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Sample records for effector ssei mediates

  1. The Salmonella SPI2 Effector SseI Mediates Long-Term Systemic Infection by Modulating Host Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Christiane; Gopinath, Smita; Peng, Kaitian; Laidlaw, Grace; Chien, Yueh-Hsiu; Jeong, Ha-Won; Li, Zhigang; Brown, Matthew D.; Sacks, David B.; Monack, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Host-adapted strains of Salmonella enterica cause systemic infections and have the ability to persist systemically for long periods of time despite the presence of a robust immune response. Chronically infected hosts are asymptomatic and transmit disease to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria, thereby serving as a critical reservoir for disease. We show that the bacterial effector protein SseI (also called SrfH), which is translocated into host cells by the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) type III secretion system (T3SS), is required for Salmonella typhimurium to maintain a long-term chronic systemic infection in mice. SseI inhibits normal cell migration of primary macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro, and such inhibition requires the host factor IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), an important regulator of cell migration. SseI binds directly to IQGAP1 and co-localizes with this factor at the cell periphery. The C-terminal domain of SseI is similar to PMT/ToxA, a bacterial toxin that contains a cysteine residue (C1165) that is critical for activity. Mutation of the corresponding residue in SseI (C178A) eliminates SseI function in vitro and in vivo, but not binding to IQGAP1. In addition, infection with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium suppressed DC migration to the spleen in vivo in an SseI-dependent manner. Correspondingly, examination of spleens from mice infected with WT S. typhimurium revealed fewer DC and CD4+ T lymphocytes compared to mice infected with ΔsseI S. typhimurium. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SseI inhibits normal host cell migration, which ultimately counteracts the ability of the host to clear systemic bacteria. PMID:19956712

  2. TAL effector-mediated genome visualization (TGV).

    PubMed

    Miyanari, Yusuke

    2014-09-01

    The three-dimensional remodeling of chromatin within nucleus is being recognized as determinant for genome regulation. Recent technological advances in live imaging of chromosome loci begun to explore the biological roles of the movement of the chromatin within the nucleus. To facilitate better understanding of the functional relevance and mechanisms regulating genome architecture, we applied transcription activator-like effector (TALE) technology to visualize endogenous repetitive genomic sequences in mouse cells. The application, called TAL effector-mediated genome visualization (TGV), allows us to label specific repetitive sequences and trace nuclear remodeling in living cells. Using this system, parental origin of chromosomes was specifically traced by distinction of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This review will present our approaches to monitor nuclear dynamics of target sequences and highlights key properties and potential uses of TGV. PMID:24704356

  3. Modes of TAL effector-mediated repression

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jeannette; Gossen, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Engineered transcription activator-like effectors, or TALEs, have emerged as a new class of designer DNA-binding proteins. Their DNA recognition sites can be specified with great flexibility. When fused to appropriate transcriptional regulatory domains, they can serve as designer transcription factors, modulating the activity of targeted promoters. We created tet operator (tetO)-specific TALEs (tetTALEs), with an identical DNA-binding site as the Tet repressor (TetR) and the TetR-based transcription factors that are extensively used in eukaryotic transcriptional control systems. Different constellations of tetTALEs and tetO modified chromosomal transcription units were analyzed for their efficacy in mammalian cells. We find that tetTALE-silencers can entirely abrogate expression from the strong human EF1α promoter when binding upstream of the transcriptional control sequence. Remarkably, the DNA-binding domain of tetTALE alone can effectively counteract trans-activation mediated by the potent tettrans-activator and also directly interfere with RNA polymerase II transcription initiation from the strong CMV promoter. Our results demonstrate that TALEs can act as highly versatile tools in genetic engineering, serving as trans-activators, trans-silencers and also competitive repressors. PMID:25389273

  4. Armet is an effector protein mediating aphid-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Dai, Huaien; Zhang, Yi; Chandrasekar, Raman; Luo, Lan; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Sheng, Changzhong; Peng, Gongxin; Chen, Shaoliang; Tomich, John M; Reese, John; Edwards, Owain; Kang, Le; Reeck, Gerald; Cui, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Aphid saliva is predicted to contain proteins that modulate plant defenses and facilitate feeding. Armet is a well-characterized bifunctional protein in mammalian systems. Here we report a new role of Armet, namely as an effector protein in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Pea aphid Armet's physical and chemical properties and its intracellular role are comparable to those reported for mammalian Armets. Uniquely, we detected Armet in aphid watery saliva and in the phloem sap of fava beans fed on by aphids. Armet's transcript level is several times higher in the salivary gland when aphids feed on bean plants than when they feed on an artificial diet. Knockdown of the Armet transcript by RNA interference disturbs aphid feeding behavior on fava beans measured by the electrical penetration graph technique and leads to a shortened life span. Inoculation of pea aphid Armet protein into tobacco leaves induced a transcriptional response that included pathogen-responsive genes. The data suggest that Armet is an effector protein mediating aphid-plant interactions. PMID:25678626

  5. TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to bacterial blight of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight of cotton (BBC) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Xcm) is a destructive disease that has recently re-emerged in the U.S. Xcm injects transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that directly induce the expression of host susceptibility (S) or resistance (R) genes. ...

  6. Effector Contributions to Gβγ-mediated Signaling as Revealed by Muscarinic Potassium Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova-Nikolova, Tatyana T.; Breitwieser, Gerda E.

    1997-01-01

    Receptor-mediated activation of heterotrimeric G proteins leading to dissociation of the Gα subunit from Gβγ is a highly conserved signaling strategy used by numerous extracellular stimuli. Although Gβγ subunits regulate a variety of effectors, including kinases, cyclases, phospholipases, and ion channels (Clapham, D.E., and E.J. Neer. 1993. Nature (Lond.). 365:403–406), few tools exist for probing instantaneous Gβγ-effector interactions, and little is known about the kinetic contributions of effectors to the signaling process. In this study, we used the atrial muscarinic K+ channel, which is activated by direct interactions with Gβγ subunits (Logothetis, D.E., Y. Kurachi, J. Galper, E.J. Neer, and D.E. Clap. 1987. Nature (Lond.). 325:321–326; Wickman, K., J.A. Iniguez-Liuhi, P.A. Davenport, R. Taussig, G.B. Krapivinsky, M.E. Linder, A.G. Gilman, and D.E. Clapham. 1994. Nature (Lond.). 366: 654–663; Huang, C.-L., P.A. Slesinger, P.J. Casey, Y.N. Jan, and L.Y. Jan. 1995. Neuron. 15:1133–1143), as a sensitive reporter of the dynamics of Gβγ-effector interactions. Muscarinic K+ channels exhibit bursting behavior upon G protein activation, shifting between three distinct functional modes, characterized by the frequency of channel openings during individual bursts. Acetylcholine concentration (and by inference, the concentration of activated Gβγ) controls the fraction of time spent in each mode without changing either the burst duration or channel gating within individual modes. The picture which emerges is of a Gβγ effector with allosteric regulation and an intrinsic “off” switch which serves to limit its own activation. These two features combine to establish exquisite channel sensitivity to changes in Gβγ concentration, and may be indicative of the factors regulating other Gβγ-modulated effectors. PMID:9041452

  7. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. PMID:25528359

  8. The Fusarium oxysporum effector Six6 contributes to virulence and suppresses I-2-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Gawehns, F; Houterman, P M; Ichou, F Ait; Michielse, C B; Hijdra, M; Cornelissen, B J C; Rep, M; Takken, F L W

    2014-04-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate their host and facilitate colonization. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is the causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease in tomato. Upon infection, F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici secretes numerous small proteins into the xylem sap (Six proteins). Most Six proteins are unique to F. oxysporum, but Six6 is an exception; a homolog is also present in two Colletotrichum spp. SIX6 expression was found to require living host cells and a knockout of SIX6 in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici compromised virulence, classifying it as a genuine effector. Heterologous expression of SIX6 did not affect growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana toward Verticillium dahliae, Pseudomonas syringae, or F. oxysporum, suggesting a specific function for F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Six6 in the F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici- tomato pathosystem. Remarkably, Six6 was found to specifically suppress I-2-mediated cell death (I2CD) upon transient expression in N. benthamiana, whereas it did not compromise the activity of other cell-death-inducing genes. Still, this I2CD suppressing activity of Six6 does not allow the fungus to overcome I-2 resistance in tomato, suggesting that I-2-mediated resistance is independent from cell death. PMID:24313955

  9. Effector T Cells Abrogate Stroma-Mediated Chemoresistance in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weimin; Kryczek, Ilona; Dostál, Lubomír; Lin, Heng; Tan, Lijun; Zhao, Lili; Lu, Fujia; Wei, Shuang; Maj, Tomasz; Peng, Dongjun; He, Gong; Vatan, Linda; Szeliga, Wojciech; Kuick, Rork; Kotarski, Jan; Tarkowski, Rafał; Dou, Yali; Rattan, Ramandeep; Munkarah, Adnan; Liu, J Rebecca; Zou, Weiping

    2016-05-19

    Effector T cells and fibroblasts are major components in the tumor microenvironment. The means through which these cellular interactions affect chemoresistance is unclear. Here, we show that fibroblasts diminish nuclear accumulation of platinum in ovarian cancer cells, resulting in resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. We demonstrate that glutathione and cysteine released by fibroblasts contribute to this resistance. CD8(+) T cells abolish the resistance by altering glutathione and cystine metabolism in fibroblasts. CD8(+) T-cell-derived interferon (IFN)γ controls fibroblast glutathione and cysteine through upregulation of gamma-glutamyltransferases and transcriptional repression of system xc(-) cystine and glutamate antiporter via the JAK/STAT1 pathway. The presence of stromal fibroblasts and CD8(+) T cells is negatively and positively associated with ovarian cancer patient survival, respectively. Thus, our work uncovers a mode of action for effector T cells: they abrogate stromal-mediated chemoresistance. Capitalizing upon the interplay between chemotherapy and immunotherapy holds high potential for cancer treatment. PMID:27133165

  10. Neutrophils prime a long-lived effector macrophage phenotype that mediates accelerated helminth expulsion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Wu, Wenhui; Millman, Ariel; Craft, Joshua F.; Chen, Eunice; Patel, Nirav; Boucher, Jean L.; Urban, Joseph F.; Kim, Charles C.; Gause, William C.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the role of innate cells in acquired resistance to the natural murine parasitic nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Macrophages obtained as late as 45 days after N. brasiliensis inoculation were able to transfer accelerated parasite clearance to naive recipients. Primed macrophages adhered to larvae in vitro and triggered increased mortality of parasites. Neutrophil depletion in primed mice abrogated the protective effects of transferred macrophages and inhibited their in vitro binding to larvae. Neutrophils in parasite-infected mice showed a distinct transcriptional profile and promoted alternatively activated M2 macrophage polarization through secretory factors including IL-13. Differentially activated neutrophils in the context of a type 2 immune response therefore prime a long-lived effector macrophage phenotype that directly mediates rapid nematode damage and clearance. PMID:25173346

  11. Suppression of Fcγ-receptor-mediated antibody effector function during persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Douglas H; Elsaesser, Heidi; Lux, Anja; Timmerman, John M; Morrison, Sherie L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Brooks, David G

    2015-02-17

    Understanding how viruses subvert host immunity and persist is essential for developing strategies to eliminate infection. T cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection is well described, but effects on antibody-mediated effector activity are unclear. Herein, we show that increased amounts of immune complexes generated in mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) suppressed multiple Fcγ-receptor (FcγR) functions. The high amounts of immune complexes suppressed antibody-mediated cell depletion, therapeutic antibody-killing of LCMV infected cells and human CD20-expressing tumors, as well as reduced immune complex-mediated cross-presentation to T cells. Suppression of FcγR activity was not due to inhibitory FcγRs or high concentrations of free antibody, and proper FcγR functions were restored when persistently infected mice specifically lacked immune complexes. Thus, we identify a mechanism of immunosuppression during viral persistence with implications for understanding effective antibody activity aimed at pathogen control. PMID:25680277

  12. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hye; Le Pichon, Claire E; Adolfsson, Oskar; Gafner, Valérie; Pihlgren, Maria; Lin, Han; Solanoy, Hilda; Brendza, Robert; Ngu, Hai; Foreman, Oded; Chan, Ruby; Ernst, James A; DiCara, Danielle; Hotzel, Isidro; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Hansen, David V; Atwal, Jasvinder; Lu, Yanmei; Bumbaca, Daniela; Pfeifer, Andrea; Watts, Ryan J; Muhs, Andreas; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Ayalon, Gai

    2016-08-01

    The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau. PMID:27475227

  13. Antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) with antibody-coated effectors: rat and human effectors versus tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Jones, J F; Titus, J A; Segal, D M

    1981-06-01

    We have previously described techniques that cause antibody molecules to remain bound to P388D1 cells for at least 18 hr, and enable these cells to lyse hapten-coated erythrocytes not sensitized with antibody. These methods collectively are called "franking." In this study, we have determined that these methods are applicable to other systems. We franked rat splenocytes and human peripheral blood leukocytes with rabbit anti-TNP antibody, and showed that they were capable of lysing TNP-tumor and erythrocyte targets (not coated with antibody) in a hapten-specific, antibody-dependent fashion. Both the mononuclear and the polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte fractions of the human cells were capable of mediating lysis. Additionally, human leukocytes franked with rabbit antibody were stained with fluorescent goat anti-rabbit IgG Fab, and were analyzed for fluorescence by flow microfluorometry. Nearly all of the PMN cells and about one-half of the mononuclear cells had IgG on their surfaces after franking. Clearly, not all cells can be franked, but those that can retain significant numbers of antibody molecules (approximately 5 X 10(4), in the case of PMN cells) on their surfaces. PMID:7014718

  14. The effector SPRYSEC-19 of Globodera rostochiensis suppresses CC-NB-LRR-mediated disease resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Postma, Wiebe J; Slootweg, Erik J; Rehman, Sajid; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Tytgat, Tom O G; van Gelderen, Kasper; Lozano-Torres, Jose L; Roosien, Jan; Pomp, Rikus; van Schaik, Casper; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2012-10-01

    The potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis invades roots of host plants where it transforms cells near the vascular cylinder into a permanent feeding site. The host cell modifications are most likely induced by a complex mixture of proteins in the stylet secretions of the nematodes. Resistance to nematodes conferred by nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins usually results in a programmed cell death in and around the feeding site, and is most likely triggered by the recognition of effectors in stylet secretions. However, the actual role of these secretions in the activation and suppression of effector-triggered immunity is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the effector SPRYSEC-19 of G. rostochiensis physically associates in planta with the LRR domain of a member of the SW5 resistance gene cluster in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Unexpectedly, this interaction did not trigger defense-related programmed cell death and resistance to G. rostochiensis. By contrast, agroinfiltration assays showed that the coexpression of SPRYSEC-19 in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana suppresses programmed cell death mediated by several coiled-coil (CC)-NB-LRR immune receptors. Furthermore, SPRYSEC-19 abrogated resistance to Potato virus X mediated by the CC-NB-LRR resistance protein Rx1, and resistance to Verticillium dahliae mediated by an unidentified resistance in potato (Solanum tuberosum). The suppression of cell death and disease resistance did not require a physical association of SPRYSEC-19 and the LRR domains of the CC-NB-LRR resistance proteins. Altogether, our data demonstrated that potato cyst nematodes secrete effectors that enable the suppression of programmed cell death and disease resistance mediated by several CC-NB-LRR proteins in plants. PMID:22904163

  15. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Salmonella virulence factor SseI

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, Shyam S.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2012-01-01

    SseI is secreted into host cells by Salmonella and contributes to the establishment of systemic infections. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of SseI has been solved to 1.70 Å resolution, revealing it to be a member of the cysteine protease superfamily with a catalytic triad consisting of Cys178, His216 and Asp231 that is critical to its virulence activities. Structure-based analysis revealed that SseI is likely to possess either acyl hydrolase or acyltransferase activity, placing this virulence factor in the rapidly growing class of enzymes of this family utilized by bacterial pathogens inside eukaryotic cells. PMID:23151626

  16. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  17. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes.

    PubMed

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  18. Coxiella burnetii effector protein subverts clathrin-mediated vesicular trafficking for pathogen vacuole biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Howe, Dale; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Successful macrophage colonization by Coxiella burnetii, the cause of human Q fever, requires pathogen-directed biogenesis of a large, growth-permissive parasitophorous vacuole (PV) with phagolysosomal characteristics. The vesicular trafficking pathways co-opted by C. burnetii for PV development are poorly defined; however, it is predicted that effector proteins delivered to the cytosol by a defective in organelle trafficking/intracellular multiplication (Dot/Icm) type 4B secretion system are required for membrane recruitment. Here, we describe involvement of clathrin-mediated vesicular trafficking in PV generation and the engagement of this pathway by the C. burnetii type 4B secretion system substrate Coxiella vacuolar protein A (CvpA). CvpA contains multiple dileucine [DERQ]XXXL[LI] and tyrosine (YXXΦ)-based endocytic sorting motifs like those recognized by the clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes AP1, AP2, and AP3. A C. burnetii ΔcvpA mutant exhibited significant defects in replication and PV development, confirming the importance of CvpA in infection. Ectopically expressed mCherry-CvpA localized to tubular and vesicular domains of pericentrosomal recycling endosomes positive for Rab11 and transferrin receptor, and CvpA membrane interactions were lost upon mutation of endocytic sorting motifs. Consistent with CvpA engagement of the endocytic recycling system, ectopic expression reduced uptake of transferrin. In pull-down assays, peptides containing CvpA-sorting motifs and full-length CvpA interacted with AP2 subunits and clathrin heavy chain. Furthermore, depletion of AP2 or clathrin by siRNA treatment significantly inhibited C. burnetii replication. Thus, our results reveal the importance of clathrin-coated vesicle trafficking in C. burnetii infection and define a role for CvpA in subverting these transport mechanisms. PMID:24248335

  19. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes

    PubMed Central

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  20. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26039925

  1. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26039925

  2. Common and small molecules as the ultimate regulatory and effector mediators of antigen-specific transplantation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Holan, Vladimir; Krulova, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intensive research, the molecular basis of allograft and xenograft rejection still remains not fully understood. The acute rejection of an allograft is associated with the intragraft Th1 cytokine response, while tolerance of an allograft or xenograft rejection is accompanied by a higher production of the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. Nevertheless, these cytokines are not the final regulatory and effector molecules mediating transplantation reactions. Data indicate that the functioning of common molecules with enzymatic activities, such are inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) or indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the bioavailability of their substrates (L-arginine, tryptophan, heme) and the cytotoxic and regulatory actions of their small gaseous products (NO, CO) can be the ultimate mechanisms responsible for effector or regulatory reactions. Using models of transplantation immunity and tolerance we show that T cell receptor-mediated recognition of allogeneic or xenogeneic antigens as well as the balance between immunity/tolerance induces distinct cytokine production profiles. The ratio between Th1 and Th2 cytokines efficiently regulates the expression of genes for common enzymes, such as iNOS, arginase, HO-1 and IDO. These enzymes may compete for substrates, such as L-arginine or tryptophan, and the final product of their activity are small molecules (NO, CO) displaying effector or regulatory functions of the immune system. Thus, it is suggested that in spite of the high immunological specificity of transplatation reaction, the ultimate players in regulatory and effector functions could be small and common molecules. PMID:24392309

  3. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Exploits Host SUMOylation Pathways To Mediate Effector-Host Interactions and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Paige Selvy; Luo, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that selectively infects mononuclear phagocytes. We recently reported that E. chaffeensis utilizes a type 1 secretion (T1S) system to export tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors and demonstrated that these effectors interact with a functionally diverse array of host proteins. By way of these interactions, TRP effectors modulate host cell functions; however, the molecular basis of these interactions and their roles in ehrlichial pathobiology are not well defined. In this study, we describe the first bacterial protein posttranslational modification (PTM) by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). The E. chaffeensis T1S effector TRP120 is conjugated to SUMO at a carboxy-terminal canonical consensus SUMO conjugation motif in vitro and in human cells. In human cells, TRP120 was selectively conjugated with SUMO2/3 isoforms. Disruption of TRP120 SUMOylation perturbed interactions with known host proteins, through predicted SUMO interaction motif-dependent and -independent mechanisms. E. chaffeensis infection did not result in dramatic changes in the global host SUMOylated protein profile, but a robust colocalization of predominately SUMO1 with ehrlichial inclusions was observed. Inhibiting the SUMO pathway with a small-molecule inhibitor had a significant impact on E. chaffeensis replication and recruitment of the TRP120-interacting protein polycomb group ring finger protein 5 (PCGF5) to the inclusion, indicating that the SUMO pathway is critical for intracellular survival. This study reveals the novel exploitation of the SUMO pathway by Ehrlichia, which facilitates effector-eukaryote interactions necessary to usurp the host and create a permissive intracellular niche. PMID:25047847

  4. ICOS Promotes the Function of CD4+ Effector T Cells during Anti-OX40-Mediated Tumor Rejection.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Todd C; Long, Hua; Potluri, Shobha; Pertel, Thomas; Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha L; Lin, John C; Fu, Tihui; Sharma, Padmanee; Allison, James P; Feldman, Reid M R

    2016-07-01

    ICOS is a T-cell coregulatory receptor that provides a costimulatory signal to T cells during antigen-mediated activation. Antitumor immunity can be improved by ICOS-targeting therapies, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we define the role of ICOS signaling in antitumor immunity using a blocking, nondepleting antibody against ICOS ligand (ICOS-L). ICOS signaling provided critical support for the effector function of CD4(+) Foxp3(-) T cells during anti-OX40-driven tumor immune responses. By itself, ICOS-L blockade reduced accumulation of intratumoral T regulatory cells (Treg), but it was insufficient to substantially inhibit tumor growth. Furthermore, it did not impede antitumor responses mediated by anti-4-1BB-driven CD8(+) T cells. We found that anti-OX40 efficacy, which is based on Treg depletion and to a large degree on CD4(+) effector T cell (Teff) responses, was impaired with ICOS-L blockade. In contrast, the provision of additional ICOS signaling through direct ICOS-L expression by tumor cells enhanced tumor rejection and survival when administered along with anti-OX40 therapy. Taken together, our results showed that ICOS signaling during antitumor responses acts on both Teff and Treg cells, which have opposing roles in promoting immune activation. Thus, effective therapies targeting the ICOS pathway should seek to promote ICOS signaling specifically in effector CD4(+) T cells by combining ICOS agonism and Treg depletion. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3684-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197182

  5. A family of conserved bacterial effectors inhibits salicylic acid-mediated basal immunity and promotes disease necrosis in plants.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Sruti; Thilmony, Roger; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Nomura, Kinya; He, Sheng Yang

    2004-06-29

    Salicylic acid (SA)-mediated host immunity plays a central role in combating microbial pathogens in plants. Inactivation of SA-mediated immunity, therefore, would be a critical step in the evolution of a successful plant pathogen. It is known that mutations in conserved effector loci (CEL) in the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae (the Delta CEL mutation), Erwinia amylovora (the dspA/E mutation), and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (the wtsE mutation) exert particularly strong negative effects on bacterial virulence in their host plants by unknown mechanisms. We found that the loss of virulence in Delta CEL and dspA/E mutants was linked to their inability to suppress cell wall-based defenses and to cause normal disease necrosis in Arabidopsis and apple host plants. The Delta CEL mutant activated SA-dependent callose deposition in wild-type Arabidopsis but failed to elicit high levels of callose-associated defense in Arabidopsis plants blocked in SA accumulation or synthesis. This mutant also multiplied more aggressively in SA-deficient plants than in wild-type plants. The hopPtoM and avrE genes in the CEL of P. syringae were found to encode suppressors of this SA-dependent basal defense. The widespread conservation of the HopPtoM and AvrE families of effectors in various bacteria suggests that suppression of SA-dependent basal immunity and promotion of host cell death are important virulence strategies for bacterial infection of plants. PMID:15210989

  6. Requirements for capsid-binding and an effector function in TRIMCyp-mediated restriction of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Vandegraaff, Nick; Li Yuan; McGee-Estrada, Kathleen; Stremlau, Matthew; Welikala, Sohanya; Si Zhihai; Engelman, Alan; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-08-01

    In owl monkeys, a retrotransposition event replaced the gene encoding the retroviral restriction factor TRIM5{alpha} with one encoding TRIMCyp, a fusion between the RING, B-box 2 and coiled-coil domains of TRIM5 and cyclophilin A. TRIMCyp restricts human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection by a mechanism dependent on the interaction of the cyclophilin A moiety and the HIV-1 capsid protein. Here, we show that infection by retroviruses other than HIV-1 can be restricted by TRIMCyp, providing an explanation for the evolutionary retention of the TRIMCyp gene in owl monkey lineages. The TRIMCyp-mediated block to HIV-1 infection occurs before the earliest step of reverse transcription. TRIMCyp-mediated restriction involves at least two functions: (1) capsid binding, which occurs most efficiently for trimeric TRIMCyp proteins that retain the coiled-coil and cyclophilin A domains, and (2) an effector function that depends upon the B-box 2 domain.

  7. Toxicity and SidJ-Mediated Suppression of Toxicity Require Distinct Regions in the SidE Family of Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Havey, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular bacteria use a variety of strategies to evade degradation and create a replicative niche. Legionella pneumophila is an intravacuolar pathogen that establishes a replicative niche through the secretion of more than 300 effector proteins. The function of most effectors remains to be determined. Toxicity in yeast has been used to identify functional domains and elucidate the biochemical function of effectors. A library of L. pneumophila effectors was screened using an expression plasmid that produces low levels of each protein. This screen identified the effector SdeA as a protein that confers a strong toxic phenotype that inhibits yeast replication. The toxicity of SdeA was suppressed in cells producing the effector SidJ. The effector SdeA is a member of the SidE family of L. pneumophila effector proteins. All SidE orthologs encoded by the Philadelphia isolate of Legionella pneumophila were toxic to yeast, and SidJ suppressed the toxicity of each. We identified a conserved central region in the SidE proteins that was sufficient to mediate yeast toxicity. Surprisingly, SidJ did not suppress toxicity when this central region was produced in yeast. We determined that the amino-terminal region of SidE was essential for SidJ-mediated suppression of toxicity. Thus, there is a genetic interaction that links the activity of SidJ and the amino-terminal region of SidE, which is required to modulate the toxic activity displayed by the central region of the SidE protein. This suggests a complex mechanism by which the L. pneumophila effector SidJ modulates the function of the SidE proteins after translocation into host cells. PMID:26099583

  8. Neutrophils prime a long-lived effector macrophage phenotype that mediates accelerated helminth expulsion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The innate immune cell populations that mediate metazoan parasite expulsion remain largely undefined. We examined the role of innate cells in the immune response to the nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis hypothesizing that they may mediate the markedly accelerated CD4+ T cell-independen...

  9. A transcription activator-like effector induction system mediated by proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Matthew F.; Politz, Mark C.; Johnson, Charles B.; Markley, Andrew L.; Pfleger, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Simple and predictable trans-acting regulatory tools are needed in the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering to build complex genetic circuits and optimize the levels of native and heterologous gene products. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are bacterial virulence factors that have recently gained traction in biotechnology applications due to their customizable DNA binding specificity. In this work we expand the versatility of these transcription factors to create an inducible TALE system by inserting tobacco-etch virus (TEV) protease recognition sites into the TALE backbone. The resulting engineered TALEs maintain transcriptional repression of their target genes in Escherichia coli, but are degraded following the induction of the TEV protease, thereby promoting expression of the previously repressed target gene of interest. This TALE-TEV technology enables both repression and induction of plasmid or chromosomal target genes in a manner analogous to traditional repressor proteins but with the added flexibility of being operator agnostic. PMID:26854666

  10. EDS1 mediates pathogen resistance and virulence function of a bacterial effector in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) are well known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1- (GmEDS1a/b) and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean. Consist...

  11. TAL effectors mediate high-efficiency transposition of the piggyBac transposon in silkworm Bombyx mori L

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lupeng; You, Zhengying; Qian, Qiujie; Zhang, Yuyu; Che, Jiaqian; Song, Jia; Zhong, Boxiong

    2015-01-01

    The piggyBac (PB) transposon is one of the most useful transposable elements, and has been successfully used for genetic manipulation in more than a dozen species. However, the efficiency of PB-mediated transposition is still insufficient for many purposes. Here, we present a strategy to enhance transposition efficiency using a fusion of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) and the PB transposase (PBase). The results demonstrate that the TALE-PBase fusion protein which is engineered in this study can produce a significantly improved stable transposition efficiency of up to 63.9%, which is at least 7 times higher than the current transposition efficiency in silkworm. Moreover, the average number of transgene-positive individuals increased up to 5.7-fold, with each positive brood containing an average of 18.1 transgenic silkworms. Finally, we demonstrate that TALE-PBase fusion-mediated PB transposition presents a new insertional preference compared with original insertional preference. This method shows a great potential and value for insertional therapy of many genetic diseases. In conclusion, this new and powerful transposition technology will efficiently promote genetic manipulation studies in both invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:26608076

  12. Eosinophilia of dystrophin-deficient muscle is promoted by perforin-mediated cytotoxicity by T cell effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, B.; Spencer, M. J.; Nakamura, G.; Tseng-Ong, L.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) contribute to muscle pathology in the dystrophin-null mutant mouse (mdx) model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through perforin-dependent and perforin-independent mechanisms. We have assessed whether the CTL-mediated pathology includes the promotion of eosinophilia in dystrophic muscle, and thereby provides a secondary mechanism through which CTLs contribute to muscular dystrophy. Quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx dystrophy. In addition, electron microscopic observations show that eosinophils traverse the basement membrane of mdx muscle fibers and display sites of close apposition of eosinophil and muscle membranes. The close membrane apposition is characterized by impingement of eosinophilic rods of major basic protein into the muscle cell membrane. Transfer of mdx splenocytes and mdx muscle extracts to irradiated C57 mice by intraperitoneal injection resulted in muscle eosinophilia in the recipient mice. Double-mutant mice lacking dystrophin and perforin showed less eosinophilia than was displayed by mdx mice that expressed perforin. Finally, administration of prednisolone, which has been shown previously to reduce the concentration of CTLs in dystrophic muscle, produced a significant reduction in eosinophilia. These findings indicate that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx pathology that is promoted by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity of effector T cells. However, some eosinophilia of mdx muscle is independent of perforin-mediated processes.

  13. Propanil Exposure Induces Delayed but Sustained Abrogation of Cell-Mediated Immunity through Direct Interference with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, James M.; Frankenberry, Marc A.; Schell, Todd D.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2006-01-01

    The postemergent herbicide propanil (PRN; also known as 3,4-dichloropropionanilide) is used on rice and wheat crops and has well-known immunotoxic effects on various compartments of the immune system, including T-helper lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and macrophages. It is unclear, however, whether PRN also adversely affects cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), the primary (1°) effectors of cell-mediated immunity. In this study we examined both the direct and indirect effects of PRN exposure on CTL activation and effector cell function to gauge its likely impact on cell-mediated immunity. Initial experiments addressed whether PRN alters the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) pathway for antigen processing and presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), thereby indirectly affecting effector function. These experiments demonstrated that PRN does not impair the activation of CTLs by PRN-treated APCs. Subsequent experiments addressed whether PRN treatment of CTLs directly inhibits their activation and revealed that 1° alloreactive CTLs exposed to PRN are unimpaired in their proliferative response and only marginally inhibited in their lytic activity. Surprisingly, secondary stimulation of these alloreactive CTL effectors, however, even in the absence of further PRN exposure, resulted in complete abrogation of CTL lytic function and a delayed but significant long-term effect on CTL responsiveness. These findings may have important implications for the diagnosis and clinical management of anomalies of cell-mediated immunity resulting from environmental exposure to various herbicides and other pesticides. PMID:16835059

  14. Paclitaxel promotes a caspase 8-mediated apoptosis via death effector domain association with microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Mielgo, Ainhoa; Torres, Vicente A.; Clair, Kiran; Barbero, Simone; Stupack, Dwayne G.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-perturbing drugs have become front line chemotherapeutics, inducing cell cycle crisis as a major mechanism of action. However, these agents exhibit pleiotropic effects on cells, and can induce apoptosis via other means. Paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis, though the precise mechanism(s) remain unclear. Here, we used genetic approaches to evaluate the role of caspase 8 in paclitaxel-mediated apoptosis. We observed that caspase 8-expressing cells are more sensitive to paclitaxel than caspase 8-deficient cells. Mechanistically, caspase 8 was found associated with microtubules, and this interaction increased following paclitaxel-treatment. The prodomains (DEDs) of caspase 8 were sufficient for interaction with microtubules, but the caspase 8 holoprotein was required for apoptosis. DED-only forms of caspase 8 were found in both primary and tumor cell lines, associating with perinuclear microtubules and the centrosome. Microtubule-association, and paclitaxel-sensitivity, depends upon a critical lysine (K156) within a microtubule-binding motif (KLD) in DED-b of caspase 8. The results reveal an unexpected pathway of apoptosis mediated by caspase 8. PMID:19668227

  15. Versatile strategy for isolating transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated knockout mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Takuma; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Ohtani, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Targeted genome editing using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems has recently emerged as a potentially powerful method for creating locus-specific mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans. Due to the low mutation frequencies, one of the crucial steps in using these technologies is screening animals that harbor a targeted mutation. In previous studies, identifying targeted mutations in C. elegans usually depended on observations of fluorescent markers such as a green fluorescent protein or visible phenotypes such as dumpy and uncoordinated phenotypes. However, this strategy is limited in practice because the phenotypes caused by targeted mutations such as defects in sensory behaviors are often apparently invisible. Here, we describe a versatile strategy for isolating C. elegans knockout mutants by TALEN-mediated genome editing and a heteroduplex mobility assay. We applied TALENs to engineer the locus of the neural gene glr-1, which is a C. elegans AMPA-type receptor orthologue that is known to have crucial roles in various sensory behaviors. Knockout mutations in the glr-1 locus, which caused defective mechanosensory behaviors, were efficiently identified by the heteroduplex mobility assay. Thus, we demonstrated the utility of a TALEN-based knockout strategy for creating C. elegans with mutations that cause invisible phenotypes. PMID:24409999

  16. The RalB Small GTPase Mediates Formation of Invadopodia through a GTPase-Activating Protein-Independent Function of the RalBP1/RLIP76 Effector

    PubMed Central

    Neel, Nicole F.; Rossman, Kent L.; Martin, Timothy D.; Hayes, Tikvah K.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2012-01-01

    Our recent studies implicated key and distinct roles for the highly related RalA and RalB small GTPases (82% sequence identity) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tumorigenesis and invasive and metastatic growth, respectively. How RalB may promote PDAC invasion and metastasis has not been determined. In light of known Ral effector functions in regulation of actin organization and secretion, we addressed a possible role for RalB in formation of invadopodia, actin-rich membrane protrusions that contribute to tissue invasion and matrix remodeling. We determined that a majority of KRAS mutant PDAC cell lines exhibited invadopodia and that expression of activated K-Ras is both necessary and sufficient for invadopodium formation. Invadopodium formation was not dependent on the canonical Raf-MEK-ERK effector pathway and was instead dependent on the Ral effector pathway. However, this process was more dependent on RalB than on RalA. Surprisingly, RalB-mediated invadopodium formation was dependent on RalBP1/RLIP76 but not Sec5 and Exo84 exocyst effector function. Unexpectedly, the requirement for RalBP1 was independent of its best known function as a GTPase-activating protein for Rho small GTPases. Instead, disruption of the ATPase function of RalBP1 impaired invadopodium formation. Our results identify a novel RalB-mediated biochemical and signaling mechanism for invadopodium formation. PMID:22331470

  17. Mechanisms of corticosteroid action on lymphocyte subpopulations. III. Differential effects of dexamethasone administration on subpopulations of effector cells mediating cellular cytotoxicity in man

    PubMed Central

    Parrillo, J. E.; Fauci, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) administration on different populations of mononuclear cells and neutrophils mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against different target cells. Mononuclear cells (lymphocytes and monocytes) and neutrophils were obtained from twenty-seven normal volunteers at 0, 4, 24 and 48 hr after oral administration of 21 mg of DEX. ADCC was determined utilizing the following targets: human red blood cells (HRBC), Chang liver cells (Ch) and human heart cells (HHC). The predominant mononuclear effector in HRBC killing was shown to be a monocyte and in Ch and HHC killing, a K cell. As previously shown, DEX produced a profound monocytopenia and lymphocytopenia at 4 hr with a return of lymphocyte counts to normal and monocyte counts to supra-normal at 24 hr. At the point of maximal monocytopenia, monocyte-mediated HRBC killing decreased from a geometric mean of 14 to 4 lytic units per 108 effector cells (P<0·05) and rebounded at 24 hr to a mean of 39 lytic units (P<0·02) with the rebound monocytosis. At the point of absolute lymphopenia (4 hr), there was a relative enrichment in the proportion of lymphocytes bearing an Fc receptor (K cells, P<0·01). Concomitant with this was an increase in ADCC against Ch and HHC from geometric means of 1121 to 7172 lytic units and 939 to 7354 lytic units (P<0·001) respectively. Thus, a major action of DEX administration on mononuclear ADCC was to differentially enrich or deplete different effector cells to and from the circulation, causing changes in cytotoxicity. Since the cytotoxicity paralleled the proportion of effector cells, the cells remaining in the circulation following DEX administration retained normal antibody-dependent cytotoxic capabilities. Neutrophil-mediated ADCC against HRBC significantly increased at 4 hr from a geometric mean of 3785 to 20142 lytic units (P<0·02) concomitant with the blood neutrophilia and remained elevated for 72 hr

  18. Type I interferons induced by radiation therapy mediate recruitment and effector function of CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joanne Y H; Gerber, Scott A; Murphy, Shawn P; Lord, Edith M

    2014-03-01

    The need for an intact immune system for cancer radiation therapy to be effective suggests that radiation not only acts directly on the tumor but also indirectly, through the activation of host immune components. Recent studies demonstrated that endogenous type I interferons (type I IFNs) play a role in radiation-mediated anti-tumor immunity by enhancing the ability of dendritic cells to cross-prime CD8(+) T cells. However, it is still unclear to what extent endogenous type I IFNs contribute to the recruitment and function of CD8(+) T cells. Little is also known about the effects of type I IFNs on myeloid cells. In the current study, we demonstrate that type I and type II IFNs (IFN-γ) are both required for the increased production of CXCL10 (IP-10) chemokine by myeloid cells within the tumor after radiation treatment. Radiation-induced intratumoral IP-10 levels in turn correlate with tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cell numbers. Moreover, type I IFNs promote potent tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells by directly affecting the phenotype, effector molecule production, and enhancing cytolytic activity. Using a unique inducible expression system to increase local levels of IFN-α exogenously, we show here that the capacity of radiation therapy to result in tumor control can be enhanced. Our preclinical approach to study the effects of local increase in IFN-α levels can be used to further optimize the combination therapy strategy in terms of dosing and scheduling, which may lead to better clinical outcome. PMID:24357146

  19. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  20. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M.; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  1. The μ Subunit of Arabidopsis Adaptor Protein-2 Is Involved in Effector-Triggered Immunity Mediated by Membrane-Localized Resistance Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Hillmer, Rachel; Yamaoka, Shohei; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2016-05-01

    Endocytosis has been suggested to be important in the cellular processes of plant immune responses. However, our understanding of its role during effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is still limited. We have previously shown that plant endocytosis, especially clathrin-coated vesicle formation at the plasma membrane, is mediated by the adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) complex and that loss of the μ subunit of AP-2 (AP2M) affects plant growth and floral organ development. Here, we report that AP2M is required for full-strength ETI mediated by the disease resistance (R) genes RPM1 and RPS2 in Arabidopsis. Reduced ETI was observed in an ap2m mutant plant, measured by growth of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 strains carrying the corresponding effector genes avrRpm1 or avrRpt2 and by hypersensitive cell death response and defense gene expression triggered by these strains. In contrast, RPS4-mediated ETI and its associated immune responses were not affected by the ap2m mutation. While RPM1 and RPS2 are localized to the plasma membrane, RPS4 is localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus. Our results suggest that AP2M is involved in ETI mediated by plasma membrane-localized R proteins, possibly by mediating endocytosis of the immune receptor complex components from the plasma membrane. PMID:26828402

  2. TPL2 Kinase Is a Crucial Signaling Factor and Mediator of NKT Effector Cytokine Expression in Immune-Mediated Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Vyrla, Dimitra; Nikolaidis, Georgios; Oakley, Fiona; Perugorria, Maria J; Tsichlis, Philip N; Mann, Derek A; Eliopoulos, Aristides G

    2016-05-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells represent a subset of innate-like T lymphocytes that function as orchestrators of hepatic inflammation underpinning liver damage. In this study, we demonstrate that TPL2, an MAP3 kinase that has mostly been appreciated for its physiological role in macrophage responses, is a signaling factor in CD3(+)NK1.1(+) iNKT cells and mediator of hepatic inflammation. Genetic ablation of TPL2 in the mouse ameliorates liver injury induced by Con A and impinges on hallmarks of NKT cell activation in the liver without affecting NKT cell development in the thymus. The pivotal role of TPL2 in iNKT cell functions is further endorsed by studies using the iNKT-specific ligand α-galactosylceramide, which causes mild hepatitis in the mouse in a TPL2-dependent manner, including production of the effector cytokines IL-4 and IFN-γ, accumulation of neutrophils and licensing and activation of other immune cell types in the liver. A TPL2 kinase inhibitor mirrors the effects of genetic ablation of TPL2 in vivo and uncovers ERK and Akt as the TPL2-regulated signaling pathways responsible for IL-4 and IFN-γ expression through the activation of the transcription factors JunB and NFAT. Collectively, these findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms of iNKT cell activation and suggest that modulation of TPL2 has the potential to minimize the severity of immune-driven liver diseases. PMID:27053764

  3. The use of FLP-mediated recombination for the functional analysis of an effector gene family in the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Khrunyk, Yuliya; Münch, Karin; Schipper, Kerstin; Lupas, Andrei N; Kahmann, Regine

    2010-09-01

    *In the Ustilago maydis genome, several novel secreted effector proteins are encoded by gene families. Because of the limited number of selectable markers, the ability to carry out sequential gene deletions has limited the analysis of effector gene families that may have redundant functions. *Here, we established an inducible FLP-mediated recombination system in U. maydis that allows repeated rounds of gene deletion using a single selectable marker (Hyg(R)). To avoid genome rearrangements via FRT sites remaining in the genome after excision, different mutated FRT sites were introduced. *The FLP-mediated selectable marker-removal technique was successfully applied to delete a family of 11 effector genes (eff1) using five sequential rounds of recombination. We showed that expression of all 11 genes is up-regulated during the biotrophic phase. Strains carrying deletions of 9 or all 11 genes showed a significant reduction in virulence, and this phenotype could be partially complemented by the introduction of different members from the gene family, demonstrating redundancy. *The establishment of the FLP/FRT system in a plant pathogenic fungus paves the way for analyzing multigene families with redundant functions. PMID:20673282

  4. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipase in inflammatory mediator release from human inflammatory effector cells (platelets, granulocytes, and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    König, B; Jaeger, K E; Sage, A E; Vasil, M L; König, W

    1996-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipase and phospholipase C (PLC), two extracellular lipolytic enzymes, interact with each other during 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) generation from human platelets. In this regard. the addition of purified P. aeruginosa lipase to PLC-containing crude P. aeruginosa culture supernatants enhances the generation of the chemotactically active 12-HETE from human platelets. Therefore, we analyzed the interaction of purified P. aeruginosa lipase and purified hemolytic P. aeruginosa PLC with regard to inflammatory mediator release from human platelets, neutrophilic and basophilic granulocytes, and monocytes. Purified P. aeruginosa PLC, but not purified lipase by itself, induced 12-HETE generation from human platelets, the generation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and oxygen metabolites, enzyme release from human neutrophils, and histamine release from basophils but diminished interleukin-8 (IL-8) release from human monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of purified lipase enhanced PLC-induced 12-HETE and LTB4 generation, did not influence enzyme, histamine, or IL-8 release, but diminished the PLC-induced chemiluminescent response. Similar results were obtained when the hemolytic PLC from Clostridium perfringens was used instead of P. aeruginosa PLC. For further comparison, we used the well-defined calcium ionophore A23187 and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) as stimuli. Lipase enhanced calcium ionophore-induced LTB4 generation and beta-glucuronidase release but reduced calcium ionophore-induced and PMA-induced chemiluminescence. In parallel, we analyzed the role of lipase in a crude P. aeruginosa culture supernatant containing PLC and lipase. Lipase activity in the P. aeruginosa culture supernatant was inhibited by treatment with the lipase-specific inhibitor hexadecylsulfonyl fluoride, leaving the activity of PLC unaffected. The capacity of "lipase-inactivated culture supernatant" to induce 12-HETE

  5. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity against Candida albicans induced by cyclophosphamide: nature of the in vitro cytotoxic effector.

    PubMed Central

    Baccarini, M; Bistoni, F; Puccetti, P; Garaci, E

    1983-01-01

    We have recently reported the in vivo modulation of resistance to experimental Candida albicans infection by cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally) in mice and have shown that increased resistance to the microbial challenge occurs 12 to 21 days after treatment with the drug (Bistoni et al., Infect. Immun. 40: 46-55, 1983). The event is accompanied by the appearance of a highly candidacidal cell population in the spleen and the activation of a subpopulation of natural cytotoxic effectors reactive in vitro against YAC-1 tumor cells. We now provide evidence that these anti-YAC-1 cytotoxic effectors are clearly distinct from the cyclophosphamide-induced candidacidal effectors, which seem to belong to a macrophage-monocyte lineage. The enhanced cytotoxic activity induced by cyclophosphamide was not restricted to C. albicans but was also exerted against a panel of Candida strains. PMID:6352489

  6. The WxxxE effector EspT triggers expression of immune mediators in an Erk/JNK and NF-κB-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Benoit; Crepin, Valerie F.; Collins, James W.; Frankel, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Summary Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and Citrobacter rodentium colonize their respective hosts while forming attaching and effacing lesions. Their infection strategy relies on translocation of a battery of type III secretion system effectors, including Map, EspM and EspT, which belong to the WxxxE/SopE family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Using the C. rodentium mouse model we found that EspT triggers expression of KC and TNFα in vivo. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that, in addition to subversion of actin dynamics, the SopE and the WxxxE effectors activate signalling pathways involved in immune responses. In this study we found that EspT induces expression of the pro-inflammatory mediators cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) an enzyme involved in production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE2), interleukin (Il)-8 and Il-1β in U937 human macrophages by activating the nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways. Since EspT modulates the activation of Cdc42 and Rac1, which mediates bacterial invasion into epithelial cells, we investigated the involvement of these Rho GTPases and bacterial invasion on pro-inflammatory responses and found that (i) Rac1, but not Cdc42, is involved in EspT-induced Il-8 and Il-1β secretion and (ii) cytochalasin D inhibits EspT-induced EPEC invasion into U937 but not Il-8 or Il-1β secretion. These results suggest that while EPEC translocates a number of effectors (i.e. NleC, NleD, NleE, NleH) that inhibit inflammation, a subset of strains, which encode EspT, employ an infection strategy that also involves upregulation of immune mediators. PMID:21848814

  7. Host-Mediated Post-Translational Prenylation of Novel Dot/Icm-Translocated Effectors of Legionella Pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher T. D.; Jones, Snake C.; Amundson, Karen E.; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2010-01-01

    The Dot/Icm type IV translocated Ankyrin B (AnkB) effector of Legionella pneumophila is modified by the host prenylation machinery that anchors it into the outer leaflet of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), which is essential for biological function of the effector in vitro and in vivo. Prenylation involves the covalent linkage of an isoprenoid lipid moiety to a C-terminal CaaX motif in eukaryotic proteins enabling their anchoring into membranes. We show here that the LCV harboring an ankB null mutant is decorated with prenylated proteins in a Dot/Icm-dependent manner, indicating that other LCV membrane-anchored proteins are prenylated. In silico analyses of four sequenced L. pneumophila genomes revealed the presence of eleven other genes that encode proteins with a C-terminal eukaryotic CaaX prenylation motif. Of these eleven designated Prenylated effectors of Legionella (Pel), seven are also found in L. pneumophila AA100. We show that six L. pneumophila AA100 Pel proteins exhibit distinct cellular localization when ectopically expressed in mammalian cells and this is dependent on action of the host prenylation machinery and the conserved cysteine residue of the CaaX motif. Although inhibition of the host prenylation machinery completely blocks intra-vacuolar proliferation of L. pneumophila, it only had a modest effect on intracellular trafficking of the LCV. Five of the Pel proteins are injected into human macrophages by the Dot/Icm type IV translocation system of L. pneumophila. Taken together, the Pel proteins are novel Dot/Icm-translocated effectors of L. pneumophila that are post-translationally modified by the host prenylation machinery, which enables their anchoring into cellular membranes, and the prenylated effectors contribute to evasion of lysosomal fusion by the LCV. PMID:21687755

  8. Ndfip-mediated degradation of Jak1 tunes cytokine signalling to limit expansion of CD4+ effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Claire E.; Riling, Christopher R.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Ding, Hua; Kumar, Suresh; Deng, Guoping; Liu, Yuhong; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Oliver, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    Nedd4 family E3 ubiquitin ligases have been shown to restrict T-cell function and impact T-cell differentiation. We show here that Ndfip1 and Ndfip2, activators of Nedd4 family ligases, together limit accumulation and function of effector CD4+ T cells. Using a three-part proteomics approach in primary T cells, we identify stabilization of Jak1 in Ndfip1/2-deficient T cells stimulated through the TCR. Jak1 degradation is aborted in activated T cells that lack Ndfips. In wild-type cells, Jak1 degradation lessens CD4+ cell sensitivity to cytokines during TCR stimulation, while in Ndfip-deficient cells cytokine responsiveness persists, promoting increased expansion and survival of pathogenic effector T cells. Thus, Ndfip1/Ndfip2 regulate the cross talk between the T-cell receptor and cytokine signalling pathways to limit inappropriate T-cell responses. PMID:27088444

  9. Cdc42p regulation of the yeast formin Bni1p mediated by the effector Gic2p

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin; Kuo, Chun-Chen; Kang, Hui; Howell, Audrey S.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Jin, Michelle; Lew, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Actin filaments are dynamically reorganized to accommodate ever-changing cellular needs for intracellular transport, morphogenesis, and migration. Formins, a major family of actin nucleators, are believed to function as direct effectors of Rho GTPases, such as the polarity regulator Cdc42p. However, the presence of extensive redundancy has made it difficult to assess the in vivo significance of the low-affinity Rho GTPase–formin interaction and specifically whether Cdc42p polarizes the actin cytoskeleton via direct formin binding. Here we exploit a synthetically rewired budding yeast strain to eliminate the redundancy, making regulation of the formin Bni1p by Cdc42p essential for viability. Surprisingly, we find that direct Cdc42p–Bni1p interaction is dispensable for Bni1p regulation. Alternative paths linking Cdc42p and Bni1p via “polarisome” components Spa2p and Bud6p are also collectively dispensable. We identify a novel regulatory input to Bni1p acting through the Cdc42p effector, Gic2p. This pathway is sufficient to localize Bni1p to the sites of Cdc42p action and promotes a polarized actin organization in both rewired and wild-type contexts. We suggest that an indirect mechanism linking Rho GTPases and formins via Rho effectors may provide finer spatiotemporal control for the formin-nucleated actin cytoskeleton. PMID:22918946

  10. ISG15 Functions as an Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Effector Early in the Murine Norovirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Marisela R.; Monte, Kristen; Thackray, Larissa B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNoV) are the leading cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Similar to HuNoV, murine noroviruses (MNV) are enteric pathogens spread via the fecal-oral route and have been isolated from numerous mouse facilities worldwide. Type I and type II interferons (IFN) restrict MNV-1 replication; however, the antiviral effectors impacting MNV-1 downstream of IFN signaling are largely unknown. Studies using dendritic cells, macrophages, and mice deficient in free and conjugated forms of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) revealed that ISG15 conjugation contributes to protection against MNV-1 both in vitro and in vivo. ISG15 inhibited a step early in the viral life cycle upstream of viral genome transcription. Directly transfecting MNV-1 RNA into IFN-stimulated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) lacking ISG15 conjugates bypassed the antiviral activity of ISG15, further suggesting that ISG15 conjugates restrict the MNV-1 life cycle at the viral entry/uncoating step. These results identify ISG15 as the first type I IFN effector regulating MNV-1 infection both in vitro and in vivo and for the first time implicate the ISG15 pathway in the regulation of early stages of MNV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE Type I IFNs are important in controlling murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) infections; however, the proteins induced by IFNs that restrict viral growth are largely unknown. This report reveals that interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) mitigates MNV-1 replication both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, it shows that ISG15 inhibits MNV-1 replication by targeting an early step in the viral life cycle, MNV-1 entry and/or uncoating. These results identify ISG15 as the first type I IFN effector regulating MNV-1 infection both in vitro and in vivo and for the first time implicate the ISG15 pathway in the regulation of viral entry/uncoating. PMID:24899198

  11. Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 Mediates Pathogen Resistance and Virulence Function of a Bacterial Effector in Soybean1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jialin; Shine, M.B.; Gao, Qing-Ming; Navarre, Duroy; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Qingshan; Hu, Guohua; Kachroo, Aardra

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced disease susceptibility1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient4 (PAD4) are well-known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1-like (GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b) proteins and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean (Glycine max). Consistent with their significant structural conservation to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) counterparts, constitutive expression of GmEDS1 or GmPAD4 complemented the pathogen resistance defects of Arabidopsis eds1 and pad4 mutants, respectively. Interestingly, however, the GmEDS1 and GmPAD4 did not complement pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation in the eds1/pad4 mutants. Furthermore, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins were unable to complement the turnip crinkle virus coat protein-mediated activation of the Arabidopsis R protein Hypersensitive reaction to Turnip crinkle virus (HRT), even though both interacted with HRT. Silencing GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b or GmPAD4 reduced basal and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation and enhanced soybean susceptibility to virulent pathogens. The GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b and GmPAD4 genes were also required for Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv glycinea2 (Rpg2)-mediated resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Notably, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins interacted with the cognate bacterial effector AvrA1 and were required for its virulence function in rpg2 plants. Together, these results show that despite significant structural similarities, conserved defense signaling components from diverse plants can differ in their functionalities. In addition, we demonstrate a role for GmEDS1 in regulating the virulence function of a bacterial effector. PMID:24872380

  12. The cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (R)-roscovitine mediates selective suppression of alloreactive human T cells but preserves pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific effectors

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Anoma; Liu, Bianling; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.; Li, Lequn

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD), mediated by donor T cells, remains the primary cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and novel therapeutic approaches are required. Cdk2 is a critical node of signal integration and programming of T cell responses towards immunity versus anergy but is dispensable for hematopoiesis and thymocyte development. We examined the effects of pharmacologic Cdk2 inhibition on alloreactive human T cells. Inhibition of Cdk2 blocked expansion of alloreactive T cells upon culture with HLA-mismatched dendritic cells and prevented generation of IFN-γ-producing alloantigen-specific effectors. In contrast, Cdk2 inhibition preserved effectors specific for Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) leukemia antigen and for CMV as determined by WT1-specific and CMV-specific pentamers. Cdk2 inhibition preserved Treg cells, which have the ability to prevent GvHD while maintaining GvL. Thus, Cdk inhibitors may improve allogeneic HSCT by reducing alloreactivity and GvHD without loss of pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific immunity. PMID:24631965

  13. The cyst nematode effector protein 10A07 targets and recruits host posttranslational machinery to mediate its nuclear trafficking and to promote parasitism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Juvale, Parijat S; Piya, Sarbottam; Maier, Tom R; Rambani, Aditi; Rice, J Hollis; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes synthesize and secrete effector proteins that are essential for parasitism. One such protein is the 10A07 effector from the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, which is exclusively expressed in the nematode dorsal gland cell during all nematode parasitic stages. Overexpression of H. schachtii 10A07 in Arabidopsis thaliana produced a hypersusceptible phenotype in response to H. schachtii infection along with developmental changes reminiscent of auxin effects. The 10A07 protein physically associates with a plant kinase and the IAA16 transcription factor in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The interacting plant kinase (IPK) phosphorylates 10A07 at Ser-144 and Ser-231 and mediates its trafficking from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocation to the nucleus is phosphorylation dependent since substitution of Ser-144 and Ser-231 by alanine resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic accumulation of 10A07. IPK and IAA16 are highly upregulated in the nematode-induced syncytium (feeding cells), and deliberate manipulations of their expression significantly alter plant susceptibility to H. schachtii in an additive fashion. An inactive variant of IPK functioned antagonistically to the wild-type IPK and caused a dominant-negative phenotype of reduced plant susceptibility. Thus, exploitation of host processes to the advantage of the parasites is one mechanism by which cyst nematodes promote parasitism of host plants. PMID:25715285

  14. The cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (R)-roscovitine mediates selective suppression of alloreactive human T cells but preserves pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific effectors.

    PubMed

    Nellore, Anoma; Liu, Bianling; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A; Li, Lequn

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD), mediated by donor T cells, remains the primary cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and novel therapeutic approaches are required. Cdk2 is a critical node of signal integration and programming of T cell responses towards immunity versus anergy but is dispensable for hematopoiesis and thymocyte development. We examined the effects of pharmacologic Cdk2 inhibition on alloreactive human T cells. Inhibition of Cdk2 blocked expansion of alloreactive T cells upon culture with HLA-mismatched dendritic cells and prevented generation of IFN-γ-producing alloantigen-specific effectors. In contrast, Cdk2 inhibition preserved effectors specific for Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) leukemia antigen and for CMV as determined by WT1-specific and CMV-specific pentamers. Cdk2 inhibition preserved Treg cells, which have the ability to prevent GvHD while maintaining GvL. Thus, Cdk inhibitors may improve allogeneic HSCT by reducing alloreactivity and GvHD without loss of pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific immunity. PMID:24631965

  15. The Cyst Nematode Effector Protein 10A07 Targets and Recruits Host Posttranslational Machinery to Mediate Its Nuclear Trafficking and to Promote Parasitism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hewezi, Tarek; Juvale, Parijat S.; Piya, Sarbottam; Maier, Tom R.; Rambani, Aditi; Rice, J. Hollis; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Davis, Eric L.; Hussey, Richard S.; Baum, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes synthesize and secrete effector proteins that are essential for parasitism. One such protein is the 10A07 effector from the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, which is exclusively expressed in the nematode dorsal gland cell during all nematode parasitic stages. Overexpression of H. schachtii 10A07 in Arabidopsis thaliana produced a hypersusceptible phenotype in response to H. schachtii infection along with developmental changes reminiscent of auxin effects. The 10A07 protein physically associates with a plant kinase and the IAA16 transcription factor in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The interacting plant kinase (IPK) phosphorylates 10A07 at Ser-144 and Ser-231 and mediates its trafficking from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocation to the nucleus is phosphorylation dependent since substitution of Ser-144 and Ser-231 by alanine resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic accumulation of 10A07. IPK and IAA16 are highly upregulated in the nematode-induced syncytium (feeding cells), and deliberate manipulations of their expression significantly alter plant susceptibility to H. schachtii in an additive fashion. An inactive variant of IPK functioned antagonistically to the wild-type IPK and caused a dominant-negative phenotype of reduced plant susceptibility. Thus, exploitation of host processes to the advantage of the parasites is one mechanism by which cyst nematodes promote parasitism of host plants. PMID:25715285

  16. bIgG time for large eaters: monocytes and macrophages as effector and target cells of antibody-mediated immune activation and repression.

    PubMed

    Gordan, Sina; Biburger, Markus; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-11-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system consists of a great variety of cell subsets localized throughout the body in immunological and non-immunological tissues. While one of their prime tasks is to detect, phagocytose, and kill intruding microorganisms, they are also involved in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune tolerance toward self through removal of dying cells. Furthermore, monocytes and macrophages have been recognized to play a critical role for mediating immunoglobulin G (IgG)-dependent effector functions, including target cell depletion, tissue inflammation, and immunomodulation. For this, monocyte and macrophage populations are equipped with a complex set of Fc-receptors, enabling them to directly interact with pro- or anti-inflammatory IgG preparations. In this review, we will summarize the most recent findings, supporting a central role of monocytes and macrophages for pro- and anti-inflammatory IgG activity. PMID:26497512

  17. Estrogen receptor alpha mediates epithelial to mesenchymal transition, expression of specific matrix effectors and functional properties of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bouris, Panagiotis; Skandalis, Spyros S; Piperigkou, Zoi; Afratis, Nikos; Karamanou, Konstantina; Aletras, Alexios J; Moustakas, Aristidis; Theocharis, Achilleas D; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2015-04-01

    The 17β-estradiol (E2)/estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling pathway is one of the most important pathways in hormone-dependent breast cancer. E2 plays pivotal roles in cancer cell growth, survival, and architecture as well as in gene expression regulatory mechanisms. In this study, we established stably transfected MCF-7 cells by knocking down the ERα gene (designated as MCF-7/SP10+ cells), using specific shRNA lentiviral particles, and compared them with the control cells (MCF-7/c). Interestingly, ERα silencing in MCF-7 cells strongly induced cellular phenotypic changes accompanied by significant changes in gene and protein expression of several markers typical of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Notably, these cells exhibited enhanced cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, ERα suppression strongly affected the gene and protein expression of EGFR and HER2 receptor tyrosine kinases, and various extracellular matrix (ECM) effectors, including matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors (MMPs/TIMPs) and components of the plasminogen activation system. The action caused by E2 in MCF-7/c cells in the expression of HER2, MT1-MMP, MMP1, MMP9, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 was abolished in MCF-7/SP10+ cells lacking ERα. These data suggested a regulatory role for the E2/ERα pathway in respect to the composition and activity of the extracellular proteolytic molecular network. Notably, loss of ERα promoted breast cancer cell migration and invasion by inducing changes in the expression levels of certain matrix macromolecules (especially uPA, tPA, PAI-1) through the EGFR-ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, loss of ERα in breast cancer cells results in a potent EMT characterized by striking changes in the expression profile of specific matrix macromolecules highlighting the potential nodal role of matrix effectors in breast cancer endocrine resistance. PMID:25728938

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated female-specific sterility in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Wang, Y; Li, Z; Ling, L; Zeng, B; James, A A; Tan, A; Huang, Y

    2014-12-01

    Engineering sex-specific sterility is critical for developing transgene-based sterile insect technology. Targeted genome engineering achieved by customized zinc-finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems has been exploited extensively in a variety of model organisms; however, screening mutated individuals without a detectable phenotype is still challenging. In addition, genetically recessive mutations only detectable in homozygotes make the experiments time-consuming. In the present study, we model a novel genetic system in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, that results in female-specific sterility by combining transgenesis with TALEN technologies. This system induces sex-specific sterility at a high efficiency by targeting the female-specific exon of the B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) gene, which has sex-specific splicing isoforms regulating somatic sexual development. Transgenic animals co-expressing TALEN left and right arms targeting the female-specific Bmdsx exon resulted in somatic mutations and female mutants lost fecundity because of lack of egg storage and abnormal external genitalia. The wild-type sexual dimorphism of abdominal segment was not evident in mutant females. In contrast, there were no deleterious effects in mutant male moths. The current somatic TALEN technologies provide a promising approach for future insect functional genetics, thus providing the basis for the development of attractive genetic alternatives for insect population management. PMID:25125145

  19. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated metabolic engineering for enhanced fatty acids production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aouida, Mustapha; Li, Lixin; Mahjoub, Ali; Alshareef, Sahar; Ali, Zahir; Piatek, Agnieszka; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-10-01

    Targeted engineering of microbial genomes holds much promise for diverse biotechnological applications. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems are capable of efficiently editing microbial genomes, including that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we demonstrate the use of TALENs to edit the genome of S. cerevisiae with the aim of inducing the overproduction of fatty acids. Heterodimeric TALENs were designed to simultaneously edit the FAA1 and FAA4 genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetases in S. cerevisiae. Functional yeast double knockouts generated using these TALENs over-produce large amounts of free fatty acids into the cell. This study demonstrates the use of TALENs for targeted engineering of yeast and demonstrates that this technology can be used to stimulate the enhanced production of free fatty acids, which are potential substrates for biofuel production. This proof-of-principle study extends the utility of TALENs as excellent genome editing tools and highlights their potential use for metabolic engineering of yeast and other organisms, such as microalgae and plants, for biofuel production. PMID:25907574

  20. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated female-specific sterility in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Wang, Yueqiang; Li, Zhiqian; Ling, Lin; Zeng, Baosheng; James, Anthony A.; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Engineering sex-specific sterility is critical for developing transgene-based Sterile Insect Technology. Targeted genome engineering achieved by customized ZFN, TALENs or CRIPSPR/Cas9 systems has been exploited extensively in a variety of model organisms. However, screening mutated individuals without a detectable phenotype is still challenging. In addition, genetically recessive mutations only detectable in homozygotes make the experiments time-consuming. Here we model a novel genetic system in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, that results in female-specific sterility by combining transgenesis with transcription activator–like effector nucleases (TALENs) technologies. This system induces sex-specific sterility at a high efficiency by targeting the female-specific exon of the B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) gene, which has sex-specific splicing isoforms regulating somatic sexual development. Transgenic animals co-expressing TALEN left and right arms targeting the female-specific Bmdsx exon resulted in somatic mutations and female mutants lost fecundity due to lack of egg storage and abnormal external genitalia. The wild-type sexual dimorphism of abdominal segment was not evident in mutant females. In contrast, there were no deleterious effects in mutant male moths. The current somatic TALEN technologies provide a promising approach in future insect functional genetics, thus providing the basis for the development of attractive genetic alternatives for insect population management. PMID:25125145

  1. Colletotrichum orbiculare Secretes Virulence Effectors to a Biotrophic Interface at the Primary Hyphal Neck via Exocytosis Coupled with SEC22-Mediated Traffic[W

    PubMed Central

    Irieda, Hiroki; Maeda, Hitomi; Akiyama, Kaoru; Hagiwara, Asuka; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Uemura, Aiko; Terauchi, Ryohei; Takano, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic pathogen Colletotrichum orbiculare develops biotrophic hyphae inside cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cells via appressorial penetration; later, the pathogen switches to necrotrophy. C. orbiculare also expresses specific effectors at different stages. Here, we found that virulence-related effectors of C. orbiculare accumulate in a pathogen–host biotrophic interface. Fluorescence-tagged effectors accumulated in a ring-like region around the neck of the biotrophic primary hyphae. Fluorescence imaging of cellular components and transmission electron microscopy showed that the ring-like signals of the effectors localized at the pathogen–plant interface. Effector accumulation at the interface required induction of its expression during the early biotrophic phase, suggesting that transcriptional regulation may link to effector localization. We also investigated the route of effector secretion to the interface. An exocytosis-related component, the Rab GTPase SEC4, localized to the necks of biotrophic primary hyphae adjacent to the interface, thereby suggesting focal effector secretion. Disruption of SEC4 in C. orbiculare reduced virulence and impaired effector delivery to the ring signal interface. Disruption of the v-SNARE SEC22 also reduced effector delivery. These findings suggest that biotrophy-expressed effectors are secreted, via the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi route and subsequent exocytosis, toward the interface generated between C. orbiculare and the host cell. PMID:24850852

  2. Generation of Fibroblasts Lacking the Sal-like 1 Gene by Using Transcription Activator-like Effector Nuclease-mediated Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Eun; Kim, Ji Woo; Kim, Yeong Ji; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Kang, Man-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The Sal-like 1 gene (Sall1) is essential for kidney development, and mutations in this gene result in abnormalities in the kidneys. Mice lacking Sall1 show agenesis or severe dysgenesis of the kidneys. In a recent study, blastocyst complementation was used to develop mice and pigs with exogenic organs. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated homologous recombination was used to produce Sall1-knockout porcine fibroblasts for developing knockout pigs. The vector targeting the Sall1 locus included a 5.5-kb 5′ arm, 1.8-kb 3′ arm, and a neomycin resistance gene as a positive selection marker. The knockout vector and TALEN were introduced into porcine fibroblasts by electroporation. Antibiotic selection was performed over 11 days by using 300 μg/mL G418. DNA of cells from G418-resistant colonies was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to confirm the presence of fragments corresponding to the 3′ and 5′ arms of Sall1. Further, mono- and bi-allelic knockout cells were isolated and analyzed using PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism. The results of our study indicated that TALEN-mediated homologous recombination induced bi-allelic knockout of the endogenous gene. PMID:26949958

  3. Spontaneous and natural cytotoxicity receptor-mediated cytotoxicity are effector functions of distinct natural killer subsets in hepatitis C virus-infected chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Verstrepen, B E; Nieuwenhuis, I G; Mooij, P; Bogers, W M; Boonstra, A; Koopman, G

    2016-07-01

    In humans, CD16 and CD56 are used to identify functionally distinct natural killer (NK) subsets. Due to ubiquitous CD56 expression, this marker cannot be used to distinguish between NK cell subsets in chimpanzees. Therefore, functional analysis of distinct NK subsets during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has never been performed in these animals. In the present study an alternative strategy was used to identify four distinct NK subsets on the basis of the expression of CD16 and CD94. The expression of activating and inhibiting surface receptors showed that these subsets resemble human NK subsets. CD107 expression was used to determine degranulation of the different subsets in naive and HCV-infected chimpanzees. In HCV-infected chimpanzees increased spontaneous cytotoxicity was observed in CD94(high/dim) CD16(pos) and CD94(low) CD16(pos) subsets. By contrast, increased natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR)- mediated degranulation after NKp30 and NKp44 triggering was demonstrated in the CD94(dim) CD16(neg) subset. Our findings suggest that spontaneous and NCR-mediated cytotoxicity are effector functions of distinct NK subsets in HCV-infected chimpanzees. PMID:26850369

  4. Tremelimumab (anti-CTLA4) mediates immune responses mainly by direct activation of T effector cells rather than by affecting T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Burt, Deborah J; Ralph, Christy; Thistlethwaite, Fiona C; Hawkins, Robert E; Elkord, Eyad

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) blockade has shown antitumor activity against common cancers. However, the exact mechanism of immune mediation by anti-CTLA4 remains to be elucidated. Further understanding of how CTLA4 blockade with tremelimumab mediates immune responses may allow a more effective selection of responsive patients. Our results show that tremelimumab enhanced the proliferative response of T effector cells (Teff) upon TCR stimulation, and abrogated Treg suppressive ability. In the presence of tremelimumab, frequencies of IL-2-secreting CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were increased in response to polyclonal activation and tumor antigens. Importantly, Treg frequency was not reduced in the presence of tremelimumab, and expanded Tregs in cancer patients treated with tremelimumab expressed FoxP3 with no IL-2 release, confirming them as bona fide Tregs. Taken together, this data indicates that tremelimumab induces immune responses mainly by direct activation of Teff rather than by affecting Tregs. PMID:21056008

  5. Human intrahepatic regulatory T cells are functional, require IL‐2 from effector cells for survival, and are susceptible to Fas ligand‐mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung‐Yi; Jeffery, Hannah C.; Hunter, Stuart; Bhogal, Ricky; Birtwistle, Jane; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Roberts, Sheree; Ming, Mikaela; Hannah, Jack; Thomas, Clare; Adali, Gupse; Hübscher, Stefan G.; Syn, Wing‐Kin; Afford, Simon; Lalor, Patricia F.; Adams, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress T effector cell proliferation and maintain immune homeostasis. Autoimmune liver diseases persist despite high frequencies of Treg in the liver, suggesting that the local hepatic microenvironment might affect Treg stability, survival, and function. We hypothesized that interactions between Treg and endothelial cells during recruitment and then with epithelial cells within the liver affect Treg stability, survival, and function. To model this, we explored the function of Treg after migration through human hepatic sinusoidal‐endothelium (postendothelial migrated Treg [PEM Treg]) and the effect of subsequent interactions with cholangiocytes and local proinflammatory cytokines on survival and stability of Treg. Our findings suggest that the intrahepatic microenvironment is highly enriched with proinflammatory cytokines but deficient in the Treg survival cytokine interleukin (IL)‐2. Migration through endothelium into a model mimicking the inflamed liver microenvironment did not affect Treg stability; however, functional capacity was reduced. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous IL‐2 enhanced PEM Treg phosphorylated STAT5 signaling compared with PEMCD8. CD4 and CD8 T cells are the main source of IL‐2 in the inflamed liver. Liver‐infiltrating Treg reside close to bile ducts and coculture with cholangiocytes or their supernatants induced preferential apoptosis of Treg compared with CD8 effector cells. Treg from diseased livers expressed high levels of CD95, and their apoptosis was inhibited by IL‐2 or blockade of CD95. Conclusion: Recruitment through endothelium does not impair Treg stability, but a proinflammatory microenvironment deficient in IL‐2 leads to impaired function and increased susceptibility of Treg to epithelial cell‐induced Fas‐mediated apoptosis. These results provide a mechanism to explain Treg dysfunction in inflamed tissues and suggest that IL‐2 supplementation, particularly if used in conjunction

  6. Concerted action of two avirulent spore effectors activates Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1)-mediated cereal stem rust resistance.

    PubMed

    Nirmala, Jayaveeramuthu; Drader, Tom; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot; Steber, Camille M; Steffenson, Brian J; Szabo, Les J; von Wettstein, Diter; Kleinhofs, Andris

    2011-08-30

    The barley stem rust resistance gene Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1), encoding a receptor-like kinase, confers durable resistance to the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. The fungal urediniospores form adhesion structures with the leaf epidermal cells within 1 h of inoculation, followed by hyphae and haustorium formation. The RPG1 protein is constitutively expressed and not phosphorylated. On inoculation with avirulent urediniospores, it is phosphorylated in vivo within 5 min and subsequently degraded. Application of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide loops prevented the formation of adhesion structures for spore attachment, the phosphorylation of RPG1, and germination of the viable spores. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid affinity chromatography of proteins from the ungerminated avirulent rust spores led to the purification and identification of a protein with fibronectin type III and breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein domains and a vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 9 with a coupling of ubiquitin to endoplasmic reticulum degradation domain. Both proteins are required to induce in vivo phosphorylation and degradation of RPG1. Combined application of both proteins caused hypersensitive reaction on the stem rust-resistant cultivar Morex but not on the susceptible cultivar Steptoe. Expression studies indicated that mRNA of both genes are present in ungerminated urediniospores and are constitutively transcribed in sporelings, infected leaves, and haustoria in the investigated avirulent races. Evidence is presented that RPG1, in yeast, interacts with the two protein effectors from the urediniospores that activate cooperatively the stem rust resistance protein RPG1 long before haustoria formation. PMID:21873196

  7. Bacteriophage-encoded type III effectors in Salmonella enterica subspecies 1 serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ehrbar, Kristin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are Gram-negative bacteria which cause infections ranging from mild, self-limiting enterocolitis to systemic (typhoid) disease. Recent work has established that the genetic makeup varies considerably between different Salmonella strains. Phages play an important role in this diversity. In fact, Salmonella has emerged as a prime example for the involvement of virulence factor encoding phages in the emergence of new epidemic strains. Among other virulence factors, Salmonella enterica utilizes two specialized protein secretion systems termed type III secretion systems (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells which manipulate host cell signaling cascades. These two TTSS and several effectors are encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. Some effectors including SopE, SspH1, SseI and SopE2 are encoded by phages or phage remnants. These phage-encoded effectors seem to be transferred between different Salmonella strains. They have attracted much interest because they might contribute to the evolution of Salmonella spp. Here we will focus on SopEPhi which encodes the SPI-1 effector SopE. It provides an excellent example to illustrate how horizontally transferred effector proteins are integrated into the complex regulatory network of a TTSS in a recipient bacterium. Additional data supporting the hypothesis are presented. This is a prerequisite to allow optimization of the bacterium host cell interaction by reassortment of the phage-encoded effector protein repertoire. PMID:15567133

  8. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho; Park, Kwang-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs. PMID:27051344

  9. Evidence that the rab5 effector APPL1 mediates APP-βCTF-induced dysfunction of endosomes in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Sato, Y; Mohan, P S; Peterhoff, C; Pensalfini, A; Rigoglioso, A; Jiang, Y; Nixon, R A

    2016-05-01

    β-Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleaved products are strongly implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Endosomes are highly active APP processing sites, and endosome anomalies associated with upregulated expression of early endosomal regulator, rab5, are the earliest known disease-specific neuronal response in AD. Here, we show that the rab5 effector APPL1 (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif) mediates rab5 overactivation in Down syndrome (DS) and AD, which is caused by elevated levels of the β-cleaved carboxy-terminal fragment of APP (βCTF). βCTF recruits APPL1 to rab5 endosomes, where it stabilizes active GTP-rab5, leading to pathologically accelerated endocytosis, endosome swelling and selectively impaired axonal transport of rab5 endosomes. In DS fibroblasts, APPL1 knockdown corrects these endosomal anomalies. βCTF levels are also elevated in AD brain, which is accompanied by abnormally high recruitment of APPL1 to rab5 endosomes as seen in DS fibroblasts. These studies indicate that persistent rab5 overactivation through βCTF-APPL1 interactions constitutes a novel APP-dependent pathogenic pathway in AD. PMID:26194181

  10. Inhibition of Cryptococcus neoformans replication by nitrogen oxides supports the role of these molecules as effectors of macrophage-mediated cytostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, J.A.; Granger, D.L. )

    1991-07-01

    Activated macrophages are able to inhibit the replication of intracellular microbes and tumor cells. In the murine system, this cytostatic effect is associated with the oxidation of L-arginine to L-citrulline, nitrite, and nitrate and is thought to be mediated by an intermediate of this reaction, possibly nitric oxide (NO.). By exposing replicating Cryptococcus neoformans cells to conditions under which NO. is chemically generated, we have observed a cytostatic effect similar to that caused by activated murine macrophages. Nitric oxide is formed as a decomposition product of nitrite salts in acidic, aqueous solutions. Although C. neoformans replicates well in the presence of high nitrite concentrations at physiologic pH, its growth in acidic media can be inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of sodium nitrite. The degree of cytostasis is dependent on both the pH and the nitrite concentration of the NO. generating solution. The cytostatic effector molecule appears to be a gas since, in addition to inhibiting C. neoformans replication in solution, it is able to exert its inhibitory effect across a gas-permeable but ion-impermeable membrane. At high nitrite concentrations, a fungicidal effect occurs. We propose that the growth inhibition of C. neoformans upon exposure to chemically generated NO. or some related oxide of nitrogen represents a cell-free system simulating the cytostatic effect of activated murine macrophages.

  11. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs. PMID:27051344

  12. Nck adaptors, besides promoting N-WASP mediated actin-nucleation activity at pedestals, influence the cellular levels of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Tir effector.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Pelegrin, Elvira; Kenny, Brendan; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) binding to human intestinal cells triggers the formation of disease-associated actin rich structures called pedestals. The latter process requires the delivery, via a Type 3 secretion system, of the translocated Intimin receptor (Tir) protein into the host plasma membrane where binding of a host kinase-modified form to the bacterial surface protein Intimin triggers pedestal formation. Tir-Intimin interaction recruits the Nck adaptor to a Tir tyrosine phosphorylated residue where it activates neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP); initiating the major pathway to actin polymerization mediated by the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. Previous studies with Nck-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) identified a key role for Nck in pedestal formation, presumed to reflect a lack of N-WASP activation. Here, we show the defect relates to reduced amounts of Tir within Nck-deficient cells. Indeed, Tir delivery and, thus, pedestal formation defects were much greater for MEFs than HeLa (human epithelial) cells. Crucially, the levels of two other effectors (EspB/EspF) within Nck-deficient MEFs were not reduced unlike that of Map (Mitochondrial associated protein) which, like Tir, requires CesT chaperone function for efficient delivery. Interestingly, drugs blocking various host protein degradation pathways failed to increase Tir cellular levels unlike an inhibitor of deacetylase activity (Trichostatin A; TSA). Treatments with TSA resulted in significant recovery of Tir levels, potentiation of actin polymerization and improvement in bacterial attachment to cells. Our findings have important implications for the current model of Tir-mediated actin polymerization and opens new lines of research in this area. PMID:25482634

  13. Effector-mediated eradication of precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a novel Fc engineered monoclonal antibody targeting the BAFF-R

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Lim, Min; Fei, Fei; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Arutyunyan, Anna; Schiffer, Isabelle; McLaughlin, Margaret E.; Gram, Hermann; Huet, Heather; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor receptor (BAFF-R) is expressed on precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia ALL (pre-B ALL) cells but not on their pre-B normal counterparts. Thus, selective killing of ALL cells is possible by targeting this receptor. Here we have further examined therapeutic targeting of pre-B ALL based on the presence of the BAFF-R. Mouse pre-B ALL cells lacking BAFF-R function had comparable viability and proliferation to wild type cells but were more sensitive to drug treatment. Viability of human pre-B ALL cells was further reduced when antibodies to the BAFF-R were combined with other drugs, even in the presence of stromal protection. This indicates that inhibition of BAFF-R function reduces fitness of stressed pre-B ALL cells. We tested a novel humanized anti-BAFF-R monoclonal antibody optimalized for FcRγIII mediated, antibody-dependent cell killing by effector cells. Antibody binding to human ALL cells was inhibitable, in a dose-dependent manner, by recombinant human BAFF. There was no evidence for internalization of the antibodies. The antibodies significantly stimulated NK cell-mediated killing of different human patient-derived ALL cells. Moreover, incubation of such ALL cells with these antibodies stimulated phagocytosis by macrophages. When this was tested in an immunodeficient transplant model, mice that were treated with the antibody had a significantly decreased leukemia burden in bone marrow and spleen. In view of the restricted expression of the BAFF-R on normal cells and the multiple anti-pre-B ALL activities stimulated by this antibody, a further examination of its use for treatment of pre-B ALL is warranted. PMID:24825858

  14. Cancer-induced defective cytotoxic T lymphocyte effector function: another mechanism how antigenic tumors escape immune-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Radoja, S.; Frey, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The notion that a deficit in immune cell functions permits tumor growth has received experimental support with the discovery of several different biochemical defects in T lymphocytes that infiltrate cancers. Decreased levels of enzymes involved with T-cell signal transduction have been reported by several laboratories, suggesting that tumors or host cells recruited to the tumor site actively down-regulate antitumor T-cell immune response. This permits tumor escape from immune-mediated killing. The possibility that defects in T-cell signal transduction can be reversed, which would potentially permit successful vaccination or adoptive immunotherapy, motivates renewed interest in the field. Summarizing the literature concerning tumor-induced T-cell dysfunction, we focus on the end stage of immune response to human cancer, that of defective cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing function. Based on the data from several laboratories, we hypothesize a biochemical mechanism that accounts for the unusual phenotype of antitumor T-cell accumulation in tumors, but with defective killing function. PMID:10972084

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) knockout rats produced by transcriptional activator-like effector nuclease- (TALEN)-mediated gene inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Carolyn; McKay, Matthew; Harris, R. Adron; Homanics, Gregg E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice are a valuable resource for studies of the behavioral effects of ethanol. However, for some behavioral tests of ethanol action, the rat is a superior model organism. Production of genetically engineered rats has been severely hampered due to technical limitations. Here we utilized a promising new technique for efficient site-specific gene modification to create a novel gene knockout rat line. This approach is based on Transcriptional Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs). TALENs function in pairs and bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Upon binding to the target sequence, a functional nuclease is reconstituted that creates double-stranded breaks in the DNA that are efficiently repaired by non-homologous end joining. This error-prone process often results in deletions of varying lengths at the targeted locus. The toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) gene was selected for TALEN-mediated gene inactivation. Tlr4 has been implicated in ethanol-induced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, as well as multiple ethanol-induced behavioral effects. To generate Tlr4 knockout rats, a pair of TALEN constructs was created that specifically target Exon 1 immediately downstream of the start of translation. TALEN mRNAs were microinjected into the cytoplasm of one-cell Wistar rat embryos. Of 13 live-born pups that resulted, one harbored a mutation in Exon 1 of Tlr4. The mutated allele consisted of a 13 base-pair deletion that was predicted to create a frameshift mutation after amino acid 25. This founder rat successfully transmitted the mutation to F1 offspring. Heterozygous F1 offspring were interbred to produce homozygous F2 animals. Homozygous mutants expressed the 13-bp deletion in Tlr4 mRNA. In contrast to control rats that produced a robust increase in plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to a lipopolysaccharide challenge, homozygous rats had a markedly attenuated response. Thus, the mutant Tlr4 allele generated by TALEN-mediated gene

  16. Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Laura A; Polanski, Krzysztof; de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Jayaraman, Siddharth; Bowden, Laura; Moore, Jonathan; Penfold, Christopher A; Jenkins, Dafyd J; Hill, Claire; Baxter, Laura; Kulasekaran, Satish; Truman, William; Littlejohn, George; Prusinska, Justyna; Mead, Andrew; Steinbrenner, Jens; Hickman, Richard; Rand, David; Wild, David L; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Smirnoff, Nick; Beynon, Jim; Denby, Katherine; Grant, Murray

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is integral to effective plant defense. Pathogen effectors act transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally to suppress defense responses. A major challenge to understanding disease and defense responses is discriminating between transcriptional reprogramming associated with microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) and that orchestrated by effectors. A high-resolution time course of genome-wide expression changes following challenge with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the nonpathogenic mutant strain DC3000hrpA- allowed us to establish causal links between the activities of pathogen effectors and suppression of MTI and infer with high confidence a range of processes specifically targeted by effectors. Analysis of this information-rich data set with a range of computational tools provided insights into the earliest transcriptional events triggered by effector delivery, regulatory mechanisms recruited, and biological processes targeted. We show that the majority of genes contributing to disease or defense are induced within 6 h postinfection, significantly before pathogen multiplication. Suppression of chloroplast-associated genes is a rapid MAMP-triggered defense response, and suppression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and induction of ubiquitin-related genes coincide with pathogen-induced abscisic acid accumulation. Specific combinations of promoter motifs are engaged in fine-tuning the MTI response and active transcriptional suppression at specific promoter configurations by P. syringae. PMID:26566919

  17. Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Laura A.; Polanski, Krzysztof; de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Bowden, Laura; Jenkins, Dafyd J.; Hill, Claire; Baxter, Laura; Truman, William; Prusinska, Justyna; Hickman, Richard; Wild, David L.; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Beynon, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is integral to effective plant defense. Pathogen effectors act transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally to suppress defense responses. A major challenge to understanding disease and defense responses is discriminating between transcriptional reprogramming associated with microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) and that orchestrated by effectors. A high-resolution time course of genome-wide expression changes following challenge with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the nonpathogenic mutant strain DC3000hrpA- allowed us to establish causal links between the activities of pathogen effectors and suppression of MTI and infer with high confidence a range of processes specifically targeted by effectors. Analysis of this information-rich data set with a range of computational tools provided insights into the earliest transcriptional events triggered by effector delivery, regulatory mechanisms recruited, and biological processes targeted. We show that the majority of genes contributing to disease or defense are induced within 6 h postinfection, significantly before pathogen multiplication. Suppression of chloroplast-associated genes is a rapid MAMP-triggered defense response, and suppression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and induction of ubiquitin-related genes coincide with pathogen-induced abscisic acid accumulation. Specific combinations of promoter motifs are engaged in fine-tuning the MTI response and active transcriptional suppression at specific promoter configurations by P. syringae. PMID:26566919

  18. Host-mediated gene silencing of a single effector gene from the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans imparts partial resistance to late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Sanju, Suman; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Thakur, Aditi; Shukla, Pradeep K; Srivastava, Nidhi; Pattanayak, Debasis; Sharma, Sanjeev; Singh, B P

    2015-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has proved a powerful genetic tool for silencing genes in plants. Host-induced gene silencing of pathogen genes has provided a gene knockout strategy for a wide range of biotechnological applications. The RXLR effector Avr3a gene is largely responsible for virulence of oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In this study, we attempted to silence the Avr3a gene of P. infestans through RNAi technology. The P. infestans inoculation resulted in lower disease progression and a reduction in pathogen load, as demonstrated by disease scoring and quantification of pathogen biomass in terms of Pi08 repetitive elements, respectively. Transgenic plants induced moderate silencing of Avr3a, and the presence and/or expression of small interfering RNAs, as determined through Northern hybridization, indicated siRNA targeted against Avr3a conferred moderate resistance to P. infestans. The single effector gene did not provide complete resistance against P. infestans. Although the Avr3a effector gene could confer moderate resistance, for complete resistance, the cumulative effect of effector genes in addition to Avr3a needs to be considered. In this study, we demonstrated that host-induced RNAi is an effective strategy for functional genomics in oomycetes. PMID:26077032

  19. Two Putatively Homoeologous Wheat Genes Mediate Recognition of SnTox3 to Confer Effector-triggered Susceptibility to Stagonospora nodorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogen Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple virulence effectors, also known as host-selective toxins (HSTs), that interact with corresponding host sensitivity genes in an inverse gene-for-gene manner to cause the disease Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB) in wheat. In this study, a novel sens...

  20. MyD88 mediates in vivo effector functions of alveolar macrophages in acute lung inflammatory responses to carbon nanotube exposure.

    PubMed

    Frank, Evan A; Birch, M Eileen; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are rapidly emerging as high-priority occupational toxicants. CNT powders contain fibrous particles that aerosolize readily in places of manufacture and handling, posing an inhalation risk for workers. Studies using animal models indicate that lung exposure to CNTs causes prolonged inflammatory responses and diffuse alveolar injury. The mechanisms governing CNT-induced lung inflammation are not fully understood but have been suggested to involve alveolar macrophages (AMs). In the current study, we sought to systematically assess the effector role of AMs in vivo in the induction of lung inflammatory responses to CNT exposures and investigate their cell type-specific mechanisms. Multi-wall CNTs characterized for various physicochemical attributes were used as the CNT type. Using an AM-specific depletion and repopulation approach in a mouse model, we unambiguously demonstrated that AMs are major effector cells necessary for the in vivo elaboration of CNT-induced lung inflammation. We further investigated in vitro AM responses and identified molecular targets which proved critical to pro-inflammatory responses in this model, namely MyD88 as well as MAPKs and Ca(2+)/CamKII. We further demonstrated that MyD88 inhibition in donor AMs abrogated their capacity to reconstitute CNT-induced inflammation when adoptively transferred into AM-depleted mice. Taken together, this is the first in vivo demonstration that AMs act as critical effector cell types in CNT-induced lung inflammation and that MyD88 is required for this in vivo effector function. AMs and their cell type-specific mechanisms may therefore represent potential targets for future therapeutic intervention of CNT-related lung injury. PMID:26272622

  1. Xanthomonas axonopodis virulence is promoted by a transcription activator-like effector-mediated induction of a SWEET sugar transporter in cassava.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Megan; Bart, Rebecca S; Shybut, Mikel; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Gomez, Michael; Morbitzer, Robert; Hou, Bi-Huei; Frommer, Wolf B; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2014-11-01

    The gene-for-gene concept has historically been applied to describe a specific resistance interaction wherein single genes from the host and the pathogen dictate the outcome. These interactions have been observed across the plant kingdom and all known plant microbial pathogens. In recent years, this concept has been extended to susceptibility phenotypes in the context of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that target SWEET sugar transporters. However, because this interaction has only been observed in rice, it was not clear whether the gene-for-gene susceptibility was unique to that system. Here, we show, through a combined systematic analysis of the TAL effector complement of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis and RNA sequencing to identify targets in cassava, that TAL20Xam668 specifically induces the sugar transporter MeSWEET10a to promote virulence. Designer TAL effectors (dTALE) complement TAL20Xam668 mutant phenotypes, demonstrating that MeSWEET10a is a susceptibility gene in cassava. Sucrose uptake-deficient X. axonopodis pv. manihotis bacteria do not lose virulence, indicating that sucrose may be cleaved extracellularly and taken up as hexoses into X. axonopodis pv. manihotis. Together, our data suggest that pathogen hijacking of plant nutrients is not unique to rice blight but also plays a role in bacterial blight of the dicot cassava. PMID:25083909

  2. Effector triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce virulence factors called effectors, which are important components of the infection process. Effectors aid in pathogenesis by facilitating bacterial attachment, pathogen entry into or exit from the host cell, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression. Effectors also have the ability to subvert host cellular processes, such as hijacking cytoskeletal machinery or blocking protein translation. However, host cells possess an evolutionarily conserved innate immune response that can sense the pathogen through the activity of its effectors and mount a robust immune response. This “effector triggered immunity” (ETI) was first discovered in plants but recent evidence suggest that the process is also well conserved in metazoans. We will discuss salient points of the mechanism of ETI in metazoans from recent studies done in mammalian cells and invertebrate model hosts. PMID:25513770

  3. Sympathetic neural signaling via the β2-adrenergic receptor suppresses T-cell receptor-mediated human and mouse CD8(+) T-cell effector function.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Leonardo D; Ağaç, Didem; Farrar, J David

    2016-08-01

    Postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervate secondary lymphoid organs and secrete norepinephrine (NE) as the primary neurotransmitter. NE binds and signals through five distinct members of the adrenergic receptor family. In this study, we show elevated expression of the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) on primary human CD8(+) effector memory T cells. Treatment of both human and murine CD8(+) T cells with NE decreased IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion and suppressed their cytolytic capacity in response to T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. The effects of NE were specifically reversed by β2-specific antagonists. Adrb2(-/-) CD8(+) T cells were completely resistant to the effects of NE. Further, the ADRB2-specific pharmacological ligand, albuterol, significantly suppressed effector functions in both human and mouse CD8(+) T cells. While both TCR activation and stimulation with IL-12 + IL-18 were able to induce inflammatory cytokine secretion, NE failed to suppress IFN-γ secretion in response to IL-12 + IL18. Finally, the long-acting ADRB2-specific agonist, salmeterol, markedly reduced the cytokine secretion capacity of CD8(+) T cells in response to infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. This study reveals a novel intrinsic role for ADRB2 signaling in CD8(+) T-cell function and underscores the novel role this pathway plays in adaptive T-cell responses to infection. PMID:27222010

  4. Functional Analysis of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis RXLR Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Pel, Michiel J. C.; Wintermans, Paul C. A.; Cabral, Adriana; Robroek, Bjorn J. M.; Seidl, Michael F.; Bautor, Jaqueline; Parker, Jane E.; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Pieterse, Corné M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The biotrophic plant pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis produces a set of putative effector proteins that contain the conserved RXLR motif. For most of these RXLR proteins the role during infection is unknown. Thirteen RXLR proteins from H. arabidopsidis strain Waco9 were analyzed for sequence similarities and tested for a role in virulence. The thirteen RXLR proteins displayed conserved N-termini and this N-terminal conservation was also found in the 134 predicted RXLR genes from the genome of H. arabidopsidis strain Emoy2. To investigate the effects of single RXLR effector proteins on plant defense responses, thirteen H. arabidopsidis Waco9 RXLR genes were expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Subsequently, these plants were screened for altered susceptibility to the oomycetes H. arabidopsidis and Phytophthora capsici, and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Additionally, the effect of the RXLR proteins on flg22-triggered basal immune responses was assessed. Multifactorial analysis of results collated from all experiments revealed that, except for RXLR20, all RXLR effector proteins tested affected plant immunity. For RXLR9 this was confirmed using a P. syringae ΔCEL-mediated effector delivery system. Together, the results show that many H. arabidopsidis RXLR effectors have small effects on the plant immune response, suggesting that suppression of host immunity by this biotrophic pathogen is likely to be caused by the combined actions of effectors. PMID:25375163

  5. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  6. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  7. The type III effector HsvG of the gall-forming Pantoea agglomerans mediates expression of the host gene HSVGT.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Gal; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Chalupowicz, Laura; Teper, Doron; Yeheskel, Adva; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Sessa, Guido; Barash, Isaac

    2012-02-01

    The type III effector HsvG of the gall-forming Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae is a DNA-binding protein that is imported to the host nucleus and involved in host specificity. The DNA-binding region of HsvG was delineated to 266 amino acids located within a secondary structure region near the N-terminus of the protein but did not display any homology to canonical DNA-binding motifs. A binding site selection procedure was used to isolate a target gene of HsvG, named HSVGT, in Gypsophila paniculata. HSVGT is a predicted acidic protein of the DnaJ family with 244 amino acids. It harbors characteristic conserved motifs of a eukaryotic transcription factor, including a bipartite nuclear localization signal, zinc finger, and leucine zipper DNA-binding motifs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that HSVGT transcription is specifically induced in planta within 2 h after inoculation with the wild-type P. agglomerans pv. gypsophilae compared with the hsvG mutant. Induction of HSVGT reached a peak of sixfold at 4 h after inoculation and progressively declined thereafter. Gel-shift assay demonstrated that HsvG binds to the HSVGT promoter, indicating that HSVGT is a direct target of HsvG. Our results support the hypothesis that HsvG functions as a transcription factor in gypsophila. PMID:21995766

  8. Comparative genomics identifies the Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence effector AvrPi9 that triggers Pi9-mediated blast resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Kou, Yanjun; Bao, Jiandong; Li, Ya; Tang, Mingzhi; Zhu, Xiaoli; Ponaya, Ariane; Xiao, Gui; Li, Jinbin; Li, Chenyun; Song, Min-Young; Cumagun, Christian Joseph R; Deng, Qiyun; Lu, Guodong; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Naqvi, Naweed I; Zhou, Bo

    2015-06-01

    We identified the Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence effector AvrPi9 cognate to rice blast resistance gene Pi9 by comparative genomics of requisite strains derived from a sequential planting method. AvrPi9 encodes a small secreted protein that appears to localize in the biotrophic interfacial complex and is translocated to the host cell during rice infection. AvrPi9 forms a tandem gene array with its paralogue proximal to centromeric region of chromosome 7. AvrPi9 is expressed highly at early stages during initiation of blast disease. Virulent isolate strains contain Mg-SINE within the AvrPi9 coding sequence. Loss of AvrPi9 did not lead to any discernible defects during growth or pathogenesis in M. oryzae. This study reiterates the role of diverse transposable elements as off-switch agents in acquisition of gain-of-virulence in the rice blast fungus. The prevalence of AvrPi9 correlates well with the avirulence pathotype in diverse blast isolates from the Philippines and China, thus supporting the broad-spectrum resistance conferred by Pi9 in different rice growing areas. Our results revealed that Pi9 and Piz-t at the Pi2/9 locus activate race specific resistance by recognizing sequence-unrelated AvrPi9 and AvrPiz-t genes, respectively. PMID:25659573

  9. Interleukin-13 Pathway Alterations Impair Invariant Natural Killer T-Cell-Mediated Regulation of Effector T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Usero, Lorena; Sánchez, Ana; Pizarro, Eduarda; Xufré, Cristina; Martí, Mercè; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Roura-Mir, Carme

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have shown that human natural killer T (NKT) cells can promote immunity to pathogens, but their regulatory function is still being investigated. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells have been shown to be effective in preventing type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model. Activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells, modulation of B-cell responses, and immune deviation were proposed to be responsible for the suppressive effect of iNKT cells. We studied the regulatory capacity of human iNKT cells from control subjects and patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at disease clinical onset. We demonstrate that control iNKT cells suppress the proliferation of effector T cells (Teffs) through a cell contact-independent mechanism. Of note, suppression depended on the secretion of interleukin-13 (IL-13) by iNKT cells because an antibody blocking this cytokine resulted from the abrogation of Teff suppression; however, T1D-derived iNKT cells showed impaired regulation that could be attributed to the decrease in IL-13 secretion. Thus, alteration of the IL-13 pathway at disease onset may lead to the progression of the autoimmune response in T1D. Advances in the study of iNKT cells and the selection of agonists potentiating IL-13 secretion should permit new therapeutic strategies to prevent the development of T1D. PMID:27207542

  10. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN)-Mediated CLYBL Targeting Enables Enhanced Transgene Expression and One-Step Generation of Dual Reporter Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) and Neural Stem Cell (NSC) Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cerbini, Trevor; Funahashi, Ray; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Park, Kyeyoon; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Zou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%–58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells. PMID:25587899

  11. Antibodies as effectors.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, L B

    2002-09-10

    Antibodies are critical in protection against extracellular microbial pathogens. Although antibodies also play a role in transplant/tumor rejection and in autoimmune disease, this paper focuses on defense against bovine infections. Effector mechanisms of different bovine isotypes, subisotypes and allotypes are discussed. The importance of antigen specificity is also stressed. PMID:12072231

  12. Vinculin Interacts with the Chlamydia Effector TarP Via a Tripartite Vinculin Binding Domain to Mediate Actin Recruitment and Assembly at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, Tristan R.; Pedrosa, Antonio T.; Peacock, Thomas P.; Carabeo, Rey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian protein vinculin is often a target of bacterial pathogens to subvert locally host cell actin dynamics. In Chlamydia infection, vinculin has been implicated in RNA interference screens, but the molecular basis for vinculin requirement has not been characterized. In this report, we show that vinculin was involved in the actin recruitment and F-actin assembly at the plasma membrane to facilitate invasion. Vinculin was recruited to the plasma membrane via its interaction with a specific tripartite motif within TarP that resembles the vinculin-binding domain (VBD) found in the Shigella invasion factor IpaA. The TarP-mediated plasma membrane recruitment of vinculin resulted in the localized recruitment of actin. In vitro pulldown assays for protein-protein interaction and imaging-based evaluation of recruitment to the plasma membrane demonstrated the essential role of the vinculin-binding site 1 (VBS1), and the dispensability of VBS2 and VBS3. As further support for the functionality of VBD-vinculin interaction, VBD-mediated actin recruitment required vinculin. Interestingly, while both vinculin and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) colocalized at the sites of adhesion, the recruitment of one was independent of the other; and the actin recruitment function of the VBD/vinculin signaling axis was independent of the LD/FAK pathway. PMID:26649283

  13. A STING-dependent innate-sensing pathway mediates resistance to corneal HSV-1 infection via upregulation of the antiviral effector tetherin.

    PubMed

    Royer, D J; Carr, D J J

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 interferons (IFNs; IFNα/β) mediate immunological host resistance to numerous viral infections, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The pathways responsible for IFNα/β signaling during the innate immune response to acute HSV-1 infection in the cornea are incompletely understood. Using a murine ocular infection model, we hypothesized that the stimulator of IFN genes (STING) mediates resistance to HSV-1 infection at the ocular surface and preserves the structural integrity of this mucosal site. Viral pathogenesis, tissue pathology, and host immune responses during ocular HSV-1 infection were characterized by plaque assay, esthesiometry, pachymetry, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and small interfering RNA transfection in wild-type C57BL/6 (WT), STING-deficient (STING(-/-)), and IFNα/β receptor-deficient (CD118(-/-)) mice at days 3-5 postinfection. The presence of STING was critical for sustained control of HSV-1 replication in the corneal epithelium and resistance to viral neuroinvasion, but loss of STING had a negligible impact with respect to gross tissue pathology. Auxiliary STING-independent IFNα/β signaling pathways were responsible for maintenance of corneal integrity. Lymphatic vessels, mast cells, and sensory innervation were compromised in CD118(-/-) mice concurrent with increased tissue edema. STING-dependent signaling led to the upregulation of tetherin, a viral restriction factor we identify is important in containing the spread of HSV-1 in vivo. PMID:26627457

  14. Increasing the efficacy of CD20 antibody therapy through the engineering of a new type II anti-CD20 antibody with enhanced direct and immune effector cell–mediated B-cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Ekkehard; Brünker, Peter; Moser, Samuel; Püntener, Ursula; Schmidt, Carla; Herter, Sylvia; Grau, Roger; Gerdes, Christian; Nopora, Adam; van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Ferrara, Claudia; Sondermann, Peter; Jäger, Christiane; Strein, Pamela; Fertig, Georg; Friess, Thomas; Schüll, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Dal Porto, Joseph; Del Nagro, Christopher; Dabbagh, Karim; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Poppema, Sibrand; Klein, Christian

    2010-01-01

    CD20 is an important target for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma as well as autoimmune disorders. B-cell depletion therapy using monoclonal antibodies against CD20, such as rituximab, has revolutionized the treatment of these disorders, greatly improving overall survival in patients. Here, we report the development of GA101 as the first Fc-engineered, type II humanized IgG1 antibody against CD20. Relative to rituximab, GA101 has increased direct and immune effector cell-mediated cytotoxicity and exhibits superior activity in cellular assays and whole blood B-cell depletion assays. In human lymphoma xenograft models, GA101 exhibits superior antitumor activity, resulting in the induction of complete tumor remission and increased overall survival. In nonhuman primates, GA101 demonstrates superior B cell–depleting activity in lymphoid tissue, including in lymph nodes and spleen. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence for the development of GA101 as a promising new therapy for the treatment of B-cell disorders. PMID:20194898

  15. Robotic end effector

    SciTech Connect

    Minichan, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gamble with a probe, the gamble holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gamble and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  16. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  17. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.

    1993-10-05

    An end effector is described for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion. 7 figures.

  18. The aspartyl protease TgASP5 mediates the export of the Toxoplasma GRA16 and GRA24 effectors into host cells.

    PubMed

    Curt-Varesano, Aurélie; Braun, Laurence; Ranquet, Caroline; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Bougdour, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species are obligatory intracellular parasites that export proteins into the infected cells in order to interfere with host-signalling pathways, acquire nutrients or evade host defense mechanisms. With regard to export mechanism, a wealth of information in Plasmodium spp. is available, while the mechanisms operating in T. gondii remain uncertain. The recent discovery of exported proteins in T. gondii, mainly represented by dense granule resident proteins, might explain this discrepancy and offers a unique opportunity to study the export mechanism in T. gondii. Here, we report that GRA16 export is mediated by two protein elements present in its N-terminal region. Because the first element contains a putative Plasmodium export element linear motif (RRLAE), we hypothesized that GRA16 export depended on a maturation process involving protein cleavage. Using both N- and C-terminal epitope tags, we provide evidence for protein proteolysis occurring in the N-terminus of GRA16. We show that TgASP5, the T. gondii homolog of Plasmodium plasmepsin V, is essential for GRA16 export and is directly responsible for its maturation in a Plasmodium export element-dependent manner. Interestingly, TgASP5 is also involved in GRA24 export, although the GRA24 maturation mechanism is TgASP5-independent. Our data reveal different modus operandi for protein export, in which TgASP5 should play multiple functions. PMID:26270241

  19. V-ATPase: a master effector of E2F1-mediated lysosomal trafficking, mTORC1 activation and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Meo-Evoli, Nathalie; Almacellas, Eugènia; Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Gentilella, Antonio; Ambrosio, Santiago; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Tauler, Albert

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being a master regulator of cell cycle progression, E2F1 regulates other associated biological processes, including growth and malignancy. Here, we uncover a regulatory network linking E2F1 to lysosomal trafficking and mTORC1 signaling that involves v-ATPase regulation. By immunofluorescence and time-lapse microscopy we found that E2F1 induces the movement of lysosomes to the cell periphery, and that this process is essential for E2F1-induced mTORC1 activation and repression of autophagy. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments reveal that E2F1 regulates v-ATPase activity and inhibition of v-ATPase activity repressed E2F1-induced lysosomal trafficking and mTORC1 activation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that E2F1 induces the recruitment of v-ATPase to lysosomal RagB GTPase, suggesting that E2F1 regulates v-ATPase activity by enhancing the association of V0 and V1 v-ATPase complex. Analysis of v-ATPase subunit expression identified B subunit of V0 complex, ATP6V0B, as a transcriptional target of E2F1. Importantly, ATP6V0B ectopic-expression increased v-ATPase and mTORC1 activity, consistent with ATP6V0B being responsible for mediating the effects of E2F1 on both responses. Our findings on lysosomal trafficking, mTORC1 activation and autophagy suppression suggest that pharmacological intervention at the level of v-ATPase may be an efficacious avenue for the treatment of metastatic processes in tumors overexpressing E2F1. PMID:26356814

  20. Effector Glycosyltransferases in Legionella

    PubMed Central

    Belyi, Yury; Jank, Thomas; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Legionella causes severe pneumonia in humans. The pathogen produces an array of effectors, which interfere with host cell functions. Among them are the glucosyltransferases Lgt1, Lgt2 and Lgt3 from L. pneumophila. Lgt1 and Lgt2 are produced predominately in the post-exponential phase of bacterial growth, while synthesis of Lgt3 is induced mainly in the lag-phase before intracellular replication of bacteria starts. Lgt glucosyltransferases are structurally similar to clostridial glucosylating toxins. The enzymes use UDP–glucose as a donor substrate and modify eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A at serine-53. This modification results in inhibition of protein synthesis and death of target cells.In addition to Lgts, Legionella genomes disclose several genes, coding for effector proteins likely to possess glycosyltransferase activities, including SetA (subversion of eukaryotic vesicle trafficking A), which influences vesicular trafficking in the yeast model system and displays tropism for late endosomal/lysosomal compartments of mammalian cells. This review mainly discusses recent results on the structure–function relationship of Lgt glucosyltransferases. PMID:21833323

  1. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  2. Effector-triggered defence against apoplastic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stotz, Henrik U; Mitrousia, Georgia K; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Fitt, Bruce D L

    2014-08-01

    R gene-mediated host resistance against apoplastic fungal pathogens is not adequately explained by the terms pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) or effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Therefore, it is proposed that this type of resistance is termed 'effector-triggered defence' (ETD). Unlike PTI and ETI, ETD is mediated by R genes encoding cell surface-localised receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that engage the receptor-like kinase SOBIR1. In contrast to this extracellular recognition, ETI is initiated by intracellular detection of pathogen effectors. ETI is usually associated with fast, hypersensitive host cell death, whereas ETD often triggers host cell death only after an elapsed period of endophytic pathogen growth. In this opinion, we focus on ETD responses against foliar fungal pathogens of crops. PMID:24856287

  3. Orbital maneuvering end effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an end effector device for grasping and maneuvering objects such as berthing handles of a space telescope. The device includes a V-shaped capture window defined as inclined surfaces in parallel face plates which converge toward a retainer recess in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess where latches lock handle in the recess. To align the capture window, plates may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base. Drive means is included in the form of a motor coupled with a harmonic drive speed reducer, which provides for slow movement of the fingers at a high torque so that large articles may be handled. Novelty of the invention is believed to reside in the combined intermeshing finger structure, drive means and the harmonic drive speed reducer, which features provide the required maneuverability and strength.

  4. The RalGEF-Ral Effector Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Neel, Nicole F.; Martin, Timothy D.; Stratford, Jeran K.; Zand, Tanya P.; Reiner, David J.; Der, Channing J.

    2011-01-01

    The high frequency of RAS mutations in human cancers (33%) has stimulated intense interest in the development of anti-Ras inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, the major focus of these efforts is centered on inhibitors of components involved in Ras downstream effector signaling. In particular, more than 40 inhibitors of the Raf-MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-AKT-mTOR effector signaling networks are currently under clinical evaluation. However, these efforts are complicated by the fact that Ras can utilize at least 9 additional functionally distinct effectors, with at least 3 additional effectors with validated roles in Ras-mediated oncogenesis. Of these, the guanine nucleotide exchange factors of the Ras-like (Ral) small GTPases (RalGEFs) have emerged as important effectors of mutant Ras in pancreatic, colon, and other cancers. In this review, we summarize the evidence for the importance of this effector pathway in cancer and discuss possible directions for therapeutic inhibition of aberrant Ral activation and signaling. PMID:21779498

  5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Pamela Y.; Johnson, Christian W.; Fang, Cong; Cao, Xiaoqing; Graeber, Thomas G.; Mattos, Carla; Colicelli, John

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins are signal transduction gatekeepers that mediate cell growth, survival, and differentiation through interactions with multiple effector proteins. The RAS effector RAS- and RAB-interacting protein 1 (RIN1) activates its own downstream effectors, the small GTPase RAB5 and the tyrosine kinase Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase (ABL), to modulate endocytosis and cytoskeleton remodeling. To identify ABL substrates downstream of RAS-to-RIN1 signaling, we examined human HEK293T cells overexpressing components of this pathway. Proteomic analysis revealed several novel phosphotyrosine peptides, including Harvey rat sarcoma oncogene (HRAS)-pTyr137. Here we report that ABL phosphorylates tyrosine 137 of H-, K-, and NRAS. Increased RIN1 levels enhanced HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation by nearly 5-fold, suggesting that RAS-stimulated RIN1 can drive ABL-mediated RAS modification in a feedback circuit. Tyr137 is well conserved among RAS orthologs and is part of a transprotein H-bond network. Crystal structures of HRASY137F and HRASY137E revealed conformation changes radiating from the mutated residue. Although consistent with Tyr137 participation in allosteric control of HRAS function, the mutations did not alter intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates in vitro. HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation enhanced HRAS signaling capacity in cells, however, as reflected by a 4-fold increase in the association of phosphorylated HRASG12V with its effector protein RAF proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase 1 (RAF1). These data suggest that RAS phosphorylation at Tyr137 allosterically alters protein conformation and effector binding, providing a mechanism for effector-initiated modulation of RAS signaling.—Ting, P. Y., Johnson, C. W., Fang, C., Cao, X., Graeber, T. G., Mattos, C., Colicelli, J. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding. PMID:25999467

  6. Effectors of animal and plant pathogens use a common domain to bind host phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Guo, Yirui; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Type III Secretion Systems deliver effectors into host cells to manipulate cellular processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Many host targets of these effectors are found on membranes. Therefore, to identify their targets, effectors often use specialized membrane-localization domains to localize to appropriate host membranes. However, the molecular mechanisms used by many domains are unknown. Here we identify a conserved bacterial phosphoinositide-binding domain (BPD) that is found in functionally diverse Type III effectors of both plant and animal pathogens. We show that members of the BPD family functionally bind phosphoinositides and mediate localization to host membranes. Moreover, NMR studies reveal that the BPD of the newly identified Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III effector VopR is unfolded in solution, but folds into a specific structure upon binding its ligand phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate. Thus, our findings suggest a possible mechanism for promoting refolding of Type III effectors after delivery into host cells. PMID:24346350

  7. Lifestyles of the effector-rich: genome-enabled characterization of bacterial plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequencing of bacterial plant pathogens is providing transformative insights into the complex network of molecular plant-microbe interactions mediated by extracellular effectors during pathogenesis. Bacterial pathogens sequenced to completion are phylogenetically diverse and vary significant...

  8. Hepatic effector CD8+ T-cell dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Iannacone, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play a critical role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) pathogenesis. During acute, self-limited infections, these cells are instrumental to viral clearance; in chronic settings, they sustain repetitive cycles of hepatocellular necrosis that promote hepatocellular carcinoma development. Both CD8+ T-cell defensive and destructive functions are mediated by antigen-experienced effector cells and depend on the ability of these cells to migrate to the liver, recognize hepatocellular antigens and perform effector functions. Understanding the signals that modulate the spatiotemporal dynamics of CD8+ T cells in the liver, particularly in the context of antigen recognition, is therefore critical to gaining insight into the pathogenesis of acute and chronic HBV infection. Here, we highlight recent data on how effector CD8+ T cells traffic within the liver, and we discuss the potential for novel imaging techniques to shed light on this important aspect of HBV pathogenesis. PMID:25242274

  9. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  10. A Plethora of Virulence Strategies Hidden Behind Nuclear Targeting of Microbial Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Susana; Genin, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Plant immune responses depend on the ability to couple rapid recognition of the invading microbe to an efficient response. During evolution, plant pathogens have acquired the ability to deliver effector molecules inside host cells in order to manipulate cellular and molecular processes and establish pathogenicity. Following translocation into plant cells, microbial effectors may be addressed to different subcellular compartments. Intriguingly, a significant number of effector proteins from different pathogenic microorganisms, including viruses, oomycetes, fungi, nematodes, and bacteria, is targeted to the nucleus of host cells. In agreement with this observation, increasing evidence highlights the crucial role played by nuclear dynamics, and nucleocytoplasmic protein trafficking during a great variety of analyzed plant–pathogen interactions. Once in the nucleus, effector proteins are able to manipulate host transcription or directly subvert essential host components to promote virulence. Along these lines, it has been suggested that some effectors may affect histone packing and, thereby, chromatin configuration. In addition, microbial effectors may either directly activate transcription or target host transcription factors to alter their regular molecular functions. Alternatively, nuclear translocation of effectors may affect subcellular localization of their cognate resistance proteins in a process that is essential for resistance protein-mediated plant immunity. Here, we review recent progress in our field on the identification of microbial effectors that are targeted to the nucleus of host plant cells. In addition, we discuss different virulence strategies deployed by microbes, which have been uncovered through examination of the mechanisms that guide nuclear localization of effector proteins. PMID:22639625

  11. Improving a Gripper End Effector

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, O Dennis; Smith, Christopher M.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2001-01-31

    This paper discusses the improvement made to an existing four-bar linkage gripping end effector to adapt it for use in a current project. The actuating linkage was modified to yield higher jaw force overall and particularly in the critical range of jaw displacement

  12. EffectorP: predicting fungal effector proteins from secretomes using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Dodds, Peter N; Tini, Francesco; Covarelli, Lorenzo; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2016-04-01

    Eukaryotic filamentous plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that modulate the host cell to facilitate infection. Computational effector candidate identification and subsequent functional characterization delivers valuable insights into plant-pathogen interactions. However, effector prediction in fungi has been challenging due to a lack of unifying sequence features such as conserved N-terminal sequence motifs. Fungal effectors are commonly predicted from secretomes based on criteria such as small size and cysteine-rich, which suffers from poor accuracy. We present EffectorP which pioneers the application of machine learning to fungal effector prediction. EffectorP improves fungal effector prediction from secretomes based on a robust signal of sequence-derived properties, achieving sensitivity and specificity of over 80%. Features that discriminate fungal effectors from secreted noneffectors are predominantly sequence length, molecular weight and protein net charge, as well as cysteine, serine and tryptophan content. We demonstrate that EffectorP is powerful when combined with in planta expression data for predicting high-priority effector candidates. EffectorP is the first prediction program for fungal effectors based on machine learning. Our findings will facilitate functional fungal effector studies and improve our understanding of effectors in plant-pathogen interactions. EffectorP is available at http://effectorp.csiro.au. PMID:26680733

  13. Dexterous end effector flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L.; Monford, Leo G.

    1994-01-01

    The Dexterous End Effector Flight Experiment is a flight demonstration of newly developed equipment and methods which make for more dexterous manipulation of robotic arms. The following concepts are to be demonstrated: The Force Torque Sensor is a six axis load cell located at the end of the RMS which displays load data to the operator on the orbiter CCTV monitor. TRAC is a target system which provides six axis positional information to the operator. It has the characteristic of having high sensitivity to attitude misalignment while being flat. AUTO-TRAC is a variation of TRAC in which a computer analyzes a target, displays translational and attitude misalignment information, and provides cues to the operator for corrective inputs. The Magnetic End Effector is a fault tolerant end effector which grapples payloads using magnetic attraction. The Carrier Latch Assembly is a fault tolerant payload carrier, which uses mechanical latches and/or magnetic attraction to hold small payloads during launch/landing and to release payloads as desired. The flight experiment goals and objectives are explained. The experiment equipment is described, and the tasks to be performed during the demonstration are discussed.

  14. Controlling transcription in human pluripotent stem cells using CRISPR-effectors.

    PubMed

    Genga, Ryan M; Kearns, Nicola A; Maehr, René

    2016-05-15

    The ability to manipulate transcription in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is fundamental for the discovery of key genes and mechanisms governing cellular state and differentiation. Recently developed CRISPR-effector systems provide a systematic approach to rapidly test gene function in mammalian cells, including hPSCs. In this review, we discuss recent advances in CRISPR-effector technologies that have been employed to control transcription through gene activation, gene repression, and epigenome engineering. We describe an application of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs by targeting a synthetic promoter driving a GFP transgene, demonstrating the ease and effectiveness of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs. PMID:26525193

  15. Type IV secretion system of Brucella spp. and its effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Li, Wengfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause infection in domestic and wild animals. They are often used as model organisms to study intracellular bacterial infections. Brucella VirB T4SS is a key virulence factor that plays important roles in mediating intracellular survival and manipulating host immune response to infection. In this review, we discuss the roles of Brucella VirB T4SS and 15 effectors that are proposed to be crucial for Brucella pathogenesis. VirB T4SS regulates the inflammation response and manipulates vesicle trafficking inside host cells. VirB T4SS also plays crucial roles in the inhibition of the host immune response and intracellular survival during infection. Here, we list the key molecular events in the intracellular life cycle of Brucella that are potentially targeted by the VirB T4SS effectors. Elucidating the functions of these effectors will help clarify the molecular role of T4SS during infection. Furthermore, studying the effectors secreted by Brucella spp. might provide insights into the mechanisms used by the bacteria to hijack the host signaling pathways and aid in the development of better vaccines and therapies against brucellosis. PMID:26528442

  16. Plasmodium cellular effector mechanisms and the hepatic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Frevert, Ute; Krzych, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the most serious health problems globally. Immunization with attenuated parasites elicits multiple cellular effector mechanisms capable of eliminating Plasmodium liver stages. However, malaria liver stage (LS) immunity is complex and the mechanisms effector T cells use to locate the few infected hepatocytes in the large liver in order to kill the intracellular LS parasites remain a mystery to date. Here, we review our current knowledge on the behavior of CD8 effector T cells in the hepatic microvasculature, in malaria and other hepatic infections. Taking into account the unique immunological and lymphogenic properties of the liver, we discuss whether classical granule-mediated cytotoxicity might eliminate infected hepatocytes via direct cell contact or whether cytokines might operate without cell–cell contact and kill Plasmodium LSs at a distance. A thorough understanding of the cellular effector mechanisms that lead to parasite death hence sterile protection is a prerequisite for the development of a successful malaria vaccine to protect the 40% of the world’s population currently at risk of Plasmodium infection. PMID:26074888

  17. Five Xanthomonas type III effectors suppress cell death induced by components of immunity-associated MAP kinase cascades

    PubMed Central

    Teper, Doron; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Martin, Gregory B; Sessa, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play a fundamental role in signaling of plant immunity and mediate elicitation of cell death. Xanthomonas spp. manipulate plant signaling by using a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into host cells. We examined the ability of 33 Xanthomonas effectors to inhibit cell death induced by overexpression of components of MAPK cascades in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Five effectors inhibited cell death induced by overexpression of MAPKKKα and MEK2, but not of MAP3Kϵ. In addition, expression of AvrBs1 in yeast suppressed activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAPK pathway, suggesting that the target of this effector is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. These results indicate that Xanthomonas employs several type III effectors to suppress immunity-associated cell death mediated by MAPK cascades. PMID:26237448

  18. Space Station end effector strategy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Jensen, Robert L.; Willshire, Kelli F.; Satterthwaite, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study are presented for terminology definition, identification of functional requirements, technolgy assessment, and proposed end effector development strategies for the Space Station Program. The study is composed of a survey of available or under-developed end effector technology, identification of requirements from baselined Space Station documents, a comparative assessment of the match between technology and requirements, and recommended strategies for end effector development for the Space Station Program.

  19. ER-Dependent Ca++-mediated Cytosolic ROS as an Effector for Induction of Mitochondrial Apoptotic and ATM-JNK Signal Pathways in Gallic Acid-treated Human Oral Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Liang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2016-02-01

    Release of calcium (Ca(++)) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been proposed to be involved in induction of apoptosis by oxidative stress. Using inhibitor of ER Ca(++) release dantrolene and inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(++) uptake Ru-360, we demonstrated that Ca(++) release from the ER was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis of human oral cancer (OC) cells induced by gallic acid (GA). Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase inhibited tunicamycin-induced induction of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, C/EBP homologous protein, pro-caspase-12 cleavage, cytosolic Ca(++) increase and apoptosis, but did not attenuate the increase in cytosolic Ca(++) level and apoptosis induced by GA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis by GA was blocked by dantrolene. The specificity of ROS-mediated ATM-JNK activation was confirmed by treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger. Blockade of ATM activation by specific inhibitor KU55933, short hairpin RNA, or kinase-dead ATM overexpression suppressed JNK phosphorylation but did not completely inhibit cytosolic ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, pro-caspase-3 cleavage, and apoptosis induced by GA. Taken together, these results indicate that GA induces OC cell apoptosis by inducing the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic and ATM-JNK signal pathways, likely through ER Ca(++)-mediated ROS production. PMID:26851027

  20. Blockade of TNF-α signaling benefits cancer therapy by suppressing effector regulatory T cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Su, Shih-Huan; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Effector but not naive regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can accumulate in the peripheral blood as well as the tumor microenvironment, expand during tumor progression and be one of the main suppressors for antitumor immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms for effector Treg cell expansion in tumor are still unknown. We demonstrate that effector Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor CD8+ T cells is tumor-nonspecific. Furthermore, TNFR2 expression is increased in these Treg cells by Affymetrix chip analysis which was confirmed by monoclonal antibody staining in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and murine models. Correspondingly, increased levels of TNF-α in both tissue and serum were also demonstrated. Interestingly, TNF-α could not only expand effector Treg cells through TNFR2 signaling, but also enhanced their suppressive activity against antitumor immunity of CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, targeting TNFR2 signaling with a TNF-α inhibitor could selectively reduce rapid resurgence of effector Treg cells after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion and markedly inhibit the growth of established tumors. Herein, we propose a novel mechanism in which TNF-α could promote tumor-associated effector Treg cell expansion and suggest a new cancer immunotherapy strategy using TNF-α inhibitors to reduce effector Treg cells expansion after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion. PMID:26451304

  1. Orbital maneuvering vehicle end effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An end effector device (A) for grasping and holding an article such as a handle (18) of a space telescope is disclosed. The device includes a V-shaped capture window (74) defined as inclined surfaces (76, 78) in parallel face plates (22, 24) which converge toward a retainer recess (54) in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers (26, 28) which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess (54) where latches (50) lock handle (18) in the recess. To align the capture window, plates (22, 24) may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base (64).

  2. The type three secreted effector SipC regulates the trafficking of PERP during Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Hallstrom, Kelly N.; McCormick, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Salmonella enterica Typhimurium employs type III secreted effectors to induce cellular invasion and pathogenesis. We previously reported the secreted effector SipA is in part responsible for inducing the apical accumulation of the host membrane protein PERP, a host factor we have shown is key to the inflammatory response induced by Salmonella. We now report that the S. Typhimurium type III secreted effector SipC significantly contributes to PERP redistribution to the apical membrane surface. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a role for SipC in directing the trafficking of a host membrane protein to the cell surface. In sum, facilitation of PERP trafficking appears to be a result of type III secreted effector-mediated recruitment of vesicles to the apical surface. Our study therefore reveals a new role for SipC, and builds upon previous reports suggesting recruitment of vesicles to the cell surface is important for Salmonella invasion. PMID:27078059

  3. Enhancement of Immune Effector Functions by Modulating IgG’s Intrinsic Affinity for Target Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Yariv; Yang, Chunning; Borrok, M. Jack; Ayriss, Joanne; Aherne, Karen; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated immune effector functions play an essential role in the anti-tumor efficacy of many therapeutic mAbs. While much of the effort to improve effector potency has focused on augmenting the interaction between the antibody-Fc and activating Fc-receptors expressed on immune cells, the role of antibody binding interactions with the target antigen remains poorly understood. We show that antibody intrinsic affinity to the target antigen clearly influences the extent and efficiency of Fc-mediated effector mechanisms, and report the pivotal role of antibody binding valence on the ability to regulate effector functions. More particularly, we used an array of affinity modulated variants of three different mAbs, anti-CD4, anti-EGFR and anti-HER2 against a panel of target cell lines expressing disparate levels of the target antigen. We found that at saturating antibody concentrations, IgG variants with moderate intrinsic affinities, similar to those generated by the natural humoral immune response, promoted superior effector functions compared to higher affinity antibodies. We hypothesize that at saturating concentrations, effector function correlates most directly with the amount of Fc bound to the cell surface. Thus, high affinity antibodies exhibiting slow off-rates are more likely to interact bivalently with the target cell, occupying two antigen sites with a single Fc. In contrast, antibodies with faster off-rates are likely to dissociate each binding arm more rapidly, resulting in a higher likelihood of monovalent binding. Monovalent binding may in turn increase target cell opsonization and lead to improved recruitment of effector cells. This unpredicted relationship between target affinity and effector function potency suggests a careful examination of antibody design and engineering for the development of next-generation immunotherapeutics. PMID:27322177

  4. Assembly of scaffold-mediated complexes containing Cdc42p, the exchange factor Cdc24p, and the effector Cla4p required for cell cycle-regulated phosphorylation of Cdc24p.

    PubMed

    Bose, I; Irazoqui, J E; Moskow, J J; Bardes, E S; Zyla, T R; Lew, D J

    2001-03-01

    In budding yeast cells, the cytoskeletal polarization and depolarization events that shape the bud are triggered at specific times during the cell cycle by the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28p. Polarity establishment also requires the small GTPase Cdc42p and its exchange factor, Cdc24p, but the mechanism whereby Cdc28p induces Cdc42p-dependent polarization is unknown. Here we show that Cdc24p becomes phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, triggered by Cdc28p. However, the role of Cdc28p is indirect, and the phosphorylation appears to be catalyzed by the p21-activated kinase family member Cla4p and also depends on Cdc42p and the scaffold protein Bem1p. Expression of GTP-Cdc42p, the product of Cdc24p-mediated GDP/GTP exchange, stimulated Cdc24p phosphorylation independent of cell cycle cues, raising the possibility that the phosphorylation is part of a feedback regulatory pathway. Bem1p binds directly to Cdc24p, to Cla4p, and to GTP-bound Cdc42p and can mediate complex formation between these proteins in vitro. We suggest that Bem1p acts to concentrate polarity establishment proteins at a discrete site, facilitating polarization and promoting Cdc24p phosphorylation at specific times during the cell cycle. PMID:11113154

  5. The Functions of Effector Proteins in Yersinia Virulence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linglin; Mei, Meng; Yu, Chan; Shen, Wenwen; Ma, Lixin; He, Jiewang; Yi, Li

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia species are bacterial pathogens that can cause plague and intestinal diseases after invading into human cells through the Three Secretion System (TTSS). The effect of pathogenesis is mediated by Yersinia outer proteins (Yop) and manifested as down-regulation of the cytokine genes expression by inhibiting nuclear factor-κ-gene binding (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. In addition, its pathogenesis can also manipulate the disorder of host innate immune system and cell death such as apoptosis, pyroptosis, and autophagy. Among the Yersinia effector proteins, YopB and YopD assist the injection of other virulence effectors into the host cytoplasm, while YopE, YopH, YopJ, YopO, and YopT target on disrupting host cell signaling pathways in the host cytosols. Many efforts have been applied to reveal that intracellular proteins such as Rho-GTPase, and transmembrane receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) both play critical roles in Yersinia pathogenesis, establishing a connection between the pathogenic process and the signaling response. This review will mainly focus on how the effector proteins of Yersinia modulate the intrinsic signals in host cells and disturb the innate immunity of hosts through TTSS. PMID:27281989

  6. Mouse and human FcR effector functions.

    PubMed

    Bruhns, Pierre; Jönsson, Friederike

    2015-11-01

    Mouse and human FcRs have been a major focus of attention not only of the scientific community, through the cloning and characterization of novel receptors, and of the medical community, through the identification of polymorphisms and linkage to disease but also of the pharmaceutical community, through the identification of FcRs as targets for therapy or engineering of Fc domains for the generation of enhanced therapeutic antibodies. The availability of knockout mouse lines for every single mouse FcR, of multiple or cell-specific--'à la carte'--FcR knockouts and the increasing generation of hFcR transgenics enable powerful in vivo approaches for the study of mouse and human FcR biology. This review will present the landscape of the current FcR family, their effector functions and the in vivo models at hand to study them. These in vivo models were recently instrumental in re-defining the properties and effector functions of FcRs that had been overlooked or discarded from previous analyses. A particular focus will be made on the (mis)concepts on the role of high-affinity IgG receptors in vivo and on results from antibody engineering to enhance or abrogate antibody effector functions mediated by FcRs. PMID:26497511

  7. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Landry

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of

  8. Proteogenomic analysis of the Venturia pirina (Pear Scab Fungus) secretome reveals potential effectors.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Ira R; Jones, Dan; Bowen, Joanna K; Deng, Cecilia; Faou, Pierre; Hall, Nathan E; Jayachandran, Vignesh; Liem, Michael; Taranto, Adam P; Plummer, Kim M; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2014-08-01

    A proteogenomic analysis is presented for Venturia pirina, a fungus that causes scab disease on European pear (Pyrus communis). V. pirina is host-specific, and the infection is thought to be mediated by secreted effector proteins. Currently, only 36 V. pirina proteins are catalogued in GenBank, and the genome sequence is not publicly available. To identify putative effectors, V. pirina was grown in vitro on and in cellophane sheets mimicking its growth in infected leaves. Secreted extracts were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry, and the data (ProteomeXchange identifier PXD000710) was queried against a protein database generated by combining in silico predicted transcripts with six frame translations of a whole genome sequence of V. pirina (GenBank Accession JEMP00000000 ). We identified 1088 distinct V. pirina protein groups (FDR 1%) including 1085 detected for the first time. Thirty novel (not in silico predicted) proteins were found, of which 14 were identified as potential effectors based on characteristic features of fungal effector protein sequences. We also used evidence from semitryptic peptides at the protein N-terminus to corroborate in silico signal peptide predictions for 22 proteins, including several potential effectors. The analysis highlights the utility of proteogenomics in the study of secreted effectors. PMID:24965097

  9. A bacterial type III secretion-based delivery system for functional assays of fungal effectors in cereals.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Ellis, Jeffery G; Dodds, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    Large numbers of candidate effectors are being identified by genome sequencing of fungal pathogens and in planta expression studies. These effectors are both a boon and a curse for pathogens as they modulate the host cellular environment or suppress defense response to allow fungal growth as well as become targets of plant resistance (R) proteins. Recognition of a fungal effector by a plant R protein triggers a hypersensitive reaction (HR) leading to death of plant cells in and around the infection site, thus preventing further proliferation of the pathogen. Such HR induction has been used as an indicator of effector activity in functional assays of candidate effectors in dicots based on Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression. However, the Agrobacterium assay is not functional in cereal leaves. We therefore have adapted an alternative assay based on effector protein delivery using the type III secretion system (T3SS) of a non-pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. for use in wheat and other cereals. Here, we describe protocols for delivery of effector proteins into wheat and barley cells using the AvrRpm1 T3SS signal in the engineered non-pathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Effector-to-Host Analyzer (EtHAn). For ease of making expression clones we have generated the GATEWAY cloning compatible vectors. A calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (Cya) reporter protein can be used as an effective marker for fusion protein delivery into wheat and barley by this system. PMID:24643568

  10. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silcox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  11. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  12. Spiral lead platen robotic end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, David C. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic end effector is disclosed which makes use of a rotating platen with spiral leads used to impact lateral motion to gripping fingers. Actuation is provided by the contact of rolling pins with the walls of the leads. The use of the disclosed method of actuation avoids jamming and provides excellent mechanical advantage while remaining light in weight and durable. The entire end effector is compact and easily adapted for attachment to robotic arms currently in use.

  13. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Novel Functions of Salmonella enterica SPI2-T3SS Effector Proteins in Remodeling of the Host Cell Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, Roopa; Liebl, David; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Liss, Viktoria; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular Salmonella enterica induce a massive remodeling of the endosomal system in infected host cells. One dramatic consequence of this interference is the induction of various extensive tubular aggregations of membrane vesicles, and tubules positive for late endosomal/lysosomal markers are referred to as Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. SIF are highly dynamic in nature with extension and collapse velocities of 0.4–0.5 µm x sec−1. The induction of SIF depends on the function of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) and a subset of effector proteins. In this study, we applied live cell imaging and electron microscopy to analyze the role of individual effector proteins in SIF morphology and dynamic properties of SIF. SIF in cells infected with sifB, sseJ, sseK1, sseK2, sseI, sseL, sspH1, sspH2, slrP, steC, gogB or pipB mutant strains showed a morphology and dynamics comparable to SIF induced by WT Salmonella. SIF were absent in cells infected with the sifA-deficient strain and live cell analyses allowed tracking of the loss of the SCV membrane of intracellular sifA Salmonella. In contrast to analyses in fixed cells, in living host cells SIF induced by sseF- or sseG-deficient strains were not discontinuous, but rather continuous and thinner in diameter. A very dramatic phenotype was observed for the pipB2-deficient strain that induced very bulky, non-dynamic aggregations of membrane vesicles. Our study underlines the requirement of the study of Salmonella-host interaction in living systems and reveals new phenotypes due to the intracellular activities of Salmonella. PMID:25522146

  14. End effector with astronaut foot restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a foot restraint platform designed primarily for use by an astronaut being rigidly and permanently attached to an end effector which is suitable for attachment to the manipulator arm of a remote manipulating system is described. The foot restraint platform is attached by a brace to the end effector at a location away from the grappling interface of the end effector. The platform comprises a support plate provided with a pair of stirrups for receiving the toe portion of an astronaut's boots when standing on the platform and a pair of heel retainers in the form of raised members which are fixed to the surface of the platform and located to provide abutment surfaces for abutting engagement with the heels of the astronaut's boots when his toes are in the stirrups. The heel retainers preclude a backward sliding movement of the feet on the platform and instead require a lifting of the heels in order to extract the feet. The brace for attaching the foot restraint platform to the end effector may include a pivot or swivel joint to permit various orientations of the platform with respect to the end effector.

  15. TAL effectors and the executor R genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Yin, Zhongchao; White, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are bacterial type III secretion proteins that function as transcription factors in plants during Xanthomonas/plant interactions, conditioning either host susceptibility and/or host resistance. Three types of TAL effector associated resistance (R) genes have been characterized—recessive, dominant non-transcriptional, and dominant TAL effector-dependent transcriptional based resistance. Here, we discuss the last type of R genes, whose functions are dependent on direct TAL effector binding to discrete effector binding elements in the promoters. Only five of the so-called executor R genes have been cloned, and commonalities are not clear. We have placed the protein products in two groups for conceptual purposes. Group 1 consists solely of the protein from pepper, BS3, which is predicted to have catalytic function on the basis of homology to a large conserved protein family. Group 2 consists of BS4C-R, XA27, XA10, and XA23, all of which are relatively short proteins from pepper or rice with multiple potential transmembrane domains. Group 2 members have low sequence similarity to proteins of unknown function in closely related species. Firm predictions await further experimentation on these interesting new members to the R gene repertoire, which have potential broad application in new strategies for disease resistance. PMID:26347759

  16. Unconventionally secreted effectors of two filamentous pathogens target plant salicylate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingli; Song, Tianqiao; Zhang, Xiong; Yuan, Hongbo; Su, Liming; Li, Wanlin; Xu, Jing; Liu, Shiheng; Chen, Linlin; Chen, Tianzi; Zhang, Meixiang; Gu, Lichuan; Zhang, Baolong; Dou, Daolong

    2014-01-01

    Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes pose an increasing threat to food security and ecosystem health worldwide. These filamentous pathogens, while taxonomically distinct, modulate host defense responses by secreting effectors, which are typically identified based on the presence of signal peptides. Here we show that Phytophthora sojae and Verticillium dahliae secrete isochorismatases (PsIsc1 and VdIsc1, respectively) that are required for full pathogenesis. PsIsc1 and VdIsc1 can suppress salicylate-mediated innate immunity in planta and hydrolyse isochorismate in vitro. A conserved triad of catalytic residues is essential for both functions. Thus, the two proteins are isochorismatase effectors that disrupt the plant salicylate metabolism pathway by suppressing its precursor. Furthermore, these proteins lack signal peptides, but exhibit characteristics that lead to unconventional secretion. Therefore, this secretion pathway is a novel mechanism for delivering effectors and might play an important role in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25156390

  17. Transcription Factor Networks Directing the Development, Function, and Evolution of Innate Lymphoid Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joonsoo; Malhotra, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian lymphoid immunity is mediated by fast and slow responders to pathogens. Fast innate lymphocytes are active within hours after infections in mucosal tissues. Slow adaptive lymphocytes are conventional T and B cells with clonal antigen receptors that function days after pathogen exposure. A transcription factor (TF) regulatory network guiding early T cell development is at the core of effector function diversification in all innate lymphocytes, and the kinetics of immune responses is set by developmental programming. Operational units within the innate lymphoid system are not classified by the types of pathogen-sensing machineries but rather by discrete effector functions programmed by regulatory TF networks. Based on the evolutionary history of TFs of the regulatory networks, fast effectors likely arose earlier in the evolution of animals to fortify body barriers, and in mammals they often develop in fetal ontogeny prior to the establishment of fully competent adaptive immunity. PMID:25650177

  18. Rho GTPases and their effector proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, A L; Hall, A

    2000-01-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that regulate many essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, gene transcription, cell-cycle progression and cell adhesion. About 30 potential effector proteins have been identified that interact with members of the Rho family, but it is still unclear which of these are responsible for the diverse biological effects of Rho GTPases. This review will discuss how Rho GTPases physically interact with, and regulate the activity of, multiple effector proteins and how specific effector proteins contribute to cellular responses. To date most progress has been made in the cytoskeleton field, and several biochemical links have now been established between GTPases and the assembly of filamentous actin. The main focus of this review will be Rho, Rac and Cdc42, the three best characterized mammalian Rho GTPases, though the genetic analysis of Rho GTPases in lower eukaryotes is making increasingly important contributions to this field. PMID:10816416

  19. A bacterial type III secretion assay for delivery of fungal effector proteins into wheat.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mago, Rohit; Staskawicz, Brian J; Ayliffe, Michael A; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N

    2014-03-01

    Large numbers of candidate effectors from fungal pathogens are being identified through whole-genome sequencing and in planta expression studies. Although Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression has enabled high-throughput functional analysis of effectors in dicot plants, this assay is not effective in cereal leaves. Here, we show that a nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens engineered to express the type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. syringae and the wheat pathogen Xanthomonas translucens can deliver fusion proteins containing T3SS signals from P. syringae (AvrRpm1) and X. campestris (AvrBs2) avirulence (Avr) proteins, respectively, into wheat leaf cells. A calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase reporter protein was delivered effectively into wheat and barley by both bacteria. Absence of any disease symptoms with P. fluorescens makes it more suitable than X. translucens for detecting a hypersensitive response (HR) induced by an effector protein with avirulence activity. We further modified the delivery system by removal of the myristoylation site from the AvrRpm1 fusion to prevent its localization to the plasma membrane which could inhibit recognition of an Avr protein. Delivery of the flax rust AvrM protein by the modified delivery system into transgenic tobacco leaves expressing the corresponding M resistance protein induced a strong HR, indicating that the system is capable of delivering a functional rust Avr protein. In a preliminary screen of effectors from the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, we identified one effector that induced a host genotype-specific HR in wheat. Thus, the modified AvrRpm1:effector-Pseudomonas fluorescens system is an effective tool for large-scale screening of pathogen effectors for recognition in wheat. PMID:24156769

  20. Intermediate filaments enable pathogen docking to trigger type 3 effector translocation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Brian C; Stamm, Luisa M; Raaben, Matthijs; Kim, Caleb M; Kahoud, Emily; Robinson, Lindsey R; Bose, Sayantan; Queiroz, Ana L; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Baxt, Leigh A; Mor-Vaknin, Nirit; Fu, Yang; Molina, Gabriel; Markovitz, David M; Whelan, Sean P; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2016-01-01

    Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs) of bacterial pathogens translocate bacterial effector proteins that mediate disease into the eukaryotic cytosol. Effectors traverse the plasma membrane through a translocon pore formed by T3SS proteins. In a genome-wide selection, we identified the intermediate filament vimentin as required for infection by the T3SS-dependent pathogen S. flexneri. We found that vimentin is required for efficient T3SS translocation of effectors by S. flexneri and other pathogens that use T3SS, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Vimentin and the intestinal epithelial intermediate filament keratin 18 interact with the C-terminus of the Shigella translocon pore protein IpaC. Vimentin and its interaction with IpaC are dispensable for pore formation, but are required for stable docking of S. flexneri to cells; moreover, stable docking triggers effector secretion. These findings establish that stable docking of the bacterium specifically requires intermediate filaments, is a process distinct from pore formation, and is a prerequisite for effector secretion. PMID:27572444

  1. Allergic pulmonary inflammation in mice is dependent on eosinophil-induced recruitment of effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Pero, Ralph S.; Taranova, Anna G.; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Colbert, Dana C.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm surrounding allergen-mediated T helper type 2 (Th2) immune responses in the lung suggests an almost hegemonic role for T cells. Our studies propose an alternative hypothesis implicating eosinophils in the regulation of pulmonary T cell responses. In particular, ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized/challenged mice devoid of eosinophils (the transgenic line PHIL) have reduced airway levels of Th2 cytokines relative to the OVA-treated wild type that correlated with a reduced ability to recruit effector T cells to the lung. Adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OVA-specific transgenic T cells (OT-II) alone into OVA-challenged PHIL recipient mice failed to restore Th2 cytokines, airway histopathologies, and, most importantly, the recruitment of pulmonary effector T cells. In contrast, the combined transfer of OT-II cells and eosinophils into PHIL mice resulted in the accumulation of effector T cells and a concomitant increase in both airway Th2 immune responses and histopathologies. Moreover, we show that eosinophils elicit the expression of the Th2 chemokines thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 and macrophage-derived chemokine/CCL22 in the lung after allergen challenge, and blockade of these chemokines inhibited the recruitment of effector T cells. In summary, the data suggest that pulmonary eosinophils are required for the localized recruitment of effector T cells. PMID:18316417

  2. Role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in shaping the effector phase of the antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Boutet, Marie; Combadière, Christophe; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2012-12-15

    Immune system-mediated eradication of neoplastic cells requires induction of a strong long-lasting antitumor T-cell response. However, generation of tumor-specific effector T cells does not necessarily result in tumor clearance. CTL must first be able to migrate to the tumor site, infiltrate the tumor tissue, and interact with the target to finally trigger effector functions indispensable for tumor destruction. Chemokines are involved in circulation, homing, retention, and activation of immunocompetent cells. Although some of them are known to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, others are responsible for changes in the tumor microenvironment that lead to extensive infiltration of lymphocytes, resulting in tumor eradication. Given their chemoattractive and activating properties, a role for chemokines in the development of the effector phase of the antitumor immune response has been suggested. Here, we emphasize the role of the chemokine-chemokine receptor network at multiple levels of the T-cell-mediated antitumor immune response. The identification of chemokine-dependent molecular mechanisms implicated in tumor-specific CTL trafficking, retention, and regulation of their in situ effector functions may offer new perspectives for development of innovative immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment. PMID:23222302

  3. EZH2 is crucial for both differentiation of regulatory T cells and T effector cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang-Ping; Jiang, Kan; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Vahedi, Golnaz; Afzali, Behdad; Sciume, Giuseppe; Bonelli, Michael; Sun, Hong-Wei; Jankovic, Dragana; Kanno, Yuka; Sartorelli, Vittorio; O’Shea, John J.; Laurence, Arian

    2015-01-01

    The roles of EZH2 in various subsets of CD4+ T cells are controversial and its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. FOXP3-positive Treg cells are a critical helper T cell subset, and dysregulation of Treg generation or function results in systemic autoimmunity. FOXP3 associates with EZH2 to mediate gene repression and suppressive function. Herein, we demonstrate that deletion of Ezh2 in CD4 T cells resulted in reduced numbers of Treg cells in vivo and differentiation in vitro and an increased proportion of memory CD4 T cells in part due to exaggerated production of effector cytokines. Furthermore, we found that both Ezh2-deficient Treg cells and T effector cells were functionally impaired in vivo: Tregs failed to constrain autoimmune colitis and T effector cells neither provided a protective response to T. gondii infection nor mediated autoimmune colitis. The dichotomous function of EZH2 in regulating differentiation and senescence in effector and regulatory T cells helps to explain the apparent existing contradictions in literature. PMID:26090605

  4. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  5. Kinematic evaluation of end effector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Gary W.

    1992-09-01

    The complex, many degree-of-freedom end effectors at the leading edge of technology would be unusable in the sea bottom research environment. Simpler designs are required to provide adequate reliability for subsea use. This work examines selection of end effector designs to achieve optimum grasping ability with minimal mechanical complexity. A new method of calculating grasp stability is developed, incorporating elements of previous works in the field. Programs are developed which evaluate the ability of different end effector configurations to grasp representative objects (a cube, sphere, and infinite cylinder). End effector designs considered had circular palms with fingers located at the periphery, oriented so that each pointed to the center of the palm. The program tested configurations of from 1 to 4 fingers and from 1 to 3 links per finger. Three sets of finger proportions were considered: equal length links, half length links, and anthropomorphic proportions. The 2 finger, 2 link per finger configuration was determined to be the optimum design, and the half length proportions were selected as the best set of proportions.

  6. Immune-surveillance through exhausted effector T-cells.

    PubMed

    Zehn, Dietmar; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Thimme, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the hepatitis B and C virus (HBV, HCV) and certain strains of the rodent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) establish a state of persisting viral replication. This occurs besides strong adoptive immune responses and the induction of large numbers of activated pathogen-specific T-cells. The failure of the immune system to clear these viruses is typically attributed to a loss of effector T-cell function-a phenomenon referred to as T-cell exhaustion. Though largely accepted, this loss of function concept is being more and more challenged by comprehensive clinical and experimental observations which highlight that T-cells in chronic infections are more functional than previously considered. Here, we highlight examples that demonstrate that such T-cells mediate a profound form of immune-surveillance. We also briefly discuss the opportunities and limitations of employing 'exhausted' T-cells for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26826950

  7. The interplay of effector and regulatory T cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Eil, Robert L; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress effector T (Teff) cells and prevent immune-mediated rejection of cancer. Much less appreciated are mechanisms by which Teff cells antagonize Treg cells. Herein, we consider how complex reciprocal interactions between Teff and Treg cells shape their population dynamics within tumors. Under states of tolerance, including during tumor escape, suppressed Teff cells support Treg cell populations through antigen-dependent provision of interleukin (IL)-2. During immune activation, Teff cells can lose this supportive capacity and directly antagonize Treg cell populations to neutralize their immunosuppressive function. While this latter state is rarely achieved spontaneously within tumors, we propose that therapeutic induction of immune activation has the potential to stably disrupt immunosuppressive population states resulting in durable cancer regression. PMID:25728990

  8. Type VI secretion effectors: poisons with a purpose

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Alistair B.; Peterson, S. Brook; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) mediates interactions between a diverse range of Gram-negative bacterial species. Recent studies have led to a drastic increase in the number of characterized T6SS effector proteins and produced a more complete and nuanced view of the adaptive significance of the system. While the system is most often implicated in antagonism, in this review we consider the case for its involvement in both antagonistic and non-antagonistic behaviors. Clarifying the roles that T6S plays in microbial communities will contribute to broader efforts to understand the importance of microbial interactions in maintaining human and environmental health, and will inform efforts to manipulate these interactions for therapeutic or environmental benefit. PMID:24384601

  9. Bacterial Effector Nanoparticles as Breast Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Herrera Estrada, Lina; Padmore, Trudy J; Champion, Julie A

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial pathogens trigger cell death by a variety of mechanisms, including injection of effector proteins. Effector proteins have great potential as anticancer agents because they efficiently subvert a variety of eukaryotic signaling pathways involved in cancer development, drug resistance, and metastasis. In breast cancer, MAPK and NFκB pathways are known to be dysregulated. YopJ, an effector from Yersinia pestis, downregulates MAPK and NFκB pathways to induce cell death in specific cell types. We expressed YopJ in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), forming self-assembled protein nanoparticles with diameters of 100 nm. YopJ-GST nanoparticles efficiently delivered protein to cells, replacing the need for the pathogen secretion mechanism for effector delivery to cells. These nanoparticles induced dose and time dependent death in SKBR-3 breast cancer cells. After 72 h, 97% of cells died, significantly more than with the same molar dose of doxorubicin. Treatment with sublethal doses of nanoparticles decreased cell migration in vitro and downregulated the MAPK ERK 1/2 pathway, which has been correlated to metastasis. Exposure to a panel of breast cancer cell lines showed that YopJ-GST nanoparticles are cytotoxic to different subtypes, including doxorubicin resistant cells. However, they were not cytotoxic to NIH/3T3 fibroblasts or HeLa cells. Thus, YopJ-GST nanoparticles demonstrate the potential of effector proteins as breast cancer therapeutics with selective cytotoxicity and the capacity to decrease metastatic predictive behaviors. PMID:26800341

  10. The GTPase-deficient Rnd Proteins Are Stabilized by Their Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Liuh Ling; Manser, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Rnd proteins are Rho family GTP-binding proteins with cellular functions that antagonize RhoA signaling. We recently described a new Rnd3 effector Syx, also named PLEKHG5, that interacts with Rnds via a Raf1-like “Ras-binding domain.” Syx is a multidomain RhoGEF that participates in early zebrafish development. Here we demonstrated that Rnd1, Rnd2, and Rnd3 stability is acutely dependent on interaction with their effectors such as Syx or p190 RhoGAP. Although Rnd3 turnover is blocked by treatment of cells with MG132, we provide evidence that such turnover is mediated indirectly by effects on the Rnd3 effectors, rather than on Rnd3 itself, which is not significantly ubiquitinated. The minimal regions of Syx and p190 RhoGAP that bind Rnd3 are not sequence-related but have similar effects. We have identified features that allow for Rnd3 turnover including a conserved Lys-45 close to the switch I region and the C-terminal membrane-binding domain of Rnd3, which cannot be substituted by the equivalent Cdc42 CAAX sequence. By contrast, an effector binding-defective mutant of Rnd3 when overexpressed undergoes turnover at normal rates. Interestingly the activity of the RhoA-regulated kinase ROCK stimulates Rnd3 turnover. This study suggests that Rnd proteins are regulated through feedback mechanisms in cells where the level of effectors and RhoA activity influence the stability of Rnd proteins. This effector feedback behavior is analogous to the ability of ACK1 and PAK1 to prolong the lifetime of the active GTP-bound state of Cdc42 and Rac1. PMID:22807448

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells differentially modulate effector CD8+ T cell subsets and exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Justin D; Smith, Matthew D; Calabresi, Peter A; Whartenby, Katharine A

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have emerged as a promising candidate for inflammatory suppression and disease amelioration, especially of neuro-inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Auto-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells acquire pathogenic IFNγ-producing- (Type I) and IL-17A-producing- (Type 17) effector phenotypes in MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Although MSC have been extensively demonstrated to suppress pathogenic effector CD4+ T cells and CD4+ T cell-mediated EAE, surprisingly few studies have addressed their modulation of effector CD8+ T cells represented in MS or their impact on CD8+ T cell-mediated EAE. We find that MSC differentially modulate CD8+ T cell development depending on effector T cell subtype. MSC drive activated low-IFNγ producers toward an enhanced high-IFNγ Tc1-like phenotype but strongly inhibit the production of IL-17A and Tc17 polarization in vitro. These observations are underscored by differential MSC modulation of T cell activation, proliferation, and signature transcription factor up-regulation. In addition, effector CD8+ T cells co-cultured with MSC exhibited increased production of IL-2, a molecule known to enhance IFNγ, yet suppress IL-17A, production. Based on these in vitro effects on CD8+ T cells, we next evaluated their impact on the severity of EAE. To better evaluate CD8+ T cells, we immunized mice with MOG37-50 , which is a CD8-targeted epitope. Our results revealed a worsening of disease, consistent with their in vitro stimulation of Tc1 cells. These findings highlight the emerging duality of MSC in immune modulation and provide implications for their future use in immune-related diseases. PMID:24911892

  12. Novel Control Effectors for Truss Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Edward V.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Joshi, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    At cruise flight conditions very high aspect ratio/low sweep truss braced wings (TBW) may be subject to design requirements that distinguish them from more highly swept cantilevered wings. High aspect ratio, short chord length and relative thinness of the airfoil sections all contribute to relatively low wing torsional stiffness. This may lead to aeroelastic issues such as aileron reversal and low flutter margins. In order to counteract these issues, high aspect ratio/low sweep wings may need to carry additional high speed control effectors to operate when outboard ailerons are in reversal and/or must carry additional structural weight to enhance torsional stiffness. The novel control effector evaluated in this study is a variable sweep raked wing tip with an aileron control surface. Forward sweep of the tip allows the aileron to align closely with the torsional axis of the wing and operate in a conventional fashion. Aft sweep of the tip creates a large moment arm from the aileron to the wing torsional axis greatly enhancing aileron reversal. The novelty comes from using this enhanced and controllable aileron reversal effect to provide roll control authority by acting as a servo tab and providing roll control through intentional twist of the wing. In this case the reduced torsional stiffness of the wing becomes an advantage to be exploited. The study results show that the novel control effector concept does provide roll control as described, but only for a restricted class of TBW aircraft configurations. For the configuration studied (long range, dual aisle, Mach 0.85 cruise) the novel control effector provides significant benefits including up to 12% reduction in fuel burn.

  13. Impact of end effector technology on telemanipulation performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Szakaly, Z.; Ohm, T.

    1990-01-01

    Generic requirements for end effector design are briefly summarized as derived from generic functional and operational requirements. Included is a brief summary of terms and definitions related to end effector technology. The second part contains a brief overview of end effector technology work as JPL during the past ten years, with emphasis on the evolution of new mechanical, sensing and control capabilities of end effectors. The third and major part is devoted to the description of current end effector technology. The ongoing work addresses mechanical, sensing and control details with emphasis on mechanical ruggedness, increased resolution in sensing, and close electronic and control integration with overall telemanipulator control system.

  14. Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2 is a conserved RxLR effector that promotes infection in soybean and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qin; Ye, Wenwu; Choi, Duseok; Wong, James; Qiao, Yongli; Tao, Kai; Wang, Yuanchao; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-12-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of notorious and emerging pathogens of economically important crops. Each Phytophthora genome encodes several hundreds of cytoplasmic effectors, which are believed to manipulate plant immune response inside the host cells. However, the majority of Phytophthora effectors remain functionally uncharacterized. We recently discovered two effectors from the soybean stem and root rot pathogen Phytophthora sojae with the activity to suppress RNA silencing in plants. These effectors are designated Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing (PSRs). Here, we report that the P. sojae PSR2 (PsPSR2) belongs to a conserved and widespread effector family in Phytophthora. A PsPSR2-like effector produced by P. infestans (PiPSR2) can also suppress RNA silencing in plants and promote Phytophthora infection, suggesting that the PSR2 family effectors have conserved functions in plant hosts. Using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy roots induction, we demonstrated that the expression of PsPSR2 rendered hypersusceptibility of soybean to P. sojae. Enhanced susceptibility was also observed in PsPSR2-expressing Arabidopsis thaliana plants during Phytophthora but not bacterial infection. These experiments provide strong evidence that PSR2 is a conserved Phytophthora effector family that performs important virulence functions specifically during Phytophthora infection of various plant hosts. PMID:25387135

  15. Investigating Age-Related Changes in Fine Motor Control Across Different Effectors and the Impact of White Matter Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Holtrop, Joseph L.; Loucks, Torrey M; Sosnoff, Jacob J; Sutton, Bradley P

    2014-01-01

    Changes in fine motor control that eventually compromise dexterity accompany advanced age; however there is evidence that age-related decline in motor control may not be uniform across effectors. Particularly, the role of central mechanisms in effector-specific decline has not been examined but is relevant for placing age-related motor declines into the growing literature of age-related changes in brain function. We examined sub-maximal force control across three different effectors (fingers, lips, and tongue) in 18 young and 14 older adults. In parallel with the force variability measures we examined changes in white matter structural integrity in effector-specific pathways in the brain with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Motor pathways for each effector were identified by using an fMRI localizer task followed by tractography to identify the fiber tracts propagating to the midbrain. Increases in force control variability were found with age in all three effectors but the effectors showed different degrees of age-related variability. Motor control changes were accompanied by a decline in white matter structural integrity with age shown by measures of fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity. The DTI metrics appear to mediate some of the age-related declines in motor control. Our findings indicate that the structural integrity of descending motor systems may play a significant role in age-related increases in motor performance variability, but that differential age-related declines in oral and manual effectors are not likely due to structural integrity of descending motor pathways in the brain. PMID:24657352

  16. Structural and Functional Investigations of the Effector Protein LpiR1 from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Beyrakhova, Ksenia A; van Straaten, Karin; Li, Lei; Boniecki, Michal T; Anderson, Deborah H; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2016-07-22

    Legionella pneumophila is a causative agent of a severe pneumonia, known as Legionnaires' disease. Legionella pathogenicity is mediated by specific virulence factors, called bacterial effectors, which are injected into the invaded host cell by the bacterial type IV secretion system. Bacterial effectors are involved in complex interactions with the components of the host cell immune and signaling pathways, which eventually lead to bacterial survival and replication inside the mammalian cell. Structural and functional studies of bacterial effectors are, therefore, crucial for elucidating the mechanisms of Legionella virulence. Here we describe the crystal structure of the LpiR1 (Lpg0634) effector protein and investigate the effects of its overexpression in mammalian cells. LpiR1 is an α-helical protein that consists of two similar domains aligned in an antiparallel fashion. The hydrophilic cleft between the domains might serve as a binding site for a potential host cell interaction partner. LpiR1 binds the phosphate group at a conserved site and is stabilized by Mn(2+), Ca(2+), or Mg(2+) ions. When overexpressed in mammalian cells, a GFP-LpiR1 fusion protein is localized in the cytoplasm. Intracellular signaling antibody array analysis revealed small changes in the phosphorylation state of several components of the Akt signaling pathway in HEK293T cells overexpressing LpiR1. PMID:27226543

  17. Radiation-induced CXCL16 release by breast cancer cells attracts effector T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Satoko; Wang, Baomei; Kawashima, Noriko; Braunstein, Steve; Badura, Michelle; Cameron, Thomas O.; Babb, James S.; Schneider, Robert J.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Dustin, Michael L.; Demaria, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of effector T cells to inflamed peripheral tissues is regulated by chemokines and their receptors, but the factors regulating recruitment to tumors remain largely undefined. Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is a common treatment modality for breast and other cancers. Used as a cytocidal agent for proliferating cancer cells, IR in combination with immunotherapy has been shown to promote immune-mediated tumor destruction in pre-clinical studies. Here we demonstrate that IR markedly enhanced the secretion by mouse and human breast cancer cells of CXCL16, a chemokine that binds to CXCR6 on Th1 and activated CD8 effector T cells, and plays an important role in their recruitment to sites of inflammation. Employing a poorly immunogenic mouse model of breast cancer, we found that irradiation increased the migration of CD8+CXCR6+ activated T cells to tumors in vitro and in vivo. CXCR6-deficient mice showed reduced infiltration of tumors by activated CD8 T cells and impaired tumor regression following treatment with local IR to the tumor and antibodies blocking the negative regulator of T cell activation CTLA-4. These results provide the first evidence that IR can induce the secretion by cancer cells of pro-inflammatory chemotactic factors that recruit anti-tumor effector T cells. The ability of IR to convert tumors into “inflamed” peripheral tissues could be exploited to overcome obstacles at the effector phase of the anti-tumor immune response and improve the therapeutic efficacy of immunotherapy. PMID:18713980

  18. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Boevink, Petra C; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R J

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c-1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease. PMID:26822079

  19. 24-hour control of body temperature in rats. I. Integration of behavioral and autonomic effectors.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    1994-07-01

    Some studies suggest that the nocturnal elevation in core temperature (Tc) of the rat is mediated by an elevation in the set point. The role of set point can be assessed if behavioral effectors are measured simultaneously with other thermoregulatory effectors and Tc over a 24-h period. Selected ambient temperature (STa) and motor activity (MA) were measured in rats housed in a temperature gradient system with a 12:12-h photoperiod (lights on 0600 h). Tc and heart rate (HR) were monitored by telemetry. During the light phase, STa, Tc, HR, and MA were relatively stable with values 29.0 degrees C, 37.1 degrees C, 310 beats/min, and 1-2 m/h, respectively. During the light-to-dark transition there were abrupt elevations in Tc, HR, and MA but no change in STa. STa decreased during the dark phase and reached a nadir of 23 degrees C at 0500 h. All variables recovered to basal levels within 3-4 h after the onset of the light phase. Overall, autonomic effectors control the elevation in Tc during the onset of the dark phase while behavioral effectors have little if any role. Behavioral thermoregulation is important in two ways: 1) the selection of cooler Ta values at night to prevent an excess elevation in Tc and 2) a preference for cooler Ta values before the light phase to facilitate the recovery of Tc. PMID:8048648

  20. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica Type III Secretion System Effector Proteins as Carriers for Heterologous Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Xu, Xin; Metelitsa, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella enterica have a high potential as carriers of recombinant vaccines. The type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent translocation of S. enterica can be deployed for delivery of heterologous antigens to antigen-presenting cells. Here we investigated the efficacy of various effector proteins of the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI2)-encoded T3SS for the translocation of model antigens and elicitation of immune responses. The SPI2 T3SS effector proteins SifA, SteC, SseL, SseJ, and SseF share an endosomal membrane-associated subcellular localization after translocation. We observed that all effector proteins could be used to translocate fusion proteins with the model antigens ovalbumin and listeriolysin into the cytosol of host cells. Under in vitro conditions, fusion proteins with SseJ and SteC stimulated T-cell responses that were superior to those triggered by fusion proteins with SseF. However, in mice vaccinated with Salmonella carrier strains, only fusion proteins based on SseJ or SifA elicited potent T-cell responses. These data demonstrate that the selection of an optimal SPI2 effector protein for T3SS-mediated translocation is a critical parameter for the rational design of effective Salmonella-based recombinant vaccines. PMID:22252866

  1. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease

    PubMed Central

    Boevink, Petra C.; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R.; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c–1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease. PMID:26822079

  2. The relationship of stress and blood pressure effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ayada, C; Toru, Ü; Korkut, Y

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated cardiovascular response to acute and chronic stresses increases the risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Stress also can be broadly defined as a disruption of homeostasis. The re-establishment and maintenance of homeostasis entail the coordinated activation and control of neuroendocrine and autonomic stress systems. Stressor-related information from all major sensory systems is conveyed to the brain.  Brain activates neural and neuroendocrine systems to minimize the harmful effects of stress. Stress is generally thought to contribute to the development of hypertension. On the other hand, the evidence is still inconclusive. It is generally accepted that stress-induced hypertension occurs because of increases in sympathoadrenal activity, which enhances vascular tone, but complete α-adrenoreceptor blockade cannot prevent the long-lasting vasoconstriction induced by sympathetic nerve stimulation. That is why it is suggested that sympathetic nerve-mediated vasoconstriction may also be mediated by factors other than catecholamines. In this review, we aim to present the relationship between blood pressure effectors and stress altogether, along with evaluating the relationship between stress and blood pressure. In this respect, we have identified topics to explain the relationship between stress and the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, glucocorticoids, endothelial nitric oxide, endothelin-1 and L-type Ca2+ channels. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2): 99-108.

  3. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  4. Effector discovery in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Mirzadi Gohari, Amir; Ware, Sarah B; Wittenberg, Alexander H J; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ben M'Barek, Sarrah; Verstappen, Els C P; van der Lee, Theo A J; Robert, Olivier; Schouten, Henk J; de Wit, Pierre P J G M; Kema, Gert H J

    2015-12-01

    Fungal plant pathogens, such as Zymoseptoria tritici (formerly known as Mycosphaerella graminicola), secrete repertoires of effectors to facilitate infection or trigger host defence mechanisms. The discovery and functional characterization of effectors provides valuable knowledge that can contribute to the design of new and effective disease management strategies. Here, we combined bioinformatics approaches with expression profiling during pathogenesis to identify candidate effectors of Z. tritici. In addition, a genetic approach was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) carrying putative effectors, enabling the validation of both complementary strategies for effector discovery. In planta expression profiling revealed that candidate effectors were up-regulated in successive waves corresponding to consecutive stages of pathogenesis, contrary to candidates identified by QTL mapping that were, overall, expressed at low levels. Functional analyses of two top candidate effectors (SSP15 and SSP18) showed their dispensability for Z. tritici pathogenesis. These analyses reveal that generally adopted criteria, such as protein size, cysteine residues and expression during pathogenesis, may preclude an unbiased effector discovery. Indeed, genetic mapping of genomic regions involved in specificity render alternative effector candidates that do not match the aforementioned criteria, but should nevertheless be considered as promising new leads for effectors that are crucial for the Z. tritici-wheat pathosystem. PMID:25727413

  5. Specific Conformational States of Ras GTPase upon Effector Binding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To uncover the structural and dynamical determinants involved in the highly specific binding of Ras GTPase to its effectors, the conformational states of Ras in uncomplexed form and complexed to the downstream effectors Byr2, PI3Kγ, PLCε, and RalGDS were investigated using molecular dynamics and cross-comparison of the trajectories. The subtle changes in the dynamics and conformations of Ras upon effector binding require an analysis that targets local changes independent of global motions. Using a structural alphabet, a computational procedure is proposed to quantify local conformational changes. Positions detected by this approach were characterized as either specific for a particular effector, specific for an effector domain type, or as effector unspecific. A set of nine structurally connected residues (Ras residues 5–8, 32–35, 39–42, 55–59, 73–78, and 161–165), which link the effector binding site to the distant C-terminus, changed dynamics upon effector binding, indicating a potential effector-unspecific signaling route within the Ras structure. Additional conformational changes were detected along the N-terminus of the central β-sheet. Besides the Ras residues at the effector interface (e.g., D33, E37, D38, and Y40), which adopt effector-specific local conformations, the binding signal propagates from the interface to distant hot-spot residues, in particular to Y5 and D57. The results of this study reveal possible conformational mechanisms for the stabilization of the active state of Ras upon downstream effector binding and for the structural determinants responsible for effector specificity. PMID:23316125

  6. Design and fabrication of an end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, F. R. E.; Umholtz, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The construction is described of a prototype mechanical hand or 'end effector' for use on a remotely controlled robot, but with possible application as a prosthetic device. An analysis of hand motions is reported, from which it is concluded that the two most important manipulations (apart from grasps) are to be able to pick up a tool and draw it into a nested grip against the palm, and to be able to hold a pistol-grip tool such as an electric drill and pull the trigger. A model was tested and found capable of both these operations.

  7. The Salmonella effector protein SifA plays a dual role in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weidong; Moest, Thomas; Zhao, Yaya; Guilhon, Aude-Agnès; Buffat, Christophe; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Méresse, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of Salmonella relies on the expression of effector proteins that the bacterium injects inside infected cells. Salmonella enters eukaryotic cells and resides in a vacuolar compartment on which a number of effector proteins such as SifA are found. SifA plays an essential role in Salmonella virulence. It is made of two distinct domains. The N-terminal domain of SifA interacts with the host protein SKIP. This interaction regulates vacuolar membrane dynamics. The C-terminal has a fold similar to other bacterial effector domains having a guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity. Although SifA interacts with RhoA, it does not stimulate the dissociation of GDP and the activation of this GTPase. Hence it remains unknown whether the C-terminal domain contributes to the function of SifA in virulence. We used a model of SKIP knockout mice to show that this protein mediates the host susceptibility to salmonellosis and to establish that SifA also contributes to Salmonella virulence independently of its interaction with SKIP. We establish that the C-terminal domain of SifA mediates this SKIP-independent contribution. Moreover, we show that the two domains of SifA are functionally linked and participate to the same signalling cascade that supports Salmonella virulence. PMID:26268777

  8. The Rab5 Effector Rabankyrin-5 Regulates and Coordinates Different Endocytic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 is a key regulator of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. On early endosomes, within a spatially restricted domain enriched in phosphatydilinositol-3-phosphate [PI(3)P], Rab5 coordinates a complex network of effectors that functionally cooperate in membrane tethering, fusion, and organelle motility. Here we discovered a novel PI(3)P-binding Rab5 effector, Rabankyrin-5, which localises to early endosomes and stimulates their fusion activity. In addition to early endosomes, however, Rabankyrin-5 localises to large vacuolar structures that correspond to macropinosomes in epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Overexpression of Rabankyrin-5 increases the number of macropinosomes and stimulates fluid-phase uptake, whereas its downregulation inhibits these processes. In polarised epithelial cells, this function is primarily restricted to the apical membrane. Rabankyrin-5 localises to large pinocytic structures underneath the apical surface of kidney proximal tubule cells, and its overexpression in polarised Madin-Darby canine kidney cells stimulates apical but not basolateral, non-clathrin-mediated pinocytosis. In demonstrating a regulatory role in endosome fusion and (macro)pinocytosis, our studies suggest that Rab5 regulates and coordinates different endocytic mechanisms through its effector Rabankyrin-5. Furthermore, its active role in apical pinocytosis in epithelial cells suggests an important function of Rabankyrin-5 in the physiology of polarised cells. PMID:15328530

  9. TAL Effector-Nucleotide Targeter (TALE-NT) 2.0: tools for TAL effector design and target prediction

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Erin L.; Booher, Nicholas J.; Standage, Daniel S.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Brendel, Volker P.; VanDyk, John K.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are repeat-containing proteins used by plant pathogenic bacteria to manipulate host gene expression. Repeats are polymorphic and individually specify single nucleotides in the DNA target, with some degeneracy. A TAL effector-nucleotide binding code that links repeat type to specified nucleotide enables prediction of genomic binding sites for TAL effectors and customization of TAL effectors for use in DNA targeting, in particular as custom transcription factors for engineered gene regulation and as site-specific nucleases for genome editing. We have developed a suite of web-based tools called TAL Effector-Nucleotide Targeter 2.0 (TALE-NT 2.0; https://boglab.plp.iastate.edu/) that enables design of custom TAL effector repeat arrays for desired targets and prediction of TAL effector binding sites, ranked by likelihood, in a genome, promoterome or other sequence of interest. Search parameters can be set by the user to work with any TAL effector or TAL effector nuclease architecture. Applications range from designing highly specific DNA targeting tools and identifying potential off-target sites to predicting effector targets important in plant disease. PMID:22693217

  10. Melatonin controls experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by altering the T effector/regulatory balance.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Cruz-Chamorro, Ivan; López-González, Antonio; Utrilla, José C; Fernández-Santos, José M; Martínez-López, Alicia; Lardone, Patricia J; Guerrero, Juan M; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the experimental model for multiple sclerosis (MS), is triggered by myelin-specific Th1 and Th17 cells. The immunomodulatory activities of melatonin have been shown to be beneficial under several conditions in which the immune system is exacerbated. Here, we sought to elucidate the basis of the melatonin protective effect on EAE by characterizing the T effector/regulatory responses, particularly those of the memory cell subsets. Melatonin was tested for its effect on Th1, Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells in the lymph nodes and CNS of immunodominant peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (pMOG)-immunized and EAE mice, respectively. The capacity of melatonin to ameliorate EAE as well as modifying both T cell response and effector/regulatory balance was surveyed. T cell memory subsets and CD44, a key activation marker involved in the EAE pathogenesis, were also examined. Melatonin protected from EAE by decreasing peripheral and central Th1/Th17 responses and enhancing both the Treg frequency and IL-10 synthesis in the CNS. Melatonin reduced the T effector memory population and its pro-inflammatory response and regulated CD44 expression, which was decreased in T effector cells and increased in Tregs. The alterations in the T cell subpopulations were associated with a reduced mononuclear infiltration (CD4 and CD11b cells) of the melatonin-treated mice CNS. For the first time, we report that melatonin protects against EAE by controlling peripheral and central T effector/regulatory responses, effects that might be partially mediated by CD44. This immunomodulatory effect on EAE suggests that melatonin may represent an effective treatment option for MS. PMID:26130320

  11. Formins as effector proteins of Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Sonja; Geyer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Formin proteins were recognized as effectors of Rho GTPases some 15 years ago. They contribute to different cellular actin cytoskeleton structures by their ability to polymerize straight actin filaments at the barbed end. While not all formins necessarily interact with Rho GTPases, a subgroup of mammalian formins, termed Diaphanous-related formins or DRFs, were shown to be activated by small GTPases of the Rho superfamily. DRFs are autoinhibited in the resting state by an N- to C-terminal interaction that renders the central actin polymerization domain inactive. Upon the interaction with a GTP-bound Rho, Rac, or Cdc42 GTPase, the C-terminal autoregulation domain is displaced from its N-terminal recognition site and the formin becomes active to polymerize actin filaments. In this review we discuss the current knowledge on the structure, activation, and function of formin-GTPase interactions for the mammalian formin families Dia, Daam, FMNL, and FHOD. We describe both direct and indirect interactions of formins with GTPases, which lead to formin activation and cytoskeletal rearrangements. The multifaceted function of formins as effector proteins of Rho GTPases thus reflects the diversity of the actin cytoskeleton in cells. PMID:24914801

  12. RNA-activated DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR-Cas effector complex.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Michael A; Kuo, Fang-Ting; Bailey, Scott

    2016-02-15

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) system is an RNA-guided immune system that protects prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. This system represents an inheritable and adaptable immune system that is mediated by multisubunit effector complexes. In the Type III-B system, the Cmr effector complex has been found to cleave ssRNA in vitro. However, in vivo, it has been implicated in transcription-dependent DNA targeting. We show here that the Cmr complex from Thermotoga maritima can cleave an ssRNA target that is complementary to the CRISPR RNA. We also show that binding of a complementary ssRNA target activates an ssDNA-specific nuclease activity in the histidine-aspartate (HD) domain of the Cmr2 subunit of the complex. These data suggest a mechanism for transcription-coupled DNA targeting by the Cmr complex and provide a unifying mechanism for all Type III systems. PMID:26848046

  13. The Crystal Structure of TAL Effector PthXo1 Bound to Its DNA Target

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Amanda Nga-Sze; Bradley, Philip; Cernadas, Raul A.; Bogdanove, Adam J.; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2012-02-10

    DNA recognition by TAL effectors is mediated by tandem repeats, each 33 to 35 residues in length, that specify nucleotides via unique repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs). The crystal structure of PthXo1 bound to its DNA target was determined by high-throughput computational structure prediction and validated by heavy-atom derivatization. Each repeat forms a left-handed, two-helix bundle that presents an RVD-containing loop to the DNA. The repeats self-associate to form a right-handed superhelix wrapped around the DNA major groove. The first RVD residue forms a stabilizing contact with the protein backbone, while the second makes a base-specific contact to the DNA sense strand. Two degenerate amino-terminal repeats also interact with the DNA. Containing several RVDs and noncanonical associations, the structure illustrates the basis of TAL effector-DNA recognition.

  14. Potential effector and immunoregulatory functions of mast cells in mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Laurent L; Sibilano, Riccardo; Mukai, Kaori; Galli, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are cells of hematopoietic origin that normally reside in mucosal tissues, often near epithelial cells, glands, smooth muscle cells, and nerves. Best known for their contributions to pathology during IgE-associated disorders such as food allergy, asthma, and anaphylaxis, MCs are also thought to mediate IgE-associated effector functions during certain parasite infections. However, various MC populations also can be activated to express functional programs – such as secreting pre-formed and/or newly synthesized biologically active products – in response to encounters with products derived from diverse pathogens, other host cells (including leukocytes and structural cells), damaged tissue, or the activation of the complement or coagulation systems, as well as by signals derived from the external environment (including animal toxins, plant products, and physical agents). In this review, we will discuss evidence suggesting that MCs can perform diverse effector and immunoregulatory roles that contribute to homeostasis or pathology in mucosal tissues. PMID:25669149

  15. Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Effector Translocation into Host Cells Using Beta-lactamase Effector Fusions.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Manuel; Zobiak, Bernd; Nauth, Theresa; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria including pathogenic Yersinia spp. employ type III secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells. Inside the host cell the effector proteins manipulate cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. To better understand the control of type III secretion during host cell interaction, sensitive and accurate assays to measure translocation are required. We here describe the application of an assay based on the fusion of a Yersinia enterocolitica effector protein fragment (Yersinia outer protein; YopE) with TEM-1 beta-lactamase for quantitative analysis of translocation. The assay relies on cleavage of a cell permeant FRET dye (CCF4/AM) by translocated beta-lactamase fusion. After cleavage of the cephalosporin core of CCF4 by the beta-lactamase, FRET from coumarin to fluorescein is disrupted and excitation of the coumarin moiety leads to blue fluorescence emission. Different applications of this method have been described in the literature highlighting its versatility. The method allows for analysis of translocation in vitro and also in in vivo, e.g., in a mouse model. Detection of the fluorescence signals can be performed using plate readers, FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy. In the setup described here, in vitro translocation of effector fusions into HeLa cells by different Yersinia mutants is monitored by laser scanning microscopy. Recording intracellular conversion of the FRET reporter by the beta-lactamase effector fusion in real-time provides robust quantitative results. We here show exemplary data, demonstrating increased translocation by a Y. enterocolitica YopE mutant compared to the wild type strain. PMID:26484613

  16. Bioinformatic analysis of expression data to identify effector candidates.

    PubMed

    Reid, Adam J; Jones, John T

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens produce effectors that manipulate the host to the benefit of the pathogen. These effectors are often secreted proteins that are upregulated during the early phases of infection. These properties can be used to identify candidate effectors from genomes and transcriptomes of pathogens. Here we describe commonly used bioinformatic approaches that (1) allow identification of genes encoding predicted secreted proteins within a genome and (2) allow the identification of genes encoding predicted secreted proteins that are upregulated at important stages of the life cycle. Other approaches for bioinformatic identification of effector candidates, including OrthoMCL analysis to identify expanded gene families, are also described. PMID:24643549

  17. Mcl-1 antagonizes Bax/Bak to promote effector CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, P; Koss, B; Opferman, J T; Hildeman, D A

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Bcl-2 family have critical roles in regulating tissue homeostasis by modulating apoptosis. Anti-apoptotic molecules physically interact and restrain pro-apoptotic family members preventing the induction of cell death. However, the specificity of the functional interactions between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members remains unclear. The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bcl-2 interacting mediator of death (Bim) has a critical role in promoting the death of activated, effector T cells following viral infections. Although Bcl-2 is an important Bim antagonist in effector T cells, and Bcl-xL is not required for effector T-cell survival, the roles of other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in regulating effector T-cell responses in vivo. We found, at the peak of the response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, that Mcl-1 expression was increased in activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Retroviral overexpression of Mcl-1-protected activated T cells from death, whereas deletion of Mcl-1 during the course of infection led to a massive loss of LCMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the co-deletion of Bim failed to prevent the loss of Mcl-1-deficient T cells. Furthermore, lck-driven overexpression of a Bcl-xL transgene only partially rescued Mcl-1-deficient effector T cells suggesting a lack of redundancy between the family members. In contrast, additional loss of Bax and Bak completely rescued Mcl-1-deficient effector T-cell number and function, without enhancing T-cell proliferation. These data suggest that Mcl-1 is critical for promoting effector T-cell responses, but does so by combating pro-apoptotic molecules beyond Bim. PMID:23558951

  18. Comparison of gene activation by two TAL effectors from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis reveals candidate host susceptibility genes in cassava.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Megan; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2016-08-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) employs transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to promote bacterial growth and symptom formation during infection of cassava. TAL effectors are secreted via the bacterial type III secretion system into plant cells, where they are directed to the nucleus, bind DNA in plant promoters and activate the expression of downstream genes. The DNA-binding activity of TAL effectors is carried out by a central domain which contains a series of repeat variable diresidues (RVDs) that dictate the sequence of bound nucleotides. TAL14Xam668 promotes virulence in Xam strain Xam668 and has been shown to activate multiple cassava genes. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to identify the full target repertoire of TAL14Xam668 in cassava, which includes over 50 genes. A subset of highly up-regulated genes was tested for activation by TAL14CIO151 from Xam strain CIO151. Although TAL14CIO151 and TAL14Xam668 differ by only a single RVD, they display differential activation of gene targets. TAL14CIO151 complements the TAL14Xam668 mutant defect, implying that shared target genes are important for TAL14Xam668 -mediated disease susceptibility. Complementation with closely related TAL effectors is a novel approach to the narrowing down of biologically relevant susceptibility genes of TAL effectors with multiple targets. This study provides an example of how TAL effector target activation by two strains within a single species of Xanthomonas can be dramatically affected by a small change in RVD-nucleotide affinity at a single site, and reflects the parameters of RVD-nucleotide interaction determined using designer TAL effectors in transient systems. PMID:26575863

  19. Immunization with genetically attenuated P52-deficient Plasmodium berghei sporozoites induces a long-lasting effector memory CD8+ T cell response in the liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The induction of sterile immunity and long lasting protection against malaria has been effectively achieved by immunization with sporozoites attenuated by gamma-irradiation or through deletion of genes. For mice immunized with radiation attenuated sporozoites (RAS) it has been shown that intrahepatic effector memory CD8+ T cells are critical for protection. Recent studies have shown that immunization with genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) in mice is also conferred by liver effector memory CD8+ T cells. Findings In this study we analysed effector memory cell responses after immunization of GAP that lack the P52 protein. We demonstrate that immunization with p52-GAP sporozoites also results in a strong increase of effector memory CD8+ T cells, even 6 months after immunization, whereas no specific CD4+ effector T cells response could be detected. In addition, we show that the increase of effector memory CD8+ T cells is specific for the liver and not for the spleen or lymph nodes. Conclusions These results indicate that immunization of mice with P. berghei p52-GAP results in immune responses that are comparable to those induced by RAS or GAP lacking expression of UIS3 or UIS4, with an important role implicated for intrahepatic effector memory CD8+ T cells. The knowledge of the mediators of protective immunity after immunization with different GAP is important for the further development of vaccines consisting of genetically attenuated sporozoites. PMID:22004696

  20. Lytic effector cell function in schizophrenia and depression.

    PubMed

    Urch, A; Müller, C; Aschauer, H; Resch, F; Zielinski, C C

    1988-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) were tested in patients with schizophrenia or depression. It was found that NK activity as well as ADCC were significantly lower in both groups, as compared to healthy control individuals (P less than 0.001). Psychopharmacologic treatment with neuroleptics and antidepressives resulted in a significant increase in NK activity and ADCC (P less than 0.005) in patients with schizophrenia but not in treated patients with depression. In patients with schizophrenia, no correlation could be established between the dose of neuroleptic given and the increase in NK activity. Lithium also did not produce an increase in NK activity and ADCC. The addition of serum, derived from untreated patients with schizophrenia, to cell cultures in concentrations of 10 and 20% had an inhibitory effect upon the ADCC and, to a lesser degree, upon NK activity (20% serum concentration only); sera from treatment schizophrenics produced no inhibition of NK activity, but did affect ADCC. No serum-derived inhibitory effect upon either NK activity or ADCC was found to be present in sera from patients with depression. We conclude that lytic effector mechanisms are impaired in patients with schizophrenia or depression and that this defect is reversed in schizophrenic patients on treatment, but not in depressives on therapy. Patients with schizophrenia also tend to have a reversible serum-mediated inhibition of NK activity which is absent in patients with depression. PMID:2898486

  1. Effector and regulatory T cell subsets in diabetes-associated inflammation. Is there a connection with ST2/IL-33 axis? Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ryba-Stanisławowska, Monika; Stanisławowski, Marcin; Myśliwska, Jolanta

    2014-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (DM1) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which when progresses leads to the development of late vascular complications. The disease involves impairments in regulatory and effector subsets of T lymphocytes, which suppress and maintain inflammatory response, respectively. ST2/IL-33 pathway is involved in T-cell-mediated immune response and might regulate the inflammatory process in several diseases. This review presents the latest research findings regarding effector and regulatory T cell subsets in the context of inflammation accompanying DM1 with particular focus on the ST2/IL-33 network and its possible association with T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:24547981

  2. Miniature Trailing Edge Effector for Aerodynamic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae (Inventor); Bieniawski, Stefan R. (Inventor); Kroo, Ilan M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improved miniature trailing edge effectors for aerodynamic control are provided. Three types of devices having aerodynamic housings integrated to the trailing edge of an aerodynamic shape are presented, which vary in details of how the control surface can move. A bucket type device has a control surface which is the back part of a C-shaped member having two arms connected by the back section. The C-shaped section is attached to a housing at the ends of the arms, and is rotatable about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down and neutral states. A flip-up type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down, neutral and brake states. A rotating type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the chord line to provide up, down and neutral states.

  3. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily. PMID:26874289

  4. Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malladi, Narasimha

    1993-01-01

    NASA is developing a mechanism to manipulate and insert Racks into the Space Station Logistic modules. The mechanism consists of the following: a base with three motorized degrees of freedom, a 3 section motorized boom that goes from 15 to 44 feet in length, and a Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) with 5 hand wheels for precise alignment. The robotics section was tasked with the automation of the RIEE unit. In this report, for the automation of the RIEE unit, application of the Perceptics Vision System was conceptually developed to determine the position and orientation of the RIEE relative to the logistic module, and a MathCad program is written to display the needed displacements for precise alignment and final insertion of the Rack. The uniqueness of this report is that the whole report is in fact a MathCad program including text, derivations, and executable equations with example inputs and outputs.

  5. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects. PMID:26143263

  6. Acquisition of effector-specific and effector-independent components of sequencing skill.

    PubMed

    Berner, Michael P; Hoffman, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In a serial reaction time task, participants practiced a repeating sequence with 1 hand. In interleaved blocks, they responded to random sequences with the other hand. Experiment 1 was composed of 5 sessions, each consisting of 30 blocks. Intermanual transfer, reflecting a hand-independent component of sequence knowledge, increased across session. A smaller but significant, nontransferable, and hand-specific component was evident in each session and did not increase with practice. Experiment 2 comprised only 1 session. Uninterrupted practice (no interleaved random blocks) improved hand-independent sequence learning in comparison with interrupted practice (as implemented in Experiment 1), whereas hand-specific sequence learning was unaffected by this between-subjects manipulation. These findings suggest separate mechanisms for effector-independent sequence learning and effector-specific acquisition of optimized response coarticulation. PMID:19073469

  7. Computational Prediction of Effector Proteins in Fungi: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K; Bélanger, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Effector proteins are mostly secretory proteins that stimulate plant infection by manipulating the host response. Identifying fungal effector proteins and understanding their function is of great importance in efforts to curb losses to plant diseases. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have facilitated the availability of several fungal genomes and 1000s of transcriptomes. As a result, the growing amount of genomic information has provided great opportunities to identify putative effector proteins in different fungal species. There is little consensus over the annotation and functionality of effector proteins, and mostly small secretory proteins are considered as effector proteins, a concept that tends to overestimate the number of proteins involved in a plant-pathogen interaction. With the characterization of Avr genes, criteria for computational prediction of effector proteins are becoming more efficient. There are 100s of tools available for the identification of conserved motifs, signature sequences and structural features in the proteins. Many pipelines and online servers, which combine several tools, are made available to perform genome-wide identification of effector proteins. In this review, available tools and pipelines, their strength and limitations for effective identification of fungal effector proteins are discussed. We also present an exhaustive list of classically secreted proteins along with their key conserved motifs found in 12 common plant pathogens (11 fungi and one oomycete) through an analytical pipeline. PMID:26904083

  8. Nematode effector proteins: an emerging paradigm of parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytonematodes use a stylet and secreted effectors to invade host tissues and extract nutrients to support their growth and development. The molecular function of nematode effectors is currently the subject of intense investigation. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of nematode ...

  9. Computational Prediction of Effector Proteins in Fungi: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K.; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Effector proteins are mostly secretory proteins that stimulate plant infection by manipulating the host response. Identifying fungal effector proteins and understanding their function is of great importance in efforts to curb losses to plant diseases. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have facilitated the availability of several fungal genomes and 1000s of transcriptomes. As a result, the growing amount of genomic information has provided great opportunities to identify putative effector proteins in different fungal species. There is little consensus over the annotation and functionality of effector proteins, and mostly small secretory proteins are considered as effector proteins, a concept that tends to overestimate the number of proteins involved in a plant–pathogen interaction. With the characterization of Avr genes, criteria for computational prediction of effector proteins are becoming more efficient. There are 100s of tools available for the identification of conserved motifs, signature sequences and structural features in the proteins. Many pipelines and online servers, which combine several tools, are made available to perform genome-wide identification of effector proteins. In this review, available tools and pipelines, their strength and limitations for effective identification of fungal effector proteins are discussed. We also present an exhaustive list of classically secreted proteins along with their key conserved motifs found in 12 common plant pathogens (11 fungi and one oomycete) through an analytical pipeline. PMID:26904083

  10. Fungal effector Ecp6 outcompetes host immune receptor for chitin binding through intrachain LysM dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Kombrink, Anja; Hansen, Guido; Valkenburg, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    While host immune receptors detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns to activate immunity, pathogens attempt to deregulate host immunity through secreted effectors. Fungi employ LysM effectors to prevent recognition of cell wall-derived chitin by host immune receptors, although the mechanism to compete for chitin binding remained unclear. Structural analysis of the LysM effector Ecp6 of the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum reveals a novel mechanism for chitin binding, mediated by intrachain LysM dimerization, leading to a chitin-binding groove that is deeply buried in the effector protein. This composite binding site involves two of the three LysMs of Ecp6 and mediates chitin binding with ultra-high (pM) affinity. Intriguingly, the remaining singular LysM domain of Ecp6 binds chitin with low micromolar affinity but can nevertheless still perturb chitin-triggered immunity. Conceivably, the perturbation by this LysM domain is not established through chitin sequestration but possibly through interference with the host immune receptor complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00790.001 PMID:23840930

  11. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  12. Tissue Specific Heterogeneity in Effector Immune Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Saba; Badrealam, Khan Farheen; Sherwani, Asif; Gupta, Umesh D.; Owais, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct “homing codes” (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors) during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A) and sunlight (vitamin D3) prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centre stage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue-tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues along with giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells. PMID:23986763

  13. Complement Effectors of Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Fluid Correlate with Clinical Measures of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Laura A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Perkins, Amy M.; Shah, Tushar A.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2015-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), lung damage is mediated by a cycle of obstruction, infection, and inflammation. Here we explored complement inflammatory effectors in CF lung fluid. In this study soluble fractions (sols) from sputum samples of 15 CF patients were assayed for complement effectors and analyzed with clinical measurements. The pro-inflammatory peptide C5a was increased 4.8-fold (P = 0.04) in CF sols compared with controls. Incubation of CF sols with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus increased C5a concentration 2.3-fold (P = 0.02). A peptide inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) completely blocked the increase in C5a concentration from P. aeruginosa in CF sol in vitro (P = 0.001). C5a concentration in CF sol correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI) percentile in children (r = -0.77, P = 0.04). C3a, which has anti-inflammatory effects, correlated positively with FEV1% predicted (rs = 0.63, P = 0.02). These results suggest that complement effectors may significantly impact inflammation in CF lung fluid. PMID:26642048

  14. Lysine11-Linked Polyubiquitination of the AnkB F-Box Effector of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Bruckert, William M.

    2015-01-01

    The fate of the polyubiquitinated protein is determined by the lysine linkages involved in the polymerization of the ubiquitin monomers, which has seven lysine residues (K6, K11, K27, K29, K33, K48, and K63). The translocated AnkB effector of the intravacuolar pathogen Legionella pneumophila is a bona fide F-box protein, which is localized to the cytosolic side of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) and is essential for intravacuolar proliferation within macrophages and amoebae. The F-box domain of AnkB interacts with the host SCF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase that triggers the decoration of the LCV with K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins that are targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here we report that AnkB becomes rapidly polyubiquitinated within the host cell, and this modification is independent of the F-box domain of AnkB, indicating host-mediated polyubiquitination. We show that the AnkB effector interacts specifically with the host E3 ubiquitin ligase Trim21. Mass spectrometry analyses have shown that AnkB is modified by K11-linked polyubiquitination, which has no effect on its stability. This work shows the first example of K11-linked polyubiquitination of a bacterial effector and its interaction with the host Trim21 ubiquitin ligase. PMID:26483404

  15. Action selection in multi-effector decision making

    PubMed Central

    Madlon-Kay, Seth; Pesaran, Bijan; Daw, Nathaniel D.

    2012-01-01

    Decision making and reinforcement learning over movements suffer from the curse of dimensionality: the space of possible movements is too vast to search or even represent in its entirety. When actions involve only a single effector, this problem can be ameliorated by considering that effector separately; accordingly, the brain’s sensorimotor systems can subdivide choice by representing values and actions separately for each effector. However, for many actions, such as playing the piano, the value of an action by an effector (e.g., a hand) depends inseparably on the actions of other effectors. By definition, the values of such coordinated multi-effector actions cannot be represented by effector-specific action values, such as those that have been most extensively investigated in parietal and premotor regions. For such actions, one possible solution is to choose according to more abstract valuations over different goods or options, which can then be mapped onto the necessary motor actions. Such an approach separates the learning and decision problem, which will often be lower-dimensional than the space of possible movements, from the multi-effector movement planning problem. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is thought to contain goods-based value signals, so we hypothesized that this region might preferentially drive multi-effector action selection. To examine how the brain solves this problem, we used fMRI to compare patterns of BOLD activity in humans during reward learning tasks in which options were selected through either unimanual or bimanual actions, and in which the response requirements in the latter condition inseparably coupled valuation across both hands. We found value signals in the bilateral medial motor cortex and vmPFC, and consistent with previous studies, the medial motor value signals contained contra-lateral biases indicating effector-specificity, while the vmPFC value signals did not exhibit detectable effector specificity. Although

  16. Epigenetic Control of Effector Gene Expression in the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Leptosphaeria maculans

    PubMed Central

    Soyer, Jessica L.; El Ghalid, Mennat; Glaser, Nicolas; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Linglin, Juliette; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael; Rouxel, Thierry; Fudal, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of small secreted proteins (SSPs) acting as effectors that modulate host immunity to facilitate infection. SSP-encoding genes are often located in particular genomic environments and show waves of concerted expression at diverse stages of plant infection. To date, little is known about the regulation of their expression. The genome of the Ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans comprises alternating gene-rich GC-isochores and gene-poor AT-isochores. The AT-isochores harbor mosaics of transposable elements, encompassing one-third of the genome, and are enriched in putative effector genes that present similar expression patterns, namely no expression or low-level expression during axenic cultures compared to strong induction of expression during primary infection of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Here, we investigated the involvement of one specific histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 methylation (H3K9me3), in epigenetic regulation of concerted effector gene expression in L. maculans. For this purpose, we silenced the expression of two key players in heterochromatin assembly and maintenance, HP1 and DIM-5 by RNAi. By using HP1-GFP as a heterochromatin marker, we observed that almost no chromatin condensation is visible in strains in which LmDIM5 was silenced by RNAi. By whole genome oligoarrays we observed overexpression of 369 or 390 genes, respectively, in the silenced-LmHP1 and -LmDIM5 transformants during growth in axenic culture, clearly favouring expression of SSP-encoding genes within AT-isochores. The ectopic integration of four effector genes in GC-isochores led to their overexpression during growth in axenic culture. These data strongly suggest that epigenetic control, mediated by HP1 and DIM-5, represses the expression of at least part of the effector genes located in AT-isochores during growth in axenic culture. Our hypothesis is that changes of lifestyle and a switch toward pathogenesis lift chromatin-mediated

  17. Epigenetic control of effector gene expression in the plant pathogenic fungus Leptosphaeria maculans.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Jessica L; El Ghalid, Mennat; Glaser, Nicolas; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Linglin, Juliette; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Connolly, Lanelle R; Freitag, Michael; Rouxel, Thierry; Fudal, Isabelle

    2014-03-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of small secreted proteins (SSPs) acting as effectors that modulate host immunity to facilitate infection. SSP-encoding genes are often located in particular genomic environments and show waves of concerted expression at diverse stages of plant infection. To date, little is known about the regulation of their expression. The genome of the Ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans comprises alternating gene-rich GC-isochores and gene-poor AT-isochores. The AT-isochores harbor mosaics of transposable elements, encompassing one-third of the genome, and are enriched in putative effector genes that present similar expression patterns, namely no expression or low-level expression during axenic cultures compared to strong induction of expression during primary infection of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Here, we investigated the involvement of one specific histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 methylation (H3K9me3), in epigenetic regulation of concerted effector gene expression in L. maculans. For this purpose, we silenced the expression of two key players in heterochromatin assembly and maintenance, HP1 and DIM-5 by RNAi. By using HP1-GFP as a heterochromatin marker, we observed that almost no chromatin condensation is visible in strains in which LmDIM5 was silenced by RNAi. By whole genome oligoarrays we observed overexpression of 369 or 390 genes, respectively, in the silenced-LmHP1 and -LmDIM5 transformants during growth in axenic culture, clearly favouring expression of SSP-encoding genes within AT-isochores. The ectopic integration of four effector genes in GC-isochores led to their overexpression during growth in axenic culture. These data strongly suggest that epigenetic control, mediated by HP1 and DIM-5, represses the expression of at least part of the effector genes located in AT-isochores during growth in axenic culture. Our hypothesis is that changes of lifestyle and a switch toward pathogenesis lift chromatin-mediated

  18. The Piriformospora indica effector PIIN_08944 promotes the mutualistic Sebacinalean symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Akum, Fidele N.; Steinbrenner, Jens; Biedenkopf, Dagmar; Imani, Jafargholi; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic and mutualistic microbes actively suppress plant defense by secreting effector proteins to manipulate the host responses for their own benefit. Current knowledge about fungal effectors has been mainly derived from biotrophic and hemibiotrophic plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes with restricted host range. We studied colonization strategies of the root endophytic basidiomycete Piriformospora indica that colonizes a wide range of plant species thereby establishing long-term mutualistic relationships. The release of P. indica’s genome helped to identify hundreds of genes coding for candidate effectors and provides an opportunity to investigate the role of those proteins in a mutualistic symbiosis. We demonstrate that the candidate effector PIIN_08944 plays a crucial role during fungal colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. PIIN_08944 expression was detected during chlamydospore germination, and fungal deletion mutants (PiΔ08944) showed delayed root colonization. Constitutive over-expression of PIIN_08944 in Arabidopsis rescued the delayed colonization phenotype of the deletion mutant. PIIN_08944-expressing Arabidopsis showed a reduced expression of flg22-induced marker genes of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and the salicylic acid (SA) defense pathway, and expression of PIIN_08944 in barley reduced the burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by flg22 and chitin. These data suggest that PIIN_08944 contributes to root colonization by P. indica by interfering with SA-mediated basal immune responses of the host plant. Consistent with this, PIIN_08944-expressing Arabidopsis also supported the growth of the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis while growth of the necrotrophic fungi Botrytis cinerea on Arabidopsis and Fusarium graminearum on barley was not affected. PMID:26579156

  19. Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malladi, Narasimha S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA-KSC has developed a mechanism to handle and insert Racks into the Space Station Logistic Modules. This mechanism consists of a Base with 3 motorized degrees of freedom, a 3 section motorized Boom that goes from 15 to 44 feet in length, and a Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) with 5 hand wheels for precise alignment. During the 1993 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC, I designed an Active Vision (Camera) Arrangement and developed an algorithm to determine (1) the displacements required by the Room for its initial positioning and (2) the rotations required at the five hand-wheels of the RIEE, for the insertion of the Rack, using the centroids fo the Camera Images of the Location Targets in the Logistic Module. Presently, during the summer of '94, I completed the preliminary design of an easily portable measuring instrument using encoders to obtain the 3-Dimensional Coordinates of Location Targets in the Logistics Module relative to the RIEE mechanism frame. The algorithm developed in '93 can use the output of this instrument also. Simplification of the '93 work and suggestions for the future work are discussed.

  20. Human Urinary Exosomes as Innate Immune Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Thomas F.; Charles, Philip D.; Gracia, Tannia; Hester, Svenja S.; Gatto, Laurent; Al-Lamki, Rafia; Floto, R. Andres; Su, Ya; Skepper, Jeremy N.

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles, approximately 50 nm in diameter, derived from the endocytic pathway and released by a variety of cell types. Recent data indicate a spectrum of exosomal functions, including RNA transfer, antigen presentation, modulation of apoptosis, and shedding of obsolete protein. Exosomes derived from all nephron segments are also present in human urine, where their function is unknown. Although one report suggested in vitro uptake of exosomes by renal cortical collecting duct cells, most studies of human urinary exosomes have focused on biomarker discovery rather than exosome function. Here, we report results from in-depth proteomic analyses and EM showing that normal human urinary exosomes are significantly enriched for innate immune proteins that include antimicrobial proteins and peptides and bacterial and viral receptors. Urinary exosomes, but not the prevalent soluble urinary protein uromodulin (Tamm–Horsfall protein), potently inhibited growth of pathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli and induced bacterial lysis. Bacterial killing depended on exosome structural integrity and occurred optimally at the acidic pH typical of urine from omnivorous humans. Thus, exosomes are innate immune effectors that contribute to host defense within the urinary tract. PMID:24700864

  1. Bacterial secreted effectors and caspase-3 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Daniel M; McCormick, Beth A

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a critical process that intrinsically links organism survival to its ability to induce controlled death. Thus, functional apoptosis allows organisms to remove perceived threats to their survival by targeting those cells that it determines pose a direct risk. Central to this process are apoptotic caspases, enzymes that form a signalling cascade, converting danger signals via initiator caspases into activation of the executioner caspase, caspase-3. This enzyme begins disassembly of the cell by activating DNA degrading enzymes and degrading the cellular architecture. Interaction of pathogenic bacteria with caspases, and in particular, caspase-3, can therefore impact both host cell and bacterial survival. With roles outside cell death such as cell differentiation, control of signalling pathways and immunomodulation also being described for caspase-3, bacterial interactions with caspase-3 may be of far more significance in infection than previously recognized. In this review, we highlight the ways in which bacterial pathogens have evolved to subvert caspase-3 both through effector proteins that directly interact with the enzyme or by modulating pathways that influence its activation and activity. PMID:25262664

  2. Potato NPH3/RPT2-Like Protein StNRL1, Targeted by a Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector, Is a Susceptibility Factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; McLellan, Hazel; Naqvi, Shaista; He, Qin; Boevink, Petra C; Armstrong, Miles; Giuliani, Licida M; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Zhendong; Zhan, Jiasui; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Birch, Paul R J

    2016-05-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to manipulate host processes. We know little about how fungal and oomycete effectors target host proteins to promote susceptibility, yet such knowledge is vital to understand crop disease. We show that either transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, or stable transgenic expression in potato (Solanum tuberosum), of the Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector Pi02860 enhances leaf colonization by the pathogen. Expression of Pi02860 also attenuates cell death triggered by the P. infestans microbe-associated molecular pattern INF1, indicating that the effector suppresses pattern-triggered immunity. However, the effector does not attenuate cell death triggered by Cf4/Avr4 coexpression, showing that it does not suppress all cell death activated by cell surface receptors. Pi02860 interacts in yeast two-hybrid assays with potato NPH3/RPT2-LIKE1 (NRL1), a predicted CULLIN3-associated ubiquitin E3 ligase. Interaction of Pi02860 in planta was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. Virus-induced gene silencing of NRL1 in N. benthamiana resulted in reduced P. infestans colonization and accelerated INF1-mediated cell death, indicating that this host protein acts as a negative regulator of immunity. Moreover, whereas NRL1 virus-induced gene silencing had no effect on the ability of the P. infestans effector Avr3a to suppress INF1-mediated cell death, such suppression by Pi02860 was significantly attenuated, indicating that this activity of Pi02860 is mediated by NRL1. Transient overexpression of NRL1 resulted in the suppression of INF1-mediated cell death and enhanced P. infestans leaf colonization, demonstrating that NRL1 acts as a susceptibility factor to promote late blight disease. PMID:26966171

  3. Potato NPH3/RPT2-Like Protein StNRL1, Targeted by a Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector, Is a Susceptibility Factor1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Naqvi, Shaista; Boevink, Petra C.; Armstrong, Miles; Giuliani, Licida M.; Zhan, Jiasui; Birch, Paul R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to manipulate host processes. We know little about how fungal and oomycete effectors target host proteins to promote susceptibility, yet such knowledge is vital to understand crop disease. We show that either transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, or stable transgenic expression in potato (Solanum tuberosum), of the Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector Pi02860 enhances leaf colonization by the pathogen. Expression of Pi02860 also attenuates cell death triggered by the P. infestans microbe-associated molecular pattern INF1, indicating that the effector suppresses pattern-triggered immunity. However, the effector does not attenuate cell death triggered by Cf4/Avr4 coexpression, showing that it does not suppress all cell death activated by cell surface receptors. Pi02860 interacts in yeast two-hybrid assays with potato NPH3/RPT2-LIKE1 (NRL1), a predicted CULLIN3-associated ubiquitin E3 ligase. Interaction of Pi02860 in planta was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. Virus-induced gene silencing of NRL1 in N. benthamiana resulted in reduced P. infestans colonization and accelerated INF1-mediated cell death, indicating that this host protein acts as a negative regulator of immunity. Moreover, whereas NRL1 virus-induced gene silencing had no effect on the ability of the P. infestans effector Avr3a to suppress INF1-mediated cell death, such suppression by Pi02860 was significantly attenuated, indicating that this activity of Pi02860 is mediated by NRL1. Transient overexpression of NRL1 resulted in the suppression of INF1-mediated cell death and enhanced P. infestans leaf colonization, demonstrating that NRL1 acts as a susceptibility factor to promote late blight disease. PMID:26966171

  4. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOEpatents

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot. 12 figures.

  5. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOEpatents

    Burry, David B.; Williams, Paul M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  6. Fibrocytes: emerging effector cells in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reilkoff, Ronald A.; Bucala, Richard; Herzog, Erica L.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrocytes are mesenchymal cells that arise from monocyte precursors. They are present in injured organs and have both the inflammatory features of macrophages and the tissue remodelling properties of fibroblasts. Chronic inflammatory stimuli mediate the differentiation, trafficking and accumulation of these cells in fibrosing conditions associated with autoimmunity, cardiovascular disease and asthma. This Opinion article discusses the immunological mediators controlling fibrocyte differentiation and recruitment, describes the association of fibrocytes with chronic inflammatory diseases and compares the potential roles of fibrocytes in these disorders with those of macrophages and fibroblasts. It is hoped that this information prompts new opportunities for the study of these unique cells. PMID:21597472

  7. Specific in planta recognition of two GKLR proteins of the downy mildew Bremia lactucae revealed in a large effector screen in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Joost H M; den Boer, Erik; Vergeer, Pim W J; Andel, Annemiek; Ellendorff, Ursula; Pelgrom, Koen; Pel, Mathieu; Schut, Johan; Zonneveld, Olaf; Jeuken, Marieke J W; Van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2013-11-01

    Breeding lettuce (Lactuca sativa) for resistance to the downy mildew pathogen Bremia lactucae is mainly achieved by introgression of dominant downy mildew resistance (Dm) genes. New Bremia races quickly render Dm genes ineffective, possibly by mutation of recognized host-translocated effectors or by suppression of effector-triggered immunity. We have previously identified 34 potential RXLR(-like) effector proteins of B. lactucae that were here tested for specific recognition within a collection of 129 B. lactucae-resistant Lactuca lines. Two effectors triggered a hypersensitive response: BLG01 in 52 lines, predominantly L. saligna, and BLG03 in two L. sativa lines containing Dm2 resistance. The N-terminal sequences of BLG01 and BLG03, containing the signal peptide and GKLR variant of the RXLR translocation motif, are not required for in planta recognition but function in effector delivery. The locus responsible for BLG01 recognition maps to the bottom of lettuce chromosome 9, whereas recognition of BLG03 maps in the RGC2 cluster on chromosome 2. Lactuca lines that recognize the BLG effectors are not resistant to Bremia isolate Bl:24 that expresses both BLG genes, suggesting that Bl:24 can suppress the triggered immune responses. In contrast, lettuce segregants displaying Dm2-mediated resistance to Bremia isolate Bl:5 are responsive to BLG03, suggesting that BLG03 is a candidate Avr2 protein. PMID:23883357

  8. Experimental approaches to investigate effector translocation into host cells in the Ustilago maydis/maize pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Djamei, Armin; Presti, Libera Lo; Schipper, Kerstin; Winterberg, Sarah; Amati, Simone; Becker, Dirk; Büchner, Heike; Kumlehn, Jochen; Reissmann, Stefanie; Kahmann, Regine

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Ustilago maydis is a pathogen that establishes a biotrophic interaction with Zea mays. The interaction with the plant host is largely governed by more than 300 novel, secreted protein effectors, of which only four have been functionally characterized. Prerequisite to examine effector function is to know where effectors reside after secretion. Effectors can remain in the extracellular space, i.e. the plant apoplast (apoplastic effectors), or can cross the plant plasma membrane and exert their function inside the host cell (cytoplasmic effectors). The U. maydis effectors lack conserved motifs in their primary sequences that could allow a classification of the effectome into apoplastic/cytoplasmic effectors. This represents a significant obstacle in functional effector characterization. Here we describe our attempts to establish a system for effector classification into apoplastic and cytoplasmic members, using U. maydis for effector delivery. PMID:26118724

  9. A Pathogen Type III Effector with a Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Skarina, Tatiana; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Egler, Monique; Srikumar, Tharan; Raught, Brian; Lee, Justin; Scheel, Dierk; Savchenko, Alexei; Bonas, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Type III effectors are virulence factors of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens delivered directly into host cells by the type III secretion nanomachine where they manipulate host cell processes such as the innate immunity and gene expression. Here, we show that the novel type III effector XopL from the model plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria exhibits E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and in planta, induces plant cell death and subverts plant immunity. E3 ligase activity is associated with the C-terminal region of XopL, which specifically interacts with plant E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes and mediates formation of predominantly K11-linked polyubiquitin chains. The crystal structure of the XopL C-terminal domain revealed a single domain with a novel fold, termed XL-box, not present in any previously characterized E3 ligase. Mutation of amino acids in the central cavity of the XL-box disrupts E3 ligase activity and prevents XopL-induced plant cell death. The lack of cysteine residues in the XL-box suggests the absence of thioester-linked ubiquitin-E3 ligase intermediates and a non-catalytic mechanism for XopL-mediated ubiquitination. The crystal structure of the N-terminal region of XopL confirmed the presence of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, which may serve as a protein-protein interaction module for ubiquitination target recognition. While the E3 ligase activity is required to provoke plant cell death, suppression of PAMP responses solely depends on the N-terminal LRR domain. Taken together, the unique structural fold of the E3 ubiquitin ligase domain within the Xanthomonas XopL is unprecedented and highlights the variation in bacterial pathogen effectors mimicking this eukaryote-specific activity. PMID:23359647

  10. Actin dynamics shape microglia effector functions.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Ria; Gertz, Karen; Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Tobias; Nolte, Christiane; Freyer, Dorette; Kettenmann, Helmut; Endres, Matthias; Kronenberg, Golo

    2016-06-01

    Impaired actin filament dynamics have been associated with cellular senescence. Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are emerging as a central pathophysiological player in neurodegeneration. Microglia activation, which ranges on a continuum between classical and alternative, may be of critical importance to brain disease. Using genetic and pharmacological manipulations, we studied the effects of alterations in actin dynamics on microglia effector functions. Disruption of actin dynamics did not affect transcription of genes involved in the LPS-triggered classical inflammatory response. By contrast, in consequence of impaired nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT6, genes involved in IL-4 induced alternative activation were strongly downregulated. Functionally, impaired actin dynamics resulted in reduced NO secretion and reduced release of TNFalpha and IL-6 from LPS-stimulated microglia and of IGF-1 from IL-4 stimulated microglia. However, pathological stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton increased LPS-induced release of IL-1beta and IL-18, which belong to an unconventional secretory pathway. Reduced NO release was associated with decreased cytoplasmic iNOS protein expression and decreased intracellular arginine uptake. Furthermore, disruption of actin dynamics resulted in reduced microglia migration, proliferation and phagocytosis. Finally, baseline and ATP-induced [Ca(2+)]int levels were significantly increased in microglia lacking gelsolin, a key actin-severing protein. Together, the dynamic state of the actin cytoskeleton profoundly and distinctly affects microglia behaviours. Disruption of actin dynamics attenuates M2 polarization by inhibiting transcription of alternative activation genes. In classical activation, the role of actin remodelling is complex, does not relate to gene transcription and shows a major divergence between cytokines following conventional and unconventional secretion. PMID:25989853

  11. An intelligent end-effector for a rehabilitation robot.

    PubMed

    Gosine, R G; Harwin, W S; Furby, L J; Jackson, R D

    1989-01-01

    A UMI RTX robot, modified with limited end-effector sensors and a restricted but effective vision system, is currently used in a developmental education setting for severely physically disabled children. The low physical and cognitive abilities of the children involved in the project require a semi-autonomous robot with environmental sensing capability to operate in a task oriented mode. A variety of low-cost sensors including proximity, distance, force and slip sensors, have been investigated for integration in end-effectors for the RTX robot. The sensors employed on a modified end-effector are detailed and experimental results are presented. A design for an end-effector with integrated sensors is discussed. The integration of the sensor information into a high-level, task-oriented programming language is detailed and examples of high-level control sequences using sensor inputs are presented. Finally, the development of intelligent gripping strategies based on sensor information is discussed. PMID:2733012

  12. Robotic end-effector for rewaterproofing shuttle tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manouchehri, Davoud; Hansen, Joseph M.; Wu, Cheng M.; Yamamoto, Brian S.; Graham, Todd

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes work by Rockwell International's Space Systems Division's Robotics Group at Downey, California. The work is part of a NASA-led team effort to automate Space Shuttle rewaterproofing in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center and the ferry facility at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Rockwell's effort focuses on the rewaterproofing end-effector, whose function is to inject hazardous dimethylethyloxysilane into thousands of ceramic tiles on the underside of the orbiter after each flight. The paper has five sections. First, it presents background on the present manual process. Second, end-effector requirements are presented, including safety and interface control. Third, a design is presented for the five end-effector systems: positioning, delivery, containment, data management, and command and control. Fourth, end-effector testing and integrating to the total system are described. Lastly, future applications for this technology are discussed.

  13. Gunite Scarifying End Effector. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    The Gunite Scarifying End Effector (GSEE) is designed to remove a layer of the gunite tank walls, which are contaminated with radioactivity. Removing this radioactivity is necessary to close the tank.

  14. Amotl2a interacts with the Hippo effector Yap1 and the Wnt/β-catenin effector Lef1 to control tissue size in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sobhika; Duquesne, Sandra; Liu, Kun; Boehm, Anton; Grimm, Lin; Link, Sandra; König, Sabine; Eimer, Stefan; Ronneberger, Olaf; Lecaudey, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    During development, proliferation must be tightly controlled for organs to reach their appropriate size. While the Hippo signaling pathway plays a major role in organ growth control, how it senses and responds to increased cell density is still unclear. In this study, we use the zebrafish lateral line primordium (LLP), a group of migrating epithelial cells that form sensory organs, to understand how tissue growth is controlled during organ formation. Loss of the cell junction-associated Motin protein Amotl2a leads to overproliferation and bigger LLP, affecting the final pattern of sensory organs. Amotl2a function in the LLP is mediated together by the Hippo pathway effector Yap1 and the Wnt/β-catenin effector Lef1. Our results implicate for the first time the Hippo pathway in size regulation in the LL system. We further provide evidence that the Hippo/Motin interaction is essential to limit tissue size during development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08201.001 PMID:26335201

  15. Design, testing and evaluation of latching end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, B.; Vandersluis, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Latching End Effector (LEE) forms part of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) for which Spar Aerospace Ltd, Space Systems Division is the prime contractor. The design, testing and performance evaluation of the Latching End Effector mechanisms is the subject of this paper focusing on: (1) ambient, thermal and vibration testing; (2) snare/rigidize performance testing and interaction during payload acquisition; and (3) latch/umbilical test results and performance.

  16. Views of the manipulator development facility end effector simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Closeup view of the manipulator development facility (MDF) during an end effector simulation showing the two specially made extensions deployed on April 16 by the STS 51-D crewmembers (30953); Medium closeup view of MDF. The white cylindar at right represents the Syncon IV (LEASAT) satellite. The robot device in the foreground is the forearm and end effector of a training version of the remote manipulator system (RMS). Attached to the arm's end are two flyswatter-like tools (30954-5).

  17. Ultraviolet B suppresses immunity by inhibiting effector and memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sabita; Byrne, Scott Napier; MacDonald, Linda Joanne; Chan, Carling Yan-Yan; Halliday, Gary Mark

    2008-04-01

    Contact hypersensitivity is a T-cell-mediated response to a hapten. Exposing C57BL/6 mice to UV B radiation systemically suppresses both primary and secondary contact hypersensitivity responses. The effects of UVB on in vivo T-cell responses during UVB-induced immunosuppression are unknown. We show here that UVB exposure, before contact sensitization, inhibits the expansion of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes and reduces the number of CD4+ and IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells infiltrating challenged ear skin. In the absence of UVB, at 10 weeks after initial hapten exposure, the ear skin of sensitized mice was infiltrated by dermal effector memory CD8+ T cells at the site of challenge. However, if mice were previously exposed to UVB, this cell population was absent, suggesting an impaired development of peripheral memory T cells. This finding occurred in the absence of UVB-induced regulatory CD4+ T cells and did not involve prostaglandin E2, suggesting that the importance of these two factors in mediating or initiating UVB-induced immunosuppression is dependent on UVB dose. Together these data indicate that in vivo T-cell responses are prone to immunoregulation by UVB, including a novel effect on both the activated T-cell pool size and the development of memory T cells in peripheral compartments. PMID:18292235

  18. S-maltoheptaose targets syndecan-bound effectors to reduce smoking-related neutrophilic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, David CL; Chan, Stanley CH; Mak, Judith CW; Freeman, Craig; Ip, Mary SM; Shum, Daisy KY

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke induces injury and neutrophilic inflammation in the airways of smokers. The stability and activity of inflammatory effectors, IL8 and neutrophil elastase (NE), can be prolonged by binding to airway heparan sulfate (HS)/syndecan-1, posing risk for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD). We hypothesize that antagonizing HS/syndecan-1 binding of the inflammatory effectors could reduce smoking-related neutrophil-mediated airway inflammation. Analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid(BALF) of COPD patients found both total and unopposed NE levels to be significantly higher among smokers with COPD than non-COPD subjects. Similar NE burden was observed in smoke-exposed rats compared to sham air controls. We chose sulfated-maltoheptaose(SM), a heparin-mimetic, to antagonize HS/sydecan-1 binding of the inflammatory mediators in airway fluids and lung tissues of the smoke-exposed rat model. Airway treatment with SM resulted in displacement of CINC-1 and NE from complexation with bronchio-epithelial HS/syndecan-1, dissipating the chemokine gradient for neutrophil flux across to the bronchial lumen. Following SM displacement of NE from shed HS/syndecan-1 in bronchial fluids, NE became accessible to inhibition by α1-antitrypsin endogenous in test samples. The antagonistic actions of SM against syndecan-1 binding of NE and CINC-1 in smoke-exposed airways suggest new therapeutic opportunities for modulating airway inflammation in smokers with SM delivery. PMID:26256047

  19. Characterization and DNA-Binding Specificities of Ralstonia TAL-Like Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. PMID:23300258

  20. Characterization and DNA-binding specificities of Ralstonia TAL-like effectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixin; Atef, Ahmed; Piatek, Agnieszka; Ali, Zahir; Piatek, Marek; Aouida, Mustapha; Sharakuu, Altanbadralt; Mahjoub, Ali; Wang, Guangchao; Khan, Suhail; Fedoroff, Nina V; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. PMID:23300258

  1. Ultraviolet B Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting Effector and Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sabita; Byrne, Scott Napier; MacDonald, Linda Joanne; Chan, Carling Yan-Yan; Halliday, Gary Mark

    2008-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity is a T-cell-mediated response to a hapten. Exposing C57BL/6 mice to UV B radiation systemically suppresses both primary and secondary contact hypersensitivity responses. The effects of UVB on in vivo T-cell responses during UVB-induced immunosuppression are unknown. We show here that UVB exposure, before contact sensitization, inhibits the expansion of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes and reduces the number of CD4+ and IFN-γ+ CD8+ T cells infiltrating challenged ear skin. In the absence of UVB, at 10 weeks after initial hapten exposure, the ear skin of sensitized mice was infiltrated by dermal effector memory CD8+ T cells at the site of challenge. However, if mice were previously exposed to UVB, this cell population was absent, suggesting an impaired development of peripheral memory T cells. This finding occurred in the absence of UVB-induced regulatory CD4+ T cells and did not involve prostaglandin E2, suggesting that the importance of these two factors in mediating or initiating UVB-induced immunosuppression is dependent on UVB dose. Together these data indicate that in vivo T-cell responses are prone to immunoregulation by UVB, including a novel effect on both the activated T-cell pool size and the development of memory T cells in peripheral compartments. PMID:18292235

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulator XBP-1 Contributes to Effector CD8+ T Cell Differentiation during Acute Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Bevan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor X-box-binding protein-1 (XBP-1) plays an essential role in activating the unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transcribed XBP-1 mRNA is converted to its active form by unconventional cytoplasmic splicing mediated by inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE-1) upon ER stress. We report activation of the IRE-1/XBP-1 pathway in effector CD8+ T cells during the response to acute infection. Transcription of unspliced XBP-1 mRNA is up-regulated by IL-2 signals, while its splicing is induced after TCR ligation. Splicing of XBP-1 mRNA was evident during the expansion of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells in response to viral or bacterial infection. An XBP-1 splicing reporter revealed that splicing activity was enriched in terminal effector cells expressing high levels of killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1). Overexpression of the spliced form of XBP-1 in CD8+ T cells enhanced KLRG1 expression during infection, whereas XBP-1−/− CD8+ T cells or cells expressing a dominant-negative form of XBP-1 showed a decreased proportion of KLRG1high effector cells. These results suggest that, in the response to pathogen, activation of ER stress sensors and XBP-1 splicing contribute to the differentiation of end-stage effector CD8+ T cells. PMID:18832700

  3. Antigen-specific CD4{sup +} effector T cells: Analysis of factors regulating clonal expansion and cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, Kazunobu; Watanabe, Yuri; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Watanabe, Shiho; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kotani, Motoko; Kozono, Haruo; Tanabe, Kazunari; Abe, Ryo

    2009-03-20

    In order to fully understand T cell-mediated immunity, the mechanisms that regulate clonal expansion and cytokine production by CD4{sup +} antigen-specific effector T cells in response to a wide range of antigenic stimulation needs clarification. For this purpose, panels of antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cell clones with different thresholds for antigen-induced proliferation were generated by repeated stimulation with high- or low-dose antigen. Differences in antigen sensitivities did not correlate with expression of TCR, CD4, adhesion or costimulatory molecules. There was no significant difference in antigen-dependent cytokine production by TG40 cells transfected with TCR obtained from either high- or low-dose-responding T cell clones, suggesting that the affinity of TCRs for their ligands is not primary determinant of T cell antigen reactivity. The proliferative responses of all T cell clones to both peptide stimulation and to TCR{beta} crosslinking revealed parallel dose-response curves. These results suggest that the TCR signal strength of effector T cells and threshold of antigen reactivity is determined by an intrinsic property, such as the TCR signalosome and/or intracellular signaling machinery. Finally, the antigen responses of high- and low-peptide-responding T cell clones reveal that clonal expansion and cytokine production of effector T cells occur independently of antigen concentration. Based on these results, the mechanisms underlying selection of high 'avidity' effector and memory T cells in response to pathogen are discussed.

  4. A common glycan structure on immunoglobulin G for enhancement of effector functions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Wei; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Li, Shiou-Ting; Tsai, Tsung-I; Chu, Kuo-Ching; Liu, Ying-Chih; Lai, Meng-Yu; Wu, Chia-Yu; Tseng, Yung-Chieh; Shivatare, Sachin S; Wang, Chia-Hung; Chao, Ping; Wang, Shi-Yun; Shih, Hao-Wei; Zeng, Yi-Fang; You, Tsai-Hong; Liao, Jung-Yu; Tu, Yu-Chen; Lin, Yih-Shyan; Chuang, Hong-Yang; Chen, Chia-Lin; Tsai, Charng-Sheng; Huang, Chiu-Chen; Lin, Nan-Horng; Ma, Che; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2015-08-25

    Antibodies have been developed as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer, infection, and inflammation. In addition to binding activity toward the target, antibodies also exhibit effector-mediated activities through the interaction of the Fc glycan and the Fc receptors on immune cells. To identify the optimal glycan structures for individual antibodies with desired activity, we have developed an effective method to modify the Fc-glycan structures to a homogeneous glycoform. In this study, it was found that the biantennary N-glycan structure with two terminal alpha-2,6-linked sialic acids is a common and optimized structure for the enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and antiinflammatory activities. PMID:26253764

  5. pH sensing by intracellular Salmonella induces effector translocation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Jun; McGourty, Kieran; Liu, Mei; Unsworth, Kate E; Holden, David W

    2010-05-21

    Salmonella enterica is an important intracellular bacterial pathogen of humans and animals. It replicates within host-cell vacuoles by delivering virulence (effector) proteins through a vacuolar membrane pore made by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS assembly follows vacuole acidification, but when bacteria are grown at low pH, effector secretion is negligible. We found that effector secretion was activated at low pH from mutant strains lacking a complex of SPI-2-encoded proteins SsaM, SpiC, and SsaL. Exposure of wild-type bacteria to pH 7.2 after growth at pH 5.0 caused dissociation and degradation of SsaM/SpiC/SsaL complexes and effector secretion. In infected cells, loss of the pH 7.2 signal through acidification of host-cell cytosol prevented complex degradation and effector translocation. Thus, intravacuolar Salmonella senses host cytosolic pH, resulting in the degradation of regulatory complex proteins and effector translocation. PMID:20395475

  6. Characterization of the largest effector gene cluster of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Brefort, Thomas; Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Neidig, Nina; Doehlemann, Gunther; Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-07-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function. PMID:24992561

  7. Multi-Angle Effector Function Analysis of Human Monoclonal IgG Glycovariants

    PubMed Central

    Dashivets, Tetyana; Thomann, Marco; Rueger, Petra; Knaupp, Alexander; Buchner, Johannes; Schlothauer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic performance of recombinant antibodies relies on two independent mechanisms: antigen recognition and Fc-mediated antibody effector functions. Interaction of Fc-fragment with different FcR triggers antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity and determines longevity of the antibody in serum. In context of therapeutic antibodies FcγRs play the most important role. It has been demonstrated that the Fc-attached sugar moiety is essential for IgG effector functionality, dictates its affinity to individual FcγRs and determines binding to different receptor classes: activating or inhibitory. In this study, we systematically analyze effector functions of monoclonal IgG1 and its eight enzymatically engineered glycosylation variants. The analysis of interaction of glycovariants with FcRs was performed for single, as well as for antigen-bound antibodies and IgGs in a form of immune complex. In addition to functional properties we addressed impact of glycosylation on the structural properties of the tested glycovariants. We demonstrate a clear impact of glycosylation pattern on antibody stability and interaction with different FcγRs. Consistent with previous reports, deglycosylated antibodies failed to bind all Fcγ-receptors, with the exception of high affinity FcγRI. The FcγRII and FcγRIIIa binding activity of IgG1 was observed to depend on the galactosylation level, and hypergalactosylated antibodies demonstrated increased receptor interaction. Sialylation did not decrease the FcγR binding of the tested IgGs; in contrast, sialylation of antibodies improved binding to FcγRIIa and IIb. We demonstrate that glycosylation influences to some extent IgG1 interaction with FcRn. However, independent of glycosylation pattern the interaction of IgG1 with a soluble monomeric target surprisingly resulted in an impaired receptor binding. Here, we demonstrate, that immune complexes (IC), induced by multimeric ligand, compensated for the

  8. C. elegans S6K Mutants Require a Creatine-Kinase-like Effector for Lifespan Extension.

    PubMed

    McQuary, Philip R; Liao, Chen-Yu; Chang, Jessica T; Kumsta, Caroline; She, Xingyu; Davis, Andrew; Chu, Chu-Chiao; Gelino, Sara; Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L; Petrascheck, Michael; Brill, Laurence M; Ladiges, Warren C; Kennedy, Brian K; Hansen, Malene

    2016-03-01

    Deficiency of S6 kinase (S6K) extends the lifespan of multiple species, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. To discover potential effectors of S6K-mediated longevity, we performed a proteomics analysis of long-lived rsks-1/S6K C. elegans mutants compared to wild-type animals. We identified the arginine kinase ARGK-1 as the most significantly enriched protein in rsks-1/S6K mutants. ARGK-1 is an ortholog of mammalian creatine kinase, which maintains cellular ATP levels. We found that argk-1 is possibly a selective effector of rsks-1/S6K-mediated longevity and that overexpression of ARGK-1 extends C. elegans lifespan, in part by activating the energy sensor AAK-2/AMPK. argk-1 is also required for the reduced body size and increased stress resistance observed in rsks-1/S6K mutants. Finally, creatine kinase levels are increased in the brains of S6K1 knockout mice. Our study identifies ARGK-1 as a longevity effector in C. elegans with reduced RSKS-1/S6K levels. PMID:26923601

  9. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  10. Fine-tuning of CD8(+) T-cell effector functions by targeting the 2B4-CD48 interaction.

    PubMed

    Lissina, Anna; Ambrozak, David R; Boswell, Kristin L; Yang, Wenjing; Boritz, Eli; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Iglesias, Maria C; Hashimoto, Masao; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Haddad, Elias; Douek, Daniel C; Zhu, Jun; Koup, Richard A; Yamamoto, Takuya; Appay, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Polyfunctionality and cytotoxic activity dictate CD8(+) T-cell efficacy in the eradication of infected and malignant cells. The induction of these effector functions depends on the specific interaction between the T-cell receptor (TCR) and its cognate peptide-MHC class I complex, in addition to signals provided by co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory receptors, which can further regulate these functions. Among these receptors, the role of 2B4 is contested, as it has been described as either co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory in modulating T-cell functions. We therefore combined functional, transcriptional and epigenetic approaches to further characterize the impact of disrupting the interaction of 2B4 with its ligand CD48, on the activity of human effector CD8(+) T-cell clones. In this setting, we show that the 2B4-CD48 axis is involved in the fine-tuning of CD8(+) T-cell effector function upon antigenic stimulation. Blocking this interaction resulted in reduced CD8(+) T-cell clone-mediated cytolytic activity, together with a subtle drop in the expression of genes involved in effector function regulation. Our results also imply a variable contribution of the 2B4-CD48 interaction to the modulation of CD8(+) T-cell functional properties, potentially linked to intrinsic levels of T-bet expression and TCR avidity. The present study thus provides further insights into the role of the 2B4-CD48 interaction in the fine regulation of CD8(+) T-cell effector function upon antigenic stimulation. PMID:26860368

  11. Serine Protease Inhibitor-6 Differentially Affects the Survival of Effector and Memory Alloreactive CD8-T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, J.; Ohori, S.; Ting, C.; Uehara, M.; Abdoli, R.; Smith, B. D.; Safa, K.; Solhjou, Z.; Lukyanchykov, P.; Patel, J.; McGrath, M.; Abdi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The clonal expansion of effector T cells and subsequent generation of memory T cells are critical in determining the outcome of transplantation. While cytotoxic T lymphocytes induce direct cytolysis of target cells through secretion of Granzyme-B (GrB), they also express cytoplasmic serine protease inhibitor-6 (Spi6) to protect themselves from GrB that has leaked from granules. Here, we studied the role of GrB/Spi6 axis in determining clonal expansion of alloreactive CD8-T cells and subsequent generation of memory CD8-T cells in transplantation. CD8-T cells from Spi6−/− mice underwent more GrB mediated apoptosis upon alloantigen stimulation in vitro and in vivo following adoptive transfer into an allogeneic host. Interestingly, while OT1.Spi6−/− CD8 T cells showed significantly lower clonal expansion following skin transplants from OVA mice, there was no difference in the size of the effector memory CD8-T cells long after transplantation. Furthermore, lack of Spi6 resulted in a decrease of short-lived-effector-CD8-cells but did not impact the pool of memory-precursor-effector-CD8-cells. Similar results were found in heart transplant models. Our findings suggest that the final alloreactive CD8-memory-pool-size is independent from the initial clonal-proliferation as memory precursors express low levels of GrB and therefore are independent of Spi6 for survival. These data advance our understanding of memory T cells generation in transplantation and provide basis for Spi6 based strategies to target effector T cells. PMID:25534448

  12. Effect of Zidovudine on the Primary Cytolytic T-Lymphocyte Response and T-Cell Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Sabine; Orosz, Charles G.; Hayes, Kathleen A.; Mathes, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Azidothymidine (AZT) and other nucleoside analogues, used to treat AIDS, can cause severe clinical side effects and are suspected of suppressing immune cell proliferation and effector immune cell function. The purpose of the present study was to quantitatively measure the effects of AZT on cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) priming and to determine if the major histocompatibility complex-restricted CTL killing was affected by AZT exposure. For this purpose, we employed a murine alloantigen model and limiting-dilution analysis (LDA) to estimate cytotoxic effector cell frequencies of alloreactive splenocytes treated with drug during antigen sensitization. This noninfectious model was chosen to avoid analysis of a virus-compromised immune system. Exposure of splenocytes to therapeutic concentrations of AZT (2 to 10 μM) caused a two- to threefold dose-dependent reduction in CLT precursor frequency. This reduction was caused by decreased proliferation of alloantigen-specific CTLs rather than loss of function, because full cytolytic function could be restored by adjusting the AZT-treated effector/target cell ratios to that of untreated cells. In addition, when AZT was added to the assay system at various times during antigen sensitization there was a time-related loss of the suppressive effect on the generation of cytolytic effector function, suggesting that functional CTLs are not affected by even high doses of AZT. Taken together, the data indicate that the reduction of CTL function associated with AZT treatment is due to a quantitative decrease of effector cell precursor frequency rather than to direct drug cytotoxicity or interference with mediation of cytolysis. Furthermore, antigen-naive immune cells were most sensitive to this effect during the first few days following antigen encounter. PMID:10858351

  13. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    PubMed

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions. PMID:26563393

  14. Characterization of a chemoattractant for endothelium induced by angiogenesis effectors.

    PubMed

    Raju, K S; Alessandri, G; Gullino, P M

    1984-04-01

    The mechanism of neovascularization was further explored by the use of chemically defined angiogenesis effectors. The vascularization of the rabbit cornea was selected as an experimental approach that permits comparison of one cornea treated by the angiogenesis effector with the contralateral cornea of the same subject treated by the same molecule deprived of angiogenic capacity. Under these conditions, we observed that neovascularization was initiated by the appearance of a chemoattractant for the bovine capillary endothelium only in the cornea treated by the angiogenesis effector. The chemoattractant was purified about 150-fold by a single-step procedure, using gelatin:Sepharose affinity chromatography. Chemoattraction resulted from the combined effect of a chemotactic factor(s) and an activating factor(s). The association of the two enhanced 5- to 8-fold the motility of the capillary endothelium in a concentration-dependent manner with optimum at 0.2 mg/ml. The activating factor(s) does not have chemotactic capacity, but without it, chemotaxis is reduced to about one half. The chemotactic complex was present in the cornea regardless of the nature of the angiogenesis effector used as the triggering device. Heat and proteases eliminated chemotaxis and destroyed the chemotactic complex. Thus, neovascularization may be triggered by effectors able to induce in the cornea proteins, normally not present, that influence angiogenesis via mobilization of capillary endothelium. PMID:6200213

  15. Potency of Transgenic Effectors for Neurogenetic Manipulation in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Dennis; von Essen, Alina; Lyutova, Radostina; van Giesen, Lena; Rosner, Ronny; Wegener, Christian; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulations of neuronal activity are a cornerstone of studies aimed to identify the functional impact of defined neurons for animal behavior. With its small nervous system, rapid life cycle, and genetic amenability, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides an attractive model system to study neuronal circuit function. In the past two decades, a large repertoire of elegant genetic tools has been developed to manipulate and study neural circuits in the fruit fly. Current techniques allow genetic ablation, constitutive silencing, or hyperactivation of neuronal activity and also include conditional thermogenetic or optogenetic activation or inhibition. As for all genetic techniques, the choice of the proper transgenic tool is essential for behavioral studies. Potency and impact of effectors may vary in distinct neuron types or distinct types of behavior. We here systematically test genetic effectors for their potency to alter the behavior of Drosophila larvae, using two distinct behavioral paradigms: general locomotor activity and directed, visually guided navigation. Our results show largely similar but not equal effects with different effector lines in both assays. Interestingly, differences in the magnitude of induced behavioral alterations between different effector lines remain largely consistent between the two behavioral assays. The observed potencies of the effector lines in aminergic and cholinergic neurons assessed here may help researchers to choose the best-suited genetic tools to dissect neuronal networks underlying the behavior of larval fruit flies. PMID:25359929

  16. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins are essential for the metabolic programming of effector T cells and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kidani, Yoko; Elsaesser, Heidi; Hock, M Benjamin; Vergnes, Laurent; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Marbois, Beth N; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Wilson, Elizabeth B; Osborne, Timothy F; Graeber, Thomas G; Reue, Karen; Brooks, David G; Bensinger, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Newly activated CD8+ T cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the extraordinary biosynthetic demands of clonal expansion; however, the signals mediating metabolic reprogramming remain poorly defined. Herein, we demonstrate an essential role for sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in the acquisition of effector cell metabolism. Without SREBP signaling, CD8+ T cells are unable to blast, resulting in markedly attenuated clonal expansion during viral infection. Mechanistic studies indicate that SREBPs are essential to meet the heightened lipid requirements of membrane synthesis during blastogenesis. SREBPs are dispensable for homeostatic proliferation, indicating a context-specific requirement for SREBPs in effector responses. These studies provide insights into the molecular signals underlying metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells during the transition from quiescence to activation. PMID:23563690

  17. The Xanthomonas campestris Type III Effector XopJ Proteolytically Degrades Proteasome Subunit RPT61[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many animal and plant pathogenic bacteria inject type III effector (T3E) proteins into their eukaryotic host cells to suppress immunity. The Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) family of T3Es is a widely distributed family of effector proteins found in both animal and plant pathogens, and its members are highly diversified in virulence functions. Some members have been shown to possess acetyltransferase activity; however, whether this is a general feature of YopJ family T3Es is currently unknown. The T3E Xanthomonas outer protein J (XopJ), a YopJ family effector from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, interacts with the proteasomal subunit Regulatory Particle AAA-ATPase6 (RPT6) in planta to suppress proteasome activity, resulting in the inhibition of salicylic acid-related immune responses. Here, we show that XopJ has protease activity to specifically degrade RPT6, leading to reduced proteasome activity in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Proteolytic degradation of RPT6 was dependent on the localization of XopJ to the plasma membrane as well as on its catalytic triad. Mutation of the Walker B motif of RPT6 prevented XopJ-mediated degradation of the protein but not XopJ interaction. This indicates that the interaction of RPT6 with XopJ is dependent on the ATP-binding activity of RPT6, but proteolytic cleavage additionally requires its ATPase activity. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs the proteasomal turnover of Nonexpressor of Pathogenesis-Related1 (NPR1), the master regulator of salicylic acid responses, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated NPR1, which likely interferes with the full induction of NPR1 target genes. Our results show that YopJ family T3Es are not only highly diversified in virulence function but also appear to possess different biochemical activities. PMID:25739698

  18. Increased in vivo effector function of human IgG4 isotype antibodies through afucosylation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qian; Hazen, Meredith; Marshall, Brett; Crowell, Susan R; Ou, Qinglin; Wong, Athena W; Phung, Wilson; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y Gloria; Tejada, Max; Andersen, Dana; Kelley, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    For some antibodies intended for use as human therapeutics, reduced effector function is desired to avoid toxicities that might be associated with depletion of target cells. Since effector function(s), including antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), require the Fc portion to be glycosylated, reduced ADCC activity antibodies can be obtained through aglycosylation of the human IgG1 isotype. An alternative is to switch to an IgG4 isotype in which the glycosylated antibody is known to have reduced effector function relative to glycosylated IgG1 antibody. ADCC activity of glycosylated IgG1 antibodies is sensitive to the fucosylation status of the Fc glycan, with both in vitro and in vivo ADCC activity increased upon fucose removal ("afucosylation"). The effect of afucosylation on activity of IgG4 antibodies is less well characterized, but it has been shown to increase the in vitro ADCC activity of an anti-CD20 antibody. Here, we show that both in vitro and in vivo activity of anti-CD20 IgG4 isotype antibodies is increased via afucosylation. Using blends of material made in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and Fut8KO-CHO cells, we show that ADCC activity of an IgG4 version of an anti-human CD20 antibody is directly proportional to the fucose content. In mice transgenic for human FcγRIIIa, afucosylation of an IgG4 anti-mouse CD20 antibody increases the B cell depletion activity to a level approaching that of the mIgG2a antibody. PMID:27216702

  19. Innate Immune Effectors in Mycobacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saiga, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Yosuke; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis, which is caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the major bacterial infections worldwide. Host defense against Mtb is mediated by a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the last 15 years, the mechanisms for activation of innate immunity have been elucidated. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been revealed to be critical for the recognition of pathogenic microorganisms including mycobacteria. Subsequent studies further revealed that NOD-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors are responsible for the TLR-independent recognition of mycobacteria. Several molecules, such as active vitamin D3, secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, and lipocalin 2, all of which are induced by TLR stimulation, have been shown to direct innate immune responses to mycobacteria. In addition, Irgm1-dependent autophagy has recently been demonstrated to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria. Thus, our understanding of the mechanisms for the innate immune response to mycobacteria is developing. PMID:21274449

  20. Dusky-like functions as a Rab11 effector for the deposition of cuticle during Drosophila bristle development

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Ranganayaki; Adler, Paul N.

    2012-01-01

    The morphogenesis of Drosophila sensory bristles is dependent on the function of their actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Actin filaments are important for bristle shape and elongation, while microtubules are thought to mediate protein and membrane trafficking to promote growth. We have identified an essential role for the bristle cuticle in the maintenance of bristle structure and shape at late stages of bristle development. We show that the small GTPase Rab11 mediates the organized deposition of chitin, a major cuticle component in bristles, and disrupting Rab11 function leads to phenotypes that result from bristle collapse rather than a failure to elongate. We further establish that Rab11 is required for the plasma membrane localization of the ZP domain-containing Dusky-like (Dyl) protein and that Dyl is also required for cuticle formation in bristles. Our data argue that Dyl functions as a Rab11 effector for mediating the attachment of the bristle cell membrane to chitin to establish a stable cuticle. Our studies also implicate the exocyst as a Rab11 effector in this process and that Rab11 trafficking along the bristle shaft is mediated by microtubules. PMID:22278919

  1. Signaling in Effector Lymphocytes: Insights toward Safer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Kamalakannan; Riese, Matthew J.; Rao, Sridhar; Wang, Li; Thakar, Monica S.; Sentman, Charles L.; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Receptors on T and NK cells systematically propagate highly complex signaling cascades that direct immune effector functions, leading to protective immunity. While extensive studies have delineated hundreds of signaling events that take place upon receptor engagement, the precise molecular mechanism that differentially regulates the induction or repression of a unique effector function is yet to be fully defined. Such knowledge can potentiate the tailoring of signal transductions and transform cancer immunotherapies. Targeted manipulations of signaling cascades can augment one effector function such as antitumor cytotoxicity while contain the overt generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines that contribute to treatment-related toxicity such as “cytokine storm” and “cytokine-release syndrome” or lead to autoimmune diseases. Here, we summarize how individual signaling molecules or nodes may be optimally targeted to permit selective ablation of toxic immune side effects. PMID:27242783

  2. Development and testing of the cooling coil cleaning end effector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.I.; Mullen, O.D.; Powell, M.R.; Daly, D.S.; Engel, D.W.

    1997-09-30

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancement (KPD{ampersand}E) program has developed and tested an end effector to support the waste retrieval mission at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The end effector was developed specifically to remove a sticky waste material from the cooling coils in the High Level Liquid Waste (HLLW) tank, and to vacuum up a sediment layer that has settled beneath the cooling coils. An extensive testing program was conducted in the hydraulic test bed (HTB) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to evaluate the performance of the end effector under simulated in-tank conditions. A mock up of the cooling coils was installed in the test bed tank, and simulated waste materials were included to represent the sticky waste on the tubes and the particulate waste settled beneath them. The testing program focused on assessing long-duration mining strategies for cleaning the cooling coils and removing the particulate waste forms. The report describes the results of the end effector testing program at PNNL. Section 2 describes the physical characteristics of the HLLW tanks, including the layout of the cooling coils, and it also describes what is known of the waste forms in the tanks. Section 3 describes the cleaning and retrieval strategy that was used in developing the end effector design. Section 4 describes the cooling coil mockup in the hydraulic test bed. Section 5 discusses the rationale used in selecting the simulants for the tarry waste and particulate waste forms. Section 6 describes the tests that were performed to evaluate cleaning of the cooling coils and retrieval of the particulate simulant. Section 7 summarizes the cleaning and retrieval tests, assesses the relative importance of cleaning the cooling coils and retrieving the particulate waste, and suggests modifications that would simplify the end effector design.

  3. T Cell Signaling Targets for Enhancing Regulatory or Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fan; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; Jiang, Shuiping

    2015-01-01

    To respond to infection, resting or naïve T cells must undergo activation, clonal expansion, and differentiation into specialized functional subsets of effector T cells. However, to prevent excessive or self-destructive immune responses, regulatory T cells (Tregs) are instrumental in suppressing the activation and function of effector cells, including effector T cells. The transcription factor Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) regulates the expression of genes involved in the development and function of Tregs. Foxp3 interacts with other transcription factors and with epigenetic elements such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases. Treg suppressive function can be increased by exposure to HDAC inhibitors. The individual contributions of different HDAC family members to Treg function and their respective mechanisms of action, however, remain unclear. A study showed that HDAC6, HDAC9, and Sirtuin-1 had distinct effects on Foxp3 expression and function, suggesting that selectively targeting HDACs individually or in combination may enhance Treg stability and suppressive function. Another study showed that the receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1), a well-known inhibitor of T cell activation, halted cell cycle progression in effector T cells by inhibiting the transcription of the gene encoding the substrate-recognition component (Skp2) of the ubiquitin ligase SCFSkp2. Together, these findings reveal new signaling targets for enhancing Treg or effector T cell function that may be helpful in designing future therapies, either to increase Treg suppressive function in transplantation and autoimmune diseases or to block PD-1 function, thus increasing the magnitude of antiviral or antitumor immune responses of effector T cells. PMID:22855503

  4. Identification of Anaplasma marginale Type IV Secretion System Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brayton, Kelly A.; Beare, Paul A.; Brown, Wendy C.; Heinzen, Robert A.; Broschat, Shira L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Anaplasma marginale, an obligate intracellular alphaproteobacterium in the order Rickettsiales, is a tick-borne pathogen and the leading cause of anaplasmosis in cattle worldwide. Complete genome sequencing of A. marginale revealed that it has a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The T4SS is one of seven known types of secretion systems utilized by bacteria, with the type III and IV secretion systems particularly prevalent among pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. The T4SS is predicted to play an important role in the invasion and pathogenesis of A. marginale by translocating effector proteins across its membrane into eukaryotic target cells. However, T4SS effector proteins have not been identified and tested in the laboratory until now. Results By combining computational methods with phylogenetic analysis and sequence identity searches, we identified a subset of potential T4SS effectors in A. marginale strain St. Maries and chose six for laboratory testing. Four (AM185, AM470, AM705 [AnkA], and AM1141) of these six proteins were translocated in a T4SS-dependent manner using Legionella pneumophila as a reporter system. Conclusions The algorithm employed to find T4SS effector proteins in A. marginale identified four such proteins that were verified by laboratory testing. L. pneumophila was shown to work as a model system for A. marginale and thus can be used as a screening tool for A. marginale effector proteins. The first T4SS effector proteins for A. marginale have been identified in this work. PMID:22140462

  5. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  6. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-02-26

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  7. Nanorobotic end-effectors: Design, fabrication, and in situ characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheng

    Nano-robotic end-effectors have promising applications for nano-fabrication, nano-manufacturing, nano-optics, nano-medical, and nano-sensing; however, low performances of the conventional end-effectors have prevented the widespread utilization of them in various fields. There are two major difficulties in developing the end-effectors: their nano-fabrication and their advanced characterization in the nanoscale. Here we introduce six types of end-effectors: the nanotube fountain pen (NFP), the super-fine nanoprobe, the metal-filled carbon nanotube (m CNT)-based sphere-on-pillar (SOP) nanoantennas, the tunneling nanosensor, and the nanowire-based memristor. The investigations on the NFP are focused on nano-fluidics and nano-fabrications. The NFP could direct write metallic "inks" and fabricating complex metal nanostructures from 0D to 3D with a position servo control, which is critically important to future large-scale, high-throughput nanodevice production. With the help of NFP, we could fabricate the end-effectors such as super-fine nanoprobe and m CNT-based SOP nanoantennas. Those end-effectors are able to detect local flaws or characterize the electrical/mechanical properties of the nanostructure. Moreover, using electron-energy-loss-spectroscopy (EELS) technique during the operation of the SOP optical antenna opens a new basis for the application of nano-robotic end-effectors. The technique allows advanced characterization of the physical changes, such as carrier diffusion, that are directly responsible for the device's properties. As the device was coupled with characterization techniques of scanning-trasmission-electron-microscopy (STEM), the development of tunneling nanosensor advances this field of science into quantum world. Furthermore, the combined STEM-EELS technique plays an important role in our understanding of the memristive switching performance in the nanowire-based memristor. The developments of those nano-robotic end-effectors expend the study

  8. Hemipteran and dipteran pests: Effectors and plant host immune regulators.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Walling, Linda L

    2016-04-01

    Hemipteran and dipteran insects have behavioral, cellular and chemical strategies for evading or coping with the host plant defenses making these insects particularly destructive pests worldwide. A critical component of a host plant's defense to herbivory is innate immunity. Here we review the status of our understanding of the receptors that contribute to perception of hemipteran and dipteran pests and highlight the gaps in our knowledge in these early events in immune signaling. We also highlight recent advances in identification of the effectors that activate pattern-triggered immunity and those involved in effector-triggered immunity. PMID:26467026

  9. Visual End-Effector Position Error Compensation for Planetary Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; DiCicco, Matthew; Backes, Paul; Nickels, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a vision-guided manipulation algorithm that improves arm end-effector positioning to subpixel accuracy and meets the highly restrictive imaging and computational constraints of a planetary robotic flight system. Analytical, simulation-based, and experimental analyses of the algorithm's effectiveness and sensitivity to camera and arm model error is presented along with results on several prototype research systems and 'ground-in-the-loop' technology experiments on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) vehicles. A computationally efficient and robust subpixel end-effector fiducial detector that is instrumental to the algorithm's ability to achieve high accuracy is also described along with its validation results on MER data.

  10. ICAM-1–expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R.; Hordijk, Peter L.; Hogg, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1–deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1–mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  11. IRF4 at the crossroads of effector T-cell fate decision.

    PubMed

    Huber, Magdalena; Lohoff, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) is a transcription factor that is expressed in hematopoietic cells and plays pivotal roles in the immune response. Originally described as a lymphocyte-specific nuclear factor, IRF4 promotes differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into T helper 2 (Th2), Th9, Th17, or T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and is required for the function of effector regulatory T (eTreg) cells. Moreover, IRF4 is essential for the sustained differentiation of cytotoxic effector CD8(+) T cells, for CD8(+) T-cell memory formation, and for differentiation of naïve CD8(+) T cells into IL-9-producing (Tc9) and IL-17-producing (Tc17) CD8(+) T-cell subsets. In this review, we focus on recent findings on the role of IRF4 during the development of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell subsets and the impact of IRF4 on T-cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. PMID:24782159

  12. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  13. Altered effector functions of NK cells in chronic hepatitis C are associated with IFNL3 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rogalska-Taranta, Magdalena; Markova, Antoaneta A; Taranta, Andrzej; Lunemann, Sebastian; Schlaphoff, Verena; Flisiak, Robert; Manns, Michael P; Cornberg, Markus; Kraft, Anke R M; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    Interferon α-mediated effector functions of NK cells may contribute to the control of HCV replication and the pathogenesis of liver disease. The single-nucleotide polymorphism rs12979860 near IFNL3 (previously known as IL28B) is important in response to IFN-α treatment and in spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C. The role of the IFNL3 polymorphism in NK cell function is unclear. Thus, we investigated the role of IFNL3 polymorphism in type I IFN-dependent regulation of NK cell functions in patients with cHC and healthy control subjects. We demonstrated a marked polarization of NK cells toward cytotoxicity in response to IFN-α stimulation in patients with hepatitis C. That TRAIL up-regulation was present, particularly in patients with the IFNL3-TT allele, was supported by a shift in the pSTAT-1:pSTAT-4 ratios toward pSTAT-1. In patients bearing the IFNL3-TT allele, NK cell effector function correlated with liver disease activity. In contrast, higher cytokine production of NK cells was observed in healthy individuals with the IFNL3-CC genotype, which may support spontaneous HCV clearance in acute infection. Overall, these findings show that the role of NK cells may differ in chronic infection vs. early antiviral defense and that the IFNL3 genotype differentially influences NK cell function. PMID:26034208

  14. A Burkholderia Type VI Effector Deamidates Rho GTPases to Activate the Pyrin Inflammasome and Trigger Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Daniel F; Xu, Hao; Yang, Jieling; Shi, Xuyan; Gao, Wenqing; Li, Lin; Bisaro, Fabiana; Chen, She; Valvano, Miguel A; Shao, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen of the cystic fibrosis lung that elicits a strong inflammatory response. B. cenocepacia employs a type VI secretion system (T6SS) to survive in macrophages by disarming Rho-type GTPases, causing actin cytoskeletal defects. Here, we identified TecA, a non-VgrG T6SS effector responsible for actin disruption. TecA and other bacterial homologs bear a cysteine protease-like catalytic triad, which inactivates Rho GTPases by deamidating a conserved asparagine in the GTPase switch-I region. RhoA deamidation induces caspase-1 inflammasome activation, which is mediated by the familial Mediterranean fever disease protein Pyrin. In mouse infection, the deamidase activity of TecA is necessary and sufficient for B. cenocepacia-triggered lung inflammation and also protects mice from lethal B. cenocepacia infection. Therefore, Burkholderia TecA is a T6SS effector that modifies a eukaryotic target through an asparagine deamidase activity, which in turn elicits host cell death and inflammation through activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. PMID:27133449

  15. Piperine from black pepper inhibits activation-induced proliferation and effector function of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Carolyn D; Rodgers, Gemma; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2015-11-01

    Piperine is a major alkaloid component of black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn), which is a widely consumed spice. Here, we investigated the effect of piperine on mouse T lymphocyte activation. Piperine inhibited polyclonal and antigen-specific T lymphocyte proliferation without affecting cell viability. Piperine also suppressed T lymphocyte entry into the S and G2 /M phases of the cell cycle, and decreased expression of G1 -associated cyclin D3, CDK4, and CDK6. In addition, piperine inhibited CD25 expression, synthesis of interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-17A, and the generation of cytotoxic effector cells. The inhibitory effect of piperine on T lymphocytes was associated with hypophosphorylation of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and inhibitor of κBα, but not ZAP-70. The ability of piperine to inhibit several key signaling pathways involved in T lymphocyte activation and the acquisition of effector function suggests that piperine might be useful in the management of T lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:25900378

  16. Identification of a novel effector domain of BIN1 for cancer suppression.

    PubMed

    Lundgaard, Greta L; Daniels, Natae E; Pyndiah, Slovénie; Cassimere, Erica K; Ahmed, Kazi M; Rodrigue, Amélie; Kihara, Daisuke; Post, Carol B; Sakamuro, Daitoku

    2011-10-01

    Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a nucleocytoplasmic adaptor protein with tumor suppressor properties. The protein interacts with and inhibits the c-MYC transcription factor through the BIN1 MYC-binding domain (MBD). However, in vitro colony formation assays have clearly demonstrated that the MBD is not essential for BIN1-mediated growth arrest. We hypothesized that BIN1 contains a MYC-independent effector domain (MID) for cancer suppression. Because a functionally unique domain frequently contains a distinct structure, the human full-length BIN1 protein was subjected to limited trypsin digestion and the digested peptides were analyzed with Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry. We identified a trypsin-resistant peptide that corresponds to amino acids 146-268 of BIN1. It encompassed part of the BAR region, a putative effector region of BIN1. Computational analysis predicted that the peptide is very likely to exhibit coiled-coil motifs, implying a potential role for this region in sustaining the BIN1 structure and function. Like MBD-deleted BIN1, the trypsin-resistant peptide of BIN1 was predominantly present in the cytoplasm and was sufficient to inhibit cancer growth, regardless of dysregulated c-MYC activity. Our results suggest that the coiled-coil BIN1 BAR peptide encodes a novel BIN1 MID domain, through which BIN1 acts as a MYC-independent cancer suppressor. PMID:21678469

  17. Evaluation of human pancreatic RNase as effector molecule in a therapeutic antibody platform

    PubMed Central

    Schirrmann, Thomas; Frenzel, André; Linden, Lars; Stelte-Ludwig, Beatrix; Willuda, Jörg; Harrenga, Axel; Dübel, Stefan; Müller-Tiemann, Beate; Trautwein, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Human antibody-ribonuclease (RNase) fusion proteins, referred to as immunoRNases, have been proposed as an alternative to heterologous immunotoxins, without their immunogenicity and unspecific toxicity issues. In this study, we investigated if human pancreatic RNase will be suitable as effector component in a therapeutic antibody development platform. We generated several fusion proteins consisting of tumor-specific human immunoglobulins (IgGs) and human pancreatic RNase. Transient mammalian cell production was efficient and IgG-RNases were purified to homogeneity. Antigen binding was comparable to the parental antibodies and RNase catalytic activity was retained even in the presence of 50-fold molar excess of human cytosolic RNase inhibitor (RI). Serum stability, cell binding and internalization of IgG-RNases were comparable to the parental IgGs. Despite these promising properties, none of the IgG-RNases revealed significant inhibition of tumor cell growth in vitro even when targeting different antigens putatively employing different endocytotic pathways. The introduction of different linkers containing endosomal protease cleavage sites into the IgG-RNase did not enhance cytotoxicity. Similarly, RI evasive human pancreatic RNase variants mediated only small inhibiting effects on tumor cell growth at high concentrations, potentially reflecting inefficient cytosolic translocation. Taken together, human pancreatic RNase and variants did not prove to be generally suitable as effector component for a therapeutic antibody drug development platform. PMID:24492302

  18. The FTF gene family regulates virulence and expression of SIX effectors in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Niño-Sánchez, Jonathan; Casado-Del Castillo, Virginia; Tello, Vega; De Vega-Bartol, José J; Ramos, Brisa; Sukno, Serenella A; Díaz Mínguez, José María

    2016-09-01

    The FTF (Fusarium transcription factor) gene family comprises a single copy gene, FTF2, which is present in all the filamentous ascomycetes analysed, and several copies of a close relative, FTF1, which is exclusive to Fusarium oxysporum. An RNA-mediated gene silencing system was developed to target mRNA produced by all the FTF genes, and tested in two formae speciales: F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli (whose host is common bean) and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (whose host is tomato). Quantification of the mRNA levels showed knockdown of FTF1 and FTF2 in randomly isolated transformants of both formae speciales. The attenuation of FTF expression resulted in a marked reduction in virulence, a reduced expression of several SIX (Secreted In Xylem) genes, the best studied family of effectors in F. oxysporum, and lower levels of SGE1 (Six Gene Expression 1) mRNA, the presumptive regulator of SIX expression. Moreover, the knockdown mutants showed a pattern of colonization of the host plant similar to that displayed by strains devoid of FTF1 copies (weakly virulent strains). Gene knockout of FTF2 also resulted in a reduction in virulence, but to a lesser extent. These results demonstrate the role of the FTF gene expansion, mostly the FTF1 paralogues, as a regulator of virulence in F. oxysporum and suggest that the control of effector expression is the mechanism involved. PMID:26817616

  19. Structurally distinct Arabidopsis thaliana NLR immune receptors recognize tandem WY domains of an oomycete effector.

    PubMed

    Goritschnig, Sandra; Steinbrenner, Adam D; Grunwald, Derrick J; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2016-05-01

    Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR, or NLR) receptors mediate pathogen recognition. The Arabidopsis thaliana NLR RPP1 recognizes the tandem WY-domain effector ATR1 from the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis through direct association with C-terminal LRRs. We isolated and characterized homologous NLR genes RPP1-EstA and RPP1-ZdrA from two Arabidopsis ecotypes, Estland (Est-1) and Zdarec (Zdr-1), responsible for recognizing a novel spectrum of ATR1 alleles. RPP1-EstA and -ZdrA encode nearly identical NLRs that are phylogenetically distinct from known immunity-activating RPP1 homologs and possess greatly expanded LRR domains. Site-directed mutagenesis and truncation analysis of ATR1 suggests that these homologs recognize a novel surface of the 2(nd) WY domain of ATR1, partially specified by a C-terminal region of the LRR domain. Synteny comparison with RPP1 loci involved in hybrid incompatibility suggests that these functions evolved independently. Closely related RPP1 homologs have diversified their recognition spectra through LRR expansion and sequence variation, allowing them to detect multiple surfaces of the same pathogen effector. Engineering NLR receptor specificity may require a similar combination of repeat expansion and tailored amino acid variation. PMID:26725254

  20. Effector Functions of Natural Killer Cell Subsets in the Control of Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Angela; Stabile, Helena; Nisti, Paolo; Santoni, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of hematological malignant disorders has been improved over the last years, but high relapse rate mainly attributable to the presence of minimal residual disease still persists. Therefore, it is of great interest to explore novel therapeutic strategies to obtain long-term remission. Immune effector cells, and especially natural killer (NK) cells, play a crucial role in the control of hematological malignancies. In this regard, the efficiency of allogeneic stem cell transplantation clearly depends on the immune-mediated graft versus leukemia effect without the risk of inducing graft versus host disease. Alloreactive donor NK cells generated following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation ameliorate the outcome of leukemia patients; in addition, in vivo transfer of in vitro expanded NK cells represents a crucial tool for leukemia treatment. To improve NK cell effector functions against resistant leukemia cells, novel immunotherapeutic strategies are oriented to the identification, isolation, expansion, and administration of particular NK cell subsets endowed with multifunctional anti-tumor potential and tropism toward tumor sites. Moreover, the relationship between the emergence and persistence of distinct NK cell subsets during post-graft reconstitution and the maintenance of a remission state is still rather unclear. PMID:26594216

  1. ICAM-1-expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R; Hordijk, Peter L; Hogg, Nancy; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-02-18

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1-deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1-mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  2. T Cells: Soldiers and Spies—The Surveillance and Control of Effector T Cells by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, T cells were CD4+ helper or CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and with antibodies, they were the soldiers of immunity. Now, many functionally distinct subsets of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been described, each with distinct cytokine and transcription factor expression. For CD4+ T cells, these include Th1 cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet and cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-β; Th2 cells expressing GATA-3 and the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13; and Th17 cells expressing RORγt and cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22. The cytokines produced determine the immune inflammation that they mediate. T cells of the effector lineage can be naïve T cells, recently activated T cells, or memory T cells that can be distinguished by cell surface markers. T regulatory cells or spies were characterized as CD8+ T cells expressing I-J in the 1970s. In the 1980s, suppressor cells fell into disrepute when the gene for I-J was not present in the mouse MHC I region. At that time, a CD4+ T cell expressing CD25, the IL-2 receptor-α, was identified to transfer transplant tolerance. This was the same phenotype of activated CD4+CD25+ T cells that mediated rejection. Thus, the cells that could induce tolerance and undermine rejection had similar badges and uniforms as the cells effecting rejection. Later, FOXP3, a transcription factor that confers suppressor function, was described and distinguishes T regulatory cells from effector T cells. Many subtypes of T regulatory cells can be characterized by different expressions of cytokines and receptors for cytokines or chemokines. In intense immune inflammation, T regulatory cells express cytokines characteristic of effector cells; for example, Th1-like T regulatory cells express T-bet, and IFN-γ–like Th1 cells and effector T cells can change sides by converting to T regulatory cells. Effector T cells and T regulatory cells use similar molecules to be activated and mediate their function, and thus, it can be

  3. Robotic End Effectors for Hard-Rock Climbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Brett; Leger, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Special-purpose robot hands (end effectors) now under development are intended to enable robots to traverse cliffs much as human climbers do. Potential applications for robots having this capability include scientific exploration (both on Earth and other rocky bodies in space), military reconnaissance, and outdoor search and rescue operations. Until now, enabling robots to traverse cliffs has been considered too difficult a task because of the perceived need of prohibitively sophisticated planning algorithms as well as end effectors as dexterous as human hands. The present end effectors are being designed to enable robots to attach themselves to typical rock-face features with less planning and simpler end effectors. This advance is based on the emulation of the equipment used by human climbers rather than the emulation of the human hand. Climbing-aid equipment, specifically cams, aid hooks, and cam hooks, are used by sport climbers when a quick ascent of a cliff is desired (see Figure 1). Currently two different end-effector designs have been created. The first, denoted the simple hook emulator, consists of three "fingers" arranged around a central "palm." Each finger emulates the function of a particular type of climbing hook (aid hook, wide cam hook, and a narrow cam hook). These fingers are connected to the palm via a mechanical linkage actuated with a leadscrew/nut. This mechanism allows the fingers to be extended or retracted. The second design, denoted the advanced hook emulator (see Figure 2), shares these features, but it incorporates an aid hook and a cam hook into each finger. The spring-loading of the aid hook allows the passive selection of the type of hook used. The end effectors can be used in several different modes. In the aid-hook mode, the aid hook on one of the fingers locks onto a horizontal ledge while the other two fingers act to stabilize the end effector against the cliff face. In the cam-hook mode, the broad, flat tip of the cam hook is

  4. Apoptosis and expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte effector molecules in renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Falk, M C

    1999-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) mediated apoptosis is thought to play a major role in the rejection of renal allografts following transplantation, however, the CTL effector mechanism that is primarily responsible for immunological rejection is unknown. The two major effector pathways of CTL killing which lead to apoptosis involve the Fas/Fas ligand (Fas L) lytic pathway, and the perforin/granzyme degranulation pathway. The expression of CTL effector molecules which influence these pathways include Fas, Fas L and TiA-1 (cytotoxic granule protein). This study has investigated apoptosis by in situ terminal deoxytransferase-catalysed DNA nick end labelling (TUNEL), and the expression of CTL effector molecules by immunohistochemistry, in renal allograft biopsies obtained from patients following kidney transplantation. Renal biopsies were classified into three histological groups; acute cellular rejection, chronic rejection, or no rejection. The extent of T-cell infiltration of renal tissues was assessed by immunohistochemical staining with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. Numerous TUNEL positive cells were detected in all transplant biopsies examined; these consisted mainly of renal tubular cells and infiltrating cells, with some TUNEL positive cells also detected in the glomeruli. In the case of normal kidney tissue, renal cells also stained positive for TUNEL but there was no lymphocytic infiltration. There was significantly more T-cell infiltration observed in acute rejection biopsies compared to the no rejection biopsies. In the case of Fas L expression, there was little expression in all three biopsy groups, apart from one case of chronic rejection. Conversely, although there were no significant differences in TiA-1 expression between the three biopsy groups, TiA-1 expression was more prominent in acute rejection biopsies. Furthermore, Fas expression was significantly decreased in acute rejection biopsies when compared to those of chronic and no rejection in which Fas

  5. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-19

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  6. Effector proteins support the asymmetric apportioning of Salmonella during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaya; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Méresse, Stéphane

    2016-08-17

    Salmonella-infected cells are characterized by the presence of intra-cellular membranous tubules that emerge from bacterial vacuoles and extend along microtubules. The formation of Salmonella-induced tubules depends on the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS-2) that translocates bacterial effector proteins inside host cells. Effector proteins have enzymatic activities or allow for hijacking of cellular functions. The role of Salmonella-induced tubules in virulence remains unclear but their absence is correlated with virulence defects. This study describes the presence of inter-cellular tubules that arise between daughter cells during cytokinesis. Inter-cellular tubules connect bacterial vacuoles originally present in the parent cell and that have been apportioned between daughters. Their formation requires a functional T3SS-2 and effector proteins. Our data establish a correlation between the formation of inter-cellular tubules and the asymmetric distribution of bacterial vacuoles in daughters. Thus, by manipulating the distribution of bacteria in cytokinetic cells, Salmonella T3SS-2 effector proteins may increase bacterial spreading and the systemic character of the infection. PMID:27046257

  7. Hand to Mouth: Automatic Imitation across Effector Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jane; Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    The effector dependence of automatic imitation was investigated using a stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) procedure during which participants were required to make an open or closed response with their hand or their mouth. The correct response for each trial was indicated by a pair of letters in Experiments 1 and 2 and by a colored square in…

  8. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  9. Developmental control of integrin expression regulates Th2 effector homing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrin CD18, a component of the LFA-1 complex that also includes CD11a, is essential for Th2, but not Th1, cell homing, but the explanation for this phenomenon remains obscure. In this study, we investigate the mechanism by which Th2 effector responses require the LFA-1 complex. CD11a-deficient T ...

  10. Effector-triggered immunity: from pathogen perception to robust defense.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Tsuda, Kenichi; Parker, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    In plant innate immunity, individual cells have the capacity to sense and respond to pathogen attack. Intracellular recognition mechanisms have evolved to intercept perturbations by pathogen virulence factors (effectors) early in host infection and convert it to rapid defense. One key to resistance success is a polymorphic family of intracellular nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) receptors that detect effector interference in different parts of the cell. Effector-activated NLRs connect, in various ways, to a conserved basal resistance network in order to transcriptionally boost defense programs. Effector-triggered immunity displays remarkable robustness against pathogen disturbance, in part by employing compensatory mechanisms within the defense network. Also, the mobility of some NLRs and coordination of resistance pathways across cell compartments provides flexibility to fine-tune immune outputs. Furthermore, a number of NLRs function close to the nuclear chromatin by balancing actions of defense-repressing and defense-activating transcription factors to program cells dynamically for effective disease resistance. PMID:25494461

  11. Robot End Effector To Place and Solder Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Encapsulated in robot end effector is RF induction-heating coil for heating solar cell while in transit. Holes in encapsulant permit end of unit to act as vacuum pickup to grip solar cell. Use of RF induction heating allows cell to be heated without requiring direct mechanical and thermal contact of bonding tool such as soldering iron.

  12. Effector proteins support the asymmetric apportioning of Salmonella during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaya; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Méresse, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella-infected cells are characterized by the presence of intra-cellular membranous tubules that emerge from bacterial vacuoles and extend along microtubules. The formation of Salmonella-induced tubules depends on the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS-2) that translocates bacterial effector proteins inside host cells. Effector proteins have enzymatic activities or allow for hijacking of cellular functions. The role of Salmonella-induced tubules in virulence remains unclear but their absence is correlated with virulence defects. This study describes the presence of inter-cellular tubules that arise between daughter cells during cytokinesis. Inter-cellular tubules connect bacterial vacuoles originally present in the parent cell and that have been apportioned between daughters. Their formation requires a functional T3SS-2 and effector proteins. Our data establish a correlation between the formation of inter-cellular tubules and the asymmetric distribution of bacterial vacuoles in daughters. Thus, by manipulating the distribution of bacteria in cytokinetic cells, Salmonella T3SS-2 effector proteins may increase bacterial spreading and the systemic character of the infection. PMID:27046257

  13. The Coding and Effector Transfer of Movement Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Attila J.; Muhlbauer, Thomas; Shea, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments utilizing a 14-element arm movement sequence were designed to determine if reinstating the visual-spatial coordinates, which require movements to the same spatial locations utilized during acquisition, results in better effector transfer than reinstating the motor coordinates, which require the same pattern of homologous muscle…

  14. [PROBLEM OF END EFFECTOR OF ISCHEMIC POSTCONDITIONING OF THE HEART].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaya, N V; Pei, J-M; Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Khaliulin, I J; Lishmanov, Yu B

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that cardiovascular disease and in particular acute myocardial infarction are a major cause of death among working-age population in Russia. Some of the patients die after successful recanalization of the infarct-related coronary artery as a result of ischemic and reperfusion injury of the heart. It is obvious that there is an urgent need to develop new approaches to prevention reoxygenation heart damages. In this regard the study of adaptive phenomenon postconditioning is of particular interest. This analysis of literature source preformed by authors of the article indicates that main pretenders to the role of end-effectors of ischemic postconditioning of the heart are: (1) Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel of BK-type (big conductance K+ channel), (2) mitoKATp channel (mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel), (3) MPT pore (mitochondrial permeability transition pore). At the same time, some investigators consider that mitoK(ATP) channel is only an intermediate link in the series of signaling events ensured an increase in cardiac tolerance to impact of ischemia-reperfusion. The most likely end effector of these three structures is MPT pore. Alternatively, it is possible, that unique molecular complex appearing a single end effector of postconditioning does not exist. Perhaps, that there are several effectors ensured cardioprotective effect of an adaptive phenomenon of postconditioning. PMID:26470485

  15. RMS end effector waiting for command and SPAS-01 nearby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The end effector of the remote manipulator system (RMS) appears to be waiting for its next command at the top of this frame and the Shuttle pallet satellite (SPAS-01), in its free flying mode, appears nearby. The three letters legible on the SPAS stand for Messerschmitt-Boelkow-Blohm Gmbit, a West German firm.

  16. Effects of dose on effector mechanisms in morphine-induced hyperthermia and poikilothermia.

    PubMed

    Jorenby, D E; Keesey, R E; Baker, T B

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a variety of morphine doses on thermoregulatory effector systems was examined in ambient temperatures of 27.0 degrees C and 4.0 degrees C. Rats were given saline or morphine sulfate (5, 15, or 25 mg/kg); their core temperature, oxygen consumption, and activity were monitored for 4 or 6 h post-injection. The results suggest two distinct actions of morphine, possibly mediated by two opiate receptors. Low doses of morphine produce hyperthermia that is the result of a direct activation of activity and whole body heat production. High doses produce effects dependent on ambient temperature: hypermetabolism and hyperthermia in the 27.0 degrees C environment; hypometabolism, vasodilation, and hypothermia in the 4.0 degrees C environment. The findings suggest limitations in current set-point theories of morphine's thermic actions. PMID:2502798

  17. Transgenic plants that express the phytoplasma effector SAP11 show altered phosphate starvation and defense responses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Ting; Li, Meng-Ying; Cheng, Kai-Tan; Tan, Choon Meng; Su, Li-Wen; Lin, Wei-Yi; Shih, Hsien-Tzung; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen; Yang, Jun-Yi

    2014-03-01

    Phytoplasmas have the smallest genome among bacteria and lack many essential genes required for biosynthetic and metabolic functions, making them unculturable, phloem-limited plant pathogens. In this study, we observed that transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing the secreted Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom protein11 shows an altered root architecture, similarly to the disease symptoms of phytoplasma-infected plants, by forming hairy roots. This morphological change is paralleled by an accumulation of cellular phosphate (Pi) and an increase in the expression levels of Pi starvation-induced genes and microRNAs. In addition to the Pi starvation responses, we found that secreted Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom protein11 suppresses salicylic acid-mediated defense responses and enhances the growth of a bacterial pathogen. These results contribute to an improved understanding of the role of phytoplasma effector SAP11 and provide new insights for understanding the molecular basis of plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:24464367

  18. Upstream regulators and downstream effectors of NF-κB in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhe-Min; Han, Ya-Wei; Han, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Kun; Chang, Ya-Nan; Hu, Zhi-Mei; Qi, Hai-Xia; Ting, Chen; Zhen, Zhang; Hong, Wei

    2016-07-15

    Since Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming the prevalent dementia in the whole world, more underlying mechanisms are emerging. Long time has the transcription factor NF-κB been identified to participate in AD pathogenesis, various studies have focused on the causes and effects of AD that are linked to NF-κB. In this review we discuss diverse environmental stimuli including oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and metabolism, involved signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT, MAPK and AGE/RAGE/GSK-3 and newly found ncRNAs that mediate neuron toxicity or neuron protection through NF-κB activation and the following response associated with the same factors in AD. These may provide future orientation of investigation at transcription level and support efficient treatment to AD by a better understanding of the upstream regulators and downstream effectors of NF-κB. PMID:27288790

  19. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 β-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5–10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  20. The Shigella flexneri OspB effector: an early immunomodulator.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Cecilia; Pompili, Monica; Scribano, Daniela; Limongi, Dolores; Petrucca, Andrea; Cannavacciuolo, Sonia; Schippa, Serena; Zagaglia, Carlo; Grossi, Milena; Nicoletti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Through the action of the type three secretion system (T3SS) Shigella flexneri delivers several effectors into host cells to promote cellular invasion, multiplication and to exploit host-cell signaling pathways to modulate the host innate immune response. Although much progress has been made in the understanding of many type III effectors, the molecular and cellular mechanism of the OspB effector is still poorly characterized. In this study we present new evidence that better elucidates the role of OspB as pro-inflammatory factor at very early stages of infection. Indeed, we demonstrate that, during the first hour of infection, OspB is required for full activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs and the cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Activation of cPLA(2) ultimately leads to the production and secretion of PMN chemoattractant metabolite(s) uncoupled with release of IL-8. Moreover, we also present evidence that OspB is required for the development of the full and promptly inflammatory reaction characteristic of S. flexneri wild-type infection in vivo. Based on OspB and OspF similarity (both effectors share similar transcription regulation, temporal secretion into host cells and nuclear localization) we hypothesized that OspB and OspF effectors may form a pair aimed at modulating the host cell response throughout the infection process, with opposite effects. A model is presented to illustrate how OspB activity would promote S. flexneri invasion and bacterial dissemination at early critical phases of infection. PMID:25434600

  1. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles – Biomarkers and Effectors of the Cellular Interactome in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms both health and disease are defined by patterns of communication between the constituent cells. In addition to networks of soluble mediators, cells are also programed to exchange complex messages pre-assembled as multimolecular cargo of membraneous structures known extracellular vesicles (EV). Several biogenetic pathways produce EVs with different properties, and known as exosomes, ectosomes, and apoptotic bodies. In cancer, EVs carry molecular signatures and effectors of the disease, such as mutant oncoproteins, oncogenic transcripts, microRNA, and DNA sequences. Intercellular trafficking of such EVs (oncosomes) may contribute to horizontal cellular transformation, phenotypic reprograming, and functional re-education of recipient cells, both locally and systemically. The EV-mediated, reciprocal molecular exchange also includes tumor suppressors, phosphoproteins, proteases, growth factors, and bioactive lipids, all of which participate in the functional integration of multiple cells and their collective involvement in tumor angiogenesis, inflammation, immunity, coagulopathy, mobilization of bone marrow-derived effectors, metastasis, drug resistance, or cellular stemness. In cases where the EV role is rate limiting their production and uptake may represent and unexplored anticancer therapy target. Moreover, oncosomes circulating in biofluids of cancer patients offer an unprecedented, remote, and non-invasive access to crucial molecular information about cancer cells, including their driver mutations, classifiers, molecular subtypes, therapeutic targets, and biomarkers of drug resistance. New nanotechnologies are being developed to exploit this unique biomarker platform. Indeed, embracing the notion that human cancers are defined not only by processes occurring within cancer cells, but also between them, and amidst the altered tumor and systemic microenvironment may open new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:23508692

  3. KLRG+ invariant natural killer T cells are long-lived effectors.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kanako; Sato, Yusuke; Shinga, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Endo, Takaho; Asakura, Miki; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Kinjo, Yuki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Watarai, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tsuji, Moriya; Taniguchi, Masaru; Ohara, Osamu; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2014-08-26

    Immunological memory has been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. However, natural killer (NK) cells and γδT cells, which traditionally are classified as innate immune cells, have been shown in recent studies to have hallmark features of memory cells. Invariant NKT cell (iNKT cell)-mediated antitumor effects indicate that iNKT cells are activated in vivo by vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded CD1d(+) cells, but not by vaccination with unbound NKT cell ligand. In such models, it previously was thought that the numbers of IFN-γ-producing cells in the spleen returned to the basal level around 1 wk after the vaccination. In the current study, we demonstrate the surprising presence of effector memory-like iNKT cells in the lung. We found long-term antitumor activity in the lungs of mice was enhanced after vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded dendritic cells. Further analyses showed that the KLRG1(+) (Killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G, member 1-positive) iNKT cells coexpressing CD49d and granzyme A persisted for several months and displayed a potent secondary response to cognate antigen. Finally, analyses of CDR3β by RNA deep sequencing demonstrated that some particular KLRG1(+) iNKT-cell clones accumulated, suggesting the selection of certain T-cell receptor repertoires by an antigen. The current findings identifying effector memory-like KLRG1(+) iNKT cells in the lung could result in a paradigm shift regarding the basis of newly developed extrathymic iNKT cells and could contribute to the future development of antitumor immunotherapy by uniquely energizing iNKT cells. PMID:25118276

  4. Tomato immune receptor Ve1 recognizes effector of multiple fungal pathogens uncovered by genome and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Ronnie; Peter van Esse, H.; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Bolton, Melvin D.; Santhanam, Parthasarathy; Saber, Mojtaba Keykha; Zhang, Zhao; Usami, Toshiyuki; Lievens, Bart; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Thomma, Bart P. H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Fungal plant pathogens secrete effector molecules to establish disease on their hosts, and plants in turn use immune receptors to try to intercept these effectors. The tomato immune receptor Ve1 governs resistance to race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum, but the corresponding Verticillium effector remained unknown thus far. By high-throughput population genome sequencing, a single 50-Kb sequence stretch was identified that only occurs in race 1 strains, and subsequent transcriptome sequencing of Verticillium-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants revealed only a single highly expressed ORF in this region, designated Ave1 (for Avirulence on Ve1 tomato). Functional analyses confirmed that Ave1 activates Ve1-mediated resistance and demonstrated that Ave1 markedly contributes to fungal virulence, not only on tomato but also on Arabidopsis. Interestingly, Ave1 is homologous to a widespread family of plant natriuretic peptides. Besides plants, homologous proteins were only found in the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis and the plant pathogenic fungi Colletotrichum higginsianum, Cercospora beticola, and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. The distribution of Ave1 homologs, coincident with the presence of Ave1 within a flexible genomic region, strongly suggests that Verticillium acquired Ave1 from plants through horizontal gene transfer. Remarkably, by transient expression we show that also the Ave1 homologs from F. oxysporum and C. beticola can activate Ve1-mediated resistance. In line with this observation, Ve1 was found to mediate resistance toward F. oxysporum in tomato, showing that this immune receptor is involved in resistance against multiple fungal pathogens. PMID:22416119

  5. Tomato immune receptor Ve1 recognizes effector of multiple fungal pathogens uncovered by genome and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Ronnie; van Esse, H Peter; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Bolton, Melvin D; Santhanam, Parthasarathy; Saber, Mojtaba Keykha; Zhang, Zhao; Usami, Toshiyuki; Lievens, Bart; Subbarao, Krishna V; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2012-03-27

    Fungal plant pathogens secrete effector molecules to establish disease on their hosts, and plants in turn use immune receptors to try to intercept these effectors. The tomato immune receptor Ve1 governs resistance to race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum, but the corresponding Verticillium effector remained unknown thus far. By high-throughput population genome sequencing, a single 50-Kb sequence stretch was identified that only occurs in race 1 strains, and subsequent transcriptome sequencing of Verticillium-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants revealed only a single highly expressed ORF in this region, designated Ave1 (for Avirulence on Ve1 tomato). Functional analyses confirmed that Ave1 activates Ve1-mediated resistance and demonstrated that Ave1 markedly contributes to fungal virulence, not only on tomato but also on Arabidopsis. Interestingly, Ave1 is homologous to a widespread family of plant natriuretic peptides. Besides plants, homologous proteins were only found in the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis and the plant pathogenic fungi Colletotrichum higginsianum, Cercospora beticola, and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. The distribution of Ave1 homologs, coincident with the presence of Ave1 within a flexible genomic region, strongly suggests that Verticillium acquired Ave1 from plants through horizontal gene transfer. Remarkably, by transient expression we show that also the Ave1 homologs from F. oxysporum and C. beticola can activate Ve1-mediated resistance. In line with this observation, Ve1 was found to mediate resistance toward F. oxysporum in tomato, showing that this immune receptor is involved in resistance against multiple fungal pathogens. PMID:22416119

  6. Focusing and sustaining the antitumor CTL effector killer response by agonist anti-CD137 mAb

    PubMed Central

    Weigelin, Bettina; Bolaños, Elixabet; Teijeira, Alvaro; Martinez-Forero, Ivan; Labiano, Sara; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Quetglas, José I.; Wagena, Esther; Sánchez-Paulete, Alfonso Rodríguez; Chen, Lieping; Friedl, Peter; Melero, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is undergoing significant progress due to recent clinical successes by refined adoptive T-cell transfer and immunostimulatory monoclonal Ab (mAbs). B16F10-derived OVA-expressing mouse melanomas resist curative immunotherapy with either adoptive transfer of activated anti-OVA OT1 CTLs or agonist anti-CD137 (4-1BB) mAb. However, when acting in synergistic combination, these treatments consistently achieve tumor eradication. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes that accomplish tumor rejection exhibit enhanced effector functions in both transferred OT-1 and endogenous cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). This is consistent with higher levels of expression of eomesodermin in transferred and endogenous CTLs and with intravital live-cell two-photon microscopy evidence for more efficacious CTL-mediated tumor cell killing. Anti-CD137 mAb treatment resulted in prolonged intratumor persistence of the OT1 CTL-effector cells and improved function with focused and confined interaction kinetics of OT-1 CTL with target cells and increased apoptosis induction lasting up to six days postadoptive transfer. The synergy of adoptive T-cell therapy and agonist anti-CD137 mAb thus results from in vivo enhancement and sustainment of effector functions. PMID:26034288

  7. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components. PMID:22935613

  8. The FonSIX6 gene acts as an avirulence effector in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum - watermelon pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaowei; Zhao, Xiaoqiang; Ling, Kai-Shu; Levi, Amnon; Sun, Yuyan; Fan, Min

    2016-01-01

    When infecting a host plant, the fungus Fusarium oxysporum secretes several effector proteins into the xylem tissue to promote virulence. However, in a host plant with an innate immune system involving analogous resistance proteins, the fungus effector proteins may trigger resistance, rather than promoting virulence. Identity of the effector genes of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon) races that affect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) are currently unknown. In this study, the SIX6 (secreted in xylem protein 6) gene was identified in Fon races 0 and 1 but not in the more virulent Fon race 2. Disrupting the FonSIX6 gene in Fon race 1 did not affect the sporulation or growth rate of the fungus but significantly enhanced Fon virulence in watermelon, suggesting that the mutant ΔFon1SIX6 protein allowed evasion of R protein-mediated host resistance. Complementation of the wild-type race 2 (which lacks FonSIX6) with FonSIX6 reduced its virulence. These results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that FonSIX6 is an avirulence gene. The identification of FonSix6 as an avirulence factor may be a first step in understanding the mechanisms of Fon virulence and resistance in watermelon and further elucidating the role of Six6 in Fusarium-plant interactions. PMID:27320044

  9. The FonSIX6 gene acts as an avirulence effector in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum - watermelon pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaowei; Zhao, Xiaoqiang; Ling, Kai-Shu; Levi, Amnon; Sun, Yuyan; Fan, Min

    2016-01-01

    When infecting a host plant, the fungus Fusarium oxysporum secretes several effector proteins into the xylem tissue to promote virulence. However, in a host plant with an innate immune system involving analogous resistance proteins, the fungus effector proteins may trigger resistance, rather than promoting virulence. Identity of the effector genes of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon) races that affect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) are currently unknown. In this study, the SIX6 (secreted in xylem protein 6) gene was identified in Fon races 0 and 1 but not in the more virulent Fon race 2. Disrupting the FonSIX6 gene in Fon race 1 did not affect the sporulation or growth rate of the fungus but significantly enhanced Fon virulence in watermelon, suggesting that the mutant ΔFon1SIX6 protein allowed evasion of R protein-mediated host resistance. Complementation of the wild-type race 2 (which lacks FonSIX6) with FonSIX6 reduced its virulence. These results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that FonSIX6 is an avirulence gene. The identification of FonSix6 as an avirulence factor may be a first step in understanding the mechanisms of Fon virulence and resistance in watermelon and further elucidating the role of Six6 in Fusarium-plant interactions. PMID:27320044

  10. Analysis of three Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri effector proteins in pathogenicity and their interactions with host plant proteins.

    PubMed

    Dunger, Germán; Garofalo, Cecilia G; Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S; Rosa, María C Pereda; Farah, Chuck S; Orellano, Elena G; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2012-10-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the bacterium responsible for citrus canker, uses effector proteins secreted by a type III protein secretion system to colonize its hosts. Among the putative effector proteins identified for this bacterium, we focused on the analysis of the roles of AvrXacE1, AvrXacE2 and Xac3090 in pathogenicity and their interactions with host plant proteins. Bacterial deletion mutants in avrXacE1, avrXacE2 and xac3090 were constructed and evaluated in pathogenicity assays. The avrXacE1 and avrXacE2 mutants presented lesions with larger necrotic areas relative to the wild-type strain when infiltrated in citrus leaves. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to identify several plant proteins likely to interact with AvrXacE1, AvrXacE2 and Xac3090. We also assessed the localization of these effector proteins fused to green fluorescent protein in the plant cell, and observed that they co-localized to the subcellular spaces in which the plant proteins with which they interacted were predicted to be confined. Our results suggest that, although AvrXacE1 localizes to the plant cell nucleus, where it interacts with transcription factors and DNA-binding proteins, AvrXacE2 appears to be involved in lesion-stimulating disease 1-mediated cell death, and Xac3090 is directed to the chloroplast where its function remains to be clarified. PMID:22435635

  11. Die another day: molecular mechanisms of effector-triggered immunity elicited by type III secreted effector proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial pathogens inject type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into their hosts where they display dual roles depending on the host genotype. T3SEs promote bacterial virulence in susceptible hosts, and elicit immunity in resistant hosts. T3SEs are typically recognized when they modify a host ...

  12. Operation and maintenance manual for the common video end effector system (CVEE) system 6260

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, A.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-24

    This document defines the requirements for the operation,maintenance, and storage of the Common Video End Effector System (CVEE) used with the video end effectors as part of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) system.

  13. Early effector cells survive the contraction phase in malaria infection and generate both central and effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Opata, Michael M; Carpio, Victor H; Ibitokou, Samad A; Dillon, Brian E; Obiero, Joshua M; Stephens, Robin

    2015-06-01

    CD4 T cells orchestrate immunity against blood-stage malaria. However, a major challenge in designing vaccines to the disease is poor understanding of the requirements for the generation of protective memory T cells (Tmem) from responding effector T cells (Teff) in chronic parasite infection. In this study, we use a transgenic mouse model with T cells specific for the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 of Plasmodium chabaudi to show that activated T cells generate three distinct Teff subsets with progressive activation phenotypes. The earliest observed Teff subsets (CD127(-)CD62L(hi)CD27(+)) are less divided than CD62L(lo) Teff and express memory genes. Intermediate (CD62L(lo)CD27(+)) effector subsets include the most multicytokine-producing T cells, whereas fully activated (CD62L(lo)CD27(-)) late effector cells have a terminal Teff phenotype (PD-1(+), Fas(hi), AnnexinV(+)). We show that although IL-2 promotes expansion, it actually slows terminal effector differentiation. Using adoptive transfer, we show that only early Teff survive the contraction phase and generate the terminal late Teff subsets, whereas in uninfected recipients, they become both central and effector Tmem. Furthermore, we show that progression toward full Teff activation is promoted by increased duration of infection, which in the long-term promotes Tem differentiation. Therefore, we have defined markers of progressive activation of CD4 Teff at the peak of malaria infection, including a subset that survives the contraction phase to make Tmem, and show that Ag and cytokine levels during CD4 T cell expansion influence the proportion of activated cells that can survive contraction and generate memory in malaria infection. PMID:25911759

  14. Erwinia amylovora effector protein Eop1 suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity in Malus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) utilizes a type three secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Several Ea effectors have been identified based on their sequence similarity to plant and animal bacterial pathogen effectors; however, the function of the majority of Ea effecto...

  15. End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot

    SciTech Connect

    Fowley, M.D.

    2001-01-03

    It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck

  16. End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot

    SciTech Connect

    Fowley, M.D.

    2001-01-31

    It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck

  17. Functional metagenomic discovery of bacterial effectors in the human microbiome and isolation of commendamide, a GPCR G2A/132 agonist

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Louis J.; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chu, John; Huang, Yun-Han; Gordon, Emma A.; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B.; Ternei, Melinda A.; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Brady, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    The trillions of bacteria that make up the human microbiome are believed to encode functions that are important to human health; however, little is known about the specific effectors that commensal bacteria use to interact with the human host. Functional metagenomics provides a systematic means of surveying commensal DNA for genes that encode effector functions. Here, we examine 3,000 Mb of metagenomic DNA cloned from three phenotypically distinct patients for effectors that activate NF-κB, a transcription factor known to play a central role in mediating responses to environmental stimuli. This screen led to the identification of 26 unique commensal bacteria effector genes (Cbegs) that are predicted to encode proteins with diverse catabolic, anabolic, and ligand-binding functions and most frequently interact with either glycans or lipids. Detailed analysis of one effector gene family (Cbeg12) recovered from all three patient libraries found that it encodes for the production of N-acyl-3-hydroxypalmitoyl-glycine (commendamide). This metabolite was also found in culture broth from the commensal bacterium Bacteroides vulgatus, which harbors a gene highly similar to Cbeg12. Commendamide resembles long-chain N-acyl-amides that function as mammalian signaling molecules through activation of G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), which led us to the observation that commendamide activates the GPCR G2A/GPR132. G2A has been implicated in disease models of autoimmunity and atherosclerosis. This study shows the utility of functional metagenomics for identifying potential mechanisms used by commensal bacteria for host interactions and outlines a functional metagenomics-based pipeline for the systematic identification of diverse commensal bacteria effectors that impact host cellular functions. PMID:26283367

  18. Renewing the conspiracy theory debate: does Raf function alone to mediate Ras oncogenesis?

    PubMed

    Repasky, Gretchen A; Chenette, Emily J; Der, Channing J

    2004-11-01

    Ras proteins function as signal transducers and are mutationally activated in many human cancers. In 1993, Raf was identified as a key downstream effector of Ras signaling, and it was believed then that the primary function of Ras was simply to facilitate Raf activation. However, the subsequent discovery of other proteins that are effectors of Ras function suggested that oncogenic activities of Ras are mediated by both Raf-dependent and Raf-independent signaling. Further complexity arose with the identification of Ras effectors with putative tumor suppressor, rather than oncogenic, functions. However, the recent identification of B-raf mutations in human cancers has renewed the debate regarding whether Raf activation alone promotes Ras-mediated oncogenesis. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of Ras effectors in Ras-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:15519853

  19. Interchangeable end effector tools utilized on the protoflight manipulator arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A subset of teleoperator and effector tools was designed, fabricated, delivered and successfully demonstrated on the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) protoflight manipulator arm (PFMA). The tools delivered included a rotary power tool with interchangeable collets and two fluid coupling mate/demate tools; one for a Fairchild coupling and the other for a Purolator coupling. An electrical interface connector was also provided for the rotary power tool. A tool set, from which the subset was selected, for performing on-orbit satellite maintenance was identified and conceptionally designed. Maintenance requirements were synthesized, evaluated and prioritized to develop design requirements for a set of end effector tools representative of those needed to provide on-orbit maintenance of satellites to be flown in the 1986 to 2000 timeframe.

  20. Proteomics of effector-triggered immunity (ETI) in plants

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Brenden; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Guttman, David S; Desveaux, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) was originally termed gene-for-gene resistance and dates back to fundamental observations of flax resistance to rust fungi by Harold Henry Flor in the 1940s. Since then, genetic and biochemical approaches have defined our current understanding of how plant “resistance” proteins recognize microbial effectors. More recently, proteomic approaches have expanded our view of the protein landscape during ETI and contributed significant advances to our mechanistic understanding of ETI signaling. Here we provide an overview of proteomic techniques that have been used to study plant ETI including both global and targeted approaches. We discuss the challenges associated with ETI proteomics and highlight specific examples from the literature, which demonstrate how proteomics is advancing the ETI research field. PMID:25513776

  1. Subversion of Retrograde Trafficking by Translocated Pathogen Effectors.

    PubMed

    Personnic, Nicolas; Bärlocher, Kevin; Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert the endocytic bactericidal pathway to form specific replication-permissive compartments termed pathogen vacuoles or inclusions. To this end, the pathogens employ type III or type IV secretion systems, which translocate dozens, if not hundreds, of different effector proteins into their host cells, where they manipulate vesicle trafficking and signaling pathways in favor of the intruders. While the distinct cocktail of effectors defines the specific processes by which a pathogen vacuole is formed, the different pathogens commonly target certain vesicle trafficking routes, including the endocytic or secretory pathway. Recently, the retrograde transport pathway from endosomal compartments to the trans-Golgi network emerged as an important route affecting pathogen vacuole formation. Here, we review current insight into the host cell's retrograde trafficking pathway and how vacuolar pathogens of the genera Legionella, Coxiella, Salmonella, Chlamydia, and Simkania employ mechanistically distinct strategies to subvert this pathway, thus promoting intracellular survival and replication. PMID:26924068

  2. A robot end effector exchange mechanism for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorin, Barney F.

    1990-01-01

    Efficient robot operation requires the use of specialized end effectors or tools for tasks. In spacecraft applications, the microgravity environment precludes the use of gravitational forces to retain the tools in holding fixture. As a result of this, a retention mechanism which forms a part of the tool storage container is required. A unique approach to this problem has resulted in the development of an end effector exchange mechanism that meets the requirements for spaceflight applications while avoiding the complexity usually involved. This mechanism uses multiple latching cams both on the manipulator and in the tool storage container, combined with a system of catch rings to provide retention in both locations and the required failure tolerance. Because of the cam configuration the mechanism operates passively, requiring no electrical commands except those needed to move the manipulator into position. Similarly, it inherently provides interlocks to prevent the release of one cam before its opposite number is engaged.

  3. Xanthomonas and the TAL Effectors: Nature's Molecular Biologist.

    PubMed

    White, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium, due to the transfer of T-DNA to the host genome, is known as nature's genetic engineer. Once again, bacteria have led the way to newfound riches in biotechnology. Xanthomonas has emerged as nature's molecular biologist as the functional domains of the sequence-specific DNA transcription factors known as TAL effectors were characterized and associated with the cognate disease susceptibility and resistance genes of plants. PMID:26443209

  4. Targeting DNA Double-Strand Breaks with TAL Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Michelle; Cermak, Tomas; Doyle, Erin L.; Schmidt, Clarice; Zhang, Feng; Hummel, Aaron; Bogdanove, Adam J.; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Engineered nucleases that cleave specific DNA sequences in vivo are valuable reagents for targeted mutagenesis. Here we report a new class of sequence-specific nucleases created by fusing transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease. Both native and custom TALE-nuclease fusions direct DNA double-strand breaks to specific, targeted sites. PMID:20660643

  5. RMS end effector waiting for command and SPAS-01 nearby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The end effector of the remote manipulator system (RMS) appears to be waiting for its next command at the top of this frame and the Shuttle pallet satellite (SPAS-01), in its free flying mode, appears nearby. The three letters legible on the SPAS stand for Messerschmitt-Boelkow-Blohm Gmbit, a West German firm. The earth's horizon is visible at the bottom of the frame.

  6. Autonomous dexterous end-effectors for space robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, George A.; Iberall, Thea; Liu, Huan

    1989-01-01

    The development of a knowledge-based controller is summarized for the Belgrade/USC robot hand, a five-fingered end effector, designed for maximum autonomy. The biological principles of the hand and its architecture are presented. The conceptual and software aspects of the grasp selection system are discussed, including both the effects of the geometry of the target object and the task to be performed. Some current research issues are presented.

  7. Multiple Regulatory and Effector Roles of Autophagy in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Deretic, Vojo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Autophagy is a cytoplasmic homeostasis pathway, enabling cells to digest their own cytosol, remove toxic protein aggregates, and eliminate deffective or surplus organelles. A plenitude of studies have now expanded roles of autophagy to both effector and regulatory functions in innate and adaptive immunity. In its role of an immunological effector, autophagy plays many parts: (i) In its most primeval manifestation, autophagy captures and digests intracellular microbes; (ii) it is an anti-microbial output of Toll-like receptor (TLR) response to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMP); and (iii) autophagy is an effector of Th1-Th2 polarization in resistance or susceptibility to intracellular pathogens. As a regulator of immunity, autophagy plays a multitude of functions: (i) It acts as a topological inversion device servicing both innate and adaptive immunity by delivering cytosolic antigens to the lumen of MHC II compartments and cytosolic PAMPs to endosomal TLRs; (ii) autophagy is critical in T cell repertoire selection in the thymus and control of central tolerance; (iii) it plays a role in T and B cell homeostasis; and (iv) autophagy is of significance for inflammatory pathology. A properly functioning autophagy helps prevent autoimmunity and assists in clearing pathogens. When aberrant, it contributes to human inflammatory disorders such as Crohn’s disease. PMID:19269148

  8. Current activities of the Yersinia effector protein YopM.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Sabrina; Grabowski, Benjamin; Norkowski, Stefanie; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Yersinia outer protein M (YopM) belongs to the group of Yop effector proteins, which are highly conserved among pathogenic Yersinia species. During infection, the effectors are delivered into the host cell cytoplasm via the type 3 secretion system to subvert the host immune response and support the survival of Yersinia. In contrast to the other Yop effectors, YopM does not possess a known enzymatic activity and its molecular mechanism(s) of action remain(s) poorly understood. However, YopM was shown to promote colonization and dissemination of Yersinia, thus being crucial for the pathogen's virulence in vivo. Moreover, YopM interacts with several host cell proteins and might utilize them to execute its anti-inflammatory activities. The results obtained so far indicate that YopM is a multifunctional protein that counteracts the host immune defense by multiple activities, which are at least partially independent of each other. Finally, its functions seem to be also influenced by differences between the specific YopM isoforms expressed by Yersinia subspecies. In this review, we focus on the global as well as more specific contribution of YopM to virulence of Yersinia during infection and point out the various extra- and intracellular molecular functions of YopM. In addition, the novel cell-penetrating ability of recombinant YopM and its potential applications as a self-delivering immunomodulatory therapeutic will be discussed. PMID:25865799

  9. A smart end-effector for assembly of space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Rhodes, Marvin D.; Wise, Marion A.; Armistead, Maurice F.

    1992-01-01

    A unique facility, the Automated Structures Research Laboratory, is being used to investigate robotic assembly of truss structures. A special-purpose end-effector is used to assemble structural elements into an eight meter diameter structure. To expand the capabilities of the facility to include construction of structures with curved surfaces from straight structural elements of different lengths, a new end-effector has been designed and fabricated. This end-effector contains an integrated microprocessor to monitor actuator operations through sensor feedback. This paper provides an overview of the automated assembly tasks required by this end-effector and a description of the new end-effector's hardware and control software.

  10. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-01-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15 : 1, 9 : 7 or 3 : 1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability. PMID:24889686

  11. Plant-Pathogen Effectors: Cellular Probes Interfering with Plant Defenses in Spatial and Temporal Manners.

    PubMed

    Toruño, Tania Y; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Coaker, Gitta

    2016-08-01

    Plants possess large arsenals of immune receptors capable of recognizing all pathogen classes. To cause disease, pathogenic organisms must be able to overcome physical barriers, suppress or evade immune perception, and derive nutrients from host tissues. Consequently, to facilitate some of these processes, pathogens secrete effector proteins that promote colonization. This review covers recent advances in the field of effector biology, focusing on conserved cellular processes targeted by effectors from diverse pathogens. The ability of effectors to facilitate pathogen entry into the host interior, suppress plant immune perception, and alter host physiology for pathogen benefit is discussed. Pathogens also deploy effectors in a spatial and temporal manner, depending on infection stage. Recent advances have also enhanced our understanding of effectors acting in specific plant organs and tissues. Effectors are excellent cellular probes that facilitate insight into biological processes as well as key points of vulnerability in plant immune signaling networks. PMID:27359369

  12. Expression Profile of Human Fc Receptors in Mucosal Tissue: Implications for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Effector Functions Targeting HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Hannah M.; Carias, Ann M.; Evans, Abbey B.; Olejniczak, Natalia J.; Ziprin, Paul; King, Deborah F. L.; Hope, Thomas J.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of new Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 infections are acquired via sexual transmission at mucosal surfaces. Partial efficacy (31.2%) of the Thai RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial has been correlated with Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting the V1V2 region of the HIV-1 envelope. This has led to speculation that ADCC and other antibody-dependent cellular effector functions might provide an important defense against mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection. However, the ability of antibody-dependent cellular effector mechanisms to impact on early mucosal transmission events will depend on a variety of parameters including effector cell type, frequency, the class of Fc-Receptor (FcR) expressed, the number of FcR per cell and the glycoslyation pattern of the induced antibodies. In this study, we characterize and compare the frequency and phenotype of IgG (CD16 [FcγRIII], CD32 [FcγRII] and CD64 [FcγRI]) and IgA (CD89 [FcαR]) receptor expression on effector cells within male and female genital mucosal tissue, colorectal tissue and red blood cell-lysed whole blood. The frequency of FcR expression on CD14+ monocytic cells, myeloid dendritic cells and natural killer cells were similar across the three mucosal tissue compartments, but significantly lower when compared to the FcR expression profile of effector cells isolated from whole blood, with many cells negative for all FcRs. Of the three tissues tested, penile tissue had the highest percentage of FcR positive effector cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to determine the location of CD14+, CD11c+ and CD56+ cells within the three mucosal tissues. We show that the majority of effector cells across the different mucosal locations reside within the subepithelial lamina propria. The potential implication of the observed FcR expression patterns on the effectiveness of FcR-dependent cellular effector functions to impact on the initial events in

  13. Stable G protein-effector complexes in striatal neurons: mechanism of assembly and role in neurotransmitter signaling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keqiang; Masuho, Ikuo; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Cao, Yan; Sasaki, Keita; Lai, Chun Wan J; Han, Pyung-Lim; Ueda, Hiroshi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Xu, Baoji; Willardson, Barry M; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    In the striatum, signaling via G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors is essential for motor control. Critical to this process is the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5) that produces second messenger cAMP upon receptor-mediated activation by G protein Golf. However, the molecular organization of the Golf-AC5 signaling axis is not well understood. In this study, we report that in the striatum AC5 exists in a stable pre-coupled complex with subunits of Golf heterotrimer. We use genetic mouse models with disruption in individual components of the complex to reveal hierarchical order of interactions required for AC5-Golf stability. We further identify that the assembly of AC5-Golf complex is mediated by PhLP1 chaperone that plays central role in neurotransmitter receptor coupling to cAMP production motor learning. These findings provide evidence for the existence of stable G protein-effector signaling complexes and identify a new component essential for their assembly. PMID:26613416

  14. Tropomodulin3 is a novel Akt2 effector regulating insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis through cortical actin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun-Yan; Bi, Xuezhi; Wu, Donghai; Kim, Jae Bum; Gunning, Peter W.; Hong, Wanjin; Han, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Akt2 and its downstream effectors mediate insulin-stimulated GLUT4-storage vesicle (GSV) translocation and fusion with the plasma membrane (PM). Using mass spectrometry, we identify actin-capping protein Tropomodulin 3 (Tmod3) as an Akt2-interacting partner in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We demonstrate that Tmod3 is phosphorylated at Ser71 on insulin-stimulated Akt2 activation, and Ser71 phosphorylation is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 PM insertion and glucose uptake. Phosphorylated Tmod3 regulates insulin-induced actin remodelling, an essential step for GSV fusion with the PM. Furthermore, the interaction of Tmod3 with its cognate tropomyosin partner, Tm5NM1 is necessary for GSV exocytosis and glucose uptake. Together these results establish Tmod3 as a novel Akt2 effector that mediates insulin-induced cortical actin remodelling and subsequent GLUT4 membrane insertion. Our findings suggest that defects in cytoskeletal remodelling may contribute to impaired GLUT4 exocytosis and glucose uptake. PMID:25575350

  15. Stable G protein-effector complexes in striatal neurons: mechanism of assembly and role in neurotransmitter signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Keqiang; Masuho, Ikuo; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Cao, Yan; Sasaki, Keita; Lai, Chun Wan J; Han, Pyung-Lim; Ueda, Hiroshi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Xu, Baoji; Willardson, Barry M; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    In the striatum, signaling via G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors is essential for motor control. Critical to this process is the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5) that produces second messenger cAMP upon receptor-mediated activation by G protein Golf. However, the molecular organization of the Golf-AC5 signaling axis is not well understood. In this study, we report that in the striatum AC5 exists in a stable pre-coupled complex with subunits of Golf heterotrimer. We use genetic mouse models with disruption in individual components of the complex to reveal hierarchical order of interactions required for AC5-Golf stability. We further identify that the assembly of AC5-Golf complex is mediated by PhLP1 chaperone that plays central role in neurotransmitter receptor coupling to cAMP production motor learning. These findings provide evidence for the existence of stable G protein-effector signaling complexes and identify a new component essential for their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10451.001 PMID:26613416

  16. Prediction of bacterial type IV secreted effectors by C-terminal features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria can deliver pathogenic proteins (effectors) through type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) to eukaryotic cytoplasm, causing host diseases. The inherent property, such as sequence diversity and global scattering throughout the whole genome, makes it a big challenge to effectively identify the full set of T4SS effectors. Therefore, an effective inter-species T4SS effector prediction tool is urgently needed to help discover new effectors in a variety of bacterial species, especially those with few known effectors, e.g., Helicobacter pylori. Results In this research, we first manually annotated a full list of validated T4SS effectors from different bacteria and then carefully compared their C-terminal sequential and position-specific amino acid compositions, possible motifs and structural features. Based on the observed features, we set up several models to automatically recognize T4SS effectors. Three of the models performed strikingly better than the others and T4SEpre_Joint had the best performance, which could distinguish the T4SS effectors from non-effectors with a 5-fold cross-validation sensitivity of 89% at a specificity of 97%, based on the training datasets. An inter-species cross prediction showed that T4SEpre_Joint could recall most known effectors from a variety of species. The inter-species prediction tool package, T4SEpre, was further used to predict new T4SS effectors from H. pylori, an important human pathogen associated with gastritis, ulcer and cancer. In total, 24 new highly possible H. pylori T4S effector genes were computationally identified. Conclusions We conclude that T4SEpre, as an effective inter-species T4SS effector prediction software package, will help find new pathogenic T4SS effectors efficiently in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24447430

  17. Single molecule real-time sequencing of Xanthomonas oryzae genomes reveals a dynamic structure and complex TAL (transcription activator-like) effector gene relationships

    PubMed Central

    Booher, Nicholas J.; Carpenter, Sara C. D.; Sebra, Robert P.; Wang, Li; Salzberg, Steven L.; Leach, Jan E.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-injected, direct transcriptional activators of host genes, TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors play determinative roles in plant diseases caused by Xanthomonas spp. A large domain of nearly identical, 33–35 aa repeats in each protein mediates DNA recognition. This modularity makes TAL effectors customizable and thus important also in biotechnology. However, the repeats render TAL effector (tal) genes nearly impossible to assemble using next-generation, short reads. Here, we demonstrate that long-read, single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing solves this problem. Taking an ensemble approach to first generate local, tal gene contigs, we correctly assembled de novo the genomes of two strains of the rice pathogen X. oryzae completed previously using the Sanger method and even identified errors in those references. Sequencing two more strains revealed a dynamic genome structure and a striking plasticity in tal gene content. Our results pave the way for population-level studies to inform resistance breeding, improve biotechnology and probe TAL effector evolution. PMID:27148456

  18. A Phytophthora sojae effector PsCRN63 forms homo-/hetero-dimers to suppress plant immunity via an inverted association manner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Meixiang; Shen, Danyu; Liu, Tingli; Chen, Yanyu; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2016-01-01

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of effectors to promote infection. Their mode of action are largely unknown. Here we show that a Phytophthora sojae effector, PsCRN63, suppresses flg22-induced expression of FRK1 gene, a molecular marker in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). However, PsCRN63 does not suppress upstream signaling events including flg22-induced MAPK activation and BIK1 phosphorylation, indicating that it acts downstream of MAPK cascades. The PsCRN63-transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) DC3000 and oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The callose deposition were suppressed in PsCRN63-transgenic plants compared with the wild-type control plants. Genes involved in PTI were also down-regulated in PsCRN63-transgenic plants. Interestingly, we found that PsCRN63 forms an dimer that is mediated by inter-molecular interactions between N-terminal and C-terminal domains in an inverted association manner. Furthermore, the N-terminal and C-terminal domains required for the dimerization are widely conserved among CRN effectors, suggesting that homo-/hetero-dimerization of Phytophthora CRN effectors is required to exert biological functions. Indeed, the dimerization was required for PTI suppression and cell death-induction activities of PsCRN63. PMID:27243217

  19. Immunogenic, but Not Steady-State, Antigen Presentation Permits Regulatory T-Cells To Control CD8+ T-Cell Effector Differentiation by IL-2 Modulation

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Alice; McNally, Michael; Galea, Ryan; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of IL-2 is one proposed mechanism of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Direct in vivo experimental evidence for this has recently been obtained. While modulation of IL-2 bioavailability controls CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation under strongly immunogenic conditions it is not known whether Treg modulate CD8+ T cell responses through this mechanism under steady-state conditions. Here we assess this using a mouse model in which dendritic cells (DC) are manipulated to present cognate antigen to CD8+ T cells either in the steady-state or after activation. Our observations show that Treg exert a check on expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells under strongly immunogenic conditions associated with TLR ligand activation of DC, and this is mediated by limiting IL-2 availability. In contrast, when DC remain unactivated, depletion of Treg has little apparent effect on effector differentiation or IL-2 homeostasis. We conclude that while modulation of IL-2 homeostasis is an important mechanism through which Treg control CD8+ effector differentiation under immunogenic conditions, this mechanism plays little role in modulating CD8+ T-cell differentiation under steady-state conditions. PMID:24454872

  20. A Phytophthora sojae effector PsCRN63 forms homo-/hetero-dimers to suppress plant immunity via an inverted association manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Meixiang; Shen, Danyu; Liu, Tingli; Chen, Yanyu; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2016-01-01

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of effectors to promote infection. Their mode of action are largely unknown. Here we show that a Phytophthora sojae effector, PsCRN63, suppresses flg22-induced expression of FRK1 gene, a molecular marker in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). However, PsCRN63 does not suppress upstream signaling events including flg22-induced MAPK activation and BIK1 phosphorylation, indicating that it acts downstream of MAPK cascades. The PsCRN63-transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) DC3000 and oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The callose deposition were suppressed in PsCRN63-transgenic plants compared with the wild-type control plants. Genes involved in PTI were also down-regulated in PsCRN63-transgenic plants. Interestingly, we found that PsCRN63 forms an dimer that is mediated by inter-molecular interactions between N-terminal and C-terminal domains in an inverted association manner. Furthermore, the N-terminal and C-terminal domains required for the dimerization are widely conserved among CRN effectors, suggesting that homo-/hetero-dimerization of Phytophthora CRN effectors is required to exert biological functions. Indeed, the dimerization was required for PTI suppression and cell death-induction activities of PsCRN63. PMID:27243217

  1. From dead leaf, to new life: TAL effectors as tools for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Orlando; Binder, Andreas; Lahaye, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Whether rice, yeast or fly there is barely a model organism not yet reached by transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and their derivative fusion proteins. Insights into fundamental biology are now arriving on the back of work in recent years to develop these proteins as tools for molecular biology. This began with the publication of the simple cipher determining base-specific DNA recognition by TALEs in 2009, and now encompasses a huge variety of established fusion proteins mediating targeted modifications to transcriptome, genome and, recently, epigenome. Straightforward design and exquisite specificity, allowing unique sites to be targeted even within complex eukaryote genomes, are key to the popularity of this system. Synthetic biology is one field that is just beginning to make use of these properties, with a number of recent publications demonstrating TALE-mediated regulation of synthetic genetic circuits. Intense interest has surrounded the CRISPR/Cas9 system within the last 12 months, and it is already proving its mettle as a tool for targeted gene modifications and transcriptional regulation. However, questions over off-target activity and means for independent regulation of multiple Cas9-guide RNA pairs must be resolved before this method can be included in the synthetic biology toolbox. TALEs are already showing promise as regulators of synthetic biological systems, a role that is likely to be developed further in the coming years. PMID:24602153

  2. Inhibition of inflammasome activation by Coxiella burnetii type IV secretion system effector IcaA

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Larissa D.; Ribeiro, Juliana M.; Fernandes, Talita D.; Massis, Liliana M.; Khoo, Chen Ai; Moffatt, Jennifer H.; Newton, Hayley J.; Roy, Craig R.; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2015-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a highly infectious bacterium that promotes its own replication in macrophages by inhibiting several host cell responses. Here, we show that C. burnetii inhibits caspase-1 activation in primary mouse macrophages. By using co-infection experiments, we determine that the infection of macrophages with C. burnetii inhibits the caspase-11-mediated non-canonical activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome induced by subsequent infection with Escherichia coli or Legionella pneumophila. Genetic screening using flagellin mutants of L. pneumophila as a surrogate host, reveals a novel C. burnetii gene (IcaA) involved in the inhibition of caspase activation. Expression of IcaA in L. pneumophila inhibited the caspase-11 activation in macrophages. Moreover, icaA- mutants of C. burnetii failed to suppress the caspase-11-mediated inflammasome activation induced by L. pneumophila. Our data reveal IcaA as a novel C. burnetii effector protein that is secreted by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system and interferes with the caspase-11-induced, non-canonical activation of the inflammasome. PMID:26687278

  3. Cytomegalovirus infection impairs immunosuppressive and antimicrobial effector functions of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Roland; Heseler, Kathrin; Nau, Julia; Schmidt, Silvia Kathrin; Leineweber, Margret; Pudelko, Sabine; Wenning, Johannes; Zimmermann, Albert; Hengel, Hartmut; Sinzger, Christian; Degistirici, Özer; Sorg, Rüdiger Volker; Däubener, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) possess immunosuppressive and antimicrobial effects that are partly mediated by the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Therefore MSC represent a promising novel cellular immunosuppressant which has the potential to control steroid-refractory acute graft versus host disease (GvHD). In addition, MSC are capable of reducing the risk of infection in patients after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HST). Recent data indicate that signals from the microenvironment including those from microbes may modulate MSC effector functions. As Cytomegalovirus (CMV) represents a prominent pathogen in immunocompromised hosts, especially in patients following HST, we investigated the impact of CMV infection on MSC-mediated effects on the immune system. We demonstrate that CMV-infected MSC lose their cytokine-induced immunosuppressive capacity and are no longer able to restrict microbial growth. IDO expression is substantially impaired following CMV infection of MSC and this interaction critically depends on intact virus and the number of MSC as well as the viral load. Since overt CMV infection may undermine the clinical efficacy of MSC in the treatment of GvHD in transplant patients, we recommend that patients scheduled for MSC therapy should undergo thorough evaluation for an active CMV infection and receive CMV-directed antiviral therapy prior to the administration of MSC. PMID:24782599

  4. Effector-Triggered Immunity Determines Host Genotype-Specific Incompatibility in Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Michiko; Miwa, Hiroki; Masuda, Sachiko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Okazaki, Shin

    2016-08-01

    Symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia leads to the formation of N2-fixing root nodules. In soybean, several host genes, referred to as Rj genes, control nodulation. Soybean cultivars carrying the Rj4 gene restrict nodulation by specific rhizobia such as Bradyrhizobium elkanii We previously reported that the restriction of nodulation was caused by B. elkanii possessing a functional type III secretion system (T3SS), which is known for its delivery of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis for the T3SS-dependent nodulation restriction in Rj4 soybean. Inoculation tests revealed that soybean cultivar BARC-2 (Rj4/Rj4) restricted nodulation by B. elkanii USDA61, whereas its nearly isogenic line BARC-3 (rj4/rj4) formed nitrogen-fixing nodules with the same strain. Root-hair curling and infection threads were not observed in the roots of BARC-2 inoculated with USDA61, indicating that Rj4 blocked B. elkanii infection in the early stages. Accumulation of H2O2 and salicylic acid (SA) was observed in the roots of BARC-2 inoculated with USDA61. Transcriptome analyses revealed that inoculation of USDA61, but not its T3SS mutant in BARC-2, induced defense-related genes, including those coding for hypersensitive-induced responsive protein, which act in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) in Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that B. elkanii T3SS triggers the SA-mediated ETI-type response in Rj4 soybean, which consequently blocks symbiotic interactions. This study revealed a common molecular mechanism underlying both plant-pathogen and plant-symbiont interactions, and suggests that establishment of a root nodule symbiosis requires the evasion or suppression of plant immune responses triggered by rhizobial effectors. PMID:27373538

  5. A cyst nematode effector binds to diverse plant proteins, increases nematode susceptibility and affects root morphology.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Juvale, Parijat S; Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Hussey, Richard; Davis, Eric L; Mitchum, Melissa G; Baum, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    Cyst nematodes are plant-parasitic roundworms that are of significance in many cropping systems around the world. Cyst nematode infection is facilitated by effector proteins secreted from the nematode into the plant host. The cDNAs of the 25A01-like effector family are novel sequences that were isolated from the oesophageal gland cells of the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines). To aid functional characterization, we identified an orthologous member of this protein family (Hs25A01) from the closely related sugar beet cyst nematode H. schachtii, which infects Arabidopsis. Constitutive expression of the Hs25A01 CDS in Arabidopsis plants caused a small increase in root length, accompanied by up to a 22% increase in susceptibility to H. schachtii. A plant-expressed RNA interference (RNAi) construct targeting Hs25A01 transcripts in invading nematodes significantly reduced host susceptibility to H. schachtii. These data document that Hs25A01 has physiological functions in planta and a role in cyst nematode parasitism. In vivo and in vitro binding assays confirmed the specific interactions of Hs25A01 with an Arabidopsis F-box-containing protein, a chalcone synthase and the translation initiation factor eIF-2 β subunit (eIF-2bs), making these proteins probable candidates for involvement in the observed changes in plant growth and parasitism. A role of eIF-2bs in the mediation of Hs25A01 virulence function is further supported by the observation that two independent eIF-2bs Arabidopsis knock-out lines were significantly more susceptible to H. schachtii. PMID:26575318

  6. Separable roles for Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESX-3 effectors in iron acquisition and virulence.

    PubMed

    Tufariello, JoAnn M; Chapman, Jessica R; Kerantzas, Christopher A; Wong, Ka-Wing; Vilchèze, Catherine; Jones, Christopher M; Cole, Laura E; Tinaztepe, Emir; Thompson, Victor; Fenyö, David; Niederweis, Michael; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Philips, Jennifer A; Jacobs, William R

    2016-01-19

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encodes five type VII secretion systems (T7SS), designated ESX-1-ESX-5, that are critical for growth and pathogenesis. The best characterized is ESX-1, which profoundly impacts host cell interactions. In contrast, the ESX-3 T7SS is implicated in metal homeostasis, but efforts to define its function have been limited by an inability to recover deletion mutants. We overcame this impediment using medium supplemented with various iron complexes to recover mutants with deletions encompassing select genes within esx-3 or the entire operon. The esx-3 mutants were defective in uptake of siderophore-bound iron and dramatically accumulated cell-associated mycobactin siderophores. Proteomic analyses of culture filtrate revealed that secretion of EsxG and EsxH was codependent and that EsxG-EsxH also facilitated secretion of several members of the proline-glutamic acid (PE) and proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) protein families (named for conserved PE and PPE N-terminal motifs). Substrates that depended on EsxG-EsxH for secretion included PE5, encoded within the esx-3 locus, and the evolutionarily related PE15-PPE20 encoded outside the esx-3 locus. In vivo characterization of the mutants unexpectedly showed that the ESX-3 secretion system plays both iron-dependent and -independent roles in Mtb pathogenesis. PE5-PPE4 was found to be critical for the siderophore-mediated iron-acquisition functions of ESX-3. The importance of this iron-acquisition function was dependent upon host genotype, suggesting a role for ESX-3 secretion in counteracting host defense mechanisms that restrict iron availability. Further, we demonstrate that the ESX-3 T7SS secretes certain effectors that are important for iron uptake while additional secreted effectors modulate virulence in an iron-independent fashion. PMID:26729876

  7. Cathepsin G-regulated Release of Formyl Peptide Receptor Agonists Modulate Neutrophil Effector Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Woloszynek, Josh C.; Hu, Ying; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases play an important role in inflammation by modulating neutrophil effector functions. We have previously shown that neutrophils deficient in the serine proteases cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase (CG/NE neutrophils) exhibit severe defects in chemokine CXCL2 release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production when activated on immobilized immune complex. Exogenously added active CG rescues these defects, but the mechanism remains undefined. Using a protease-based proteomic approach, we found that, in vitro, the addition of exogenous CG to immune complex-stimulated CG/NE neutrophils led to a decrease in the level of cell-associated annexin A1 (AnxA1) and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), both known inflammatory mediators. We further confirmed that, in vivo, CG was required for the extracellular release of AnxA1 and CRAMP in a subcutaneous air pouch model. In vitro, CG efficiently cleaved AnxA1, releasing the active N-terminal peptide Ac2-26, and processed CRAMP in limited fashion. Ac2-26 and CRAMP peptides enhanced the release of CXCL2 by CG/NE neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner via formyl peptide receptor (FPR) stimulation. Blockade of FPRs by an antagonist, Boc2 (t-Boc-Phe-d-Leu-Phe-d-Leu-Phe), abrogates CXCL2 release, whereas addition of FPR agonists, fMLF and F2L, relieves Boc2 inhibition. Furthermore, the addition of active CG, but not inactive CG, also relieves Boc2 inhibition. These findings suggest that CG modulates neutrophil effector functions partly by controlling the release (and proteolysis) of FPR agonists. Unexpectedly, we found that mature CRAMP, but not Ac2-26, induced ROS production through an FPR-independent pathway. PMID:22879591

  8. A unique wheat disease resistance-like gene governs effector-triggered susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Justin D.; Zhang, Zengcui; Lu, Huangjun; Lu, Shunwen; Reddy, Leela; Cloutier, Sylvie; Fellers, John P.; Meinhardt, Steven W.; Rasmussen, Jack B.; Xu, Steven S.; Oliver, Richard P.; Simons, Kristin J.; Friesen, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Plant disease resistance is often conferred by genes with nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) or serine/threonine protein kinase (S/TPK) domains. Much less is known about mechanisms of susceptibility, particularly to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. The pathogens that cause the diseases tan spot and Stagonospora nodorum blotch on wheat produce effectors (host-selective toxins) that induce susceptibility in wheat lines harboring corresponding toxin sensitivity genes. The effector ToxA is produced by both pathogens, and sensitivity to ToxA is governed by the Tsn1 gene on wheat chromosome arm 5BL. Here, we report the cloning of Tsn1, which was found to have disease resistance gene-like features, including S/TPK and NBS-LRR domains. Mutagenesis revealed that all three domains are required for ToxA sensitivity, and hence disease susceptibility. Tsn1 is unique to ToxA-sensitive genotypes, and insensitive genotypes are null. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Tsn1 arose in the B-genome diploid progenitor of polyploid wheat through a gene-fusion event that gave rise to its unique structure. Although Tsn1 is necessary to mediate ToxA recognition, yeast two-hybrid experiments suggested that the Tsn1 protein does not interact directly with ToxA. Tsn1 transcription is tightly regulated by the circadian clock and light, providing further evidence that Tsn1-ToxA interactions are associated with photosynthesis pathways. This work suggests that these necrotrophic pathogens may thrive by subverting the resistance mechanisms acquired by plants to combat other pathogens. PMID:20624958

  9. Broad Meloidogyne Resistance in Potato Based on RNA Interference of Effector Gene 16D10.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Phuong T Y; Zhang, Linhai; Mojtahedi, Hassan; Brown, Charles R; Elling, Axel A

    2015-03-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are a significant problem in potato (Solanum tuberosum) production. There is no potato cultivar with Meloidogyne resistance, even though resistance genes have been identified in wild potato species and were introgressed into breeding lines. The objectives of this study were to generate stable transgenic potato lines in a cv. Russet Burbank background that carry an RNA interference (RNAi) transgene capable of silencing the 16D10 Meloidogyne effector gene, and test for resistance against some of the most important root-knot nematode species affecting potato, i.e., M. arenaria, M. chitwoodi, M. hapla, M. incognita, and M. javanica. At 35 days after inoculation (DAI), the number of egg masses per plant was significantly reduced by 65% to 97% (P < 0.05) in the RNAi line compared to wild type and empty vector controls. The largest reduction was observed in M. hapla, whereas the smallest reduction occurred in M. javanica. Likewise, the number of eggs per plant was significantly reduced by 66% to 87% in M. arenaria and M. hapla, respectively, compared to wild type and empty vector controls (P < 0.05). Plant-mediated RNAi silencing of the 16D10 effector gene resulted in significant resistance against all of the root-knot nematode species tested, whereas R Mc1(blb) , the only known Meloidogyne resistance gene in potato, did not have a broad resistance effect. Silencing of 16D10 did not interfere with the attraction of M. incognita second-stage juveniles to roots, nor did it reduce root invasion. PMID:25861119

  10. Separable roles for Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESX-3 effectors in iron acquisition and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Chapman, Jessica R.; Kerantzas, Christopher A.; Wong, Ka-Wing; Vilchèze, Catherine; Jones, Christopher M.; Cole, Laura E.; Tinaztepe, Emir; Thompson, Victor; Fenyö, David; Niederweis, Michael; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Philips, Jennifer A.; Jacobs, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encodes five type VII secretion systems (T7SS), designated ESX-1–ESX-5, that are critical for growth and pathogenesis. The best characterized is ESX-1, which profoundly impacts host cell interactions. In contrast, the ESX-3 T7SS is implicated in metal homeostasis, but efforts to define its function have been limited by an inability to recover deletion mutants. We overcame this impediment using medium supplemented with various iron complexes to recover mutants with deletions encompassing select genes within esx-3 or the entire operon. The esx-3 mutants were defective in uptake of siderophore-bound iron and dramatically accumulated cell-associated mycobactin siderophores. Proteomic analyses of culture filtrate revealed that secretion of EsxG and EsxH was codependent and that EsxG–EsxH also facilitated secretion of several members of the proline-glutamic acid (PE) and proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) protein families (named for conserved PE and PPE N-terminal motifs). Substrates that depended on EsxG–EsxH for secretion included PE5, encoded within the esx-3 locus, and the evolutionarily related PE15–PPE20 encoded outside the esx-3 locus. In vivo characterization of the mutants unexpectedly showed that the ESX-3 secretion system plays both iron-dependent and -independent roles in Mtb pathogenesis. PE5–PPE4 was found to be critical for the siderophore-mediated iron-acquisition functions of ESX-3. The importance of this iron-acquisition function was dependent upon host genotype, suggesting a role for ESX-3 secretion in counteracting host defense mechanisms that restrict iron availability. Further, we demonstrate that the ESX-3 T7SS secretes certain effectors that are important for iron uptake while additional secreted effectors modulate virulence in an iron-independent fashion. PMID:26729876

  11. Absence of CD4(+) T cell help generates corrupt CD8(+) effector T cells in sarcoma-bearing Swiss mice treated with NLGP vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Biswas, Jaydip; Mallick, Atanu; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-07-01

    One of the prime objectives of cancer immunology and immunotherapy is to study the issues related to rescue and/or maintenance of the optimum effector CD8(+) T cell functions by minimizing tumor-induced negative factors. In this regard the influence of host intrinsic CD4(+) helper T cells towards generation and maintenance of CD8(+) effector T cells appears controversial in different experimental settings. Therefore, the present study was aimed to re-analyze the influence of CD4(+) helper T cells towards effector T cells during neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP)-vaccine-mediated tumor growth restriction. CD4 depletion (mAb; Clone GK1.5) surprisingly resulted in significant increase in CD8(+) T cells in different immune organs from NLGP-treated sarcoma-bearing mice. However, such CD8 surge could not restrict the sarcoma growth in NLGP-treated CD4-depleted mice. Furthermore, CD4 depletion in early phase hinders CD8(+) T cell activation and terminal differentiation by targeting crucial transcription factor Runx3. CD4 depletion decreases accumulation of CD8α(+) dendritic cells within tumor draining lymph node, hampers antigen cross priming and CD86-CD28 interactions for optimum CD8(+) T cell functions. In order to search the mechanism of CD4(+) T cell help on NLGP-mediated CD8 effector functions, the role of CD4(+) helper T cell-derived IL-2 on optimization of CD8 functions was found using STAT5 signaling, but complete response requires physical contact of CD4(+) helper T cells with its CD8 counterpart. In conclusion, it was found that CD4(+) T cell help is not required to generate CD8(+) T cells but was found to be an integral phenomenon in maintenance of its anti-tumor functions even in NLGP-vaccine-mediated sarcoma growth restriction. PMID:27178306

  12. A survey of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion system effector repertoire reveals several effectors that are deleterious when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The injection of nearly 30 effector proteins by the type III secretion system underlies the ability of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 to cause disease in tomato and other host plants. The search for effector functions is complicated by redundancy within the repertoire and by plant R-g...

  13. Deletions in the repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion effector genes reveal functional overlap among effectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals disarm and remodel host cells by injecting large repertoires of effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS). The repertoires of individual strains appear to function as robust systems that can tolerate loss of individual effectors with little or ...

  14. Destabilization of strigolactone receptor DWARF14 by binding of ligand and E3-ligase signaling effector DWARF3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Hua; Zhou, X Edward; Yi, Wei; Wu, Zhongshan; Liu, Yue; Kang, Yanyong; Hou, Li; de Waal, Parker W; Li, Suling; Jiang, Yi; Scaffidi, Adrian; Flematti, Gavin R; Smith, Steven M; Lam, Vinh Q; Griffin, Patrick R; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2015-11-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are endogenous hormones and exuded signaling molecules in plant responses to low levels of mineral nutrients. Key mediators of the SL signaling pathway in rice include the α/β-fold hydrolase DWARF 14 (D14) and the F-box component DWARF 3 (D3) of the ubiquitin ligase SCF(D3) that mediate ligand-dependent degradation of downstream signaling repressors. One perplexing feature is that D14 not only functions as the SL receptor but is also an active enzyme that slowly hydrolyzes diverse natural and synthetic SLs including GR24, preventing the crystallization of a binary complex of D14 with an intact SL as well as the ternary D14/SL/D3 complex. Here we overcome these barriers to derive a structural model of D14 bound to intact GR24 and identify the interface that is required for GR24-mediated D14-D3 interaction. The mode of GR24-mediated signaling, including ligand recognition, hydrolysis by D14, and ligand-mediated D14-D3 interaction, is conserved in structurally diverse SLs. More importantly, D14 is destabilized upon the binding of ligands and D3, thus revealing an unusual mechanism of SL recognition and signaling, in which the hormone, the receptor, and the downstream effectors are systematically destabilized during the signal transduction process. PMID:26470846

  15. Phytophthora infestans RXLR-WY Effector AVR3a Associates with Dynamin-Related Protein 2 Required for Endocytosis of the Plant Pattern Recognition Receptor FLS2.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Schwizer, Simon; Sklenar, Jan; Yoshida, Kentaro; Petre, Benjamin; Bos, Jorunn I B; Schornack, Sebastian; Jones, Alexandra M E; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens utilize effectors to suppress basal plant defense known as PTI (Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity). However, our knowledge of PTI suppression by filamentous plant pathogens, i.e. fungi and oomycetes, remains fragmentary. Previous work revealed that the co-receptor BAK1/SERK3 contributes to basal immunity against the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Moreover BAK1/SERK3 is required for the cell death induced by P. infestans elicitin INF1, a protein with characteristics of PAMPs. The P. infestans host-translocated RXLR-WY effector AVR3a is known to supress INF1-mediated cell death by binding the plant E3 ligase CMPG1. In contrast, AVR3aKI-Y147del, a deletion mutant of the C-terminal tyrosine of AVR3a, fails to bind CMPG1 and does not suppress INF1-mediated cell death. Here, we studied the extent to which AVR3a and its variants perturb additional BAK1/SERK3-dependent PTI responses in N. benthamiana using the elicitor/receptor pair flg22/FLS2 as a model. We found that all tested variants of AVR3a suppress defense responses triggered by flg22 and reduce internalization of activated FLS2. Moreover, we discovered that AVR3a associates with the Dynamin-Related Protein 2 (DRP2), a plant GTPase implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, silencing of DRP2 impaired ligand-induced FLS2 internalization but did not affect internalization of the growth receptor BRI1. Our results suggest that AVR3a associates with a key cellular trafficking and membrane-remodeling complex involved in immune receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that AVR3a is a multifunctional effector that can suppress BAK1/SERK3-mediated immunity through at least two different pathways. PMID:26348328

  16. Phytophthora infestans RXLR-WY Effector AVR3a Associates with Dynamin-Related Protein 2 Required for Endocytosis of the Plant Pattern Recognition Receptor FLS2

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Schwizer, Simon; Sklenar, Jan; Yoshida, Kentaro; Petre, Benjamin; Bos, Jorunn I. B.; Schornack, Sebastian; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens utilize effectors to suppress basal plant defense known as PTI (Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity). However, our knowledge of PTI suppression by filamentous plant pathogens, i.e. fungi and oomycetes, remains fragmentary. Previous work revealed that the co-receptor BAK1/SERK3 contributes to basal immunity against the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Moreover BAK1/SERK3 is required for the cell death induced by P. infestans elicitin INF1, a protein with characteristics of PAMPs. The P. infestans host-translocated RXLR-WY effector AVR3a is known to supress INF1-mediated cell death by binding the plant E3 ligase CMPG1. In contrast, AVR3aKI-Y147del, a deletion mutant of the C-terminal tyrosine of AVR3a, fails to bind CMPG1 and does not suppress INF1-mediated cell death. Here, we studied the extent to which AVR3a and its variants perturb additional BAK1/SERK3-dependent PTI responses in N. benthamiana using the elicitor/receptor pair flg22/FLS2 as a model. We found that all tested variants of AVR3a suppress defense responses triggered by flg22 and reduce internalization of activated FLS2. Moreover, we discovered that AVR3a associates with the Dynamin-Related Protein 2 (DRP2), a plant GTPase implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, silencing of DRP2 impaired ligand-induced FLS2 internalization but did not affect internalization of the growth receptor BRI1. Our results suggest that AVR3a associates with a key cellular trafficking and membrane-remodeling complex involved in immune receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that AVR3a is a multifunctional effector that can suppress BAK1/SERK3-mediated immunity through at least two different pathways. PMID:26348328

  17. Telepresence Master Glove Controller For Dexterous Robotic End-Effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, A. M.; Joyce, R. R.; Britt, J. P.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes recent research in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA's Ames Research Center to develop a glove-like, control and data-recording device (DataGlove) that records and transmits to a host computerin real time, and at appropriate resolution, a numeric data-record of a user's hand/finger shape and dynamics. System configuration and performance specifications are detailed, and current research is discussed investigating its applications in operator control of dexterous robotic end-effectors and for use as a human factors research tool in evaluation of operator hand function requirements and performance in other specialized task environments.

  18. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  19. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  20. Exact positioning of the robotic arm end effector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Fedir

    2016-07-01

    Orbital service becomes a new challenge of space exploration. The necessity to introduce it is connected first of all with an attractive opportunity to prolong the exploitation terms of expensive commercial satellites by, e.g., refilling of fuel or changing batteries. Other application area is a fight with permanently increasing amount of space litter - defunct satellites, burnt-out rocket stages, discarded trash and other debris. Now more than few tens of thousands orbiting objects larger than 5-10 cm (or about 1 million junks larger than 1 cm) are a huge problem for crucial and costly satellites and manned vehicles. For example, in 2014 the International Space Station had to change three times its orbit to avoid collision with space debris. So the development of the concepts and actions related to removal of space debris or non-operational satellites with use of robotic arm of a servicing satellite is very actual. Such a technology is also applicable for unmanned exploratory missions in solar system, for example for collecting a variety of samples from a celestial body surface. Naturally, the robotic arm movements should be controlled with great accuracy at influence of its non-rigidity, thermal and other factors. In these circumstances often the position of the arm end effector has to be controlled with high accuracy. The possibility of coordinate determination for the robotic arm end effector with use of a low frequency active electromagnetic system has been considered in the presented report. The proposed design of such a system consists of a small magnetic dipole source, which is mounted inside of the arm end effector and two or three 3-component magnetic field sensors mounted on a servicing satellite body. The data from this set of 3-component magnetic field sensors, which are fixed relatively to the satellite body, allows use of the mathematical approach for determination of position and orientation of the magnetic dipole source. The theoretical

  1. The Rab11 Effector Protein FIP1 Regulates Adiponectin Trafficking and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, Jose Maria; Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Mora, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine secreted by white adipocytes involved in regulating insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues. Secretion of adiponectin in adipocytes relies on the endosomal system, however, the intracellular machinery involved in mediating adiponectin release is unknown. We have previously reported that intracellular adiponectin partially compartmentalizes with rab 5 and rab11, markers for the early/sorting and recycling compartments respectively. Here we have examined the role of several rab11 downstream effector proteins (rab11 FIPs) in regulating adiponectin trafficking and secretion. Overexpression of wild type rab11 FIP1, FIP3 and FIP5 decreased the amount of secreted adiponectin expressed in HEK293 cells, whereas overexpression of rab11 FIP2 or FIP4 had no effect. Furthermore shRNA-mediated depletion of FIP1 enhanced adiponectin release whereas knock down of FIP5 decreased adiponectin secretion. Knock down of FIP3 had no effect. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, endogenous FIP1 co-distributed intracellularly with endogenous adiponectin and FIP1 depletion enhanced adiponectin release without altering insulin-mediated trafficking of the glucose transporter Glut4. While adiponectin receptors internalized with transferrin receptors, there were no differences in transferrin receptor recycling between wild type and FIP1 depleted adipocytes. Consistent with its inhibitory role, FIP1 expression was decreased during adipocyte differentiation, by treatment with thiazolidinediones, and with increased BMI in humans. In contrast, FIP1 expression increased upon exposure of adipocytes to TNFα. In all, our findings identify FIP1 as a novel protein involved in the regulation of adiponectin trafficking and release. PMID:24040321

  2. chinmo is a functional effector of the JAK/STAT pathway that regulates eye development, tumor formation and stem cell self-renewal in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Maria Sol; Salis, Pauline; Evans, Cory J.; Ekas, Laura A.; Marouf, Amine; Zavadil, Jiri; Banerjee, Utpal; Bach, Erika A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Drosophila STAT transcription factor Stat92E regulates diverse functions, including organ development and stem cell self-renewal. However, the Stat92E functional effectors that mediate these processes are largely unknown. Here we show that chinmo is a cell-autonomous, downstream mediator of Stat92E that shares numerous functions with this protein. Loss of either gene results in malformed eyes and head capsules due to defects in eye progenitor cells. Hyperactivation of Stat92E or misexpression of Chinmo results in blood cell tumors. Both proteins are expressed in germline (GSCs) and cyst stem cells (CySCs) in the testis. While Stat92E is required for the self-renewal of both populations, chinmo is only required in CySCs, indicating that Stat92E regulates self-renewal in different stem cells through independent effectors. Like hyperactivated Stat92E, Chinmo misexpression in CySCs is sufficient to maintain GSCs non-autonomously. Chinmo is therefore a key effector of JAK/STAT signaling in a variety of developmental and pathological contexts. PMID:20412771

  3. Investigation of a bio-inspired lift-enhancing effector on a 2D airfoil.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Joe; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2012-09-01

    A flap mounted on the upper surface of an airfoil, called a 'lift-enhancing effector', has been shown in wind tunnel tests to have a similar function to a bird's covert feathers, which rise off the wing's surface in response to separated flows. The effector, fabricated from a thin Mylar sheet, is allowed to rotate freely about its leading edge. The tests were performed in the NCSU subsonic wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4 × 10(5). The maximum lift coefficient with the effector was the same as that for the clean airfoil, but was maintained over an angle-of-attack range from 12° to almost 20°, resulting in a very gentle stall behavior. To better understand the aerodynamics and to estimate the deployment angle of the free-moving effector, fixed-angle effectors fabricated out of stiff wood were also tested. A progressive increase in the stall angle of attack with increasing effector angle was observed, with diminishing returns beyond the effector angle of 60°. Drag tests on both the free-moving and fixed effectors showed a marked improvement in drag at high angles of attack. Oil flow visualization on the airfoil with and without the fixed-angle effectors proved that the effector causes the separation point to move aft on the airfoil, as compared to the clean airfoil. This is thought to be the main mechanism by which an effector improves both lift and drag. A comparison of the fixed-effector results with those from the free-effector tests shows that the free effector's deployment angle is between 30° and 45°. When operating at and beyond the clean airfoil's stall angle, the free effector automatically deploys to progressively higher angles with increasing angles of attack. This slows down the rapid upstream movement of the separation point and avoids the severe reduction in the lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient that are seen on the clean airfoil at the onset of stall. Thus, the effector postpones the stall by 4-8° and makes the

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Small Secreted Cysteine-Rich Proteins Identifies Candidate Effector Proteins Potentially Involved in Fusarium graminearum-Wheat Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunwen; Edwards, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Pathogen-derived, small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of wheat. We report here a comprehensive analysis of SSCPs encoded in the genome of this fungus and selection of candidate effector proteins through proteomics and sequence/transcriptional analyses. A total of 190 SSCPs were identified in the genome of F. graminearum (isolate PH-1) based on the presence of N-terminal signal peptide sequences, size (≤200 amino acids), and cysteine content (≥2%) of the mature proteins. Twenty-five (approximately 13%) SSCPs were confirmed to be true extracellular proteins by nanoscale liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) analysis of a minimal medium-based in vitro secretome. Sequence analysis suggested that 17 SSCPs harbor conserved functional domains, including two homologous to Ecp2, a known effector produced by the tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. Transcriptional analysis revealed that at least 34 SSCPs (including 23 detected in the in vitro secretome) are expressed in infected wheat heads; about half are up-regulated with expression patterns correlating with the development of FHB. This work provides a solid candidate list for SSCP-derived effectors that may play roles in mediating F. graminearum-wheat interactions. The in vitro secretome-based method presented here also may be applicable for identifying candidate effectors in other ascomycete pathogens of crop plants. PMID:26524547

  5. In vivo inhibition of human CD19 targeted effector T cells by natural T regulatory cells in a xenotransplant murine model of B cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Hayman, Erik; Pegram, Hollie; Santos, Elmer; Heller, Glen; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2011-01-01

    Human T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specific to the B cell tumor antigen CD19 can successfully eradicate systemic human CD19+ tumors in immunocompromised SCID-Beige mice. However, in the clinical setting, CD4+ CD25hi T regulatory cells (Tregs) present within the tumor microenvironment are potent suppressors of tumor-targeted effector T cells. In order to assess the impact of Tregs on CAR-modified T cells in the SCID-Beige xenotransplant model, we isolated, genetically targeted and expanded natural T regulatory cells (nTregs). In vitro, nTregs, modified to express CD19 targeted CARs efficiently inhibited the proliferation of activated human T cells, as well as the capacity of CD19-targeted 19-28z+ effector T cells to lyse CD19+ Raji tumor cells. Intravenous infusion of CD19-targeted nTregs into SCID-Beige mice with systemic Raji tumors traffic to sites of tumor and recapitulate a clinically relevant hostile tumor microenvironment. Anti-tumor efficacy of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells was fully abrogated as assessed by long-term survival of treated mice. Optimal suppression by genetically targeted nTregs was dependent on nTreg to effector T cell ratios and in vivo nTreg activation. Prior infusion of cyclophosphamide in the setting of this nTreg-mediated hostile microenvironment was able to restore the anti-tumor activity of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells through the eradication of tumor targeted nTregs. These findings have significant implications on the design of future clinical trials utilizing CAR-based adoptive T cell therapies of cancer. PMID:21487038

  6. Neem leaf glycoprotein promotes dual generation of central and effector memory CD8(+) T cells against sarcoma antigen vaccine to induce protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that Neem Leaf Glycoprotein (NLGP) mediates sustained tumor protection by activating host immune response. Now we report that adjuvant help from NLGP predominantly generates CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high) central memory (TCM; in lymph node) and CD44(+)CD62L(low)CCR7(low) effector memory (TEM; in spleen) CD8(+) T cells of Swiss mice after vaccination with sarcoma antigen (SarAg). Generated TCM and TEM participated either to replenish memory cell pool for sustained disease free states or in rapid tumor eradication respectively. TCM generated after SarAg+NLGP vaccination underwent significant proliferation and IL-2 secretion following SarAg re-stimulation. Furthermore, SarAg+NLGP vaccination helps in greater survival of the memory precursor effector cells at the peak of the effector response and their maintenance as mature memory cells, in comparison to single modality treatment. Such response is corroborated with the reduced phosphorylation of FOXO in the cytosol and increased KLF2 in the nucleus associated with enhanced CD62L, CCR7 expression of lymph node-resident CD8(+) T cells. However, spleen-resident CD8(+) T memory cells show superior efficacy for immediate memory-to-effector cell conversion. The data support in all aspects that SarAg+NLGP demonstrate superiority than SarAg vaccination alone that benefits the host by rapid effector functions whenever required, whereas, central-memory cells are thought to replenish the memory cell pool for ultimate sustained disease free survival till 60 days following post-vaccination tumor inoculation. PMID:26851529

  7. Pseudomonas syringae type III secretion system effectors: repertoires in search of functions.

    PubMed

    Cunnac, Sébastien; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Collmer, Alan

    2009-02-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas syringae to grow and cause diseases in plants is dependent on the injection of multiple effector proteins into plant cells via the type III secretion system (T3SS). Genome-enabled bioinformatic/experimental methods have comprehensively identified the repertoires of effectors and related T3SS substrates for P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and three other sequenced strains. The effector repertoires are diverse and internally redundant. Insights into effector functions are being gained through the construction of mutants lacking one or more effector genes, which may be reduced in growth in planta, and through gain-of-function assays for the ability of single effectors to suppress plant innate immune defenses, manipulate hormone signaling, elicit cell death, and/or display biochemical activities on plant protein targets. PMID:19168384

  8. Effector triggered manipulation of host immune response elicited by different pathotypes of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jayamani, Elamparithi; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Effectors are virulence factors that are secreted by bacteria during an infection in order to subvert cellular processes or induce the surveillance system of the host. Pathogenic microorganisms encode effectors, toxins and components of secretion systems that inject the effectors to the host. Escherichia coli is part of the innocuous commensal microbial flora of the gastrointestinal tract. However, pathogenic E. coli can cause diarrheal and extraintestinal diseases. Pathogenic E. coli uses secretion systems to inject an array of effector proteins directly into the host cells. Herein, we discuss the effectors secreted by different pathotypes of E. coli and provide an overview of strategies employed by effectors to target the host cellular and subcellular processes as well as their role in triggering host immune response. PMID:25513774

  9. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  10. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 with signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) serves as a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint that limits the response of macrophages to antibody therapies, and CD47-blocking agents overcome this barrier to augment phagocytosis. The response of macrophages to antibody therapies can also be enhanced with engineered Fc variants, bispecific antibodies, or antibody-drug conjugates. Macrophages have demonstrated success as effectors of cancer immunotherapy, and further investigation will unlock their full potential for the benefit of patients. PMID:25667985

  11. Local sensory control of a dexterous end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Victor H.; Everett, Louis J.; Driels, Morris

    1990-01-01

    A numerical scheme was developed to solve the inverse kinematics for a user-defined manipulator. The scheme was based on a nonlinear least-squares technique which determines the joint variables by minimizing the difference between the target end effector pose and the actual end effector pose. The scheme was adapted to a dexterous hand in which the joints are either prismatic or revolute and the fingers are considered open kinematic chains. Feasible solutions were obtained using a three-fingered dexterous hand. An algorithm to estimate the position and orientation of a pre-grasped object was also developed. The algorithm was based on triangulation using an ideal sensor and a spherical object model. By choosing the object to be a sphere, only the position of the object frame was important. Based on these simplifications, a minimum of three sensors are needed to find the position of a sphere. A two dimensional example to determine the position of a circle coordinate frame using a two-fingered dexterous hand was presented.

  12. Flight Control Using Distributed Shape-Change Effector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Montgomery, Raymond C.; Green, Lawrence I.; Park, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent discoveries in material science and fluidics have been used to create a variety of novel effector devices that offer great potential to enable new approaches to aerospace vehicle flight control. Examples include small inflatable blisters, shape-memory alloy diaphragms, and piezoelectric patches that may be used to produce distortions or bumps on the surface of an airfoil to generate control moments. Small jets have also been used to produce a virtual shape-change through fluidic means by creating a recirculation bubble on the surface of an airfoil. An advanced aerospace vehicle might use distributed arrays of hundreds of such devices to generate moments for stabilization and maneuver control, either augmenting or replacing conventional ailerons, flaps or rudders. This research demonstrates the design and use of shape-change device arrays for a tailless aircraft in a low-rate maneuvering application. A methodology for assessing the control authority of the device arrays is described, and a suite of arrays is used in a dynamic simulation to illustrate allocation and deployment methodologies. Although the authority of the preliminary shape-change array designs studied in this paper appeared quite low, the simulation results indicate that the effector suite possessed sufficient authority to stabilize and maneuver the vehicle in mild turbulence.

  13. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 with signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) serves as a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint that limits the response of macrophages to antibody therapies, and CD47-blocking agents overcome this barrier to augment phagocytosis. The response of macrophages to antibody therapies can also be enhanced with engineered Fc variants, bispecific antibodies, or antibody-drug conjugates. Macrophages have demonstrated success as effectors of cancer immunotherapy, and further investigation will unlock their full potential for the benefit of patients. PMID:25667985

  14. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly.

    PubMed

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly ('Gibson assembly') that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  15. Posttranscriptional Control of T Cell Effector Function by Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Faubert, Brandon; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O’Sullivan, David; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; van der Windt, Gerritje J.W.; Blagih, Julianna; Qiu, Jing; Weber, Jason D.; Pearce, Edward J.; Jones, Russell G.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A “switch” from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of T cell activation and is thought to be required to meet the metabolic demands of proliferation. However, why proliferating cells adopt this less efficient metabolism, especially in an oxygen-replete environment, remains incompletely understood. We show here that aerobic glycolysis is specifically required for effector function in T cells but that this pathway is not necessary for proliferation or survival. When activated T cells are provided with costimulation and growth factors but are blocked from engaging glycolysis, their ability to produce IFN-γ is markedly compromised. This defect is translational and is regulated by the binding of the glycolysis enzyme GAPDH to AU-rich elements within the 3′ UTR of IFN-γ mRNA. GAPDH, by engaging/disengaging glycolysis and through fluctuations in its expression, controls effector cytokine production. Thus, aerobic glycolysis is a metabolically regulated signaling mechanism needed to control cellular function. PMID:23746840

  16. Method and apparatus for positioning a robotic end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Clifford W. (Inventor); Li, Larry C. H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic end effector and operation protocol for a reliable grasp of a target object irrespective of the target's contours is disclosed. A robotic hand includes a plurality of jointed fingers, one of which, like a thumb, is in opposed relation to the other. Each finger is comprised of at least two jointed sections, and provided with reflective proximity sensors, one on the inner surface of each finger section. Each proximity sensor comprises a transmitter of a beam of radiant energy and means for receiving reflections of the transmitted energy when reflected by a target object and for generating electrical signals responsive thereto. On the fingers opposed to the thumb, the proximity sensors on the outermost finger sections are aligned in an outer sensor array and the sensors on the intermediate finger sections and sensors on the innermost finger sections are similarly arranged to form an intermediate sensor array and an inner sensor array, respectively. The invention includes a computer system with software and/or circuitry for a protocol comprising the steps in sequence of: (1) approach axis alignment to maximize the number of outer layer sensors which detect the target; (2) non-contact contour following the target by the robot fingers to minimize target escape potential; and (3) closing to rigidize the target including dynamically re-adjusting the end effector finger alignment to compensate for target motion. A signal conditioning circuit and gain adjustment means are included to maintain the dynamic range of low power reflection signals.

  17. Physiological roles of Rab27 effectors in regulated exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Tetsuro

    2007-12-01

    Recent discoveries that Rab27a/b and their multiple effectors are involved in the regulated exocytosis of lysosome-related organelles and secretory granules have generated numerous related studies. However, not all of these studies have yielded physiologically relevant data because they were not all performed under physiological conditions. For example, "in vivo interactions" have been claimed without examination of the endogenous complex. In some studies, the only proof of interaction was between exogenously expressed proteins in cultured cells where these proteins are not normally expressed. Because regulated exocytic pathways contain highly differentiated secretory organelles, it is important to analyze the molecular interaction in cells harboring these organelles and the associated molecules. Furthermore, previous overexpression experiments to examine the effect on secretion often failed to compare the level of the exogenous protein with that of the endogenous one. Similarly, some knockdown experiments using small-interfering RNAs have only shown downregulation of the exogenously expressed protein, and not of the endogenous one. Many of the conflicting findings in previous studies may be attributable to these shortcomings. The present study summarizes our knowledge about the roles of Rab27 effectors in regulated exocytic pathways based on physiologically relevant data. PMID:17664848

  18. Innovative technology summary report: Confined sluicing end effector

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A Confined Sluicing End-Effector (CSEE) was field tested during the summer of 1997 in Tank W-3, one of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). It should be noted that the specific device used at the Oak Ridge Reservation demonstration was the Sludge Retrieval End-Effector (SREE), although in common usage it is referred to as the CSEE. Deployed by the Modified Light-Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA) and the Houdini remotely operated vehicle (ROV), the CSEE was used to mobilize and retrieve waste from the tank. After removing the waste, the CSEE was used to scarify the gunite walls of Tank W-3, removing approximately 0.1 in of material. The CSEE uses three rotating water-jets to direct a short-range pressurized jet of water to effectively mobilize the waste. Simultaneously, the water and dislodged tank waste, or scarified materials, are aspirated using a water-jet pump-driven conveyance system. The material is then pumped outside of the tank, where it can be stored for treatment. The technology, its performance, uses, cost, and regulatory issues are discussed.

  19. Evaluation of Secretion Prediction Highlights Differing Approaches Needed for Oomycete and Fungal Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Williams, Angela H.; Hane, James K.; Singh, Karam B.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The steadily increasing number of sequenced fungal and oomycete genomes has enabled detailed studies of how these eukaryotic microbes infect plants and cause devastating losses in food crops. During infection, fungal and oomycete pathogens secrete effector molecules which manipulate host plant cell processes to the pathogen's advantage. Proteinaceous effectors are synthesized intracellularly and must be externalized to interact with host cells. Computational prediction of secreted proteins from genomic sequences is an important technique to narrow down the candidate effector repertoire for subsequent experimental validation. In this study, we benchmark secretion prediction tools on experimentally validated fungal and oomycete effectors. We observe that for a set of fungal SwissProt protein sequences, SignalP 4 and the neural network predictors of SignalP 3 (D-score) and SignalP 2 perform best. For effector prediction in particular, the use of a sensitive method can be desirable to obtain the most complete candidate effector set. We show that the neural network predictors of SignalP 2 and 3, as well as TargetP were the most sensitive tools for fungal effector secretion prediction, whereas the hidden Markov model predictors of SignalP 2 and 3 were the most sensitive tools for oomycete effectors. Thus, previous versions of SignalP retain value for oomycete effector prediction, as the current version, SignalP 4, was unable to reliably predict the signal peptide of the oomycete Crinkler effectors in the test set. Our assessment of subcellular localization predictors shows that cytoplasmic effectors are often predicted as not extracellular. This limits the reliability of secretion predictions that depend on these tools. We present our assessment with a view to informing future pathogenomics studies and suggest revised pipelines for secretion prediction to obtain optimal effector predictions in fungi and oomycetes. PMID:26779196

  20. The criticality of high-resolution N-linked carbohydrate assays and detailed characterization of antibody effector function in the context of biosimilar development.

    PubMed

    Brady, Lowell J; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Visone, Devi B; Daugherty, Ken C; Bartron, Jeff L; Coon, Michael; Cornwall, Cabot; Hinckley, Peter J; Connell-Crowley, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement and functional characterization of antibody Fc domain N-linked glycans is critical to successful biosimilar development. Here, we describe the application of methods to accurately quantify and characterize the N-linked glycans of 2 IgG1 biosimilars with effector function activity, and show the potential pitfalls of using assays with insufficient resolution. Accurate glycan assessment was combined with glycan enrichment using lectin chromatography or production with glycosylation inhibitors to produce enriched pools of key glycan species for subsequent assessment in cell-based antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity effector function assays. This work highlights the challenges of developing high-quality biosimilar candidates and the need for modern biotechnology capabilities. These results show that high-quality analytics, combined with sensitive cell-based assays to study in vivo mechanisms of action, is an essential part of biosimilar development. PMID:25898160

  1. The criticality of high-resolution N-linked carbohydrate assays and detailed characterization of antibody effector function in the context of biosimilar development

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Lowell J; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Visone, Devi B; Daugherty, Ken C; Bartron, Jeff L; Coon, Michael; Cornwall, Cabot; Hinckley, Peter J; Connell-Crowley, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement and functional characterization of antibody Fc domain N-linked glycans is critical to successful biosimilar development. Here, we describe the application of methods to accurately quantify and characterize the N-linked glycans of 2 IgG1 biosimilars with effector function activity, and show the potential pitfalls of using assays with insufficient resolution. Accurate glycan assessment was combined with glycan enrichment using lectin chromatography or production with glycosylation inhibitors to produce enriched pools of key glycan species for subsequent assessment in cell-based antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity effector function assays. This work highlights the challenges of developing high-quality biosimilar candidates and the need for modern biotechnology capabilities. These results show that high-quality analytics, combined with sensitive cell-based assays to study in vivo mechanisms of action, is an essential part of biosimilar development. PMID:25898160

  2. The enteropathogenic E. coli effector EspH promotes actin pedestal formation and elongation via WASP-interacting protein (WIP)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alexander R. C.; Raymond, Benoit; Collins, James W.; Crepin, Valerie F.; Frankel, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Summary Enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) are diarrheagenic pathogens that colonize the gut mucosa via attaching-and-effacing lesion formation. EPEC and EHEC utilize a type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins that subvert host cell signalling to sustain colonization and multiplication. EspH, a T3SS effector that modulates actin dynamics, was implicated in the elongation of the EHEC actin pedestals. In this study we found that EspH is necessary for both efficient pedestal formation and pedestal elongation during EPEC infection. We report that EspH induces actin polymerization at the bacterial attachment sites independently of the Tir tyrosine residues Y474 and Y454, which are implicated in binding Nck and IRSp53/ITRKS respectively. Moreover, EspH promotes recruitment of neural Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and the Arp2/3 complex to the bacterial attachment site, in a mechanism involving the C-terminus of Tir and the WH1 domain of N-WASP. Dominant negative of WASP-interacting protein (WIP), which binds the N-WASP WH1 domain, diminished EspH-mediated actin polymerization. This study implicates WIP in EPEC-mediated actin polymerization and pedestal elongation and represents the first instance whereby N-WASP is efficiently recruited to the EPEC attachment sites independently of the Tir:Nck and Tir:IRTKS/IRSp53 pathways. Our study reveals the intricacies of Tir and EspH-mediated actin signalling pathways that comprise of distinct, convergent and synergistic signalling cascades. PMID:22372637

  3. Intracellular Complement Activation Sustains T Cell Homeostasis and Mediates Effector Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G.; Fara, Antonella F.; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C.; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T. Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While “tonic” intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  4. Intracellular complement activation sustains T cell homeostasis and mediates effector differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G; Fara, Antonella F; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-12

    Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While "tonic" intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  5. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES NATURAL CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE EFFECTOR CELL FUNCTION: EFFECTS ON MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of MnCl2 in mice caused an increase in macrophage functional activity. Spleen cell antibody-dependent cellmediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against both chicken erythrocytes and P815 tumor cell targets was enhanced 24 hours following a single injection...

  6. Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Fairchild, Amanda J.; Fritz, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Mediating variables are prominent in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an independent variable on a dependent variable. Differences between mediating variables and confounders, moderators, and covariates are outlined. Statistical methods to assess mediation and modern comprehensive approaches are described. Future directions for mediation analysis are discussed. PMID:16968208

  7. USP2-45 Is a Circadian Clock Output Effector Regulating Calcium Absorption at the Post-Translational Level

    PubMed Central

    Pouly, Daniel; Chenaux, Sébastien; Martin, Virginie; Babis, Maja; Koch, Rafael; Nagoshi, Emi; Katanaev, Vladimir L.; Gachon, Frédéric; Staub, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock influences most aspects of physiology and behavior through the transcriptional control of a wide variety of genes, mostly in a tissue-specific manner. About 20 clock-controlled genes (CCGs) oscillate in virtually all mammalian tissues and are generally considered as core clock components. One of them is Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 (Usp2), whose status remains controversial, as it may be a cogwheel regulating the stability or activity of core cogwheels or an output effector. We report here that Usp2 is a clock output effector related to bodily Ca2+ homeostasis, a feature that is conserved across evolution. Drosophila with a whole-body knockdown of the orthologue of Usp2, CG14619 (dUsp2-kd), predominantly die during pupation but are rescued by dietary Ca2+ supplementation. Usp2-KO mice show hyperabsorption of dietary Ca2+ in small intestine, likely due to strong overexpression of the membrane scaffold protein NHERF4, a regulator of the Ca2+ channel TRPV6 mediating dietary Ca2+ uptake. In this tissue, USP2-45 is found in membrane fractions and negatively regulates NHERF4 protein abundance in a rhythmic manner at the protein level. In clock mutant animals (Cry1/Cry2-dKO), rhythmic USP2-45 expression is lost, as well as the one of NHERF4, confirming the inverse relationship between USP2-45 and NHERF4 protein levels. Finally, USP2-45 interacts in vitro with NHERF4 and endogenous Clathrin Heavy Chain. Taken together these data prompt us to define USP2-45 as the first clock output effector acting at the post-translational level at cell membranes and possibly regulating membrane permeability of Ca2+. PMID:26756164

  8. Dynamic and thermodynamic response of the Ras protein Cdc42Hs upon association with the effector domain of PAK3.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Veronica R; Valentine, Kathleen G; Bédard, Sabrina; Kasinath, Vignesh; Dogan, Jakob; Love, Fiona M; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-10-23

    Human cell division cycle protein 42 (Cdc42Hs) is a small, Rho-type guanosine triphosphatase involved in multiple cellular processes through its interactions with downstream effectors. The binding domain of one such effector, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating p21-activated kinase 3, is known as PBD46. Nitrogen-15 backbone and carbon-13 methyl NMR relaxation was measured to investigate the dynamical changes in activated GMPPCP·Cdc42Hs upon PBD46 binding. Changes in internal motion of the Cdc42Hs, as revealed by methyl axis order parameters, were observed not only near the Cdc42Hs-PBD46 interface but also in remote sites on the Cdc42Hs molecule. The binding-induced changes in side-chain dynamics propagate along the long axis of Cdc42Hs away from the site of PBD46 binding with sharp distance dependence. Overall, the binding of the PBD46 effector domain on the dynamics of methyl-bearing side chains of Cdc42Hs results in a modest rigidification, which is estimated to correspond to an unfavorable change in conformational entropy of approximately -10kcalmol(-1) at 298K. A cluster of methyl probes closest to the nucleotide-binding pocket of Cdc42Hs becomes more rigid upon binding of PBD46 and is proposed to slow the catalytic hydrolysis of the γ phosphate moiety. An additional cluster of methyl probes surrounding the guanine ring becomes more flexible on binding of PBD46, presumably facilitating nucleotide exchange mediated by a guanosine exchange factor. In addition, the Rho insert helix, which is located at a site remote from the PBD46 binding interface, shows a significant dynamic response to PBD46 binding. PMID:25109462

  9. Elucidating the Role of Effectors in Plant-Fungal Interactions: Progress and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Selin, Carrie; de Kievit, Teresa R; Belmonte, Mark F; Fernando, W G Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi have diverse growth lifestyles that support fungal colonization on plants. Successful colonization and infection for all lifestyles depends upon the ability to modify living host plants to sequester the necessary nutrients required for growth and reproduction. Secretion of virulence determinants referred to as "effectors" is assumed to be the key governing factor that determines host infection and colonization. Effector proteins are capable of suppressing plant defense responses and alter plant physiology to accommodate fungal invaders. This review focuses on effector molecules of biotrophic and hemibiotrophic plant pathogenic fungi, and the mechanism required for the release and uptake of effector molecules by the fungi and plant cells, respectively. We also place emphasis on the discovery of effectors, difficulties associated with predicting the effector repertoire, and fungal genomic features that have helped promote effector diversity leading to fungal evolution. We discuss the role of specific effectors found in biotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi and examine how CRISPR/Cas9 technology may provide a new avenue for accelerating our ability in the discovery of fungal effector function. PMID:27199930

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Effector-Loop Mutants of CDC42 in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gladfelter, Amy S.; Moskow, John J.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    The highly conserved small GTPase Cdc42p is a key regulator of cell polarity and cytoskeletal organization in eukaryotic cells. Multiple effectors of Cdc42p have been identified, although it is unclear how their activities are coordinated to produce particular cell behaviors. One strategy used to address the contributions made by different effector pathways downstream of small GTPases has been the use of “effector-loop” mutants of the GTPase that selectively impair only a subset of effector pathways. We now report the generation and preliminary characterization of a set of effector-loop mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC42. These mutants define genetically separable pathways influencing actin or septin organization. We have characterized the phenotypic defects of these mutants and the binding defects of the encoded proteins to known yeast Cdc42p effectors in vitro. The results suggest that these effectors cannot account for the observed phenotypes, and therefore that unknown effectors exist that affect both actin and septin organization. The availability of partial function alleles of CDC42 in a genetically tractable system serves as a useful starting point for genetic approaches to identify such novel effectors. PMID:11359919

  11. Isolation and characterization of effector-loop mutants of CDC42 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gladfelter, A S; Moskow, J J; Zyla, T R; Lew, D J

    2001-05-01

    The highly conserved small GTPase Cdc42p is a key regulator of cell polarity and cytoskeletal organization in eukaryotic cells. Multiple effectors of Cdc42p have been identified, although it is unclear how their activities are coordinated to produce particular cell behaviors. One strategy used to address the contributions made by different effector pathways downstream of small GTPases has been the use of "effector-loop" mutants of the GTPase that selectively impair only a subset of effector pathways. We now report the generation and preliminary characterization of a set of effector-loop mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC42. These mutants define genetically separable pathways influencing actin or septin organization. We have characterized the phenotypic defects of these mutants and the binding defects of the encoded proteins to known yeast Cdc42p effectors in vitro. The results suggest that these effectors cannot account for the observed phenotypes, and therefore that unknown effectors exist that affect both actin and septin organization. The availability of partial function alleles of CDC42 in a genetically tractable system serves as a useful starting point for genetic approaches to identify such novel effectors. PMID:11359919

  12. Chronic Parasitic Infection Maintains High Frequencies of Short-Lived Ly6C+CD4+ Effector T Cells That Are Required for Protection against Re-infection

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nathan C.; Pagán, Antonio J.; Lawyer, Phillip G.; Hand, Timothy W.; Henrique Roma, Eric; Stamper, Lisa W.; Romano, Audrey; Sacks, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the ability of long-lived CD8+ memory T cells to mediate protection against systemic viral infections, the relationship between CD4+ T cell memory and acquired resistance against infectious pathogens remains poorly defined. This is especially true for T helper 1 (Th1) concomitant immunity, in which protection against reinfection coincides with a persisting primary infection. In these situations, pre-existing effector CD4 T cells generated by ongoing chronic infection, not memory cells, may be essential for protection against reinfection. We present a systematic study of the tissue homing properties, functionality, and life span of subsets of memory and effector CD4 T cells activated in the setting of chronic Leishmania major infection in resistant C57Bl/6 mice. We found that pre-existing, CD44+CD62L−T-bet+Ly6C+ effector (TEFF) cells that are short-lived in the absence of infection and are not derived from memory cells reactivated by secondary challenge, mediate concomitant immunity. Upon adoptive transfer and challenge, non-dividing Ly6C+ TEFF cells preferentially homed to the skin, released IFN-γ, and conferred protection as compared to CD44+CD62L−Ly6C− effector memory or CD44+CD62L+Ly6C− central memory cells. During chronic infection, Ly6C+ TEFF cells were maintained at high frequencies via reactivation of TCM and the TEFF themselves. The lack of effective vaccines for many chronic diseases may be because protection against infectious challenge requires the maintenance of pre-existing TEFF cells, and is therefore not amenable to conventional, memory inducing, vaccination strategies. PMID:25473946

  13. Genetic analysis of environmental strains of the plant pathogen Phytophthora capsici reveals heterogeneous repertoire of effectors and possible effector evolution via genomic island.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, María Josefina; Pascuan, Cecilia; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a virulent oomycete pathogen of many vegetable crops. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the recognition of the RXLR effector AVR3a1 of P. capsici (PcAVR3a1) triggers a hypersensitive response and plays a critical role in mediating non-host resistance. Here, we analyzed the occurrence of PcAVR3a1 in 57 isolates of P. capsici derived from globe squash, eggplant, tomato and bell pepper cocultivated in a small geographical area. The occurrence of PcAVR3a1 in environmental strains of P. capsici was confirmed by PCR in only 21 of these pathogen isolates. To understand the presence-absence pattern of PcAVR3a1 in environmental strains, the flanking region of this gene was sequenced. PcAVR3a1 was found within a genetic element that we named PcAVR3a1-GI (PcAVR3a1 genomic island). PcAVR3a1-GI was flanked by a 22-bp direct repeat, which is related to its site-specific recombination site. In addition to the PcAVR3a1 gene, PcAVR3a1-GI also encoded a phage integrase probably associated with the excision and integration of this mobile element. Exposure to plant induced the presence of an episomal circular intermediate of PcAVR3a1-GI, indicating that this mobile element is functional. Collectively, these findings provide evidence of PcAVR3a1 evolution via mobile elements in environmental strains of Phytophthora. PMID:26443834

  14. Programmed death 1 regulates memory phenotype CD4 T cell accumulation, inhibits expansion of the effector memory phenotype subset and modulates production of effector cytokines.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Joanna J; Tsoukatou, Debbie; Mamalaki, Clio; Chatzidakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Memory phenotype CD4 T cells are found in normal mice and arise through response to environmental antigens or homeostatic mechanisms. The factors that regulate the homeostasis of memory phenotype CD4 cells are not clear. In the present study we demonstrate that there is a marked accumulation of memory phenotype CD4 cells, specifically of the effector memory (T(EM)) phenotype, in lymphoid organs and tissues of mice deficient for the negative co-stimulatory receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1). This can be correlated with decreased apoptosis but not with enhanced homeostatic turnover potential of these cells. PD-1 ablation increased the frequency of memory phenotype CD4 IFN-γ producers but decreased the respective frequency of IL-17A-producing cells. In particular, IFN-γ producers were more abundant but IL-17A producing cells were more scarce among PD-1 KO T(EM)-phenotype cells relative to WT. Transfer of peripheral naïve CD4 T cells suggested that accumulated PD-1 KO T(EM)-phenotype cells are of peripheral and not of thymic origin. This accumulation effect was mediated by CD4 cell-intrinsic mechanisms as shown by mixed bone marrow chimera experiments. Naïve PD-1 KO CD4 T cells gave rise to higher numbers of TEM-phenotype lymphopenia-induced proliferation memory cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that PD-1 has an important role in determining the composition and functional aspects of memory phenotype CD4 T cell pool. PMID:25803808

  15. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  16. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  17. Prospects for engineering HIV-specific antibodies for enhanced effector function and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Austin W.; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review A wealth of recent animal model data suggests that as exciting possibilities for the use of antibodies in passive immunotherapy strategies continue to develop, it will be important to broadly consider how antibodies achieve anti-HIV-1 effect in vivo. Recent findings Beyond neutralization breadth and potency, substantial evidence from natural infection, vaccination, and studies in animal models points to a critical role for antibody Fc receptor (FcR) engagement in reducing risk of infection, decreasing postinfection viremia, and delaying viral rebound. Supporting these findings in the setting of HIV, the clinical maturation of recombinant antibody therapeutics has reinforced the importance of Fc-driven activity in vivo across many disease settings, as well as opportunely resulted in the development and exploration of a number of engineered Fc sequence and glycosylation variants that possess differential binding to FcRs. Exploiting these variants as tools, the individual and concerted effects of antibody effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition, phagocytosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody half-life, and compartmentalization are now being explored. As exciting molecular therapies are advanced, these studies promise to provide insight into optimal in-vivo antibody activity profiles. Summary Careful consideration of recent progress in understanding protective antibody activities in vivo can point toward how tailoring antibody activity via Fc domain modification may enable optimization of HIV prevention and eradication strategies. PMID:25700208

  18. Suppression of plant defenses by a Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) salivary effector protein

    PubMed Central

    Elzinga, Dezi A.; De Vos, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex interactions between aphids and their host plant are species-specific and involve multiple layers of recognition and defense. Aphid salivary proteins, which are released into the plant during phloem feeding, are a likely mediator of these interactions. In an approach to identify aphid effectors that facilitate feeding from host plants, eleven Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) salivary proteins and the GroEL protein of Buchnera aphidicola, a bacterial endosymbiont of this aphid species, were expressed transiently in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Whereas two salivary proteins increased aphid reproduction, expression of three other aphid proteins and GroEL significantly decreased aphid reproduction on N. tabacum. These effects were recapitulated in stable transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants. Further experiments with A. thaliana expressing Mp55, a salivary protein that increased aphid reproduction, showed lower accumulation of 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate, callose, and hydrogen peroxide in response to aphid feeding. Mp55-expressing plants also were more attractive for aphids in choice assays. Silencing Mp55 gene expression in M. persicae using RNA interference approaches reduced aphid reproduction on N. tabacum, A. thaliana, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Together, these results demonstrate a role for Mp55, a protein with as yet unknown molecular function, in the interaction of M. persicae with its host plants. PMID:24654979

  19. Repeat 1 of TAL effectors affects target specificity for the base at position zero

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Tom; Bonas, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    AvrBs3, the founding member of the Xanthomonas transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs), is translocated into the plant cell where it localizes to the nucleus and acts as transcription factor. The DNA-binding domain of AvrBs3 consists of 17.5 nearly-identical 34 amino acid-repeats. Each repeat specifies binding to one base in the target DNA via amino acid residues 12 and 13 termed repeat variable diresidue (RVD). Natural target sequences of TALEs are generally preceded by a thymine (T0), which is coordinated by a tryptophan residue (W232) in a degenerated repeat upstream of the canonical repeats. To investigate the necessity of T0 and the conserved tryptophan for AvrBs3-mediated gene activation we tested TALE mutant derivatives on target sequences preceded by all possible four bases. In addition, we performed domain swaps with TalC from a rice pathogenic Xanthomonas because TalC lacks the tryptophan residue, and the TalC target sequence is preceded by cytosine. We show that T0 works best and that T0 specificity depends on the repeat number and overall RVD-composition. T0 and W232 appear to be particularly important if the RVD of the first repeat is HD (‘rep1 effect’). Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanism of T0 recognition by TALE proteins and are important for TALE-based biotechnological applications. PMID:24792160

  20. Systemic Effector and Regulatory Immune Responses to Chlamydial Antigens in Trachomatous Trichiasis

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Alevtina; Horowitz, Amir; Joof, Hassan; Natividad, Angels; Tetteh, Kevin; Riley, Eleanor; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.; Holland, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Trachomatous trichiasis (TT) caused by repeated or chronic ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is the result of a pro-fibrotic ocular immune response. At the conjunctiva, the increased expression of both inflammatory (IL1B, TNF) and regulatory cytokines (IL10) have been associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We measured in vitro immune responses of peripheral blood to a number of chlamydial antigens. Peripheral blood effector cells (CD4, CD69, IFNγ, IL-10) and regulatory cells (CD4, CD25, FOXP3, CTLA4/GITR) were readily stimulated by C. trachomatis antigens but neither the magnitude (frequency or stimulation index) or the breadth and amount of cytokines produced in vitro [IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, IFNγ, and TNFα] were significantly different between TT cases and their non-diseased controls. Interestingly we observed that CD4+ T cells account for <50% of the IFNγ positive cells induced following stimulation. Further investigation in individuals selected from communities where exposure to ocular infection with C. trachomatis is endemic indicated that CD3−CD56+ (classical natural killer cells) were a major early source of IFNγ production in response to C. trachomatis elementary body stimulation and that the magnitude of this response increased with age. Future efforts to unravel the contribution of the adaptive immune response to conjunctival fibrosis should focus on the early events following infection and the interaction with innate immune mediated mechanisms of inflammation in the conjunctiva. PMID:21747780

  1. CTLA4Ig inhibits effector T cells through regulatory T cells and TGFβ1

    PubMed Central

    Deppong, Christine M.; Bricker, Traci L.; Rannals, Brandy D.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Green, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The CD28 costimulatory receptor is a critical regulator of T cell function making it an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of immune mediated diseases. CTLA4Ig, now approved for use in humans, prevents naive T cell activation by binding to B7-proteins and blocking engagement of CD28. However, CTLA4Ig suppresses inflammation even if administered when disease is established, suggesting alternative mechanisms. We identified a novel, CD28-independent mechanism by which CTLA4Ig inhibits activated T cells. We show that in vitro, CTLA4Ig synergizes with nitric oxide from bone marrow derived macrophages to inhibit T cell proliferation. Depletion of Tregs or interference with TGFβ signaling abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTLA4Ig. Parallel in vivo experiments using an allergic airway inflammation model demonstrated that this novel mechanism required both macrophages andTregs. Furthermore, CTLA4Ig was ineffective in SMAD3-deficient mice, supporting a requirement for TGFβ signaling. Thus, in addition to preventing naïve T cells from being fully activated, CTLA4Ig can turn off already activated effector T cells by an NO/Treg/TGFβ-dependent pathway. This mechanism is similar to cell extrinsic effects of endogenous CTLA-4 and may be particularly important in the ability of CTLA4Ig to treat chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:23956428

  2. IgG Subclasses and Allotypes: From Structure to Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vidarsson, Gestur; Dekkers, Gillian; Rispens, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Of the five immunoglobulin isotypes, immunoglobulin G (IgG) is most abundant in human serum. The four subclasses, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, which are highly conserved, differ in their constant region, particularly in their hinges and upper CH2 domains. These regions are involved in binding to both IgG-Fc receptors (FcγR) and C1q. As a result, the different subclasses have different effector functions, both in terms of triggering FcγR-expressing cells, resulting in phagocytosis or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and activating complement. The Fc-regions also contain a binding epitope for the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), responsible for the extended half-life, placental transport, and bidirectional transport of IgG to mucosal surfaces. However, FcRn is also expressed in myeloid cells, where it participates in both phagocytosis and antigen presentation together with classical FcγR and complement. How these properties, IgG-polymorphisms and post-translational modification of the antibodies in the form of glycosylation, affect IgG-function will be the focus of the current review. PMID:25368619

  3. Identification of Novel Membrane-binding Domains in Multiple Yeast Cdc42 Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe

    2007-01-01

    The Rho-type GTPase Cdc42 is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell polarity and signal transduction. In budding yeast, Cdc42 regulates polarity and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in part through the PAK-family kinase Ste20. Activation of Ste20 requires a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain, which mediates its recruitment to membrane-associated Cdc42. Here, we identify a separate domain in Ste20 that interacts directly with membrane phospholipids and is critical for its function. This short region, termed the basic-rich (BR) domain, can target green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane in vivo and binds PIP2-containing liposomes in vitro. Mutation of basic or hydrophobic residues in the BR domain abolishes polarized localization of Ste20 and its function in both MAP kinase–dependent and independent pathways. Thus, Cdc42 binding is required but is insufficient; instead, direct membrane binding by Ste20 is also required. Nevertheless, phospholipid specificity is not essential in vivo, because the BR domain can be replaced with several heterologous lipid-binding domains of varying lipid preferences. We also identify functionally important BR domains in two other yeast Cdc42 effectors, Gic1 and Gic2, suggesting that cooperation between protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions is a prevalent mechanism during Cdc42-regulated signaling and perhaps for other dynamic localization events at the cell cortex. PMID:17914055

  4. Suppression of plant defenses by a Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) salivary effector protein.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Dezi A; De Vos, Martin; Jander, Georg

    2014-07-01

    The complex interactions between aphids and their host plant are species-specific and involve multiple layers of recognition and defense. Aphid salivary proteins, which are released into the plant during phloem feeding, are a likely mediator of these interactions. In an approach to identify aphid effectors that facilitate feeding from host plants, eleven Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) salivary proteins and the GroEL protein of Buchnera aphidicola, a bacterial endosymbiont of this aphid species, were expressed transiently in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Whereas two salivary proteins increased aphid reproduction, expression of three other aphid proteins and GroEL significantly decreased aphid reproduction on N. tabacum. These effects were recapitulated in stable transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Further experiments with A. thaliana expressing Mp55, a salivary protein that increased aphid reproduction, showed lower accumulation of 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate, callose and hydrogen peroxide in response to aphid feeding. Mp55-expressing plants also were more attractive for aphids in choice assays. Silencing Mp55 gene expression in M. persicae using RNA interference approaches reduced aphid reproduction on N. tabacum, A. thaliana, and N. benthamiana. Together, these results demonstrate a role for Mp55, a protein with as-yet-unknown molecular function, in the interaction of M. persicae with its host plants. PMID:24654979

  5. Lung epithelial cells are essential effectors of inducible resistance to pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, Jeffrey O.; You, Dahui; Michaud, Danielle R.; Guzmán Pruneda, Francisco A.; Leiva Juarez, Miguel M.; Zhang, Jiexin; Weill, Patrick M.; Adachi, Roberto; Gong, Lei; Moghaddam, Seyed; Poynter, Matthew E.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Evans, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious pneumonias are a leading cause of death worldwide, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic stimulation of the lungs’ intrinsic defenses with a unique combination of inhaled Toll-like receptor agonists broadly protects mice against otherwise lethal pneumonias. As the survival benefit persists despite cytotoxic chemotherapy-related neutropenia, the cells required for protection were investigated. The inducibility of resistance was tested in mice with deficiencies of leukocyte lineages due to genetic deletions and in wild type mice with leukocyte populations significantly reduced by antibodies or toxins. Surprisingly, these serial reductions in leukocyte lineages did not appreciably impair inducible resistance, but targeted disruption of Toll-like receptor signaling in the lung epithelium resulted in complete abrogation of the protective effect. Isolated lung epithelial cells were also induced to kill pathogens in the absence of leukocytes. Proteomic and gene expression analyses of isolated epithelial cells and whole lungs revealed highly congruent antimicrobial responses. Taken together, these data indicate that lung epithelial cells are necessary and sufficient effectors of inducible resistance. These findings challenge conventional paradigms about the role of epithelia in antimicrobial defense and offer a novel potential intervention to protect patients with impaired leukocyte-mediated immunity from fatal pneumonias. PMID:23632328

  6. Prophage-Encoded Peroxidase in 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' Is a Secreted Effector That Suppresses Plant Defenses.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mukesh; Fleites, Laura A; Gabriel, Dean W

    2015-12-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is transmitted by psyllids and causes huanglongbing (HLB), a lethal disease of citrus. Most pathogenic 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains carry two nearly identical prophages similar to SC1 and SC2 in strain UF506. SC2 was observed to replicate as a moderately high-copy excision plasmid encoding a reactive oxygen species-scavenging peroxidase (SC2_gp095), a predicted lysogenic conversion factor. SC2_gp095 was expressed at significantly higher levels in periwinkle than in citrus and was suppressed in psyllids. SC2_gp095 was cloned in a shuttle vector and transformed into Escherichia coli and Liberibacter crescens, a culturable proxy for 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. Transformed L. crescens cells showed 20 to 25% enhanced resistance to H₂O₂on agar plates, 47% greater enzymatic activity, and enhanced growth in liquid cultures. A nonclassical secretion potential was predicted for SC2_gp095 and secretion from L. crescens was confirmed by enzymatic and Western blot analyses. Transient expression of SC2_gp095 in planta resulted in strong transcriptional downregulation of RbohB, the key gatekeeper of the H₂O₂-mediated defense signaling in plants, helping explain the surprisingly long incubation period (years) before HLB symptoms appear in 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected citrus. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' peroxidase is likely a secreted, horizontally acquired effector that suppresses host symptom development, a tactic used by most biotrophic plant pathogens. PMID:26313412

  7. Lim kinase, a bi-functional effector in injury-induced structural plasticity of synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The structural plasticity of synaptic terminals contributes to normal nervous system function but also to neural degeneration, in the form of terminal retraction, and regeneration, due to process growth. Synaptic morphological change is mediated through the actin cytoskeleton, which is enriched in axonal and dendritic terminals. Whereas the three RhoGTPases, RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac, function as upstream signaling nodes sensitive to extracellular stimuli, LIMK-cofilin activity serves as a common downstream effector to up-regulate actin turnover, which is necessary for both polymerization and depolymerization. The dual effects of LIMK activity make LIMK a potential target of therapeutic intervention for injury-induced synaptic plasticity, as LIMK inhibition can stabilize actin cytoskeleton and preserve existing structure. This therapeutic benefit of LIMK inhibition has been demonstrated in animal models of injury-induced axon retraction and neuritic sprouting by rod photoreceptors. A better understanding of the regulation of LIMK-cofilin activity and the interaction with the microtubular cytoskeleton may open new ways to promote synaptic regeneration that can benefit neuronal degenerative disease.

  8. Lung epithelial cells are essential effectors of inducible resistance to pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, J O; You, D; Michaud, D R; Pruneda, F A Guzmán; Juarez, M M Leiva; Zhang, J; Weill, P M; Adachi, R; Gong, L; Moghaddam, S J; Poynter, M E; Tuvim, M J; Evans, S E

    2014-01-01

    Infectious pneumonias are the leading cause of death worldwide, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic stimulation of the lungs' intrinsic defenses with a unique combination of inhaled Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists broadly protects mice against otherwise lethal pneumonias. As the survival benefit persists despite cytotoxic chemotherapy-related neutropenia, the cells required for protection were investigated. The inducibility of resistance was tested in mice with deficiencies of leukocyte lineages due to genetic deletions and in wild-type mice with leukocyte populations significantly reduced by antibodies or toxins. Surprisingly, these serial reductions in leukocyte lineages did not appreciably impair inducible resistance, but targeted disruption of TLR signaling in the lung epithelium resulted in complete abrogation of the protective effect. Isolated lung epithelial cells were also induced to kill pathogens in the absence of leukocytes. Proteomic and gene expression analyses of isolated epithelial cells and whole lungs revealed highly congruent antimicrobial responses. Taken together, these data indicate that lung epithelial cells are necessary and sufficient effectors of inducible resistance. These findings challenge conventional paradigms about the role of epithelia in antimicrobial defense and offer a novel potential intervention to protect patients with impaired leukocyte-mediated immunity from fatal pneumonias. PMID:23632328

  9. Effector, Memory, and Dysfunctional CD8+ T Cell Fates in the Antitumor Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune system plays a pivotal role in the host's ability to mount an effective, antigen-specific immune response against tumors. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) mediate tumor rejection through recognition of tumor antigens and direct killing of transformed cells. In growing tumors, TILs are often functionally impaired as a result of interaction with, or signals from, transformed cells and the tumor microenvironment. These interactions and signals can lead to transcriptional, functional, and phenotypic changes in TILs that diminish the host's ability to eradicate the tumor. In addition to effector and memory CD8+ T cells, populations described as exhausted, anergic, senescent, and regulatory CD8+ T cells have been observed in clinical and basic studies of antitumor immune responses. In the context of antitumor immunity, these CD8+ T cell subsets remain poorly characterized in terms of fate-specific biomarkers and transcription factor profiles. Here we discuss the current characterization of CD8+ T cell fates in antitumor immune responses and discuss recent insights into how signals in the tumor microenvironment influence TIL transcriptional networks to promote CD8+ T cell dysfunction. PMID:27314056

  10. Molecular regulation of effector and memory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, John T; Wherry, E John; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a cardinal feature of adaptive immunity and an important goal of vaccination strategies. Here we highlight advances in the understanding of the diverse T lymphocyte subsets that provide acute and long-term protection from infection. These include new insights into the transcription factors, and the upstream ‘pioneering’ factors that regulate their accessibility to key sites of gene regulation, as well as metabolic regulators that contribute to the differentiation of effector and memory subsets; ontogeny and defining characteristics of tissue-resident memory lymphocytes; and origins of the remarkable heterogeneity exhibited by activated T cells. Collectively, these findings underscore progress in delineating the underlying pathways that control diversification in T cell responses but also reveal gaps in the knowledge, as well as the challenges that arise in the application of this knowledge to rationally elicit desired T cell responses through vaccination and immunotherapy. PMID:25396352

  11. Cell-autonomous effector mechanisms against mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2014-10-01

    Few pathogens run the gauntlet of sterilizing immunity like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This organism infects mononuclear phagocytes and is also ingested by neutrophils, both of which possess an arsenal of cell-intrinsic effector mechanisms capable of eliminating it. Here Mtb encounters acid, oxidants, nitrosylating agents, and redox congeners, often exuberantly delivered under low oxygen tension. Further pressure is applied by withholding divalent Fe²⁺, Mn²⁺, Cu²⁺, and Zn²⁺, as well as by metabolic privation in the form of carbon needed for anaplerosis and aromatic amino acids for growth. Finally, host E3 ligases ubiquinate, cationic peptides disrupt, and lysosomal enzymes digest Mtb as part of the autophagic response to this particular pathogen. It is a testament to the evolutionary fitness of Mtb that sterilization is rarely complete, although sufficient to ensure most people infected with this airborne bacterium remain disease-free. PMID:25081628

  12. Intervention of Phytohormone Pathways by Pathogen Effectors[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kazan, Kemal; Lyons, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The constant struggle between plants and microbes has driven the evolution of multiple defense strategies in the host as well as offense strategies in the pathogen. To defend themselves from pathogen attack, plants often rely on elaborate signaling networks regulated by phytohormones. In turn, pathogens have adopted innovative strategies to manipulate phytohormone-regulated defenses. Tactics frequently employed by plant pathogens involve hijacking, evading, or disrupting hormone signaling pathways and/or crosstalk. As reviewed here, this is achieved mechanistically via pathogen-derived molecules known as effectors, which target phytohormone receptors, transcriptional activators and repressors, and other components of phytohormone signaling in the host plant. Herbivores and sap-sucking insects employ obligate pathogens such as viruses, phytoplasma, or symbiotic bacteria to intervene with phytohormone-regulated defenses. Overall, an improved understanding of phytohormone intervention strategies employed by pests and pathogens during their interactions with plants will ultimately lead to the development of new crop protection strategies. PMID:24920334

  13. The Commonalities in Bacterial Effector Inhibition of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Keith S; Aw, Rochelle

    2016-08-01

    Antiapoptotic pathways of the host cell play integral roles in bacterial pathogenesis, with inhibition of those pathways resulting in halted disease pathology. Certain pathogens have developed elegant mechanisms to modulate the fate of the host cell, many of which target novel pathways that are poorly understood in the context of the cell biology. Bacterial pathogenesis research not only promotes the understanding of the role of antiapoptotic pathways in bacterial infection, but has a broader context in understanding the epitome of human disease, that is, developing the understanding of tumorigenic or inflammatory pathways. Here we review host antiapoptotic signalling pathways manipulated by translocated bacterial effectors that propagate the disease state, drawing common parallels and showing the novel differences. PMID:27117049

  14. Wheat protein antigens and effector cells of aspecific immunity.

    PubMed

    Roccatello, D; Coppo, R; Cavalli, G; Piccoli, G; Amprimo, M C; Guerra, M G; Amore, A; Di Mauro, C; Quattrocchio, G; Cacace, G

    1990-04-01

    The effects of gliadin and glyc-gli on leukocyte chemiluminescence response, cytotoxic activity and locomotion were assessed in vitro. A dose-dependent increase in chemiluminescence response of neutrophils stimulated by Zymosan was observed by using gliadin at concentrations ranging between 1 and 20 micrograms. By increasing glyc-gli concentrations, a bimodal response was observed with an enhancement up to 50 micrograms/ml, followed by dose-dependent suppressive effects. The cytotoxic activity of a suspension of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on the human myeloid line K562 was assessed in a Chromium release assay. By pretreating effector cells with optimal doses of gliadin (5 micrograms/ml) or glyc-gli (50 micrograms/ml), an enhancement of cytotoxic activity, similar to that of the gamma-Interferon, could be achieved. Finally glyc-gli was found to elicit neutrophil chemokinesis. The possible implications of these findings in diseases characterized by gluten intolerance are discussed. PMID:1967061

  15. Thrombin A-Chain: Activation Remnant or Allosteric Effector?

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Isis S. R.; Vanden Hoek, Amanda L.; Pryzdial, Edward L. G.; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although prothrombin is one of the most widely studied enzymes in biology, the role of the thrombin A-chain has been neglected in comparison to the other domains. This paper summarizes the current data on the prothrombin catalytic domain A-chain region and the subsequent thrombin A-chain. Attention is given to biochemical characterization of naturally occurring prothrombin A-chain mutations and alanine scanning mutants in this region. While originally considered to be simply an activation remnant with little physiologic function, the thrombin A-chain is now thought to play a role as an allosteric effector in enzymatic reactions and may also be a structural scaffold to stabilize the protease domain. PMID:22084659

  16. Manufacture of an optical effector using silicon micro-machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrill, M. G.; McKenzie, J. S.; Clark, C.

    2000-03-01

    Using a complex micro-machined structure a novel optical-to-fluid pressure converter has been developed. The device offers immunity from electromagnetic interference and the potential for intrinsic safety. The effector, an improved version of a previous device, has been further miniaturized and fully micro-machined from silicon and glass. The device operates when light enters a sealed air-filled cell, formed within a silicon wafer, and is converted to heat by an absorber. The associated rise in temperature increases the pressure inside the cell and forces a diaphragm to move. The diaphragm movement is detected by a change in the back pressure of an impinging jet of fluid; which can be either pneumatic or hydraulic. The response time of the device, of the order of tens of milliseconds, has been further reduced as a result of miniaturization. This paper outlines the manufacturing technique and presents selected experimental test results.

  17. Immune Effector Mechanisms Implicated in Atherosclerosis: From Mice to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Lichtman, Andrew H.; Hansson, Göran K.

    2013-01-01

    According to the traditional view, atherosclerosis results from a passive buildup of cholesterol in the artery wall. Yet, burgeoning evidence implicates inflammation and immune effector mechanisms in the pathogenesis of this disease. Both innate and adaptive immunity operate during atherogenesis and link many traditional risk factors to altered arterial functions. Inflammatory pathways have become targets in the quest for novel preventive and therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease, a growing contributor to morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review current experimental and clinical knowledge of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through an immunological lens and how host defense mechanisms essential for survival of the species actually contribute to this chronic disease but also present new opportunities for its mitigation. PMID:23809160

  18. End effectors and attachments for buried waste excavation equipment

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Their efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Department`s needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex-situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment, and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. This report presents a literature search on the state-of-the-art in end effectors and attachments in support of excavator of buried transuranic waste. Included in the report are excavator platforms and a discussion of the various attachments. Also included is it list of vendors and specifications.

  19. Gibberellin Perception by the Gibberellin Receptor and its Effector Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoshima, Toshio; Murase, Kohji; Hirano, Yoshinori; Sun, Tai-Ping

    Gibberellins control a diverse range of growth and developmental processes in higher plants and have been widely utilized in the agricultural industry. By binding to a nuclear receptor GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1), gibberellins regulate gene expression by promoting degradation of the transcriptional regulator DELLA proteins. The precise manner in which GID1 discriminates and becomes activated by bioactive gibberellins for specific binding to DELLA proteins remains unclear. We present the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Arabidopsis thaliana GID1A, a bioactive gibberellin and the N-terminal DELLA domain of GAI. In this complex, GID1a occludes gibberellin in a deep binding pocket covered by its N-terminal helical switch region, which in turn interacts with the DELLA domain containing DELLA, VHYNP and LExLE motifs. Our results establish a structural model of a plant hormone receptor which is distinct from the hormone-perception mechanism and effector recognition of the known auxin receptors.

  20. Cell-Autonomous Effector Mechanisms against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    MacMicking, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Few pathogens run the gauntlet of sterilizing immunity like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This organism infects mononuclear phagocytes and is also ingested by neutrophils, both of which possess an arsenal of cell-intrinsic effector mechanisms capable of eliminating it. Here Mtb encounters acid, oxidants, nitrosylating agents, and redox congeners, often exuberantly delivered under low oxygen tension. Further pressure is applied by withholding divalent Fe2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+, as well as by metabolic privation in the form of carbon needed for anaplerosis and aromatic amino acids for growth. Finally, host E3 ligases ubiquinate, cationic peptides disrupt, and lysosomal enzymes digest Mtb as part of the autophagic response to this particular pathogen. It is a testament to the evolutionary fitness of Mtb that sterilization is rarely complete, although sufficient to ensure most people infected with this airborne bacterium remain disease-free. PMID:25081628

  1. Pointing Hand Stimuli Induce Spatial Compatibility Effects and Effector Priming

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Akio; Michimata, Chikashi

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the automatic influence of perceiving a picture that indicates other’s action on one’s own task performance in terms of spatial compatibility and effector priming. Participants pressed left and right buttons with their left and right hands respectively, depending on the color of a central dot target. Preceding the target, a left or right hand stimulus (pointing either to the left or right with the index or little finger) was presented. In Experiment 1, with brief presentation of the pointing hand, a spatial compatibility effect was observed: responses were faster when the direction of the pointed finger and the response position were spatially congruent than when incongruent. The spatial compatibility effect was larger for the pointing index finger stimulus compared to the pointing little finger stimulus. Experiment 2 employed longer duration of the pointing hand stimuli. In addition to the spatial compatibility effect for the pointing index finger, the effector priming effect was observed: responses were faster when the anatomical left/right identity of the pointing and response hands matched than when the pointing and response hands differed in left/right identity. The results indicate that with sufficient processing time, both spatial/symbolic and anatomical features of a static body part implying another’s action simultaneously influence different aspects of the perceiver’s own action. Hierarchical coding, according to which an anatomical code is used only when a spatial code is unavailable, may not be applicable if stimuli as well as responses contain anatomical features. PMID:23637688

  2. Protection after stroke: cellular effectors of neurovascular unit integrity

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Duque, Rafael Andres; Barreto, George E.; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders are prevalent worldwide. Cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 55% of all neurological diseases, are the leading cause of permanent disability, cognitive and motor disorders and dementia. Stroke affects the function and structure of blood-brain barrier, the loss of cerebral blood flow regulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and the loss of neural connections. Currently, no gold standard treatments are available outside the acute therapeutic window to improve outcome in stroke patients. Some promising candidate targets have been identified for the improvement of long-term recovery after stroke, such as Rho GTPases, cell adhesion proteins, kinases, and phosphatases. Previous studies by our lab indicated that Rho GTPases (Rac and RhoA) are involved in both tissue damage and survival, as these proteins are essential for the morphology and movement of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells, thus playing a critical role in the balance between cell survival and death. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of RhoA/ROCK blocks the activation of the neurodegeneration cascade. In addition, Rac and synaptic adhesion proteins (p120 catenin and N-catenin) play critical roles in protection against cerebral infarction and in recovery by supporting the neurovascular unit and cytoskeletal remodeling activity to maintain the integrity of the brain parenchyma. Interestingly, neuroprotective agents, such as atorvastatin, and CDK5 silencing after cerebral ischemia and in a glutamate-induced excitotoxicity model may act on the same cellular effectors to recover neurovascular unit integrity. Therefore, future efforts must focus on individually targeting the structural and functional roles of each effector of neurovascular unit and the interactions in neural and non-neural cells in the post-ischemic brain and address how to promote the recovery or prevent the loss of homeostasis in the short, medium and long term. PMID:25177270

  3. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein interactions in the context of living cells can generate critical information about localization, dynamics, and interacting partners. This information is particularly valuable in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Many pathogen proteins function within host cells in a variety of way such as, enabling evasion of the host immune system and survival within the intracellular environment. To study these pathogen-protein host-cell interactions, several approaches are commonly used, including: in vivo infection with a strain expressing a tagged or mutant protein, or introduction of pathogen genes via transfection or transduction. Each of these approaches has advantages and disadvantages. We sought a means to directly introduce exogenous proteins into cells. Electroporation is commonly used to introduce nucleic acids into cells, but has been more rarely applied to proteins although the biophysical basis is exactly the same. A standard electroporator was used to introduce affinity-tagged bacterial effectors into mammalian cells. Human epithelial and mouse macrophage cells were cultured by traditional methods, detached, and placed in 0.4 cm gap electroporation cuvettes with an exogenous bacterial pathogen protein of interest (e.g. Salmonella Typhimurium GtgE). After electroporation (0.3 kV) and a short (4 hr) recovery period, intracellular protein was verified by fluorescently labeling the protein via its affinity tag and examining spatial and temporal distribution by confocal microscopy. The electroporated protein was also shown to be functional inside the cell and capable of correct subcellular trafficking and protein-protein interaction. While the exogenous proteins tended to accumulate on the surface of the cells, the electroporated samples had large increases in intracellular effector concentration relative to incubation alone. The protocol is simple and fast enough to be done in a parallel fashion, allowing for high

  4. Homologous RXLR effectors from Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and Phytophthora sojae suppress immunity in distantly related plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse pathogens secrete effector proteins into plant cells to manipulate host cellular processes. Oomycete pathogens contain very large complements of predicted effector genes defined by an RXLR host cell entry motif. The genome of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa, downy mildew of Arabidopsis) ...

  5. How filamentous pathogens co-opt plants; the ins and outs of eukaryotic effectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on effectors secreted by pathogens during host attack has dominated the field of molecular plant-microbe interactions over recent years. Functional analysis of type III secreted effectors that are injected by pathogenic bacteria into host cells has significantly advanced the field and demon...

  6. Transgenic expression of Erwinia amylovora effectors eopB1 and hopCEa in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea), the causal agent of fire blight, uses a type three secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Once inside the host cell, these effector proteins are thought to be involved with suppressing host defense responses, redirecting normal host metab...

  7. Differential expression of candidate salivary effector proteins in field collections of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence is emerging that proteins secreted by gall forming plant-parasites are the effectors responsible for systemic changes in the host plant, such as galling and nutrient tissue formation. A large number of secreted salivary gland proteins (SSGPs) that are hypothesized to be the effectors respon...

  8. Elucidating the Role of Effectors in Plant-Fungal Interactions: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Selin, Carrie; de Kievit, Teresa R.; Belmonte, Mark F.; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi have diverse growth lifestyles that support fungal colonization on plants. Successful colonization and infection for all lifestyles depends upon the ability to modify living host plants to sequester the necessary nutrients required for growth and reproduction. Secretion of virulence determinants referred to as “effectors” is assumed to be the key governing factor that determines host infection and colonization. Effector proteins are capable of suppressing plant defense responses and alter plant physiology to accommodate fungal invaders. This review focuses on effector molecules of biotrophic and hemibiotrophic plant pathogenic fungi, and the mechanism required for the release and uptake of effector molecules by the fungi and plant cells, respectively. We also place emphasis on the discovery of effectors, difficulties associated with predicting the effector repertoire, and fungal genomic features that have helped promote effector diversity leading to fungal evolution. We discuss the role of specific effectors found in biotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi and examine how CRISPR/Cas9 technology may provide a new avenue for accelerating our ability in the discovery of fungal effector function. PMID:27199930

  9. Putative rust fungal effector proteins in infected bean and soybean leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant pathogenic fungi Uromyces appendiculatus and Phakopsora pachyrhizi cause debilitating rust diseases on common bean and soybean. These rust fungi secrete effector proteins that allow them to infect plants, but the effector repertoire for U. appendiculatus and P. pachyrhizi is not fully def...

  10. Molecular determinants of resistance activation and suppression by Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is able to rapidly evolve to overcome resistance genes. The pathogen accomplishes this by secreting an arsenal of proteins, termed effectors, that function to modify host cells. Although hundreds of candidate effectors have been identified in ...

  11. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F; Mattson, Mark P; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here, we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling. PMID:25515406

  12. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F.; Mattson, Mark P.; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling. PMID:25515406

  13. TAL effectors: highly adaptable phytobacterial virulence factors and readily engineered DNA targeting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Erin L.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are transcription factors injected into plant cells by pathogenic bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas. They function as virulence factors by activating host genes important for disease, or as avirulence factors by turning on genes that provide resistance. DNA binding specificity is encoded by polymorphic repeats in each protein that correspond one-to-one with different nucleotides. This code has facilitated target identification and opened new avenues for engineering disease resistance. It has also enabled TAL effector customization for targeted gene control, genome editing, and other applications. This article reviews the structural basis for TAL effector-DNA specificity, the impact of the TAL effector-DNA code on plant pathology and engineered resistance, and recent accomplishments and future challenges in TAL effector-based DNA targeting. PMID:23707478

  14. The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system employs diverse effector modules for intraspecific competition

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Daniel; Miyata, Sarah T.; Bachmann, Verena; Brooks, Teresa M.; Mullins, Travis; Kostiuk, Benjamin; Provenzano, Daniele; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that consists of over 200 serogroups with differing pathogenic potential. Only strains that express the virulence factors cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) are capable of pandemic spread of cholera diarrhoea. Regardless, all V. cholerae strains sequenced to date harbour genes for the type VI secretion system (T6SS) that translocates effectors into neighbouring eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Here we report that the effectors encoded within these conserved gene clusters differ widely among V. cholerae strains, and that immunity proteins encoded immediately downstream from the effector genes protect their host from neighbouring bacteria producing corresponding effectors. As a consequence, strains with matching effector-immunity gene sets can coexist, while strains with different sets compete against each other. Thus, the V. cholerae T6SS contributes to the competitive behaviour of this species. PMID:24686479

  15. MorTAL Kombat: the story of defense against TAL effectors through loss-of-susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Mathilde; Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Lopez, Camilo; Szurek, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-pathogenic xanthomonads rely on Transcription Activator-Like (TAL) effectors to colonize their host. This particular family of type III effectors functions as specific plant transcription factors via a programmable DNA-binding domain. Upon binding to the promoters of plant disease susceptibility genes in a sequence-specific manner, the expression of these host genes is induced. However, plants have evolved specific strategies to counter the action of TAL effectors and confer resistance. One mechanism is to avoid the binding of TAL effectors by mutations of their DNA binding sites, resulting in resistance by loss-of-susceptibility. This article reviews our current knowledge of the susceptibility hubs targeted by Xanthomonas TAL effectors, possible evolutionary scenarios for plants to combat the pathogen with loss-of-function alleles, and how this knowledge can be used overall to develop new pathogen-informed breeding strategies and improve crop resistance. PMID:26236326

  16. Structure of NS1A effector domain from the influenza A/Udorn/72 virus

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Robertus, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the effector domain of the influenza protein NS1, a validated antiviral drug target, has been solved in two space groups. The nonstructural protein NS1A from influenza virus is a multifunctional virulence factor and a potent inhibitor of host immunity. It has two functional domains: an N-terminal 73-amino-acid RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal effector domain. Here, the crystallographic structure of the NS1A effector domain of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus is presented. Structure comparison with the NS1 effector domain from mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus strain reveals a similar monomer conformation but a different dimer interface. Further analysis and evaluation shows that the dimer interface observed in the structure of the PR8 NS1 effector domain is likely to be a crystallographic packing effect. A hypothetical model of the intact NS1 dimer is presented.

  17. Molecular weaponry: diverse effectors delivered by the Type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Alcoforado Diniz, Juliana; Liu, Yi‐Chia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Type VI secretion system is a widespread bacterial nanomachine, used to deliver toxins directly into eukaryotic or prokaryotic target cells. These secreted toxins, or effectors, act on diverse cellular targets, and their action provides the attacking bacterial cell with a significant fitness advantage, either against rival bacteria or eukaryotic host organisms. In this review, we discuss the delivery of diverse effectors by the Type VI secretion system, the modes of action of the so‐called ‘anti‐bacterial’ and ‘anti‐eukaryotic’ effectors, the mechanism of self‐resistance against anti‐bacterial effectors and the evolutionary implications of horizontal transfer of Type VI secretion system‐associated toxins. Whilst it is likely that many more effectors remain to be identified, it is already clear that toxins delivered by this secretion system represent efficient weapons against both bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:26432982

  18. Legionella pneumophila, armed to the hilt: justifying the largest arsenal of effectors in the bacterial world.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Alexander W

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use dedicated translocation systems to deliver arsenals of effector proteins to their hosts. Once inside the host cytosol, these effectors modulate eukaryotic cell biology to acquire nutrients, block microbial degradation, subvert host defenses, and enable pathogen transmission to other hosts. Among all bacterial pathogens studied to date, the gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, maintains the largest arsenal of effectors, with over 330 effector proteins translocated by the Dot/Icm type IVB translocation system. In this review, I will discuss some of the recent work on understanding the consequences of this large arsenal. I will also present several models that seek to explain how L. pneumophila has acquired and subsequently maintained so many more effectors than its peers. PMID:26709975

  19. The regulatory T cell effector soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 induces tubular epithelial cell apoptosis in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zitong; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Long; Zhao, Tian; Hu, Linkun; Rong, Ruiming; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Tongyu

    2014-02-01

    Acute rejection (AR) hinders renal allograft survival. Tubular epithelial cell (TEC) apoptosis contributes to premature graft loss in AR, while the mechanism remains unclear. Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 (sFGL2), a novel effector of regulatory T cells (Treg), induces apoptosis to mediate tissue injury. We previously found that serum sFGL2 significantly increased in renal allograft rejection patients. In this study, the role of sFGL2 in AR was further investigated both in vivo and in vitro. The serum level of sFGL2 and the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg in the peripheral blood were measured in renal allograft recipients with AR or stable renal function (n = 30 per group). The human TEC was stimulated with sFGL2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or phosphate buffered saline and investigated for apoptosis in vitro. Apoptosis-associated genes expression in TEC was further assessed. Approval for this study was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Fudan University. Our results showed that the serum level of sFGL2, correlated with Treg in the peripheral blood, was significantly increased in the AR patients. In vitro, sFGL2 remarkably induced TEC apoptosis, with a significant up-regulation of proapoptotic genes, including CASP-3, CASP-8, CASP-9, CASP-10, TRADD, TNFSF10, FADD, FAS, FASLG, BAK1, BAD, BAX, and NF-KB1. However, no significant changes were observed in the expression of antiapoptotic genes, including CARD-18, NAIP, BCL2, IKBKB, and TBK1. Therefore, sFGL2, an effector of Treg, induces TEC apoptosis. Our study suggests that sFGL2 is a potential mediator in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection and provides novel insights into the role of Treg in AR. PMID:24414480

  20. A New Anti-CXCR4 Antibody That Blocks the CXCR4/SDF-1 Axis and Mobilizes Effector Cells.

    PubMed

    Broussas, Matthieu; Boute, Nicolas; Akla, Barbara; Berger, Sven; Beau-Larvor, Charlotte; Champion, Thierry; Robert, Alain; Beck, Alain; Haeuw, Jean-François; Goetsch, Liliane; Bailly, Christian; Dumontet, Charles; Matthes, Thomas; Corvaia, Nathalie; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The type IV C-X-C-motif chemokine receptor (CXCR4) is expressed in a large variety of human cancers, including hematologic malignancies, and this receptor and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), play a crucial role in cancer progression. We generated a humanized immunoglobulin G1 mAb, hz515H7, which binds human CXCR4, efficiently competes for SDF-1 binding, and induces a conformational change in CXCR4 homodimers. Furthermore, it inhibits both CXCR4 receptor-mediated G-protein activation and β-arrestin-2 recruitment following CXCR4 activation. The binding of the hz515H7 antibody to CXCR4 inhibits the SDF-1-induced signaling pathway, resulting in reduced phosphorylation of downstream effectors, such as Akt, Erk1/2, p38, and GSK3β. Hz515H7 also strongly inhibits cell migration and proliferation and, while preserving normal blood cells, induces both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity against neoplastic cells. In mouse xenograft models, hz515H7 displays antitumor activities with multiple hematologic tumor cell lines, with its Fc-mediated effector functions proving essential in this context. Furthermore, hz515H7 binds to primary tumor cells from acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma patients. Collectively, our results demonstrate two major mechanisms of action, making hz515H7 unique in this regard. Its potential as a best-in-class molecule is currently under investigation in a phase I clinical trial. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1890-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27297868

  1. Multiple Xanthomonas euvesicatoria Type III Effectors Inhibit flg22-Triggered Immunity.

    PubMed

    Popov, Georgy; Fraiture, Malou; Brunner, Frederic; Sessa, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Xanthomonas euvesicatoria is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease in pepper and tomato. X. euvesicatoria bacteria interfere with plant cellular processes by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion (T3S) system. About 35 T3S effectors have been identified in X. euvesicatoria 85-10, and a few of them were implicated in suppression of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). We used an Arabidopsis thaliana pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify X. euvesicatoria 85-10 effectors that interfere with PTI signaling induced by the bacterial peptide flg22. Of 33 tested effectors, 17 inhibited activation of a PTI-inducible promoter. Among them, nine effectors also interfered with activation of an abscisic acid-inducible promoter. However, effectors that inhibited flg22-induced signaling did not affect phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases acting downstream of flg22 perception. Further investigation of selected effectors revealed that XopAJ, XopE2, and XopF2 inhibited activation of a PTI-inducible promoter by the bacterial peptide elf18 in Arabidopsis protoplasts and by flg22 in tomato protoplasts. The effectors XopF2, XopE2, XopAP, XopAE, XopH, and XopAJ inhibited flg22-induced callose deposition in planta and enhanced disease symptoms caused by attenuated Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. Finally, selected effectors were found to localize to various plant subcellular compartments. These results indicate that X. euvesicatoria bacteria utilize multiple T3S effectors to suppress flg22-induced signaling acting downstream or in parallel to MAP kinase cascades and suggest they act through different molecular mechanisms. PMID:27529660

  2. The genome sequence and effector complement of the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini

    PubMed Central

    Nemri, Adnane; Saunders, Diane G. O.; Anderson, Claire; Upadhyaya, Narayana M.; Win, Joe; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Jones, David A.; Kamoun, Sophien; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi cause serious yield reductions on crops, including wheat, barley, soybean, coffee, and represent real threats to global food security. Of these fungi, the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini has been developed most extensively over the past 80 years as a model to understand the molecular mechanisms that underpin pathogenesis. During infection, M. lini secretes virulence effectors to promote disease. The number of these effectors, their function and their degree of conservation across rust fungal species is unknown. To assess this, we sequenced and assembled de novo the genome of M. lini isolate CH5 into 21,130 scaffolds spanning 189 Mbp (scaffold N50 of 31 kbp). Global analysis of the DNA sequence revealed that repetitive elements, primarily retrotransposons, make up at least 45% of the genome. Using ab initio predictions, transcriptome data and homology searches, we identified 16,271 putative protein-coding genes. An analysis pipeline was then implemented to predict the effector complement of M. lini and compare it to that of the poplar rust, wheat stem rust and wheat stripe rust pathogens to identify conserved and species-specific effector candidates. Previous knowledge of four cloned M. lini avirulence effector proteins and two basidiomycete effectors was used to optimize parameters of the effector prediction pipeline. Markov clustering based on sequence similarity was performed to group effector candidates from all four rust pathogens. Clusters containing at least one member from M. lini were further analyzed and prioritized based on features including expression in isolated haustoria and infected leaf tissue and conservation across rust species. Herein, we describe 200 of 940 clusters that ranked highest on our priority list, representing 725 flax rust candidate effectors. Our findings on this important model rust species provide insight into how effectors of rust fungi are conserved across species and how they may act to promote infection on their

  3. QueTAL: a suite of tools to classify and compare TAL effectors functionally and phylogenetically

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Lamy, Léo; Gordon, Jonathan L.; Escalon, Aline; Cunnac, Sébastien; Szurek, Boris; Gagnevin, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like (TAL) effectors from Xanthomonas plant pathogenic bacteria can bind to the promoter region of plant genes and induce their expression. DNA-binding specificity is governed by a central domain made of nearly identical repeats, each determining the recognition of one base pair via two amino acid residues (a.k.a. Repeat Variable Di-residue, or RVD). Knowing how TAL effectors differ from each other within and between strains would be useful to infer functional and evolutionary relationships, but their repetitive nature precludes reliable use of traditional alignment methods. The suite QueTAL was therefore developed to offer tailored tools for comparison of TAL effector genes. The program DisTAL considers each repeat as a unit, transforms a TAL effector sequence into a sequence of coded repeats and makes pair-wise alignments between these coded sequences to construct trees. The program FuncTAL is aimed at finding TAL effectors with similar DNA-binding capabilities. It calculates correlations between position weight matrices of potential target DNA sequence predicted from the RVD sequence, and builds trees based on these correlations. The programs accurately represented phylogenetic and functional relationships between TAL effectors using either simulated or literature-curated data. When using the programs on a large set of TAL effector sequences, the DisTAL tree largely reflected the expected species phylogeny. In contrast, FuncTAL showed that TAL effectors with similar binding capabilities can be found between phylogenetically distant taxa. This suite will help users to rapidly analyse any TAL effector genes of interest and compare them to other available TAL genes and should improve our understanding of TAL effectors evolution. It is available at http://bioinfo-web.mpl.ird.fr/cgi-bin2/quetal/quetal.cgi. PMID:26284082

  4. Diverse Secreted Effectors Are Required for Salmonella Persistence in a Mouse Infection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kidwai, Afshan S.; Mushamiri, Ivy T.; Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-08-12

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes typhoid-like disease in mice and is a model of typhoid fever in humans. One of the hallmarks of typhoid is persistence, the ability of the bacteria to survive in the host weeks after infection. Virulence factors called effectors facilitate this process by direct transfer to the cytoplasm of infected cells thereby subverting cellular processes. Secretion of effectors to the cell cytoplasm takes place through multiple routes, including two separate type III secretion (T3SS) apparati as well as outer membrane vesicles. The two T3SS are encoded on separate pathogenicity islands, SPI-1 and -2, with SPI-1 more strongly associated with the intestinal phase of infection, and SPI-2 with the systemic phase. Both T3SS are required for persistence, but the effectors required have not been systematically evaluated. In this study, mutations in 48 described effectors were tested for persistence. We replaced each effector with a specific DNA barcode sequence by allelic exchange and co-infected with a wild-type reference to calculate the ratio of wild-type parent to mutant at different times after infection. The competitive index (CI) was determined by quantitative PCR in which primers that correspond to the barcode were used for amplification. Mutations in all but seven effectors reduced persistence demonstrating that most effectors were required. One exception was CigR, a recently discovered effector that is widely conserved throughout enteric bacteria. Deletion of cigR increased lethality, suggesting that it may be an anti-virulence factor. The fact that almost all Salmonella effectors are required for persistence argues against redundant functions. This is different from effector repertoires in other intracellular pathogens such as Legionella.

  5. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Diane G O; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M; Szabo, Les J; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components. PMID:22238666

  6. The Conformation of a Plasma Membrane-Localized Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase Complex Is Altered by a Potato Aphid-Derived Effector1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hsuan-Chieh; Hicks, Glenn R.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are transmembrane receptors involved in plant immunity. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carries three SERK members. One of these, SlSERK1, is required for Mi-1.2-mediated resistance to potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Mi-1.2 encodes a coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein that in addition to potato aphids confers resistance to two additional phloem-feeding insects and to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). How SlSERK1 participates in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance is unknown, and no Mi-1.2 cognate pest effectors have been identified. Here, we study the mechanistic involvement of SlSERK1 in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance. We show that potato aphid saliva and protein extracts induce the Mi-1.2 defense marker gene SlWRKY72b, indicating that both saliva and extracts contain a Mi-1.2 recognized effector. Resistant tomato cultivar Motelle (Mi-1.2/Mi-1.2) plants overexpressing SlSERK1 were found to display enhanced resistance to potato aphids. Confocal microscopy revealed that Mi-1.2 localizes at three distinct subcellular compartments: the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments in these tomato plants and in Nicotiana benthamiana transiently expressing Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 showed that Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 colocalize only in a microsomal complex. Interestingly, bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis showed that the interaction of Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 at the plasma membrane distinctively changes in the presence of potato aphid saliva, suggesting a model in which a constitutive complex at the plasma membrane participates in defense signaling upon effector binding. PMID:27208261

  7. The Conformation of a Plasma Membrane-Localized Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase Complex Is Altered by a Potato Aphid-Derived Effector.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsuan-Chieh; Mantelin, Sophie; Hicks, Glenn R; Takken, Frank L W; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2016-07-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are transmembrane receptors involved in plant immunity. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carries three SERK members. One of these, SlSERK1, is required for Mi-1.2-mediated resistance to potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Mi-1.2 encodes a coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein that in addition to potato aphids confers resistance to two additional phloem-feeding insects and to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). How SlSERK1 participates in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance is unknown, and no Mi-1.2 cognate pest effectors have been identified. Here, we study the mechanistic involvement of SlSERK1 in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance. We show that potato aphid saliva and protein extracts induce the Mi-1.2 defense marker gene SlWRKY72b, indicating that both saliva and extracts contain a Mi-1.2 recognized effector. Resistant tomato cultivar Motelle (Mi-1.2/Mi-1.2) plants overexpressing SlSERK1 were found to display enhanced resistance to potato aphids. Confocal microscopy revealed that Mi-1.2 localizes at three distinct subcellular compartments: the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments in these tomato plants and in Nicotiana benthamiana transiently expressing Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 showed that Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 colocalize only in a microsomal complex. Interestingly, bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis showed that the interaction of Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 at the plasma membrane distinctively changes in the presence of potato aphid saliva, suggesting a model in which a constitutive complex at the plasma membrane participates in defense signaling upon effector binding. PMID:27208261

  8. Conformational Masking and Receptor-Dependent Unmasking of Highly Conserved Env Epitopes Recognized by Non-Neutralizing Antibodies That Mediate Potent ADCC against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Finzi, Andrés; DeVico, Anthony L; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-09-01

    The mechanism of antibody-mediated protection is a major focus of HIV-1 vaccine development and a significant issue in the control of viremia. Virus neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both, are major mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1, although other mechanisms, such as virus aggregation, are known. The interplay between virus neutralization and Fc-mediated effector function in protection against HIV-1 is complex and only partially understood. Passive immunization studies using potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) show that both neutralization and Fc-mediated effector function provides the widest dynamic range of protection; however, a vaccine to elicit these responses remains elusive. By contrast, active immunization studies in both humans and non-human primates using HIV-1 vaccine candidates suggest that weakly neutralizing or non-neutralizing antibodies can protect by Fc-mediated effector function, albeit with a much lower dynamic range seen for passive immunization with bnAbs. HIV-1 has evolved mechanisms to evade each type of antibody-mediated protection that must be countered by a successful AIDS vaccine. Overcoming the hurdles required to elicit bnAbs has become a major focus of HIV-1 vaccine development. Here, we discuss a less studied problem, the structural basis of protection (and its evasion) by antibodies that protect only by potent Fc-mediated effector function. PMID:26393642

  9. Efficient disruption and replacement of an effector gene in the oomycete Phytophthora sojae using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Tyler, Brett M

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae is an oomycete pathogen of soybean. As a result of its economic importance, P. sojae has become a model for the study of oomycete genetics, physiology and pathology. The lack of efficient techniques for targeted mutagenesis and gene replacement have long hampered genetic studies of pathogenicity in Phytophthora species. Here, we describe a CRISPR/Cas9 system enabling rapid and efficient genome editing in P. sojae. Using the RXLR effector gene Avr4/6 as a target, we observed that, in the absence of a homologous template, the repair of Cas9-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in P. sojae was mediated by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), primarily resulting in short indels. Most mutants were homozygous, presumably as a result of gene conversion triggered by Cas9-mediated cleavage of non-mutant alleles. When donor DNA was present, homology-directed repair (HDR) was observed, which resulted in the replacement of Avr4/6 with the NPT II gene. By testing the specific virulence of several NHEJ mutants and HDR-mediated gene replacements in soybean, we have validated the contribution of Avr4/6 to recognition by soybean R gene loci, Rps4 and Rps6, but also uncovered additional contributions to resistance by these two loci. Our results establish a powerful tool for the study of functional genomics in Phytophthora, which provides new avenues for better control of this pathogen. PMID:26507366

  10. Proline Isomerization of the Immune Receptor-Interacting Protein RIN4 by a Cyclophilin Inhibits Effector-Triggered Immunity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Ma, Xiqing; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Yadeta, Koste A.; Ding, Pengfei; Dong, Liansai; Zhao, Yan; Li, Xiuming; Yu, Yufei; Zhang, Ling; Shen, Qian-Hua; Xia, Bin; Coaker, Gitta; Liu, Dong; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY In the absence of pathogen infection, plant effector-triggered immune (ETI) receptors are maintained in a preactivation state by intermolecular interactions with other host proteins. Pathogen effector-induced alterations activate the receptor. In Arabidopsis, the ETI receptor RPM1 is activated via bacterial effector AvrB-induced phosphorylation of the RPM1-interacting protein RIN4 at Threonine 166. We find that RIN4 also interacts with the prolyl-peptidyl isomerase (PPIase) ROC1, which is reduced upon RIN4 Thr166 phosphorylation. ROC1 suppresses RPM1 immunity in a PPIase-dependent manner. Consistent with this, RIN4 Pro149 undergoes cis/trans isomerization in the presence of ROC1. While the RIN4P149V mutation abolishes RPM1 resistance, the deletion of Pro149 leads to RPM1 activation in the absence of RIN4 phosphorylation. These results support a model in which RPM1 directly senses conformational changes in RIN4 surrounding Pro149 that is controlled by ROC1. RIN4 Thr166 phosphorylation indirectly regulates RPM1 resistance by modulating the ROC1-mediated RIN4 isomerization. PMID:25299333

  11. Deregulation of Rab and Rab Effector Genes in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Joel R.; Chapeaublanc, Elodie; Kirkwood, Lisa; Nicolle, Remy; Benhamou, Simone; Lebret, Thierry; Allory, Yves; Southgate, Jennifer; Radvanyi, François; Goud, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that Rab GTPases, key regulators of intracellular transport in eukaryotic cells, play an important role in cancer. We analysed the deregulation at the transcriptional level of the genes encoding Rab proteins and Rab-interacting proteins in bladder cancer pathogenesis, distinguishing between the two main progression pathways so far identified in bladder cancer: the Ta pathway characterized by a high frequency of FGFR3 mutation and the carcinoma in situ pathway where no or infrequent FGFR3 mutations have been identified. A systematic literature search identified 61 genes encoding Rab proteins and 223 genes encoding Rab-interacting proteins. Transcriptomic data were obtained for normal urothelium samples and for two independent bladder cancer data sets corresponding to 152 and 75 tumors. Gene deregulation was analysed with the SAM (significant analysis of microarray) test or the binomial test. Overall, 30 genes were down-regulated, and 13 were up-regulated in the tumor samples. Five of these deregulated genes (LEPRE1, MICAL2, RAB23, STXBP1, SYTL1) were specifically deregulated in FGFR3-non-mutated muscle-invasive tumors. No gene encoding a Rab or Rab-interacting protein was found to be specifically deregulated in FGFR3-mutated tumors. Cluster analysis showed that the RAB27 gene cluster (comprising the genes encoding RAB27 and its interacting partners) was deregulated and that this deregulation was associated with both pathways of bladder cancer pathogenesis. Finally, we found that the expression of KIF20A and ZWINT was associated with that of proliferation markers and that the expression of MLPH, MYO5B, RAB11A, RAB11FIP1, RAB20 and SYTL2 was associated with that of urothelial cell differentiation markers. This systematic analysis of Rab and Rab effector gene deregulation in bladder cancer, taking relevant tumor subgroups into account, provides insight into the possible roles of Rab proteins and their effectors in bladder cancer pathogenesis

  12. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, T.J.; Vansteelandt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects through other pathways. The approaches proposed here accommodate exposure-mediator interactions and, to a certain extent, mediator-mediator interactions as well. The methods handle binary or continuous mediators and binary, continuous or count outcomes. When the mediators affect one another, the strategy of trying to assess direct and indirect effects one mediator at a time will in general fail; the approach given in this paper can still be used. A characterization is moreover given as to when the sum of the mediated effects for multiple mediators considered separately will be equal to the mediated effect of all of the mediators considered jointly. The approach proposed in this paper is robust to unmeasured common causes of two or more mediators. PMID:25580377

  13. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Plays a Critical Role in Naive and Effector Murine T Cells but Not Natural Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ramadan A; Camick, Christina; Wiles, Katherine; Walseth, Timothy F; Slama, James T; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Giovannucci, David R; Wall, Katherine A

    2016-02-26

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing second messenger discovered to date, has been implicated in Ca(2+) signaling in some lymphomas and T cell clones. In contrast, the role of NAADP in Ca(2+) signaling or the identity of the Ca(2+) stores targeted by NAADP in conventional naive T cells is less clear. In the current study, we demonstrate the importance of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals in murine naive T cells. Combining live-cell imaging methods and a pharmacological approach using the NAADP antagonist Ned-19, we addressed the involvement of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals evoked by TCR stimulation and the role of this signal in downstream physiological end points such as proliferation, cytokine production, and other responses to stimulation. We demonstrated that acidic compartments in addition to the endoplasmic reticulum were the Ca(2+) stores that were sensitive to NAADP in naive T cells. NAADP was shown to evoke functionally relevant Ca(2+) signals in both naive CD4 and naive CD8 T cells. Furthermore, we examined the role of this signal in the activation, proliferation, and secretion of effector cytokines by Th1, Th2, Th17, and CD8 effector T cells. Overall, NAADP exhibited a similar profile in mediating Ca(2+) release in effector T cells as in their counterpart naive T cells and seemed to be equally important for the function of these different subsets of effector T cells. This profile was not observed for natural T regulatory cells. PMID:26728458

  14. Autophagy mediates the mitotic senescence transition

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrew R.J.; Narita, Masako; Ferreira, Manuela; Kirschner, Kristina; Sadaie, Mahito; Darot, Jeremy F.J.; Tavaré, Simon; Arakawa, Satoko; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Watt, Fiona M.; Narita, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    As a stress response, senescence is a dynamic process involving multiple effector mechanisms whose combination determines the phenotypic quality. Here we identify autophagy as a new effector mechanism of senescence. Autophagy is activated during senescence and its activation is correlated with negative feedback in the PI3K–mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. A subset of autophagy-related genes are up-regulated during senescence: Overexpression of one of those genes, ULK3, induces autophagy and senescence. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy delays the senescence phenotype, including senescence-associated secretion. Our data suggest that autophagy, and its consequent protein turnover, mediate the acquisition of the senescence phenotype. PMID:19279323

  15. Bacterial effector HopF2 interacts with AvrPto and suppresses Arabidopsis innate immunity at the plasma membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogenic bacteria inject a cocktail of effector proteins into host plant cells to modulate the host immune response, thereby promoting pathogenicity. How or whether these effectors work cooperatively is largely unknown. The Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 effector HopF2 suppresses the host plan...

  16. Memory CD4 T cells emerge from effector T-cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Laurie E; Janowski, Karen M; Oliver, James R; Zajac, Allan J; Weaver, Casey T

    2008-03-20

    A hallmark of adaptive immunity is the generation of memory T cells that confer long-lived, antigen-specific protection against repeat challenges by pathogens. Understanding the mechanisms by which memory T cells arise is important for rational vaccination strategies and improved therapeutic interventions for chronic infections and autoimmune disorders. The large clonal expansion of CD8 T cells in response to some infections has made the development of CD8 T-cell memory more amenable to study, giving rise to a model of memory cell differentiation in which a fraction of fully competent effector T cells transition into long-lived memory T cells. Delineation of CD4 T-cell memory development has proved more difficult as a result of limitations on tracking the smaller populations of CD4 effector T cells generated during a pathogenic challenge, complicating efforts to determine whether CD4 memory T cells are direct descendants of effector T cells or whether they develop by alternative pathways. Here, using two complementary cytokine reporter mouse models to identify interferon (IFN)-gamma-positive effector T cells and track their fate, we show that the lineage relationship between effector and memory CD4 T cells resembles that for CD8 T cells responding to the same pathogen. We find that, in parallel with effector CD8 T cells, IFN-gamma-positive effector CD4 T cells give rise to long-lived memory T cells capable of anamnestic responses to antigenic rechallenge. PMID:18322463

  17. Studying the Mechanism of Plasmopara viticola RxLR Effectors on Suppressing Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jiang; Li, Xinlong; Wu, Jiao; Yin, Ling; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The RxLR effector family, produced by oomycete pathogens, may manipulate host physiological and biochemical events inside host cells. A group of putative RxLR effectors from Plasmopara viticola have been recently identified by RNA-Seq analysis in our lab. However, their roles in pathogenesis are poorly understood. In this study, we attempted to characterize 23 PvRxLR effector candidates identified from a P. viticola isolate “ZJ-1-1.” During host infection stages, expression patterns of the effector genes were varied and could be categorized into four different groups. By using transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana, we found that 17 of these effector candidates fully suppressed programmed cell death elicited by a range of cell death-inducing proteins, including BAX, INF1, PsCRN63, PsojNIP, PvRxLR16 and R3a/Avr3a. We also discovered that all these PvRxLRs could target the plant cell nucleus, except for PvRxLR55 that localized to the membrane. Furthermore, we identified a single effector, PvRxLR28, that showed the highest expression level at 6 hpi. Functional analysis revealed that PvRxLR28 could significantly enhance susceptibilities of grapevine and tobacco to pathogens. These results suggest that most P. viticola effectors tested in this study may act as broad suppressors of cell death to manipulate immunity in plant. PMID:27242731

  18. Pathogen-induced inflammatory environment controls effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Obar, Joshua J; Jellison, Evan R; Sheridan, Brian S; Blair, David A; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Zickovich, Julianne M; Lefrançois, Leo

    2011-11-15

    In response to infection, CD8(+) T cells integrate multiple signals and undergo an exponential increase in cell numbers. Simultaneously, a dynamic differentiation process occurs, resulting in the formation of short-lived effector cells (SLECs; CD127(low)KLRG1(high)) and memory precursor effector cells (CD127(high)KLRG1(low)) from an early effector cell that is CD127(low)KLRG1(low) in phenotype. CD8(+) T cell differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection differed significantly than during Listeria monocytogenes infection with a substantial reduction in early effector cell differentiation into SLECs. SLEC generation was dependent on Ebi3 expression. Furthermore, SLEC differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection was enhanced by administration of CpG-DNA, through an IL-12-dependent mechanism. Moreover, CpG-DNA treatment enhanced effector CD8(+) T cell functionality and memory subset distribution, but in an IL-12-independent manner. Population dynamics were dramatically different during secondary CD8(+) T cell responses, with a much greater accumulation of SLECs and the appearance of a significant number of CD127(high)KLRG1(high) memory cells, both of which were intrinsic to the memory CD8(+) T cell. These subsets persisted for several months but were less effective in recall than memory precursor effector cells. Thus, our data shed light on how varying the context of T cell priming alters downstream effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation. PMID:21987662

  19. A massive expansion of effector genes underlies gall-formation in the wheat pest Mayetiola destructor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Escalante, Lucio Navarro; Chen, Hang; Benatti, Thiago R; Qu, Jiaxin; Chellapilla, Sanjay; Waterhouse, Robert M; Wheeler, David; Andersson, Martin N; Bao, Riyue; Batterton, Matthew; Behura, Susanta K; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Caragea, Doina; Carolan, James C; Coyle, Marcus; El-Bouhssini, Mustapha; Francisco, Liezl; Friedrich, Markus; Gill, Navdeep; Grace, Tony; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Herndon, Nicolae; Holder, Michael; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Johnson, Alisha J; Kalra, Divya; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Lara, Fremiet; Lee, Sandra L; Liu, Xuming; Löfstedt, Christer; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Muzny, Donna M; Nagar, Swapnil; Nazareth, Lynne V; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Perales, Lora; Peterson, Brittany F; Pu, Ling-Ling; Robertson, Hugh M; Schemerhorn, Brandon J; Scherer, Steven E; Shreve, Jacob T; Simmons, DeNard; Subramanyam, Subhashree; Thornton, Rebecca L; Xue, Kun; Weissenberger, George M; Williams, Christie E; Worley, Kim C; Zhu, Dianhui; Zhu, Yiming; Harris, Marion O; Shukle, Richard H; Werren, John H; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Chen, Ming-Shun; Brown, Susan J; Stuart, Jeffery J; Richards, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Gall-forming arthropods are highly specialized herbivores that, in combination with their hosts, produce extended phenotypes with unique morphologies [1]. Many are economically important, and others have improved our understanding of ecology and adaptive radiation [2]. However, the mechanisms that these arthropods use to induce plant galls are poorly understood. We sequenced the genome of the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor; Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a plant parasitic gall midge and a pest of wheat (Triticum spp.), with the aim of identifying genic modifications that contribute to its plant-parasitic lifestyle. Among several adaptive modifications, we discovered an expansive reservoir of potential effector proteins. Nearly 5% of the 20,163 predicted gene models matched putative effector gene transcripts present in the M. destructor larval salivary gland. Another 466 putative effectors were discovered among the genes that have no sequence similarities in other organisms. The largest known arthropod gene family (family SSGP-71) was also discovered within the effector reservoir. SSGP-71 proteins lack sequence homologies to other proteins, but their structures resemble both ubiquitin E3 ligases in plants and E3-ligase-mimicking effectors in plant pathogenic bacteria. SSGP-71 proteins and wheat Skp proteins interact in vivo. Mutations in different SSGP-71 genes avoid the effector-triggered immunity that is directed by the wheat resistance genes H6 and H9. Results point to effectors as the agents responsible for arthropod-induced plant gall formation. PMID:25660540

  20. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sirjana Devi; Chapman, Patrick; Zhang, Yun; Gijzen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076) with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains. PMID:26930612

  1. Cytolytic effector function is present in resting peripheral T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Geisberg, M; Dupont, B

    1992-11-01

    Antigen-specific cytotoxic killer lymphocytes (CTLs) represent one of the major effector functions of the immune system. It is well established that, as a consequence of TCR recognition of the antigen-bearing target cell, resting T lymphocytes develop into fully active antigen-specific CTLs. In contrast, natural killer (NK) cells are immediately lytic upon contact with an appropriate target cell. The lytic machinery of CTLs and NK cells is thought to include the contents of their cytoplasmic granules, in particular the pore-forming protein perforin. Here we report direct cytolytic activity by resting peripheral CD3+CD8+ T cells as a result of TCR-CD3 binding to the target cell; the murine OKT3 hybridoma (anti-human CD3) was used as a target. The cytotoxicity was more pronounced in the CD8+CD45RO+ population, which contains 'memory' T cells, than in the reciprocal CD8+CD45RA+ subset; CD8+CD4- mature thymocytes were non-cytotoxic. The cytolytic potential of these populations correlated with the presence or absence of perforin. The results demonstrate that the cytolytic machinery of T cells develops post-thymically and can be immediately triggered by TCR-CD3 stimulation. PMID:1472478

  2. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, E; Perut, F; Roncuzzi, L; Zini, N; Baglìo, S R; Baldini, N

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg) showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies. PMID:25241964

  3. Effector selection precedes reach planning in the dorsal parietofrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence and computational modeling suggest that target selection for reaching is associated with the parallel encoding of multiple movement plans in the dorsomedial posterior parietal cortex (dmPPC) and the caudal part of the dorsal premotor cortex (PMdc). We tested the hypothesis that a similar mechanism also accounts for arm selection for unimanual reaching, with simultaneous and separate motor goal representations for the left and right arms existing in the right and left parietofrontal cortex, respectively. We recorded simultaneous electroencephalograms and functional MRI and studied a condition in which subjects had to select the appropriate arm for reaching based on the color of an appearing visuospatial target, contrasting it to a condition in which they had full knowledge of the arm to be used before target onset. We showed that irrespective of whether subjects had to select the arm or not, activity in dmPPC and PMdc was only observed contralateral to the reaching arm after target onset. Furthermore, the latency of activation in these regions was significantly delayed when arm selection had to be achieved during movement planning. Together, these results demonstrate that effector selection is not achieved through the simultaneous specification of motor goals tied to the two arms in bilateral parietofrontal cortex, but suggest that a motor goal is formed in these regions only after an arm is selected for action. PMID:22457458

  4. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  5. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sirjana Devi; Chapman, Patrick; Zhang, Yun; Gijzen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076) with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains. PMID:26930612

  6. Targeted mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana using engineered TAL effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Christian, Michelle; Qi, Yiping; Zhang, Yong; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-10-01

    Custom TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) are increasingly used as reagents to manipulate genomes in vivo. Here, we used TALENs to modify the genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We engineered seven TALENs targeting five Arabidopsis genes, namely ADH1, TT4, MAPKKK1, DSK2B, and NATA2. In pooled seedlings expressing the TALENs, we observed somatic mutagenesis frequencies ranging from 2-15% at the intended targets for all seven TALENs. Somatic mutagenesis frequencies as high as 41-73% were observed in individual transgenic plant lines expressing the TALENs. Additionally, a TALEN pair targeting a tandemly duplicated gene induced a 4.4-kb deletion in somatic cells. For the most active TALEN pairs, namely those targeting ADH1 and NATA2, we found that TALEN-induced mutations were transmitted to the next generation at frequencies of 1.5-12%. Our work demonstrates that TALENs are useful reagents for achieving targeted mutagenesis in this important plant model. PMID:23979944

  7. Receptor-coupled effector systems and their interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the modulation of intracellular signal generation by receptor-coupled effector systems in B lymphocytes, and whether these alterations are consistent with the effects of prostaglandins. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate) and sn-1,2,-dioctanoylglycerol (diC{sub 8}) substitute for lipid derived signals which activate protein kinase C. Pretreating splenocytes from athymic nude mice with 100nM TPA or 5 {mu}M diC{sub 8} potentiated the forskolin-induced increased in cAMP (measured by radioimmunoassay) 2.5 and 3.0 times (respectively), but they decreased the PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP rise 48% and 35% (respectively). Goat anti-mouse IgM, which activates diacylglycerol production, potentiated the forskolin-induced cAMP increase by 76%, but reduced that of PGE{sub 1} by 30%. Rabbit anti-mouse IgG, its F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragment, or goat anti-mouse IGM induced increases in the cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}), (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}, which TPA inhibited. In contrast, TPA potential antibody-induced {sup 3}H-thymidine (85x) and {sup 3}H-uridine (30x) uptake in B lymphocytes.

  8. Membrane flickering of the human erythrocyte: physical and chemical effectors.

    PubMed

    Puckeridge, Max; Chapman, Bogdan E; Conigrave, Arthur D; Kuchel, Philip W

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies suggest a link between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration and the amplitude of cell membrane flickering (CMF) in the human erythrocyte (red blood cell; RBC). Potentially, the origin of this phenomenon and the unique discocyte shape could be active processes that account for some of the ATP turnover in the RBC. Active flickering could depend on several factors, including pH, osmolality, enzymatic rates and metabolic fluxes. In the present work, we applied the data analysis described in the previous article to study time courses of flickering RBCs acquired using differential interference contrast light microscopy in the presence of selected effectors. We also recorded images of air bubbles in aqueous detergent solutions and oil droplets in water, both of which showed rapid fluctuations in image intensity, the former showing the same type of spectral envelope (relative frequency composition) to RBCs. We conclude that CMF is not directly an active process, but that ATP affects the elastic properties of the membrane that flickers in response to molecular bombardment in a manner that is described mathematically by a constrained random walk. PMID:24668224

  9. Space-based multifunctional end effector systems functional requirements and proposed designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishkin, A. H.; Jau, B. M.

    1988-01-01

    The end effector is an essential element of teleoperator and telerobot systems to be employed in space in the next decade. The report defines functional requirements for end effector systems to perform operations that are currently only feasible through Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). Specific tasks and functions that the end effectors must be capable of performing are delineated. Required capabilities for forces and torques, clearances, compliance, and sensing are described, using current EVA requirements as guidelines where feasible. The implications of these functional requirements on the elements of potential end effector systems are discussed. The systems issues that must be considered in the design of space-based manipulator systems are identified; including impacts on subsystems tightly coupled to the end effector, i.e., control station, information processing, manipulator arm, tool and equipment stowage. Possible end effector designs are divided into three categories: single degree-of-freedom end effectors, multiple degree of freedom end effectors, and anthropomorphic hands. Specific design alternatives are suggested and analyzed within the individual categories. Two evaluations are performed: the first considers how well the individual end effectors could substitute for EVA; the second compares how manipulator systems composed of the top performers from the first evaluation would improve the space shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) capabilities. The analysis concludes that the anthropomorphic hand is best-suited for EVA tasks. A left- and right-handed anthropomorphic manipulator arm configuration is suggested as appropriate to be affixed to the RMS, but could also be used as part of the Smart Front End for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The technical feasibility of the anthropomorphic hand and its control are demonstrated. An evolutionary development approach is proposed and approximate scheduling provided for implementing the suggested

  10. Using the Kinect to limit abnormal kinematics and compensation strategies during therapy with end effector robots.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Lum, Peter S; Cooper, Rory A; Brewer, Bambi R

    2013-06-01

    Abnormal kinematics and the use of compensation strategies during training limit functional improvement from therapy. The Kinect is a low cost ($100) sensor that does not require any markers to be placed on the user. Integration of this sensor into currently used therapy systems can provide feedback about the user's movement quality, and the use of compensatory strategies to complete tasks. This paper presents a novel technique of adding the Kinect to an end effector robot to limit compensation strategies and to train normal joint coordination during movements with an end effector robot. This methodology has wider implications for other robotic and passively actuated end effector rehabilitation devices. PMID:24187203

  11. System and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    SciTech Connect

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a system and method for exchanging tools and effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  12. System and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    SciTech Connect

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a system and method for exchanging tools and effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  13. Chemokine receptor Cxcr4 contributes to kidney fibrosis via multiple effectors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Amy; Lee, Yashang; Choi, Uimook; Moeckel, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis is the final common pathway for virtually every type of chronic kidney disease and is a consequence of a prolonged healing response that follows tissue inflammation. Chronic kidney inflammation ultimately leads to progressive tissue injury and scarring/fibrosis. Several pathways have been implicated in the progression of kidney fibrosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that G protein-coupled chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR)4 was significantly upregulated after renal injury and that sustained activation of Cxcr4 expression augmented the fibrotic response. We demonstrate that after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), both gene and protein expression of Cxcr4 were highly upregulated in tubular cells of the nephron. The increased Cxcr4 expression in tubules correlated with their increased dedifferentiated state, leading to increased mRNA expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and concurrent loss of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7). Ablation of tubular Cxcr4 attenuated UUO-mediated fibrotic responses, which correlated with a significant reduction in PDGF-α and TGF-β1 levels and preservation of Bmp7 expression after UUO. Furthermore, Cxcr4+ immune cells infiltrated the obstructed kidney and further upregulate their Cxcr4 expression. Genetic ablation of Cxcr4 from macrophages was protective against UUO-induced fibrosis. There was also reduced total kidney TGF-β1, which correlated with reduced Smad activation and α-smooth muscle actin levels. We conclude that chronic high Cxcr4 expression in multiple effector cell types can contribute to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis by altering their biological profile. This study uncovered a novel cross-talk between Cxcr4-TGF-β1 and Bmp7 pathways and may provide novel targets for interrupting the progression of fibrosis. PMID:25537742

  14. iNKT cells require TSC1 for terminal maturation and effector lineage fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinhong; Yang, Jialong; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongxia; Gorentla, Balachandra; Shin, Jinwook; Qiu, Yurong; Que, Loretta G.; Foster, W. Michael; Xia, Zhenwei; Chi, Hongbo; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Terminal maturation of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells from stage 2 (CD44+NK1.1–) to stage 3 (CD44+NK1.1+) is accompanied by a functional acquisition of a predominant IFN-γ–producing (iNKT-1) phenotype; however, some cells develop into IL-17–producing iNKT (iNKT-17) cells. iNKT-17 cells are rare and restricted to a CD44+NK1.1– lineage. It is unclear how iNKT terminal maturation is regulated and what factors mediate the predominance of iNKT-1 compared with iNKT-17. The tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1) is an important negative regulator of mTOR signaling, which regulates T cell differentiation, function, and trafficking. Here, we determined that mice lacking TSC1 exhibit a developmental block of iNKT differentiation at stage 2 and skew from a predominantly iNKT-1 population toward a predominantly iNKT-17 population, leading to enhanced airway hypersensitivity. Evaluation of purified iNKT cells revealed that TSC1 promotes T-bet, which regulates iNKT maturation, but downregulates ICOS expression in iNKT cells by inhibiting mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, mice lacking T-bet exhibited both a terminal maturation defect of iNKT cells and a predominance of iNKT-17 cells, and increased ICOS expression was required for the predominance of iNKT-17 cells in the population of TSC1-deficient iNKT cells. Our data indicate that TSC1-dependent control of mTORC1 is crucial for terminal iNKT maturation and effector lineage decisions, resulting in the predominance of iNKT-1 cells. PMID:24614103

  15. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite are the body's responses to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both the brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new therapeutic options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  16. Chemokine receptor Cxcr4 contributes to kidney fibrosis via multiple effectors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Amy; Lee, Yashang; Choi, Uimook; Moeckel, Gilbert; Karihaloo, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Kidney fibrosis is the final common pathway for virtually every type of chronic kidney disease and is a consequence of a prolonged healing response that follows tissue inflammation. Chronic kidney inflammation ultimately leads to progressive tissue injury and scarring/fibrosis. Several pathways have been implicated in the progression of kidney fibrosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that G protein-coupled chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR)4 was significantly upregulated after renal injury and that sustained activation of Cxcr4 expression augmented the fibrotic response. We demonstrate that after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), both gene and protein expression of Cxcr4 were highly upregulated in tubular cells of the nephron. The increased Cxcr4 expression in tubules correlated with their increased dedifferentiated state, leading to increased mRNA expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and concurrent loss of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7). Ablation of tubular Cxcr4 attenuated UUO-mediated fibrotic responses, which correlated with a significant reduction in PDGF-α and TGF-β1 levels and preservation of Bmp7 expression after UUO. Furthermore, Cxcr4(+) immune cells infiltrated the obstructed kidney and further upregulate their Cxcr4 expression. Genetic ablation of Cxcr4 from macrophages was protective against UUO-induced fibrosis. There was also reduced total kidney TGF-β1, which correlated with reduced Smad activation and α-smooth muscle actin levels. We conclude that chronic high Cxcr4 expression in multiple effector cell types can contribute to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis by altering their biological profile. This study uncovered a novel cross-talk between Cxcr4-TGF-β1 and Bmp7 pathways and may provide novel targets for interrupting the progression of fibrosis. PMID:25537742

  17. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Superoxide Provides a Third Signal for CD4 T Cell Effector Responses.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Tse, Hubert M

    2016-09-01

    Originally recognized for their direct induced toxicity as a component of the innate immune response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can profoundly modulate T cell adaptive immune responses. Efficient T cell activation requires: signal 1, consisting of an antigenic peptide-MHC complex binding with the TCR; signal 2, the interaction of costimulatory molecules on T cells and APCs; and signal 3, the generation of innate immune-derived ROS and proinflammatory cytokines. This third signal, in particular, has proven essential in generating productive and long-lasting immune responses. Our laboratory previously demonstrated profound Ag-specific hyporesponsiveness in the absence of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. To further examine the consequences of ROS deficiency on Ag-specific T cell responses, our laboratory generated the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse, possessing superoxide-deficient T cells recognizing the nominal Ag OVA323-339 In this study, we demonstrate that OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) CD4 T cells displayed a severe reduction in Th1 T cell responses, in addition to blunted IL-12R expression and severely attenuated proinflammatory chemokine ligands. Conversely, IFN-γ synthesis and IL-12R synthesis were rescued by the addition of exogenous superoxide via the paramagnetic superoxide donor potassium dioxide or superoxide-sufficient dendritic cells. Ultimately, these data highlight the importance of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS in providing a third signal for adaptive immune maturation by modulating the IL-12/IL-12R pathway and the novelty of the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse model to determine the role of redox-dependent signaling on effector responses. Thus, targeting ROS represents a promising therapeutic strategy in dampening Ag-specific T cell responses and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. PMID:27474077

  18. Regulator Versus Effector Paradigm: Interleukin-10 as Indicator of the Switching Response.

    PubMed

    Mingomataj, Ervin Ç; Bakiri, Alketa H

    2016-02-01

    The interleukin-10 (IL-10) is generally considered as the most important cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties and one of the key cytokines preventing inflammation-mediated tissue damage. In this respect, IL-10 producing cells play a crucial role in the outcome of infections, allergy, autoimmune reactions, tumor development, and transplant tolerance. Based on recent findings with regard to the mentioned clinical conditions, this review attempts to shed some light on the IL-10 functions, considering this cytokine as inherent inducer of the switching immunity. While acute infections and vaccinations are associated by IL-10 enhanced during few weeks, chronic parasitoses, tumor diseases, allergen-specific immunotherapy, transplants, and use of immune-suppressor drugs show an increased IL-10 level along months or years. With regard to autoimmune pathologies, the IL-10 increase is prevalently observed during early stages, whereas the successive stages are characterized by reaching of immune equilibrium independently to disease's activity. Together, these findings indicate that IL-10 is mainly produced during transient immune conditions and the persistent IL-10-related effect is the indication/prediction (and maybe effectuation) of the switching immunity. Actual knowledge emphasizes that any manipulation of the IL-10 response for treatment purposes should be considered very cautiously due to its potential hazards to the immune system. Probably, the IL-10 as potential switcher of immunity response should be used in association with co-stimulatory immune effectors that are necessary to determine the appropriate deviation during treatment of respective pathologies. Hopefully, further findings would open new avenues to study the biology of this "master switch" cytokine and its therapeutic potential. PMID:26450621

  19. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: Evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite is the body's response to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum-and-glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  20. A diametric role for OX40 in the response of effector/memory CD4+ T cells and regulatory T cells to alloantigen

    PubMed Central

    Kinnear, Gillian; Wood, Kathryn J.; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Jones, Nick D.

    2013-01-01

    OX40 is a member of the TNFR superfamily that has potent costimulatory properties. Although the impact of blockade of the OX40-OX40L pathway has been well documented in models of autoimmune disease, its effect on the rejection of allografts is less well defined. Here we show that the alloantigen-mediated activation of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells results in the induction of OX40 expression and that blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions prevents skin allograft rejection mediated by either subset of T cells. Moreover, a blocking anti-OX40 was found to have no effect on the activation and proliferation of T cells, but rather effector T cells failed to accumulate in peripheral lymph nodes and subsequently migrate to skin allografts. This was found to be the result of an enhanced degree of cell death amongst proliferating effector cells. In clear contrast, blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions at the time of exposure to alloantigen enhanced the ability of regulatory T cells to suppress T cell responses to alloantigen by supporting rather than diminishing regulatory T cell survival. These data show that OX40-OX40L signalling contributes to the evolution of the adaptive immune response to an allograft via the differential control of alloreactive effector and regulatory T cell survival. Moreover, these data serve to further highlight OX40 and OX40L as therapeutic targets to assist the induction of tolerance to allografts and self-antigens. PMID:23817421

  1. Manipulation of Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-18 Production by Yersinia pestis Effectors YopJ and YopM and Redundant Impact on Virulence.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Dmitry; Orning, M Pontus A; Starheim, Kristian K; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Proulx, Megan K; Goguen, Jon D; Lien, Egil

    2016-05-01

    Innate immunity plays a central role in resolving infections by pathogens. Host survival during plague, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, is favored by a robust early innate immune response initiated by IL-1β and IL-18. These cytokines are produced by a two-step mechanism involving NF-κB-mediated pro-cytokine production and inflammasome-driven maturation into bioactive inflammatory mediators. Because of the anti-microbial effects induced by IL-1β/IL-18, it may be desirable for pathogens to manipulate their production. Y. pestis type III secretion system effectors YopJ and YopM can interfere with different parts of this process. Both effectors have been reported to influence inflammasome caspase-1 activity; YopJ promotes caspase-8-dependent cell death and caspase-1 cleavage, whereas YopM inhibits caspase-1 activity via an incompletely understood mechanism. However, neither effector appears essential for full virulence in vivo Here we report that the sum of influences by YopJ and YopM on IL-1β/IL-18 release is suppressive. In the absence of YopM, YopJ minimally affects caspase-1 cleavage but suppresses IL-1β, IL-18, and other cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, we find that Y. pestis containing combined deletions of YopJ and YopM induces elevated levels of IL-1β/IL-18 in vitro and in vivo and is significantly attenuated in a mouse model of bubonic plague. The reduced virulence of the YopJ-YopM mutant is dependent on the presence of IL-1β, IL-18, and caspase-1. Thus, we conclude that Y. pestis YopJ and YopM can both exert a tight control of host IL-1β/IL-18 production to benefit the bacteria, resulting in a redundant impact on virulence. PMID:26884330

  2. Human Effector / Initiator Gene Sets That Regulate Myometrial Contractility During Term and Preterm Labor

    PubMed Central

    WEINER, Carl P.; MASON, Clifford W.; DONG, Yafeng; BUHIMSCHI, Irina A.; SWAAN, Peter W.; BUHIMSCHI, Catalin S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Distinct processes govern transition from quiescence to activation during term (TL) and preterm labor (PTL). We sought gene sets responsible for TL and PTL, along with the effector genes necessary for labor independent of gestation and underlying trigger. Methods Expression was analyzed in term and preterm +/− labor (n =6 subjects/group). Gene sets were generated using logic operations. Results 34 genes were similarly expressed in PTL/TL but absent from nonlabor samples (Effector Set). 49 genes were specific to PTL (Preterm Initiator Set) and 174 to TL (Term Initiator Set). The gene ontogeny processes comprising Term Initiator and Effector Sets were diverse, though inflammation was represented in 4 of the top 10; inflammation dominated the Preterm Initiator Set. Comments TL and PTL differ dramatically in initiator profiles. Though inflammation is part of the Term Initiator and the Effector Sets, it is an overwhelming part of PTL associated with intraamniotic inflammation. PMID:20452493

  3. Structural consequences of effector protein complex formation in a diiron hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; McCoy, Jason G.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2009-06-12

    Carboxylate-bridged diiron hydroxylases are multicomponent enzyme complexes responsible for the catabolism of a wide range of hydrocarbons and as such have drawn attention for their mechanism of action and potential uses in bioremediation and enzymatic synthesis. These enzyme complexes use a small molecular weight effector protein to modulate the function of the hydroxylase. However, the origin of these functional changes is poorly understood. Here, we report the structures of the biologically relevant effector protein-hydroxylase complex of toluene 4-monooxygenase in 2 redox states. The structures reveal a number of coordinated changes that occur up to 25 {angstrom} from the active site and poise the diiron center for catalysis. The results provide a structural basis for the changes observed in a number of the measurable properties associated with effector protein binding. This description provides insight into the functional role of effector protein binding in all carboxylate-bridged diiron hydroxylases.

  4. End-effector: Joint conjugates for robotic assembly of large truss structures in space: Extended concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, W. V.; Rasis, E. P.; Shih, H. R.

    1993-06-01

    Results from NASA/HBCU Grant No. NAG-1-1125 are summarized. Designs developed for model fabrication, exploratory concepts drafted, interface of computer with robot and end-effector, and capability enhancement are discussed.

  5. Methods and Systems for Authorizing an Effector Command in an Integrated Modular Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, Dean E. (Inventor); Ahrendt, Terry J. (Inventor); Moore, Tim (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and systems are provided for authorizing a command of an integrated modular environment in which a plurality of partitions control actions of a plurality of effectors is provided. A first identifier, a second identifier, and a third identifier are determined. The first identifier identifies a first partition of the plurality of partitions from which the command originated. The second identifier identifies a first effector of the plurality of effectors for which the command is intended. The third identifier identifies a second partition of the plurality of partitions that is responsible for controlling the first effector. The first identifier and the third identifier are compared to determine whether the first partition is the same as the second partition for authorization of the command.

  6. Ubiquitin Ligases and Deubiquitinating Enzymes in CD4+ T Cell Effector Fate Choice and Function.

    PubMed

    Layman, Awo A K; Oliver, Paula M

    2016-05-15

    The human body is exposed to potentially pathogenic microorganisms at barrier sites such as the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. To mount an effective response against these pathogens, the immune system must recruit the right cells with effector responses that are appropriate for the task at hand. Several types of CD4(+) T cells can be recruited, including Th cells (Th1, Th2, and Th17), T follicular helper cells, and regulatory T cells. These cells help to maintain normal immune homeostasis in the face of constantly changing microbes in the environment. Because these cells differentiate from a common progenitor, the composition of their intracellular milieu of proteins changes to appropriately guide their effector function. One underappreciated process that impacts the levels and functions of effector fate-determining factors is ubiquitylation. This review details our current understanding of how ubiquitylation regulates CD4(+) T cell effector identity and function. PMID:27183634

  7. Regulation of vesicular trafficking and leukocyte function by Rab27 GTPases and their effectors

    PubMed Central

    Catz, Sergio Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Rab27 family of GTPases regulates the efficiency and specificity of exocytosis in hematopoietic cells, including neutrophils, CTLs, NK cells, and mast cells. However, the mechanisms regulated by Rab27 GTPases are cell-specific, as they depend on the differential expression and function of particular effector molecules that are recruited by the GTPases. In addition, Rab27 GTPases participate in multiple steps of the regulation of the secretory process, including priming, tethering, docking, and fusion through sequential interaction with multiple effector molecules. Finally, recent reports suggest that Rab27 GTPases and their effectors regulate vesicular trafficking mechanisms other than exocytosis, including endocytosis and phagocytosis. This review focuses on the latest discoveries on the function of Rab27 GTPases and their effectors Munc13-4 and Slp1 in neutrophil function comparatively to their functions in other leukocytes. PMID:23378593

  8. [Problem of end-effector of ischemic postconditioning of the heart].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaia, N V; Hanuš, L; Pei, J-M; Baĭkov, A N; Zhang, I; Wang, H; Khaliulin, I G

    2013-05-01

    Analysis of literature source indicates that main pretenders to the role of end-effectors of ischemic postconditioning of the heart are: 1) Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel of BK-type (big conductance K+ channel), 2) mitoK(ATP) channel (mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+)-channel), 3) MPT pore (mitochondrial permeability transition pore). At the same time, some investigators consider that mitoK(ATP) channel is only an intermediate link in the series of signaling events ensured an increase in cardiac tolerance to impact of ischemia-reperfusion. The most likely end-effector of the three structures is MPT pore. Alternatively, it is possible, that unique molecular complex appearing a single end-effector of postconditioning does not exist. Perhaps, that there are several effectors ensured cardioprotective effect of adaptive phenomenon of postconditioning. PMID:24459867

  9. End-effector: Joint conjugates for robotic assembly of large truss structures in space: Extended concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, W. V.; Rasis, E. P.; Shih, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    Results from NASA/HBCU Grant No. NAG-1-1125 are summarized. Designs developed for model fabrication, exploratory concepts drafted, interface of computer with robot and end-effector, and capability enhancement are discussed.

  10. A Chlamydia effector recruits CEP170 to reprogram host microtubule organization

    PubMed Central

    Dumoux, Maud; Menny, Anais; Delacour, Delphine; Hayward, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis deploys virulence effectors to subvert host cell functions enabling its replication within a specialized membrane-bound compartment termed an inclusion. The control of the host cytoskeleton is crucial for Chlamydia uptake, inclusion biogenesis and cell exit. Here, we demonstrate how a Chlamydia effector rearranges the microtubule (MT) network by initiating organization of the MTs at the inclusion surface. We identified an inclusion-localized effector that is sufficient to interfere with MT assembly, which we named inclusion protein acting on MTs (IPAM). We established that IPAM recruits and stimulates the centrosomal protein 170 kDa (CEP170) to hijack the MT organizing functions of the host cell. We show that CEP170 is essential for chlamydial control of host MT assembly, and is required for inclusion morphogenesis and bacterial infectivity. Together, we demonstrate how a pathogen effector reprograms the host MT network to support its intracellular development. PMID:26220855

  11. Visual processing at goal and effector locations is dynamically enhanced during motor preparation.

    PubMed

    Mason, Luke; Linnell, Karina J; Davis, Rob; Van Velzen, José

    2015-08-15

    Previous theoretical and experimental works has shown that preparing to act causes enhanced perceptual processing at movement-relevant locations. Up until now, this has focused almost exclusively on the goal of an action, neglecting the role of the effector. We addressed this by measuring changes in visual processing across time during motor preparation at both goal and effector locations. We compared event related potentials (ERPs) elicited by task-irrelevant visual probe stimuli at both goal and effector locations during motor preparation. Participants were instructed to place their hands on two starting positions (effector locations) and an auditory tone instructed them to immediately move to one of two target buttons (goal locations). Probe stimuli were presented in the interval between the offset of the cue and the execution of the movement at either a goal or an effector location. Probes were presented randomly at either 100ms, 200ms or 300ms after the auditory cue. Analysis of the visual N1 ERP showed enhanced visual processing at moving vs. not-moving goal locations across all three SOAs. At effector locations, enhanced processing for the moving vs. not-moving effector was only observed during the middle (200ms) SOA. These results demonstrate, for the first time, simultaneous perceptual enhancement of goal and effector locations during motor preparation. We interpret these results as reflecting a temporally and spatially specific dynamic attentional map of the environment that adapts to maximise efficiency of movement by selectively weighting processing of multiple functional components of action in parallel. PMID:26032889

  12. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E.; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. Significance The present study describes a novel and powerful tool for the delivery of the genome editing enzyme transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) directly into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), achieving desired base changes on the genomes of PSCs with high efficiency. This novel approach uses bacteria as a protein delivery

  13. The Pseudomonas syringae Type III Effector AvrRpt2 Promotes Pathogen Virulence via Stimulating Arabidopsis Auxin/Indole Acetic Acid Protein Turnover1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fuhao; Wu, Shujing; Sun, Wenxian; Coaker, Gitta; Kunkel, Barbara; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2013-01-01

    To accomplish successful infection, pathogens deploy complex strategies to interfere with host defense systems and subvert host physiology to favor pathogen survival and multiplication. Modulation of plant auxin physiology and signaling is emerging as a common virulence strategy for phytobacteria to cause diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. We have previously shown that the Pseudomonas syringae type III effector AvrRpt2 alters Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) auxin physiology. Here, we report that AvrRpt2 promotes auxin response by stimulating the turnover of auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins, the key negative regulators in auxin signaling. AvrRpt2 acts additively with auxin to stimulate Aux/IAA turnover, suggesting distinct, yet proteasome-dependent, mechanisms operated by AvrRpt2 and auxin to control Aux/IAA stability. Cysteine protease activity is required for AvrRpt2-stimulated auxin signaling and Aux/IAA degradation. Importantly, transgenic plants expressing the dominant axr2-1 mutation recalcitrant to AvrRpt2-mediated degradation ameliorated the virulence functions of AvrRpt2 but did not alter the avirulent function mediated by the corresponding RPS2 resistance protein. Thus, promoting auxin response via modulating the stability of the key transcription repressors Aux/IAA is a mechanism used by the bacterial type III effector AvrRpt2 to promote pathogenicity. PMID:23632856

  14. Fine-Mapping the Wheat Snn1 Locus Conferring Sensitivity to the Parastagonospora nodorum Necrotrophic Effector SnTox1 Using an Eight Founder Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross Population

    PubMed Central

    Cockram, James; Scuderi, Alice; Barber, Toby; Furuki, Eiko; Gardner, Keith A.; Gosman, Nick; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw; Phan, Huyen P.; Rose, Gemma A.; Tan, Kar-Chun; Oliver, Richard P.; Mackay, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is an important pathogen of one of the world’s most economically important cereal crops, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). P. nodorum produces necrotrophic protein effectors that mediate host cell death, providing nutrients for continuation of the infection process. The recent discovery of pathogen effectors has revolutionized disease resistance breeding for necrotrophic diseases in crop species, allowing often complex genetic resistance mechanisms to be broken down into constituent parts. To date, three effectors have been identified in P. nodorum. Here we use the effector, SnTox1, to screen 642 progeny from an eight-parent multiparent advanced generation inter-cross (i.e., MAGIC) population, genotyped with a 90,000-feature single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The MAGIC founders showed a range of sensitivity to SnTox1, with transgressive segregation evident in the progeny. SnTox1 sensitivity showed high heritability, with quantitative trait locus analyses fine-mapping the Snn1 locus to the short arm of chromosome 1B. In addition, a previously undescribed SnTox1 sensitivity locus was identified on the long arm of chromosome 5A, termed here QSnn.niab-5A.1. The peak single-nucleotide polymorphism for the Snn1 locus was converted to the KASP genotyping platform, providing breeders and researchers a simple and cheap diagnostic marker for allelic state at Snn1. PMID:26416667

  15. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells.

    PubMed

    Drube, Sebastian; Weber, Franziska; Loschinski, Romy; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-03-10

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca²⁺-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term "subthreshold IKK activation".This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33.We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo.Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  16. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Drube, Sebastian; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A.; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H.; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term “subthreshold IKK activation”. This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33. We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo. Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  17. Do CD8 effector cells need IL-7R expression to become resting memory cells?

    PubMed

    Buentke, Eva; Mathiot, Anne; Tolaini, Mauro; Di Santo, James; Zamoyska, Rose; Seddon, Benedict

    2006-09-15

    The role for IL-7R expression in the differentiation of effector T cells into resting memory remains controversial. Here, using a conditional IL-7R transgenic model, we were able to test directly whether CD8 effector T cells require IL-7R expression for their differentiation into resting memory cells. In the absence of IL-7R expression, effector cells transferred into "full" hosts underwent a protracted and unremitting contraction compared with IL-7R-expressing control cells and were unable to develop into long-term resting memory cells. Surprisingly, when the same effector cells were transferred into empty T-cell-deficient hosts, they could generate long-lived fully functional resting memory cells independently of IL-7R expression. Formation of these latter cells was found to be dependent on IL-15, because the same IL-7R-deficient effector cells were rapidly lost from IL-15-deficient hosts, having a half-life of less than 40 hours. Therefore, our data suggest that, under physiological conditions, both IL-7 and IL-15 synergize to promote the formation of memory cells directly by limiting the contraction of effectors that occurs following an immune response and that reexpression of IL-7R is a key checkpoint in the regulation of this process. PMID:16705084

  18. A Salmonella Type Three Secretion Effector/Chaperone Complex Adopts a Hexameric Ring-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Roblin, Pierre; Dewitte, Frédérique; Villeret, Vincent; Biondi, Emanuele G.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use type three secretion systems (T3SS) to inject virulence factors, named effectors, directly into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Most of the T3SS components are conserved among plant and animal pathogens, suggesting a common mechanism of recognition and secretion of effectors. However, no common motif has yet been identified for effectors allowing T3SS recognition. In this work, we performed a biochemical and structural characterization of the Salmonella SopB/SigE chaperone/effector complex by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our results showed that the SopB/SigE complex is assembled in dynamic homohexameric-ring-shaped structures with an internal tunnel. In this ring, the chaperone maintains a disordered N-terminal end of SopB molecules, in a good position to be reached and processed by the T3SS. This ring dimensionally fits the ring-organized molecules of the injectisome, including ATPase hexameric rings; this organization suggests that this structural feature is important for ATPase recognition by T3SS. Our work constitutes the first evidence of the oligomerization of an effector, analogous to the organization of the secretion machinery, obtained in solution. As effectors share neither sequence nor structural identity, the quaternary oligomeric structure could constitute a strategy evolved to promote the specificity and efficiency of T3SS recognition. PMID:25404693

  19. Rust fungal effectors mimic host transit peptides to translocate into chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Petre, Benjamin; Lorrain, Cécile; Saunders, Diane G O; Win, Joe; Sklenar, Jan; Duplessis, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien

    2016-04-01

    Parasite effector proteins target various host cell compartments to alter host processes and promote infection. How effectors cross membrane-rich interfaces to reach these compartments is a major question in effector biology. Growing evidence suggests that effectors use molecular mimicry to subvert host cell machinery for protein sorting. We recently identified chloroplast-targeted protein 1 (CTP1), a candidate effector from the poplar leaf rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina that carries a predicted transit peptide and accumulates in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Here, we show that the CTP1 transit peptide is necessary and sufficient for accumulation in the stroma of chloroplasts. CTP1 is part of a Melampsora-specific family of polymorphic secreted proteins. Two members of that family, CTP2 and CTP3, also translocate in chloroplasts in an N-terminal signal-dependent manner. CTP1, CTP2 and CTP3 are cleaved when they accumulate in chloroplasts, while they remain intact when they do not translocate into chloroplasts. Our findings reveal that fungi have evolved effector proteins that mimic plant-specific sorting signals to traffic within plant cells. PMID:26426202

  20. Computational prediction of type III and IV secreted effectors in Gram-negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Peterson, Elena S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Niemann, George; Cambronne, Eric; Sharp, Danna; Adkins, Joshua N.; Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the methods employed by four recent papers that described novel methods for computational prediction of secreted effectors from type III and IV secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria. The results of the studies in terms of performance at accurately predicting secreted effectors and similarities found between secretion signals that may reflect biologically relevant features for recognition. We discuss the web-based tools for secreted effector prediction described in these studies and announce the availability of our tool, the SIEVEserver (http://www.biopilot.org). Finally, we assess the accuracy of the three type III effector prediction methods on a small set of proteins not known prior to the development of these tools that we have recently discovered and validated using both experimental and computational approaches. Our comparison shows that all methods use similar approaches and, in general arrive at similar conclusions. We discuss the possibility of an order-dependent motif in the secretion signal, which was a point of disagreement in the studies. Our results show that there may be classes of effectors in which the signal has a loosely defined motif, and others in which secretion is dependent only on compositional biases. Computational prediction of secreted effectors from protein sequences represents an important step toward better understanding the interaction between pathogens and hosts.

  1. In-flight adaptive performance optimization (APO) control using redundant control effectors of an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Practical application of real-time (or near real-time) Adaptive Performance Optimization (APO) is provided for a transport aircraft in steady climb, cruise, turn descent or other flight conditions based on measurements and calculations of incremental drag from a forced response maneuver of one or more redundant control effectors defined as those in excess of the minimum set of control effectors required to maintain the steady flight condition in progress. The method comprises the steps of applying excitation in a raised-cosine form over an interval of from 100 to 500 sec. at the rate of 1 to 10 sets/sec of excitation, and data for analysis is gathered in sets of measurements made during the excitation to calculate lift and drag coefficients C.sub.L and C.sub.D from two equations, one for each coefficient. A third equation is an expansion of C.sub.D as a function of parasitic drag, induced drag, Mach and altitude drag effects, and control effector drag, and assumes a quadratic variation of drag with positions .delta..sub.i of redundant control effectors i=1 to n. The third equation is then solved for .delta..sub.iopt the optimal position of redundant control effector i, which is then used to set the control effector i for optimum performance during the remainder of said steady flight or until monitored flight conditions change by some predetermined amount as determined automatically or a predetermined minimum flight time has elapsed.

  2. Effector-Mining in the Poplar Rust Fungus Melampsora larici-populina Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Lorrain, Cécile; Hecker, Arnaud; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The poplar leaf rust fungus, Melampsora larici-populina has been established as a tree-microbe interaction model. Understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling infection by pathogens appears essential for durable management of tree plantations. In biotrophic plant-parasites, effectors are known to condition host cell colonization. Thus, investigation of candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs) is a major goal in the poplar–poplar rust interaction. Unlike oomycetes, fungal effectors do not share conserved motifs and candidate prediction relies on a set of a priori criteria established from reported bona fide effectors. Secretome prediction, genome-wide analysis of gene families and transcriptomics of M. larici-populina have led to catalogs of more than a thousand secreted proteins. Automatized effector-mining pipelines hold great promise for rapid and systematic identification and prioritization of CSEPs for functional characterization. In this review, we report on and discuss the current status of the poplar rust fungus secretome and prediction of candidate effectors from this species. PMID:26697026

  3. Development of a Mild Viral Expression System for Gain-Of-Function Study of Phytoplasma Effector In Planta.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sin-Fen; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Chan-Pin; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Hong, Syuan-Fei; Yang, Chiao-Yin; Lo, Hsiao-Feng; Tseng, Ting-Yu; Chen, Wei-Yao; Lin, Shih-Shun

    2015-01-01

    PHYL1 and SAP54 are orthologs of pathogenic effectors of Aster yellow witches'-broom (AYWB) phytoplasma and Peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma, respectively. These effectors cause virescence and phyllody symptoms (hereafter leafy flower) in phytoplasma-infected plants. T0 lines of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the PHYL1 or SAP54 genes (PHYL1 or SAP54 plants) show a leafy flower phenotype and result in seedless, suggesting that PHYL1 and SAP54 interfere with reproduction stage that restrict gain-of-function studies in the next generation of transgenic plants. Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) mild strain (TuGK) has an Arg182Lys mutation in the helper-component proteinase (HC-ProR182K) that blocks suppression of the miRNA pathway and prevents symptom development in TuGK-infected plants. We exploited TuGK as a viral vector for gain-of-function studies of PHYL1 and SAP54 in Arabidopsis plants. TuGK-PHYL1- and TuGK-SAP54-infected Arabidopsis plants produced identical leafy flower phenotypes and similar gene expression profiles as PHYL1 and SAP54 plants. In addition, the leafy flower formation rate was enhanced in TuGK-PHYL1- or TuGK-SAP54-infected Arabidopsis plants that compared with the T0 lines of PHYL1 plants. These results provide more evidence and novel directions for further studying the mechanism of PHYL1/SAP54-mediated leafy flower development. In addition, the TuGK vector is a good alternative in transgenic plant approaches for rapid gene expression in gain-of-function studies. PMID:26076458

  4. Development of a Mild Viral Expression System for Gain-Of-Function Study of Phytoplasma Effector In Planta

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Hong, Syuan-Fei; Yang, Chiao-Yin; Lo, Hsiao-Feng; Tseng, Ting-Yu; Chen, Wei-Yao; Lin, Shih-Shun

    2015-01-01

    PHYL1 and SAP54 are orthologs of pathogenic effectors of Aster yellow witches’-broom (AYWB) phytoplasma and Peanut witches’-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma, respectively. These effectors cause virescence and phyllody symptoms (hereafter leafy flower) in phytoplasma-infected plants. T0 lines of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the PHYL1 or SAP54 genes (PHYL1 or SAP54 plants) show a leafy flower phenotype and result in seedless, suggesting that PHYL1 and SAP54 interfere with reproduction stage that restrict gain-of-function studies in the next generation of transgenic plants. Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) mild strain (TuGK) has an Arg182Lys mutation in the helper-component proteinase (HC-ProR182K) that blocks suppression of the miRNA pathway and prevents symptom development in TuGK-infected plants. We exploited TuGK as a viral vector for gain-of-function studies of PHYL1 and SAP54 in Arabidopsis plants. TuGK-PHYL1- and TuGK-SAP54-infected Arabidopsis plants produced identical leafy flower phenotypes and similar gene expression profiles as PHYL1 and SAP54 plants. In addition, the leafy flower formation rate was enhanced in TuGK-PHYL1- or TuGK-SAP54-infected Arabidopsis plants that compared with the T0 lines of PHYL1 plants. These results provide more evidence and novel directions for further studying the mechanism of PHYL1/SAP54-mediated leafy flower development. In addition, the TuGK vector is a good alternative in transgenic plant approaches for rapid gene expression in gain-of-function studies. PMID:26076458

  5. γδ T Cells from Tolerized αβ T Cell Receptor (TCR)–deficient Mice Inhibit Contact Sensitivity-Effector T Cells In Vivo, and Their Interferon-γ Production In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanik, Marian; Anderson, Laurel R.; Ushio, Hiroko; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Owen, Michael J.; Hayday, Adrian C.; Askenase, Philip W.

    1996-01-01

    Contact sensitivity (CS) responses to reactive hapten Ag, such as picryl chloride (PCl) or oxazolone (OX), are classical examples of T cell–mediated immune responses in vivo that are clearly subject to multifaceted regulation. There is abundant evidence that downregulation of CS may be mediated by T cells exposed to high doses of Ag. This is termed high dose Ag tolerance. To clarify the T cell types that effect CS responses and mediate their downregulation, we have undertaken studies of CS in mice congenitally deficient in specific subsets of lymphocytes. The first such studies, using αβ T cell–deficient (TCRα−/−) mice, are presented here. The results clearly show that TCRα−/− mice cannot mount CS, implicating αβ T cells as the critical CS-effector cells. However, TCRα−/− mice can, after high dose tolerance, downregulate α+/+ CS-effector T cells adoptively transferred into them. By mixing ex vivo and then adoptive cell transfers in vivo, the active downregulatory cells in tolerized α−/− mice are shown to include γδ TCR+ cells that also can downregulate interferon-γ production by the targeted CS-effector cells in vitro. Downregulation by γδ cells showed specificity for hapten, but was not restricted by the MHC. Together, these findings establish that γδ T cells cannot fulfill CS-effector functions performed by αβ T cells, but may fulfill an Ag-specific downregulatory role that may be directly comparable to reports of Ag-specific downregulation of IgE antibody responses by γδ T cells. Comparisons are likewise considered with downregulation by γδ T cells occurring in immune responses to pathogens, tumors, and allografts, and in systemic autoimmunity. PMID:8976169

  6. DEEP--a tool for differential expression effector prediction.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Jost; Haubrock, Martin; Dönitz, Jürgen; Wingender, Edgar; Crass, Torsten

    2007-07-01

    --differentially expressed or not--may play pivotal roles in the tissues or conditions under examination. The described method has been implemented in Java as a client/server application and a web interface called DEEP (Differential Expression Effector Prediction). The client, which features an easy-to-use graphical interface, can freely be downloaded from the following URL: http://deep.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de. PMID:17584786

  7. Design of endoscopic micro-robotic end effectors: safety and performance evaluation based on physical intestinal tissue damage characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Tae; Kim, Dae-Eun; Yang, Sungwook; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2014-06-01

    During the last several years, legged locomotive mechanism has been considered as one of the main self-propelling mechanisms for future endoscopic microrobots due to its superior propulsion efficiency of an endoscopic microrobot inside the intestinal track. Nevertheless, its clinical application has been largely limited since the legged locomotive mechanism utilizes an end effector which has a sharp tip to generate sufficient traction by physically penetrating and interlocking with the intestinal tissue. This can cause excessive physical tissue damage or even complete perforation of the intestinal wall that can lead to abdominal inflammation. Hence, in this work two types of new end effectors, penetration-limited end effector (PLEE) and bi-material structured end effector (BMEE) were specially designed to acquire high medical safety as well as effective traction generation performance. The microscopic end effector specimens were fabricated with micro-wire electric discharge machining process. Traction generation performance of the end effectors was evaluated by direct measurement of resistance forces during contact-sliding tests using a custom-built contact-sliding tester. The safety of the end effector design was evaluated by examination of microscopic intestinal tissue damage using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Physical damage characteristics of the intestinal tissue and related contact physics of the end effectors were discussed. From the results, the end effectors were evaluated with respect to their prospects in future medical applications as safe end effectors as well as micro-surgical tools. PMID:24634056

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei Bsa Type III Secretion System Effectors Using Hypersecreting Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Vander Broek, Charles W.; Chalmers, Kevin J.; Stevens, Mark P.; Stevens, Joanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals. One of the virulence factors critical for early stages of infection is the Burkholderia secretion apparatus (Bsa) Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS), a molecular syringe that injects bacterial proteins, called effectors, into eukaryotic cells where they subvert cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. Although the Bsa T3SS itself is known to be important for invasion, intracellular replication, and virulence, only a few genuine effector proteins have been identified and the complete repertoire of proteins secreted by the system has not yet been fully characterized. We constructed a mutant lacking bsaP, a homolog of the T3SS “gatekeeper” family of proteins that exert control over the timing and magnitude of effector protein secretion. Mutants lacking BsaP, or the T3SS translocon protein BipD, were observed to hypersecrete the known Bsa effector protein BopE, providing evidence of their role in post-translational control of the Bsa T3SS and representing key reagents for the identification of its secreted substrates. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ), a gel-free quantitative proteomics technique, was used to compare the secreted protein profiles of the Bsa T3SS hypersecreting mutants of B. pseudomallei with the isogenic parent strain and a bsaZ mutant incapable of effector protein secretion. Our study provides one of the most comprehensive core secretomes of B. pseudomallei described to date and identified 26 putative Bsa-dependent secreted proteins that may be considered candidate effectors. Two of these proteins, BprD and BapA, were validated as novel effector proteins secreted by the Bsa T3SS of B. pseudomallei. PMID:25635268

  9. A genetic screen to isolate type III effectors translocated into pepper cells during Xanthomonas infection

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Anne Roden, Branids Belt, Jason Barzel Ross, Thomas Tachibana, Joe Vargas, Mary Beth Mudgett

    2004-11-23

    The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) uses a type III secretion system (TTSS) to translocate effector proteins into host plant cells. The TTSS is required for Xcv colonization, yet the identity of many proteins translocated through this apparatus is not known. We used a genetic screen to functionally identify Xcv TTSS effectors. A transposon 5 (Tn5)-based transposon construct including the coding sequence for the Xcv AvrBs2 effector devoid of its TTSS signal was randomly inserted into the Xcv genome. Insertion of the avrBs2 reporter gene into Xcv genes coding for proteins containing a functional TTSS signal peptide resulted in the creation of chimeric TTSS effector::AvrBs2 fusion proteins. Xcv strains containing these fusions translocated the AvrBs2 reporter in a TTSS-dependent manner into resistant BS2 pepper cells during infection, activating the avrBs2-dependent hypersensitive response (HR). We isolated seven chimeric fusion proteins and designated the identified TTSS effectors as Xanthomonas outer proteins (Xops). Translocation of each Xop was confirmed by using the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cydase reporter assay. Three xop genes are Xanthomonas spp.-specific, whereas homologs for the rest are found in other phytopathogenic bacteria. XopF1 and XopF2 define an effector gene family in Xcv. XopN contains a eukaryotic protein fold repeat and is required for full Xcv pathogenicity in pepper and tomato. The translocated effectors identified in this work expand our knowledge of the diversity of proteins that Xcv uses to manipulate its hosts.

  10. Flicking the molecular switch underlying MLKL-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Joanne M; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M

    2015-01-01

    The pseudokinase domain of the necroptosis effector mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) functions as a latch to restrain the unleashing of its N-terminal 4-helix bundle (4HB) domain. Cell death mediated by the 4HB domain relies on membrane association and oligomerization, which can be inhibited by an ATP-mimetic small molecule that binds the pseudokinase domain of MLKL. PMID:27308464

  11. Identification of Immune Effectors Essential to the Control of Primary and Secondary Intranasal Infection with Brucella melitensis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Machelart, Arnaud; Potemberg, Georges; De Trez, Carl; Ryffel, Bernhard; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2016-05-01

    The mucosal immune system represents the first line of defense against Brucella infection in nature. We used genetically deficient mice to identify the lymphocytes and signaling pathways implicated in the control of primary and secondary intranasal infection with B. melitensis Our analysis of primary infection demonstrated that the effectors implicated differ at the early and late stages and are dependent on the organ. TCR-δ, TAP1, and IL-17RA deficiency specifically