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Sample records for effects potential targets

  1. Tea polyphenols, their biological effects and potential molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Marina Si; Wan, Sheng Biao; Lam, Wai Har; Huo, Congde; Landis-Piwowar, Kristin R.; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Wali, Anil; Chan, Tak Hang; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tea is the most popular beverage in the world, second only to water. Tea contains an infusion of the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, the most abundant of which is (−)-EGCG. Although tea has been consumed for centuries, it has only recently been studied extensively as a health-promoting beverage that may act to prevent a number of chronic diseases and cancers. The results of several investigations indicate that green tea consumption may be of modest benefit in reducing the plasma concentration of cholesterol and preventing atherosclerosis. Additionally, the cancer-preventive effects of green tea are widely supported by results from epidemiological, cell culture, animal and clinical studies. In vitro cell culture studies show that tea polyphenols potently induce apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells but not in their normal cell counterparts. Green tea polyphenols were shown to affect several biological pathways, including growth factor-mediated pathway, the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-dependent pathway, and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation pathways. Various animal studies have revealed that treatment with green tea inhibits tumor incidence and multiplicity in different organ sites such as skin, lung, liver, stomach, mammary gland and colon. Recently, phase I and II clinical trials have been conducted to explore the anticancer effects of green tea in humans. A major challenge of cancer prevention is to integrate new molecular findings into clinical practice. Therefore, identification of more molecular targets and biomarkers for tea polyphenols is essential for improving the design of green tea trials and will greatly assist in a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying its anti-cancer activity. PMID:18228206

  2. Establishment of the method for screening the potential targets and effective components of huatuo reconstruction pill.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke-Zhu; Jiang, Yun-Gen; Zuo, Ying; Li, Ai-Xiu

    2014-06-01

    Huatuo reconstruction pill (HTRP) is a traditional Chinese medicine prescription that mainly treats for hemiplegia and postoperation of brain stroke. Existing pharmacological studies have previously shown that HTRP could inhibit in vitro thrombosis, delay platelet adhesion, dilate blood vessels, and improve the microcirculation disturbances. In this paper, we chiefly concerned about the potential targets of HTRP and tried to figure out the active components of it. Computer-aided drug design method was emploied to search for the active components and explain the mechanism between the targets and the small molecules at molecular lever. The potential targets of this compound pharmaceutics were searched through relevant pharmacological studies and three pharmacophore models which involved the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor, the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HT2A) were constructed by Discotech method of Sybyl. Thus, the candidate compounds which agreed with the pharmacophore models were obtained by the virtual screening to the known ingredients of HTRP. Based on that, sequence and structure prediction of the unknown targets were realized by homology modeling which were used for molecular docking with those candidate compounds. Results showed that three compounds, which may prove to be valid to these targets, got higher scores than the existing corresponding inhibitors after molecular docking, including ferulic acid, onjixanthone I and albiflorin. And the three molecules may refer to the singificant substances to the total compounds of HTRP which were effective to the disease. PMID:25172450

  3. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  4. Quinoxalines Potential to Target Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Tristán-Manzano, María; Guirado, Antonio; Martínez-Esparza, María; Gálvez, Jesús; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J

    2015-01-01

    The study of quinoxalines has increased immeasurably during the last two decades, due firstly to their relatively simple chemical synthesis, which has generated a vast variety of compounds with diverse structural modifications, and secondly, to the wide therapeutic potential and biological activities exhibited by this family of compounds. Quinoxalines constitute a rising biomedical class of low-molecular weight heterocyclic compounds with potential functions as antitumour, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiparasitic and antidiabetic agents, as well as being of interest for the potential treatment of glaucoma, insomnia, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, among others. However, a deeper knowledge of the molecular targets of quinoxalines that fulfil a key role in certain pathologies is required for the development of new and more specific drugs through a rational design strategy to avoid undesirable side effects. In the present review, we summarize the most important molecular targets of the quinoxaline derivatives discovered to date, thus providing a first reference index for researchers to identify the potential targets of their quinoxalines derived collections, which could facilitate the development of new quinoxaline- based therapies. PMID:26264925

  5. Innate immune receptors in heart failure: Side effect or potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Katharina B; Felix, Stephan B; Riad, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in western countries and occasions major expenses for public health systems. Although optimal medical treatment is widely available according to current guidelines, the prognosis of patients with HF is still poor. Despite the etiology of the disease, increased systemic or cardiac activation of the innate immune system is well documented in several types of HF. In some cases there is evidence of an association between innate immune activation and clinical outcome of patients with this disease. However, the few large trials conducted with the use of anti-inflammatory medication in HF have not revealed its benefits. Thus, greater understanding of the relationship between alteration in the immune system and development and progression of HF is urgently necessary: prior to designing therapeutic interventions that target pathological inflammatory processes in preventing harmful cardiac effects of immune modulatory therapy. In this regard, relatively recently discovered receptors of the innate immune system, i.e., namely toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nod-like receptors (NLRs)-are the focus of intense cardiovascular research. These receptors are main up-stream regulators of cytokine activation. This review will focus on current knowledge of the role of TLRs and NLRs, as well as on downstream cytokine activation, and will discuss potential therapeutic implications. PMID:25228958

  6. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy: Potential new areas

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. . E-mail: jwong@coh.org

    2006-10-01

    Radiation oncology is entering an exciting new era with therapies being delivered in a targeted fashion through an increasing number of novel approaches. External beam radiotherapy now integrates functional and anatomic tumor imaging to guide delivery of conformal radiation to the tumor target. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) adds an important new dimension by making available to Radiation oncologist biologically targeted radiation therapy. Impressive clinical results with antibody-targeted radiotherapy, leading to the Food and Drug Administration's approval of two anti-CD20 radiolabeled antibodies, highlight the potential of STaRT. Optimization strategies will further improve the efficacy of STaRT by improving delivery systems, modifying the tumor microenvironment to increase targeted dose, and maximizing dose effect. Ultimately, the greatest potential for STaRT will not be as monotherapy, but as therapy integrated into established multimodality regimens and used as adjuvant or consolidative therapy in patients with minimal or micrometastatic disease.

  7. Dual targeting of Angiopoetin-2 and VEGF potentiates effective vascular normalisation without inducing empty basement membrane sleeves in xenograft tumours

    PubMed Central

    Coutelle, O; Schiffmann, L M; Liwschitz, M; Brunold, M; Goede, V; Hallek, M; Kashkar, H; Hacker, U T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective vascular normalisation following vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition is associated with endothelial cell regression leaving empty basement membrane sleeves (BMS). These long-lived BMS permit the rapid regrowth of tumour vasculature upon treatment cessation and promote resistance to VEGF-targeting drugs. Previous attempts at removing BMS have failed. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) is a vascular destabilizing factor that antagonises normalisation. We hypothesised that Ang2 inhibition could permit vascular normalisation at significantly reduced doses of VEGF inhibition, avoiding excessive vessel regression and the formation of empty BMS. Methods: Mice xenografted with human colorectal cancer cells (LS174T) were treated with low (0.5 mg kg−1) or high (5 mg kg−1) doses of the VEGF-targeting antibody bevacizumab with or without an Ang2 blocking peptibody L1-10. Tumour growth, BMS formation and normalisation parameters were examined including vessel density, pericyte coverage, adherence junctions, leakiness, perfusion, hypoxia and proliferation. Results: Dual targeting of VEGF and Ang2 achieved effective normalisation at only one-tenth of the dose required with bevacizumab alone. Pericyte coverage, vascular integrity, adherence junctions and perfusion as prerequisites for improved access of chemotherapy were improved without inducing empty BMS that facilitate rapid vascular regrowth. Conclusions: Dual targeting of VEGF and Ang2 can potentiate the effectiveness of VEGF inhibitors and avoid the formation of empty BMS. PMID:25562438

  8. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  9. Aptamer targeting of the elongation factor 1A impairs hepatocarcinoma cells viability and potentiates bortezomib and idarubicin effects.

    PubMed

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Farra, Rosella; Dapas, Barbara; Baj, Gabriele; Pozzato, Gabriele; Grassi, Mario; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Grassi, Gabriele

    2016-06-15

    The high morbidity and mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is mostly due to the limited efficacy of the available therapeutic approaches. Here we explore the anti-HCC potential of an aptamer targeting the elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a protein implicated in the promotion of HCC. As delivery methods, we have compared the effectiveness of cationic liposome and cholesterol-mediated approaches. A75 nucleotide long aptamer containing GT repetition (GT75) was tested in three HCC cell lines, HepG2, HuH7 and JHH6. When delivered by liposomes, GT75 was able to effectively reducing HCC cells viability in a dose and time dependent fashion. Particular sensitive were JHH6 where increased apoptosis with no effects on cell cycle were observed. GT75 effect was likely due to the interference with eEF1A activity as neither the mRNA nor the protein levels were significantly affected. Notably, cholesterol-mediated delivery of GT75 abrogated its efficacy due to cellular mis-localization as proven by fluorescence and confocal microscopic analysis. Finally, liposome-mediated delivery of GT75 improved the therapeutic index of the anticancer drugs bortezomib and idarubicin. In conclusion, liposome but not cholesterol-mediated delivery of GT75 resulted in an effective delivery of GT75, causing the impairment of the vitality of a panel of HCC derived cells. PMID:27094354

  10. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as a therapeutic target for intervention of respiratory effects and lethality from phosgene.

    PubMed

    Andres, Devon; Keyser, Brian; Benton, Betty; Melber, Ashley; Olivera, Dorian; Holmes, Wesley; Paradiso, Danielle; Anderson, Dana; Ray, Radharaman

    2016-02-26

    Phosgene (CG), a toxic inhalation and industrial hazard, causes bronchoconstriction, vasoconstriction and associated pathological effects that could be life threatening. Ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family have been identified to act as specific chemosensory molecules in the respiratory tract in the detection, control of adaptive responses and initiation of detrimental signaling cascades upon exposure to various toxic inhalation hazards (TIH); their activation due to TIH exposure may result in broncho- and vasoconstriction. We studied changes in the regulation of intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultures of human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) and human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) exposed to CG (16ppm, 8min), using an air/liquid interface exposure system. CG increased [Ca(2+)]i (p<0.05) in both cell types, The CG-induced [Ca(2+)]i was blocked (p<0.05) by two types of TRP channel blockers, SKF-96365, a general TRP channel blocker, and RR, a general TRPV (vanilloid type) blocker, in both BSMC and HPMEC. These effects correlate with the in vivo efficacies of these compounds to protect against lung injury and 24h lethality from whole body CG inhalation exposure in mice (8-10ppm×20min). Thus the TRP channel mechanism appears to be a potential target for intervention in CG toxicity. PMID:26562769

  11. Neuroprotective effects of the catalytic subunit of telomerase: A potential therapeutic target in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Forero, Diego A; Echeverria, Valentina; Gonzalez, Janneth; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E

    2016-07-01

    Senescence plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases and involves key molecular changes induced by several mechanisms such as oxidative stress, telomere shortening and DNA damage. Potential therapeutic strategies directed to counteract these molecular changes are of great interest for the prevention of the neurodegenerative process. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein composed of a catalytic subunit (TERT) and a RNA subunit (TERC). It is known that the telomerase is involved in the maintenance of telomere length and is a highly expressed protein in embryonic stages and decreases in adult cells. In the last decade, a growing number of studies have shown that TERT has neuroprotective effects in cellular and animal models after a brain injury. Significantly, differences in TERT expression between controls and patients with major depressive disorder have been observed. More recently, TERT has been associated with the decrease in reactive oxygen species and DNA protection in mitochondria of neurons. In this review, we highlight the role of TERT in some neurodegenerative disorders and discuss some studies focusing on this protein as a potential target for neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27095058

  12. Autotaxin and LPA Receptors Represent Potential Molecular Targets for the Radiosensitization of Murine Glioma through Effects on Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Linkous, Amanda G.; Hu, Rong; Leahy, Kathleen M.; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite wide margins and high dose irradiation, unresectable malignant glioma (MG) is less responsive to radiation and is uniformly fatal. We previously found that cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is a molecular target for radiosensitizing cancer through the vascular endothelium. Autotaxin (ATX) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors are downstream from cPLA2 and highly expressed in MG. Using the ATX and LPA receptor inhibitor, α-bromomethylene phosphonate LPA (BrP-LPA), we studied ATX and LPA receptors as potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of tumor vasculature in MG. Treatment of Human Umbilical Endothelial cells (HUVEC) and mouse brain microvascular cells bEND.3 with 5 µmol/L BrP-LPA and 3 Gy irradiation showed decreased clonogenic survival, tubule formation, and migration. Exogenous addition of LPA showed radioprotection that was abrogated in the presence of BrP-LPA. In co-culture experiments using bEND.3 and mouse GL-261 glioma cells, treatment with BrP-LPA reduced Akt phosphorylation in both irradiated cell lines and decreased survival and migration of irradiated GL-261 cells. Using siRNA to knock down LPA receptors LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 in HUVEC, we demonstrated that knockdown of LPA2 but neither LPA1 nor LPA3 led to increased viability and proliferation. However, knockdown of LPA1 and LPA3 but not LPA2 resulted in complete abrogation of tubule formation implying that LPA1 and LPA3 on endothelial cells are likely targets of BrP-LPA radiosensitizing effect. Using heterotopic tumor models of GL-261, mice treated with BrP-LPA and irradiation showed a tumor growth delay of 6.8 days compared to mice treated with irradiation alone indicating that inhibition of ATX and LPA receptors may significantly improve malignant glioma response to radiation therapy. These findings identify ATX and LPA receptors as molecular targets for the development of radiosensitizers for MG. PMID:21799791

  13. Potential new therapeutic targets for pathological pruritus.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Very few approved medications are indicated for the treatment of pruritus, and drug development for pruritic diseases is awaited. During the past two decades, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the physiology and pathophysiology of pruritus. Newly identified potential targets for pathological pruritus include receptors (histamine H4 receptor, leukotriene B4 receptors, interleukin-31 receptor A, bombesin BB2 receptor, toll-like receptor 3, α-adrenoceptor, and opioid μ- and κ-receptors), channels (transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 and TRPA1 channels), and enzymes (histidine decarboxylase, sphingomyelin glucosylceramide deacylase, 5-lipoxygenase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase, and autotaxin). The development of specific, effective blockers and agonists/antagonists of these targets is awaited. PMID:23902965

  14. Antitumor Effects of Oncolytic Adenovirus-Carrying siRNA Targeting Potential Oncogene EphA3

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yali; Li, Hailiang; Wu, Ruiqin; Li, Shanhu; Wang, Peng; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) armed with antitumor transgenes hold promise for cancer treatment. In previous studies, we showed that the 1504-siRNA targeting potential oncogene EphA3 was an efficient therapeutic transgene and that the telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (TERTp) driving the CRAd was a more advanced generation of CRAd. Therefore, we combined Ad-TERTp-E1A-1504 by inserting 1504-siRNA into the CRAd to study its antitumor effects and mechanism of action, using Ad-TERTp-E1A-NC and nonreplicating adenovirus carrying 1504-siRNA as controls. Cell viability assays and ED50 studies of growth inhibition confirmed that Ad-TERTp-E1A-1504 has 3.5- and 1,400-fold greater ability to kill EphA3- and TERT-expressing tumor cells compared to Ad-TERTp-E1A-NC and Ad-ΔE1A-1504, respectively. Also, Ad-TERTp-E1A-1504 had little effect on cells that modestly expressed EphA3 and TERT such as 2BS. The antitumor efficacy of Ad-TERTp-E1A-1504 was also validated in vivo. Furthermore, the virus yield of Ad-TERTp-E1A-1504 in C4-2B was ~1,000 times greater than that in 2BS. No obvious differences were observed between Ad-TERTp-E1A-1504 and Ad-TERTp-E1A-NC. Both acridine orange staining and Beclin1 protein measurements indicated that autophagy with Ad-TERTp-E1A-1504 at 5 and 10 MOI was higher than that of Ad-TERTp-E1A-NC. Finally, the classical negatively regulated autophagy signaling pathway, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, was suppressed (reduced phosphorylated form) in contrast to NC, and that this was mediated by 1504-siRNA. Thus, Ad- TERTp-E1A-1504 does not harm normal cells but has dual inhibiting and killing effects on TERT- and EphA3-positive tumor cells, and this effect is mediated by the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway via induction of autophagy. These data may offer a foundation for novel antitumor therapies targeting this mechanism. PMID:25978371

  15. A Targeted Metabolomics MRM-MS Study on Identifying Potential Hypertension Biomarkers in Human Plasma and Evaluating Acupuncture Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingxiao; Yu, Zheng; Deng, Shufang; Chen, Xiaomin; Chen, Liang; Guo, Zhenyu; Zheng, Hui; Chen, Lin; Cai, Dingjun; Wen, Bo; Wu, Qiaofeng; Liang, Fanrong

    2016-01-01

    The critical role of metabolic abnormality in hypertension is increasingly recognized, but its biomarkers are not clearly identified. In this study, 47 chemical compounds recorded by literature were employed as target metabolites of essential hypertension (EH). We detected their content in the plasma of EH patients and healthy subjects by using the Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry (MRM-MS). After screening the most altered compounds, acupuncture was used to treat patients for 3 months and these plasma metabolites were tested again. The results showed that oleic acid (OA) and myoinositol (MI) were the most important differential metabolites between the hypertensive plasma and the healthy plasma. They were also closely correlated with 24-hour blood pressure and nocturnal dipping. Moreover, plasma OA and MI could be restored to normal levels by acupuncture, accompanying with reduction of 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure [from 145.10 ± 9.28 mm Hg to 140.70 ± 9.59 mm Hg (P < 0.0001), and 88.35 ± 7.92 mm Hg to 85.86 ± 7.95 mm Hg (P = 0.0024), respectively] and improvement of circadian blood pressure rhythm. This study demonstrated that plasma OA and MI were potential hypertension biomarkers and they could be used to preliminarily assess the treating effects such as acupuncture. PMID:27181907

  16. A Targeted Metabolomics MRM-MS Study on Identifying Potential Hypertension Biomarkers in Human Plasma and Evaluating Acupuncture Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxiao; Yu, Zheng; Deng, Shufang; Chen, Xiaomin; Chen, Liang; Guo, Zhenyu; Zheng, Hui; Chen, Lin; Cai, Dingjun; Wen, Bo; Wu, Qiaofeng; Liang, Fanrong

    2016-01-01

    The critical role of metabolic abnormality in hypertension is increasingly recognized, but its biomarkers are not clearly identified. In this study, 47 chemical compounds recorded by literature were employed as target metabolites of essential hypertension (EH). We detected their content in the plasma of EH patients and healthy subjects by using the Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry (MRM-MS). After screening the most altered compounds, acupuncture was used to treat patients for 3 months and these plasma metabolites were tested again. The results showed that oleic acid (OA) and myoinositol (MI) were the most important differential metabolites between the hypertensive plasma and the healthy plasma. They were also closely correlated with 24-hour blood pressure and nocturnal dipping. Moreover, plasma OA and MI could be restored to normal levels by acupuncture, accompanying with reduction of 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure [from 145.10 ± 9.28 mm Hg to 140.70 ± 9.59 mm Hg (P < 0.0001), and 88.35 ± 7.92 mm Hg to 85.86 ± 7.95 mm Hg (P = 0.0024), respectively] and improvement of circadian blood pressure rhythm. This study demonstrated that plasma OA and MI were potential hypertension biomarkers and they could be used to preliminarily assess the treating effects such as acupuncture. PMID:27181907

  17. Potential molecular targets for Ewing's sarcoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Jully, Babu; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2012-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a highly malignant tumor of children and young adults. Modern therapy for Ewing's sarcoma combines high-dose chemotherapy for systemic control of disease, with advanced surgical and/or radiation therapeutic approaches for local control. Despite optimal management, the cure rate for localized disease is only approximately 70%, whereas the cure rate for metastatic disease at presentation is less than 30%. Patients who experience long-term disease-free survival are at risk for significant side-effects of therapy, including infertility, limb dysfunction and an increased risk for second malignancies. The identification of new targets for innovative therapeutic approaches is, therefore, strongly needed for its treatment. Many new pharmaceutical agents have been tested in early phases of clinical trials in ES patients who have recurrent disease. While some agents led to partial response or stable disease, the percentages of drugs eliciting responses or causing an overall effect have been minimal. Furthermore, of the new pharmaceuticals being introduced to clinical practice, the most effective agents also have dose-limiting toxicities. Novel approaches are needed to minimize non-specific toxicity, both for patients with recurrence and at diagnosis. This report presents an overview of the potential molecular targets in ES and highlights the possibility that they may serve as therapeutic targets for the disease. Although additional investigations are required before most of these approaches can be assessed in the clinic, they provide a great deal of hope for patients with Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:23580819

  18. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells communicate with the cells of their microenvironment via a series of molecular and cellular interactions to aid their progression to a malignant state and ultimately their metastatic spread. Of the cells in the microenvironment with a key role in cancer development, tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) are among the most notable. Tumour cells release a range of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors to attract macrophages, and these in turn release numerous factors (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9 and EGF) that are implicated in invasion-promoting processes such as tumour cell growth, flicking of the angiogenic switch and immunosuppression. TAM density has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer, suggesting that these cells may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, there are currently no agents that specifically target TAM's available for clinical use. Bisphosphonates (BPs), such as zoledronic acid, are anti-resorptive agents approved for treatment of skeletal complication associated with metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer. These agents act on osteoclasts, key cells in the bone microenvironment, to inhibit bone resorption. Over the past 30 years this has led to a great reduction in skeletal-related events (SRE's) in patients with advanced cancer and improved the morbidity associated with cancer-induced bone disease. However, there is now a growing body of evidence, both from in vitro and in vivo models, showing that zoledronic acid can also target tumour cells to increase apoptotic cell death and decrease proliferation, migration and invasion, and that this effect is significantly enhanced in combination with chemotherapy agents. Whether macrophages in the peripheral tumour microenvironment are exposed to sufficient levels of bisphosphonate to be affected is currently unknown. Macrophages belong to the same cell lineage as osteoclasts, the major target of BPs, and are highly phagocytic cells shown to be sensitive to

  19. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  20. PEGylation Potentiates the Effectiveness of an Antagonistic Peptide That Targets the EphB4 Receptor with Nanomolar Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Noberini, Roberta; Mitra, Sayantan; Salvucci, Ombretta; Valencia, Fatima; Duggineni, Srinivas; Prigozhina, Natalie; Wei, Ke; Tosato, Giovanna; Huang, Ziwei; Pasquale, Elena B.

    2011-01-01

    The EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase together with its preferred ligand, ephrin-B2, regulates a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including tumor progression, pathological forms of angiogenesis, cardiomyocyte differentiation and bone remodeling. We previously reported the identification of TNYL-RAW, a 15 amino acid-long peptide that binds to the ephrin-binding pocked of EphB4 with low nanomolar affinity and inhibits ephrin-B2 binding. Although ephrin-B2 interacts promiscuously with all the EphB receptors, the TNYL-RAW peptide is remarkably selective and only binds to EphB4. Therefore, this peptide is a useful tool for studying the biological functions of EphB4 and for imaging EphB4-expressing tumors. Furthermore, TNYL-RAW could be useful for treating pathologies involving EphB4-ephrin-B2 interaction. However, the peptide has a very short half-life in cell culture and in the mouse blood circulation due to proteolytic degradation and clearance by the kidneys and reticuloendothelial system. To overcome these limitations, we have modified TNYL-RAW by fusion with the Fc portion of human IgG1, complexation with streptavidin or covalent coupling to a 40 KDa branched polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer. These modified forms of TNYL-RAW all have greatly increased stability in cell culture, while retaining high binding affinity for EphB4. Furthermore, PEGylation most effectively increases peptide half-life in vivo. Consistent with increased stability, submicromolar concentrations of PEGylated TNYL-RAW effectively impair EphB4 activation by ephrin-B2 in cultured B16 melanoma cells as well as capillary-like tube formation and capillary sprouting in co-cultures of endothelial and epicardial mesothelial cells. Therefore, PEGylated TNYL-RAW may be useful for inhibiting pathological forms of angiogenesis through a novel mechanism involving disruption of EphB4-ephrin-B2 interactions between endothelial cells and supporting perivascular mesenchymal cells. Furthermore

  1. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus.

    PubMed

    Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with target processing (N2b and P3b) and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-). An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided into three age groups (Young: 21-29, Middle-aged: 51-64, Old: 65-84 years old). Participants were asked to attend to visual stimuli and to ignore auditory stimuli. Aging was associated with slowed reaction times, target stimulus processing in working memory (WM, longer N2b and P3b latencies) and selection and preparation of the motor response (longer sLRP and earlier rLRP onset latencies). In the novel relative to the standard condition we observed, in the three age groups: (1) a distraction effect, reflected in a slowing of reaction times, of stimuli categorization in WM (longer P3b latency), and of motor response selection (longer sLRP onset latency); (2) a facilitation effect on response preparation (later rLRP onset latency), and (3) an increase in arousal (larger amplitudes of all ERPs evaluated, except for N2b amplitude in the Old group). A distraction effect on the stimulus evaluation processes (longer N2b latency) were also observed, but only in middle-aged and old participants, indicating that the attentional capture slows the stimulus evaluation in WM from early ages (from 50 years onwards, without differences between middle-age and older adults), but not in young adults. PMID:25294999

  2. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with target processing (N2b and P3b) and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-). An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided into three age groups (Young: 21–29, Middle-aged: 51–64, Old: 65–84 years old). Participants were asked to attend to visual stimuli and to ignore auditory stimuli. Aging was associated with slowed reaction times, target stimulus processing in working memory (WM, longer N2b and P3b latencies) and selection and preparation of the motor response (longer sLRP and earlier rLRP onset latencies). In the novel relative to the standard condition we observed, in the three age groups: (1) a distraction effect, reflected in a slowing of reaction times, of stimuli categorization in WM (longer P3b latency), and of motor response selection (longer sLRP onset latency); (2) a facilitation effect on response preparation (later rLRP onset latency), and (3) an increase in arousal (larger amplitudes of all ERPs evaluated, except for N2b amplitude in the Old group). A distraction effect on the stimulus evaluation processes (longer N2b latency) were also observed, but only in middle-aged and old participants, indicating that the attentional capture slows the stimulus evaluation in WM from early ages (from 50 years onwards, without differences between middle-age and older adults), but not in young adults. PMID:25294999

  3. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  4. Potential of the microbial assay for risk assessment (MARA) for assessing ecotoxicological effects of herbicides to non-target organisms.

    PubMed

    Fai, Patricia Bi Asanga; Mbida, Mpoame; Demefack, Jean Marc; Yamssi, Cedric

    2015-11-01

    Many microbiotests that have been proposed for use in the risk assessment of environmental pollutants have the drawback of lacking relevant published data on various aspects of their test application possibilities and therefore do not receive the regulatory recognition which they may deserve. The MARA bioassay lacks published data for many relevant environmental pollutants, particularly pesticides and this may limit its use in regulatory framework. The present study has assessed the sensitivity of the MARA bioassay relative to other established bioassays (Daphnia magna and Oreochromis niloticus) to two widely used herbicide formulations: Roundup (having glyphosate as active ingredient) and Herbextra (with the active ingredient being 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-2,4-D). Roundup was found to be more toxic than Herbextra in all three bioassays. The D. magna EC50 s obtained for Roundup and Herbextra were respectively 5.55 and 356.61 mg/l while the LC50 s for O. niloticus were 11.30 and 222,28 mg/l respectively. In the case of the MARA bioassay microbial toxic concentrations (MTCs) for individual species ranged from 6.85 to 468 mg/l with an overall mean MTC of 101.82 mg/l for glyphosate and from 74.67 to 13,333 mg/l for 2,4-D giving an overall mean MTC of 2855.88 mg/l. Although the overall MTCs from the MARA bioassay were much higher than the LC50 s and EC50 s from the fish and daphnia bioassays respectively, the most sensitive MARA organism for each of the herbicides had MTCs that were comparable to or lower than the corresponding endpoints from the other bioassays implying that the MARA assay is a potentially useful bioassay for risk assessment of pesticides. PMID:26362569

  5. Evaluation of anti-coccidial effects of 1-[4-(4-nitrophenoxy)phenyl]propane-1-one and identification of its potential target proteins in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yeo, Seon-Ju; Kaewintajuk, Kusuma; Yi, Kyu-Yang; Kim, Suk; Song, Hyun-Ok; Park, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Coccidiosis affects many vertebrates worldwide, but treatment with known anti-coccidial drugs causes several adverse side effects. There is a critical need for the development and evaluation of new drugs. The anti-coccidial effect of 1-[4-(4-nitrophenoxy)phenyl]propane-1-one (NPPP), a synthetic compound, was studied in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with NPPP showed anti-Toxoplasma activity in vitro with a lower EC50 value than pyrimethamine. In ICR mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii, oral administration of NPPP for 4 days showed statistically significant anti-Toxoplasma activity with lower numbers of tachyzoite than those of the negative control (p < 0.01). NPPP also exhibited strong anti-Eimeria activity in Eimeria tenella-infected chickens when treated for 4 days with orally administered NPPP at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Potential target proteins of NPPP were analyzed by proteomic profiles of T. gondii tachyzoites. Two hypothetical proteins were identified as possible targets of NPPP, a putative ortholog of vacuolar ATP synthase subunit C and a class I S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase. Our data show that the NPPP might be an anti-coccidial drug candidate for clinical application against coccidial infections. Future investigations will focus on identifying the function of proteins regulated by NPPP. PMID:24824336

  6. Colon-targeted delivery of piceatannol enhances anti-colitic effects of the natural product: potential molecular mechanisms for therapeutic enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Soohwan; Jeong, Seongkeun; Lee, Sunyoung; Nam, Joon; Kim, Wooseong; Yoo, Jin-Wook; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Bok Luel; Jung, Yunjin

    2015-01-01

    Piceatannol (PCT), an anti-colitic natural product, undergoes extensive Phase II hepatic metabolism, resulting in very low bioavailability. We investigated whether colon-targeted delivery of PCT could enhance anti-colitic effects and how therapeutic enhancement occurred at the molecular level. Molecular effects of PCT were examined in human colon carcinoma cells and inflamed colons. The anti-colitic effects of PCT in a colon-targeted capsule (colon-targeted PCT) were compared with PCT in a gelatin capsule (conventional PCT) in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced rat colitis model. Colon-targeted PCT elicited greatly enhanced recovery of the colonic inflammation. In HCT116 cells, PCT inhibited nuclear factor kappaB while activating anti-colitic transcription factors, nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2) p45-related factor 2, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1. Colon-targeted PCT, but not conventional PCT, modulated production of the target gene products of the transcription factors in the inflamed colonic tissues. Rectal administration of PCT, which simulates the therapeutic action of colon-targeted PCT, also ameliorated rat colitis and reproduced the molecular effects in the inflamed colonic tissues. Colon-targeted delivery increased therapeutic efficacy of PCT against colitis, likely resulting from multitargeted effects exerted by colon-targeted PCT. The drug delivery technique may be useful for therapeutic optimization of anti-colitic lead compounds including natural products. PMID:26273188

  7. Semaphorin 3A: A Potential Target for Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Zhang, Lihai; Zhang, Licheng; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a common disorder. Pathological innervation and intervertebral disc degeneration are two major factors associated with this disease. Semaphorin 3A, originally known for its potent inhibiting effect on axonal outgrowth, is recently found to correlate with disease activity and histological features in some skeletal disorders. Based on its effects on innervation and vascularization, as well as enzyme secretion, we presume that semaphorin 3A may act as a potential target for low back pain. PMID:26635602

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm: potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Garima; Rao, Saloni; Bansal, Ankiti; Dang, Shweta; Gupta, Sanjay; Gabrani, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms. It is frequently related to nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bacteremia. The biofilm formed by the bacteria allows it to adhere to any surface, living or non-living and thus Pseudomonal infections can involve any part of the body. Further, the adaptive and genetic changes of the micro-organisms within the biofilm make them resistant to all known antimicrobial agents making the Pseudomonal infections complicated and life threatening. Pel, Psl and Alg operons present in P. aeruginosa are responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharide which plays an important role in cell-cell and cell-surface interactions during biofilm formation. Understanding the bacterial virulence which depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors is essential to know the potential drug targets for future studies. Current novel methods like small molecule based inhibitors, phytochemicals, bacteriophage therapy, photodynamic therapy, antimicrobial peptides, monoclonal antibodies and nanoparticles to curtail the biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa are being discussed in this review. PMID:24309094

  9. High-density lipoprotein-mediated anti-atherosclerotic and endothelial-protective effects: a potential novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Besler, Christian; Heinrich, Kathrin; Riwanto, Meliana; Lüscher, Thomas F; Landmesser, Ulf

    2010-05-01

    Reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) are associated with a substantially increased risk of coronary disease and cardiovascular events. Furthermore, numerous studies have suggested that HDL may exert several potentially important antiatherosclerotic and endothelial-protective effects. In particular, the promotion of reverse cholesterol transport, i.e. cholesterol efflux from lipid-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions and the subsequent cholesterol transport back to the liver, has been proposed as an anti-atherogenic effect of HDL that may promote regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction is thought to play a critical role in development and progression of atherosclerosis and several recent studies have suggested that HDL exerts direct endothelial-protective effects, such as stimulation of endothelial production of the anti-atherogenic molecule nitric oxide, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects. Furthermore, it has been observed that HDL may stimulate endothelial repair processes, involving mobilisation and promotion of endothelial repair capacity of endothelial progenitor cells. The relative significance of these different potential anti-atherosclerotic effects of HDL remains still unclear at present. Importantly, at the same time it has been recognized that the vascular effects of HDL may be variable, i.e. the capacity of HDL to stimulate macrophage cholesterol efflux and endothelial-protective effects may be altered in patients with inflammatory or cardiovascular disease. The further characterisation of underlying mechanisms and the identification of the clinical relevance of this "HDL dysfunction" are currently an active field of research. HDL-targeted treatment strategies are at present intensely evaluated and may lead to increased HDL plasma levels and/or HDL-stimulated anti-atherosclerotic effects. The cardiovascular protection provided by such approaches may likely depend

  10. Second-Generation Sequencing Supply an Effective Way to Screen RNAi Targets in Large Scale for Potential Application in Pest Insect Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haichao; Miao, Xuexia

    2011-01-01

    The key of RNAi approach success for potential insect pest control is mainly dependent on careful target selection and a convenient delivery system. We adopted second-generation sequencing technology to screen RNAi targets. Illumina's RNA-seq and digital gene expression tag profile (DGE-tag) technologies were used to screen optimal RNAi targets from Ostrinia furnalalis. Total 14690 stage specific genes were obtained which can be considered as potential targets, and 47 were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Ten larval stage specific expression genes were selected for RNAi test. When 50 ng/µl dsRNAs of the genes DS10 and DS28 were directly sprayed on the newly hatched larvae which placed on the filter paper, the larval mortalities were around 40∼50%, while the dsRNAs of ten genes were sprayed on the larvae along with artificial diet, the mortalities reached 73% to 100% at 5 d after treatment. The qRT-PCR analysis verified the correlation between larval mortality and the down-regulation of the target gene expression. Topically applied fluorescent dsRNA confirmed that dsRNA did penetrate the body wall and circulate in the body cavity. It seems likely that the combination of DGE-tag with RNA-seq is a rapid, high-throughput, cost less and an easy way to select the candidate target genes for RNAi. More importantly, it demonstrated that dsRNAs are able to penetrate the integument and cause larval developmental stunt and/or death in a lepidopteron insect. This finding largely broadens the target selection for RNAi from just gut-specific genes to the targets in whole insects and may lead to new strategies for designing RNAi-based technology against insect damage. PMID:21494551

  11. Protein kinases are potential targets to treat inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Yan, Yutao

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the two main forms of which are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. In this article, we will review the mechanisms of involvement of protein kinases in the pathogenesis of and intervention against IBD, in terms of their effects on genetics, microbiota, mucous layer and tight junction, and the potential of protein kinases as therapeutic targets against IBD. PMID:25374761

  12. Oxidative stress and abdominal aortic aneurysm: potential treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Emeto, Theophilus I; Moxon, Joseph V; Au, Minnie; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a significant cause of mortality in older adults. A key mechanism implicated in AAA pathogenesis is inflammation and the associated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. These have been suggested to promote degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and vascular smooth muscle apoptosis. Experimental and human association studies suggest that ROS can be favourably modified to limit AAA formation and progression. In the present review, we discuss mechanisms potentially linking ROS to AAA pathogenesis and highlight potential treatment strategies targeting ROS. Currently, none of these strategies has been shown to be effective in clinical practice. PMID:26814202

  13. Magnetic albumin immuno-nanospheres as an efficient gene delivery system for a potential use in lung cancer: preparation, in vitro targeting and biological effect analysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xinxin; Zhang, Hao; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic albumin immuno-nanospheres (MAINs), simultaneously loaded with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting application and anticancer gene, plasmid-survivin/shRNA (pshRNA) and modified with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody Cetuximab for targeting and treatment agents, were prepared for targeting lung cancer. Transmission electron microscopy images and transfection photographs, respectively, showed that magnetic nanoparticles and pshRNA were successfully encased in the albumin nanospheres. The release profiles in vitro indicated that nanospheres had an obvious effect of sustained release of pshRNA. The results of slide agglutination test and immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that the immuno-nanospheres retained the immuno-reactivity of Cetuximab. The MAINs significantly increased adherence and uptake by GLC-82 lung cancer cells over-expressed epidermal growth factor receptor over a magnetic albumin nanospheres (MANs) control. The pshRNA-loaded MAINs formulation was more effective than equimolar doses of free Cetuximab, single magnetic targeting with pshRNA (pshRNA-loaded MANs) or single monoclonal antibody targeting with pshRNA (pshRNA-loaded AINs) in the treatment of GLC-82 lung cancer cells. Collectively, the study indicates that the novel pshRNA-loaded magnetic immuno-nanospheres represent a promising approach for magnetic and monoclonal antibody-dependent gene targeting in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26325231

  14. SecA: a potential antimicrobial target.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Arpana S; Chen, Weixuan; Jin, Jinshan; Tai, Phang C; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    There is a consensus in the medical profession of the pressing need for novel antimicrobial agents due to issues related to drug resistance. In practice, solutions to this problem to a large degree lie with the identification of new and vital targets in bacteria and subsequently designing their inhibitors. We consider SecA a very promising antimicrobial target. In this review, we compile and analyze information available on SecA to show that inhibition of SecA has a multitude of consequences. Furthermore, we discuss issues critical to the design and evaluation of SecA inhibitors. PMID:26062397

  15. SecA: a potential antimicrobial target

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Arpana S; Chen, Weixuan; Jin, Jinshan; Tai, Phang C; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    There is a consensus in the medical profession of the pressing need for novel antimicrobial agents due to issues related to drug resistance. In practice, solutions to this problem to a large degree lie with the identification of new and vital targets in bacteria and subsequently designing their inhibitors. We consider SecA a very promising antimicrobial target. In this review, we compile and analyze information available on SecA to show that inhibition of SecA has a multitude of consequences. Furthermore, we discuss issues critical to the design and evaluation of SecA inhibitors. PMID:26062397

  16. Extracellular Matrix Molecules: Potential Targets in Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Järveläinen, Hannu; Sainio, Annele; Koulu, Markku; Wight, Thomas N.; Penttinen, Risto

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of numerous macromolecules classified traditionally into collagens, elastin, and microfibrillar proteins, proteoglycans including hyaluronan, and noncollagenous glycoproteins. In addition to being necessary structural components, ECM molecules exhibit important functional roles in the control of key cellular events such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Any structural inherited or acquired defect and/or metabolic disturbance in the ECM may cause cellular and tissue alterations that can lead to the development or progression of disease. Consequently, ECM molecules are important targets for pharmacotherapy. Specific agents that prevent theexcess accumulation of ECM molecules in the vascular system, liver, kidney, skin, and lung; alternatively, agents that inhibit the degradation of the ECM in degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis would be clinically beneficial. Unfortunately, until recently, the ECM in drug discovery has been largely ignored. However, several of today's drugs that act on various primary targets affect the ECM as a byproduct of the drugs' actions, and this activity may in part be beneficial to the drugs' disease-modifying properties. In the future, agents and compounds targeting directly the ECM will significantly advance the treatment of various human diseases, even those for which efficient therapies are not yet available. PMID:19549927

  17. Characterization of a Conjugate between Rose Bengal and Chitosan for Targeted Antibiofilm and Tissue Stabilization Effects as a Potential Treatment of Infected Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Annie; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms and dentin structural changes are some of the major challenges in the management of infected dentin tissue. This study characterized a photosensitizer-conjugated chitosan with enhanced photodynamic efficacy against dental biofilms, as well as the ability to reinforce the postinfected dentin matrix in order to improve its mechanical and chemical stability. Rose Bengal-conjugated chitosan (CSRB) was synthesized using a chemical cross-linking method and characterized for photophysical, photobiological, and cytotoxicity properties. Its potential as an antibacterial and matrix-reinforcing agent on dentin collagen was also evaluated. Enterococcus faecalis as planktonic and in vitro biofilms was treated with CSRB and photodynamically activated with 5 to 60 J/cm2 green light. Dentin collagen was used for the CSRB cross-linking experiments and evaluated for chemical changes, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and mechanical properties. CSRB was a photosensitizer with efficient singlet oxygen yield. In vitro photoactivation gave higher fibroblast cell survival than did RB alone. CSRB showed significant antibiofilm photoinactivation (P < 0.01). The CSRB-cross-linked dentin collagen showed higher resistance to collagenase degradation and superior mechanical properties (P < 0.05). In summary, the photoactivated CSRB particles synthesized in this study may be a synergistic multifunctional treatment approach with lower cytotoxicity and effective antibiofilm activity as well as the ability to reinforce the dentin collagen to enhance resistance to degradation and improve mechanical properties. This may be a targeted treatment strategy to deal with infected dentin hard tissues in a clinical scenario, where both disinfection and structural integrity need to be addressed concomitantly. PMID:22777042

  18. gp130 receptor ligands as potential therapeutic targets for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Febbraio, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and its related cluster of pathophysiologic conditions including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are recognized as growing threats to world health. It is now estimated that 10% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. As a result, new therapeutic options for the treatment of obesity are clearly warranted. Recent research has focused on the role that gp130 receptor ligands may play as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. One cytokine in particular, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), acts both centrally and peripherally and mimics the biologic actions of the appetite control hormone leptin, but unlike leptin, CNTF appears to be effective in obesity and as such may have therapeutic potential. In addition, CNTF suppresses inflammatory signaling cascades associated with lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle. This review examines the potential role of gp130 receptor ligands as part of a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity. PMID:17404609

  19. Potential therapeutic targets in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Saboisky, Julian P; Chamberlin, Nancy L; Malhotra, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a disease of ever-increasing importance due to its association with multiple impairments and rising prevalence in an increasingly susceptible demographic. The syndrome is linked with loud snoring, disrupted sleep and observed apnoeas. Serious co-morbidities associated with OSA appear to be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment; however, CPAP is variably tolerated leaving many patients untreated and emphasising the need for alternative treatments. Virtually all OSA patients have airways that are anatomically vulnerable to collapse, but numerous pathophysiological factors underlie when and how OSA is manifested. This review describes how the complexity of OSA requires multiple treatment approaches that are individually targeted. This approach may take the form of more specific diagnoses in terms of the mechanisms underlying OSA as well as rational pharmacological treatment directed toward such disparate ends as arousal threshold and ventilatory control/chemosensitivity, and mechanical treatment in the form of surgery and augmentation of lung volumes. PMID:19530985

  20. Potential Targets for Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Temraz, Sally; Mukherji, Deborah; Shamseddine, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The step-wise development of colorectal neoplasia from adenoma to carcinoma suggests that specific interventions could delay or prevent the development of invasive cancer. Several key factors involved in colorectal cancer pathogenesis have already been identified including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), survivin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Clinical trials of COX-2 inhibitors have provided the “proof of principle” that inhibition of this enzyme can prevent the formation of colonic adenomas and potentially carcinomas, however concerns regarding the potential toxicity of these drugs have limited their use as a chemopreventative strategy. Curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin are chemopreventive agents that are able to suppress multiple signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis and hence are attractive candidates for further research. PMID:23975167

  1. Current Chemotherapy and Potential New Targets in Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Momtahen, Shabnam; Curtin, John; Mittal, Khush

    2016-01-01

    A variety of chemotherapeutic agents have been used for treating recurrent or advanced stage uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS). The response rates of these current agents are disappointing, with partial response rates varying from 0% to 33%, and complete response rates varying from 0% to 8%. Recent studies have documented many molecular changes in ULMSs. Prominent amongst these are gains of growth factors C-MYC, Bcl-2, K-ras, and Ki-67, and losses in tumor suppressors p16, p53, Rb1, ING2 and D14S267. Various techniques that have been used to target these molecules are presented. Targeting specific therapies at these underlying molecular changes could potentially yield better response rates with fewer side effects. PMID:26858789

  2. Retinoids as potential targets for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Rupinder K; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, modulate several physiological and pathological processes through their interactions with nuclear retinoid receptor proteins termed as retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). An increasing body of evidence signifies the existence of retinoid signaling in diverse brain areas including cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and striatum suggesting its involvement in adult brain functions. Defective retinoid signaling has been evidenced in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Reports demonstrate that vitamin A deprived mice exhibit serious defects in spatial learning and memory signifying its importance in the maintenance of memory functions. Retinoid signaling impacts the development of AD pathology through multiple pathways. Ligand activation of RAR and RXR in APP/PS1 transgenic mice ameliorated the symptoms of AD and reduced amyloid accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation. Retinoids also reduce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by astrocytes and the microglia. Studies also suggest that neuronal cell lines treated with retinoid agonists exhibit an up-regulation in the expression and activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Reports depict that retinoic acid isomers enhance, the expression of genes linked with cholesterol efflux e.g. apoe, abca-1 and abcg-1 proteins in astrocytes. Furthermore numerous studies also indicate antioxidant potential of retinoids. Through this review we concisely summarize the biology of retinoids, emphasizing on their probable neuroprotective mechanisms that will help to elucidate the pivotal role of these receptors in AD pathology. PMID:24582848

  3. Atmospheric effects on target acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeika, Norman S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Golbraikh, Ephim

    2012-06-01

    Imaging systems have advanced significantly in the last decades in terms of low noise and better resolution. While imaging hardware resolution can be limited by collection aperture size or by the camera modulation transfer function (MTF), it is the atmosphere that usually limits image quality for long range imaging. The main atmospheric distortions are caused by optical turbulence, absorption, and scattering by particulates in the atmosphere. The effects of the turbulent medium over long/short exposures are image blur and wavefront tilts that cause spatio-temporal image shifts. This blur limits the frequency of line pairs that can be resolved in the target's image and thus affects the ability to acquire targets. The observer appears to be able to ignore large-scale distortions while small-scale distortions blur the image and degrade resolution. Resolution degradations due to turbulence are included in current performance models by the use of an atmospheric MTF. Turbulence distortion effects are characterized by both short and long exposure MTFs. In addition to turbulence, scattering and absorption produced by molecules and aerosols in the atmosphere cause both attenuation and additional image blur according to the atmospheric aerosol MTF. The absorption can have significant effect on target acquisition in infrared (IR) imaging. In the present work, a brief overview and discussion of atmospheric effects on target acquisition in the IR is given.

  4. Schistosoma mansoni Sirtuins: Characterization and Potential as Chemotherapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lancelot, Julien; Caby, Stéphanie; Dubois-Abdesselem, Florence; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Trolet, Jacques; Oliveira, Guilherme; Bracher, Franz; Jung, Manfred; Pierce, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemotherapy of schistosomiasis currently depends on the use of a single drug, praziquantel. In order to develop novel chemotherapeutic agents we are investigating enzymes involved in the epigenetic modification of chromatin. Sirtuins are NAD+ dependent lysine deacetylases that are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes including histone deacetylation, and have been demonstrated to be therapeutic targets in various pathologies, including cancer. Methodology, Principal Findings In order to determine whether Schistosoma mansoni sirtuins are potential therapeutic targets we first identified and characterized their protein sequences. Five sirtuins (SmSirt) are encoded in the S. mansoni genome and phylogenetic analysis showed that they are orthologues of mammalian Sirt1, Sirt2, Sirt5, Sirt6 and Sirt7. Both SmSirt1 and SmSirt7 have large insertion in the catalytic domain compared to their mammalian orthologues. SmSirt5 is the only mitochondrial sirtuin encoded in the parasite genome (orthologues of Sirt3 and Sirt4 are absent) and transcripts corresponding to at least five splicing isoforms were identified. All five sirtuins are expressed throughout the parasite life-cycle, but with distinct patterns of expression. Sirtuin inhibitors were used to treat both schistosomula and adult worms maintained in culture. Three inhibitors in particular, Sirtinol, Salermide and MS3 induced apoptosis and death of schistosomula, the separation of adult worm pairs, and a reduction in egg laying. Moreover, Salermide treatment led to a marked disruption of the morphology of ovaries and testes. Transcriptional knockdown of SmSirt1 by RNA interference in adult worms led to morphological changes in the ovaries characterized by a marked increase in mature oocytes, reiterating the effects of sirtuin inhibitors and suggesting that SmSirt1 is their principal target. Conclusion, Significance Our data demonstrate the potential of schistosome sirtuins as therapeutic targets

  5. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs. PMID:24827844

  6. Structure-Based Development of Small Molecule PFKFB3 Inhibitors: A Framework for Potential Cancer Therapeutic Agents Targeting the Warburg Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Minsuh; Kim, Jeong-Do; Neau, David; Sehgal, Inder; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2012-02-10

    Cancer cells adopt glycolysis as the major source of metabolic energy production for fast cell growth. The HIF-1-induced PFKFB3 plays a key role in this adaptation by elevating the concentration of Fru-2,6-BP, the most potent glycolysis stimulator. As this metabolic conversion has been suggested to be a hallmark of cancer, PFKFB3 has emerged as a novel target for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we report that a small molecular inhibitor, N4A, was identified as an initial lead compound for PFKFB3 inhibitor with therapeutic potential. In an attempt to improve its potency, we determined the crystal structure of the PFKFB3 {sm_bullet} N4A complex to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and, exploiting the resulting molecular information, attained the more potent YN1. When tested on cultured cancer cells, both N4A and YN1 inhibited PFKFB3, suppressing the Fru-2,6-BP level, which in turn suppressed glycolysis and, ultimately, led to cell death. This study validates PFKFB3 as a target for new cancer therapies and provides a framework for future development efforts.

  7. Identification of a Potential Target of Capsaicin by Computational Target Fishing

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xuan-yi; Ling, Qing-zhi; Chen, Shao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, the component responsible for the pungency of chili peppers, shows beneficial effects in many diseases, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the potential targets of capsaicin were predicted using PharmMapper and confirmed via chemical-protein interactome (CPI) and molecular docking. Carbonic anhydrase 2 was identified as the main disease-related target, with the pharmacophore model matching well with the molecular features of capsaicin. The relation was confirmed by CPI and molecular docking and supported by previous research showing that capsaicin is a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes. The present study provides a basis for understanding the mechanisms of action of capsaicin or those of other natural compounds. PMID:26770256

  8. Identification of a Potential Target of Capsaicin by Computational Target Fishing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuan-Yi; Ling, Qing-Zhi; Chen, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, the component responsible for the pungency of chili peppers, shows beneficial effects in many diseases, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the potential targets of capsaicin were predicted using PharmMapper and confirmed via chemical-protein interactome (CPI) and molecular docking. Carbonic anhydrase 2 was identified as the main disease-related target, with the pharmacophore model matching well with the molecular features of capsaicin. The relation was confirmed by CPI and molecular docking and supported by previous research showing that capsaicin is a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes. The present study provides a basis for understanding the mechanisms of action of capsaicin or those of other natural compounds. PMID:26770256

  9. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  10. Fatty acid synthase as a potential therapeutic target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Richard; Peluso, Stephane; Nguyen, Paul L; Loda, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a key enzyme involved in neoplastic lipogenesis. Overexpression of FASN is common in many cancers, and accumulating evidence suggests that it is a metabolic oncogene with an important role in tumor growth and survival, making it an attractive target for cancer therapy. Early small-molecule FASN inhibitors such as cerulenin, C75 and orlistat have been shown to induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines and to induce tumor growth delay in several cancer xenograft models but their mechanism is still not well understood. These molecules suffer from pharmacological limitations and weight loss as a side effect that prevent their development as systemic drugs. Several potent inhibitors have recently been reported that may help to unravel and exploit the full potential of FASN as a target for cancer therapy in the near future. Furthermore, novel sources of FASN inhibitors, such as green tea and dietary soy, make both dietary manipulation and chemoprevention potential alternative modes of therapy in the future. PMID:20373869

  11. MicroRNAs and Potential Targets in Osteosarcoma: Review

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Valerie B.; Yoo, Soonmoon; Kumar, Asmita; Vetter, Nancy S.; Kolb, E. Anders

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and young adults. Surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy are the standard treatment regimens for this disease. New therapies are being investigated to improve overall survival in patients. Molecular targets that actively modulate cell processes, such as cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis, have been studied, but it remains a challenge to develop novel, effective-targeted therapies to treat this heterogeneous and complex disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in regulating cell processes including growth, development, and disease. miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors to regulate gene and protein expression. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma with the potential for development in disease diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs and their target genes and evaluate their potential use as therapeutic agents in osteosarcoma. We also summarize the efficacy of inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs or expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs in preclinical models of osteosarcoma. Recent progress on systemic delivery as well as current applications for miRNAs as therapeutic agents has seen the advancement of miR-34a in clinical trials for adult patients with non-resectable primary liver cancer or metastatic cancer with liver involvement. We suggest a global approach to the understanding of the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma may identify candidate miRNAs as promising biomarkers for this rare disease. PMID:26380245

  12. Necroptosis: a potential, promising target and switch in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Qu, Feng-Zhi; Li, Le; Lv, Jia-Chen; Sun, Bei

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell death is the major pathophysiological change in early acute pancreatitis (AP), and the death modalities are important factors determining its progression and prognosis. During AP, acinar cells undergo two major modes of death, including necrosis and apoptosis. Acinar necrosis can lead to intensely local and systemic inflammatory responses, which both induce and aggravate the lesion. Necrosis has long been considered an unregulated, and passive cell death process. Since the effective interventions of necrosis are difficult to perform, its relevant studies have not received adequate attention. Necroptosis is a newly discovered cell death modality characterized by both necrosis and apoptosis, i.e., it is actively regulated by special genes, while has the typical morphological features of necrosis. Currently, necroptosis is gradually becoming an important topic in the fields of inflammatory diseases. The preliminary results from necroptosis in AP have confirmed the existence of acinar cell necroptosis, which may be a potential target for effectively regulating inflammatory injuries and improving its outcomes; however, the functional changes and mechanisms of necroptosis still require further investigation. This article reviewed the progress of necroptosis in AP to provide a reference for deeply understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of AP and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:26514558

  13. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  14. Combretastatin A-4 and Derivatives: Potential Fungicides Targeting Fungal Tubulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-lin; Yan, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Jiu-jiu; Pang, Wan; Kai, Zhen-peng; Wu, Fan-hong

    2016-02-01

    Combretastatin A-4, first isolated from the African willow tree Combretum caffrum, is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor in medicine. It was first postulated as a potential fungicide targeting fungal tubulin for plant disease control in this study. Combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives were synthesized and tested against Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia oryzae. Several compounds have EC50 values similar to or better than that of isoprothiolane, which is widely used for rice disease control. Structure-activity relationship study indicated the the cis configuration and hydroxyl group in combretastatin A-4 are crucial to the antifungal effect. Molecular modeling indicated the binding sites of combretastatin A-4 and carbendazim on fungal tubulin are totally different. The bioactivity of combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives against carbendazim-resistant strains was demonstrated in this study. The results provide a new approach for fungicide discovery and fungicide resistance management. PMID:26711170

  15. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor As Potential Target against Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    The CB2 receptor is one of the components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, a complex network of signaling molecules and receptors involved in the homeostatic control of several physiological functions. Accumulated evidence suggests a role for CB2 receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and indicates their potential as a therapeutic target against this neurodegenerative disease. Levels of CB2 receptors are significantly increased in post-mortem AD brains, mainly in microglia surrounding senile plaques, and their expression levels correlate with the amounts of Aβ42 and β-amyloid plaque deposition. Moreover, several studies on animal models of AD have demonstrated that specific CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, reduce AD-like pathology, resulting in attenuation of the inflammation associated with the disease but also modulating Aβ and tau aberrant processing, among other effects. CB2 receptor activation also improves cognitive impairment in animal models of AD. This review discusses available data regarding the role of CB2 receptors in AD and the potential usefulness of specific agonists of these receptors against AD. PMID:27303261

  16. Leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids: potential therapeutic targets in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Støving, René Klinkby; Andries, Alin; Brixen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Hørder, Kirsten; Frystyk, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has the highest mortality rate between psychiatric disorders, and evidence for managing it is still very limited. So far, pharmacological treatment has focused on a narrow range of drugs and only a few controlled studies have been performed. Furthermore, the studies have been of short duration and included a limited number of subjects, often heterogenic with regard to stage and acute nutritive status. Thus, novel approaches are urgently needed. Body weight homeostasis is tightly regulated throughout life. With the discovery of orexigenic and anorectic signals, an array of new molecular targets to control eating behavior has emerged. This review focuses on recent advances in three important signal systems: leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids toward the identification of potential therapeutical breakthroughs in AN. Our review of the current literature shows that leptin may have therapeutic potentials in promoting restoration of menstrual cycles in weight restored patients, reducing motor restlessness in severely hyperactive patients, and preventing osteoporosis in chronic patients. Ghrelin and endocannabinoids exert orexigenic effects which may facilitate nutritional restoration. Leptin and endocannabinoids may exert antidepressive and anxiolytic effects. Finally, monitoring serum concentration of leptin may be useful in order to prevent refeeding syndrome. PMID:18926548

  17. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: A potential target for metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    He, Jinlong; Wang, Chunjiong; Zhu, Yi; Ai, Ding

    2016-05-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), important lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid, have many beneficial effects in metabolic diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and kidney disease. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids can be further hydrolyzed to less active diols by the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Increasing evidence suggests that inhibition of sEH increases levels of EETs, which have anti-inflammatory effects and can prevent the development of hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart failure, fatty liver, and multiple organ fibrosis. Arachidonic acid is the most abundant omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and shares the same set of enzymes with omega-3 PUFAs, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. The omega-3 PUFAs and metabolites, such as regioisomeric epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids, have been reported to have strong vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, sEH may be a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. In this review, we focus on our and other recent studies of the functions of sEH, including the effects of its eicosanoid products from both omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs, in various metabolic diseases. We also discuss the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sEH. PMID:26621325

  18. Therapeutic potential of stem cells expressing suicide genes that selectively target human breast cancer cells: Evidence that they exert tumoricidal effects via tumor tropism

    PubMed Central

    YI, BO-RIM; CHOI, KELVIN J.; KIM, SEUNG U.; CHOI, KYUNG-CHUL

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide and is classified into ductal and lobular carcinoma. Breast cancer as well as lobular carcinoma is associated with various risk factors such as gender, age, female hormone exposure, ethnicity, family history and genetic risk factor-associated genes. Genes associated with a high risk of developing breast cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, PTEN, CHEK2 and ATM. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy are used to treat breast cancer but these therapies, except for surgery, have many side-effects such as alopecia, anesthesia, diarrhea and arthralgia. Gene-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GEPT) or suicide gene therapy, may improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy without side-effects. GEPT most often involves the use of a viral vector to deliver a gene not found in mammalian cells and that produces enzymes which can convert a relatively non-toxic prodrug into a toxic agent. Examples of these systems include cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC), carboxyl esterase/irinotecan (CE/CPT-11), and thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (TK/GCV). Recently, therapies based on genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) using a GEPT system have received a great deal of attention for their clinical and therapeutic potential to treat breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential of GESTECs via tumor tropism effects and therapeutic efficacy against several different types of cancer cells. GESTECs represent a useful tool for treating breast cancer without inducing injuries associated with conventional therapeutic modalities. PMID:22736197

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  20. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  1. Targeting Bone Marrow to Potentiate the Anti-Tumor Effect of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor in Preclinical Rat Model of Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaaban, S.; Alsulami, M.; Arbab, S.A.; Ara, R.; Shankar, A.; Iskander, A.; Angara, K.; Jain, M.; Bagher-Ebadian, H.; Achyut, B.R.; Arbab, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents caused paradoxical increase in pro-growth and pro-angiogenic factors and caused tumor growth in glioblastoma (GBM). It is hypothesized that paradoxical increase in pro-angiogenic factors would mobilize Bone Marrow Derived Cells (BMDCs) to the treated tumor and cause refractory tumor growth. The purposes of the studies were to determine whether whole body irradiation (WBIR) or a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100) will potentiate the effect of vatalanib (a VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and prevent the refractory growth of GBM. Human GBM were grown orthotopically in three groups of rats (control, pretreated with WBIR and AMD3100) and randomly selected for vehicle or vatalanib treatments for 2 weeks. Then all animals underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) followed by euthanasia and histochemical analysis. Tumor volume and different vascular parameters (plasma volume (vp), forward transfer constant (Ktrans), back flow constant (kep), extravascular extracellular space volume (ve) were determined from MRI. In control group, vatalanib treatment increased the tumor growth significantly compared to that of vehicle treatment but by preventing the mobilization of BMDCs and interaction of CXCR4-SDF-1 using WBIR and ADM3100, respectively, paradoxical growth of tumor was controlled. Pretreatment with WBIR or AMD3100 also decreased tumor cell migration, despite the fact that ADM3100 increased the accumulation of M1 and M2 macrophages in the tumors. Vatalanib also increased Ktrans and ve in control animals but both of the vascular parameters were decreased when the animals were pretreated with WBIR and AMD3100. In conclusion, depleting bone marrow cells or CXCR4 interaction can potentiate the effect of vatalanib. PMID:27429653

  2. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  3. Metabolic Enzymes of Helminth Parasites: Potential as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways that extract energy from carbon compounds are essential for an organism's survival. Therefore, inhibition of enzymes in these pathways represents a potential therapeutic strategy to combat parasitic infections. However, the high degree of similarity between host and parasite enzymes makes this strategy potentially difficult. Nevertheless, several existing drugs to treat infections by parasitic helminths (worms) target metabolic enzymes. These include the trivalent antimonials that target phosphofructokinase and Clorsulon that targets phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglycerate kinase. Glycolytic enzymes from a variety of helminths have been characterised biochemically, and some inhibitors identified. To date none of these inhibitors have been developed into therapies. Many of these enzymes are externalised from the parasite and so are also of interest in the development of potential vaccines. Less work has been done on tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Again, while some inhibitors have been identified none have been developed into drug-like molecules. Barriers to the development of novel drugs targeting metabolic enzymes include the lack of experimentally determined structures of helminth enzymes, lack of direct proof that the enzymes are vital in the parasites and lack of cell culture systems for many helminth species. Nevertheless, the success of Clorsulon (which discriminates between highly similar host and parasite enzymes) should inspire us to consider making serious efforts to discover novel anthelminthics, which target metabolic enzymes. PMID:26983888

  4. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? PMID:23711791

  5. TRPM8: a potential target for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoguo; Wu, Hongyan; Wei, Zhonghong; Wang, Xu; Shen, Peiliang; Wang, Siliang; Wang, Aiyun; Chen, Wenxing; Lu, Yin

    2016-09-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel superfamily plays critical roles in variety of processes, including temperature perception, pain transduction, vasorelaxation, male fertility, and tumorigenesis. One of seven families within the TRP superfamily of ion channels, the melastatin, or TRPM family comprises a group of eight structurally and functionally diverse channels. Of all the members of TRPM subfamily, TRPM8 is the most notable one. A lot of literatures have demonstrated that transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) could perform a myriad of functions in vertebrates and invertebrates alike. In addition to its well-known function in cold sensation, TRPM8 has an emerging role in a variety of biological systems, including thermoregulation, cancer, bladder function, and asthma. Recent studies have shown that TRPM8 is necessary to the initiation and progression of tumors, and the aberrant expression of TRPM8 was found in varieties of tumors, such as prostate tumor, melanoma, breast adenocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and colorectal cancer, making it a novel molecular target potentially useful in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. This review outlines our current understanding on the role of TRPM8 in occurrence and development of different kinds of tumor and also includes discussion about the regulation of TRPM8 during carcinogenesis as well as therapeutic potential of targeting TRPM8 in tumor, which may be utilized for a potential pharmacological use as a target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26803314

  6. Hsp90 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Aguilà, Mònica; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a pivotal cellular regulator involved in the folding, activation and assembly of a wide range of proteins. Hsp90 has multiple roles in the retina and the use of different Hsp90 inhibitors has been shown to prevent retinal degeneration in models of retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Hsp90 is also a potential target in uveal melanoma. Mechanistically, Hsp90 inhibition can evoke a dual response in the retina; stimulating a stress response with molecular chaperone expression. Thereby leading to an improvement in visual function and photoreceptor survival; however, prolonged inhibition can also stimulate the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins potentially deleteriously affect vision. Here, we review the multiple roles of Hsp90 in the retina and the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 as a target. PMID:26427407

  7. Target and Non-Target Processing during Oddball and Cyberball: A Comparative Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Weschke, Sarah; Niedeggen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of social exclusion can be investigated by using a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball. In neuroimaging studies, structures have been identified which are activated during social exclusion. But to date the underlying mechanisms are not fully disclosed. In previous electrophysiological studies it was shown that the P3 complex is sensitive to exclusion manipulations in the Cyberball paradigm and that there is a correlation between P3 amplitude and self-reported social pain. Since this posterior event-related potential (ERP) was widely investigated using the oddball paradigm, we directly compared the ERP effects elicited by the target (Cyberball: "ball possession") and non-target (Cyberball: "ball possession of a co-player) events in both paradigms. Analyses mainly focused on the effect of altered stimulus probabilities of the target and non-target events between two consecutive blocks of the tasks. In the first block, the probability of the target and non-target event was 33% (Cyberball: inclusion), in the second block target probability was reduced to 17%, and accordingly, non-target probability was increased to 66% (Cyberball: exclusion). Our results indicate that ERP amplitude differences between inclusion and exclusion are comparable to ERP amplitude effects in a visual oddball task. We therefore suggest that ERP effects-especially in the P3 range-in the Oddball and Cyberball paradigm rely on similar mechanisms, namely the probability of target and non-target events. Since the simulation of social exclusion (Cyberball) did not trigger a unique ERP response, the idea of an exclusion-specific neural alarm system is not supported. The limitations of an ERP-based approach will be discussed. PMID:27100787

  8. Mitochondrial Peroxiredoxin III is a Potential Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, In-Sung; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu; Jeong, Seung-Hun; Lee, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Nari; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Ko, Kyung Soo; Han, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved either directly or indirectly in oncogenesis and the alteration of metabolism in cancer cells. Cancer cells contain large numbers of abnormal mitochondria and produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of ROS and the antioxidant capacity of the cell. Several cancer therapies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation, disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis and release cytochrome c, leading to apoptosome formation, which activates the intrinsic pathway. This is modulated by the extent of mitochondrial oxidative stress. The peroxiredoxin (Prx) system is a cellular defense system against oxidative stress, and mitochondria in cancer cells are known to contain high levels of Prx III. Here, we review accumulating evidence suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress is involved in cancer, and discuss the role of the mitochondrial Prx III antioxidant system as a potential target for cancer therapy. We hope that this review will provide the basis for new strategic approaches in the development of effective cancer treatments. PMID:22072940

  9. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  10. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  11. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  12. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  13. Target and Non-Target Processing during Oddball and Cyberball: A Comparative Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Weschke, Sarah; Niedeggen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of social exclusion can be investigated by using a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball. In neuroimaging studies, structures have been identified which are activated during social exclusion. But to date the underlying mechanisms are not fully disclosed. In previous electrophysiological studies it was shown that the P3 complex is sensitive to exclusion manipulations in the Cyberball paradigm and that there is a correlation between P3 amplitude and self-reported social pain. Since this posterior event-related potential (ERP) was widely investigated using the oddball paradigm, we directly compared the ERP effects elicited by the target (Cyberball: “ball possession”) and non-target (Cyberball: “ball possession of a co-player) events in both paradigms. Analyses mainly focused on the effect of altered stimulus probabilities of the target and non-target events between two consecutive blocks of the tasks. In the first block, the probability of the target and non-target event was 33% (Cyberball: inclusion), in the second block target probability was reduced to 17%, and accordingly, non-target probability was increased to 66% (Cyberball: exclusion). Our results indicate that ERP amplitude differences between inclusion and exclusion are comparable to ERP amplitude effects in a visual oddball task. We therefore suggest that ERP effects–especially in the P3 range–in the Oddball and Cyberball paradigm rely on similar mechanisms, namely the probability of target and non-target events. Since the simulation of social exclusion (Cyberball) did not trigger a unique ERP response, the idea of an exclusion-specific neural alarm system is not supported. The limitations of an ERP-based approach will be discussed. PMID:27100787

  14. Aquaporin 1, a potential therapeutic target for migraine with aura

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of migraine remains largely unknown. However, evidence regarding the molecules participating in the pathophysiology of migraine has been accumulating. Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins (AQPs), notably AQP-1 and AQP-4, appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. This review outlines newly emerging evidence indicating that AQP-1 plays an important role in pain signal transduction and migraine and could therefore serve as a potential therapeutic target for these diseases. PMID:20969805

  15. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  16. Effects of target typicality on categorical search

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Justin T.; Stalder, Westri D.; Zelinsky, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of target typicality in a categorical visual search task was investigated by cueing observers with a target name, followed by a five-item target present/absent search array in which the target images were rated in a pretest to be high, medium, or low in typicality with respect to the basic-level target cue. Contrary to previous work, we found that search guidance was better for high-typicality targets compared to low-typicality targets, as measured by both the proportion of immediate target fixations and the time to fixate the target. Consistent with previous work, we also found an effect of typicality on target verification times, the time between target fixation and the search judgment; as target typicality decreased, verification times increased. To model these typicality effects, we trained Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers on the target categories, and tested these on the corresponding specific targets used in the search task. This analysis revealed significant differences in classifier confidence between the high-, medium-, and low-typicality groups, paralleling the behavioral results. Collectively, these findings suggest that target typicality broadly affects both search guidance and verification, and that differences in typicality can be predicted by distance from an SVM classification boundary. PMID:25274990

  17. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26195510

  18. Statins as Targeted "Magical Pills" for the Conservative Treatment of Endometriosis: May Potential Adverse Effects on Female Fertility Represent the "Dark Side of the Same Coin"? A Systematic Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Vitagliano, Amerigo; Noventa, Marco; Quaranta, Michela; Gizzo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze all the available evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies regarding the efficacy of statin therapy in the treatment of endometriosis, evaluating the potential efficacy, side effects, and contraindications of their administration in humans. We focused on defining the potential benefits that the administration of statins may have on patients affected by endometriosis and the possible adverse effects of such a therapy on ovarian function and fertility profile. According to our article selection criteria, we included in the review in vitro and in vivo studies performed on human or animal models. The systematic review of literature identified 24 eligible articles, 12 of which reported evidence regarding the effects of statins on endometrial/endometriotic cells and 12 regarding their effects on ovarian function and fertility. All articles seem to emphasize the utility of statin administration in the treatment of endometriosis due to their anti-proliferative/proapoptotic effects, their ability to reduce cell viability and migration, and the inhibition of angiogenesis and anti-inflammatory activities. Regarding the potential adverse effects on gonadal activities, steroidogenesis and fertility function, no conclusive data were collected in human models (excluding women affected by polycystic ovary syndrome in which significant decline of androgen levels was reported after statin treatment), while contrasting results were reported by studies conducted in in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Despite evidence supporting statins as the potential therapeutic agent for a targeted conservative treatment of endometriosis, the uncertainties regarding their impact on gonadal function may not define them as an appropriate therapy for all young fertile women. PMID:25929256

  19. Potential of solid lipid nanoparticles in brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Bhandari, Rohit; Bhandari, Swati; Kakkar, Vandita

    2008-04-21

    Brain is a delicate organ, isolated from general circulation and characterized by the presence of relatively impermeable endothelial cells with tight junctions, enzymatic activity and the presence of active efflux transporter mechanisms (like P-gp efflux). These formidable obstacles often impede drug delivery to the brain. As a result several promising molecules (showing a good potential in in vitro evaluation) are lost from the market for a mere consequence of lack of in vivo response probably because the molecule cannot reach the brain in a sufficient concentration. The options to tailor make molecules for brain, though open to the medical chemist, are a costly proposition in terms of money, manpower and time (almost 50 years). The premedial existing approaches for brain delivery like superficial and ventricular application of chemical or the application of chemicals to brain parenchyma are invasive and hence are less patient friendly, more laborious and require skill and could also damage the brain permanently. In view of these considerations novel drug delivery systems such as the nanoparticles are presently being explored for their suitability for targeted brain delivery. Nanoparticles are solid colloidal particles ranging in size from 1 to 1000 nm (<1 microm) and composed of macromolecular material. Nanoparticles could be polymeric or lipidic (SLNs). SLNs are taken up readily by the brain because of their lipidic nature. The bioacceptable and biodegradable nature of SLNs makes them less toxic as compared to polymeric nanoparticles. Supplemented with small size which prolongs the circulation time in blood, feasible scale up for large scale production and absence of burst effect makes them interesting candidates for study. In the present review we will discuss about the barriers to CNS drug delivery, strategies to bypass the blood-brain barrier and characterization methods of SLNs and their usefulness. The proposed mechanism of uptake, methods of prolonging the

  20. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com . PMID:27167132

  1. Targeting to the hair follicles: current status and potential.

    PubMed

    Wosicka, Hanna; Cal, Krzysztof

    2010-02-01

    The pilosebaceous unit is a complex structure that undergoes a specific growth cycle and comprises a few important drug targeting sites. For example, drugs can be targeted to the bulge region with stem cells or to the sebaceous glands. Interest in pilosebaceous units is directed towards their utilization as reservoirs for localized therapy and also as a transport pathway for systemic drug delivery. Improved investigative methods, such as differential stripping, are being developed in order to determine follicular penetration. This article reviews relevant aspects of effective follicle-targeting formulations and delivery systems as well as the activity status of hair follicles, and variations in follicle size and distribution throughout various body regions. Each of these factors strongly affects follicular permeation. We provide examples of improved penetration of particle-based formulations and of a size-dependent manner of follicular penetration. Contradictions are also discussed, indicating the need for detailed future investigations. PMID:20060268

  2. Endocannabinoid system: potential novel targets for treatment of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Atsushi; Ballinger, Michael; Pletnikov, Mikhail V.; Wong, Dean F.; Kamiya, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating epidemiological evidences suggest that cannabis use during adolescence is a potential environmental risk for the development of psychosis, including schizophrenia. Consistently, clinical and preclinical studies, using pharmacological approaches and genetically engineered animals to target endocannabinoid signaling, reveal the multiple varieties of endocannabinoid system-mediated human and animal behaviors, including cognition and emotion. Recently, there has been substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of the endocannabinoid system for synaptic communications in the central nervous system. Furthermore, the impact of endocannabinoid signaling on diverse cellular processes during brain development has emerged. Thus, although schizophrenia has etiological complexities, including genetic heterogeneities and multiple environmental factors, it now becomes crucial to explore molecular pathways of convergence of genetic risk factors and endocannabinoid signaling, which may provide us with clues to find novel targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, epidemiological, clinical, and pathological evidences on the role of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiologies of schizophrenia will be presented. We will also make a brief overview of the recent progress in understanding molecular mechanisms of the endocannabinoid system for brain development and function, with particular focus on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R)-mediated cascade, the most well-characterized cannabinoid receptor. Lastly, we will discuss the potential of the endocannabinoid system in finding novel therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:23220619

  3. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  4. Genetic determinants and potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Robert; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States, carrying a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%, which is the poorest prognosis of any solid tumor type. Given the dismal prognosis associated with PDAC, a more thorough understanding of risk factors and genetic predisposition has important implications not only for cancer prevention, but also for screening techniques and the development of personalized therapies. While screening of the general population is not recommended or practicable with current diagnostic methods, studies are ongoing to evaluate its usefulness in people with at least 5- to 10-fold increased risk of PDAC. In order to help identify high-risk populations who would be most likely to benefit from early detection screening tests for pancreatic cancer, discovery of additional pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes is crucial. Thus, specific gene-based, gene-product, and marker-based testing for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are currently being developed, with the potential for these to be useful as potential therapeutic targets as well. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis for PDAC with a focus on germline and familial determinants. A discussion of potential therapeutic targets and future directions in screening and treatment is also provided. PMID:24624093

  5. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein as a potential target for cancer therapy: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Jagani, Hitesh; Kasinathan, Narayanan; Meka, Sreenivasa Reddy; Josyula, Venkata Rao

    2016-08-01

    Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein, is considered as a potential target in cancer treatment since its oncogenic potential has been proven and is well documented. Antisense technology and RNA interference (RNAi) have been used to reduce the expression of the Bcl-2 gene in many types of cancer cells and are effective as adjuvant therapy along with the chemotherapeutic agents. The lack of appropriate delivery systems is considered to be the main hurdle associated with the RNAi. In this review, we discuss the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein, its oncogenic potential, and various approaches utilized to target Bcl-2 including suitable delivery systems employed for successful delivery of siRNA. PMID:25801037

  6. Melatonin Suppresses the Growth of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines (OVCAR-429 and PA-1) and Potentiates the Effect of G1 Arrest by Targeting CDKs

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ching-Ju; Chang, Chi-Chang; Chen, Yi-Tz; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is found in animals as well as plants. In animals, it is a hormone that anticipates the daily onset of darkness and regulates physiological functions, such as sleep timing, blood pressure, and reproduction. Melatonin has also been found to have anti-tumor properties. Malignant cancers are the most common cause of death, and the mortality rate of ovarian tumor is the highest among gynecological diseases. This study investigated the anti-tumor effects of melatonin on the ovarian cancer lines, OVCAR-429 and PA-1. We observed the accumulation of melatonin-treated cells in the G1 phase due to the down-regulation of CDK 2 and 4. Our results suggest that in addition to the known effects on prevention, melatonin may also provide anti-tumor activity in established ovarian cancer. PMID:26840297

  7. Modular Nanotransporters for Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Drugs: Folate Receptors as Potential Targets

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to a subcellular drug delivery system, modular nanotransporters (MNT) that can penetrate into target cells and deliver a therapeutic into their subcellular compartments, particularly into the nucleus. The therapeutics which need such type of delivery belong to two groups: (i) those that exert their effect only when delivered into a certain cell compartment (like DNA delivered into the nucleus); and (ii) those drugs that are capable of exerting their effect in different parts of the cells, however there can be found a cell compartment that is the most sensitive to their effect. A particular interest attract such cytotoxic agents as Auger electron emitters which are known to be ineffective outside the cell nucleus, whereas they possess high cytotoxicity in the vicinity of nuclear DNA through the induction of non-reparable double-strand DNA breaks. The review discusses main approaches permitting to choose internalizable receptors permitting both recognition of target cells and penetration into them. Special interest attract folate receptors which become accessible to blood circulating therapeutics after malignant transformation or on activated macrophages which makes them an attractive target for both several oncological and inflammatory diseases, like atherosclerosis. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that MNT is a promising platform for targeted delivery of different therapeutics into the nuclei of target cells. PMID:25312738

  8. A whole genome bioinformatic approach to determine potential latent phase specific targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Do Porto, Dario Fernández; Pereira Ramos, Pablo Ivan; Nicolás, Marisa Fabiana; Sosa, Ezequiel; Radusky, Leandro; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián G; Marti, Marcelo A

    2016-03-01

    Current Tuberculosis treatment is long and expensive, faces the increasing burden of MDR/XDR strains and lack of effective treatment against latent form, resulting in an urgent need of new anti-TB drugs. Key to TB biology is its capacity to fight the host's RNOS mediated attack. RNOS are known to display a concentration dependent mycobactericidal activity, which leads to the following hypothesis "if we know which proteins are targeted by RNOS and kill TB, we we might be able to inhibit them with drugs resulting in a synergistic bactericidal effect". Based on this idea, we performed an Mtb metabolic network whole proteome analysis of potential RNOS sensitive and relevant targets which includes target druggability and essentiality criteria. Our results, available at http://tuberq.proteinq.com.ar yield new potential TB targets, like I3PS, while also providing and updated view of previous proposals becoming an important tool for researchers looking for new ways of killing TB. PMID:26791267

  9. Analyzing the Effectiveness of Targeted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbs, Eric Michael

    2010-01-01

    This action research study examines targeted instruction and its effect on academic referrals to elementary intervention and referral service committees. The West Harvard School District was not effectively utilizing targeted instruction, and there was a distinct lack of a differentiated vision throughout the district. This lack of differentiation…

  10. Protective effects of green tea polyphenol extracts against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damages in rats: stress-responsive transcription factors and MAP kinases as potential targets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Sang; Oh, Tae-Young; Kim, Young-Kyung; Baik, Joo-Hyun; So, Sung; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Surh, Young-Joon

    2005-11-11

    There are multiple lines of compelling evidence from epidemiologic and laboratory studies supporting that frequent consumption of green tea is inversely associated with the risk of chronic human diseases including cancer. The chemopreventive and chemoprotective effects of green tea have been largely attributed to antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of its polyphenolic constituents, such as epigallocatechin gallate. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of green tea polyphenols in protecting against alcohol-induced gastric damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Intragastric administration of ethanol to male Sprague-Dawley rats caused significant gastric mucosal damage, which was accompanied by elevated expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as transient activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as NF-kappaB and AP-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Oral administration of the green tea polyphenolic extract (GTE) significantly ameliorated mucosal damages induced by ethanol and also attenuated the ethanol-induced expression of COX-2 and iNOS. Inactivation of MAPKs, especially p38 and ERKl/2, by GTE might be responsible for inhibition of ethanol-induced expression of COX-2 and iNOS. PMID:16095631

  11. PD-1 as a potential target in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, David F; Atkins, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the host response to tumors has led to the identification of checkpoint signaling pathways involved in limiting the anticancer immune response. One of the most critical checkpoint pathways responsible for mediating tumor-induced immune suppression is the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway, normally involved in promoting tolerance and preventing tissue damage in settings of chronic inflammation. Many human solid tumors express PD ligand 1 (PD-L1), and this is often associated with a worse prognosis. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with cancer typically express PD-1 and have impaired antitumor functionality. Proof-of-concept has come from several preclinical studies in which blockade of PD-1 or PD-L1 enhanced T-cell function and tumor cell lysis. Three monoclonal antibodies against PD-1, and one against PD-L1, have reported phase 1 data. All four agents have shown encouraging preliminary activity, and those that have been evaluated in larger patient populations appear to have encouraging safety profiles. Additional data are eagerly awaited. This review summarizes emerging clinical data and potential of PD-1 pathway–targeted antibodies in development. If subsequent investigations confirm the initial results, it is conceivable that agents blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway will prove valuable additions to the growing armamentarium of targeted immunotherapeutic agents. Next-generation immunotherapy agents that target the PD-1 checkpoint pathway are demonstrating antitumor activity and encouraging safety profiles in early clinical trials. Current and future clinical trials will provide new insights, and the evaluation of biomarkers and rational combination therapies is ongoing. PMID:24403232

  12. Toll-like receptors: potential targets for lupus treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan-wei; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of tolerance to self-nuclear antigens. Accumulating evidence shows that Toll-like receptors (TLRs), previously proven to be critical for host defense, are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by recognition of self-molecules. Genome-wide association studies, experimental mouse models and clinical sample studies have provided evidence for the involvement of TLRs, including TLR2/4, TLR5, TLR3 and TLR7/8/9, in SLE pathogenesis. A number of downstream proteins in the TLR signaling cascade (such as MyD88, IRAKs and IFN-α) are identified as potential therapeutic targets for SLE treatment. Numerous antagonists targeting TLR signaling, including oligonucleotides, small molecular inhibitors and antibodies, are currently under preclinical studies or clinical trials for SLE treatment. Moreover, the emerging new manipulation of TLR signaling by microRNA (miRNA) regulation shows promise for the future treatment of SLE. PMID:26592511

  13. Potential drug targets for calcific aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and, given its association with age, the prevalence of CAVD is expected to continue to rise as global life expectancy increases. No drug strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. Given that valve replacement is the only available clinical option, patients often cope with a deteriorating quality of life until diminished valve function demands intervention. The recognition that CAVD results from active cellular mechanisms suggests that the underlying pathways might be targeted to treat the condition. However, no such therapeutic strategy has been successfully developed to date. One hope was that drugs already used to treat vascular complications might also improve CAVD outcomes, but the mechanisms of CAVD progression and the desired therapeutic outcomes are often different from those of vascular diseases. We, therefore, discuss the benchmarks that must be met by a CAVD treatment approach, and highlight advances in the understanding of CAVD mechanisms to identify potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24445487

  14. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27038376

  15. Hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis: pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; You, Hong; Fan, Xu; Jia, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic macrophages account for the largest non-parenchymal cell population in the liver. Recent studies have found that hepatic macrophages have different functions in different stages of experimental liver fibrosis. Some studies found that there are different types of hepatic macrophages in the liver, although others have suggested that hepatic macrophages could switch to different phenotypes in different environments. Many studies demonstrated that while hepatic macrophages promoted fibrosis through the recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells, and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the early stages, these also promoted the resolution of hepatic fibrosis through the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in the late stages. This article will review the current role played by hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis and the potential therapeutic targets that modulate hepatic macrophages. PMID:27252881

  16. Functions of astrocytes and their potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytes are often referred to, and historically have been regarded as, support cells of the mammalian CNS. Work over the last decade suggests otherwise, that astrocytes may in fact play a more active role in higher neural processing than previously recognized. Because astrocytes can potentially serve as novel therapeutic targets, it is critical to understand how astrocytes execute their diverse supportive tasks while maintaining neuronal health. To that end, this review will focus on the supportive roles of astrocytes, a line of study relevant to essentially all acute and chronic neurological diseases. Furthermore, this review will critically re-evaluate our concepts of the functional properties of astrocytes and relate these tasks to their intricate morphology. PMID:20880499

  17. Targeting cancer with sesterterpenoids: the new potential antitumor drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caiguo; Liu, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Cancer remains a major cause of death in the world to date. A variety of anticancer drugs have been used in clinical chemotherapy, acting on the particular oncogenic abnormalities that are responsible for malignant transformation and progression. Interestingly, some of these anticancer drugs are developed from natural sources such as plants, marine organisms, and microorganisms. Over the past decades, a family of naturally occuring molecules, namely sesterterpenoids, has been isolated from different organisms and they exhibit significant potential in the inhibition of tumor cells in vitro, while the molecular targets of these compounds and their functional mechanisms are still obscure. In this review, we summarize and discuss the functions of these sesterterpenoids in the inhibition of cancer cells. Moreover, we also highlight and discuss chemical structure-activity relationships of some compounds, demonstrating their pervasiveness and importance in cancer therapy. PMID:25894074

  18. Imprinted genes as potential genetic and epigenetic toxicologic targets.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, S K; Jirtle, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon in eutherian mammals that results in the differential expression of the paternally and maternally inherited alleles of a gene. Imprinted genes are necessary for normal mammalian development. This requirement has been proposed to have evolved because of an interparental genetic battle for the utilization of maternal resources during gestation and postnatally. The nonrandom requisite for monoallelic expression of a subset of genes has also resulted in the formation of susceptibility loci for neurobehavioral disorders, developmental disorders, and cancer. Since imprinting involves both cytosine methylation within CpG islands and changes in chromatin structure, imprinted genes are potential targets for dysregulation by epigenetic toxicants that modify DNA methylation and histone acetylation. PMID:10698719

  19. The Natural Flavonoid Pinocembrin: Molecular Targets and Potential Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xi; Wang, Wenzhu; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Pinocembrin is a natural flavonoid compound extracted from honey, propolis, ginger roots, wild marjoram, and other plants. In preclinical studies, it has shown anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects as well as the ability to reduce reactive oxygen species, protect the blood-brain barrier, modulate mitochondrial function, and regulate apoptosis. Considering these pharmaceutical characteristics, pinocembrin has potential as a drug to treat ischemic stroke and other clinical conditions. In this review, we summarize its pharmacologic characteristics and discuss its mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic applications. PMID:25744566

  20. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xi-Yong; Zhu, Jing

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation. Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments. PMID:12765277

  1. EMC effect: asymptotic freedom with nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    West, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    General features of the EMC effect are discussed within the framework of quantum chromodynamics as expressed via the operator product expansion and asymptotic freedom. These techniques are reviewed with emphasis on the target dependence. 22 references.

  2. Tumor Targeting Potential of Lipid-Based Nano-Pharmaceuticals (LNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kshitij; Yavlovich, Amichai; Puri, Anu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated targeted drug delivery has become the modality of interest for cancer/tumor therapy as it reduces the undesirable delivery to normal cells and improves efficacy of the pharmaceuticals. Among all the nanosystems, lipid-based nano-pharmaceuticals (LNPs) have been most extensively studied for cancer therapy. Doxil formulation was the first LNP that has been approved for cancer treatment. When conjugated with ligands, LNPs can be targeted to tumor cells. This chapter focuses on the targeting potential of LNPs for cancer therapy. We will discuss the advantages of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect (passive targeting) for preferential tumor accumulation of LNPs, the importance of pegylation to avoid reticulo-endothelial system uptake and active targeting strategies using various targeting ligands that can be coupled to the LNP surface to target the tumor region (tumor cells/tumor vasculature). Targeted LNPs show higher binding affinity, greater intracellular localization and thereby increased cancer cell killing in comparison to non targeted LNPs. However, contrasting reports exist that pose challenges to the notion that targeted LNPs are advantageous. Recent trends have also demonstrated the concept of dual targeting that simultaneously homes LNPs to receptors on the tumor cells and biomarkers expressed on the tumor vasculature. In addition, targeting with multiple ligands on the LNPs has also been explored. These approaches may prove to be a better answer for next generation of LNPs for delivery of anti-cancer agents. However, more extensive studies are required to get their clinical approval in anti-cancer therapy.

  3. Syndecans as Modulators and Potential Pharmacological Targets in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Barbouri, Despoina; Afratis, Nikolaos; Gialeli, Chrisostomi; Vynios, Demitrios H.; Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Karamanos, Nikos K.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) components form a dynamic network of key importance for cell function and properties. Key macromolecules in this interplay are syndecans (SDCs), a family of transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Specifically, heparan sulfate (HS) chains with their different sulfation pattern have the ability to interact with growth factors and their receptors in tumor microenvironment, promoting the activation of different signaling cascades that regulate tumor cell behavior. The affinity of HS chains with ligands is altered during malignant conditions because of the modification of chain sequence/sulfation pattern. Furthermore, matrix degradation enzymes derived from the tumor itself or the tumor microenvironment, like heparanase and matrix metalloproteinases, ADAM as well as ADAMTS are involved in the cleavage of SDCs ectodomain at the HS and protein core level, respectively. Such released soluble SDCs “shed SDCs” in the ECM interact in an autocrine or paracrine manner with the tumor or/and stromal cells. Shed SDCs, upon binding to several matrix effectors, such as growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines, have the ability to act as competitive inhibitors for membrane proteoglycans, and modulate the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer cells. It is notable that SDCs and their soluble counterparts may affect either the behavior of cancer cells and/or their microenvironment during cancer progression. The importance of these molecules has been highlighted since HSPGs have been proposed as prognostic markers of solid tumors and hematopoietic malignancies. Going a step further down the line, the multi-actions of SDCs in many levels make them appealing as potential pharmacological targets, either by targeting directly the tumor or indirectly the adjacent stroma. PMID:24551591

  4. Microbiome and potential targets for chemoprevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neto, Antonio Galvao; Whitaker, April; Pei, Zhiheng

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a dismal prognosis. It is increasingly recognized that esophageal cancer is a heterogeneous disease. It can be subdivided into two distinct groups: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, based on histological appearance. In the Western world, the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was considerably higher than esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) until the 1990s when, due to a dramatic increase, the incidence of EA surpassed that of squamous cell carcinoma. EA typically follows a well-established stepwise evolution from chronic inflammation due to reflux esophagitis (RE) that progresses to metaplasia (Barrett's esophagus [BE]) to dysplasia, which often culminates in EA. The pathophysiology of EA is complex and involves diverse factors, including gastroesophageal reflux, gastric acid secretion, dysfunction of the antireflux barrier, gastric emptying disturbances, and abnormalities in esophageal defense mechanisms. The current understanding of the etiology of EA is mainly derived from epidemiological studies of risk factors such as cigarette smoking, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), and low fruit and vegetable consumption. Numerous studies have been done, but the factors that drive the dynamic increase in the incidence of EA remain elusive. The advent of widespread antibiotic use occurred in the 1950s, preceding the surge of EA. Based on this temporal sequence, it has been hypothesized that antibiotics alter the microbiome to which the esophagus is exposed in patients who have GERD and that chronic exposure to this abnormal microbiome (ie, changes in species diversity or abundance) accounts for the increase in EA. If changes in the proposed factors alter the stepwise progression (RE-BE-dysplasia-EA), they may represent potential targets for chemoprevention. New discoveries will help improve our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of these cancers, and aid in finding novel therapeutic

  5. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Daniel J.; Choudhury, Marwa; Hirsh, David M.; Hardin, John A.; Cobelli, Neil J.; Sun, Hui B.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment. PMID:24284399

  6. Pyruvate Kinase M2: A Potential Target for Regulating Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Filho, Jose C.; Pålsson-McDermott, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) is the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the last step of glycolysis. Of the four PK isoforms expressed in mammalian cells, PKM2 has generated the most interest due to its impact on changes in cellular metabolism observed in cancer as well as in activated immune cells. As our understanding of dysregulated metabolism in cancer develops, and in light of the growing field of immunometabolism, intense efforts are in place to define the mechanism by which PKM2 regulates the metabolic profile of cancer as well as of immune cells. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is heavily regulated by endogenous allosteric effectors as well as by intracellular signaling pathways, affecting both the enzymatic activity of PKM2 as a PK and the regulation of the recently described non-canonical nuclear functions of PKM2. We here review the current literature on PKM2 and its regulation, and discuss the potential for this protein as a therapeutic target in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27148264

  7. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  8. Targeting CBLB as a potential therapeutic approach for disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Tang, Juan; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Yixia; Tang, Rong; Ouyang, Song; Zeng, Qiuming; Rappleye, Chad A; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Tao, Lijian; Brown, Gordon D; Langdon, Wallace Y; Li, Belinda T; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Disseminated candidiasis has become one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired blood stream infections with high mobility and mortality. However, the molecular basis of host defense against disseminated candidiasis remains elusive, and treatment options are limited. Here we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLB directs polyubiquitination of dectin-1 and dectin-2, two key pattern-recognition receptors for sensing Candida albicans, and their downstream kinase SYK, thus inhibiting dectin-1- and dectin-2-mediated innate immune responses. CBLB deficiency or inactivation protects mice from systemic infection with a lethal dose of C. albicans, and deficiency of dectin-1, dectin-2, or both in Cblb(-/-) mice abrogates this protection. Notably, silencing the Cblb gene in vivo protects mice from lethal systemic C. albicans infection. Our data reveal that CBLB is crucial for homeostatic control of innate immune responses mediated by dectin-1 and dectin-2. Our data also indicate that CBLB represents a potential therapeutic target for protection from disseminated candidiasis. PMID:27428899

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shufang; Pan, Chuli; Zhou, Feifei; Yuan, Zhi; Wang, Huiying; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Gensheng

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced endogenously by the activation of two major H2S-generating enzymes (cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase), plays important regulatory roles in different physiologic and pathologic conditions. The abnormal metabolism of H2S is associated with fibrosis pathogenesis, causing damage in structure and function of different organs. A number of in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that both endogenous H2S level and the expressions of H2S-generating enzymes in plasma and tissues are significantly downregulated during fibrosis. Supplement with exogenous H2S mitigates the severity of fibrosis in various experimental animal models. The protective role of H2S in the development of fibrosis is primarily attributed to its antioxidation, antiapoptosis, anti-inflammation, proangiogenesis, and inhibition of fibroblasts activities. Future studies might focus on the potential to intervene fibrosis by targeting the pathway of endogenous H2S-producing enzymes and H2S itself. PMID:26078809

  10. Ion Channels in Obesity: Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Luiz H C; Souza, Iara L L; Pinheiro, Lílian S; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease related to metabolic disorders and associated with genetic determinants. Currently, ion channels activity has been linked to many of these disorders, in addition to the central regulation of food intake, energetic balance, hormone release and response, as well as the adipocyte cell proliferation. Therefore, the objective of this work is to review the current knowledge about the influence of ion channels in obesity development. This review used different sources of literature (Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) to assess the role of ion channels in the pathophysiology of obesity. Ion channels present diverse key functions, such as the maintenance of physiological homeostasis and cell proliferation. Cell biology and pharmacological experimental evidences demonstrate that proliferating cells exhibit ion channel expression, conductance, and electrical properties different from the resting cells. Thereby, a large variety of ion channels has been identified in the pathogenesis of obesity such as potassium, sodium, calcium and chloride channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and transient receptor potential channels. The fundamental involvement of these channels on the generation of obesity leads to the progress in the knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for the obesity pathophysiology, consequently emerging as new targets for pharmacological modulation. PMID:27065858

  11. Ion Channels in Obesity: Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Luiz H. C.; Souza, Iara L. L.; Pinheiro, Lílian S.; Silva, Bagnólia A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease related to metabolic disorders and associated with genetic determinants. Currently, ion channels activity has been linked to many of these disorders, in addition to the central regulation of food intake, energetic balance, hormone release and response, as well as the adipocyte cell proliferation. Therefore, the objective of this work is to review the current knowledge about the influence of ion channels in obesity development. This review used different sources of literature (Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) to assess the role of ion channels in the pathophysiology of obesity. Ion channels present diverse key functions, such as the maintenance of physiological homeostasis and cell proliferation. Cell biology and pharmacological experimental evidences demonstrate that proliferating cells exhibit ion channel expression, conductance, and electrical properties different from the resting cells. Thereby, a large variety of ion channels has been identified in the pathogenesis of obesity such as potassium, sodium, calcium and chloride channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and transient receptor potential channels. The fundamental involvement of these channels on the generation of obesity leads to the progress in the knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for the obesity pathophysiology, consequently emerging as new targets for pharmacological modulation. PMID:27065858

  12. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hassan, Mubashir; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18). Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor-ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. PMID:24899801

  13. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hassan, Mubashir; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18). Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. PMID:24899801

  14. Serpine2, a potential novel target for combating melanoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi Wei

    2016-01-01

    Early stages of melanoma can be treated by surgical resection of tumor, but there is still no effective treatment once it is progressed to metastatic phases. Although growing family of both metastasis promoting and metastasis suppressor genes have been reported, the molecular mechanisms governing melanoma metastatic cascade are still not completely understood. Therefore, defining the molecules that govern melanoma metastasis may aid the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for combating cancer. In the present study, we found that Serpin Peptidase Inhibitor 2, Serpine2 was involved in the metastasis of melanoma cells. The requirement of Serpine2 in the migration of melanoma cells was confirmed by gene silencing and over-expression in vitro. Moreover, down-regulation of Serpine2 expression strikingly inhibited melanoma cellular metastasis in vivo. Finally, we found that Serpine2 promotes melanoma metastasis through the glycogen synthesis kinase 3β, GSK-3β signaling pathway. To conclude, our findings suggested a novel mechanism underlying the metastasis of melanoma cells which might serve as a new intervention target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:27347308

  15. Targeted PRINTRTM nanoparticles for effective cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Kelly Marie

    Conventional therapeutics for the treatment of cancer are often faced with challenges such as systemic biodistribution within the body, drug degradation in vivo, low bioavailability at the site of disease, and off-target toxicity. As such, particulate drug delivery systems have been developed with the aim of minimizing these limitations of current therapies. Through the PRINTRTM (Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates) technology, hydrogel nanoparticles, prepared from biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) and acid-sensitive silyl ether crosslinkers, were functionalized and conjugated with targeting ligands for the folate receptor (FR), HER2 receptor, and transferrin receptor (TfR). By conjugating specific ligands to nanoparticles to impart specificity, highly selective targeting and internalization (>80%) of nanoparticles were demonstrated in various cancer cell lines. The extent of cellular uptake of targeted nanoparticles was dependent on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles, particle concentration, and kinetics. Because a negative surface charge reduces nonspecific cellular uptake, attaching monoclonal antibodies to the surface of negatively charged PRINT nanoparticles facilitated specific binding of the antibodies to cellular surface receptors that subsequently triggered receptor-mediated endocytosis. Additionally, the multivalent nature of nanoparticles influenced cellular uptake. Specifically, nanoparticles with a higher valence internalized more rapidly and efficiently than those with a lower valence. Nanoparticles that selectively target and accumulate within diseased cells have the potential of minimizing drug degradation under physiological conditions, enhancing bioavailability at the tumor, improving the efficacy of the drug, and reducing toxicity from systemic biodistribution. Drug delivery through targeted nanoparticles was achieved by loading nanoparticles with silyl ether-modified gemcitabine prodrugs. Covalently reacting the prodrug

  16. Targeting ILK and {beta}4 integrin abrogates the invasive potential of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Kim, Baek Gil; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kang, Suki; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential of targeting ILK and integrins for highly aggressive ovarian cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unanticipated synergistic effect for the combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin effectively inhibited the PI3K/Akt/Rac1 cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting of {beta}4 integrin/ILK had potent inhibitory effects in ovarian cancer. -- Abstract: Integrins and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are essential to cancerous invasion because they mediate physical interactions with the extracellular matrix, and regulate oncogenic signaling pathways. The purpose of our study is to determine whether deletion of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK, alone or in combination, has antitumoral effects in ovarian cancer. Expression of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 196 ovarian cancer tissue samples. We assessed the effects of depleting these molecules with shRNAs in ovarian cancer cells by Western blot, conventional RT-PCR, cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vitro Rac1 activity assays, and in vivo xenograft formation assays. Overexpression of {beta}4 integrin and ILK in human ovarian cancer specimens was found to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. Depletion of these targets efficiently suppresses ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and xenograft tumor formation in vivo. We also demonstrated that single depletion of ILK or combination depletion of {beta}4 integrin/ILK inhibits phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets, p-Ser 473 Akt and p-Thr202/Tyr204 Erk1/2, and activation of Rac1, as well as reduce expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and increase expression of caspase-3 in vitro. In conclusion, targeting {beta}4 integrin combined with ILK can instigate the latent tumorigenic potential and abrogate the invasive potential in ovarian cancer.

  17. Outer hair cells as potential targets of inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Dulon, D; Schacht, J

    1990-06-01

    Inner ear sequelae with temporary or permanent sensorineural hearing loss can result from inflammatory processes in the middle ear. Loss of outer hair cells in the base of the cochlea has been noted in otitis media, but it is not known how this damage occurs. Evidence supports the permeability of the round window membrane to substances mediating inflammation in the middle ear, and the presence of white blood cells has been reported in the perilymph. In the present study, the potential cytotoxic effects of two representative inflammatory mediators, endotoxin and free radicals, have been evaluated by use of short-term culture of isolated outer hair cells from the guinea pig cochlea model. Incubation with endotoxins from two gram-negative pathogens increased the rate of hair cell death fourfold to sixfold. Free radicals (generated by exposure of cells to UV light or by excitation of intracellular fluorescent dyes) produced morphologic damage to hair cells within 60 seconds. These latter effects were delayed by addition of free-radical scavengers. It is concluded that inflammatory mediators are cytotoxic to hair cells and therefore are potentially ototoxic if permeating the round window membrane. PMID:2112361

  18. Adrenomedullin: A potential therapeutic target for retinochoroidal disease.

    PubMed

    Iesato, Yasuhiro; Yuda, Kentaro; Chong, Kelvin Teo Yi; Tan, Xue; Murata, Toshinori; Shindo, Takayuki; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidative properties discovered in a human pheochromocytoma. It is a member of the calcitonin peptide superfamily, and its signal is mediated by calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). CLR interacts with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs), among which RAMP-2 and RAMP-3 carry CLR from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cellular membrane to confer high affinity for AM. In addition to being implicated in a variety of systemic diseases, AM is a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of retinochoroidal disease. It is robustly upregulated in retinochoroidal disease models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and laser-induced choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) as well as in human patients with retinochoroidal diseases. In this review, we discuss the most salient recent findings that strongly illustrate the role of AM in retinochoroidal disease. In the OIR model, AM was identified as a key angiogenic mediator of retinal vascularisation, and AM inhibition suppressed only pathological angiogenesis, not physiological angiogenesis. On the contrary, lesion size was larger in AM(+/-) CNV model mice, presumably due to the anti-inflammatory function of AM. Despite the success of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents for the treatment of retinochoroidal disease, therapeutic shortcomings remain. Finding ways to modulate AM activity will provide new treatment avenues. Potential treatment strategies modulating the action of AM and its signaling pathway have been studied extensively. AM and its signaling molecules are intriguing future treatment targets for retinochoroidal disease. PMID:26791747

  19. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Potential Actors and Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Saby, Charles; Magnien, Kevin; Van-Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Buache, Emilie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix critically controls cancer cell behavior by inducing several signaling pathways through cell membrane receptors. Besides conferring structural properties to tissues around the tumor, the extracellular matrix is able to regulate cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Among these receptors, the integrins family constitutes a major class of receptors that mediate cell interactions with extracellular matrix components. Twenty years ago, a new class of extracellular matrix receptors has been discovered. These tyrosine kinase receptors are the two discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2. DDR1 was first identified in the Dictyostelium discoideum and was shown to mediate cell aggregation. DDR2 shares highly conserved sequences with DDR1. Both receptors are activated upon binding to collagen, one of the most abundant proteins in extracellular matrix. While DDR2 can only be activated by fibrillar collagen, particularly types I and III, DDR1 is mostly activated by type I and IV collagens. In contrast with classical growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors which display a rapid and transient activation, DDR1 and DDR2 are unique in that they exhibit delayed and sustained receptor phosphorylation upon binding to collagen. Recent studies have reported differential expression and mutations of DDR1 and DDR2 in several cancer types and indicate clearly that these receptors have to be taken into account as new players in the different aspects of tumor progression, from non-malignant to highly malignant and invasive stages. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the role of DDR1 and DDR2 in malignant transformation, cell proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migratory, and invasive processes, and finally the modulation of the response to chemotherapy. These new insights suggest that DDR1 and DDR2 are new potential targets in cancer therapy. PMID:27014069

  20. REOVIRUS: A TARGETED THERAPEUTIC – PROGRESS AND POTENTIAL

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Ghalib, Mohammad H.; Goel, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Medical therapy of patients with malignancy requires a paradigm shift through development of new drugs with a good safety record and novel mechanisms of activity. While there is no dearth of such molecules, one particular agent, “reovirus” is promising by its ability to target cancer cells with aberrant signaling pathways. This double stranded RNA virus has been therapeutically formulated and has rapidly progressed from pre-clinical validation of anti cancer activity to a phase III registration study in platinum refractory metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. During this process, reovirus has demonstrated safety both as a single agent when administered intratumorally and intravenously, as well as in combination therapy, with multiple chemotherapeutics such as gemcitabine, carboplatin/paclitaxel, and docetaxel; and similarly with radiation. The scientific rationale for its development as an anticancer agent stems from the fact that it preferentially replicates in and induces lyses of cells with an activated Kras pathway. As documented in many previous studies, the initial observation of greater tropism in Kras compromised situation might certainly not be the sole and possibly not even the predominant reason for enhanced virulence. All the same, scientists have emphasized on Kras optimistically due to its high prevalence in various types of cancers. Incidence of Kras mutation has been found to be highest in pancreatic cancer (85–90%) followed by colorectal (35–45%) and lung (25–30%). Reovirus, in fact has the potential not only as a therapy but also as a tool to unravel the aberrant cellular pathway leading to carcinogenicity. PMID:23038811

  1. Sushi Domain-Containing Protein 3: A Potential Target for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenghong; Jiang, Enze; Wang, Xinxing; Shi, Yaqin; Shangguan, Anna Junjie; Zhang, Luo; Li, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the most effective endocrine treatment for estrogen receptor α-positive (ERα+) postmenopausal breast cancer. Identification of biomarkers that are able to predict AIs responsiveness of patients is a key for successful treatment. The currently used biomarkers for tamoxifen responsiveness, which including ERα as well as progesterone receptor can only predict part of the potential responders to AIs treatment. Sushi domain-containing protein 3 (SUSD3) is a potential novel biomarker of AIs responsiveness. The lack of SUSD3 expression in breast cancer tissue can be an important predictor for non-responsiveness to AI. Here we reviewed the property and function of SUSD3, its usage as a biomarker and the practicability for SUSD3 to become a target for immune therapy. We suggest this protein can be potentially measured or targeted for prevention, diagnostic, and therapeutic purposes for estrogen or progesterone-dependent disorders including breast cancer in women. PMID:25556073

  2. Sphingosine kinase-1--a potential therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites play critical functions in the regulation of a number of fundamental biological processes including cancer. Whereas ceramide and sphingosine mediate and trigger apoptosis or cell growth arrest, sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes proliferation and cell survival. The delicate equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these sphingolipids is controlled by the enzymes that either produce or degrade these metabolites. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a crucial regulator of this two-pan balance, because it produces the prosurvival sphingosine 1-phosphate, and reduces the content of both ceramide and sphingosine, the proapoptotic sphingolipids. Sphingosine kinase-1 controls the levels of sphingolipids having opposite effects on cell survival/death, its gene was found to be of oncogenic nature, its mRNA is overexpressed in many solid tumors, its overexpression protects cells from apoptosis and its activity is decreased during anticancer treatments. Therefore, sphingosine kinase-1 appears to be a target of interest for therapeutic manipulation via its pharmacological inhibition. Strategies to kill tumor cells by increasing their ceramide and/or sphingosine content while blocking sphingosine 1-phosphate generation should have a favorable therapeutic index. PMID:17159597

  3. Erythropoietin Pathway: A Potential Target for the Treatment of Depression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chongyang; Cheng, Fafeng; Wang, Xueqian; Zhai, Changming; Yue, Wenchao; Lian, Yajun; Wang, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies has indicated that erythropoietin may have antidepressant effects. In addition to the kidney and liver, many organs have been identified as secretory tissues for erythropoietin, including the brain. Its receptor is expressed in cerebral and spinal cord neurons, the hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, dorsal root ganglia, nerve axons, and Schwann cells. These findings may highlight new functions for erythropoietin, which was originally considered to play a crucial role in the progress of erythroid differentiation. Erythropoietin and its receptor signaling through JAK2 activate multiple downstream signaling pathways including STAT5, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK. These factors may play an important role in inflammation and neuroprogression in the nervous system. This is particularly true for the hippocampus, which is possibly related to learning, memory, neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations. Thus, the influence of erythropoietin on the downstream pathways known to be involved in the treatment of depression makes the erythropoietin-related pathway an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Focusing on erythropoietin may help us understand the pathogenic mechanisms of depression and the molecular basis of its treatment. PMID:27164096

  4. GEMINs: potential therapeutic targets for spinal muscular atrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J.

    2014-01-01

    The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homolog that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development. PMID:25360080

  5. Erythropoietin Pathway: A Potential Target for the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chongyang; Cheng, Fafeng; Wang, Xueqian; Zhai, Changming; Yue, Wenchao; Lian, Yajun; Wang, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies has indicated that erythropoietin may have antidepressant effects. In addition to the kidney and liver, many organs have been identified as secretory tissues for erythropoietin, including the brain. Its receptor is expressed in cerebral and spinal cord neurons, the hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, dorsal root ganglia, nerve axons, and Schwann cells. These findings may highlight new functions for erythropoietin, which was originally considered to play a crucial role in the progress of erythroid differentiation. Erythropoietin and its receptor signaling through JAK2 activate multiple downstream signaling pathways including STAT5, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK. These factors may play an important role in inflammation and neuroprogression in the nervous system. This is particularly true for the hippocampus, which is possibly related to learning, memory, neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations. Thus, the influence of erythropoietin on the downstream pathways known to be involved in the treatment of depression makes the erythropoietin-related pathway an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Focusing on erythropoietin may help us understand the pathogenic mechanisms of depression and the molecular basis of its treatment. PMID:27164096

  6. MOLECULAR ALTERATIONS IN GLIOBLASTOMA: POTENTIAL TARGETS FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Azizul; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and deadly brain tumor, possibly arising from genetic and epigenetic alterations in normal astroglial cells. Multiple cytogenetic, chromosomal, and genetic alterations have been identified in glioblastoma, with distinct expression of antigens (Ags) and biomarkers that may alter therapeutic potential of this aggressive cancer. Current therapy consists of surgical resection, followed by radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In spite of these treatments, the prognosis for glioblastoma patients is poor. Although recent studies have focused on the development of novel immunotherapeutics against glioblastoma, little is known about glioblastoma specific immune responses. A better understanding of the molecular interactions among glioblastoma tumors, host immune cells, and the tumor microenvironment may give rise to novel integrated approaches for the simultaneous control of tumor escape pathways and the activation of antitumor immune responses. This review provides a detailed overview concerning genetic alterations in glioblastoma, their effects on Ag and biomarker expression and the future design of chemoimmunotherapeutics against glioblastoma. PMID:21199773

  7. Interference effects in potential wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, W. J.; Laloë, F.

    2015-05-01

    We propose using an array of potential wells as an interferometer in which the beam splitters are provided by tunneling during an appropriate time through the barrier between wells. This arrangement allows demonstration of generalized Hong-Ou-Mandel effects with multiple particles traversing one or several beam splitters. Other interferometer effects can occur, including a violation of the Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt form of the Bell inequality. With interactions, one sees various effects, including so-called fermionization, collective tunneling, and self-trapping.

  8. The Validation of Nematode-Specific Acetylcholine-Gated Chloride Channels as Potential Anthelmintic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wever, Claudia M.; Farrington, Danielle; Dent, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    New compounds are needed to treat parasitic nematode infections in humans, livestock and plants. Small molecule anthelmintics are the primary means of nematode parasite control in animals; however, widespread resistance to the currently available drug classes means control will be impossible without the introduction of new compounds. Adverse environmental effects associated with nematocides used to control plant parasitic species are also motivating the search for safer, more effective compounds. Discovery of new anthelmintic drugs in particular has been a serious challenge due to the difficulty of obtaining and culturing target parasites for high-throughput screens and the lack of functional genomic techniques to validate potential drug targets in these pathogens. We present here a novel strategy for target validation that employs the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to demonstrate the value of new ligand-gated ion channels as targets for anthelmintic discovery. Many successful anthelmintics, including ivermectin, levamisole and monepantel, are agonists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, suggesting that the unexploited pentameric ion channels encoded in parasite genomes may be suitable drug targets. We validated five members of the nematode-specific family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channels as targets of agonists with anthelmintic properties by ectopically expressing an ivermectin-gated chloride channel, AVR-15, in tissues that endogenously express the acetylcholine-gated chloride channels and using the effects of ivermectin to predict the effects of an acetylcholine-gated chloride channel agonist. In principle, our strategy can be applied to validate any ion channel as a putative anti-parasitic drug target. PMID:26393923

  9. GESSE: Predicting Drug Side Effects from Drug-Target Relationships.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I; Souchet, Michel; Karaboga, Arnaud S; Ritchie, David W

    2015-09-28

    The in silico prediction of unwanted side effects (SEs) caused by the promiscuous behavior of drugs and their targets is highly relevant to the pharmaceutical industry. Considerable effort is now being put into computational and experimental screening of several suspected off-target proteins in the hope that SEs might be identified early, before the cost associated with developing a drug candidate rises steeply. Following this need, we present a new method called GESSE to predict potential SEs of drugs from their physicochemical properties (three-dimensional shape plus chemistry) and to target protein data extracted from predicted drug-target relationships. The GESSE approach uses a canonical correlation analysis of the full drug-target and drug-SE matrices, and it then calculates a probability that each drug in the resulting drug-target matrix will have a given SE using a Bayesian discriminant analysis (DA) technique. The performance of GESSE is quantified using retrospective (external database) analysis and literature examples by means of area under the ROC curve analysis, "top hit rates", misclassification rates, and a χ(2) independence test. Overall, the robust and very promising retrospective statistics obtained and the many SE predictions that have experimental corroboration demonstrate that GESSE can successfully predict potential drug-SE profiles of candidate drug compounds from their predicted drug-target relationships. PMID:26251970

  10. Bacterial Targets as Potential Indicators of Diesel Fuel Toxicity in Subantarctic Soils

    PubMed Central

    van Dorst, Josie; Siciliano, Steven D.; Winsley, Tristrom; Snape, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate remediation targets or universal guidelines for polar regions do not currently exist, and a comprehensive understanding of the effects of diesel fuel on the natural microbial populations in polar and subpolar soils is lacking. Our aim was to investigate the response of the bacterial community to diesel fuel and to evaluate if these responses have the potential to be used as indicators of soil toxicity thresholds. We set up short- and long-exposure tests across a soil organic carbon gradient. Utilizing broad and targeted community indices, as well as functional genes involved in the nitrogen cycle, we investigated the bacterial community structure and its potential functioning in response to special Antarctic blend (SAB) diesel fuel. We found the primary effect of diesel fuel toxicity was a reduction in species richness, evenness, and phylogenetic diversity, with the resulting community heavily dominated by a few species, principally Pseudomonas. The decline in richness and phylogenetic diversity was linked to disruption of the nitrogen cycle, with species and functional genes involved in nitrification significantly reduced. Of the 11 targets we evaluated, we found the bacterial amoA gene indicative of potential ammonium oxidation, the most suitable indicator of toxicity. Dose-response modeling for this target generated an average effective concentration responsible for 20% change (EC20) of 155 mg kg−1, which is consistent with previous Macquarie Island ecotoxicology assays. Unlike traditional single-species tolerance testing, bacterial targets allowed us to simultaneously evaluate more than 1,700 species from 39 phyla, inclusive of rare, sensitive, and functionally relevant portions of the community. PMID:24771028

  11. Immunological Effects of Conventional Chemotherapy and Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Buqué, Aitziber; Kepp, Oliver; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-12-14

    The tremendous clinical success of checkpoint blockers illustrates the potential of reestablishing latent immunosurveillance for cancer therapy. Although largely neglected in the clinical practice, accumulating evidence indicates that the efficacy of conventional and targeted anticancer agents does not only involve direct cytostatic/cytotoxic effects, but also relies on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. Chemotherapy can promote such responses by increasing the immunogenicity of malignant cells, or by inhibiting immunosuppressive circuitries that are established by developing neoplasms. These immunological "side" effects of chemotherapy are desirable, and their in-depth comprehension will facilitate the design of novel combinatorial regimens with improved clinical efficacy. PMID:26678337

  12. Sigma receptors: potential targets for a new class of antidepressant drug

    PubMed Central

    Fishback, James A.; Robson, Matthew J.; Xu, Yan-Tong; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the widespread and devastating impact of depression on society, our current understanding of its pathogenesis is limited. Likewise, existing treatments are inadequate, providing relief to only a subset of people suffering from depression. The search for more effective antidepressant drugs includes the investigation of new molecular targets. Among them, current data suggests that sigma receptors are involved in multiple processes effecting antidepressant-like actions in vivo and in vitro. This review summarizes accumulated evidence supporting a role for sigma receptors in antidepressant effects and provides a conceptual framework for delineating their potential roles over the course of antidepressant treatment. PMID:20438757

  13. Omen: identifying potential spear-phishing targets before the email is sent.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a two year project focused on a common social engineering attack method called %22spear phishing%22. In a spear phishing attack, the user receives an email with information specifically focused on the user. This email contains either a malware-laced attachment or a link to download the malware that has been disguised as a useful program. Spear phishing attacks have been one of the most effective avenues for attackers to gain initial entry into a target network. This project focused on a proactive approach to spear phishing. To create an effective, user-specific spear phishing email, the attacker must research the intended recipient. We believe that much of the information used by the attacker is provided by the target organization's own external website. Thus when researching potential targets, the attacker leaves signs of his research in the webserver's logs. We created tools and visualizations to improve cybersecurity analysts' abilities to quickly understand a visitor's visit patterns and interests. Given these suspicious visitors and log-parsing tools, analysts can more quickly identify truly suspicious visitors, search for potential spear-phishing targeted users, and improve security around those users before the spear phishing email is sent.

  14. Potential Impact of miR-137 and Its Targets in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Carrie; Turner, Jessica A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The significant impact of microRNAs (miRNAs) on disease pathology is becoming increasingly evident. These small non-coding RNAs have the ability to post-transcriptionally silence the expression of thousands of genes. Therefore, dysregulation of even a single miRNA could confer a large polygenic effect. Schizophrenia is a genetically complex illness thought to involve multiple genes each contributing a small risk. Large genome-wide association studies identified miR-137, a miRNA shown to be involved in neuronal maturation, as one of the top risk genes. To assess the potential mechanism of impact of miR-137 in this disorder and identify its targets, we used a combination of literature searches, ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), and freely accessible bioinformatics resources. Using TargetScan and the schizophrenia gene resource (SZGR) database, we found that in addition to CSMD1, C10orf26, CACNA1C, TCF4, and ZNF804A, five schizophrenia risk genes whose transcripts are also validated miR-137 targets, there are other schizophrenia-associated genes that may be targets of miR-137, including ERBB4, GABRA1, GRIN2A, GRM5, GSK3B, NRG2, and HTR2C. IPA analyses of all the potential targets identified several nervous system (NS) functions as the top canonical pathways including synaptic long-term potentiation, a process implicated in learning and memory mechanisms and recently shown to be altered in patients with schizophrenia. Among the subset of targets involved in NS development and function, the top scoring pathways were ephrin receptor signaling and axonal guidance, processes that are critical for proper circuitry formation and were shown to be disrupted in schizophrenia. These results suggest that miR-137 may indeed play a substantial role in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia by regulating networks involved in neural development and brain function. PMID:23637704

  15. Potential Impact of miR-137 and Its Targets in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Carrie; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The significant impact of microRNAs (miRNAs) on disease pathology is becoming increasingly evident. These small non-coding RNAs have the ability to post-transcriptionally silence the expression of thousands of genes. Therefore, dysregulation of even a single miRNA could confer a large polygenic effect. Schizophrenia is a genetically complex illness thought to involve multiple genes each contributing a small risk. Large genome-wide association studies identified miR-137, a miRNA shown to be involved in neuronal maturation, as one of the top risk genes. To assess the potential mechanism of impact of miR-137 in this disorder and identify its targets, we used a combination of literature searches, ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), and freely accessible bioinformatics resources. Using TargetScan and the schizophrenia gene resource (SZGR) database, we found that in addition to CSMD1, C10orf26, CACNA1C, TCF4, and ZNF804A, five schizophrenia risk genes whose transcripts are also validated miR-137 targets, there are other schizophrenia-associated genes that may be targets of miR-137, including ERBB4, GABRA1, GRIN2A, GRM5, GSK3B, NRG2, and HTR2C. IPA analyses of all the potential targets identified several nervous system (NS) functions as the top canonical pathways including synaptic long-term potentiation, a process implicated in learning and memory mechanisms and recently shown to be altered in patients with schizophrenia. Among the subset of targets involved in NS development and function, the top scoring pathways were ephrin receptor signaling and axonal guidance, processes that are critical for proper circuitry formation and were shown to be disrupted in schizophrenia. These results suggest that miR-137 may indeed play a substantial role in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia by regulating networks involved in neural development and brain function. PMID:23637704

  16. Targeting myocardial substrate metabolism in heart failure: potential for new therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ardehali, Hossein; Sabbah, Hani N.; Burke, Michael A.; Sarma, Satyam; Liu, Peter P.; Cleland, John G.F.; Maggioni, Aldo; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Abel, E. Dale; Campia, Umberto; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of heart failure have increased significantly over the past few decades. Available data suggest that patients with heart failure independent of the aetiology have viable but dysfunctional myocardium that is potentially salvageable. Although a great deal of research effort has focused on characterizing the molecular basis of heart failure, cardiac metabolism in this disorder remains an understudied discipline. It is known that many aspects of cardiomyocyte energetics are altered in heart failure. These include a shift from fatty acid to glucose as a preferred substrate and a decline in the levels of ATP. Despite these demonstrated changes, there are currently no approved drugs that target metabolic enzymes or proteins in heart failure. This is partly due to our limited knowledge of the mechanisms and pathways that regulate cardiac metabolism. Better characterization of these pathways may potentially lead to new therapies for heart failure. Targeting myocardial energetics in the viable and potentially salvageable tissue may be particularly effective in the treatment of heart failure. Here, we will review metabolic changes that occur in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and AMP-activated kinase in heart failure. We propose that cardiac energetics should be considered as a potential target for therapy in heart failure and more research should be done in this area. PMID:22253453

  17. Prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma: potential targets, experimental models, and clinical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hoshida, Yujin; Fuchs, Bryan C.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic fibrotic liver diseases such as viral hepatitis eventually develop liver cirrhosis, which causes occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Given the limited therapeutic efficacy in advanced HCC, prevention of HCC development could be an effective strategy for improving patient prognosis. However, there is still no established therapy to meet the goal. Studies have elucidated a wide variety of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in HCC development. Genetically-engineered or chemically-treated experimental models of cirrhosis and HCC have been developed and shown their potential value in investigating molecular therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers for HCC prevention. In this review, we overview potential targets of prevention and currently available experimental models, and discuss strategies to translate the findings into clinical practice. PMID:22873223

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of a potential molecular therapeutic target for canine hemangiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    ADACHI, Mami; HOSHINO, Yuki; IZUMI, Yusuke; TAKAGI, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm of dogs for which there is currently no effective treatment. A recent study suggested that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MAPK pathways are all activated in canine and human HSA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the overexpression of these proteins by immunohistochemistry in canine splenic HSA to identify potential molecular therapeutic targets. A total of 10 splenic HSAs and two normal splenic samples surgically resected from dogs were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological diagnosis or analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The expression of RTKs, c-kit, VEGFR-2 and PDGFR-2, as well as PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MEK was higher in canine splenic HSAs compared to normal spleens. These proteins may therefore be potential therapeutic targets in canine splenic HSA. PMID:26685984

  19. Immunohistochemical detection of a potential molecular therapeutic target for canine hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Mami; Hoshino, Yuki; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm of dogs for which there is currently no effective treatment. A recent study suggested that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MAPK pathways are all activated in canine and human HSA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the overexpression of these proteins by immunohistochemistry in canine splenic HSA to identify potential molecular therapeutic targets. A total of 10 splenic HSAs and two normal splenic samples surgically resected from dogs were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological diagnosis or analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The expression of RTKs, c-kit, VEGFR-2 and PDGFR-2, as well as PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MEK was higher in canine splenic HSAs compared to normal spleens. These proteins may therefore be potential therapeutic targets in canine splenic HSA. PMID:26685984

  20. Delivery strategies and potential targets for siRNA in major cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has gained attention as a potential therapeutic reagent due to its ability to inhibit specific genes in many genetic diseases. For many years, studies of siRNA have progressively advanced toward novel treatment strategies against cancer. Cancer is caused by various mutations in hundreds of genes including both proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. In order to develop siRNAs as therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, delivery strategies for siRNA must be carefully designed and potential gene targets carefully selected for optimal anti-cancer effects. In this review, various modifications and delivery strategies for siRNA delivery are discussed. In addition, we present current thinking on target gene selection in major tumor types. PMID:27259398

  1. Histamine H3 receptor as a potential target for cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Sadeq, Adel; Jalal, Fakhreya; Stark, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The potential contributions of the brain histaminergic system in neurodegenerative diseases, and the possiblity of histamine-targeting treatments is attracting considerable interests. The histamine H3 receptor (H3R) is expressed mainly in the central nervous system, and is, consequently, an attractive pharmacological target. Although recently described clinical trials have been disappointing in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia (SCH), numerous H3R antagonists, including pitolisant, demonstrate potential in the treatment of narcolepsy, excessive daytime sleepiness associated with cognitive impairment, epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review focuses on the recent preclinical as well as clinical results that support the relevance of H3R antagonists for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases, namely AD, epilepsy and SCH. The review summarizes the role of histaminergic neurotransmission with focus on these brain disorders, as well as the effects of numerous H3R antagonists on animal models and humans. PMID:27363923

  2. PLK-1 Targeted Inhibitors and Their Potential against Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiv; Kim, Jaebong

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic kinases are the key components of the cell cycle machinery and play vital roles in cell cycle progression. PLK-1 (Polo-like kinase-1) is a crucial mitotic protein kinase that plays an essential role in both the onset of G2/M transition and cytokinesis. The overexpression of PLK-1 is strongly correlated with a wide spectrum of human cancers and poor prognosis. The (si)RNA-mediated depletion of PLK-1 arrests tumor growth and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. Therefore, PLK-1 has been selected as an attractive anticancer therapeutic drug target. Some small molecules have been discovered to target the catalytic and noncatalytic domains of PLK-1. These domains regulate the catalytic activation and subcellular localization of PLK-1. However, while PLK-1 inhibitors block tumor growth, they have been shown to cause severe adverse complications, such as toxicity, neutropenia, and bone marrow suppression during clinical trials, due to a lack of selectivity and specificity within the human kinome. To minimize these toxicities, inhibitors should be tested against all protein kinases in vivo and in vitro to enhance selectivity and specificity against targets. Here, we discuss the potency and selectivity of PLK-1-targeted inhibitors and their molecular interactions with PLK-1 domains. PMID:26557691

  3. Sirtuins as potential drug targets for metablic diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies of the sirtuin family of proteins, which possess NAD+/-dependent deacetylase and ADP ribosyltransferase activities, indicate that they regulate many biological functions, such as longevity and metabolism. These findings also suggest that sirtuins might serve as valuable drug targets f...

  4. Radiation Induced Non-targeted Response: Mechanism and Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Tom K.; Zhou, Hongning; Chai, Yunfei; Ponnaiya, Brian; Ivanov, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Generations of students in radiation biology have been taught that heritable biological effects require direct damage to DNA. Radiation-induced non-targeted/bystander effects represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, including 3D human tissue samples and whole organisms, the mechanism is not known. There is recent evidence that the NF-κB-dependent gene expression of interleukin 8, interleukin 6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 33 in directly irradiated cells produced the cytokines and prostaglandin E2 with autocrine/paracrine functions, which further activated signaling pathways and induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression in bystander cells. The observations that heritable DNA alterations can be propagated to cells many generations after radiation exposure and that bystander cells exhibit genomic instability in ways similar to directly hit cells indicate that the low dose radiation response is a complex interplay of various modulating factors. The potential implication of the non-targeted response in radiation induced secondary cancer is discussed. A better understanding of the mechanism of the non-targeted effects will be invaluable to assess its clinical relevance and ways in which the bystander phenomenon can be manipulated to increase therapeutic gain in radiotherapy. PMID:21143185

  5. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel IF

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy. PMID:23055607

  6. Eph receptor A10 has a potential as a target for a prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuya; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi

    2014-07-18

    We recently identified Eph receptor A10 (EphA10) as a novel breast cancer-specific protein. Moreover, we also showed that an in-house developed anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells, suggesting EphA10 as a promising target for breast cancer therapy. However, the only other known report for EphA10 was its expression in the testis at the mRNA level. Therefore, the potency of EphA10 as a drug target against cancers other than the breast is not known. The expression of EphA10 in a wide variety of cancer cells was studied and the potential of EphA10 as a drug target was evaluated. Screening of EphA10 mRNA expression showed that EphA10 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines as well as in prostate and colon cancer cell lines. Thus, we focused on prostate cancers in which EphA10 expression was equivalent to that in breast cancers. As a result, EphA10 expression was clearly shown in clinical prostate tumor tissues as well as in cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. In order to evaluate the potential of EphA10 as a drug target, we analyzed complement-dependent cytotoxicity effects of anti-EphA10 mAb and found that significant cytotoxicity was mediated by the expression of EphA10. Therefore, the idea was conceived that the overexpression of EphA10 in prostate cancers might have a potential as a target for prostate cancer therapy, and formed the basis for the studies reported here. PMID:24924629

  7. Uncovering potential downstream targets of oncogenic GRPR overexpression in prostate carcinomas harboring ETS rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana; Mesquita, Diana; Barros-Silva, João D; Jerónimo, Carmen; Henrique, Rui; Morais, António; Paulo, Paula; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is known to be overexpressed in several human malignancies, including prostate cancer, and has been implicated in multiple important neoplastic signaling pathways. We recently have shown that GRPR is an ERG and ETV1 target gene in prostate cancer, using a genome-wide scale and exon-level expression microarray platform. Due to its cellular localization, the relevance of its function and the availability of blocking agents, GRPR seems to be a promising candidate as therapeutic target. Our present work shows that effective knockdown of GRPR in LNCaP and VCaP cells attenuates their malignant phenotype by decreasing proliferation, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, while increasing apoptosis. Using an antibody microarray we were able to validate known and identify new targets of GRPR pathway, namely AKT1, PKCε, TYK2 and MST1. Finally, we show that overexpression of these GRPR targets is restricted to prostate carcinomas harboring ERG and/or ETV1 rearrangements, establishing their potential as therapeutic targets for these particular molecular subsets of the disease. PMID:26097883

  8. Uncovering potential downstream targets of oncogenic GRPR overexpression in prostate carcinomas harboring ETS rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana; Mesquita, Diana; Barros-Silva, João D.; Jerónimo, Carmen; Henrique, Rui; Morais, António; Paulo, Paula; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is known to be overexpressed in several human malignancies, including prostate cancer, and has been implicated in multiple important neoplastic signaling pathways. We recently have shown that GRPR is an ERG and ETV1 target gene in prostate cancer, using a genome-wide scale and exon-level expression microarray platform. Due to its cellular localization, the relevance of its function and the availability of blocking agents, GRPR seems to be a promising candidate as therapeutic target. Our present work shows that effective knockdown of GRPR in LNCaP and VCaP cells attenuates their malignant phenotype by decreasing proliferation, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, while increasing apoptosis. Using an antibody microarray we were able to validate known and identify new targets of GRPR pathway, namely AKT1, PKCε, TYK2 and MST1. Finally, we show that overexpression of these GRPR targets is restricted to prostate carcinomas harboring ERG and/or ETV1 rearrangements, establishing their potential as therapeutic targets for these particular molecular subsets of the disease. PMID:26097883

  9. Targeted Next-generation Sequencing of Advanced Prostate Cancer Identifies Potential Therapeutic Targets and Disease Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Himisha; Yelensky, Roman; Frampton, Garrett M.; Park, Kyung; Downing, Sean R.; MacDonald, Theresa Y.; Jarosz, Mirna; Lipson, Doron; Tagawa, Scott T.; Nanus, David M.; Stephens, Philip J.; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Cronin, Maureen T.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    %). There was a high incidence of genomic alterations involving key genes important for DNA repair, including breast cancer 2, early onset gene (BRCA2) loss (12%) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) mutations (8%); these alterations are potentially targetable with poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose)polymerase inhibitors. A novel and actionable rearrangement involving the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 gene (BRAF) was also detected. Conclusions This first-in-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of performing in-depth DNA analyses using FFPE tissue and brings new insight toward understanding the genomic landscape within advanced PCa. PMID:22981675

  10. MicroRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ivan G; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2014-01-01

    One cornerstone of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is fibrosis, as kidneys are susceptible due to their high vascularity and predisposition to ischemia. Presently, only therapies targeting the angiotensin receptor are used in clinical practice to retard the progression of CKD. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies designed to treat the damaged kidney. Several independent laboratories have identified a number of microRNAs that are dysregulated in human and animal models of CKD. We will explore the evidence suggesting that by blocking the activity of such dysregulated microRNAs, new therapeutics could be developed to treat the progression of CKD. PMID:23660218

  11. Electron beam pattern generator sensitivity to target potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Junru; Hartley, John

    2005-11-01

    Electrostatic chucking is the plan of record for mask clamping in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In order to minimize mask distortion it is recommended by the EUV lithography community that identical electrostatic chucks be used in the mask patterning and metrology tools. The high voltages used in electrostatic chucking have the potential to establish voltages on the mask surface, which may influence the electron optical characteristics of the pattern generator to the detrimental imaging of the pattern. To understand the relationship between image degradation and mask surface voltages, we are modeling the interaction between mask potential and electron beam columns. The first system modeled consists entirely of electrostatic elements, and the second one is a more traditional electron beam lithography system with electrostatic and magnetic components. All of the working parameters of the systems were fixed to establish optimal imaging on the grounded mask. We then altered the potential on the mask surface and determined the impact on focus and deflection errors. The simulation results establish the relationship between the mask potential, focus and deflection errors. Detailed data of focus deflection error versus mask potential will be presented for these electron beam column configurations. When combined with ITRS roadmap specifications, these results set boundaries on mask and chuck configurations as well as grounding schemes. The results are also applicable to charged particle maskless lithography schemes as well as issues of substrate charging in both pattern generators and metrology tools.

  12. Repulsive interatomic potentials for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Interatomic potentials that are relevant for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets have been calculated in the energy region below 10 keV. Potentials are calculated for the diatomic species: NeCu, ArCu, KrCu, Cu2, ArNi, Ni2 and NiCu. The calculations primarily employ density functional theory (with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional). Potential curves derived from Hartree-Fock theory calculations are also discussed. Scalar relativistic effects have been included via the second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) method. On the basis of a variational argument, it can be shown that the predicted potential curves represent an upper limit to the true potential curves. The potentials provide a basis for assessing corrections required to the ZBL and Molière screened Coulombic potentials, which are typically found to be too repulsive below 1-2 keV. These corrections significantly improve the accuracy of the sputter yield predicted by molecular dynamics for Ni(1 0 0), whereas the sputter yield predicted for Cu(1 0 0) is negligibly affected. The validity of the pair potential approximation in the repulsive region of the potential is tested by direct calculation of the potentials arising from the interaction of either an Ar or Cu atom with a Cu3 cluster. The pairwise approximation represents the Ar-Cu3 potential energy function with an error <3 eV at all Ar-Cu3 separations. For Cu-Cu3, the pairwise approximation underestimates the potential by ca. 10 eV when the interstitial atom is located near the centre of the cluster.

  13. Thiol redox biology of trypanosomatids and potential targets for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Alejandro E; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are the causative agents of African sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, and the different forms of leishmaniasis. This family of protozoan parasite possesses a trypanothione-based redox metabolism that provides the reducing equivalents for various vital processes such as the biosynthesis of DNA precursors and the detoxification of hydroperoxides. Almost all enzymes of the redox pathway proved to be essential and therefore fulfil one crucial prerequisite for a putative drug target. Trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase are present in all trypanosomatids but absent from the mammalian host which, in addition to the essentiality, renders them highly specific. The chemotherapy research on both enzymes is further supported by the availability of high-throughput screening techniques and crystal structures. In this review we focus on the recent advances and limitations in the development of lead compounds targeting trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase. We present an overview of the available inhibitors and discuss future perspectives including other components of the parasite-specific redox pathway. PMID:26592324

  14. SPARC: A Potential Prognostic and Therapeutic Target in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Juan; Ansari, Daniel; Sasor, Agata; Andersson, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that often lacks disease-specific symptoms in early stages. The malignancy is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. In advanced stages, the overall 5-year survival is less than 1% to 2%. Most available treatments lack convincing cost-efficiency determinations and are generally not associated with relevant success rates. Targeting stromal components and stromal depletion is currently becoming an area of extensive research in pancreatic cancer. In this context, a glycoprotein, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) appears to play a central role. Still, the role of SPARC in carcinogenesis is controversial because conflicting results have been reported, and the pathways involved in SPARC signaling are not well established. Nonetheless, SPARC is highly expressed in the tumor stroma, principally in peritumoral fibroblasts, and the overexpression of SPARC in this compartment is associated with poorer prognosis. Interestingly, it has been suggested that SPARC present in the tumor stroma could sequester albumin-bound paclitaxel, enhancing the delivery of paclitaxel into the tumor microenvironment. In the present review, we summarize the known associations between SPARC and pancreatic cancer. Moreover, present and future therapies comprising SPARC-targeting are discussed. PMID:26335014

  15. Anthranilic Acid: A Potential Biomarker and Treatment Target for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oxenkrug, Gregory; van der Hart, Marieke; Roeser, Julien; Summergrad, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of Trp-Kyn pathway is the most recent hypothesis of mechanisms of schizophrenia. In particular, over-production of kynurenic acid (KYNA), one of the three immediate downstream metabolites of kynurenine (Kyn) along tryptophan (Trp): Kyn pathway, has been considered as a new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. Up-regulation of KYNA formation was suggested to occur at the expense of down-regulated production of 3-hydroxyKyn (3-HK), the second immediate downstream metabolite of Kyn. We were interested to assess the third immediate downstream Kyn metabolite, anthranilic acid (AA). Serum AA concentrations were evaluated in schizophrenia patients and control subjects by HPLC-mass spectrometry method. We found 2-fold increase of AA and 3-fold decrease of 3-HK concentrations in serum of schizophrenia patients. Up regulated formation of AA might contribute to mechanisms of schizophrenia considering experimental evidences of AA augmentation of autoimmune processes in rat and mice; clinical findings of AA elevation in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases diametrical to schizophrenia; and involvement of autoimmunity in development of schizophrenia. Present data warrant further studies of AA as biological marker in, at least, a subgroup (associated with autoimmune mechanisms) of schizophrenia patients and as a new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27042691

  16. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  17. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects.

    PubMed

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-07-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  18. [Mitochondrial dynamics: a potential new therapeutic target for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Del Campo, Andrea; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Hechenleitner, Jonathan; Zepeda, Ramiro; Castro, Pablo F; Verdejo, Hugo E; Parra, Valentina; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles able to vary their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and fragmented disconnected arrays, through events of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. These events allow the transmission of signaling messengers and exchange of metabolites within the cell. They have also been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the majority of these studies have been confined to noncardiac cells, emerging evidence suggests that changes in mitochondrial morphology could participate in cardiac development, the response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. In this article, we review how the mitochondrial dynamics are altered in different cardiac pathologies, with special emphasis on heart failure, and how this knowledge may provide new therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21820793

  19. A-kinase anchoring proteins as potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Tröger, Jessica; Moutty, Marie C; Skroblin, Philipp; Klussmann, Enno

    2012-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) crucially contribute to the spatial and temporal control of cellular signalling. They directly interact with a variety of protein binding partners and cellular constituents, thereby directing pools of signalling components to defined locales. In particular, AKAPs mediate compartmentalization of cAMP signalling. Alterations in AKAP expression and their interactions are associated with or cause diseases including chronic heart failure, various cancers and disorders of the immune system such as HIV. A number of cellular dysfunctions result from mutations of specific AKAPs. The link between malfunctions of single AKAP complexes and a disease makes AKAPs and their interactions interesting targets for the development of novel drugs. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Novel cAMP Signalling Paradigms. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-2 PMID:22122509

  20. Using a geographic information system to identify areas with potential for off-target pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Pfleeger, Thomas G; Olszyk, David; Burdick, Connie A; King, George; Kern, Jeffrey; Fletcher, John

    2006-08-01

    In many countries, numerous tests are required as part of the risk assessment process before chemical registration to protect human health and the environment from unintended effects of chemical releases. Most of these tests are not based on ecological or environmental relevance but, rather, on consistent performance in the laboratory. A conceptual approach based on Geographic Information System (GIS) technology has been developed to identify areas that are vulnerable to nontarget chemical exposure. This GIS-based approach uses wind speed, frequency of those winds, pesticide application rates, and spatial location of agricultural crops to identify areas with the highest potential for pesticide exposure. A test scenario based on an incident in Idaho (USA) was used to identify the relative magnitude of risk from off-target movement of herbicides to plants in the conterminous United States. This analysis indicated that the western portion of the Corn Belt, the central California valley, southeastern Washington, the Willamette Valley of Oregon, and agricultural areas bordering the Great Lakes are among those areas in the United States that appear to have the greatest potential for off-target movement of herbicides via drift. Agricultural areas, such as the Mississippi River Valley and the southeastern United States, appears to have less potential, possibly due to lower average wind speeds. Ecological risk assessments developed for pesticide registration would be improved by using response data from species common to high-risk areas instead of extrapolating test data from species unrelated to those areas with the highest potential for exposure. PMID:16916045

  1. Combined expressional analysis, bioinformatics and targeted proteomics identify new potential therapeutic targets in glioblastoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Stangeland, Biljana; Mughal, Awais A.; Grieg, Zanina; Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Joel, Mrinal; Nygård, Ståle; Meling, Torstein; Murrell, Wayne; Vik Mo, Einar O.; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is both the most common and the most lethal primary brain tumor. It is thought that GBM stem cells (GSCs) are critically important in resistance to therapy. Therefore, there is a strong rationale to target these cells in order to develop new molecular therapies. To identify molecular targets in GSCs, we compared gene expression in GSCs to that in neural stem cells (NSCs) from the adult human brain, using microarrays. Bioinformatic filtering identified 20 genes (PBK/TOPK, CENPA, KIF15, DEPDC1, CDC6, DLG7/DLGAP5/HURP, KIF18A, EZH2, HMMR/RHAMM/CD168, NOL4, MPP6, MDM1, RAPGEF4, RHBDD1, FNDC3B, FILIP1L, MCC, ATXN7L4/ATXN7L1, P2RY5/LPAR6 and FAM118A) that were consistently expressed in GSC cultures and consistently not expressed in NSC cultures. The expression of these genes was confirmed in clinical samples (TCGA and REMBRANDT). The first nine genes were highly co-expressed in all GBM subtypes and were part of the same protein-protein interaction network. Furthermore, their combined up-regulation correlated negatively with patient survival in the mesenchymal GBM subtype. Using targeted proteomics and the COGNOSCENTE database we linked these genes to GBM signalling pathways. Nine genes: PBK, CENPA, KIF15, DEPDC1, CDC6, DLG7, KIF18A, EZH2 and HMMR should be further explored as targets for treatment of GBM. PMID:26295306

  2. Object-scene relationships vary the magnitude of target prevalence effects in visual search.

    PubMed

    Beanland, Vanessa; Le, Rebecca K; Byrne, Jamie E M

    2016-06-01

    Efficiency of visual search in real-world tasks is affected by several factors, including scene context and target prevalence. Observers are more efficient at detecting target objects in congruent locations, and less efficient at detecting rare targets. Although target prevalence and placement often covary, previous research has investigated context and prevalence effects independently. We conducted 2 experiments to explore the potential interaction between scene context and target prevalence effects. In Experiment 1, we varied target prevalence (high, low) and context (congruent, incongruent), and, for congruent contexts, target location (typical, atypical). Experiment 2 focused on the interaction between target prevalence (high, low) and location (typical, atypical) for congruent contexts, and recorded observers' eye movements to examine search strategies. Observers were poorer at detecting low versus high prevalence targets; however, prevalence effects were significantly reduced for targets in typical, congruent locations compared with atypical or incongruent locations. Eye movement analyses in Experiment 2 revealed this was related to observers dwelling disproportionately on the most typical target locations within a scene. This suggests that a byproduct of contextual guidance within scenes is that placing targets in unexpected or atypical locations will further increase miss rates for uncommon targets, which has implications for real-world situations in which rare targets appear in unexpected locations. Although prevalence effects are robust, our results suggest potential for mitigating the negative consequences of low prevalence through targeted training that teaches observers where to focus their search. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26618623

  3. Potential Therapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease Targeting or Beyond β-Amyloid: Insights from Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qiutian; Qing, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with two hallmarks: β-amyloid plagues and neurofibrillary tangles. It is one of the most alarming illnesses to elderly people. No effective drugs and therapies have been developed, while mechanism-based explorations of therapeutic approaches have been intensively investigated. Outcomes of clinical trials suggested several pitfalls in the choice of biomarkers, development of drug candidates, and interaction of drug-targeted molecules; however, they also aroused concerns on the potential deficiency in our understanding of pathogenesis of AD, and ultimately stimulated the advent of novel drug targets tests. The anticipated increase of AD patients in next few decades makes development of better therapy an urgent issue. Here we attempt to summarize and compare putative therapeutic strategies that have completed clinical trials or are currently being tested from various perspectives to provide insights for treatments of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25136630

  4. Targeting Tumors with Salmonella Typhimurium - Potential for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Daniel M.; Srikanth, C.V.; McCormick, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    When one considers the organism Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), one usually thinks of the Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes the severe food borne illness, gastroentertitis. In this context, the idea of Salmonella being exploited as a cancer therapeutic seems pretty remote. However, there has been an escalating interest in the development of tumor-therapeutic bacteria for use in the treatment of a variety of cancers. This strategy takes advantage of the remarkable ability of certain bacteria to preferentially replicate and accumulate within tumors. In the case of S. Typhimurium, this organism infects and selectively grows within implanted tumors, achieving tumor/normal tissue ratios of approximately 1,000:1. Salmonella also has some attractive properties well suited for the design of a chemotherapeutic agent. In particular, this pathogen can easily be manipulated to carry foreign genes, and since this species is a facultative anaerobe, it is able to survival in both oxygenated and hypoxic conditions, implying this organism could colonize both small metastatic lesions as well as larger tumors. These observations are the impetus to a burgeoning field focused on the development of Salmonella as a clinically useful anti-cancer agent. We will discuss three cutting edge technologies employing Salmonella to target tumors. PMID:21321381

  5. MPHOSPH1: a potential therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinran; Zhou, Yafan; Liu, Xinyuan; Peng, Anlin; Gong, Hao; Huang, Lizi; Ji, Kaige; Petersen, Robert B; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2014-11-15

    MPHOSPH1 is a critical kinesin protein that functions in cytokinesis. Here, we show that MPHOSPH1 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, where it is essential for proliferation. Attenuating MPHOSPH1 expression with a tumor-selective shRNA-expressing adenovirus (Ad-shMPP1) was sufficient to arrest HCC cell proliferation in a manner associated with an accumulation of multinucleated polyploid cells, induction of postmitotic apoptosis, and increased sensitivity to taxol cytotoxicity. Mechanistic investigations showed that attenuation of MPHOSPH1 stabilized p53, blocked STAT3 phosphorylation, and prolonged mitotic arrest. In a mouse subcutaneous xenograft model of HCC, tumoral injection of Ad-shMPP1 inhibited MPHOSPH1 expression and tumor growth in a manner correlated with induction of apoptosis. Combining Ad-shMPP1 injection with taxol administration enhanced antitumor efficacy relative to taxol alone. Furthermore, Ad-shMPP1 tail vein injection suppressed formation of orthotopic liver nodules and prevented hepatic dysfunction. Taken together, our results identify MPHOSPH1 as an oncogenic driver and candidate therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:25269478

  6. Purinergic receptors as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lucas T; Ajit, Deepa; Camden, Jean M; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive ability and is a serious cause of mortality. Many of the pathological characteristics associated with AD are revealed post-mortem, including amyloid-β plaque deposition, neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau proteins and neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex. Although several genetic mutations and risk factors have been associated with the disease, the causes remain poorly understood. Study of disease-initiating mechanisms and AD progression in humans is inherently difficult as most available tissue specimens are from late-stages of disease. Therefore, AD researchers rely on in vitro studies and the use of AD animal models where neuroinflammation has been shown to be a major characteristic of AD. Purinergic receptors are a diverse family of proteins consisting of P1 adenosine receptors and P2 nucleotide receptors for ATP, UTP and their metabolites. This family of receptors has been shown to regulate a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroinflammation, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and AD. Experimental evidence from human AD tissue has suggested that purinergic receptors may play a role in AD progression and studies using selective purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists in vitro and in AD animal models have demonstrated that purinergic receptors represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26519903

  7. Enzymology of the nematode cuticle: A potential drug target?

    PubMed

    Page, Antony P; Stepek, Gillian; Winter, Alan D; Pertab, David

    2014-08-01

    All nematodes possess an external structure known as the cuticle, which is crucial for their development and survival. This structure is composed primarily of collagen, which is secreted from the underlying hypodermal cells. Extensive studies using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrate that formation of the cuticle requires the activity of an extensive range of enzymes. Enzymes are required both pre-secretion, for synthesis of component proteins such as collagen, and post-secretion, for removal of the previous developmental stage cuticle, in a process known as moulting or exsheathment. The excretion/secretion products of numerous parasitic nematodes contain metallo-, serine and cysteine proteases, and these proteases are conserved across the nematode phylum and many are involved in the moulting/exsheathment process. This review highlights the enzymes required for cuticle formation, with a focus on the post-secretion moulting events. Where orthologues of the C. elegans enzymes have been identified in parasitic nematodes these may represent novel candidate targets for future drug/vaccine development. PMID:25057463

  8. Approaches for targeted proteomics and its potential applications in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sumit; Chourasia, Dipti; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-09-01

    An extensive guide on practicable and significant quantitative proteomic approaches in neuroscience research is important not only because of the existing overwhelming limitations but also for gaining valuable understanding into brain function and deciphering proteomics from the workbench to the bedside. Early methodologies to understand the functioning of biological systems are now improving with high-throughput technologies, which allow analysis of various samples concurrently, or of thousand of analytes in a particular sample. Quantitative proteomic approaches include both gel-based and non-gel-based methods that can be further divided into different labelling approaches. This review will emphasize the role of existing technologies, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their applications in neuroscience. This review will also discuss advanced approaches for targeted proteomics using isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) coupled with laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. This technology can further be extended to single cell proteomics in other areas of biological sciences and can be combined with other 'omics' approaches to reveal the mechanism of a cellular alterations. This approach may lead to further investigation in basic biology, disease analysis and surveillance, as well as drug discovery. Although numerous challenges still exist, we are confident that this approach will increase the understanding of pathological mechanisms involved in neuroendocrinology, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders by delivering protein biomarker signatures for brain dysfunction. PMID:26333406

  9. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Smolej, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS) in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL. PMID:25691812

  10. Inflammation and hypertension: new understandings and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Carmen; Rudemiller, Nathan P; Abais, Justine M; Mattson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Research studying the role of inflammation in hypertension and cardiovascular disease has flourished in recent years; however, the exact mechanisms by which the activated immune cells lead to the development and maintenance of hypertension remain to be elucidated. The objectives of this brief review are to summarize and discuss the most recent findings in the field, with special emphasis on potential therapeutics to treat or prevent hypertension. This review will cover novel immune cell subtypes recently associated to the disease including the novel role of cytokines, toll-like receptors, and inflammasomes in hypertension. PMID:25432899

  11. Potential targets in the search for extraterrestrial life.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the potential for increasing understanding of the origins of terrestrial life by examination of other planets. If living organisms should be found on another planet, they could only have been transported from an inhabited planet or originated independently. The fundamental chemical and structural attributes of terrestrial organisms are so remarkably uniform that any living forms outside the terrestrial blueprint would almost certainly be regarded as alien organisms. It has been shown experimentally by various investigators that life can exist in an extremely wide range of temperatures and pressures. The presence of an atmosphere appears to be necessary.

  12. Galectin-3 as a Potential Target to Prevent Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hafiz; AlSadek, Dina M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between two cells or between cell and extracellular matrix mediated by protein–carbohydrate interactions play pivotal roles in modulating various biological processes such as growth regulation, immune function, cancer metastasis, and apoptosis. Galectin-3, a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, is involved in fibrosis as well as cancer progression and metastasis, but the detailed mechanisms of its functions remain elusive. This review discusses its structure, carbohydrate-binding properties, and involvement in various aspects of tumorigenesis and some potential carbohydrate ligands that are currently investigated to block galectin-3 activity. PMID:26640395

  13. Potential of targeted drug delivery system for the treatment of bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Raichur; KusumDevi, V

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a devastating complication of cancer that requires an immediate attention. Although our understanding of the metastatic process has improved over the years, yet a number of questions still remain unanswered, and more research is required for complete understanding of the skeletal consequences of metastasis. Furthermore, as no effective treatments are available for some of the most common skeleton disorders such as arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteosarcoma and metastatic bone cancer, there is an urgent need to develop new drugs and drug delivery systems for safe and efficient clinical treatments. Hence this article describes the potential of targeted delivery platforms aimed specifically at bone metastasized tumors. The review gives a brief understanding of the proposed mechanisms of metastasis and focuses primarily on the targeting moieties such as bisphosphonates, which represent the current gold standard in bone metastasis therapies. Special focus has been given to the targeted nanoparticulate systems for treating bone metastasis and its future. Also highlighted are some of the therapeutic targets that can be exploited for designing therapies for bone metastasis. Some of the patented molecules for bone metastasis prevention and treatment have also been discussed. Recently proposed HIFU-CHEM, which utilizes High Intensity Focused ultrasound (HIFU) guided by MRI in combination with temperature-sensitive nanomedicines has also been briefed. The study has been concluded with a focus on the innovations requiring an immediate attention that could improve the treatment modality of bone metastasis. PMID:24839990

  14. Kinesin family members KIF11 and KIF23 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Lee, Daiyoon; Wu, Licun; Patel, Priya; Young, Ahn Jin; Wada, Hironobu; Hu, Hsin-Pei; Ujiie, Hideki; Kaji, Mitsuhito; Kano, Satoshi; Matsuge, Shinichi; Domen, Hiromitsu; Kaga, Kichizo; Matsui, Yoshiro; Kanno, Hiromi; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Kanako C; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; de Perrot, Marc; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive form of cancer commonly associated with asbestos exposure that stems from the thoracic mesothelium with high mortality rate. Currently, treatment options for MPM are limited, and new molecular targets for treatments are urgently needed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and an RNA interference-based screening, we screened two kinesin family members as potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro investigation of the target silencing effects on MPM cells, a total of 53 MPMs were analyzed immunohistochemically with tissue microarray. KIF11 and KIF23 transcripts were found to be overexpressed in the majority of clinical MPM samples as well as human MPM cell lines as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of KIF11 and KIF23. High expression of KIF11 (KIF11-H) and KIF23 (KIF23-H) were found in 43.4 and 50.9% of all the MPM cases, respectively. Patients who received curative resection with tumors displaying KIF23-H showed shorter overall survival (P=0.0194). These results provide that inhibition of KIF11 and KIF23 may hold promise for treatment of MPMs, raising the possibility that kinesin-based drug targets may be developed in the future. PMID:27279560

  15. Cancer stem cells: potential target for bioactive food components.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young S; Farrar, William; Colburn, Nancy H; Milner, John A

    2012-07-01

    Cancer stem cells often have phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to normal stem cells including the properties of self-renewal and differentiation. Recent findings suggest that uncontrolled self-renewal may explain cancer relapses and may represent a critical target for cancer prevention. It is conceivable that the loss of regulatory molecules resulting from inappropriate consumption of specific foods and their constituents may foster the aberrant self-renewal of cancer stem cells. In fact, increasing evidence points to the network delivering signals for self-renewal from extracellular compartments to the nucleus including changes in stem cell environments, inducible expression of microRNAs, hyperplastic nuclear chromatin structures, and the on/off of differentiation process as possible sites of action for bioactive food components. Diverse dietary constituents such as vitamins A and D, genistein, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), sulforaphane, curcumin, piperine, theanine and choline have been shown to modify self-renewal properties of cancer stem cells. The ability of these bioactive food components to influence the balance between proliferative and quiescent cells by regulating critical feedback molecules in the network including dickkopf 1 (DKK-1), secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2), B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) may account for their biological response. Overall, the response to food components does not appear to be tissue or organ specific, suggesting there may be common cellular mechanisms. Unquestionably, additional studies are needed to clarify the physiological role of these dietary components in preventing the resistance of tumor cells to traditional drugs and cancer recurrence. PMID:22704055

  16. Cancer Stem Cells: Potential Target for Bioactive Food Components

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Farrar, William; Colburn, Nancy H.; Milner, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells often have phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to normal stem cells including the properties of self-renewal and differentiation. Recent findings suggest that uncontrolled self-renewal may explain cancer relapses and may represent a critical target for cancer prevention. It is conceivable that the loss of regulatory molecules resulting from inappropriate consumption of specific foods and their constituents may foster the aberrant self-renewal of cancer stem cells. In fact, increasing evidence points to the network delivering signals for self-renewal from extracellular compartments to the nucleus including changes in stem cell environments, inducible expression of microRNAs, hyperplastic nuclear chromatin structures, and the on/off of differentiation process as possible sites of action for bioactive food components. Diverse dietary constituents such as vitamins A and D, genistein, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), sulforaphane, curcumin, piperine, theanine, and choline have been shown to modify self-renewal properties of cancer stem cells. The ability of these bioactive food components to influence the balance between proliferative and quiescent cells by regulating critical feedback molecules in the network including dickkopf 1 (DKK-1), secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2), B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1), and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) may account for their biological response. Overall, the response to food components does not appear to be tissue or organ specific, suggesting there may be common cellular mechanisms. Unquestionably, additional studies are needed to clarify the physiological role of these dietary components in preventing the resistance of tumor cells to traditional drugs and cancer recurrence. PMID:22704055

  17. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-09-01

    Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RIBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summarises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RIBE. The main emphasis of this article is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy. PMID:20857259

  18. Autophagy: a potential therapeutic target in lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Kiichi

    2013-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is an evolutionally conserved intracellular process to maintain cellular homeostasis by facilitating the turnover of protein aggregates, cellular debris, and damaged organelles. During autophagy, cytosolic constituents are engulfed into double-membrane-bound vesicles called “autophagosomes,” which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Accumulated evidence suggests that autophagy is critically involved not only in the basal physiological states but also in the pathogenesis of various human diseases. Interestingly, a diverse variety of clinically approved drugs modulate autophagy to varying extents, although they are not currently utilized for the therapeutic purpose of manipulating autophagy. In this review, we highlight the functional roles of autophagy in lung diseases with focus on the recent progress of the potential therapeutic use of autophagy-modifying drugs in clinical medicine. The purpose of this review is to discuss the merits, and the pitfalls, of modulating autophagy as a therapeutic strategy in lung diseases. PMID:23709618

  19. Genetic and pharmacological targeting of TPL-2 kinase ameliorates experimental colitis: a potential target for the treatment of Crohn's disease?

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, M; Visekruna, A; Kühl, A; Schmidt, N; Kaufmann, S H E; Steinhoff, U

    2012-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by dysregulated immune responses against intestinal microflora leading to marked activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) with subsequent production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Besides NF-κB, the tumor progression locus 2 (TPL-2)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway also regulates inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, but its role during intestinal inflammation is incompletely understood. We analyzed the impact of TPL-2 in the dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis model. Despite normal activation of NF-κB, animals lacking TPL-2 developed only mild colitis with reduced synthesis of inflammatory cytokines. Further, pharmacological inhibition of the TPL-2 kinase was similarly effective in ameliorating colitis as TPL-2 deficiency without obvious side effects. Because increased TPL-2/ERK activation was seen in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) but not ulcerative colitis, our findings encourage further investigation of TPL-2 kinase as potential target for the treatment of CD patients. PMID:22157885

  20. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  1. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SS-31 is a Potential Novel Ophthalmic Medication for Neuroprotection in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Wang, Chao; Yu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of irreversible blindness and a neurodegenerative disease with a complex pathogenesis. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have crucial roles in most neurodegenerative diseases such as glaucoma. The conventional clinical treatment for glaucoma is lowering the intraocular pressure (IOP). Some patients have normal IOP, whereas other patients appear to obtain adequate control of IOP after filtration surgery or medication. However, these patients still experience progressive visual field loss. Vision field loss in glaucoma is attributed to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis. Many recent researches demonstrated that the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress was a major cause of RGCs apoptosis. How oxidative stress leads to RGCs apoptosis in glaucoma is unclear but may involve the neurotoxic effects of oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and/or damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Investigations are needed concerning the mitochondria as effective targets for potential therapeutic interventions to maintain mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative stress, and thereby delay or stop RGC loss and prolong visual function. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Szeto-Schiller (SS) peptide is a candidate molecule. Szeto-Schiller-31 (H-D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2) is an attractive mitochondria-targeted antioxidant that can protect the mitochondria and RGCs against oxidative damage. Therefore, we suggest SS-31 as a novel neuroprotective ophthalmic drug for protecting RGCs in glaucoma. PMID:27350953

  2. Improving peripheral nerve regeneration: from molecular mechanisms to potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Chan, K Ming; Gordon, Tessa; Zochodne, Douglas W; Power, Hollie A

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is common especially among young individuals. Although injured neurons have the ability to regenerate, the rate is slow and functional outcomes are often poor. Several potential therapeutic agents have shown considerable promise for improving the survival and regenerative capacity of injured neurons. These agents are reviewed within the context of their molecular mechanisms. The PI3K/Akt and Ras/ERK signaling cascades play a key role in neuronal survival. A number of agents that target these pathways, including erythropoietin, tacrolimus, acetyl-l-carnitine, n-acetylcysteine and geldanamycin have been shown to be effective. Trk receptor signaling events that up-regulate cAMP play an important role in enhancing the rate of axonal outgrowth. Agents that target this pathway including rolipram, testosterone, fasudil, ibuprofen and chondroitinase ABC hold considerable promise for human application. A tantalizing prospect is to combine different molecular targeting strategies in complementary pathways to optimize their therapeutic effects. Although further study is needed prior to human trials, these modalities could open a new horizon in the clinical arena that has so far been elusive. PMID:25220611

  3. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SS-31 is a Potential Novel Ophthalmic Medication for Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    PANG, Yu; WANG, Chao; YU, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of irreversible blindness and a neurodegenerative disease with a complex pathogenesis. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have crucial roles in most neurodegenerative diseases such as glaucoma. The conventional clinical treatment for glaucoma is lowering the intraocular pressure (IOP). Some patients have normal IOP, whereas other patients appear to obtain adequate control of IOP after filtration surgery or medication. However, these patients still experience progressive visual field loss. Vision field loss in glaucoma is attributed to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis. Many recent researches demonstrated that the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress was a major cause of RGCs apoptosis. How oxidative stress leads to RGCs apoptosis in glaucoma is unclear but may involve the neurotoxic effects of oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and/or damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Investigations are needed concerning the mitochondria as effective targets for potential therapeutic interventions to maintain mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative stress, and thereby delay or stop RGC loss and prolong visual function. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Szeto-Schiller (SS) peptide is a candidate molecule. Szeto-Schiller-31 (H-D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2) is an attractive mitochondria-targeted antioxidant that can protect the mitochondria and RGCs against oxidative damage. Therefore, we suggest SS-31 as a novel neuroprotective ophthalmic drug for protecting RGCs in glaucoma. PMID:27350953

  4. sFRP-mediated Wnt sequestration as a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Sudha; Marimuthu, Raja; Sekhar, Sreeja; Bhuvanalakshmi, G; Arfuso, Frank; Das, Anjan Kumar; Bhonde, Ramesh; Martins, Ralph; Dharmarajan, Arun

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular ligand, Wnt, and its receptors are involved in sign al transduction and play an important role in axis formation and neural development. In neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), a decrease of the intracellular Wnt effector, β-catenin, has been linked to amyloid-β-peptide-induced neurotoxicity. Despite this knowledge, targeting Wnt inhibitors as potential biomarkers has not been explored, and harnessing Wnt activators as therapeutic candidates remains largely not investigated. A wide acting family of Wnt mediators, secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs), has not been probed so far as molecular indicators of disease occurrence and progression of Alzheimer's. Unlike the effect of the Dickkopf (DKK) family of Wnt antagonists on AD, the sFRP molecules have a more pleiotropic impact on the Wnt signaling cascade and probably have a far-reaching involvement in neurodegeneration. The role of sFRPs has been poorly described in AD, and in this review, we analyze the present status of the role of sFRPs on neurodegeneration, their likely involvement, and potential implications in treatment modalities of AD. This information would provide valuable clues for the development of potential therapeutic targets for aberrant neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27063405

  5. Therapeutic potential of mGluR5 targeting in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Dhull, Dinesh K.; Mishra, Pooja S.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research dedicated toward Alzheimer's disease (AD) has culminated in much of the current understanding of the neurodegeneration associated with disease. However, delineating the pathophysiology and finding a possible cure for the disease is still wanting. This is in part due to the lack of knowledge pertaining to the connecting link between neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathways. Consequently, the inefficacy and ill-effects of the drugs currently available for AD encourage the need for alternative and safe therapeutic intervention. In this review we highlight the potential of mGluR5, a metabotropic glutamatergic receptor, in understanding the mechanism underlying the neuronal death and neuroinflammation in AD. We also discuss the role of mGlu5 receptor in mediating the neuron-glia interaction in the disease. Finally, we discuss the potential of mGluR5 as target for treating AD. PMID:26106290

  6. Diacylglycerol Kinases as Emerging Potential Drug Targets for a Variety of Diseases: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Fumio; Mizuno, Satoru; Komenoi, Suguru

    2016-01-01

    Ten mammalian diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) isozymes (α–κ) have been identified to date. Our previous review noted that several DGK isozymes can serve as potential drug targets for cancer, epilepsy, autoimmunity, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and type II diabetes (Sakane et al., 2008). Since then, recent genome-wide association studies have implied several new possible relationships between DGK isozymes and diseases. For example, DGKθ and DGKκ have been suggested to be associated with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and hypospadias, respectively. In addition, the DGKη gene has been repeatedly identified as a bipolar disorder (BPD) susceptibility gene. Intriguingly, we found that DGKη-knockout mice showed lithium (BPD remedy)-sensitive mania-like behaviors, suggesting that DGKη is one of key enzymes of the etiology of BPD. Because DGKs are potential drug targets for a wide variety of diseases, the development of DGK isozyme-specific inhibitors/activators has been eagerly awaited. Recently, we have identified DGKα-selective inhibitors. Because DGKα has both pro-tumoral and anti-immunogenic properties, the DGKα-selective inhibitors would simultaneously have anti-tumoral and pro-immunogenic (anti-tumor immunogenic) effects. Although the ten DGK isozymes are highly similar to each other, our current results have encouraged us to identify and develop specific inhibitors/activators against every DGK isozyme that can be effective regulators and drugs against a wide variety of physiological events and diseases. PMID:27583247

  7. Diacylglycerol Kinases as Emerging Potential Drug Targets for a Variety of Diseases: An Update.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Fumio; Mizuno, Satoru; Komenoi, Suguru

    2016-01-01

    Ten mammalian diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) isozymes (α-κ) have been identified to date. Our previous review noted that several DGK isozymes can serve as potential drug targets for cancer, epilepsy, autoimmunity, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and type II diabetes (Sakane et al., 2008). Since then, recent genome-wide association studies have implied several new possible relationships between DGK isozymes and diseases. For example, DGKθ and DGKκ have been suggested to be associated with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and hypospadias, respectively. In addition, the DGKη gene has been repeatedly identified as a bipolar disorder (BPD) susceptibility gene. Intriguingly, we found that DGKη-knockout mice showed lithium (BPD remedy)-sensitive mania-like behaviors, suggesting that DGKη is one of key enzymes of the etiology of BPD. Because DGKs are potential drug targets for a wide variety of diseases, the development of DGK isozyme-specific inhibitors/activators has been eagerly awaited. Recently, we have identified DGKα-selective inhibitors. Because DGKα has both pro-tumoral and anti-immunogenic properties, the DGKα-selective inhibitors would simultaneously have anti-tumoral and pro-immunogenic (anti-tumor immunogenic) effects. Although the ten DGK isozymes are highly similar to each other, our current results have encouraged us to identify and develop specific inhibitors/activators against every DGK isozyme that can be effective regulators and drugs against a wide variety of physiological events and diseases. PMID:27583247

  8. NADPH Oxidase: A Potential Target for Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Jie; Duan, Xiaochun; Tian, Xiaodi; Shen, Haitao; Sun, Qing; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in industrialized nations. Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of stroke, and excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria is thought to be the main cause of oxidative stress. NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes have recently been identified and studied as important producers of ROS in brain tissues after stroke. Several reports have shown that knockout or deletion of NOX exerts a neuroprotective effect in three major experimental stroke models. Recent studies also confirmed that NOX inhibitors ameliorate brain injury and improve neurological outcome after stroke. However, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of NOX enzymes in the central nervous system (CNS) are not known well. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of our current understanding about expression and physiological function of NOX enzymes in the CNS and its pathophysiological roles in the three major types of stroke: ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26941888

  9. Selective Mitochondrial Targeting Exerts Anxiolytic Effects In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Markus; Asara, John M; Teplytska, Larysa; Murphy, Michael P; Logan, Angela; Turck, Christoph W; Filiou, Michaela D

    2016-06-01

    Current treatment strategies for anxiety disorders are predominantly symptom-based. However, a third of anxiety patients remain unresponsive to anxiolytics highlighting the need for more effective, mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. We have previously compared high vs low anxiety mice and identified changes in mitochondrial pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress. In this work, we show that selective pharmacological targeting of these mitochondrial pathways exerts anxiolytic effects in vivo. We treated high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) mice with MitoQ, an antioxidant that selectively targets mitochondria. MitoQ administration resulted in decreased anxiety-related behavior in HAB mice. This anxiolytic effect was specific for high anxiety as MitoQ treatment did not affect the anxiety phenotype of C57BL/6N and DBA/2J mouse strains. We furthermore investigated the molecular underpinnings of the MitoQ-driven anxiolytic effect and found that MitoQ treatment alters the brain metabolome and that the response to MitoQ treatment is characterized by distinct molecular signatures. These results indicate that a mechanism-driven approach based on selective mitochondrial targeting has the potential to attenuate the high anxiety phenotype in vivo, thus paving the way for translational implementation as long-term MitoQ administration is well-tolerated with no reported side effects in mice and humans. PMID:26567514

  10. Inflammatory Pathways in Knee Osteoarthritis: Potential Targets for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Or, David; Rael, Leonard T.; Thomas, Gregory W.; Brody, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a wide-spread, debilitating disease that is prominent in Western countries. It is associated with old age, obesity, and mechanical stress on the knee joint. By examining the recent literature on the effect of the anti-inflammatory prostaglandins 15d-PGJ2 and Δ12-PGJ2, we propose that new therapeutic agents for this disease could facilitate the transition from the COX-2-dependent pro-inflammatory synthesis of the prostaglandin PGE2 (catalyzed by mPGES-1), to the equally COX-2-dependent synthesis of the aforementioned anti-inflammatory prostaglandins. This transition could be instrumental in halting the breakdown of cartilage via matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases, as well as promoting the matrix regeneration and synthesis of cartilage by chondrocytes. Another desirable property of new OA therapeutics could involve the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells to the damaged cartilage and bone, possibly resulting in the generation of chondrocytes, synoviocytes, and, in the case of bone, osteoblasts. Moreover, we propose that research promoting this transition from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory prostaglandins could aid in the identification of new OA therapeutics.

  11. Eph receptor A10 has a potential as a target for a prostate cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nagano, Kazuya; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • EphA10 mRNA is overexpressed in breast, prostate and colon cancer cell lines. • EphA10 is overexpressed in clinical prostate tumors at mRNA and protein levels. • Anti-EphA10 antibodies were cytotoxic on EphA10-positive prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: We recently identified Eph receptor A10 (EphA10) as a novel breast cancer-specific protein. Moreover, we also showed that an in-house developed anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells, suggesting EphA10 as a promising target for breast cancer therapy. However, the only other known report for EphA10 was its expression in the testis at the mRNA level. Therefore, the potency of EphA10 as a drug target against cancers other than the breast is not known. The expression of EphA10 in a wide variety of cancer cells was studied and the potential of EphA10 as a drug target was evaluated. Screening of EphA10 mRNA expression showed that EphA10 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines as well as in prostate and colon cancer cell lines. Thus, we focused on prostate cancers in which EphA10 expression was equivalent to that in breast cancers. As a result, EphA10 expression was clearly shown in clinical prostate tumor tissues as well as in cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. In order to evaluate the potential of EphA10 as a drug target, we analyzed complement-dependent cytotoxicity effects of anti-EphA10 mAb and found that significant cytotoxicity was mediated by the expression of EphA10. Therefore, the idea was conceived that the overexpression of EphA10 in prostate cancers might have a potential as a target for prostate cancer therapy, and formed the basis for the studies reported here.

  12. Targeting the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChRs) in Astrocytes as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Coronel, Juan Camilo; Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Capani, Francisco; Gonzalez, Janneth; Moran, Valentina Echeverria; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a relatively common disorder of the Central Nervous System (CNS), whose etiology is characterized by a selective and progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and the presence of Lewy bodies in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra, and gaping dopamine depletion in the striatum. Patients with this disease suffer from tremors, slowness of movements, gait instability, and rigidity. These patients may also present functional disability, reduced quality of life, and rapid cognitive decline. It has been shown that nicotine exerts beneficial effects in patients with PD and in in-vitro and in-vivo models of this disease. Astrocytes are an important component in the immune response associated with PD, and that nicotine might be able to inhibit the inflammation-related apoptosis of these cells, being this a potential strategy for PD treatment. This action of nicotine could be due mainly to activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs) expressed in glial cells. However, nicotine administration can protect dopaminergic neurons against degeneration by inhibiting astrocytes activation in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and therefore reduce inflammation. Owing to the toxicity and capacity of nicotine to induce addiction, analogues of this substance have been designed and tested in various experimental paradigms, and targeting α7-nAChRs expressed in glial cells may be a novel therapeutic strategy for PD treatment. PMID:26972289

  13. Inverse Target- and Cue-Priming Effects of Masked Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattler, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    The processing of a visual target that follows a briefly presented prime stimulus can be facilitated if prime and target stimuli are similar. In contrast to these positive priming effects, inverse priming effects (or negative compatibility effects) have been found when a mask follows prime stimuli before the target stimulus is presented: Responses…

  14. Therapeutic potential of targeting group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Duty, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Current drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), for example, L-DOPA and dopamine agonists, are very effective at reversing the motor symptoms of the disease. However, they do little to combat the underlying degeneration of dopaminergic neurones in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and their long-term use is associated with the appearance of adverse effects such as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Much emphasis has therefore been placed on finding alternative non-dopaminergic drugs that may circumvent some or all of these problems. Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were first identified in the basal ganglia a decade ago. One or more of these receptors (mGlu4, mGlu7 or mGlu8) is found on pre-synaptic terminals of basal ganglia pathways whose overactivity is implicated not only in the generation of motor symptoms in PD, but also in driving the progressive SNc degeneration. The finding that drugs which activate group III mGlu receptors can inhibit transmission across these overactive synapses has lead to the proposal that group III mGlu receptors are promising targets for drug discovery in PD. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the role and target potential of group III mGlu receptors in the basal ganglia. Overwhelming evidence obtained from in vitro studies and animal models of PD supports group III mGlu receptors as potentially important drug targets for providing both symptom relief and neuroprotection in PD. PMID:20735415

  15. PPARγ neddylation essential for adipogenesis is a potential target for treating obesity.

    PubMed

    Park, H-S; Ju, U-I; Park, J-W; Song, J Y; Shin, D H; Lee, K-H; Jeong, L S; Yu, J; Lee, H W; Cho, J Y; Kim, S Y; Kim, S W; Kim, J B; Park, K S; Chun, Y-S

    2016-08-01

    The preadipocyte-to-adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis) is a key process in fat mass increase and thus it is regarded as a compelling target for preventing or treating obesity. Of adipogenic hormone receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) has crucial roles in adipogenesis and lipid accumulation within adipocytes. Here we demonstrate that the NEDD8 (neuronal precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 8)-based post-translation modification (neddylation) of PPARγ is essential for adipogenesis. During adipogenesis, NEDD8 is robustly induced in preadipocytes and conjugates with PPARγ, leading to PPARγ stabilization. When the neddylation process was blocked by NEDD8-targeting siRNAs (or viral vectors) or an inhibitor MLN4924, adipocyte differentiation and fat tissue development were substantially impaired. We also demonstrate that MLN4924 effectively prevents the high-fat diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance in mice. This study provides a better understanding of how the PPARγ signaling pathway starts and lasts during adipogenesis and a potential anti-obesity strategy that targets the neddylation of PPARγ. PMID:26990658

  16. Potential Molecular Targets for Narrow-Spectrum Agents to Combat Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Balish, Mitchell F.; Distelhorst, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    As Mycoplasma pneumoniae macrolide resistance grows and spreads worldwide, it is becoming more important to develop new drugs to prevent infection or limit disease. Because other mycoplasma species have acquired resistance to other classes of antibiotics, it is reasonable to presume that M. pneumoniae can do the same, so switching to commonly used antibiotics like fluoroquinolones will not result in forms of therapy with long-term utility. Moreover, broad-spectrum antibiotics can have serious consequences for the patient, as these drugs may have severe impacts on the natural microbiota of the individual, compromising the health of the patient either short-term or long-term. Therefore, developing narrow-spectrum antibiotics that effectively target only M. pneumoniae and no more than a small portion of the microbiota is likely to yield impactful, positive results that can be used perhaps indefinitely to combat M. pneumoniae. Development of these agents requires a deep understanding of the basic biology of M. pneumoniae, in many areas deeper than what is currently known. In this review, we discuss potential targets for new, narrow-spectrum agents and both the positive and negative aspects of selecting these targets, which include toxic molecules, metabolic pathways, and attachment and motility. By gathering this information together, we anticipate that it will be easier for researchers to evaluate topics of priority for study of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26941728

  17. Is there potential to target FOXM1 for 'undruggable' lung cancers?

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, Vladimir V; Kalin, Tanya V

    2015-07-01

    Published studies with transgenic mice convincingly showed that Forkhead Box transcription factor M1 (FOXM1) transcription factor is an important component of the KRAS/ERK signaling pathway in respiratory epithelial cells. FOXM1 is required for oncogenic KRAS signaling in mouse lung cancer models and therefore, clear potential exists to target FOXM1 in human NSCLC driven by activated KRAS mutations. To date, several approaches to inhibit FOXM1 in cancer cells have been explored. These include siRNA/shRNA-mediated inhibition of Foxm1 mRNA, sequestration of FOXM1 protein in nucleoli using ARF peptide, inhibition of FOXM1 binding to its target promoter DNAs by the FDI-6 small-molecule compound and inhibition of proteasomes by thiazole antibiotics. Additional studies are needed to determine if inhibition of FOXM1 is beneficial for treatment of KRAS mutant NSCLCs in human patients and to develop effective delivery systems for FOXM1 inhibitors. If successful, additional strategies can be explored to screen for novel FOXM1 inhibitors, such as targeting FOXM1 nuclear localization, nuclear export or protein-protein interactions with activating kinases and co-activator proteins. Altogether, inhibition of FOXM1, either alone or in combination with other anticancer drugs, could be beneficial for treatment of KRAS mutant NSCLCs that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. PMID:25936405

  18. Redox Potential Ultrasensitive Nanoparticle for the Targeted Delivery of Camptothecin to HER2-Positive Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ideal “smart” nanoparticles for drug delivery should enhance therapeutic efficacy without introducing side effects. To achieve that, we developed a drug delivery system (HCN) based on a polymer–drug conjugate of poly[2-(pyridin-2-yldisulfanyl)]-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) and camptothecin with an intracellularly cleavable linker and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting ligands. An in vitro drug release study found that HCN was stable in the physiological environment and supersensitive to the stimulus of elevated intracellular redox potential, releasing all payloads in less than 30 min. Furthermore, confocal microscopy revealed that HCN could specifically enter HER2-positive cancer cells. As a consequence, HCN could effectively kill HER2-positive cancer cells while not affecting HER2-negative cells. PMID:24779647

  19. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 04: What if bystander effects influence cell kill within a target volume? Potential consequences of dose heterogeneity on TCP and EUD on intermediate risk prostate patients

    SciTech Connect

    Balderson, M.J.; Kirkby, C.

    2014-08-15

    In vitro evidence has suggested that radiation induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing which may influence radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms. This work applies a bystander effect model, which has been derived from published in vitro data, to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumour control probability (TCP) and compare them with predictions from standard linear quadratic (LQ) models that assume a response due only to local absorbed dose. Comparisons between the models were made under increasing dose heterogeneity scenarios. Dose throughout the CTV was modeled with normal distributions, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity yields as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. Intermediate risk prostate prescriptions of 78 Gy over 39 fractions had maximum EUD and TCP values at SD of around 5Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. The bystander model demonstrates the potential to deviate from the common local LQ model predictions as dose heterogeneity through a prostate CTV is varies. The results suggest the potential for allowing some degree of dose heterogeneity within a CTV, although further investigations of the assumptions of the bystander model are warranted.

  20. Self assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles as a potential carrier for targeting the inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esmaeili, Motahareh; Amini, Mohsen; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-25

    To develop a nanoparticulate drug carrier for targeting of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugates were synthesized, which could form self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution and budesonide (BDS) was loaded into the HANPs. Their particle sizes were in the range of 177 to 293nm with negative surface charge. The model of inflammatory CACO-2 cells was utilized to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded HA nanocarriers. The highest expression of CD44 receptors was found on inflamed Caco-2 cells, as determined by flow cytometry. FITC-labeled HANPs revealed greater uptake in inflamed CACO-2 cells compared to untreated CACO-2 and CD44-negative cell lines, NIH3T3. BDS loaded HANPs displayed almost no toxicity indicating HANPs are excellent biocompatible nano-carriers. BDS loaded HANPs demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory effect on IL-8 and TNF-α secretion in inflamed cell model compared to the same dose of free drug. These results revealed the promising potential of HA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for IBD treatment. PMID:27083829

  1. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery. PMID:25093328

  2. The mitochondria-targeted nitroxide JP4-039 augments potentially lethal irradiation damage repair.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Malolan S; Gupta, Kanika; Epperly, Michael W; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Hong; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Pierce, Joshua G; Kagan, Valerian E; Wipf, Peter; Kanai, Anthony J; Greenberger, Joel S

    2009-01-01

    It was unknown if a mitochondria-targeted nitroxide (JP4-039) could augment potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) of cells in quiescence. We evaluated 32D cl 3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells which were irradiated and then either centrifuged to pellets (to simulate PLDR conditions) or left in exponential growth for 0, 24, 48 or 72 h. Pelleted cells demonstrated cell cycle arrest with a greater percentage in the G(1)-phase than did exponentially growing cells. Irradiation survival curves demonstrated a significant radiation damage mitigation effect of JP4-039 over untreated cells in cells pelleted for 24 h. No significant radiation mitigation was detected if drugs were added 48 or 72 h after irradiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated a greater concentration of JP4-039 in mitochondria of 24 h-pelleted cells than in exponentially growing cells. These results establish a potential role of mitochondria-targeted nitroxide drugs as mitigators of radiation damage to quiescent cells including stem cells. PMID:19779106

  3. Assessment of Potential Targets for Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind; Rezai, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting 36 million people worldwide and 5.2 million in the United States. The pathogenesis of AD is still elusive. Accumulations of abnormal proteins (beta amyloid and tau protein), inflammatory cascades, abnormal responses to oxidative stress and alteration in oxidative metabolism have been implicated in AD. There are few effective therapeutic options available for this disorder at present. Neuromodulation offers a novel treatment modality for patients with AD. The databases of Medline and PubMed were searched for various studies in English literature describing the deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with AD. Various animal and human clinical studies have shown promising initial results with bilateral DBS targeting various anatomical nodes. In this review, we attempt to highlight the pathophysiology, neural circuitry and potential neuromodulation options in patients with AD. In appropriately selected patients, DBS can potentially delay the cognitive decline, enhance memory functions and can improve the overall quality of life. However, further randomized controlled trials are required to validate the efficacy of neuromodulation and to determine the most optimal target for AD. PMID:26015813

  4. Epigenetic Control and Cancer: The Potential of Histone Demethylases as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Garcia, Jeison

    2012-01-01

    The development of cancer involves an immense number of factors at the molecular level. These factors are associated principally with alterations in the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression profiles. Studying the effects of chromatin structure alterations, which are caused by the addition/removal of functional groups to specific histone residues, are of great interest as a promising way to identify markers for cancer diagnosis, classify the disease and determine its prognosis, and these markers could be potential targets for the treatment of this disease in its different forms. This manuscript presents the current point of view regarding members of the recently described family of proteins that exhibit histone demethylase activity; histone demethylases are genetic regulators that play a fundamental role in both the activation and repression of genes and whose expression has been observed to increase in many types of cancer. Some fundamental aspects of their association with the development of cancer and their relevance as potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies at the epigenetic level are discussed in the following manuscript. PMID:24280700

  5. Antibacterial Effects of Blackberry Extract Target Periodontopathogens

    PubMed Central

    González, Octavio A.; Escamilla, Carolina; Danaher, Robert J.; Dai, Jin; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Mumper, Russell J.; Miller, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Antimicrobial agents provide valuable adjunctive therapy for prevention and control of oral diseases. Limitations in their prolonged use have stimulated the search for new natural occurring agents with more specific activity and fewer adverse effects. Here we sought to determine the anti-bacterial properties of blackberry extract (BBE) in vitro against oral bacterial commensals and periodontopathogens. Material and Methods Effects of whole and fractionated BBE on the metabolism of 10 different oral bacteria were evaluated by colorimetric water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) assay. Bactericidal effects of whole BBE against F. nucleatum were determined by quantitating colony forming units (CFUs). Cytotoxicity was determined in oral epithelial (OKF6) cells. Results BBE at 350-1,400 μg/mL reduced the metabolic activity of P. gingivalis, F. nucleatum and S. mutans. The reduced metabolic activity observed for F. nucleatum corresponded to a reduction in CFUs following exposure to BBE for as little as 1 hour, indicative of its bactericidal properties. An anthocyanin-enriched fraction of BBE reduced the metabolic activity of F. nucleatum but not P. gingivalis or S. mutans, suggesting the contribution of species specific agents in the whole BBE. Oral epithelial cell viability was not reduced following ≤ 6 h exposures to whole BBE (2.24-1400 μg/mL). Conclusion BBE alters the metabolic activity of oral periodontopathogens while demonstrating minimal effect on commensals. The specific antibacterial properties of BBE shown in this study along with its anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties previously demonstrated make this natural extract a promising target as an adjunct for prevention and/or complementary therapy of periodontal infections. PMID:22812456

  6. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential for reactions involving deformed target nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and an axial-symmetrical deformed target nucleus and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier, by using the double folding model (DFM). The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile near the barrier. Program summaryProgram title: DFMDEF Catalogue identifier: AENI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215442 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C. Computer: PC, Mac. Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2), MacOS, Linux. RAM: 100 MB with average parameters set Classification: 17.9. Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and a deformed but axially symmetric target nucleus as a function of the center of mass distance as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e

  7. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates. PMID:25960144

  8. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  9. The insect ecdysone receptor is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests. PMID:25516715

  10. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV as a Potential Target for Selective Prodrug Activation and Chemotherapeutic Action in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is often offset by severe side effects attributable to poor selectivity and toxicity to normal cells. Recently, the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) was considered as a potential target for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting chemotherapeutic drugs to DPPIV as a strategy to enhance their specificity. The expression profile of DPPIV was obtained for seven cancer cell lines using DNA microarray data from the DTP database, and was validated by RT-PCR. A prodrug was then synthesized by linking the cytotoxic drug melphalan to a proline-glycine dipeptide moiety, followed by hydrolysis studies in the seven cell lines with a standard substrate, as well as the glycyl-prolyl-melphalan (GP-Mel). Lastly, cell proliferation studies were carried out to demonstrate enzyme-dependent activation of the candidate prodrug. The relative RT-PCR expression levels of DPPIV in the cancer cell lines exhibited linear correlation with U95Av2 Affymetrix data (r2 = 0.94), and with specific activity of a standard substrate, glycine-proline-p-nitroanilide (r2 = 0.96). The significantly higher antiproliferative activity of GP-Mel in Caco-2 cells (GI50 = 261 μM) compared to that in SK-MEL-5 cells (GI50 = 807 μM) was consistent with the 9-fold higher specific activity of the prodrug in Caco-2 cells (5.14 pmol/min/μg protein) compared to SK-MEL-5 cells (0.68 pmol/min/μg protein) and with DPPIV expression levels in these cells. Our results demonstrate the great potential to exploit DPPIV as a prodrug activating enzyme for efficient chemotherapeutic drug targeting. PMID:25365774

  11. The apelin-APJ axis: A novel potential therapeutic target for organ fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shifang; Chen, Linxi; Lu, Liqun; Li, Lanfang

    2016-05-01

    Apelin, an endogenous ligand of the G-protein-coupled receptor APJ, is expressed in a diverse number of organs. The apelin-APJ axis helps to control the processes of pathological and physiological fibrosis, including renal fibrosis, cardiac fibrosis, liver fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of apelin-APJ in organ fibrosis remains controversial due to conflicting study results. The apelin-APJ axis is a detrimental mechanism which promotes liver fibrosis mainly via up-regulation the expression of collagen-II and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). On the contrary, the apelin-APJ axis is beneficial for renal fibrosis, cardiac fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis. The apelin-APJ axis alleviates renal fibrosis by restraining the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In addition, the apelin-APJ axis attenuates cardiac fibrosis through multiple pathways. Furthermore, the apelin-APJ axis has beneficial effects on experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) which suggest the apelin-APJ axis potentially alleviates pulmonary fibrosis. In this article, we review the controversies associated with apelin-APJ in organ fibrosis and introduce the drugs that target apelin-APJ. We conclude that future studies should place more emphasis on the relationship among apelin isoforms, APJ receptor subtypes and organ fibrosis. The apelin-APJ axis will be a potential therapeutic target and those drugs targeted for apelin-APJ may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for renal fibrosis, cardiac fibrosis, liver fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26944568

  12. The Insect Ecdysone Receptor is a Good Potential Target for RNAi-based Pest Control

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests. PMID:25516715

  13. The mTOR pathway in obesity driven gastrointestinal cancers: Potential targets and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Malley, Cian O; Pidgeon, Graham P

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a crucial point of convergence between growth factor signalling, metabolism, nutrient status and cellular proliferation. The mTOR pathway is heavily implicated in the progression of many cancers and is emerging as an important driver of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies. Due to its central role in adapting metabolism to environmental conditions, mTOR signalling is also believed to be critical in the development of obesity. Recent research has delineated that excessive nutrient intake can promote signalling through the mTOR pathway and possibly evoke changes to cellular metabolism that could accelerate obesity related cancers. Acting through its two effector complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2, mTOR dictates the transcription of genes important in glycolysis, lipogenesis, protein translation and synthesis and has recently been defined as a central mediator of the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Activation of the mTOR pathway is involved in both the pathogenesis of GI malignancies and development of resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The use of mTOR inhibitors is a promising therapeutic option in many GI malignancies, with greatest clinical efficacy seen in combination regimens. Recent research has also provided insight into crosstalk between mTOR and other pathways which could potentially expand the list of therapeutic targets in the mTOR pathway. Here we review the available strategies for targeting the mTOR pathway in GI cancers. We discuss current clinical trials of both established and novel mTOR inhibitors, with particular focus on combinations of these drugs with conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies. PMID:27051587

  14. The mTOR pathway in obesity driven gastrointestinal cancers: Potential targets and clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Malley, Cian O.; Pidgeon, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a crucial point of convergence between growth factor signalling, metabolism, nutrient status and cellular proliferation. The mTOR pathway is heavily implicated in the progression of many cancers and is emerging as an important driver of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies. Due to its central role in adapting metabolism to environmental conditions, mTOR signalling is also believed to be critical in the development of obesity. Recent research has delineated that excessive nutrient intake can promote signalling through the mTOR pathway and possibly evoke changes to cellular metabolism that could accelerate obesity related cancers. Acting through its two effector complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2, mTOR dictates the transcription of genes important in glycolysis, lipogenesis, protein translation and synthesis and has recently been defined as a central mediator of the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Activation of the mTOR pathway is involved in both the pathogenesis of GI malignancies and development of resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The use of mTOR inhibitors is a promising therapeutic option in many GI malignancies, with greatest clinical efficacy seen in combination regimens. Recent research has also provided insight into crosstalk between mTOR and other pathways which could potentially expand the list of therapeutic targets in the mTOR pathway. Here we review the available strategies for targeting the mTOR pathway in GI cancers. We discuss current clinical trials of both established and novel mTOR inhibitors, with particular focus on combinations of these drugs with conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies. PMID:27051587

  15. The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Cytokine Alarmins to Treat Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Chandler B.; Siracusa, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disorder that results in recurrent attacks of breathlessness, coughing, and wheezing that affects millions of people worldwide. Although the precise causes of asthma are unclear, studies suggest that a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental exposure to various allergens and pathogens contribute to its development. Currently, the most common treatment to control asthma is a dual combination of β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and corticosteroids. However, studies have shown that some patients do not respond well to these medications, while others experience significant side effects. It is reported that the majority of asthmas are associated with T helper type 2 (TH2) responses. In these patients, allergen challenge initiates the influx of TH2 cells in the airways leading to an increased production of TH2-associated cytokines and the promotion of allergy-induced asthma. Therefore, biologics that target this pathway may provide an alternative method to treat the allergic airway inflammation associated with asthma. As of now, only two biologics (omalizumab and mepolizumab), which target immunoglobulin E and interleukin-5, respectively, are FDA-approved and being prescribed to asthmatics. However, recent studies have reported that targeting other components of the TH2 response also show great promise. In this review, we will briefly describe the immunologic mechanisms underlying allergic asthma. Furthermore, we will discuss the current therapeutic strategies used to treat asthma including their limitations. Finally, we will highlight the benefits of using biologics to treat asthma-associated allergic airway inflammation with an emphasis on the potential of targeting cytokine alarmins, especially thymic stromal lymphopoietin. PMID:27378934

  16. Alendronate-decorated biodegradable polymeric micelles for potential bone-targeted delivery of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yingying; Quan, Changyun; Liu, Meiqing; Liu, Jie; Huang, Gang; Tong, Guoquan; Yin, Yihua; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection disease which is caused by bacteria or other germs, and could cause serious impact on the health and working capacity of the patients. Alendronate (ALN) can chelate strongly with the calcium ion of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is commonly used to treat osteoporosis. Nanomedicine has attracted a lot of attention in that the nano-sized carrier can deliver drug molecules to specific site of interest with the aid of targeting moiety and achieve sustained release, resulting in improved therapeutic effect and reduced side effect. In this study, micelles self-assembled from poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-alendronate (PLGA-PEG-ALN) copolymer were prepared for bone-targeted delivery of vancomycin (Van). The chemical structure of PLGA-PEG-ALN was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy. The formation of the nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electronic microscopy as well as the critical micelle concentration measurement. Release profiles from the micelles revealed that the conjugation of ALN to the surface of micelle did not pose adverse effect on the drug-loading capacity and release behaviors. The cytotoxicity of Van-loaded PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles as well as the blank micelles was evaluated via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay toward rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and human embryonic hepatocytes (L02 cells), and results showed that this Van-loaded micelle possesses appropriate cytotoxicity and is safe in the potential treatment of osteomyelitis. The in vitro affinity of PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles to the HA was also confirmed in vitro. The antibacterial effect of Van-loaded PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles was tested against Staphylococcus aureus (SA) which is the main pathogenic bacteria in osteomyelitis, and the results showed that the Van-loaded micelles can effectively inhibit the growth of SA. These results

  17. Effect of target probability on pre-stimulus brain activity.

    PubMed

    Lucci, G; Berchicci, M; Perri, R L; Spinelli, D; Di Russo, F

    2016-05-13

    Studies on perceptual decision-making showed that manipulating the proportion of target and non-target stimuli affects the behavioral performance. Tasks with high frequency of targets are associated to faster response times (RTs) conjunctively to higher number of errors (reflecting a response bias characterized by speed/accuracy trade-off) when compared to conditions with low frequency of targets. Electroencephalographic studies well described modulations of post-stimulus event-related potentials as effect of the stimulus probability; in contrast, in the present study we focused on the pre-stimulus preparatory activities subtending the response bias. Two versions of a Go/No-go task characterized by different proportion of Go stimuli (88% vs. 12%) were adopted. In the task with frequent go trials, we observed a strong enhancement in the motor preparation as indexed by the Bereitschaftspotential (BP, previously associated with activity within the supplementary motor area), faster RTs, and larger commission error rate than in the task with rare go trials. Contemporarily with the BP, a right lateralized prefrontal negativity (lateral pN, previously associated with activity within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) was larger in the task with rare go trial. In the post-stimulus processing stage, we confirmed that the N2 and the P3 components were larger for rare trials, irrespective of the Go/No-go stimulus category. The increase of activities recorded in the preparatory phase related to frequency of targets is consistent with the view proposed in accumulation models of perceptual decision for which target frequency affects the subjective baseline, reducing the distance between the starting-point and the response boundary, which determines the response speed. PMID:26912279

  18. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Gonzalo; Bill, Kate Lynn J.; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Braggio, Danielle; Constantino, Dylan; Prudner, Bethany; Zewdu, Abeba; Batte, Kara; Lev, Dina; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST. Methods Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA) were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates. Results HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001) and tumor weight (p=0.02). Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6. Conclusions MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis. PMID:26200462

  19. Evaluation of Acanthamoeba Myosin-IC as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E.; Valladares, Basilio; Maciver, Sutherland K.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a fatal encephalitis. We have targeted myosin-IC by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing as a therapeutic approach, since it is known that the function of this protein is vital for the amoeba. In this work, specific siRNAs against the Acanthamoeba myosin-IC gene were developed. Treated and control amoebae were cultured in growth and encystment media to evaluate the induced effects after myosin-IC gene knockdown, as we have anticipated that cyst formation may be impaired. The effects of myosin-IC gene silencing were inhibition of cyst formation, inhibition of completion of cytokinesis, inhibition of osmoregulation under osmotic stress conditions, and death of the amoebae. The finding that myosin-IC silencing caused incompletion of cytokinesis is in agreement with earlier suggestions that the protein plays a role in cell locomotion, which is necessary to pull daughter cells apart after mitosis in a process known as “traction-mediated cytokinesis”. We conclude that myosin-IC is a very promising potential drug target for the development of much-needed antiamoebal drugs and that it should be further exploited for Acanthamoeba therapy. PMID:24468784

  20. A quantitative way to estimate clinical off-target effects for human membrane brain targets in CNS research and development

    PubMed Central

    Spiros, Athan; Geerts, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Although many preclinical programs in central nervous system research and development intend to develop highly selective and potent molecules directed at the primary target, they often act upon other off-target receptors. The simple rule of taking the ratios of affinities for the candidate drug at the different receptors is flawed since the affinity of the endogenous ligand for that off-target receptor or drug exposure is not taken into account. We have developed a mathematical receptor competition model that takes into account the competition between active drug moiety and the endogenous neurotransmitter to better assess the off-target effects on postsynaptic receptor activation under the correct target exposure conditions. As an example, we investigate the possible functional effects of the weak off-target effects for dopamine-1 receptor (D1R) in a computer simulation of a dopaminergic cortical synapse that is calibrated using published fast-cyclic rodent voltammetry and human imaging data in subjects with different catechol-O-methyltransferase genotypes. We identify the conditions under which off-target effects at the D1R can lead to clinically detectable consequences on cognitive tests, such as the N-back working memory test. We also demonstrate that certain concentrations of dimebolin (Dimebon), a recently tested Alzheimer drug, can affect D1R activation resulting in clinically detectable cognitive decrease. This approach can be extended to other receptor systems and can improve the selection of clinical candidate compounds by potentially dialing-out harmful off-target effects or dialing-in beneficial off-target effects in a quantitative and controlled way.

  1. Substrate Effects from Oblique Hypervelocity Impacts into Layered Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickle, A. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally and numerically examine effects of low-impedance layers on subsurface target damage. Oblique impacts into targets with low-impedance surface layers exhibit reduced peak pressures, subsurface damage and crater size in the substrate.

  2. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  3. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  4. Potential Ergogenic Effects of Saffron.

    PubMed

    Meamarbashi, Abbas; Rajabi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Crocus sativus, commonly known as saffron, is a rich source of carotenoids with many health benefits. The muscular strength, pulmonary function, and reaction time are vital to the athlete's performance, and this study aimed to investigate an ergogenic effect of saffron. Twenty-eight nonactive and healthy male university students were randomly assigned into the saffron (n = 14) and control (n = 15) groups. The experimental group received dried saffron stigma (300 mg/day for 10 days) and the control group received a placebo. After one session, familiarization with the tests, anthropometric parameters, visual and audio reaction times, and the maximum isometric and isotonic forces on a leg press machine were measured accordingly, 1 day before and after the supplementation period. This study shows that 10 days of supplementation with saffron significantly increased (10.1%) the isometric force (p < .0001; effect size (EF) = 0.432) and increased 6.1% the isotonic force (p < .0001; effect size = 0.662), as well as effecting faster visual (p < .05; EF = 0.217) and audio (p < .05; EF = 0.214) reaction times. The ergogenic effect of saffron (increase in the forces) may contribute to increase in the muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and positive effect on the motor cortex, both of which may explain faster audio and visual reaction times. Saffron supplementation was also possibly responsible for improvement of muscle blood perfusion and facilitation in the oxygen transport. PMID:26811090

  5. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Pichai, Madharasi V A; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-06-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn's disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied so far in animal and in vitro models, before comprehensive clinical testing in humans. The investigations carried out so far in IBD models have provided substantial evidence of the nanotherapeutic approach as having the potential to overcome some of the current drawbacks to conventional IBD therapy. We analyze the pros and cons of nanotechnology in IBD therapies studied in different models, aimed at different targets and mechanisms of IBD pathogenesis, in an attempt to predict its possible impact in humans. PMID:22736912

  6. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pichai, Madharasi VA; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn’s disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied so far in animal and in vitro models, before comprehensive clinical testing in humans. The investigations carried out so far in IBD models have provided substantial evidence of the nanotherapeutic approach as having the potential to overcome some of the current drawbacks to conventional IBD therapy. We analyze the pros and cons of nanotechnology in IBD therapies studied in different models, aimed at different targets and mechanisms of IBD pathogenesis, in an attempt to predict its possible impact in humans. PMID:22736912

  7. 1,25(OH)2D3 Induces Placental Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Relaxation by Phosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1Ser507: Potential Beneficial Effects of Vitamin D on Placental Vasculature in Humans.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiuyue; Gu, Yang; Groome, Lynn J; Al-Kofahi, Mahmoud; Alexander, J Steven; Li, Weimin; Wang, Yuping

    2016-05-01

    Placental vascular dysfunction has been linked to insufficiency/deficiency of maternal vitamin D levels during pregnancy. In contrast, sufficient maternal vitamin D levels have shown beneficial effects on pregnancy outcomes. To study the role of vitamin D in pregnancy, we tested our hypothesis that vitamin D exerts beneficial effects on placental vasculature. We examined expression of CYP2R1, CYP27B1, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and CYP24A1 in placental vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in response to 1,25(OH)2D3 We found that VDR expression was inducible, CYP27B1 expression was dose-dependently down-regulated, and CYP24A1 expression was dose-dependently up-regulated in cells treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 These data suggest a feedback autoregulatory system of vitamin D existing in placental VSMCs. Using a VSMC/collagen-gel contraction assay, we evaluated the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on placental VSMC contractility. We found that, similar to losartan, 1,25(OH)2D3 could diminish angiotensin II-induced cell contractility. The mechanism of 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated VSMC relaxation was further explored by examination of Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1)/phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) pathway molecules. Our results showed that p-MYPT1(Thr853) and p-MYPT1(Thr696) were undetectable. However, p-MYPT1(Ser507), but not p-MYPT1(Ser668), was significantly up-regulated in cells treated with losartan plus angiotensin II. Similar effects were also seen in cells treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 plus angiotensin II or 1,25(OH)2D3 plus losartan plus angiotensin II. Because MYPT1 serine phosphorylation could activate myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), and MLCP activation is an important regulatory machinery of smooth muscle cell relaxation, up-regulation of MYPT1(Ser507) phosphorylation could be a mechanism of vitamin D and/or losartan mediated placental VSMC relaxation. PMID:27075619

  8. Targeting of sonic hedgehog-Gli signaling: A potential therapeutic target for patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingqin; Wang, Weifeng; Liu, Di; Zhao, Yang; He, Jianjun; Wang, Xijing; Dai, Zhijun; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer among women. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway serves a key role in malignant cancer cell growth and migration. However, little is known with regard to the specific function of the Hh signaling pathway in human breast cancer. The current study investigated the specific role of Hh signaling in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Expression of components of Shh-Gli signaling, as well as the Gli-responsive genes B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cyclin D1, were investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells using western blotting. The effects of Shh-Gli signaling on MDA-MB-231 proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay. The role of E-cadherin in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process was determined by western blot while matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/MMP-2 secretion was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that Shh-Gli signaling was activated in MDA-MB-231 cells, significantly enhancing cell viability. Overexpression of Gli positively regulated the transcription of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 thereby regulating MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and survival. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with human sonic hedgehog, n-terminus for 72 h significantly reduced E-cadherin protein levels and enhanced secretion of MMP-9 and MMP-2. These findings suggest that Shh-Gli signaling is significantly activated in human breast cancer cells, and is accompanied by enhanced cell viability, proliferation and migration capacities. PMID:27446389

  9. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  10. Identification of Cell Surface Proteins as Potential Immunotherapy Targets in 12 Pediatric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Yang, James J.; Wen, Xinyu; Wei, Jun S.; Mackall, Crystal L.; Khan, Javed

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances now allow us to rapidly produce CARs and other antibody-derived therapeutics targeting cell surface receptors. To maximize the potential of these new technologies, relevant extracellular targets must be identified. The Pediatric Oncology Branch of the NCI curates a freely accessible database of gene expression data for both pediatric cancers and normal tissues, through which we have defined discrete sets of over-expressed transcripts in 12 pediatric cancer subtypes as compared to normal tissues. We coupled gene expression profiles to current annotation databases (i.e., Affymetrix, Gene Ontology, Entrez Gene), in order to categorize transcripts by their sub-cellular location. In this manner we generated a list of potential immune targets expressed on the cell surface, ranked by their difference from normal tissue. Global differences from normal between each of the pediatric tumor types studied varied, indicating that some malignancies expressed transcript sets that were more highly diverged from normal tissues than others. The validity of our approach is seen by our findings for pre-B cell ALL, where targets currently in clinical trials were top-ranked hits (CD19, CD22). For some cancers, reagents already in development could potentially be applied to a new disease class, as exemplified by CD30 expression on sarcomas. Moreover, several potential new targets shared among several pediatric solid tumors are herein identified, such as MCAM (MUC18), metadherin (MTDH), and glypican-2 (GPC2). These targets have been identified at the mRNA level and are yet to be validated at the protein level. The safety of targeting these antigens has yet to be demonstrated and therefore the identified transcripts should be considered preliminary candidates for new CAR and therapeutic antibody targets. Prospective candidate targets will be evaluated by proteomic analysis including Westerns and immunohistochemistry of normal and tumor tissues. PMID:23251904

  11. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies. PMID:18345820

  12. USP1 deubiquitinase: cellular functions, regulatory mechanisms and emerging potential as target in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reversible protein ubiquitination is emerging as a key process for maintaining cell homeostasis, and the enzymes that participate in this process, in particular E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs), are increasingly being regarded as candidates for drug discovery. Human DUBs are a group of approximately 100 proteins, whose cellular functions and regulatory mechanisms remain, with some exceptions, poorly characterized. One of the best-characterized human DUBs is ubiquitin-specific protease 1 (USP1), which plays an important role in the cellular response to DNA damage. USP1 levels, localization and activity are modulated through several mechanisms, including protein-protein interactions, autocleavage/degradation and phosphorylation, ensuring that USP1 function is carried out in a properly regulated spatio-temporal manner. Importantly, USP1 expression is deregulated in certain types of human cancer, suggesting that USP1 could represent a valid target in cancer therapy. This view has gained recent support with the finding that USP1 inhibition may contribute to revert cisplatin resistance in an in vitro model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we describe the current knowledge on the cellular functions and regulatory mechanisms of USP1. We also summarize USP1 alterations found in cancer, combining data from the literature and public databases with our own data. Finally, we discuss the emerging potential of USP1 as a target, integrating published data with our novel findings on the effects of the USP1 inhibitor pimozide in combination with cisplatin in NSCLC cells. PMID:23937906

  13. MicroRNAs in Osteoclastogenesis and Function: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao; Chen, Xiang; Yu, Xijie

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal osteoclast formation and resorption play a fundamental role in osteoporosis pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, much progress has been made to target osteoclasts. The existing therapeutic drugs include bisphosphonates, hormone replacement therapy, selective estrogen receptor modulators, calcitonin and receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-κB ligand (RANKL) inhibitor (denosumab), etc. Among them, bisphosphonates are most widely used due to their low price and high efficiency in reducing the risk of fracture. However, bisphosphonates still have their limitations, such as the gastrointestinal side-effects, osteonecrosis of the jaw, and atypical subtrochanteric fracture. Based on the current situation, research for new drugs to regulate bone resorption remains relevant. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new group of small, noncoding RNAs of 19–25 nucleotides, which negatively regulate gene expression after transcription. Recent studies discovered miRNAs play a considerable function in bone remodeling by regulating osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function. An increasing number of miRNAs have been identified to participate in osteoclast formation, differentiation, apoptosis, and resorption. miRNAs show great promise to serve as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for osteoporosis. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of how miRNAs regulate osteoclastogenesis and function. We will further discuss the approach to develop drugs for osteoporosis based on these miRNA networks. PMID:27005616

  14. Glucocorticoid Receptor as a Potential Target to Decrease Aromatase Expression and Inhibit Leydig Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Panza, Salvatore; Malivindi, Rocco; Chemi, Francesca; Rago, Vittoria; Giordano, Cinzia; Barone, Ines; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Gelsomino, Luca; Giordano, Francesca; Andò, Sebastiano; Catalano, Stefania

    2016-05-01

    Leydig cell tumors are the most frequent interstitial neoplasms of the testis with increased incidence in recent years. They are hormonally active and are considered one of the steroid-secreting tumors. Although usually benign, the malignant phenotype responds poorly to conventional chemotherapy or radiation, highlighting the need to identify new therapeutic targets for treatment. Here, we identified a novel glucocorticoid-mediated mechanism that controls cell growth in Leydig cell tumors. We found that a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist, dexamethasone, reduces cell proliferation in rat Leydig tumor cells by decreasing the expression and the enzymatic activity of the estrogen-producing enzyme aromatase. This inhibitory effect relies on the ability of activated glucocorticoid receptor to regulate the aromatase gene transcriptional activity through the recruitment of nuclear receptor corepressor protein and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors to a newly identified putative glucocorticoid responsive element within the aromatase promoter II. Our in vivo studies reveal a reduction of tumor growth, after dexamethasone treatment, in animal xenografts. Tumors from dexamethasone-treated mice exhibit a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and the aromatase enzyme. Our data demonstrate that activated glucocorticoid receptor, decreasing aromatase expression, induces Leydig tumor regression both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that glucocorticoid receptor might be a potential target for the therapy of Leydig cell tumors. PMID:26968343

  15. Kinases and kinase signaling pathways: potential therapeutic targets in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Jing; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2012-08-01

    Complex molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are gradually being elucidated. Accumulating genetic evidence implicates dysfunction of kinase activities and phosphorylation pathways in the pathogenesis of PD. Causative and risk gene products associated with PD include protein kinases (such as PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK) and proteins related phosphorylation signaling pathways (such as SNCA, DJ-1). PINK1, LRRK2 and several PD gene products have been associated with mitogen-activated protein (MAP) and protein kinase B (AKT) kinase signaling pathways. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and p38, signaling pathways downstream of MAP, are particularly important in PD. JNK and p38 play an integral role in neuronal death. Targeting JNK or p38 signaling may offer an effective therapy for PD. Inhibitors of the ERK signaling pathway, which plays an important role in the development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), have been shown to attenuate this condition in animal models. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence gathered over the last decade on the role of PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK and their related phosphorylation signaling pathways (JNK, ERK, p38 and PI3K/AKT) in PD. It is speculated that improvement or modulation of these signaling pathways will reveal potential therapeutic targets for attenuation of the cardinal symptoms and motor complications in patients with PD in the future. PMID:22709943

  16. Th17 Cells as Potential Probiotic Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Owaga, Eddy; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Mugendi, Beatrice; Masuku, Sakhile; Shih, Chun-Kuang; Chang, Jung-Su

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by wasting and chronic intestinal inflammation triggered by various cytokine-mediated pathways. In recent years, it was shown that T helper 17 (Th17) cells are involved in the pathogenesis of IBD, which makes them an attractive therapeutic target. Th17 cells preferentially produce interleukin (IL)-17A-F as signature cytokines. The role of the interplay between host genetics and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBD was demonstrated. Probiotics are live microorganisms that when orally ingested in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host by modulating the enteric flora or by stimulating the local immune system. Several studies indicated the effectiveness of probiotics in preventing and treating IBD (ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease). Furthermore, there is mounting evidence of probiotics selectively targeting the Th17 lineage in the prevention and management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as IBD. This review highlights critical roles of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of IBD and the rationale for using probiotics as a novel therapeutic approach for IBD through manipulation of Th17 cells. The potential molecular mechanisms by which probiotics modulate Th17 cells differentiation and production are also discussed. PMID:26340622

  17. Carbonic anhydrase IX correlates with survival and is a potential therapeutic target for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ameis, Helen M; Drenckhan, Astrid; Freytag, Morton; Izbicki, Jakob R; Supuran, Claudiu T; Reinshagen, Konrad; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Gros, Stephanie J

    2016-06-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is involved in pathological processes including tumorgenicity, metastases and poor survival in solid tumors. Twenty-two neuroblastoma samples of patients who were surgically treated at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf were evaluated immunohistochemically for expression of CAIX. Results were correlated with clinical parameters and outcome. Neuroblastoma Kelly and SH-EP-Tet-21/N cells were examined for CAIX expression and inhibited with specific inhibitors, FC5-207A and FC8-325A. 32% of neuroblastoma tumors expressed CAIX. This was significantly associated with poorer survival. Kelly and SH-EP-Tet-21/N cells showed a major increase of CAIX RNA under hypoxic conditions. Proliferation of Kelly cells was significantly decreased by CAIX inhibitors, FC5-207A and FC8-325A, while proliferation of SH-EP-Tet-21/N cells was only significantly affected by FC8-325A. CAIX is a potent biomarker that predicts survival in neuroblastoma patients. CAIX-targeted therapy in neuroblastoma cell lines is highly effective and strengthens the potential of CAIX as a clinical therapeutic target in a selected patient collective. PMID:25884234

  18. Multiplatform molecular profiling identifies potentially targetable biomarkers in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Gatalica, Zoran; Vranic, Semir; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Xiu, Joanne; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; McGill, John; Bender, Ryan P.; Discianno, Erin; Schlum, Aaron; Sanati, Souzan; Palazzo, Juan; Reddy, Sandeep; Pockaj, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare breast malignancy with sarcomatous overgrowth and with limited effective treatment options for recurrent and metastatic cases. Recent clinical trials indicated a potential for anti-angiogenic, anti-EGFR and immunotherapeutic approaches for patients with sarcomas, which led us to investigate these and other targetable pathways in malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Thirty-six malignant phyllodes tumors (including 8 metastatic tumors with two cases having matched primary and metastatic tumors) were profiled using gene sequencing, gene copy number analysis, whole genome expression, and protein expression. Whole genome expression analysis demonstrated consistent over-expression of genes involved in angiogenesis including VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2, VCAM1, PDGFRA, and PTTG1. EGFR protein overexpression was observed in 26/27 (96%) of cases with amplification of the EGFR gene in 8/24 (33%) cases. Two EGFR mutations were identified including EGFRvIII and a presumed pathogenic V774M mutation, respectively. The most common pathogenic mutations included TP53 (50%) and PIK3CA (15%). Cases with matched primary and metastatic tumors harbored identical mutations in both sites (PIK3CA/KRAS and RB1 gene mutations, respectively). Tumor expression of PD-L1 immunoregulatory protein was observed in 3/22 (14%) of cases. Overexpression of molecular biomarkers of increased angiogenesis, EGFR and immune checkpoints provides novel targeted therapy options in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast. PMID:26625196

  19. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. PMID:27018006

  20. Th17 Cells as Potential Probiotic Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Owaga, Eddy; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Mugendi, Beatrice; Masuku, Sakhile; Shih, Chun-Kuang; Chang, Jung-Su

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by wasting and chronic intestinal inflammation triggered by various cytokine-mediated pathways. In recent years, it was shown that T helper 17 (Th17) cells are involved in the pathogenesis of IBD, which makes them an attractive therapeutic target. Th17 cells preferentially produce interleukin (IL)-17A–F as signature cytokines. The role of the interplay between host genetics and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBD was demonstrated. Probiotics are live microorganisms that when orally ingested in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host by modulating the enteric flora or by stimulating the local immune system. Several studies indicated the effectiveness of probiotics in preventing and treating IBD (ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease). Furthermore, there is mounting evidence of probiotics selectively targeting the Th17 lineage in the prevention and management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as IBD. This review highlights critical roles of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of IBD and the rationale for using probiotics as a novel therapeutic approach for IBD through manipulation of Th17 cells. The potential molecular mechanisms by which probiotics modulate Th17 cells differentiation and production are also discussed. PMID:26340622

  1. Understanding the cardiovascular actions of soy isoflavones: potential novel targets for antihypertensive drug development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Doug; Song, Jin; Mark, Connie; Eyster, Kathleen

    2008-12-01

    Interest in and use of "natural" remedies has grown exponentially in recent years. Compounds that have attracted considerable attention are the isoflavones, particular those found in soy. This review will provide a critical evaluation of our current understanding of the effects, mechanisms of action, and potential clinical applications of soy isoflavones in hypertension. Current data indicate that soy isoflavones, such as genistein and daidzein and equol, relax vascular smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo via a combination of mechanisms including potentiation of endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasodilator systems and inhibition of constrictor mechanisms. These effects involve both classical genomic as well non genomic actions. Isoflavone actions are mediated in part via interactions with estrogen receptors where soy isoflavones induce unique receptor conformations and exert tissue dependent effects similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulators. Signaling pathways such as ERK1/2, PI3-Kinase/Akt and cAMP contribute to isoflavone isoflavone activation of eNOS in the vasculature as well. Isoflavones also target the kidney to increase renal blood flow and sodium excretion. Finally, soy isoflavones interact with humoral systems such as the renin angiotensin. Data from animal studies show consistently that the aggregate effect of these actions is attenuation of hypertension. In contrast, studies in humans remain controversial. Recent data also suggest that analogues of isoflavones may possess unique vascular actions. Thus significant opportunity remains for study of the effects and mechanisms of action of soy isoflavones on hypertension in both animals and humans. PMID:19202595

  2. Activated hedgehog pathway is a potential target for pharmacological intervention in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiesslich, Tobias; Mayr, Christian; Wachter, Julia; Bach, Doris; Fuereder, Julia; Wagner, Andrej; Alinger, Beate; Pichler, Martin; Di Fazio, Pietro; Ocker, Matthias; Berr, Frieder; Neureiter, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling contributes to carcinogenesis and represents a valid druggable target in human cancers, possibly also in biliary tract cancer (BTC). We analysed the expression of Hh components in BTC using eight heterogeneously differentiated cell lines, xenograft tumours and a human tissue microarray. The dose-, time- and cell line-dependent effects of two Hh inhibitors (cyclopamine and Gant-61) were analysed in vitro for survival, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and possible synergism with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. In human BTC samples, the sonic Hh ligand and the Gli1 transcription factor showed increased expression in tumours compared to normal adjacent tissue and were significantly associated with high tumour grade and positive lymph node status. In BTC cell lines, we could confirm the Hh component expression at varying extent within the employed cell lines in vitro and in vivo indicating non-canonical signalling. Both Hh inhibitors showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity above 5 µM with a stronger effect for Gant-61 inducing apoptosis whereas cyclopamine rather inhibited proliferation. Cytotoxicity was associated with low cytokeratin expression and higher mesenchymal marker expression such as vimentin. Additionally, drug combinations of Gant-61 with conventional chemotherapy (cisplatin) exerted synergistic effects. In conclusion, Hh pathway is significantly activated in human BTC tissue compared to normal adjacent tissue. The current data demonstrate for the first time an effective anticancer activity of especially Gant-61 in BTC and suggest second generation Hh pathway inhibitors as a potential novel treatment strategy in BTC. PMID:25064451

  3. Specific Targeting of Caspase-9/PP2A Interaction as Potential New Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arrouss, Issam; Nemati, Fariba; Roncal, Fernando; Wislez, Marie; Dorgham, Karim; Vallerand, David; Rabbe, Nathalie; Karboul, Narjesse; Carlotti, Françoise; Bravo, Jeronimo; Mazier, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Purpose PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase critical to physiological processes, including apoptosis. Cell penetrating peptides are molecules that can translocate into cells without causing membrane damage. Our goal was to develop cell-penetrating fusion peptides specifically designed to disrupt the caspase-9/PP2A interaction and evaluate their therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We generated a peptide containing a penetrating sequence associated to the interaction motif between human caspase-9 and PP2A (DPT-C9h), in order to target their association. Using tumour cell lines, primary human cells and primary human breast cancer (BC) xenografts, we investigated the capacity of DPT-C9h to provoke apoptosis in vitro and inhibition of tumour growth (TGI) in vivo. DPT-C9h was intraperitonealy administered at doses from 1 to 25 mg/kg/day for 5 weeks. Relative Tumour Volume (RTV) was calculated. Results We demonstrated that DPT-C9h specifically target caspase-9/PP2A interaction in vitro and in vivo and induced caspase-9-dependent apoptosis in cancer cell lines. DPT-C9h also induced significant TGI in BC xenografts models. The mouse-specific peptide DPT-C9 also induced TGI in lung (K-Ras model) and breast cancer (PyMT) models. DPT-C9h has a specific effect on transformed B cells isolated from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without any effect on primary healthy cells. Finally, neither toxicity nor immunogenic responses were observed. Conclusion Using the cell-penetrating peptides blocking caspase-9/PP2A interactions, we have demonstrated that DPT-C9h had a strong therapeutic effect in vitro and in vivo in mouse models of tumour progression. PMID:23637769

  4. Lipin-1 regulates cancer cell phenotype and is a potential target to potentiate rapamycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brohée, Laura; Demine, Stéphane; Willems, Jérome; Arnould, Thierry; Colige, Alain C.; Deroanne, Christophe F.

    2015-01-01

    Lipogenesis inhibition was reported to induce apoptosis and repress proliferation of cancer cells while barely affecting normal cells. Lipins exhibit dual function as enzymes catalyzing the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to diacylglycerol and as co-transcriptional regulators. Thus, they are able to regulate lipid homeostasis at several nodal points. Here, we show that lipin-1 is up-regulated in several cancer cell lines and overexpressed in 50 % of high grade prostate cancers. The proliferation of prostate and breast cancer cells, but not of non-tumorigenic cells, was repressed upon lipin-1 knock-down. Lipin-1 depletion also decreased cancer cell migration through RhoA activation. Lipin-1 silencing did not significantly affect global lipid synthesis but enhanced the cellular concentration of phosphatidic acid. In parallel, autophagy was induced while AKT and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation were repressed. We also observed a compensatory regulation between lipin-1 and lipin-2 and demonstrated that their co-silencing aggravates the phenotype induced by lipin-1 silencing alone. Most interestingly, lipin-1 depletion or lipins inhibition with propranolol sensitized cancer cells to rapamycin. These data indicate that lipin-1 controls main cellular processes involved in cancer progression and that its targeting, alone or in combination with other treatments, could open new avenues in anticancer therapy. PMID:25834103

  5. Potential Diagnostic, Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets of MicroRNAs in Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chia-Siu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Huang, Hsiang-Wei; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Lu, Pei-Hsuan; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Human gastric cancer (GC) is characterized by a high incidence and mortality rate, largely because it is normally not identified until a relatively advanced stage owing to a lack of early diagnostic biomarkers. Gastroscopy with biopsy is the routine method for screening, and gastrectomy is the major therapeutic strategy for GC. However, in more than 30% of GC surgical patients, cancer has progressed too far for effective medical resection. Thus, useful biomarkers for early screening or detection of GC are essential for improving patients’ survival rate. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in tumorigenesis. They contribute to gastric carcinogenesis by altering the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Because of their stability in tissues, serum/plasma and other body fluids, miRNAs have been suggested as novel tumor biomarkers with suitable clinical potential. Recently, aberrantly expressed miRNAs have been identified and tested for clinical application in the management of GC. Aberrant miRNA expression profiles determined with miRNA microarrays, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing approaches could be used to establish sample specificity and to identify tumor type. Here, we provide an up-to-date summary of tissue-based GC-associated miRNAs, describing their involvement and that of their downstream targets in tumorigenic and biological processes. We examine correlations among significant clinical parameters and prognostic indicators, and discuss recurrence monitoring and therapeutic options in GC. We also review plasma/serum-based, GC-associated, circulating miRNAs and their clinical applications, focusing especially on early diagnosis. By providing insights into the mechanisms of miRNA-related tumor progression, this review will hopefully aid in the identification of novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27322246

  6. Potential Diagnostic, Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets of MicroRNAs in Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chia-Siu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Huang, Hsiang-Wei; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Lu, Pei-Hsuan; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Human gastric cancer (GC) is characterized by a high incidence and mortality rate, largely because it is normally not identified until a relatively advanced stage owing to a lack of early diagnostic biomarkers. Gastroscopy with biopsy is the routine method for screening, and gastrectomy is the major therapeutic strategy for GC. However, in more than 30% of GC surgical patients, cancer has progressed too far for effective medical resection. Thus, useful biomarkers for early screening or detection of GC are essential for improving patients' survival rate. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in tumorigenesis. They contribute to gastric carcinogenesis by altering the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Because of their stability in tissues, serum/plasma and other body fluids, miRNAs have been suggested as novel tumor biomarkers with suitable clinical potential. Recently, aberrantly expressed miRNAs have been identified and tested for clinical application in the management of GC. Aberrant miRNA expression profiles determined with miRNA microarrays, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing approaches could be used to establish sample specificity and to identify tumor type. Here, we provide an up-to-date summary of tissue-based GC-associated miRNAs, describing their involvement and that of their downstream targets in tumorigenic and biological processes. We examine correlations among significant clinical parameters and prognostic indicators, and discuss recurrence monitoring and therapeutic options in GC. We also review plasma/serum-based, GC-associated, circulating miRNAs and their clinical applications, focusing especially on early diagnosis. By providing insights into the mechanisms of miRNA-related tumor progression, this review will hopefully aid in the identification of novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27322246

  7. ACTP: A webserver for predicting potential targets and relevant pathways of autophagy-modulating compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Liang; Cai, Haoyang; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is well known as an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. Recently, accumulating evidence has revealed a series of small-molecule compounds that may activate or inhibit autophagy for therapeutic potential on human diseases. However, targeting autophagy for drug discovery still remains in its infancy. In this study, we developed a webserver called Autophagic Compound-Target Prediction (ACTP) (http://actp.liu-lab.com/) that could predict autophagic targets and relevant pathways for a given compound. The flexible docking of submitted small-molecule compound (s) to potential autophagic targets could be performed by backend reverse docking. The webpage would return structure-based scores and relevant pathways for each predicted target. Thus, these results provide a basis for the rapid prediction of potential targets/pathways of possible autophagy-activating or autophagy-inhibiting compounds without labor-intensive experiments. Moreover, ACTP will be helpful to shed light on identifying more novel autophagy-activating or autophagy-inhibiting compounds for future therapeutic implications. PMID:26824420

  8. The Role of Steroid Receptor Coactivators in Hormone Dependent Cancers and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lonard, David M; O'Malley, Bert W

    2016-08-01

    Steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family members (SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3) interact with nuclear receptors (NRs) and many transcription factors to enhance target gene transcription. Deregulation of SRCs is widely implicated in NR mediated diseases, especially hormone dependent cancers. By integrating steroid hormone signaling and growth factor pathways, SRC proteins exert multiple modes of oncogenic regulation in cancers and represent emerging targets for cancer therapeutics. Recent work has identified SRC-targeting agents that show promise in blocking tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, and have the potential to function as powerful and broadly encompassing treatments for different cancers. PMID:27125199

  9. Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway: potential for lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Haiying; Shcherba, Marina; Pendurti, Gopichand; Liang, Yuanxin; Piperdi, Bilal; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is commonly activated in non-small-cell lung cancer. It plays important roles in promoting oncogenesis in lung cancer and mediating resistance to EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Targeted agents against the components of this pathway are currently in development and their clinical benefits remain to be defined. This review provides an overview of the pathway dysregulation and novel agents targeting the pathway in lung cancer. In addition, potential predictive biomarkers guiding patient selection for targeted PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibition is also discussed. PMID:25342981

  10. Evaluating the propagation effects of time critical targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueary, Bruce R.; Krause, Lee; Ferens, Daniel V.

    2005-05-01

    As General John P. Jumper, Air Force Chief of Staff, noted the bulk of an Air Operations Center Air Tasking Order cycle is spent gathering information from different stovepipe intelligence assets, then manually evaluating the results and planning implications. This time consuming process is an obstacle that inhibits the real-time battlespace awareness needed by commanders to dynamically task assets to address time critical targets and help the Air Force meet its goal of "striking mobile and emerging targets in single digit minutes". This paper describes how research performed for the Dynamic Intelligence Anticipation, Prioritization, and Exploitation System (DIAPES) supports this goal by leveraging advances in ontological modeling, intelligence data integration; artificial intelligence; and visualization. DIAPES applies automated analysis and visualization to an integrated ontology that specifies the relationships among intelligence and planning products and battlespace execution assets. This research seeks to enable commanders and analysts to perform 'what-if' scenarios to judge tradeoffs and determine the potential propagation effects that retasking assets to address time critical targets have throughout battlespace plans and participants.