the number of sets performed were equal. Seventy-five-year-old females were found to have a significantly higher body fat content than males

  13. Chemically amplified resist using self-solubility acceleration effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihara, Naoko; Ushirogouchi, Tohru; Tada, Tsukasa; Naito, Takuya; Saito, Satoshi; Nakase, Makoto

    1994-11-01

    This paper concerns a novel three-component chemically amplified positive tone resist system for EB lithography composed of a novolak resin, an acid generator, and a newly synthesized dissolution inhibitor. To obtain resist materials with high sensitivity and high contrast, the authors synthesized four 1-(3H)-isobenzofuranone derivatives as novel dissolution inhibitors, which contain a tert-butoxycarbonyl (t-Boc) group and a lactone ring. The t-Boc group of these dissolution inhibitors was effectively decomposed by an acid catalyzed thermal reaction. In addition to this decomposition, the lactone ring of the decomposed product was spontaneously cleft in an aqueous base to generate carboxylic acid. Among these synthesized substances, only the t-Boc derivative of o-cresolphthalein, named CP-TBOC, showed an excellent solubility in 1-acetoxy-2-ethoxyethane. The subsequent cleavage in an aqueous developer was investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy.

  14. Hall effect analysis in irradiated silicon samples with different resistivities

    SciTech Connect

    Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S. |; Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Lazanu, S.

    1999-08-01

    The changes induced by neutron irradiation in n- and p-type silicon samples with starting resistivities from 10 {Omega}-cm up to 30 K{Omega}-cm, grown using different techniques, as Float-Zone (FZ), Czochralski (CZ) and epitaxial, have been analyzed by Van der Pauw and Hall effect measurements. Increasing the fluence, each set of samples evolved toward a quasi-intrinsic p-type material. This behavior has been explained in the frame of a two-level model, that considers the introduction during irradiation of mainly two defects. A deep acceptor and a deep donor, probably related to the divacancy and to the C{sub i}O{sub i} complex, are placed in the upper and lower half of the forbidden gap, respectively. This simple model explains quantitatively the data on resistivity and Hall coefficient of each set of samples up to the fluence of {approx} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Environmental Decision Support with Consistent Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the most effective ways to pursue environmental progress is through the use of consistent metrics within a decision making framework. The US Environmental Protection Agency’s Sustainable Technology Division has developed TRACI, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of...

  16. The effect of ceramic/metal gradient armor's components characteristic on its impact-resistant characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lisheng; Zhang Qingjie; Zhai Pengcheng; Cao Dongfeng

    2008-02-15

    The effect of ceramic/metal gradient armor's components characteristic on its impact-resistant characteristic has been investigated by a new modified Alekseevskii-Tate equation. The following researching work is done by the former model [1]: the effect of ceramic layer on the impact-resistant characteristic, the effect of gradient layer on the impact-resistant characteristic and the effect of metal layer on the impact-resistant characteristic.

  17. Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based

  18. The effect of a sitting versus supine posture on normative esophageal pressure topography metrics and Chicago Classification diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinglian; Read, Andrew; Nicodème, Frédéric; Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Although, the current protocol for high resolution manometry (HRM) using the Chicago Classification is based on the supine posture, some practitioners prefer a sitting posture. Our aims were to establish normative esophageal pressure topography (EPT) data for the sitting position and to determine the effect of applying those norms to Chicago Classification diagnoses. Method EPT studies including test swallows in both a supine and sitting position of 75 healthy volunteers and 120 patients were reviewed. Integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), distal contractile integral (DCI), contractile front velocity (CFV) and distal latency (DL) were measured and compared between postures. Normative ranges were established from the healthy volunteers and the effect of applying sitting normative values to the patients was analyzed. Result Normative values of IRP, DCI and CFV all decreased significantly in the sitting posture. Applying normative sitting metrics to patient studies (27% reduction in IRP (15 to 11 mmHg), 69% reduction in DCI (8,000 to 2500 mmHg-s-cm)) reclassified 13/120 (11%) patients as having abnormal EGJ relaxation and 26/120 (22%) as hypercontractile. Three patients with an abnormal supine IRP normalized when sitting with elimination of a vascular artifact. Conclusion Clinical HRM studies should include both a supine and sitting position to minimize misdiagnoses attributable to anatomical factors. However, until outcome studies demonstrating the significance of isolated abnormalities of IRP or DCI in the sitting position are available, the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders should continue to be based on supine swallows using normative data from the supine posture. PMID:22897486

  19. Effects of resistance training fatigue on joint biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David R; Szivak, Tunde K; Distefano, Lindsay J; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Apicella, Jenna M; Kelly, Neil A; Creighton, Brent C; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2013-01-01

    Resistance training has been found to have a multitude of benefits. However, when performed with short rest, resistance training can result in substantial fatigue, which may have a negative impact on exercise technique. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of fatigue from resistance exercise on joint biomechanics to determine what residual movement effects may exist after the workout. Twelve men with at least 6 months of resistance training experience (age 24 ± 4.2 years, height 173.1 ± 3.6 cm, weight 76.9 ± 7.8 kg) performed 5 body weight squats before (pretest) and after (posttest) a highly fatiguing resistance training workout. Lower extremity biomechanics were assessed using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system during these squats. Peak angle, total displacement, and rate were assessed for knee flexion, trunk flexion, hip flexion, hip rotation, and hip adduction. Results showed a significant decrease in peak angle for knee flexion (Pre: 120.28 ± 11.93°, Post: 104.46 ± 9.85°), hip flexion (Pre: -109.42 ± 12.49°, Post: -95.8 ± 12.30°), and hip adduction (Pre: -23.32 ± 7.04°, Post: -17.30 ± 8.79°). There was a significant reduction in angular displacement for knee flexion (Pre: 115.56 ± 10.55°, Post: 103.35 ± 10.49°), hip flexion (Pre: 97.94 ± 10.69°, Post: 90.51 ± 13.22°), hip adduction (Pre: 17.79 ± 7.36°, Post: 11.89 ± 4.34°), and hip rotation (Pre: 30.72 ± 12.28, Post: 20.48 ± 10.12). There was also a significant reduction in displacement rate for knee flexion (Pre: 2.20 ± 0.20, Post: 1.98 ± 0.20), hip flexion (Pre: 1.92 ± 0.20, Post: 1.76 ± 0.27), hip adduction (Pre: -0.44 ± 0.17, Post: -0.31 ± 0.17), and hip rotation (Pre: 0.59 ± 0.23, Post: 0.38 ± 0.21). This study demonstrated that there are lasting residual effects on movement capabilities after a high-intensity short rest protocol. Thus, strength and conditioning coaches must be careful to monitor movements and exercise techniques after such workouts

  20. Edge effect on resistance scaling rules in graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangyu; Torres, Carlos M; Tang, Jianshi; Bai, Jingwei; Song, Emil B; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Yuegang; Wang, Kang L

    2011-03-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the edge effect on the room-temperature transport in graphene nanoribbon and graphene sheet (both single-layer and bilayer). By measuring the resistance scaling behaviors at both low- and high-carrier densities, we show that the transport of single-layer nanoribbons lies in a strong localization regime, which can be attributed to an edge effect. We find that this edge effect can be weakened by enlarging the width, decreasing the carrier densities, or adding an extra layer. From graphene nanoribbon to graphene sheet, the data show a dimensional crossover of the transport regimes possibly due to the drastic change of the edge effect. PMID:21322591

  1. Multimetric indices: How many metrics?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multimetric indices (MMI’s) often include 5 to 15 metrics, each representing a different attribute of assemblage condition, such as species diversity, tolerant taxa, and nonnative taxa. Is there an optimal number of metrics for MMIs? To explore this question, I created 1000 9-met...

  2. What About Metric? Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbrow, Louis E.

    Described are the advantages of using the metric system over the English system. The most common units of both systems are listed and compared. Pictures are used to exhibit use of the metric system in connection with giving prices or sizes of common items. Several examples provide computations of area, total weight of several objects, and volume;…

  3. Inching toward the Metric System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy

    1989-01-01

    Provides an overview and description of the metric system. Discusses the evolution of measurement systems and their early cultures, the beginnings of metric measurement, the history of measurement systems in the United States, the International System of Units, its general style and usage, and supplementary units. (RT)

  4. Metric Activities, Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Bob, Comp.

    This pamphlet presents worksheets for use in fifteen activities or groups of activities designed for teaching the metric system to children in grades K through 6. The approach taken in several of the activities is one of conversion between metric and English units. The majority of the activities concern length, area, volume, and capacity. A…

  5. Metrication: A Guide for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer and Corporate Affairs Dept., Ottawa (Ontario).

    The widespread use of the metric system by most of the major industrial powers of the world has prompted the Canadian government to investigate and consider use of the system. This booklet was developed to aid the consuming public in Canada in gaining some knowledge of metrication and how its application would affect their present economy.…

  6. Metric Supplement to Technical Drawing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschel, Mark

    This manual is intended for use in training persons whose vocations involve technical drawing to use the metric system of measurement. It could be used in a short course designed for that purpose or for individual study. The manual begins with a brief discussion of the rationale for conversion to the metric system. It then provides a…

  7. Metrics for Soft Goods Merchandising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in soft goods merchandising, this instructional package is one of five for the marketing and distribution cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  8. Metrics for Hard Goods Merchandising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in hard goods merchandising, this instructional package is one of five for the marketing and distribution cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  9. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the fracture load of the crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  10. Effects of Ca antagonists on Ca fluxes in resistance vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cauvin, C.; Saida, K.; van Breemen, C.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers have examined contractions and /sup 45/Ca fluxes induced by norepinephrine (NE) and 80 mM potassium (high K) depolarization and their inhibition by dilitazem in rabbit mesenteric resistance vessels. Contraction induced by both NE and high K depended almost completely on extracellular Ca. Dose-response curves for diltiazem inhibition of NE (10(-5) M) and high K contractions showed ED50 values of 1 X 10(-8) and 6 X 10(-7) M, respectively, indicating that the receptor-operated channel (ROC) was more sensitive than the potential-operated channel (POC) to the action of diltiazem. Diltiazem (10(-6) M) was shown to inhibit NE- and 80 mM K-stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx effectively by 87 +/- 15 and 85 +/- 10%, respectively. Comparison of these data to those obtained from aorta suggest that although the sensitivity of the POC is approximately the same in aorta and mesenteric resistance vessels, the sensitivity of the ROC is much greater in the latter. This increased sensitivity is paralleled by a greatly decreased role of intracellular Ca release in NE contraction in mesenteric resistance vessels.