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Sample records for efferent callosal connections

  1. Development of callosal connections in the sensorimotor cortex of the hamster.

    PubMed

    Norris, C R; Kalil, K

    1992-12-01

    To investigate the development of corpus callosal connectivity in the hamster sensorimotor cortex, we have used the sensitive axonal tracer 1,1 dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3', tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), which was injected either in vivo or in fixed brains of animals 3-6 days postnatal. First, to study changes in the overall distribution of developing callosal afferents we made large injections of DiI into the corpus callosal tract. We found that the anterogradely labeled callosal axons formed a patchy distribution in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex, which was similar to the pattern of adult connectivity described in earlier studies of the rodent corpus callosum. This result stands in contrast to previous retrograde studies of developing callosal connectivity which showed that the distribution of callosal neurons early in development is homogeneous and that the mature, patchy distribution arises later, primarily as a result of the retraction of exuberant axons. The initial patchy distribution of callosal axon growth into the sensorimotor cortex described in the present study suggests that exuberant axons destined to be eliminated do not enter the cortex. In addition, small injections of DiI into developing cortex resulted in homotopic patterns of callosal topography in which reciprocal regions of sensorimotor cortex are connected, as has been shown in the adult. Second, to study the radial growth of callosal afferents we followed the extension of individual callosal axons into the developing cortex. We found that callosal axons began to invade the contralateral cortex on about postnatal day 3, with little or no waiting period in the callosal tract. Callosal afferents then advanced steadily through the cortex, never actually invading the cortical plate but extending into layers on the first day that they could be distinguished from the cortical plate. The majority of callosal axons grew radially through the cortex and did not exhibit substantial

  2. Two rules for callosal connectivity in striate cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Olavarria, J F

    1995-10-01

    In the rat, callosal cells occupy lateral as well as medial portions of striate cortex. In the region of the border between areas 17 and 18, which contains a representation of the vertical meridian of the visual field, cells projecting through the corpus callosum are concentrated throughout the depth of the cortex. In contrast, in medial portion of striate cortex, where peripheral portions of the visual field are represented, callosal cells are preferentially found in infragranular layers. These differences in topography and laminar distribution suggest that these callosal regions, referred to as medial and lateral callosal regions in the present study, subserve different functions. We explored this possibility by analyzing the patterns of callosal linkages in these two callosal regions. We charted the location of retrogradely labeled cells within striate cortex of one hemisphere after placing restricted injections of one or more fluorescent tracers into selected sites in the contralateral striate cortex. We found the medial and lateral callosal regions have distinctly different topographic organizations. Injections into medial striate cortex of one hemisphere produced labeled cells predominantly in mirror-symmetric loci in medial portions of contralateral striate cortex. The arrangement of these connections suggests that they mediate direct interactions between cortical regions representing visual fields located symmetrically on opposite sides of the vertical meridian of the visual field. In contrast, the mapping in the lateral callosal region is reversed: injections into the 17/18a border produced labeled fields located medial to the contralateral 17/18a border, while injections slightly medial to the 17/18a border produced labeled fields located at the contralateral 17/18a border.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8550874

  3. Investigating the functional role of callosal connections with dynamic causal models

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas E.; Penny, Will D.; Marshall, John C.; Fink, Gereon R.; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the corpus callosum has been described in considerable detail. Tracing studies in animals and human post-mortem experiments are currently complemented by diffusion-weighted imaging, which enables non-invasive investigations of callosal connectivity to be conducted. In contrast to the wealth of anatomical data, little is known about the principles by which inter-hemispheric integration is mediated by callosal connections. Most importantly, we lack insights into the mechanisms that determine the functional role of callosal connections in a context-dependent fashion. These mechanisms can now be disclosed by models of effective connectivity that explain neuroimaging data from paradigms which manipulate inter-hemispheric interactions. In this article, we demonstrate that Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM), in conjunction with Bayesian model selection (BMS), is a powerful approach to disentangling the various factors that determine the functional role of callosal connections. We first review the theoretical foundations of DCM and BMS before demonstrating the application of these techniques to empirical data from a single subject. PMID:16394145

  4. Connections of the corticomedial amygdala in the golden hamster. I. Efferents of the ''vomeronasal amygdala''

    SciTech Connect

    Kevetter, G.A.; Winans, S.S.

    1981-03-20

    The medial (M) an posteromedial cortical (C3) amygdaloid nuclei and the nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (NAOT) are designated the ''vomeronasal amygdala'' because they are the only components of the amygdala to receive a direct projection from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). The efferents of M and C3 were traced after injections of /sup 3/H-proline into the amygdala in male golden hamsters. Frozen sections of the brains were processed for autoradiography. The efferents of the ''vomeronasal amygdala'' are largely to areas which are primary and secondary terminal areas along the vomeronasal pathway, although the efferents from C3 and M terminate in different layers in these areas than do the projections from the vomeronasal nerve or the AOB. Specifically, C3 projects ipsilaterally to the internal granule cell layer of the AOB, the cellular layer of NAOT, and layer Ib of M. Additional fibers from C3 terminate in a retrocommissural component of the bed nucleus of the strain terminalis (BNST) bilaterally, and in the cellular layers of the contralateral C3. The medial nucleus projects to the cellular layer of the ipsilateral NAOT, layer Ib of C3, and bilaterally to the medial component of BNST. Projections from M to non-vomeronasal areas terminate in the medial preoptic area-anterior hypothalamic junction, ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventral premammillary nucleus and possibly in the ventral subiculum. These results demonstrate reciprocal connections between primary and secondary vomeronasal areas between the secondary areas themselves. They suggest that M, but not C3, projects to areas outside this vomeronasal network. The medial amygdaloid nucleus is therefore an important link between the vomeronasal organ and areas of the brain not receiving direct vomeronasal input.

  5. Evolutionary Plasticity of Habenular Asymmetry with a Conserved Efferent Connectivity Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Néstor; Meynard, Margarita M.; Palma, Karina; Concha, Miguel L.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate habenulae (Hb) is an evolutionary conserved dorsal diencephalic nuclear complex that relays information from limbic and striatal forebrain regions to the ventral midbrain. One key feature of this bilateral nucleus is the presence of left-right differences in size, cytoarchitecture, connectivity, neurochemistry and/or gene expression. In teleosts, habenular asymmetry has been associated with preferential innervation of left-right habenular efferents into dorso-ventral domains of the midbrain interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). However, the degree of conservation of this trait and its relation to the structural asymmetries of the Hb are currently unknown. To address these questions, we performed the first systematic comparative analysis of structural and connectional asymmetries of the Hb in teleosts. We found striking inter-species variability in the overall shape and cytoarchitecture of the Hb, and in the frequency, strength and to a lesser degree, laterality of habenular volume at the population level. Directional asymmetry of the Hb was either to the left in D. rerio, E. bicolor, O. latipes, P. reticulata, B. splendens, or to the right in F. gardneri females. In contrast, asymmetry was absent in P. scalare and F. gardneri males at the population level, although in these species the Hb displayed volumetric asymmetries at the individual level. Inter-species variability was more pronounced across orders than within a single order, and coexisted with an overall conserved laterotopic representation of left-right habenular efferents into dorso-ventral domains of the IPN. These results suggest that the circuit design involving the Hb of teleosts promotes structural flexibility depending on developmental, cognitive and/or behavioural pressures, without affecting the main midbrain connectivity output, thus unveiling a key conserved role of this connectivity trait in the function of the circuit. We propose that ontogenic plasticity in habenular morphogenesis

  6. Axonal Kainate Receptors Modulate the Strength of Efferent Connectivity by Regulating Presynaptic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sakha, Prasanna; Vesikansa, Aino; Orav, Ester; Heikkinen, Joonas; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Shintyapina, Alexandra; Franssila, Sami; Jokinen, Ville; Huttunen, Henri J.; Lauri, Sari E.

    2016-01-01

    Kainate type of glutamate receptors (KARs) are highly expressed during early brain development and may influence refinement of the circuitry, via modulating synaptic transmission and plasticity. KARs are also localized to axons, however, their exact roles in regulating presynaptic processes remain controversial. Here, we have used a microfluidic chamber system allowing specific manipulation of KARs in presynaptic neurons to study their functions in synaptic development and function in vitro. Silencing expression of endogenous KARs resulted in lower density of synaptophysin immunopositive puncta in microfluidically isolated axons. Various recombinant KAR subunits and pharmacological compounds were used to dissect the mechanisms behind this effect. The calcium permeable (Q) variants of the low-affinity (GluK1–3) subunits robustly increased synaptophysin puncta in axons in a manner that was dependent on receptor activity and PKA and PKC dependent signaling. Further, an associated increase in the mean active zone length was observed in electron micrographs. Selective presynaptic expression of these subunits resulted in higher success rate of evoked EPSCs consistent with higher probability of glutamate release. In contrast, the calcium-impermeable (R) variant of GluK1 or the high-affinity subunits (GluK4,5) had no effect on synaptic density or transmission efficacy. These data suggest that calcium permeable axonal KARs promote efferent connectivity by increasing the density of functional presynaptic release sites. PMID:26834558

  7. Subcortical connections of the perirhinal, postrhinal, and entorhinal cortices of the rat. II. efferents.

    PubMed

    Agster, Kara L; Tomás Pereira, Inês; Saddoris, Michael P; Burwell, Rebecca D

    2016-09-01

    This is the second of two studies detailing the subcortical connections of the perirhinal (PER), the postrhinal (POR) and entorhinal (EC) cortices of the rat. In the present study, we analyzed the subcortical efferents of the rat PER areas 35 and 36, POR, and the lateral and medial entorhinal areas (LEA and MEA). Anterograde tracers were injected into these five regions, and the resulting density of fiber labeling was quantified in an extensive set of subcortical structures. Density and topography of fiber labeling were quantitatively assessed in 36 subcortical areas, including olfactory structures, claustrum, amygdala nuclei, septal nuclei, basal ganglia, thalamic nuclei, and hypothalamic structures. In addition to reporting the density of labeled fibers, we incorporated a new method for quantifying the size of anterograde projections that takes into account the volume of the target subcortical structure as well as the density of fiber labeling. The PER, POR, and EC displayed unique patterns of projections to subcortical areas. Interestingly, all regions examined provided strong input to the basal ganglia, although the projections arising in the PER and LEA were stronger and more widespread. PER areas 35 and 36 exhibited similar pattern of projections with some differences. PER area 36 projects more heavily to the lateral amygdala and much more heavily to thalamic nuclei including the lateral posterior nucleus, the posterior complex, and the nucleus reuniens. Area 35 projects more heavily to olfactory structures. The LEA provides the strongest and most widespread projections to subcortical structures including all those targeted by the PER as well as the medial and posterior septal nuclei. POR shows fewer subcortical projections overall, but contributes substantial input to the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus. The MEA projections are even weaker. Our results suggest that the PER and LEA have greater influence over olfactory, amygdala, and septal nuclei

  8. Connections of the corticomedial amygdala in the golden hamster. II. Efferents of the ''olfactory amygdala''

    SciTech Connect

    Kevetter, G.A.; Winans, S.S.

    1981-03-20

    The anterior cortical (C1) and posterolateral cortical (C2) nuclei of the amygdala are designated the ''olfactory amygdala'' because they each receive direct projections from the main olfactory bulb. The efferents of these nuclei were traced after stereotaxic placement of 1-5 muCi tritiated proline in the corticomedial amygdala of the male golden hamsters. Following survival times of 12, 24, or 48 hours, 20 micron frozen sections of the brains were processed for light microscopic autoradiography. Efferents from C2 terminate in layers II and III of the olfactory tubercle and in layer Ib of pars ventralis and pars medialis of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Fibers from this nucleus also project to layers I and II of the infralimbic cortex and to the molecular layer of the agranular insular cortex. More posteriorly, fibers from C2 terminate in layer I of the dorsolateral entorhinal cortex, and in the endopiriform nucleus. From C1, efferent fibers travel in the stria terminalis and terminate in the precommissural bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and in the mediobasal hypothalamus. Efferents from C1 also innervate the molecular layer of C2, the amygdalo-hippocampal area, and the adjacent piriform cortex. Neurons in both C1 and C2 project to the molecular layer of the medial amygdaloid nucleus and the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala, the plexiform layer of the ventral subiculum, and the molecular layer of the lateral entorhinal cortex.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Connectivity Analyses Reveal Efference-Copy to Primary Somatosensory Area, BA2

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fang; Arnstein, Dan; Thomas, Rajat Mani; Maurits, Natasha M.; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Some theories of motor control suggest efference-copies of motor commands reach somatosensory cortices. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test these models. We varied the amount of efference-copy signal by making participants squeeze a soft material either actively or passively. We found electromyographical recordings, an efference-copy proxy, to predict activity in primary somatosensory regions, in particular Brodmann Area (BA) 2. Partial correlation analyses confirmed that brain activity in cortical structures associated with motor control (premotor and supplementary motor cortices, the parietal area PF and the cerebellum) predicts brain activity in BA2 without being entirely mediated by activity in early somatosensory (BA3b) cortex. Our study therefore provides valuable empirical evidence for efference-copy models of motor control, and shows that signals in BA2 can indeed reflect an input from motor cortices and suggests that we should interpret activations in BA2 as evidence for somatosensory-motor rather than somatosensory coding alone. PMID:24416222

  10. A new callose function

    PubMed Central

    Apostolakos, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    Callose in polypodiaceous ferns performs multiple roles during stomatal development and function. This highly dynamic (1→3)-β-D-glucan, in cooperation with the cytoskeleton, is involved in: (a) stomatal pore formation, (b) deposition of local GC wall thickenings and (c) the mechanism of stomatal pore opening and closure. This behavior of callose, among others, probably relies on the particular mechanical properties as well as on the ability to form and degrade rapidly, to create a scaffold or to serve as a matrix for deposition of other cell wall materials and to produce fibrillar deposits in the periclinal GC walls, radially arranged around the stomatal pore. The local callose deposition in closing stomata is an immediate response of the external periclinal GC walls experiencing strong mechanical forces induced by the neighboring cells. The radial callose fibrils transiently co-exist with radial cellulose microfibrils and, like the latter, seem to be oriented via cortical MTs. PMID:21045558

  11. An Arabidopsis callose synthase.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2002-08-01

    Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially complements a yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase mutant. AtGsl5 is developmentally expressed at highest levels in flowers, consistent with flowers having high beta-1,3-glucan synthase activities for deposition of callose in pollen. A role for AtGsl5 in callose synthesis is also indicated by AtGsl5 expression in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant. PMID:12081364

  12. Callosal Connections of Primary Visual Cortex Predict the Spatial Spreading of Binocular Rivalry Across the Visual Hemifields

    PubMed Central

    Genç, Erhan; Bergmann, Johanna; Tong, Frank; Blake, Randolph; Singer, Wolf; Kohler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    In binocular rivalry, presentation of different images to the separate eyes leads to conscious perception alternating between the two possible interpretations every few seconds. During perceptual transitions, a stimulus emerging into dominance can spread in a wave-like manner across the visual field. These traveling waves of rivalry dominance have been successfully related to the cortical magnification properties and functional activity of early visual areas, including the primary visual cortex (V1). Curiously however, these traveling waves undergo a delay when passing from one hemifield to another. In the current study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate whether the strength of interhemispheric connections between the left and right visual cortex might be related to the delay of traveling waves across hemifields. We measured the delay in traveling wave times (ΔTWT) in 19 participants and repeated this test 6 weeks later to evaluate the reliability of our behavioral measures. We found large interindividual variability but also good test–retest reliability for individual measures of ΔTWT. Using DTI in connection with fiber tractography, we identified parts of the corpus callosum connecting functionally defined visual areas V1–V3. We found that individual differences in ΔTWT was reliably predicted by the diffusion properties of transcallosal fibers connecting left and right V1, but observed no such effect for neighboring transcallosal visual fibers connecting V2 and V3. Our results demonstrate that the anatomical characteristics of topographically specific transcallosal connections predict the individual delay of interhemispheric traveling waves, providing further evidence that V1 is an important site for neural processes underlying binocular rivalry. PMID:22162968

  13. Evolutionarily conserved organization of the dopaminergic system in lamprey: SNc/VTA afferent and efferent connectivity and D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Stephenson-Jones, Marcus; Suryanarayana, Shreyas M; Robertson, Brita; Grillner, Sten

    2014-12-01

    The dopaminergic system influences motor behavior, signals reward and novelty, and is an essential component of the basal ganglia in all vertebrates including the lamprey, one of the phylogenetically oldest vertebrates. The intrinsic organization and function of the lamprey basal ganglia is highly conserved. For instance, the direct and indirect pathways are modulated through dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in lamprey and in mammals. The nucleus of the tuberculum posterior, a homologue of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc)/ventral tegmental area (VTA) is present in lamprey, but only scarce data exist about its connectivity. Likewise, the D2 receptor is expressed in the striatum, but little is known about its localization in other brain areas. We used in situ hybridization and tracer injections, both in combination with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, to characterize the SNc/VTA efferent and afferent connectivity, and to relate its projection pattern with D2 receptor expression in particular. We show that most features of the dopaminergic system are highly conserved. As in mammals, the direct pallial (cortex in mammals) input and the basal ganglia connectivity with the SNc/VTA are present as part of the evaluation system, as well as input from the tectum as the evolutionary basis for salience/novelty detection. Moreover, the SNc/VTA receives sensory information from the olfactory bulbs, optic tectum, octavolateral area, and dorsal column nucleus, and it innervates, apart from the nigrostriatal pathway, several motor-related areas. This suggests that the dopaminergic system also contributes to the control of different motor centers at the brainstem level. PMID:24942187

  14. Electrophysiological Correlates of Morphological Neuroplasticity in Human Callosal Dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lazarev, Vladimir V.; de Carvalho Monteiro, Myriam; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; deAzevedo, Leonardo C.; Lent, Roberto; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    In search for the functional counterpart of the alternative Probst and sigmoid bundles, considered as morphological evidence of neuroplasticity in callosal dysgenesis, electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence analysis was combined with high resolution and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. Data of two patients with callosal agenesis, plus two with typical partial dysgenesis with a remnant genu, and one atypical patient with a substantially reduced genu were compared to those of fifteen neurotypic controls. The interhemispheric EEG coherence between homologous nontemporal brain regions corresponded to absence or partial presence of callosal connections. A generalized coherence reduction was observed in complete acallosal patients, as well as coherence preservation in the anterior areas of the two patients with a remnant genu. jThe sigmoid bundles found in three patients with partial dysgenesis correlated with augmented EEG coherence between anterior regions of one hemisphere and posterior regions of the other. These heterologous (crossed) interhemispheric connections were asymmetric in both imaging and EEG patterns, with predominance of the right-anterior-to-left-posterior connections over the mirror ones. The Probst bundles correlated with higher intrahemispheric long-distance coherence in all patients. The significant correlations observed for the delta, theta and alpha bands indicate that these alternative pathways are functional, although the neuropsychological nature of this function is still unknown. PMID:27055255

  15. Multimodal efferent and recurrent neurons in the medial lobes of cockroach mushroom bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Strausfeld, N J

    1999-07-12

    Previous electrophysiological studies of cockroach mushroom bodies demonstrated the sensitivity of efferent neurons to multimodal stimuli. The present account describes the morphology and physiology of several types of efferent neurons with dendrites in the medial lobes. In general, efferent neurons respond to a variety of modalities in a context-specific manner, responding to specific combinations or specific sequences of multimodal stimuli. Efferent neurons that show endogenous activity have dendritic specializations that extend to laminae of Kenyon cell axons equipped with many synaptic vesicles, termed "dark" laminae. Efferent neurons that are active only during stimulation have dendritic specializations that branch mainly among Kenyon cell axons having few vesicles and forming the "pale" laminae. A new category of "recurrent" efferent neuron has been identified that provides feedback or feedforward connections between different parts of the mushroom body. Some of these neurons are immunopositive to antibodies raised against the inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid. Feedback pathways to the calyces arise from satellite neuropils adjacent to the medial lobes, which receive axon collaterals of efferent neurons. Efferent neurons are uniquely identifiable. Each morphological type occurs at the same location in the mushroom bodies of different individuals. Medial lobe efferent neurons terminate in the lateral protocerebrum among the endings of antennal lobe projection neurons. It is suggested that information about the sensory context of olfactory (or other) stimuli is relayed by efferent neurons to the lateral protocerebrum where it is integrated with information about odors relayed by antennal lobe projection neurons. PMID:10376745

  16. Efferent feedback slows cochlear aging.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M Charles; Liberman, Leslie D; Maison, Stéphane F

    2014-03-26

    The inner ear receives two types of efferent feedback from the brainstem: one pathway provides gain control on outer hair cells' contribution to cochlear amplification, and the other modulates the excitability of the cochlear nerve. Although efferent feedback can protect hair cells from acoustic injury and thereby minimize noise-induced permanent threshold shifts, most prior studies focused on high-intensity exposures (>100 dB SPL). Here, we show that efferents are essential for long-term maintenance of cochlear function in mice aged 1 year post-de-efferentation without purposeful acoustic overexposure. Cochlear de-efferentation was achieved by surgical lesion of efferent pathways in the brainstem and was assessed by quantitative analysis of immunostained efferent terminals in outer and inner hair cell areas. The resultant loss of efferent feedback accelerated the age-related amplitude reduction in cochlear neural responses, as seen in auditory brainstem responses, and increased the loss of synapses between hair cells and the terminals of cochlear nerve fibers, as seen in confocal analysis of the organ of Corti immunostained for presynaptic and postsynaptic markers. This type of neuropathy, also seen after moderate noise exposure, has been termed "hidden hearing loss", because it does not affect thresholds, but can be seen in the suprathreshold amplitudes of cochlear neural responses, and likely causes problems with hearing in a noisy environment, a classic symptom of age-related hearing loss in humans. Since efferent reflex strength varies among individuals and can be measured noninvasively, a weak reflex may be an important risk factor, and prognostic indicator, for age-related hearing impairment. PMID:24672005

  17. Tau Pathology Spread in PS19 Tau Transgenic Mice Following Locus Coeruleus (LC) Injections of Synthetic Tau Fibrils is Determined by the LC’s Afferent and Efferent Connections

    PubMed Central

    Iba, Michiyo; McBride, Jennifer D.; Guo, Jing L.; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative tauopathies. An increasing number of studies implicate the cell-to-cell propagation of tau pathology in the progression of tauopathies. We recently showed [25] that inoculation of preformed synthetic tau fibrils (tau PFFs) into the hippocampus of young transgenic (Tg) mice (PS19) overexpressing human P301S mutant tau induced robust tau pathology in anatomically connected brain regions including the locus coeruleus (LC). Since Braak and colleagues hypothesized that the LC is the first brain structure to develop tau lesions and since LC has widespread connections throughout the CNS, LC neurons could be the critical initiators of the stereotypical spreading of tau pathology through connectome-dependent transmission of pathological tau in AD. Here, we report that injections of tau PFFs into the LC of PS19 mice induced propagation of tau pathology to major afferents and efferents of the LC. Notably, tau pathology propagated along LC efferent projections was localized not only to axon terminals but also to neuronal perikarya, suggesting transneuronal transfer of templated tau pathology to neurons receiving LC projections. Further, brainstem neurons giving rise to major LC afferents also developed perikaryal tau pathology. Surprisingly, while tangle bearing neurons degenerated in the LC ipsilateral to the injection site starting 6 months post-injection, no neuron loss was seen in the contralateral LC wherein tangle bearing neurons gradually cleared tau pathology by 6–12 months post-injection. However, the spreading pattern of tau pathology observed in our LC-injected mice is different from that in AD brains since hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, which are affected in early stages of AD, were largely spared of tau inclusions in our model. Thus, while our study tested critical aspects of the Braak hypothesis of tau pathology spread, this novel mouse model provides unique

  18. Callose synthesis during reproductive development in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Han, Xiao; Lu, Tie-gang

    2016-01-01

    Callose, a linear β-1,3-glucan molecule, plays important roles in a variety of processes in angiosperms, including development and the response to biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the importance of callose deposition, our understanding of the roles of callose in rice reproductive development and the regulation of callose biosynthesis is limited. GLUCAN SYNTHASE-LIKE genes encode callose synthases (GSLs), which function in the production of callose at diverse sites in plants. Studies have shown that callose participated in plant reproductive development, and that the timely deposition and degradation of callose were essential for normal male gametophyte development. In this mini-review, we described conserved sequences found in GSL family proteins from monocotyledonous (Oryza sativa and Zea mays) and dicotyledonous (Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max) plants. We also describe the latest findings on callose biosynthesis and deposition during reproductive development and discuss future challenges in unraveling the mechanism of callose synthesis and deposition in higher plants. PMID:26451709

  19. Callose synthesis during reproductive development in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Han, Xiao; Lu, Tie-Gang

    2016-02-01

    Callose, a linear β-1,3-glucan molecule, plays important roles in a variety of processes in angiosperms, including development and the response to biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the importance of callose deposition, our understanding of the roles of callose in rice reproductive development and the regulation of callose biosynthesis is limited. GLUCAN SYNTHASE-LIKE genes encode callose synthases (GSLs), which function in the production of callose at diverse sites in plants. Studies have shown that callose participated in plant reproductive development, and that the timely deposition and degradation of callose were essential for normal male gametophyte development. In this mini-review, we described conserved sequences found in GSL family proteins from monocotyledonous (Oryza sativa and Zea mays) and dicotyledonous (Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max) plants. We also describe the latest findings on callose biosynthesis and deposition during reproductive development and discuss future challenges in unraveling the mechanism of callose synthesis and deposition in higher plants. PMID:26451709

  20. Expression of Arabidopsis callose synthase 5 results in callose accumulation and cell wall permeability alteration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Deng, Yunfei; Kanaoka, Masahiro M; Okada, Kiyotaka; Hong, Zonglie

    2012-02-01

    Callose is the major polysaccharide present in the callose wall of developing microspores and the growing pollen tube wall. It is also an essential component of other specialized cell walls and its synthesis can be induced by pathogen infection, wounding and environmental cues. Among the 12 callose synthase genes (CalS) present in the Arabidopsis genome, CalS5 plays the predominant role in the synthesis of the callose wall, callose plugs and pollen tube wall. When expressed as a GFP-tagged protein in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells, CalS5 was found to be present in the plasma membrane and the Golgi-related endomembranes. Unlike the cell plate-specific CalS1 isozyme, CalS5 was not concentrated to the cell plate at cytokinesis. Expression of CalS5 resulted in callose accumulation only in the cell wall of BY-2 cells. The fact that no callose was found in the endomembranes suggests that CalS5 is not functional in that compartment. These cells exhibited a decreased plasmolysis rate in hypotonic solutions and an increased cytolysis rate in hypertonic conditions. This study demonstrates that an artificial callose wall could be synthesized by expressing a callose synthase enzyme. PMID:22195570

  1. Are there efferent synapses in fish taste buds?

    PubMed

    Reutter, Klaus; Witt, Martin

    2004-12-01

    In fish, nerve fibers of taste buds are organized within the bud's nerve fiber plexus. It is located between the sensory epithelium consisting of light and dark elongated cells and the basal cells. It comprises the basal parts and processes of light and dark cells that intermingle with nerve fibers, which are the dendritic endings of the taste sensory neurons belonging to the cranial nerves VII, IX or X. Most of the synapses at the plexus are afferent; they have synaptic vesicles on the light (or dark) cells side, which is presynaptic. In contrast, the presumed efferent synapses may be rich in synaptic vesicles on the nerve fibers (presynaptic) side, whereas the cells (postsynaptic) side may contain a subsynaptic cistern; a flat compartment of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. This structure is regarded as a prerequisite of a typical efferent synapse, as occurring in cochlear and vestibular hair cells. In fish taste buds, efferent synapses are rare and were found only in a few species that belong to different taxa. The significance of efferent synapses in fish taste buds is not well understood, because efferent connections between the gustatory nuclei of the medulla with taste buds are not yet proved. PMID:16217620

  2. Efferent and afferent connections of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus determined by neural tracer analysis: implications for lordosis regulation in female rats.

    PubMed

    Shimogawa, Yuji; Sakuma, Yasuo; Yamanouchi, Korehito

    2015-02-01

    Neural connections of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) to and from forebrain and midbrain structures, which are involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, were investigated. A retrograde (fluoro-gold [FG]) or an anterograde neural tracer (phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin [PHA-L]) was injected into the left side of the VMN in ovariectomized rats. Six days after injection with FG or 11 days after injection with PHA-L, brains were fixed and sectioned. After immunohistochemistry, digital images of FG-labeled neural cell bodies (FG-cells) or PHA-L-labeled fibers (PHA-L-fibers) were analyzed. Injection sites of FG and PHA-L were mainly in the ventrolateral VMN. Considerable numbers of FG-cells and PHA-L-fibers were present in the left side of the medial amygdala, ventral lateral septum, preoptic area, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, arcuate nucleus, periventricular nucleus of thalamus, and midbrain central gray. The lateral dorsal raphe nuclei contained many PHA-L-fibers but few FG-cells. By contrast, both sides of the median raphe nucleus contained many FG-cells but few PHA-L-fibers. Reciprocal direct neural connection between the right and left side of the VMN were observed. The present results provide an anatomical basis for functional relationships between the VMN and these nuclei. PMID:25448544

  3. Commentary on: Efferent connections of the parabrachial nucleus in the rat. C.B. Saper and A.D. Loewy, Brain Research 197:291-317, 1980.

    PubMed

    Saper, Clifford B; Loewy, Arthur D

    2016-08-15

    By the late 1970׳s, the pathways had been identified from neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract that control visceral sensory inflow and from the paraventricular nucleus and lateral hypothalamus that directly innervate the autonomic preganglionic neurons, thereby controlling autonomic outflow. However, the connections between the two were not yet clear. This paper identified the parabrachial nucleus as a key intermediary, receiving the bulk of outflow from the nucleus of the solitary tract and distributing it to a set of brainstem and forebrain sites that constituted a central autonomic control network. This work also identified the insular cortex as a key visceral sensory cortical area. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26790347

  4. Callosal Disconnection Syndrome Associated with Relapsing Polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toru; Kanno, Shigenori; Shijo, Tomomi; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Osamu; Kamimura, Naoto; Ishii, Tomonori; Mori, Etsuro

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the cartilagenous structures, and it sometimes involves the central nervous system. Encephalitis associated with RP causes a wide variety of symptoms according to the affected sites. We herein report the first case of 72-year-old right-handed man who developed acute meningoencephalitis associated with RP involving the corpus callous. After immunosuppressive therapy, his symptoms dramatically improved, but difficulty in performing bimanual movements with occasional diagonistic dyspraxia in his right hand remained. Because callosal signs are easily missed, especially in acute settings, it would be useful to know that RP can sometimes cause callosal disconnection syndrome. PMID:27150878

  5. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  6. Depletion of Inositol Polyphosphate 4-Phosphatase II Suppresses Callosal Axon Formation in the Developing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Liting; Kim, Nam-Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh; Rhee, Hae Jin

    2016-01-01

    The corpus callosum is a bundle of nerve fibers that connects the two cerebral hemispheres and is essential for coordinated transmission of information between them. Disruption of early stages of callosal development can cause agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC), including both complete and partial callosal absence, causing mild to severe cognitive impairment. Despite extensive studies, the etiology of AgCC remains to be clarified due to the complicated mechanism involved in generating AgCC. The biological function of PI3K signaling including phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is well established in diverse biochemical processes including axon and dendrite morphogenesis, but the function of the closely related phosphatidylinositol-3,4,-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2) signaling, particularly in the nervous system, is largely unknown. Here, we provide the first report on the role of inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase II (INPP4B), a PI(3,4)P2 metabolizing 4-phosphatase in the regulation of callosal axon formation. Depleting INPP4B by in utero electroporation suppressed medially directed callosal axon formation. Moreover, depletion of INPP4B significantly attenuated formation of Satb2-positive pyramidal neurons and axon polarization in cortical neurons during cortical development. Taken together, these data suggest that INPP4B plays a role in the regulating callosal axon formation by controlling axon polarization and the Satb2-positive pyramidal neuron population. Dysregulation of INPP4B during cortical development may be implicated in the generation of partial AgCC. PMID:27109423

  7. Contractile properties of afferent and efferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Abe, K

    1997-07-01

    1. The balance of vascular tone of the afferent and efferent arteriole is a crucial determinant of glomerular haemodynamics. Despite their intimate anatomical relationship in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, the mechanisms that regulate afferent and efferent arteriolar tone are different. 2. In the afferent arteriole, two intrinsic mechanisms, the myogenic response and macula densa-mediated tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) play a dominant role, maintaining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at a constant level over a wide range of renal perfusion pressure. Studies have shown that these two mechanisms are modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In addition, an interaction between TGF and angiotensin II (AngII) seems to be essential to maintaining GFR despite large variations in daily intake of salt and water. 3. In the efferent arteriole, neither myogenic response nor TGF seems to be important, while AngII is one major factor involved in the control of vascular resistance. In addition, recent studies have provided evidence that NO and prostaglandins produced by the glomerulus may control resistance of the downstream efferent arteriole. 4. As the early segment of the efferent arteriole resides within the glomerulus, various autacoid hormones produced by the glomerulus may reach and directly act on this segment, thereby controlling the glomerular capillary pressure. Thus, it would be important to understand the differences in the mechanisms operating at the afferent and efferent arteriole, as well as their alterations in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9248673

  8. Auditory Efferent System Modulates Mosquito Hearing.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Marta; Seifert, Marvin; Spalthoff, Christian; Warren, Ben; Weiss, Lukas; Giraldo, Diego; Winkler, Margret; Pauls, Stephanie; Göpfert, Martin C

    2016-08-01

    The performance of vertebrate ears is controlled by auditory efferents that originate in the brain and innervate the ear, synapsing onto hair cell somata and auditory afferent fibers [1-3]. Efferent activity can provide protection from noise and facilitate the detection and discrimination of sound by modulating mechanical amplification by hair cells and transmitter release as well as auditory afferent action potential firing [1-3]. Insect auditory organs are thought to lack efferent control [4-7], but when we inspected mosquito ears, we obtained evidence for its existence. Antibodies against synaptic proteins recognized rows of bouton-like puncta running along the dendrites and axons of mosquito auditory sensory neurons. Electron microscopy identified synaptic and non-synaptic sites of vesicle release, and some of the innervating fibers co-labeled with somata in the CNS. Octopamine, GABA, and serotonin were identified as efferent neurotransmitters or neuromodulators that affect auditory frequency tuning, mechanical amplification, and sound-evoked potentials. Mosquito brains thus modulate mosquito ears, extending the use of auditory efferent systems from vertebrates to invertebrates and adding new levels of complexity to mosquito sound detection and communication. PMID:27476597

  9. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  10. Monitoring the excitability of neocortical efferent neurons to direct activation by extracellular current pulses.

    PubMed

    Swadlow, H A

    1992-08-01

    1. Extracellular action potentials were recorded from antidromically activated efferent neurons in visual, somatosensory, and motor cortex of the awake rabbit using low-impedance metal microelectrodes. Efferent neurons were also activated by current pulses delivered near the soma [juxtasomal current pulses (JSCPs)] through the recording microelectrode. Action potentials generated by JSCPs were not directly observed (because of the stimulus artifact), but were inferred with the use of a collision paradigm. Efferent populations studied include callosal neurons [CC (n = 80)], ipsilateral corticocortical neurons [C-IC (n = 21)], corticothalamic neurons of layer 6 [CF-6 (n = 57)], and descending corticofugal neurons of layer 5 [CF-5, corticotectal neurons of the visual cortex (n = 48)]. 2. Most CC neurons (45/46) and all C-IC (8/8) and CF-6 neurons (39/39) were directly activated by JSCPs at near-threshold intensities. Some CF-5 neurons (9/38), however, showed evidence of indirect activation. All efferent classes had similar current thresholds (means 1.85-2.10 microA) to direct activation by JSCPs, and thresholds were inversely related to extracellular spike amplitude. For each neuron, the range of JSCP intensities that generated response probabilities of between 0.2 and 0.8 was measured, and this "range of uncertainty" was significantly greater in CF-5 neurons (mean 32.7% of threshold) than in CC (mean 19.0%) or CF-6 (mean 20.4%) neurons. 3. Several factors indicate that the threshold of efferent neurons to JSCPs is very sensitive to excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Iontophoretic applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) increased the threshold to JSCPs, and glutamate reduced the threshold. Electrical stimulation of afferent pathways at intensities just below threshold for eliciting action potentials resulted in a dramatic decrease in JSCP threshold. This initial short-latency threshold decrease was specific to stimulation of particular afferent pathways

  11. Efferent pathways of the mouse lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Quina, Lely A.; Tempest, Lynne; Ng, Lydia; Harris, Julie; Ferguson, Susan; Jhou, Thomas; Turner, Eric E.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is part of the habenula complex of the dorsal thalamus. Recent studies of the LHb have focused on its projections to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg), which contain GABAergic neurons that mediate reward prediction error via inhibition of dopaminergic activity. However, older studies in the rat have also identified LHb outputs to the lateral and posterior hypothalamus, median raphe, dorsal raphe, and dorsal tegmentum. Although these studies have shown that the medial and lateral divisions of the LHb have somewhat distinct projections, the topographic specificity of LHb efferents is not completely understood, and the relative extent of these projections to brainstem targets is unknown. Here we have used anterograde tracing with adeno-associated virus mediated expression of green fluorescent protein, combined with serial two-photon tomography, to map the efferents of the LHb on a standard coordinate system for the entire mouse brain, and reconstruct the efferent pathways of the LHb in three dimensions. Using automated quantitation of fiber density, we show that in addition to the RMTg, the median raphe, caudal dorsal raphe, and pontine central gray are major recipients of LHb efferents. Using retrograde tract tracing with cholera toxin subunit B, we show that LHb neurons projecting to the hypothalamus, VTA, median raphe, and caudal dorsal raphe, and pontine central gray reside in characteristic, but sometimes overlapping regions of the LHb. Together these results provide the anatomical basis for systematic studies of LHb function in neural circuits and behavior in mice. PMID:25099741

  12. Efferent pathways of the mouse lateral habenula.

    PubMed

    Quina, Lely A; Tempest, Lynne; Ng, Lydia; Harris, Julie A; Ferguson, Susan; Jhou, Thomas C; Turner, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is part of the habenula complex of the dorsal thalamus. Recent studies of the LHb have focused on its projections to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg), which contain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons that mediate reward prediction error via inhibition of dopaminergic activity. However, older studies in the rat have also identified LHb outputs to the lateral and posterior hypothalamus, median raphe, dorsal raphe, and dorsal tegmentum. Although these studies have shown that the medial and lateral divisions of the LHb have somewhat distinct projections, the topographic specificity of LHb efferents is not completely understood, and the relative extent of these projections to brainstem targets is unknown. Here we have used anterograde tracing with adeno-associated virus-mediated expression of green fluorescent protein, combined with serial two-photon tomography, to map the efferents of the LHb on a standard coordinate system for the entire mouse brain, and reconstruct the efferent pathways of the LHb in three dimensions. Using automated quantitation of fiber density, we show that in addition to the RMTg, the median raphe, caudal dorsal raphe, and pontine central gray are major recipients of LHb efferents. By using retrograde tract tracing with cholera toxin subunit B, we show that LHb neurons projecting to the hypothalamus, VTA, median raphe, caudal dorsal raphe, and pontine central gray reside in characteristic, but sometimes overlapping regions of the LHb. Together these results provide the anatomical basis for systematic studies of LHb function in neural circuits and behavior in mice. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:32-60, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25099741

  13. Callose homeostasis at plasmodesmata: molecular regulators and developmental relevance

    PubMed Central

    De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata are membrane-lined channels that are located in the plant cell wall and that physically interconnect the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of adjacent cells. Operating as controllable gates, plasmodesmata regulate the symplastic trafficking of micro- and macromolecules, such as endogenous proteins [transcription factors (TFs)] and RNA-based signals (mRNA, siRNA, etc.), hence mediating direct cell-to-cell communication and long distance signaling. Besides this physiological role, plasmodesmata also form gateways through which viral genomes can pass, largely facilitating the pernicious spread of viral infections. Plasmodesmatal trafficking is either passive (e.g., diffusion) or active and responses both to developmental and environmental stimuli. In general, plasmodesmatal conductivity is regulated by the controlled build-up of callose at the plasmodesmatal neck, largely mediated by the antagonistic action of callose synthases (CalSs) and β-1,3-glucanases. Here, in this theory and hypothesis paper, we outline the importance of callose metabolism in PD SEL control, and highlight the main molecular factors involved. In addition, we also review other proteins that regulate symplastic PD transport, both in a developmental and stress-responsive framework, and discuss on their putative role in the modulation of PD callose turn-over. Finally, we hypothesize on the role of structural sterols in the regulation of (PD) callose deposition and outline putative mechanisms by which this regulation may occur. PMID:24795733

  14. Callosally projecting neurons in the macaque monkey V1/V2 border are enriched in nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Ungerleider, L. G.; Adams, M. M.; Webster, M. J.; Gattass, R.; Blumberg, D. M.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies combined with retrograde tracing in macaque monkeys have demonstrated that corticocortical projections can be differentiated by their content of neurofilament protein. The present study analyzed the distribution of nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein in callosally projecting neurons located at the V1/V2 border. All of the retrogradely labeled neurons were located in layer III at the V1/V2 border and at an immediately adjacent zone of area V2. A quantitative analysis showed that the vast majority (almost 95%) of these interhemispheric projection neurons contain neurofilament protein immunoreactivity. This observation differs from data obtained in other sets of callosal connections, including homotypical interhemispheric projections in the prefrontal, temporal, and parietal association cortices, that were found to contain uniformly low proportions of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons. Comparably, highly variable proportions of neurofilament protein-containing neurons have been reported in intrahemispheric corticocortical pathways, including feedforward and feedback visual connections. These results indicate that neurofilament protein is a prominent neurochemical feature that identifies a particular population of interhemispheric projection neurons at the V1/V2 border and suggest that this biochemical attribute may be critical for the function of this subset of callosal neurons.

  15. Efferent feedback can explain many hearing phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W. Harvey; Flax, Matthew R.

    2015-12-01

    The mixed mode cochlear amplifier (MMCA) model was presented at the last Mechanics of Hearing workshop [4]. The MMCA consists principally of a nonlinear feedback loop formed when an efferent-controlled outer hair cell (OHC) is combined with the cochlear mechanics and the rest of the relevant neurobiology. Essential elements of this model are efferent control of the OHC motility and a delay in the feedback to the OHC. The input to the MMCA is the passive travelling wave. In the MMCA amplification is localized where both the neural and tuned mechanical systems meet in the Organ of Corti (OoC). The simplest model based on this idea is a nonlinear delay line resonator (DLR), which is mathematically described by a nonlinear delay-differential equation (DDE). This model predicts possible Hopf bifurcations and exhibits its most interesting behaviour when operating near a bifurcation. This contribution presents some simulation results using the DLR model. These show that various observed hearing phenomena can be accounted for by this model, at least qualitatively, including compression effects, two-tone suppression and some forms of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs).

  16. Deposition of callose in young ovules of two Taraxacum species varying in the mode of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Musiał, Krystyna; Kościńska-Pająk, Maria; Antolec, Renata; Joachimiak, Andrzej J

    2015-01-01

    Although callose occurs during megasporogenesis in most flowering plants, the knowledge about its general function and the mechanisms by which the callose layer is formed in particular places is still not sufficient. The results of previous studies suggest a total lack of callose in the ovules of diplosporous plants in which meiosis is omitted or disturbed. This report is the first documentation of callose events in dandelions ovules. We demonstrated the pattern of callose deposition during the formation of megaspores through diplospory of Taraxacum type and during normal meiotic megasporogenesis in apomictic triploid Taraxacum atricapillum and amphimictic diploid Taraxacum linearisquameum. We found the presence of callose in the megasporocyte wall of both diplosporous and sexual dandelions. However, in a diplosporous dandelion, callose predominated at the micropylar pole of megaspore mother cell (MMC) which may be correlated with abnormal asynaptic meiosis and may indicate diplospory of the Taraxacum type. After meiotic division, callose is mainly deposited in the walls between megaspores in tetrads and in diplodyads. In subsequent stages, callose gradually disappears around the chalazal functional megaspore. However, some variations in the pattern of callose deposition within tetrad may reflect variable positioning of the functional megaspore (FM) observed in the ovules of T. linearisquameum. PMID:24938673

  17. Subthreshold receptive fields and baseline excitability of "silent" S1 callosal neurons in awake rabbits: contributions of AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Swadlow, H A; Hicks, T P

    1997-07-01

    The contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors to excitatory subthreshold receptive fields was examined in callosal efferent neurons (CC neurons) in primary somatosensory cortex of the fully awake rabbit. Only neurons showing no traditional (suprathreshold) receptive fields were examined. Subthreshold responses were examined by monitoring the thresholds of efferent neurons to juxtasomal current pulses (JSCPs) delivered through the recording microelectrode. Changes in threshold following a peripheral conditioning stimulus signify a subthreshold response. Using this method, excitatory postsynaptic potentials and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials are manifested as decreases and increases in JSCP threshold, respectively. NMDA and non-NMDA agonists and antagonists were administered iontophoretically via a multibarrel micropipette assembly attached to the recording/stimulating microelectrode. Receptor-selective doses of both AMPA/kainate and NMDA antagonists decreased the excitability of CC neurons in the absence of any peripheral stimulation. Threshold to JSCPs rose by a mean of 20% for both classes of antagonist. Despite the similar effects of NMDA and non-NMDA antagonists on baseline excitability, these antagonists had dramatically different effects on the subthreshold excitatory response to activation of the receptive field. Whereas receptor-selective doses of AMPA/kainate antagonists either eliminated or severely attenuated the subthreshold excitatory responses to peripheral stimulation, NMDA antagonists had little or no effect on the subthreshold evoked response. PMID:9262195

  18. Diffusion Weighted Callosal Integrity Reflects Interhemispheric Communication Efficiency in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warlop, Nele P.; Achten, Eric; Debruyne, Jan; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relation between damage in the corpus callosum and the performance on an interhemispheric communication task in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Relative callosal lesion load defined as the ratio between callosal area and the total lesion load in the total corpus callosum, and the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)…

  19. Bilateral redundancy gain and callosal integrity in a man with callosal lipoma: a diffusion-tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Roser, Matthew E; Corballis, Michael C; Jansari, Ashok; Fulford, Jon; Benattayallah, Abdelmalek; Adams, William M

    2012-06-01

    We investigated whether abnormalities in the structural organization of the corpus callosum in the presence of curvilinear lipoma are associated with increased facilitation of response time to bilateral stimuli, an effect known as the redundancy gain (RG). A patient (A.J.) with a curvilinear lipoma of the corpus callosum, his genetically-identical twin, and age-matched control participants made speeded responses to luminant stimuli. Structural organization of callosal regions was assessed with diffusion-tensor imaging. A.J. was found to have reduced structural integrity in the splenium of the corpus callosum and produced a large RG suggestive of neural summation. PMID:21787244

  20. Stimulation of callose synthesis in vivio correlates with changes in intracellular distribution of the callose synthase activator [beta]-Furfuryl-[beta]-Glucoside

    SciTech Connect

    Ohana, P.; Benziman, M.; Delmer, D.P. )

    1993-01-01

    [beta]-Furfuryl-[beta]-glucoside (FG) has been shown to be a specific endogenous activator of higher plant callose synthase. Because glycosides such as FG are usually sequestered in vacuoles, we have proposed that activation of callose synthesis in vivo may involve a change in the compartmentation on FG and Ca[sup 2+], resulting in a synergistic activation of callose synthase. The use of suspension-cultured barley (Hordeum bulbosum L.) cells provides evidence that FG is largely sequestered in the vacuole. Furthermore, conditions that lead to induction of callose synthesis in vivo correspondingly lead to elevation of the cytoplasmic concentration of FG. These conditions include the lowering of cytoplasmic pH or elevation of cytoplasmic Ca[sup 2+]. Oligogalacturonide elicitors have also been reported to cause similar changes in cytoplasmic pH and Ca[sup 2+] concentration, and such an elicitor also causes and elevation in cytoplasmic FG coupled with stimulation of callose synthesis. These results support the concept that a relative redistribution of FG between cytoplasm and vacuole may be one of the components of the signal transduction pathway for elicitation of callose synthase in vivo. 18 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Callosal apraxia: a 34-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Falchook, Adam D; Watson, Robert T; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-06-01

    Loss of ability of the left upper limb (LUL) to correctly produce spatial and temporal components of skilled purposeful movements was reported 34 years ago in a woman with a callosal infarction. To learn about recovery, we recently reexamined this woman. This woman was tested for ideomotor apraxia by asking her to pantomime to command and to seeing pictures of tools. Whereas she performed normally with her right upper limb, her LUL remained severely apraxic, making many spatial (postural and movement) errors. Initially, she did not reveal loss of finger-hand deftness (limb-kinetic apraxia), and when tested again with the coin rotation task, her left hand performance was normal. Without vision, she could name objects placed in her left hand but not name numbers written in this hand. Since this woman had a callosal lesion, failure to recover cannot be accounted for by left hemisphere inhibition of her right hemisphere. Although failure for her LUL to improve may have been related to not using her LUL for skilled actions, her right hemisphere was able to observe transitive actions, and this failure of her LUL to produce skilled purposeful movements suggests her right hemisphere may have not had the capacity to learn these movement representations. Without vision, her ability to recognize objects with her left hand, but not numbers written on her left palm, suggests graphesthesia may require that her left hand did not have access to movement representations important for programming these numbers when writing. PMID:26928117

  2. Callosal lesions and behavior: history and modern concepts.

    PubMed

    Devinsky, Orrin; Laff, Rachel

    2003-12-01

    Callosotomy has played a unique role in the treatment of epilepsy and in the understanding of human brain function. The pioneering work of Dejerine and Liepmann presenting the first findings of callosal lesion pathology at the turn of the 20th century was accepted but then quickly forgotten. Two schools resurrected the phoenix of callosal syndromes: Roger Sperry and Michael Gazzaniga leading in experimental neuroscience, and Norman Geschwind leading in clinical neurology. Callosotomy remains an effective technique to treat atonic, tonic, and tonic-clonic seizures, especially in patients with symptomatic generalized epilepsies such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Neurologic, cognitive, and behavioral complications limit its use given that precise characterization of these complications as well as their frequency is difficult. The high frequencies of developmental delays, severe seizures, head injuries, antiepileptic drug burden, and other factors limit the ability to attribute a specific change to surgical intervention, since surgery can change multiple factors. For example, subtle behavioral changes in executive function and personality are difficult to delineate in a population with preexisting neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Despite this, a clearer picture of the effects of callosotomy, as defined by clinical neurology and neuropsychology as well as cognitive neuroscience, is emerging. PMID:14698693

  3. Efferent Modulation of Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emission Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Dewey, James B.; Boothalingam, Sriram; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2015-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions, sounds generated in the inner ear, have become a convenient non-invasive tool to examine the efferent modulation of cochlear mechanics. Activation of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents has been shown to alter the magnitude of these emissions. When the effects of efferent activation on the detailed spectral structures of these emissions have been examined, a shift of the spectral patterns toward higher frequencies has been reported for distortion product and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) have been proposed as the preferred emission type in the study of efferent modulation due to the simplicity of their production leading to the possibility of clearer interpretation of results. The effects of efferent activation on the complex spectral patterns of SFOAEs have not been examined to the best of our knowledge. We have examined the effects of activating the MOC efferents using broadband noise in normal-hearing humans. The detailed spectral structure of SFOAEs, known as fine structure, was recorded with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation. Results indicate that SFOAEs are reduced in magnitude and their fine structure pushed to higher frequencies by contralateral acoustic stimulation. These changes are similar to those observed in distortion product or spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and behavioral hearing thresholds. Taken together with observations made about magnitude and phase changes in otoacoustic emissions and hearing thresholds upon contralateral acoustic stimulation, all changes in otoacoustic emission and hearing threshold fine structure appear to be driven by a common set of mechanisms. Specifically, frequency shifts in fine structure patterns appear to be linked to changes in SFOAE phase due to contralateral acoustic stimulation. PMID:26696843

  4. Somatosensory cortical efferent neurons of the awake rabbit: latencies to activation via supra--and subthreshold receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Swadlow, H A; Hicks, T P

    1996-04-01

    1. Latencies to peripheral sensory stimulation were examined in four classes of antidromically identified efferent neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of awake rabbits. Both suprathreshold responses (action potentials) and subthreshold responses were examined. Subthreshold responses were examined by monitoring the thresholds of efferent neurons to juxtasomal current pulses (JSCPs) delivered through the recording microelectrode (usually 1-3 microA). Through the use of this method, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) were manifested as decreases and increases in threshold, respectively. Efferent populations examined included callosal (CC) neurons, ipsilateral corticocortical (C-IC) neurons, and descending corticofugal neurons of layer 5 (CF-5) and layer 6 (CF-6). Very brief air puffs (rise and fall times 0.6 ms) were delivered to the receptor periphery via a high-speed solenoid valve. 2. Whereas all CF-5 neurons had demonstrable suprathreshold excitatory and/or inhibitory responses to peripheral stimulation, most CC, C-IC, and CF-6 neurons did not. CC and CF-6 neurons that yielded no suprathreshold response to the stimulus had lower axonal conduction velocities than those that did respond (P < 0.0001 in both cases). However, subthreshold receptive fields could be demonstrated in many of the otherwise unresponsive CC (81%), C-IC (88%), and CF-6 (43%) neurons. The subthreshold responses usually consisted of an initial excitatory component (a decrease in the threshold to the JSCP) and a subsequent long-duration (> 80 ms) inhibitory component. A few neurons (1 CC, 1 C-IC, and 5 CF-6) showed an initial short latency inhibitory response in the absence of any excitatory component. 3. Some CC and C-IC neurons yielded supra- and/or subthreshold responses to peripheral stimulation at latencies of 6.1-7 ms. All such neurons were found at intermediate cortical depths (thought to correspond to deep layer 2

  5. Callose deposition is required for somatic embryogenesis in plasmolyzed Eleutherococcus senticosus zygotic embryos.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lei; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qiuyu; You, Xiangling

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic changes in callose content, which is deposited as a plant defense response to physiological changes, were analyzed during somatic embryogenesis in Eleutherococcus senticosus zygotic embryos plasmolyzed in 1.0 M mannitol. During plasmolysis, callose deposition was clearly observed inside the plasma membrane of zygotic embryo epidermal cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The callose content of zygotic embryos gradually increased between 0 and 12 h plasmolysis and remained stable after 24 h plasmolysis. During eight weeks induction of somatic embryogenesis, the callose content of explants plasmolyzed for 12 h was slightly higher than explants plasmolyzed for 6 or 24 h, with the largest differences observed after 6 weeks culture, which coincided with the maximum callose content and highest number of globular somatic embryos. The highest frequency of somatic embryo formation was observed in explants plasmolyzed for 12 h. The somatic embryo induction rate and number of somatic embryos per explant were markedly different in zygotic embryos pretreated with plasmolysis alone (78.0%, 43 embryos per explant) and those pretreated with plasmolysis and the callose synthase inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (11.5%, 8 embryos per explant). This study indicates that callose production is required for somatic embryogenesis in plasmolyzed explants. PMID:23203053

  6. A Specific Role for Efferent Information in Self-Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakiris, M.; Haggard, P.; Franck, N.; Mainy, N.; Sirigu, A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the specific contribution of efferent information in a self-recognition task. Subjects experienced a passive extension of the right index finger, either as an effect of moving their left hand via a lever ('self-generated action'), or imposed externally by the experimenter ('externally-generated action'). The visual feedback was…

  7. Callose is integral to the development of permanent tetrads in the liverwort Sphaerocarpos.

    PubMed

    Renzaglia, Karen S; Lopez, Renee A; Johnson, Eric E

    2015-03-01

    A striking feature of the liverwort Sphaerocarpos is that pairs of male and female spores remain united in permanent tetrads. To identify the nature of this phenomenon and to test the hypothesis that callose is involved, we examined spore wall development in Sphaerocarpos miche lii, with emphasis on the appearance, location and fate of callose vis-à-vis construction of the sculptoderm. All stages of sporogenesis were examined using differential interference contrast optics, and aniline blue fluorescence to locate callose. For precise localization, specimens were immunogold labeled with anti-callose antibody and observed in the transmission electron microscope. Callose plays a role in Sphaerocarpos spore wall development not described in any other plant, including other liverworts. A massive callose matrix forms outside of the sculptured sporocyte plasmalemma that predicts spore wall ornamentation. Consequently, layers of exine form across adjacent spores uniting them. Spore wall development occurs entirely within the callose and involves the production of six layers of prolamellae that give rise to single or stacked tripartite lamellae (TPL). Between spores, an anastomosing network of exine layers forms in lieu of intersporal septum development. As sporopollenin assembles on TPL, callose progressively disappears from the inside outward leaving layers of sporopollenin impregnated exine, the sculptoderm, overlying a thick fibrillar intine. This developmental mechanism provides a direct pathway from callose deposition to sculptured exine that does not involve the intermediary primexine found in pollen wall development. The resulting tetrad, encased in a single wall, provides a simple model for development of permanent dyads and tetrads in the earliest fossil plants. PMID:25408505

  8. Corpus callosal microstructure influences intermanual transfer in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kimberley A.; Schaeffer, Jennifer A.; Hopkins, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Learning a new motor skill with one hand typically results in performance improvements in the alternate hand. The neural substrates involved with this skill acquisition are poorly understood. We combined behavioral testing and non-invasive brain imaging to study how the organization of the corpus callosum was related to intermanual transfer performance in chimpanzees. Fifty-three chimpanzees were tested for intermanual transfer of learning using a bent-wire task. Magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor images were collected from 39 of these subjects. The dominant hand showed greater performance benefits than the nondominant hand. Further, performance was associated with structural integrity of the motor and sensory regions of the CC. Subjects with better intermanual transfer of learning had lower fractional anisotropy values. The results are consistent with the callosal access model of motor programming. PMID:24427118

  9. Efferent projections of the ectostriatum in the pigeon (Columba livia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husband, S. A.; Shimizu, T.

    1999-01-01

    The ectostriatum is a major visual component of the avian telencephalon. The core region of the ectostriatum (Ec) receives visual input from the optic tectum through thalamic nuclei. In the present study, the efferent projections of the ectostriatum were investigated by using the anterograde tracers Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin and biotinylated dextran amine. Projection patterns resulting from these tracers were confirmed by the retrograde tracer cholera toxin subunit B. When anterograde tracers were injected in Ec, primary projections were seen traveling dorsolaterally to the belt region of the ectostriatum (Ep) and the neostriatal area immediately surrounding Ep (Ep2). Neurons in Ep sent projections primarily to the overlying Ep2. The efferents of Ep2 traveled dorsolaterally to terminate in three telencephalic regions, from anterior to posterior: (1) neostriatum frontale, pars lateralis (NFL), (2) area temporo-parieto-occipitalis (TPO), and (3) neostriatum intermedium, pars lateralis (NIL). A part of the archistriatum intermedium and the lateral part of the neostriatum caudale also received somewhat minor projections. In addition, some neurons in Ec were also the source of direct, but minor, projections to the NFL, TPO, NIL, and archistriatum intermedium. The topographical relationship among the primary (Ec), secondary (Ep and Ep2), and tertiary (NFL, TPO, NIL) areas indicate that the neural populations for visual processing are organized along the rostral-caudal axis. Thus, the anterior Ec sent efferents to the anterior Ep, which in turn sent projections to anterior Ep2. Neurons in the anterior Ep2 sent projections to NFL and the anterior TPO. Similarly, the intermediate and posterior Ec sent projections to corresponding parts of Ep, whose efferents projected to intermediate and posterior Ep2, respectively. The intermediate Ep2 gave rise to major projections to TPO, whereas posterior Ep2 neurons sent efferents primarily to NIL. The organization of this

  10. The roles of callose, elicitors and ethylene in thigmomorphogenesis and gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    A correlation (both temporal and through the inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose) of callose deposition and ethylene evolution in mechanically perturbed (MP) bean or pine stems or in gravitationally stimulated corn shoots was demonstrated. It was suggested that the callose, which is deposited on the inside of the cell wall, and adjacent to the plasma membrane causes, in some way, the ethylene production. A hypothesis explaining the mechanism is discussed which states that there is a chemical activation of the enzyme system by the callose which is being deposited in apposition with it. Experimental data supporting the hypothesis are presented.

  11. Analysis of YFP(J16)-R6/2 reporter mice and postmortem brains reveals early pathology and increased vulnerability of callosal axons in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Rodolfo G; Chu, Yaping; Ye, Allen Q; Price, Steven D; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Buenaventura, Andrea; Brady, Scott T; Magin, Richard L; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Morfini, Gerardo A

    2015-09-15

    Cumulative evidence indicates that the onset and severity of Huntington's disease (HD) symptoms correlate with connectivity deficits involving specific neuronal populations within cortical and basal ganglia circuits. Brain imaging studies and pathological reports further associated these deficits with alterations in cerebral white matter structure and axonal pathology. However, whether axonopathy represents an early pathogenic event or an epiphenomenon in HD remains unknown, nor is clear the identity of specific neuronal populations affected. To directly evaluate early axonal abnormalities in the context of HD in vivo, we bred transgenic YFP(J16) with R6/2 mice, a widely used HD model. Diffusion tensor imaging and fluorescence microscopy studies revealed a marked degeneration of callosal axons long before the onset of motor symptoms. Accordingly, a significant fraction of YFP-positive cortical neurons in YFP(J16) mice cortex were identified as callosal projection neurons. Callosal axon pathology progressively worsened with age and was influenced by polyglutamine tract length in mutant huntingtin (mhtt). Degenerating axons were dissociated from microscopically visible mhtt aggregates and did not result from loss of cortical neurons. Interestingly, other axonal populations were mildly or not affected, suggesting differential vulnerability to mhtt toxicity. Validating these results, increased vulnerability of callosal axons was documented in the brains of HD patients. Observations here provide a structural basis for the alterations in cerebral white matter structure widely reported in HD patients. Collectively, our data demonstrate a dying-back pattern of degeneration for cortical projection neurons affected in HD, suggesting that axons represent an early and potentially critical target for mhtt toxicity. PMID:26123489

  12. [Lymphatic afferents and efferents of lymph nodes of the Barety's space. Anatomic review in adults].

    PubMed

    Riquet, M; Debesse, B; Zouaoui, A; Hidden, G

    1990-06-01

    Lymph nodes of the Barety's space (LNLB) often involved in lung diseases are known under various names for a long time ago by pathologists. Our study involves 360 cadavers of adult subjects. The injection of a dye was performed by direct catheterization of a pulmonary segment. L.N.L.B. were directly or indirectly coloured (inter connected ganglionary network) more often from the lobes of the right lung, but from the lobes of the left lung too. From L.N.L.B. the lymphatic flow discharges in the venous confluent of the neck in the right side; in 1/4 of the cases a mediastinal efferent joints the left venous confluent too. From the lower lymph nodes of the space efferents can go to lymph nodes which are located right along the arch of the azygos vein (and then to the thoracic duct) and in the left side the group of left suprabronchial lymph nodes (then either to the thoracic duct in the mediastinum, or to the recurrent chain to the neck). At last, it seems that inside the lymph nodes themselves, lymphatic flows exist, the topography and the nature of which change according to the area interested by the injection. PMID:2289035

  13. Responses of efferent octopaminergic thoracic unpaired median neurons in the locust to visual and mechanosensory signals.

    PubMed

    Field, Laurence H; Duch, Carsten; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Insect thoracic ganglia contain efferent octopaminergic unpaired median neurons (UM neurons) located in the midline, projecting bilaterally and modulating neuromuscular transmission, muscle contraction kinetics, sensory sensitivity and muscle metabolism. In locusts, these neurons are located dorsally or ventrally (DUM- or VUM-neurons) and divided into functionally different sub-populations activated during different motor tasks. This study addresses the responsiveness of locust thoracic DUM neurons to various sensory stimuli. Two classes of sense organs, cuticular exteroreceptor mechanosensilla (tactile hairs and campaniform sensilla), and photoreceptors (compound eyes and ocelli) elicited excitatory reflex responses. Chordotonal organ joint receptors caused no responses. The tympanal organ (Müller's organ) elicited weak excitatory responses most likely via generally increased network activity due to increased arousal. Vibratory stimuli to the hind leg subgenual organ never elicited responses. Whereas DUM neurons innervating wing muscles are not very responsive to sensory stimulation, those innervating leg and other muscles are very responsive to stimulation of exteroreceptors and hardly responsive to stimulation of proprioceptors. After cutting both cervical connectives all mechanosensory excitation is lost, even for sensory inputs from the abdomen. This suggests that, in contrast to motor neurons, the sensory inputs to octopaminergic efferent neuromodulatory cells are pre-processed in the suboesophageal ganglion. PMID:18021797

  14. Chitosan-Elicited Callose Synthesis in Soybean Cells as a Ca2+-Dependent Process 1

    PubMed Central

    Köhle, Harald; Jeblick, Wolfgang; Poten, Frauke; Blaschek, Wolfgang; Kauss, Heinrich

    1985-01-01

    A new method for the rapid and quantitative fluorometric determination of callose is described. In suspension-cultured cells of Glycine max, synthesis of callose starts within 20 minutes of treatment with chitosan and parallels over hours the accumulation of 1,3-linked glucose in the wall. Poly-l-lysine also elicits callose synthesis. The effect of chitosan is enhanced by Polymyxin B at low concentrations; this antibiotic alone at higher concentrations can also induce callose synthesis. Callose synthesis is immediately stopped when external Ca2+ is bound by ethylene glycolbis-(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N′-tetraacetate or cation exchange beads, and partly recovers upon restoration of 15 micromolar Ca2+. Callose synthesis is observed only when membrane perturbation causing electrolyte leakage from the cells is induced by one of the above treatments. It does not appear to be due to de novo synthesis or proteolytic activation of 1,3-β-d-glucan synthase. It is concluded that this Ca2+-dependent enzyme is directly activated by the influx of Ca2+ occurring concomitantly with the leakage of cell constituents. This suggestion is also discussed in conjunction with the chitosan-induced synthesis of phytoalexin in the same cells. Images Fig. 5 PMID:16664095

  15. SNAREs controlling vesicular release of BDNF and development of callosal axons

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Masafumi; Courchet, Julien; Pieraut, Simon; Torabi-Rander, Nina; Sando, Richard; Polleux, Franck; Maximov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY At presynaptic active zones, exocytosis of neurotransmitter vesicles (SVs) is driven by SNARE complexes that recruit Syb2 and SNAP25. However, it remains unknown which SNAREs promote the secretion of neuronal proteins, including those essential for circuit development and experience-dependent plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that Syb2 and SNAP25 mediate the vesicular release of BDNF in axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, suggesting these SNAREs act in multiple spatially-segregated secretory pathways. Remarkably, axonal secretion of BDNF is also strongly regulated by SNAP47 which interacts with SNAP25 but appears to be dispensable for exocytosis of SVs. Cell-autonomous ablation of SNAP47 disrupts the layer-specific branching of callosal axons of projection cortical neurons in vivo, and this phenotype is recapitulated by ablation of BDNF or its receptor, TrkB. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of protein secretion and define the functions of SNAREs in BDNF signaling and regulation of neuronal connectivity. PMID:25959820

  16. Inhibitory neurotransmission regulates vagal efferent activity and gastric motility.

    PubMed

    McMenamin, Caitlin A; Travagli, R Alberto; Browning, Kirsteen N

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract receives extrinsic innervation from both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which regulate and modulate the function of the intrinsic (enteric) nervous system. The stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract in particular are heavily influenced by the parasympathetic nervous system, supplied by the vagus nerve, and disruption of vagal sensory or motor functions results in disorganized motility patterns, disrupted receptive relaxation and accommodation, and delayed gastric emptying, amongst others. Studies from several laboratories have shown that the activity of vagal efferent motoneurons innervating the upper GI tract is inhibited tonically by GABAergic synaptic inputs from the adjacent nucleus tractus solitarius. Disruption of this influential central GABA input impacts vagal efferent output, hence gastric functions, significantly. The purpose of this review is to describe the development, physiology, and pathophysiology of this functionally dominant inhibitory synapse and its role in regulating vagally determined gastric functions. PMID:27302177

  17. The brain uses efference copy information to optimise spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, C C; Burke, M R

    2013-01-01

    Does a motor response to a target improve the subsequent recall of the target position or can we simply use peripheral position information to guide an accurate response? We suggest that a motor plan of the hand can be enhanced with actual motor and efference copy feedback (GoGo trials), which is absent in the passive observation of a stimulus (NoGo trials). To investigate this effect during eye and hand coordination movements, we presented stimuli in two formats (memory guided or visually guided) under three modality conditions (eyes only, hands only (with eyes fixated), or eyes and hand together). We found that during coordinated movements, both the eye and hand response times were facilitated when efference feedback of the movement was provided. Furthermore, both eye and hand movements to remembered locations were significantly more accurate in the GoGo than in the NoGo trial types. These results reveal that an efference copy of a motor plan enhances memory for a location that is not only observed in eye movements, but also translated downstream into a hand movement. These results have significant implications on how we plan, code and guide behavioural responses, and how we can optimise accuracy and timing to a given target. PMID:23073714

  18. Callose deposition during gravitropism of Zea mays and Pisum sativum and its inhibition by 2-deoxy-D-glucose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, M. J.; Leopold, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    In etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) and etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings, a gravitropic stimulation induces the deposition of callose. In the corn coleoptiles this occurs within 5 min of gravity stimulation, and prior to the beginning of curvature. Both gravitropic curvature and callose deposition reach their maxima by 12 h. Within the first 2 h more callose is deposited on the upper (concave) side, but after 2-3 h, this deposition pattern is reversed. An inhibitor of protein glycosylation, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DDG), inhibits callose production and considerably retards gravitropic bending in both species of plants. Mannose can relieve the inhibition of gravitropic bending by DDG. The pea mutant "Ageotropum", which does not respond to gravity when etiolated, also fails to produce callose in response to a gravitic stimulus. These correlations indicate that callose deposition may be a biochemical component of gravitropism in plant shoots.

  19. Associations between mobility, cognition and callosal integrity in people with parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Fling, Brett W.; Dale, Marian L.; Curtze, Carolin; Smulders, Katrijn; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2016-01-01

    Falls in people with parkinsonism are likely related to both motor and cognitive impairments. In addition to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), some older adults have lower body parkinsonism (a frontal gait disorder), characterized by impaired lower extremity balance and gait as well as cognition, but without tremor or rigidity. Neuroimaging during virtual gait suggests that interhemispheric, prefrontal cortex communication may be involved in locomotion, but contributions of neuroanatomy connecting these regions to objective measures of gait in people with parkinsonism remains unknown. Our objectives were to compare the integrity of fiber tracts connecting prefrontal and sensorimotor cortical regions via the corpus callosum in people with two types of parkinsonism and an age-matched control group and to relate integrity of these callosal fibers with clinical and objective measures of mobility and cognition. We recruited 10 patients with frontal gait disorders, 10 patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched healthy control participants. Participants underwent cognitive and mobility testing as well as diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging to quantify white matter microstructural integrity of interhemispheric fiber tracts. People with frontal gait disorders displayed poorer cognitive performance and a slower, wider-based gait compared to subjects with PD and age-matched control subjects. Despite a widespread network of reduced white matter integrity in people with frontal gait disorders, gait and cognitive deficits were solely related to interhemispheric circuitry employing the genu of the corpus callosum. Current results highlight the importance of prefrontal interhemispheric communication for lower extremity control in neurological patients with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27104136

  20. Associations between mobility, cognition and callosal integrity in people with parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Fling, Brett W; Dale, Marian L; Curtze, Carolin; Smulders, Katrijn; Nutt, John G; Horak, Fay B

    2016-01-01

    Falls in people with parkinsonism are likely related to both motor and cognitive impairments. In addition to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), some older adults have lower body parkinsonism (a frontal gait disorder), characterized by impaired lower extremity balance and gait as well as cognition, but without tremor or rigidity. Neuroimaging during virtual gait suggests that interhemispheric, prefrontal cortex communication may be involved in locomotion, but contributions of neuroanatomy connecting these regions to objective measures of gait in people with parkinsonism remains unknown. Our objectives were to compare the integrity of fiber tracts connecting prefrontal and sensorimotor cortical regions via the corpus callosum in people with two types of parkinsonism and an age-matched control group and to relate integrity of these callosal fibers with clinical and objective measures of mobility and cognition. We recruited 10 patients with frontal gait disorders, 10 patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched healthy control participants. Participants underwent cognitive and mobility testing as well as diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging to quantify white matter microstructural integrity of interhemispheric fiber tracts. People with frontal gait disorders displayed poorer cognitive performance and a slower, wider-based gait compared to subjects with PD and age-matched control subjects. Despite a widespread network of reduced white matter integrity in people with frontal gait disorders, gait and cognitive deficits were solely related to interhemispheric circuitry employing the genu of the corpus callosum. Current results highlight the importance of prefrontal interhemispheric communication for lower extremity control in neurological patients with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27104136

  1. The area centralis in the chicken retina contains efferent target amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Cynthia; Lindstrom, Sarah H.; De Grip, Willem J.; Wilson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The retinas of birds receive a substantial efferent, or centrifugal, input from a midbrain nucleus. The function of this input is presently unclear but previous work in the pigeon has shown that efferent input is excluded from the area centralis, suggesting that the functions of the area centralis and the efferent system are incompatible. Using an antibody specific to rods, we have identified the area centralis in another species, the chicken, and mapped the distribution of the unique amacrine cells that are the postsynaptic partners of efferent fibers. Efferent target amacrine cells are found within the chicken area centralis and their density is continuous across the border of the area centralis. In contrast to the pigeon retina then, we conclude that the chicken area centralis receives efferent input. We suggest that the difference between the 2 species is attributable to the presence of a fovea within the area centralis of the pigeon and its absence from that of the chicken. PMID:19296862

  2. Protooncogene Ski cooperates with the chromatin-remodeling factor Satb2 in specifying callosal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Baranek, Constanze; Dittrich, Manuela; Parthasarathy, Srinivas; Bonnon, Carine Gaiser; Britanova, Olga; Lanshakov, Dmitriy; Boukhtouche, Fatiha; Sommer, Julia E.; Colmenares, Clemencia; Tarabykin, Victor; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    First insights into the molecular programs orchestrating the progression from neural stem cells to cortical projection neurons are emerging. Loss of the transcriptional regulator Ski has been linked to the human 1p36 deletion syndrome, which includes central nervous system defects. Here, we report critical roles for Ski in the maintenance of the neural stem cell pool and the specification of callosal neurons. Ski-deficient callosal neurons lose their identity and ectopically express the transcription factor Ctip2. The misspecified callosal neurons largely fail to form the corpus callosum and instead redirect their axons toward subcortical targets. We identify the chromatin-remodeling factor Satb2 as a partner of Ski, and show that both proteins are required for transcriptional repression of Ctip2 in callosal neurons. We propose a model in which Satb2 recruits Ski to the Ctip2 locus, and Ski attracts histone deacetylases, thereby enabling the formation of a functional nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase repressor complex. Our findings establish a central role for Ski–Satb2 interactions in regulating transcriptional mechanisms of callosal neuron specification. PMID:22334647

  3. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Paivi M.; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models utilized by our laboratory. Here, we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to utilize these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of Red-Eared Turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed. PMID:25560461

  4. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Paivi M; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C

    2015-06-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models used by our laboratory. Here we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to use these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of red-eared turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide. Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed. PMID:25560461

  5. Interhemispheric Lipoma, Callosal Anomaly, and Malformations of Cortical Development: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Tetsu; de Vries, Linda S; Manten, Gwendolyn T R; Lequin, Maarten; Cuppen, Inge; Shibasaki, Jun; Aida, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial lipomas are rare congenital malformations. The most common type of intracranial lipoma is the interhemispheric lipoma, which is frequently associated with callosal anomalies such as hypogenesis or agenesis of the corpus callosum. In contrast, interhemispheric lipomas are less often accompanied with malformations of cortical development (MCD). We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of three infants with an interhemispheric lipoma, associated with a callosal anomaly, and MCD: two infants with nodular interhemispheric lipoma, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and polymicrogyria, and one infant with interhemispheric curvilinear lipoma, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, and heterotopias. An association was suggested regarding the occurrence of these malformations. PMID:26808679

  6. Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grush, Mary, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Connectivity has dramatically changed the landscape of higher education IT. From "on-demand" services for net-gen students and advanced eLearning systems for faculty, to high-performance computing grid resources for researchers, IT now provides more networked services than ever to connect campus constituents to each other and to the world.…

  7. Callose plug deposition patterns vary in pollen tubes of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes and in tomato species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background The pollen grain contains the male gametophyte that extends a pollen tube that grows through female tissues in order to deliver sperm to the embryo sac for double fertilization. Growing pollen tubes form periodic callose plugs that are thought to block off the older parts of the tube and ...

  8. Cognitive Control and White Matter Callosal Microstructure in Methamphetamine Dependent Subjects: A DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Ruth; Nordahl, Thomas E; Buonocore, Michael H; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Waters, Christy; Moore, Charles D; Galloway, Gantt P; Leamon, Martin H

    2009-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) abuse causes damage to structures within the human cerebrum, with particular susceptibility to white matter (WM). Abnormalities have been reported in anterior regions with less evidence of changes in posterior regions. MA abusers have also shown deficits on attention tests that measure response conflict and cognitive control. Methods We examined cognitive control using a computerized measure of the Stroop selective attention task and indices of WM microstructure obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the callosal genu and splenium of 37 currently abstinent MA abusers and 17 non-substance abusing controls. Measurements of Fractional Anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of callosal fibers and diffusion tensor eigenvalues were obtained in all subjects. Results The MA abusers exhibited greater Stroop reaction time interference (i.e., reduced cognitive control) [p=.04] compared to controls. After correcting for multiple comparisons, FA within the genu correlated significantly with measures of cognitive control in the MA abusers [p=.04, bonferroni corrected] but not in controls [p=.26]. Group differences in genu, but not splenium, FA were trend significant [p=.09]. Conclusions MA abuse appears to alter anterior callosal WM microstructure with less evidence of change within posterior callosal WM microstructure. DTI indices within the genu, but not splenium, correlated with measures of cognitive control in chronic MA abusers. PMID:18814867

  9. The brainstem efferent acoustic chiasm in pigmented and albino rats.

    PubMed

    Reuss, Stefan; Closhen-Gabrisch, Stefanie; Closhen, Christina

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined whether structural peculiarities in the brain-efferent pathway to the organ of Corti may underlie functional differences in hearing between pigmented and albino individuals of the same mammalian species. Pigmented Brown-Norway rats and albino Wistar rats received unilateral injections of an aqueous solution of the retrograde neuronal tracer Fluorogold (FG) into the scala tympani of the cochlea to identify olivocochlear neurons (OCN) in the brainstem superior olivary complex. After five days, brains were perfusion-fixed and brainstem sections were cut and analyzed with respect to retrogradely labeled neurons. Intrinsic neurons of the lateral system were located exclusively in the ipsilateral lateral superior olive (LSO) in both groups. Shell neurons surrounding the LSO and in periolivary regions, which made up only 5-8% of all OCN, were more often contralaterally located in albino than in pigmented animals. A striking difference was observed in the laterality of neurons of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) system, which provided more than one third of all OCN. These neurons, located in the rostral periolivary region and in the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, were observed contralateral to 45% in pigmented and to 68% in albino animals. Our study, the first to compare the origin of the olivocochlear bundle in pigmented and albino rats, provides evidence for differences in the crossing pattern of the olivocochlear pathway. These were found predominantly in the MOC system providing the direct efferent innervation of cochlear outer hair cells. Our findings may account for the alterations in auditory perception observed in albino mammals including man. PMID:26657095

  10. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    PubMed

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs. PMID:26364824

  11. The Plasmodesmal Protein PDLP1 Localises to Haustoria-Associated Membranes during Downy Mildew Infection and Regulates Callose Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sklenar, Jan; Findlay, Kim; Piquerez, Sophie J. M.; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Faulkner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) is a filamentous oomycete that invades plant cells via sophisticated but poorly understood structures called haustoria. Haustoria are separated from the host cell cytoplasm and surrounded by an extrahaustorial membrane (EHM) of unknown origin. In some interactions, including Hpa-Arabidopsis, haustoria are progressively encased by host-derived, callose-rich materials but the molecular mechanisms by which callose accumulates around haustoria remain unclear. Here, we report that PLASMODESMATA-LOCATED PROTEIN 1 (PDLP1) is expressed at high levels in Hpa infected cells. Unlike other plasma membrane proteins, which are often excluded from the EHM, PDLP1 is located at the EHM in Hpa-infected cells prior to encasement. The transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of PDLP1 are sufficient to convey this localization. PDLP1 also associates with the developing encasement but this association is lost when encasements are fully mature. We found that the pdlp1,2,3 triple mutant is more susceptible to Hpa while overexpression of PDLP1 enhances plant resistance, suggesting that PDLPs enhance basal immunity against Hpa. Haustorial encasements are depleted in callose in pdlp1,2,3 mutant plants whereas PDLP1 over-expression elevates callose deposition around haustoria and across the cell surface. These data indicate that PDLPs contribute to callose encasement of Hpa haustoria and suggests that the deposition of callose at haustoria may involve similar mechanisms to callose deposition at plasmodesmata. PMID:25393742

  12. Localization and Quantification of Callose in the Streptophyte Green Algae Zygnema and Klebsormidium: Correlation with Desiccation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Freshwater green algae started to colonize terrestrial habitats about 460 million years ago, giving rise to the evolution of land plants. Today, several streptophyte green algae occur in aero-terrestrial habitats with unpredictable fluctuations in water availability, serving as ideal models for investigating desiccation tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that callose, a β-d-1,3-glucan, is incorporated specifically in strained areas of the cell wall due to cellular water loss, implicating a contribution to desiccation tolerance. In the early diverging genus Klebsormidium, callose was drastically increased already after 30 min of desiccation stress. Localization studies demonstrated an increase in callose in the undulating cross cell walls during cellular water loss, allowing a regulated shrinkage and expansion after rehydration. This correlates with a high desiccation tolerance demonstrated by a full recovery of the photosynthetic yield visualized at the subcellular level by Imaging-PAM. Furthermore, abundant callose in terminal cell walls might facilitate cell detachment to release dispersal units. In contrast, in the late diverging Zygnema, the callose content did not change upon desiccation for up to 3.5 h and was primarily localized in the corners between individual cells and at terminal cells. While these callose deposits still imply reduction of mechanical damage, the photosynthetic yield did not recover fully in the investigated young cultures of Zygnema upon rehydration. The abundance and specific localization of callose correlates with the higher desiccation tolerance in Klebsormidium when compared with Zygnema. PMID:26412780

  13. Localization and Quantification of Callose in the Streptophyte Green Algae Zygnema and Klebsormidium: Correlation with Desiccation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater green algae started to colonize terrestrial habitats about 460 million years ago, giving rise to the evolution of land plants. Today, several streptophyte green algae occur in aero-terrestrial habitats with unpredictable fluctuations in water availability, serving as ideal models for investigating desiccation tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that callose, a β-d-1,3-glucan, is incorporated specifically in strained areas of the cell wall due to cellular water loss, implicating a contribution to desiccation tolerance. In the early diverging genus Klebsormidium, callose was drastically increased already after 30 min of desiccation stress. Localization studies demonstrated an increase in callose in the undulating cross cell walls during cellular water loss, allowing a regulated shrinkage and expansion after rehydration. This correlates with a high desiccation tolerance demonstrated by a full recovery of the photosynthetic yield visualized at the subcellular level by Imaging-PAM. Furthermore, abundant callose in terminal cell walls might facilitate cell detachment to release dispersal units. In contrast, in the late diverging Zygnema, the callose content did not change upon desiccation for up to 3.5 h and was primarily localized in the corners between individual cells and at terminal cells. While these callose deposits still imply reduction of mechanical damage, the photosynthetic yield did not recover fully in the investigated young cultures of Zygnema upon rehydration. The abundance and specific localization of callose correlates with the higher desiccation tolerance in Klebsormidium when compared with Zygnema. PMID:26412780

  14. Callose Deposition Is Responsible for Apoplastic Semipermeability of the Endosperm Envelope of Muskmelon Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Kyu-Ock; Bradford, Kent J.

    1998-01-01

    Semipermeable cell walls or apoplastic “membranes” have been hypothesized to be present in various plant tissues. Although often associated with suberized or lignified walls, the wall component that confers osmotic semipermeability is not known. In muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) seeds, a thin, membranous endosperm completely encloses the embryo, creating a semipermeable apoplastic envelope. When dead muskmelon seeds are allowed to imbibe, solutes leaking from the embryo are retained within the envelope, resulting in osmotic water uptake and swelling called osmotic distention (OD). The endosperm envelope of muskmelon seeds stained with aniline blue, which is specific for callose (β-1,3-glucan). Outside of the aniline-blue-stained layer was a Sudan III- and IV-staining (lipid-containing) layer. In young developing seeds 25 d after anthesis (DAA) that did not exhibit OD, the lipid layer was already present but callose had not been deposited. At 35 DAA, callose was detected as distinct vesicles or globules in the endosperm envelope. A thick callose layer was evident at 40 DAA, coinciding with development of the capacity for OD. Removal of the outer lipid layer by brief chloroform treatment resulted in more rapid water uptake by both viable and nonviable (boiled) seeds, but did not affect semipermeability of the endosperm envelope. The aniline-blue-staining layer was digested by β-1,3-glucanase, and these envelopes lost OD. Thus, apoplastic semipermeability of the muskmelon endosperm envelope is dependent on the deposition of a thick callose-containing layer outside of the endosperm cell walls. PMID:9733528

  15. Callose deposition is responsible for apoplastic semipermeability of the endosperm envelope of muskmelon seeds

    PubMed

    Yim; Bradford

    1998-09-01

    Semipermeable cell walls or apoplastic "membranes" have been hypothesized to be present in various plant tissues. Although often associated with suberized or lignified walls, the wall component that confers osmotic semipermeability is not known. In muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) seeds, a thin, membranous endosperm completely encloses the embryo, creating a semipermeable apoplastic envelope. When dead muskmelon seeds are allowed to imbibe, solutes leaking from the embryo are retained within the envelope, resulting in osmotic water uptake and swelling called osmotic distention (OD). The endosperm envelope of muskmelon seeds stained with aniline blue, which is specific for callose (beta-1,3-glucan). Outside of the aniline-blue-stained layer was a Sudan III- and IV-staining (lipid-containing) layer. In young developing seeds 25 d after anthesis (DAA) that did not exhibit OD, the lipid layer was already present but callose had not been deposited. At 35 DAA, callose was detected as distinct vesicles or globules in the endosperm envelope. A thick callose layer was evident at 40 DAA, coinciding with development of the capacity for OD. Removal of the outer lipid layer by brief chloroform treatment resulted in more rapid water uptake by both viable and nonviable (boiled) seeds, but did not affect semipermeability of the endosperm envelope. The aniline-blue-staining layer was digested by beta-1,3-glucanase, and these envelopes lost OD. Thus, apoplastic semipermeability of the muskmelon endosperm envelope is dependent on the deposition of a thick callose-containing layer outside of the endosperm cell walls. PMID:9733528

  16. Altered callose deposition during embryo sac formation of multi-pistil mutant (mp1) in Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H C; Jin, L; Li, J; Wang, X J

    2016-01-01

    Whether callose deposition is the cause or result of ovule sterility in Medicago sativa remains controversial, because it is unclear when and where changes in callose deposition and dissolution occur during fertile and sterile embryo sac formation. Here, alfalfa spontaneous multi-pistil mutant (mp1) and wild-type plants were used to compare the dynamics of callose deposition during embryo sac formation using microscopy. The results showed that both mutant and wild-type plants experienced megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis, and there was no significant difference during megasporogenesis. In contrast to the wild-type plants, in which the mature embryo sac was observed after three continuous cycles of mitosis, functional megaspores of mutant plants developed abnormally after the second round of mitosis, leading to degeneration of synergid, central, and antipodal cells. Callose deposition in both mutant and wild-type plants was first observed in the walls of megasporocytes, and then in the megaspore tetrad walls. After meiosis, the callose wall began to degrade as the functional megaspore underwent mitosis, and almost no callose was observed in the mature embryo sac in wild-type plants. However, callose deposition was observed in mp1 plants around the synergid, and increased with the development of the embryo sac, and was mainly deposited at the micropylar end. Our results indicate that synergid, central, and antipodal cells, which are surrounded by callose, may degrade owing to lack of nutrition. Callose accumulation around the synergid and at the micropylar end may hinder signals required for the pollen tube to enter the embryo sac, leading to abortion. PMID:27323128

  17. Retrograde transport of (/sup 3/H)-D-aspartate label by cochlear and vestibular efferent neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, D.W.; Schwarz, I.E.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)-D-aspartic acid was injected into the inner ear of rats. After a six hour survival time, labeled cells were found at all locations known to contain efferent cochlear or vestibular neurons. Most labeled neurons were found in the ipsilateral lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), although both ventral nuclei of the trapezoid body (VTB), group E, and the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (CPR) just adjacent to the ascending limb of the facial nerve also contained labeled cells. Because not all efferent neurons in the rat could be previously shown to be cholinergic, aspartate and glutamate are efferent transmitter candidates.

  18. Three-dimensional analysis of vestibular efferent neurons innervating semicircular canals of the gerbil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, I. M.; Perachio, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Anterograde labeling techniques were used to examine peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular efferent neurons in the crista ampullares of the gerbil. Vestibular efferent neurons were labeled by extracellular injections of biocytin or biotinylated dextran amine into the contralateral or ipsilateral dorsal subgroup of efferent cell bodies (group e) located dorsolateral to the facial nerve genu. Anterogradely labeled efferent terminal field varicosities consist mainly of boutons en passant with fewer of the terminal type. The bouton swellings are located predominately in apposition to the basolateral borders of the afferent calyces and type II hair cells, but several boutons were identified close to the hair cell apical border on both types. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphological analysis of the terminal fields from these cells located in the sensory neuroepithelium of the anterior, horizontal, and posterior cristae were performed. We show that efferent neurons densely innervate each end organ in widespread terminal fields. Subepithelial bifurcations of parent axons were minimal, with extensive collateralization occurring after the axons penetrated the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium. Axonal branching ranged between the 6th and 27th orders and terminal field collecting area far exceeds that of the peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. The terminal fields of the efferent neurons display three morphologically heterogeneous types: central, peripheral, and planum. All cell types possess terminal fields displaying a high degree of anisotropy with orientations typically parallel to or within +/-45 degrees of the longitudinal axis if the crista. Terminal fields of the central and planum zones predominately project medially toward the transverse axis from the more laterally located penetration of the basement membrane by the parent axon. Peripheral zone terminal fields extend predominately toward the planum semilunatum. The innervation

  19. Reactive amyloidosis associated with ischial callosititis: a report with histology of ischial callosities in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, David X.; Gilbert, Margaret H.; Wang, Xiaolei; Didier, Peter J.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Ischial callosities have received little attention in veterinary medicine even though they are distinguishing anatomic organs. The organs are characterized by a pair of hairless pads of thickened epidermis, located bilaterally in the gluteal region, which overlay the tuberosities of the ischia of all Old World monkeys, gibbons, and siamangs. The current report describes a case of reactive amyloidosis associated with ischial callosititis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Amyloid A (AA) protein was found in the liver, spleen, small intestine, mesenteric lymph nodes, and ischial callosities by histology, Congo red stain, and immunohistochemistry. Confocal microscopy showed that many cluster of differentiation (CD)68-positive macrophages within the ischial callosities contained intracellular AA protein, which suggests that CD68-positive macrophages have an important role in the pathogenesis of reactive amyloidosis in nonhuman primates. The normal histology of ischial callosities of rhesus macaques is also documented in this report. PMID:23104953

  20. Neurodegeneration of lateral habenula efferent fibers after intermittent cocaine administration: implications for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lax, Elad; Friedman, Alexander; Croitoru, Ofri; Sudai, Einav; Ben-Moshe, Hila; Redlus, Lior; Sasson, Efrat; Blumenfeld-Katzir, Tamar; Assaf, Yaniv; Yadid, Gal

    2013-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging technique for effective, non-pharmacological intervention in the course of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. Several brain targets have been suggested as suitable for DBS treatment of drug addiction. Previously, we showed that DBS of the lateral habenula (LHb) can reduce cocaine intake, facilitate extinction and attenuate drug-induced relapse in rats trained to self-administrate cocaine. Herein, we demonstrated that cocaine self-administration dose-dependently decreased connectivity between the LHb and midbrain, as shown by neurodegeneration of the main LHb efferent fiber, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR). FR degeneration, in turn, may have caused lack of response to LHb stimulation in rats trained to self-administer high-dose cocaine (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.). Furthermore, we show that the micro-structural changes caused by cocaine can be non-invasively detected using magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Detection of cocaine-induced alterations in FR anatomy can aid the selection of potential responders to LHb stimulation for treatment of drug addiction. PMID:23891640

  1. Elevated Early Callose Deposition Results in Complete Penetration Resistance to Powdery Mildew in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ellinger, Dorothea; Naumann, Marcel; Falter, Christian; Zwikowics, Claudia; Jamrow, Torsten; Manisseri, Chithra; Somerville, Shauna C.; Voigt, Christian A.

    2013-01-01

    A common response by plants to fungal attack is deposition of callose, a (1,3)-β-glucan polymer, in the form of cell wall thickenings called papillae, at site of wall penetration. While it has been generally believed that the papillae provide a structural barrier to slow fungal penetration, this idea has been challenged in recent studies of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where fungal resistance was found to be independent of callose deposition. To the contrary, we show that callose can strongly support penetration resistance when deposited in elevated amounts at early time points of infection. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis lines that express POWDERY MILDEW RESISTANT4 (PMR4), which encodes a stress-induced callose synthase, under the control of the constitutive 35S promoter. In these lines, we detected callose synthase activity that was four times higher than that in wild-type plants 6 h post inoculation with the virulent powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum. The callose synthase activity was correlated with enlarged callose deposits and the focal accumulation of green fluorescent protein-tagged PMR4 at sites of attempted fungal penetration. We observed similar results from infection studies with the nonadapted powdery mildew Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Haustoria formation was prevented in resistant transgenic lines during both types of powdery mildew infection, and neither the salicylic acid-dependent nor jasmonate-dependent pathways were induced. We present a schematic model that highlights the differences in callose deposition between the resistant transgenic lines and the susceptible wild-type plants during compatible and incompatible interactions between Arabidopsis and powdery mildew. PMID:23335625

  2. Maturation of lower extremity EMG responses to postural perturbations: relationship of response-latencies to development of fastest central and peripheral efferents.

    PubMed

    Müller, K; Hömberg, V; Coppenrath, P; Lenard, H G

    1991-01-01

    EMG responses to toe-up tilt perturbations on a movable platform system were analysed in 86 children between the age of 12 months and 13 years. To assess the relative contribution of peripheral and central nerve conduction properties, a concomitant recording of the fastest efferent pathways in the central and peripheral motor system was made using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation of motor cortex and peripheral nerve roots. This allowed the determination of the fastest downstream efferent connection times from motor cortex to lumbar motor neuron pools and to measure the fastest efferent conduction from these motor neuron pools to effector muscles in the lower leg. The sequence observed for stance stabilizing EMG responses was similar to that obtained in earlier studies with short latency (SL) and middle latency (ML) companents occurring in the stretched triceps surae muscle and long latency (LL) responses occurring in the non-stretched tibialis anterior muscle. Homologous responses were also obtained in upper leg muscles, being recruited consistently later than those in lower leg muscles across all age groups. In the short latency range two different SL1- and SL2-responses were obtained in children of all age groups as well as in adult controls. Both the SL1- and the SL2-responses showed a flat developmental profile, reaching adult values between 20 and 30 months of age which correlated with that of the fastest efferents from lumbar motor neuron pools to leg muscles, i.e. the final motor path. ML-responses showed a steeper developmental profile.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2065752

  3. Evidence against a hypothesis of vestibular efferent function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Efferent stimulation and nicotinic agonists can either decrease or increase the frequency of occurrence of EPSPs recorded from VIIIth nerve afferents in the frog. It has been hypothesized that the distribution of hair cell resting membrane potentials overlaps the equilibrium potential dictated by the nicotinic-gated channels on the hair cells. Nicotinic mediated increases in EPSP frequency would then be due to depolarization of hair cells that were more hyperpolarized at rest, while decreases in EPSP frequency would be due to hyperpolarization of hair cells more depolarized at rest. In order to test this hypothesis, while recording from afferents which showed an increase in EPSP frequency due to bath application of the nicotinic agonist DMPP (1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperizinium iodide), hair cells were depolarized with 10 mM K+ in the bath, and then the effects of DMPP on EPSP frequency were assessed. In this situation, DMPP still increased EPSP frequency, suggesting that the equilibrium potential for the nicotinic-gated channel was much more positive than the resting potentials of the hair cells. An alternative hypothesis then seems likely, that the nicotinic receptors on hair cells are able to activate different iontophores that result in either hair cell depolarization or hyperpolarization, dependent upon which iontophore predominates in the hair cells innervating a particular afferent.

  4. Metabolic activation of efferent pathways from the rat area postrema.

    PubMed

    Gross, P M; Wainman, D S; Shaver, S W; Wall, K M; Ferguson, A V

    1990-03-01

    We used the quantitative [14C]deoxyglucose method and autoradiography to evaluate metabolic activity in 47 individual cerebral structures or subregions that are part of neural pathways emanating from the brain stem circumventricular organ, area postrema. Electrical stimulation of the dorsocentral area postrema in halothane-ventilated rats produced hypotension and increased glucose metabolism by several structures within the ascending trajectories of efferent neural projections from the nucleus. Structures in the caudal medulla oblongata, including three subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and nucleus ambiguus-A1 noradrenergic region, had increases of metabolism during stimulation of 32-62%. Pontine activation occurred specifically in the locus coeruleus and lateral parabrachial nuclei (increases of 24-36%). Magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, and median eminence showed increases in metabolism of 22-34%. An 89% elevation of glucose metabolism by the pituitary neural lobe resulted. The findings are evidence for functional activation of specific structures within ascending neural pathways from area postrema to forebrain mechanisms regulating blood pressure and fluid balance. PMID:2316724

  5. Restricted loss of olivocochlear but not vestibular efferent neurons in the senescent gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Seeler, Sabine; Grothe, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of hearing and vertigo are symptoms of age-related auditory and vestibular disorders reflecting multifactorial changes in the peripheral and central nervous system whose interplay remains largely unknown. Originating bilaterally in the brain stem, vestibular and auditory efferent cholinergic projections exert feedback control on the peripheral sensory organs, and modulate sensory processing. We studied age-related changes in the auditory and vestibular efferent systems by evaluating number of cholinergic efferent neurons in young adult and aged gerbils, and in cholinergic trigeminal neurons serving as a control for efferents not related to the inner ear. We observed a significant loss of olivocochlear (OC) neurons in aged compared to young adult animals, whereas the overall number of lateral superior olive (LSO) cells was not reduced in aging. Although the loss of lateral and medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons was uniform and equal on both sides of the brain, there were frequency-related differences within the lateral olivocochlear (LOC) neurons, where the decline was larger in the medial limb of the superior olivary nucleus (high frequency representation) than in the lateral limb (middle-to-low frequency representation). In contrast, neither the number of vestibular efferent neurons, nor the population of motor trigeminal neurons were significantly reduced in the aged animals. These observations suggest differential effects of aging on the respective cholinergic efferent brainstem systems. PMID:25762929

  6. Induction of Embryogenesis in Brassica Napus Microspores Produces a Callosic Subintinal Layer and Abnormal Cell Walls with Altered Levels of Callose and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Rivas-Sendra, Alba; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The induction of microspore embryogenesis produces dramatic changes in different aspects of the cell physiology and structure. Changes at the cell wall level are among the most intriguing and poorly understood. In this work, we used high pressure freezing and freeze substitution, immunolocalization, confocal, and electron microscopy to analyze the structure and composition of the first cell walls formed during conventional Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis, and in cultures treated to alter the intracellular Ca2+ levels. Our results revealed that one of the first signs of embryogenic commitment is the formation of a callose-rich, cellulose-deficient layer beneath the intine (the subintinal layer), and of irregular, incomplete cell walls. In these events, Ca2+ may have a role. We propose that abnormal cell walls are due to a massive callose synthesis and deposition of excreted cytoplasmic material, and the parallel inhibition of cellulose synthesis. These features were absent in pollen-like structures and in microspore-derived embryos, few days after the end of the heat shock, where abnormal cell walls were no longer produced. Together, our results provide an explanation to a series of relevant aspects of microspore embryogenesis including the role of Ca2+ and the occurrence of abnormal cell walls. In addition, our discovery may be the explanation to why nuclear fusions take place during microspore embryogenesis. PMID:26635844

  7. Distribution of Callose Synthase, Cellulose Synthase, and Sucrose Synthase in Tobacco Pollen Tube Is Controlled in Dissimilar Ways by Actin Filaments and Microtubules1[W

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Giampiero; Faleri, Claudia; Del Casino, Cecilia; Emons, Anne Mie C.; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Callose and cellulose are fundamental components of the cell wall of pollen tubes and are probably synthesized by distinct enzymes, callose synthase and cellulose synthase, respectively. We examined the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes in relation to the dynamics of actin filaments, microtubules, and the endomembrane system using specific antibodies to highly conserved peptide sequences. The role of the cytoskeleton and membrane flow was investigated using specific inhibitors (latrunculin B, 2,3-butanedione monoxime, taxol, oryzalin, and brefeldin A). Both enzymes are associated with the plasma membrane, but cellulose synthase is present along the entire length of pollen tubes (with a higher concentration at the apex) while callose synthase is located in the apex and in distal regions. In longer pollen tubes, callose synthase accumulates consistently around callose plugs, indicating its involvement in plug synthesis. Actin filaments and endomembrane dynamics are critical for the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase, showing that enzymes are transported through Golgi bodies and/or vesicles moving along actin filaments. Conversely, microtubules appear to be critical in the positioning of callose synthase in distal regions and around callose plugs. In contrast, cellulose synthases are only partially coaligned with cortical microtubules and unrelated to callose plugs. Callose synthase also comigrates with tubulin by Blue Native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Membrane sucrose synthase, which expectedly provides UDP-glucose to callose synthase and cellulose synthase, binds to actin filaments depending on sucrose concentration; its distribution is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system but not on microtubules. PMID:21205616

  8. Right-ear advantage drives the link between olivocochlear efferent 'antimasking' and speech-in-noise listening benefits.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Bhagat, Shaum P

    2015-05-27

    The mammalian cochlea receives feedback from the brainstem medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents, whose putative 'antimasking' function is to adjust cochlear amplification and enhance peripheral signal detection in adverse listening environments. Human studies have been inconsistent in demonstrating a clear connection between this corticofugal system and behavioral speech-in-noise (SIN) listening skills. To elucidate the role of brainstem efferent activity in SIN perception, we measured ear-specific contralateral suppression of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), a proxy measure of MOC activation linked to auditory learning in noisy environments. We show that suppression of cochlear emissions is stronger with a more basal cochlear bias in the right ear compared with the left ear. Moreover, a strong negative correlation was observed between behavioral SIN performance and right-ear OAE suppression magnitudes, such that lower speech reception thresholds in noise were predicted by larger amounts of MOC-related activity. This brain-behavioral relation was not observed for left ear SIN perception. The rightward bias in contralateral MOC suppression of OAEs, coupled with the stronger association between physiological and perceptual measures, is consistent with left-hemisphere cerebral dominance for speech-language processing. We posit that corticofugal feedback from the left cerebral cortex through descending MOC projections sensitizes the right cochlea to signal-in-noise detection, facilitating figure-ground contrast and improving degraded speech analysis. Our findings demonstrate that SIN listening is at least partly driven by subcortical brain mechanisms; primitive stages of cochlear processing and brainstem MOC modulation of (right) inner ear mechanics play a critical role in dictating SIN understanding. PMID:25919996

  9. Influence of medial olivocochlear efferents on the sharpness of cochlear tuning estimates in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dinger, Zoë

    2016-08-01

    The present study objectively quantified the efferent-induced changes in the sharpness of cochlear tuning estimates and compared these alterations in cochlear tuning between adults and children. Click evoked otoacoustic emissions with and without contralateral broadband noise were recorded from 15 young adults and 14 children aged between 5 and 10 yrs. Time-frequency distributions of click evoked otoacoustic emissions were obtained via the S-transform, and the otoacoustic emission latencies were used to estimate the sharpness of cochlear tuning. Contralateral acoustic stimulation caused a significant reduction in the sharpness of cochlear tuning estimates in the low to mid frequency region, but had no effect in the higher frequencies (3175 and 4000 Hz). The magnitude of efferent-induced changes in cochlear tuning estimates was similar between adults and children. The current evidence suggests that the stimulation of the medial olivocochlear efferent neurons causes similar alterations in cochlear frequency selectivity in adults and children. PMID:27586737

  10. Efferent vagal discharge and heart rate in response to methohexitone, althesin, ketamine and etomidate in cats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Arndt, J O

    1982-10-01

    The effects of methohexitone, Althesin, ketamine and etomidate on single fibre discharge of cardiac vagal efferents and on heart rate were studied in cats. Cardiac vagal efferents were inhibited markedly and regularly for equihypnotic doses of methohexitone (2.0 mg kg-1), Althesin (0.1 ml kg-1) and ketamine (5.0 mg kg-1), but not of etomidate (0.8 mg kg-1). These inhibitory effects were independent of arterial pressure and mirrored the increases of heart rate elicited by the first three agents. Etomidate did not consistently affect cardiac vagal discharge or heart rate. Thus methohexitone. Althesin and ketamine inhibit efferent cardiac vagal drive by their central action independently of baroreflex function. This central vagolysis is probably the cause of their positive chronotropic effects. PMID:7126403

  11. Dynamic Behavior Analysis of the Glomerulo-Tubular Balance Mediated by the Efferent Blood Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinel, Andrea; Rivadeneira, Pablo S.; Costanza, Vicente; Amorena, Carlos

    In this paper, a mathematical model of the dynamics of a single-nephron function relating glomerulo-tubular balance, tubule-glomerular feedback, and peritubular blood viscosity is developed. Based upon experimental data, the model shows that complex behaviors of the nephron can be modulated by changes in the efferent arteriole blood viscosity. The main hypothesis is that the reabsorbed mass flow is modulated by the hematocrit of the efferent arteriole, in addition to the Starling forces. From a mathematical perspective, these behaviors can be explained by a bifurcation diagram analysis where the efferent blood viscosity is taken as the bifurcation parameter. This analytical description allows to predict changes in proximal convoluted tubule reabsorption, following changes in peritubular capillary viscosity generated by periodic changes in the glomerular filtration rate. Thus, the model links the tubule-glomerular feedback with the glomerular tubular balance.

  12. Ninth Grade Students' Negotiation of Aesthetic, Efferent, and Critical Stances in Response to a Novel Set in Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative, action research study was guided by two primary research questions. First, how do students negotiate aesthetic, efferent, and critical stances when reading a novel set in Afghanistan? Second, how do aesthetic and efferent stances contribute to or hinder the adoption of a critical stance? A large body of research exists that…

  13. Callose Synthase Family Genes Involved in the Grapevine Defense Response to Downy Mildew Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Jiao, Li; Fu, Shufang; Yin, Ling; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of callose is a common plant defense response to intruding pathogens and part of the plant's innate immunity. In this study, eight grapevine callose synthase (CalS) genes were identified and characterized. To investigate biological function of CalS in grapevine against the infection of Plasmopara viticola, expression patterns of grapevine CalS family genes were analyzed among resistant/susceptible cultivars. After P. viticola infection, expression of CalS1, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 were significantly modified among the grapevine cultivars. For example, the expression of CalS1 and CalS10 were greatly increased in downy mildew (DM)-immune Muscadinia rotundifolia 'Carlos' and 'Noble'. Transient expression assay with promoters of the CalS1 and CalS10 genes confirmed that they were regulated by the oomycete pathogen P. viticola. CalS1 promoter activity was also significantly up-regulated by ABA in DM-immune M. rotundifolia 'Noble', but down-regulated in DM-susceptible Vitis vinifera 'Chardonnay'. The CalS1 promoter, however, was also down-regulated by GA in 'Chardonnay', but not affected in 'Noble'. The promoter activity of CalS10 was significantly up-regulated by GA in 'Chardonnay', but not regulated by ABA at all. It is proposed that CalS1 and CalS10 were involved in grapevine defense against DM disease. PMID:26474330

  14. Callose-mediated resistance to pathogenic intruders in plant defense-related papillae

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are exposed to a wide range of potential pathogens, which derive from diverse phyla. Therefore, plants have developed successful defense mechanisms during co-evolution with different pathogens. Besides many specialized defense mechanisms, the plant cell wall represents a first line of defense. It is actively reinforced through the deposition of cell wall appositions, so-called papillae, at sites of interaction with intruding microbial pathogens. The papilla is a complex structure that is formed between the plasma membrane and the inside of the plant cell wall. Even though the specific biochemical composition of papillae can vary between different plant species, some classes of compounds are commonly found which include phenolics, reactive oxygen species, cell wall proteins, and cell wall polymers. Among these polymers, the (1,3)-β-glucan callose is one of the most abundant and ubiquitous components. Whereas the function of most compounds could be directly linked with cell wall reinforcement or an anti-microbial effect, the role of callose has remained unclear. An evaluation of recent studies revealed that the timing of the different papilla-forming transport processes is a key factor for successful plant defense. PMID:24808903

  15. Afferent and Efferent Aspects of Mandibular Sensorimotor Control in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daliri, Ayoub; Prokopenko, Roman A.; Max, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals who stutter show sensorimotor deficiencies in speech and nonspeech movements. For the mandibular system, the authors dissociated the sense of kinesthesia from the efferent control component to examine whether kinesthetic integrity itself is compromised in stuttering or whether deficiencies occur only when generating motor…

  16. Autoradiographic study of the efferent connections of the entorhinal cortex in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, J.M.

    1981-07-10

    The major findings can be summarized as follows. Whereas the projection of the lateral entorhinal area (LEA) to the dentate gyrus is broad in its longitudinal extent, the medial entorhinal area (MEA), and especially the ventral portion of this zone, projects in a more lamellar fashion. In the transverse plane the LEA preferentially projects to the inner (dorsal) blade of the dentate gyrus, while the MEA innervates both blades equally. Within the radial dimension, the entorhinal cortex projects to the dentate gyrus according to a medial to lateral gradient, with lateral portions of the LEA projecting along the pial surface and successively more medial portions of the entorhinal projecting closer to the granule cells. The commissural entorhinal to dentate projections are similar to the ipsilateral projections in location; however, they are considerably reduced in septotemporal extent and do not arise from cells in the ventral half of either LEA or the intermediate entorhinal area (IEA). The projection of the entorhinal cortex to Ammon's horn reflects the same longitudinal characteristics as the dentate projections. An alvear input which extends only to the pyramidal cells at the CA1-subicular junction was most noticeable at ventral hippocampal levels. The extrahippocampal projections arise predominantly from cells in the LEA and project forward along the angular bundle to the piriform and periamygdaloid cortices, as well as the endopiriform nucleus, the lateral, basolateral, and cortical amygdaloid nuclei, the nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract, the olfactory tubercle, the anterior olfactory nucleus, the taenia tecta, and the indusium griseum.

  17. The vomeronasal cortex - afferent and efferent projections of the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala in mice.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Pardo-Bellver, Cecília; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Most mammals possess a vomeronasal system that detects predominantly chemical signals of biological relevance. Vomeronasal information is relayed to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), whose unique cortical target is the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala. This cortical structure should therefore be considered the primary vomeronasal cortex. In the present work, we describe the afferent and efferent connections of the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala in female mice, using anterograde (biotinylated dextranamines) and retrograde (Fluorogold) tracers, and zinc selenite as a tracer specific for zinc-enriched (putative glutamatergic) projections. The results show that the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala is strongly interconnected not only with the rest of the vomeronasal system (AOB and its target structures in the amygdala), but also with the olfactory system (piriform cortex, olfactory-recipient nuclei of the amygdala and entorhinal cortex). Therefore, the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala probably integrates olfactory and vomeronasal information. In addition, the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala shows moderate interconnections with the associative (basomedial) amygdala and with the ventral hippocampus, which may be involved in emotional and spatial learning (respectively) induced by chemical signals. Finally, the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala gives rise to zinc-enriched projections to the ventrolateral septum and the ventromedial striatum (including the medial islands of Calleja). This pattern of intracortical connections (with the olfactory cortex and hippocampus, mainly) and cortico-striatal excitatory projections (with the olfactory tubercle and septum) is consistent with its proposed nature as the primary vomeronasal cortex. PMID:24188795

  18. Efferent Control of Hair Cell and Afferent Responses in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Richard; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Highstein, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The sensations of sound and motion generated by the inner ear are controlled by the brain through extensive centripetal innervation originating within the brain stem. In the semicircular canals, brain stem efferent neurons make synaptic contacts with mechanosensory hair cells and with the dendrites of afferent neurons. Here, we examine the relative contributions of efferent action on hair cells and afferents. Experiments were performed in vivo in the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. The efferent system was activated via electrical pulses to the brain stem and sensory responses to motion stimuli were quantified by simultaneous voltage recording from afferents and intracellular current- and/or voltage-clamp recordings from hair cells. Results showed synaptic inputs to both afferents and hair cells leading to relatively long-latency intracellular signaling responses: excitatory in afferents and inhibitory in hair cells. Generally, the net effect of efferent action was an increase in afferent background discharge and a simultaneous decrease in gain to angular motion stimuli. Inhibition of hair cells was likely the result of a ligand-gated opening of a major basolateral conductance. The reversal potential of the efferent-evoked current was just below the hair cell resting potential, thus resulting in a small hyperpolarization. The onset latency averaged about 90 ms and latency to peak response was 150–400 ms. Hair cell inhibition often outlasted afferent excitation and, in some cases, latched hair cells in the “off” condition for >1 s following cessation of stimulus. These features endow the animal with a powerful means to adjust the sensitivity and dynamic range of motion sensation. PMID:19571186

  19. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2014-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Overexpression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A-Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316

  20. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Over-expression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A–Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316

  1. DSCAM and DSCAML1 regulate the radial migration and callosal projection in developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Huang, Ying; Chen, Jia-Yin; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Song, Ning-Ning

    2015-01-12

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) is essential for self-avoidance and tiling of dendritic development in sensory neurons in Drosophila. Recent studies also show that DSCAM together with its closely related protein DSCAML1 functions in dendritic self-avoidance of a certain types of interneuron in mammalian retina. However, the functions of these DSCAMs in developing mammalian cerebral cortex are not well understood. Here we reduced the expression of DSCAM or DSCAML1 in mouse cortical neurons by RNA interference both in vitro and in vivo. We found that knockdown of DSCAM or DSCAML1 increases the complexity of proximal dendritic branching, and impedes the axon growth in cultured neurons. In vivo knockdown experiments showed that both DSCAM and DSCAML1 contribute to normal radial migration and callosal projection during the postnatal development. Our results indicate an important role of DSCAM and DSCAML1 in the development of cortical neural network. PMID:25451118

  2. A new sign of callosal disconnection syndrome: agonistic dyspraxia. A case study.

    PubMed

    Lavados, Manuel; Carrasco, Ximena; Peña, Marcela; Zaidel, Eran; Zaidel, Dahlia; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    We report a patient with callosal haemorrhage and no extracallosal involvement who developed a unique form of intermanual conflict. In the acute phase the patient showed a mild speech disturbance and right hemiparesis, and in her right hand, a grasp reflex and compulsive manipulation of tools, all attributable to transient frontal involvement. In the chronic phase there was intermanual conflict occasionally associated with the sensation of a second left hand. The patient also presented a sign consisting of compulsive, automatic execution of orders by one hand (the left or the right) when the patient was specifically asked to perform the movement with the other hand (the right or the left, respectively). There was no left-right confusion in this patient. We call this condition agonistic dyspraxia. In contrast with diagonistic dyspraxia, this consists of the agonistic behaviour of the other hand under conditions in which the hand that has been instructed to respond cannot execute the request. PMID:12529456

  3. Callosal tissue loss in multiple system atrophy - a one year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Minnerop, M; Luders, E; Specht, K; Ruhlmann, J; Schimke, N; Thompson, PM; Chou, YY; Toga, AW; Abele, M; Wüllner, U; Klockgether, T

    2010-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disease particularly affecting the basal ganglia, brainstem, cerebellum, and intermediolateral cell columns of the spinal cord but also the cerebral cortex. Clinically, cerebellar (MSA-C) and parkinsonian variants of MSA (MSA-P) are distinguished. We investigated 14 MSA patients (10 MSA-C, 4 MSA-P, men/women: 7/7, age: 61.1±3.3 years) and 14 matched controls (men/women: 7/7, age 58.6±5.1 years) with voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to analyze gray and white matter differences both at baseline and at follow-up, one year later. Baseline comparisons between patients and controls confirmed significantly less gray matter in MSA in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex, and significantly less white matter in the cerebellar peduncles and brainstem. Comparisons of tissue-loss profiles (i.e., baseline versus follow-up) between patients and controls, revealed white matter reduction in MSA along the middle cerebellar peduncles, reflecting degeneration of the ponto-cerebellar tract as a particularly prominent and progressive morphological alteration in MSA. Comparisons between baseline and follow-up, separately performed in patients and controls, revealed additional white matter reduction in MSA along the corpus callosum at follow-up. This was replicated through additional shape-based analyses indicating a reduced callosal thickness in the anterior and posterior midbody, extending posteriorly into the isthmus. Callosal atrophy may reflect a possibly disease-specific pattern of neurodegeneration and cortical atrophy respectively, fitting well with the predominant impairment of motor functions in MSA patients. PMID:20623690

  4. Efferent limb of gastrojejunostomy obstruction by a whole okra phytobezoar: Case report and brief review

    PubMed Central

    Zin, Thant; Maw, Myat; Pai, Dinker Ramananda; Paijan, Rosaini Binti; Kyi, Myo

    2012-01-01

    A phytobezoar is one of the intraluminal causes of gastric outlet obstruction, especially in patients with previous gastric surgery and/or gastric motility disorders. Before the proton pump inhibitor era, vagotomy, pyloroplasty, gastrectomy and gastrojejunostomy were commonly performed procedures in peptic ulcer patients. One of the sequelae of gastrojejunostomy is phytobezoar formation. However, a bezoar causing gastric outlet obstruction is rare even with giant gastric bezoars. We report a rare case of gastric outlet obstruction due to a phytobezoar obstructing the efferent limb of the gastrojejunostomy site. This phytobezoar which consisted of a whole piece of okra (lady finger vegetable) was successfully removed by endoscopic snare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of okra bezoar-related gastrojejunostomy efferent limb obstruction reported in the literature. PMID:22624073

  5. The Distribution of Prostaglandins in Afferent and Efferent Lymph From Inflammatory Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Miles G.; Hay, John B.; Movat, Henry

    1980-01-01

    Arachidonic acid labeled with 14C was injected directly into lymph nodes that had been stimulated at various times with Escherichia coli. The efferent lymph was collected, and labeled catabolites were extracted and analyzed chromatographically. The pimary conversion product recovered was Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), with the lesser products thromboxane, prostacyclin and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) also detected. When the efferent lymph was analyzed by radioimmunoassay after subcutaneous injectino of E coli into the hock, PGE and PGF levels rapidly increased, reached the highest levels in the first 10 hours, and then returned to normal by 24 hours. When the afferent lymph plasma draining inflammatory sites was compared directly with efferent lymph, PGF levels were similar, but the PGE level was always several times higher in the afferent lymph. To examine the catabolism of PG, either 3,H-PGF2ά of 3H-PGE2 was injected into the node, and the efferent lymph plasma was analyzed. No conversion of PGF2α to other products was found. In contrast, catabolic products of PGE2 were detected. With the use of equilibrium dialysis techniques, the binding of PGE2 and PGF2α to proteins in lymph and to bovine serum albumin (BSA), human serum albumin (HSA), and BSA stripped of its fatty acids was established. The binding to lymph proteins correlated with the albumin concentrations in the lymph. This albumin binging probably facilitated the retention and transport of PG in the lymph. PG appears in the lymph at a time corresponding to the uptake and processing of antigen by the node and near the time when lymphokines are detected in lymph and could modulate several steps in the immune response. The PGE detectable in the lymph draining an inflammatory site may play a role in the modulation of blood flow. PMID:6992593

  6. [The cervical somatosensory evoked potential in lesions of the cortical efferents].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1990-03-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials to median nerve stimulation were analysed in 20 patients with unilateral central paresis of the arm. Neither the configuration nor the latency and amplitude measures of the neck potential did reveal any association with pathological alterations of cortical efferents or with abnormal cortically evoked responses. Thus, also in this population the evaluation of cervical potentials can be done according to the known criteria. PMID:2110891

  7. Onset of cholinergic efferent synaptic function in sensory hair cells of the rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Roux, Isabelle; Wersinger, Eric; McIntosh, J Michael; Fuchs, Paul A; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2011-10-19

    In the developing mammalian cochlea, the sensory hair cells receive efferent innervation originating in the superior olivary complex. This input is mediated by α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and is inhibitory due to the subsequent activation of calcium-dependent SK2 potassium channels. We examined the acquisition of this cholinergic efferent input using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from inner hair cells (IHCs) in acutely excised apical turns of the rat cochlea from embryonic day 21 to postnatal day 8 (P8). Responses to 1 mm acetylcholine (ACh) were detected from P0 on in almost every IHC. The ACh-activated current amplitude increased with age and demonstrated the same pharmacology as α9-containing nAChRs. Interestingly, at P0, the ACh response was not coupled to SK2 channels, so that the initial cholinergic response was excitatory and could trigger action potentials in IHCs. Coupling to SK current was detected earliest at P1 in a subset of IHCs and by P3 in every IHC studied. Clustered nAChRs and SK2 channels were found on IHCs from P1 on using Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated α-bungarotoxin and SK2 immunohistochemistry. The number of nAChRs clusters increased with age to 16 per IHC at P8. Cholinergic efferent synaptic currents first appeared in a subset of IHCs at P1 and by P3 in every IHC studied, contemporaneously with ACh-evoked SK currents, suggesting that SK2 channels may be necessary at onset of synaptic function. An analogous pattern of development was observed for the efferent synapses that form later (P6-P8) on outer hair cells in the basal cochlea. PMID:22016543

  8. Sound-evoked efferent effects on cochlear mechanics of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Drexl, Markus; Kössl, Manfred

    2003-10-01

    The influence of the crossed medial efferent system on cochlear mechanics of the mustached bat was tested by measuring delayed evoked otoacoustic emissions (DEOAEs), cochlear microphonics, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions. Contralaterally delivered sinusoids, broadband noise and bat echolocation calls were used for acoustic stimulation of the efferent system. With all four measures we found a level-dependent suppression under stimulation with both broadband noise and echolocation calls. In addition, the sharply tuned cochlear resonance of the mustached bat which is involved in processing echolocation signals at 61 kHz shifted upward in frequency by several 100 Hz. Presentation of sinusoids did not have any significant effect. DEOAEs and DPOAEs were in some cases enhanced during contralateral presentation of the bat calls at moderate intensities. The most important function of the efferent system in the mustached bat might be the control of the extraordinarily fine-tuned resonator of this species, which is close to instability as evident from the very pronounced evoked otoacoustic emissions which sometimes convert into spontaneous otoacoustic emissions of high level. PMID:14553904

  9. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  10. Immature cortex lesions alter retinotopic maps and interhemispheric connections.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, C Ernesto; Manger, Paul R; Spenger, Christian; Innocenti, Giorgio M

    2003-07-01

    Unilateral lesions of the occipital visual areas performed on postnatal day 5 (P5) in the ferret are not compensated by the appearance, in the lesioned hemisphere, of visual responses at ectopic locations. Instead, when parts of the visual areas are spared, they show abnormal retinotopic organizations; furthermore, callosal connections are abnormally distributed in relation to the retinotopic maps. Lesions that completely eliminate the visual areas including the posterior parietal cortex cause the appearance of abnormal callosal connections from the primary somatosensory cortex on the lesion side to the contralateral, intact, posterior parietal cortex. The occipital visual areas (17, 18, 19, and 21) of the intact hemisphere show a normal retinotopy but lose callosal connections in territories homotopic to the lesions. These findings clarify the nature and limits of structural developmental plasticity in the visual cortex. Early in life, certain regions of cortex have been irreversibly allocated to the visual areas, but two properties defining the areas, that is, retinotopy and connections, remain modifiable. The findings might be relevant for understanding the consequences of early-onset visual cortical lesions in humans. PMID:12838520

  11. Callosal Sensitivity to Short-Range Stimulus Orientation and Long-Range Stimulus Context Orientation: Tachistoscopic Evidence.

    PubMed

    Braun, Claude M J; Achim, André; Roberge, Carl; Gauvin, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    To study local-global relationships in interhemispheric interactions, tachistoscopically presented pairs of lines (1.15 degrees) were compared for their relative orientation by 48 neurotypical adults. Orientations of line stimuli (local aspect of the task) were vertical, horizontal, forward slash or backslash, as were those of the interstimulus axes. The latter created a global context that could influence line discrimination. Stimulus pairs were presented within a field (not requiring callosal participation for line orientation comparison) or one on each side of the visual field meridian (requiring callosal participation). The primary purpose of the design was to determine whether local or global violations of stimulus "homotopy" across the meridian would impose costs of interhemispheric integration. The rationale for this expectation is that the fiber projection of the corpus callosum is highly symmetric across the midsagittal plane (i.e., homotopic). The expected "callosal homotopy" effect was significantly upheld as a whole but broke down or became extravagant in certain specific conditions, with specific costs of interhemispheric integration varying from null to a highly significant 20-ms as a function of interactions of interstimulus and stimulus orientations. The corpus callosum seems to be particularly sensitive to local stimulus orientation in interaction with long-range stimulus context orientation. PMID:26442342

  12. Development of the Corticospinal and Callosal Tracts from Extremely Premature Birth up to 2 Years of Age.

    PubMed

    Braga, Rodrigo M; Roze, Elise; Ball, Gareth; Merchant, Nazakat; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, David; Rueckert, Daniel; Counsell, Serena J

    2015-01-01

    White matter tracts mature asymmetrically during development, and this development can be studied using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. The aims of this study were i. to generate dynamic population-averaged white matter registration templates covering in detail the period from 25 weeks gestational age to term, and extending to 2 years of age based on DTI and fractional anisotropy, ii. to produce tract-specific probability maps of the corticospinal tracts, forceps major and forceps minor using probabilistic tractography, and iii. to assess the development of these tracts throughout this critical period of neurodevelopment. We found evidence for asymmetric development across the fiber bundles studied, with the corticospinal tracts showing earlier maturation (as measured by fractional anisotropy) but slower volumetric growth compared to the callosal fibers. We also found evidence for an anterior to posterior gradient in white matter microstructure development (as measured by mean diffusivity) in the callosal fibers, with the posterior forceps major developing at a faster rate than the anterior forceps minor in this age range. Finally, we report a protocol for delineating callosal and corticospinal fibers in extremely premature cohorts, and make available population-averaged registration templates and a probabilistic tract atlas which we hope will be useful for future neonatal and infant white-matter imaging studies. PMID:25955638

  13. Disruption of estrogen receptor signaling and similar pathways in the efferent ductules and initial segment of the epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Rex A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Seminiferous tubular atrophy may involve indirectly the disruption of estrogen receptor-α (ESR1) function in efferent ductules of the testis. ESR1 helps to maintain fluid resorption by the ductal epithelium and the inhibition or stimulation of this activity in rodent species will lead to fluid accumulation in the lumen. If not resolved, the abnormal buildup of fluid in the head of the epididymis and efferent ductules becomes a serious problem for the testis, as it leads to an increase in testis weight, tubular dilation and seminiferous epithelial degeneration, as well as testicular atrophy. The same sequence of pathogenesis occurs if the efferent ductule lumen becomes occluded. This review provides an introduction to the role of estrogen in the male reproductive tract but focuses on the various overlapping mechanisms that could induce efferent ductule dysfunction and fluid backpressure histopathology. Although efferent ductules are difficult to find, their inclusion in routine histological evaluations is recommended, as morphological images of these delicate tubules may be essential for understanding the mechanism of testicular injury, especially if dilations are observed in the rete testis and/or seminiferous tubules. Signature Lesion: The rete testis and efferent ductules can appear dilated, as if the lumens were greatly expanded with excess fluid or the accumulation of sperm. Because the efferent ductules resorb most of the fluid arriving from the rete testis lumen, one of two mechanisms is likely to be involved: a) reduced fluid uptake, which has been caused by the disruption in estrogen receptor signaling or associated pathways; or b) an increased rate of fluid resorption, which results in luminal occlusion. Both mechanisms can lead to a temporary increase in testicular weight, tubular dilation and atrophy of the seminiferous tubules. PMID:26413389

  14. Paralinguistic processing in children with callosal agenesis: emergence of neurolinguistic deficits.

    PubMed

    Brown, Warren S; Symingtion, Melissa; VanLancker-Sidtis, Diana; Dietrich, Rosalind; Paul, Lynn K

    2005-05-01

    Recent research revealed impaired processing of both nonliteral meaning and affective prosody in adults with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) and normal intelligence. Since normal children have incomplete myelination of the corpus callosum, it was hypothesized that paralanguage deficits in children with ACC would be less apparent relative to their peers. The Familiar and Novel Language Comprehension Test (FANL-C) and Prosody Test were given to 18 children with ACC and normal intelligence and 17 controls matched for age (7-13 years), education, and IQ (83-122). When controlling for age, children with ACC were significantly poorer in comprehension of the precise meaning of both literal and nonliteral items on the FANL-C. Adults with ACC had previously been shown to have difficulty only on nonliteral items. The effect size for nonliteral comprehension in children with ACC was smaller than that seen in adults. There was only a trend for the child ACC group to perform worse on the recognition of affective prosody. Thus, while deficits in paralinguistic processing were apparent, children with ACC were not as clearly different from age peers as adults, and were equally deficient at comprehending literal and nonliteral expressions. The differences in results between adults and children with ACC are thought to reflect incomplete callosal development in normal children, and the importance of the corpus callosum in the early stages of the development of the ability to process literal language. PMID:15781301

  15. Mid-callosal plane determination using preferred directions from diffusion tensor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, André L.; Rittner, Letícia; Lotufo, Roberto A.; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The corpus callosum is the major brain structure responsible for inter{hemispheric communication between neurons. Many studies seek to relate corpus callosum attributes to patient characteristics, cerebral diseases and psychological disorders. Most of those studies rely on 2D analysis of the corpus callosum in the mid-sagittal plane. However, it is common to find conflicting results among studies, once many ignore methodological issues and define the mid-sagittal plane based on precary or invalid criteria with respect to the corpus callosum. In this work we propose a novel method to determine the mid-callosal plane using the corpus callosum internal preferred diffusion directions obtained from diffusion tensor images. This plane is analogous to the mid-sagittal plane, but intended to serve exclusively as the corpus callosum reference. Our method elucidates the great potential the directional information of the corpus callosum fibers have to indicate its own referential. Results from experiments with five image pairs from distinct subjects, obtained under the same conditions, demonstrate the method effectiveness to find the corpus callosum symmetric axis relative to the axial plane.

  16. Distinct roles of neuropilin 1 signaling for radial and tangential extension of callosal axons.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fujisawa, Hajime; Murakami, Fujio; Masu, Masayuki

    2009-05-20

    Cortical excitatory neurons migrate from their origin in the ventricular zone (VZ) toward the pial surface. During migration, these neurons exhibit a stellate shape in the intermediate zone (IZ), transform into bipolar cells, and then initiate radial migration, extending a trailing process, which may lead to an axon. Here we examined the role of neuropilin 1 (NRP1) in these developmental events. Both NRP1 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in the IZ, where stellate-shaped cells were located. DiI labeling experiments showed that neuronal migration occurred normally in Nrp1 mutant mice up to embryonic day (E) 14.5, the latest day to which the mutant survives, with only subtle axonal defasciculation. However, interference with Nrp1 signaling at a later stage caused pathfinding errors: when a dominant negative form of Nrp1 was electroporated into the cortical VZ cells at E12.5 or E15.5 and examined perinatally, guidance errors were found in tangential axonal extension toward the midline. In contrast, no significant effect was noted on the migration of cortical excitatory neurons. These findings indicate that NRP1 plays an important role in the guidance of callosal axons originating from cortical excitatory neurons but does not support a role in their migration. Moreover, insofar as radial axonal extension within the cortical plate was unaffected, the present findings imply that molecular mechanisms for the axonal extension of excitatory neurons within the cortical plate are distinct from those in the white matter. PMID:19296474

  17. The biological role of the medial olivocochlear efferents in hearing: separating evolved function from exaptation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are remarkable, mechanically-active receptors that determine the exquisite sensitivity and frequency selectivity characteristic of the mammalian auditory system. While there are three to four times as many OHCs compared with inner hair cells, OHCs lack a significant afferent innervation and, instead, receive a rich efferent innervation from medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent neurons. Activation of the MOC has been shown to exert a considerable suppressive effect over OHC activity. The precise function of these efferent tracts in auditory behavior, however, is the matter of considerable debate. The most frequent functions assigned to the MOC tracts are to protect the cochlea from traumatic damage associated with intense sound and to aid the detection of signals in noise. While considerable evidence shows that interruption of MOC activity exacerbates damage due to high-level sound exposure, the well characterized MOC physiology and evolutionary studies do not support such a role. Instead, a MOC protective effect is well explained as being a byproduct of the suppressive nature of MOC action on OHC mechanical behavior. A role in the enhancement of signals in noise backgrounds, on the other hand, is well supported by (1) an extensive physiological literature (2) examination of naturally occurring environmental acoustic conditions (3) recent data from multiple laboratories showing that the MOC plays a significant role in auditory selective attention by suppressing the response to unattended or ignored stimuli. This presentation will argue that, based on the extant literature combining the suppression of background noise through MOC-mediated rapid adaptation (RA) with the suppression of non-attended signals, in concert with the corticofugal pathways descending from the auditory cortex, the MOC system has one evolved function—to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, aiding in the detection of target signals. By contrast, the MOC system

  18. Efferent Vestibular Neurons Show Homogenous Discharge Output But Heterogeneous Synaptic Input Profile In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Miranda A.; Murray, Andrew; Wijesinghe, Rajiv; Cullen, Karen; Tung, Victoria W. K.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of our sense of balance we still know remarkably little about the central control of the peripheral balance system. While previous work has shown that activation of the efferent vestibular system results in modulation of afferent vestibular neuron discharge, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of efferent neurons themselves are largely unknown. Here we substantiate the location of the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN) in the mouse, before characterizing the input and output properties of EVN neurons in vitro. We made transverse serial sections through the brainstem of 4-week-old mice, and performed immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), both expressed in the EVN of other species. We also injected fluorogold into the posterior canal and retrogradely labelled neurons in the EVN of ChAT:: tdTomato mice expressing tdTomato in all cholinergic neurons. As expected the EVN lies dorsolateral to the genu of the facial nerve (CNVII). We then made whole-cell current-, and voltage-clamp recordings from visually identified EVN neurons. In current-clamp, EVN neurons display a homogeneous discharge pattern. This is characterized by a high frequency burst of action potentials at the onset of a depolarizing stimulus and the offset of a hyperpolarizing stimulus that is mediated by T-type calcium channels. In voltage-clamp, EVN neurons receive either exclusively excitatory or inhibitory inputs, or a combination of both. Despite this heterogeneous mixture of inputs, we show that synaptic inputs onto EVN neurons are predominantly excitatory. Together these findings suggest that the inputs onto EVN neurons, and more specifically the origin of these inputs may underlie EVN neuron function. PMID:26422206

  19. Determinants of renal microvascular response to ACh: afferent and efferent arteriolar actions of EDHF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Loutzenhiser, Rodger

    2002-01-01

    The renal microvascular actions of ACh were investigated using the in vitro perfused hydronephrotic rat kidney. ACh reversed ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in the afferent and efferent arteriole by 106 +/- 2 and 75 +/- 5%, respectively. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase [NOS; 100 micromol/l N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)] and cyclooxygenase (COX; 10 micromol/l ibuprofen) prevented the sustained response of the afferent arteriole but did not reduce the magnitude of the initial dilation (97 +/- 7%). However, NOS/COX inhibition abolished the response of the efferent arteriole. The underlying mechanisms mediating this endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like response were characterized using K channel blockers. Ba (100 micromol/l), tetraethylammonium (1 mmol/l), and ouabain (3 mmol/l) had no effect, arguing against a role of an inward rectifier K channel, large-conductance Ca-activated K channel, or Na,K-ATPase. Charybdotoxin (10 nmol/l) and apamin (1.0micromol/l) attenuated the response when administered alone (63 +/- 7% and 37 +/- 5%, respectively) and abolished the response when coadministered (0.1 +/- 1.0%). These findings indicate that, as in other vascular beds, the renal EDHF-like response to ACh involves K channels that are sensitive to a combination of apamin and charybdotoxin. Our finding that EDHF modulates preglomerular, but not postglomerular, tone is consistent with the evolving concept that vasomotor mechanisms in cortical efferent arterioles do not involve voltage-gated Ca entry. PMID:11739120

  20. How can the auditory efferent system protect our ears from noise-induced hearing loss? Let us count the ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Lynne; Miller, Judi A. Lapsley

    2015-12-01

    It is a cause for some debate as to how the auditory olivocochlear (OC) efferent system could protect hearing from noise trauma. In this review, we examined physiological research to find mechanisms that could effectively attenuate the response to sound. For each purported mechanism, we indicate which part of the OC-efferent system is responsible for the function and the site of action. These mechanisms include basilar-membrane phase shifts at high stimulus levels; changes in outer-hair-cell stiffness and phase lag associated with efferent slow effects; small decreases in endocochlear potentials causing small decreases in outer- and inner-hair-cell output; low-spontaneous-rate and medium-spontaneous-rate fibers showing OC-induced decrements at high levels; auditory-nerve initial-peak reduction; OC effect increasing over minutes; cholinergic activation of anti-apoptotic pathways; and anti-excitotoxicity. There are clearly multiple opportunities for the OC-efferent system to protect the inner ear from noise trauma. From further exploration into the mechanisms outlined here, as well as to-be-discovered mechanisms, we will gain a greater understanding of the protective nature of the OC-efferent system. These findings could aid our ability to design better predictive tests for people at risk for noise-induced hearing loss.

  1. Depression of lymphocyte traffic in sheep by anaesthesia and associated changes in efferent-lymph PGE2 and antibody levels.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, T C; Spruck, C H; Leduc, L E

    1988-01-01

    General anaesthesia of sheep with ketamine and xylazine has been found to produce a profound and prolonged depression in lymphocyte traffic through primary peripheral lymph nodes, as mirrored in the output of lymphocytes into efferent lymph. In this study, the depression has been found to be associated with a marked and sustained elevation in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in efferent lymph. The degree and duration of lymphocyte output depression was found to be modulated (diminished), both in degree and duration, by study-node drainage-area stimulation from prior surgery, inflammation or bacterial immunization. Even when the anaesthesia-associated lymphocyte-output depression was modulated by drainage-area inflammation, the period of lymphocyte-output depression was correlated still with elevated levels of PGE2 in efferent lymph. When drainage-area stimulation was produced by bacterial immunization (killed Salmonella muenchen), the anaesthesia-associated depression in lymphocyte output into efferent lymph (small as well as blast) was accompanied by a depression in antibody output into efferent lymph. PMID:3422221

  2. Oculomotor learning revisited: a model of reinforcement learning in the basal ganglia incorporating an efference copy of motor actions

    PubMed Central

    Fee, Michale S.

    2012-01-01

    In its simplest formulation, reinforcement learning is based on the idea that if an action taken in a particular context is followed by a favorable outcome, then, in the same context, the tendency to produce that action should be strengthened, or reinforced. While reinforcement learning forms the basis of many current theories of basal ganglia (BG) function, these models do not incorporate distinct computational roles for signals that convey context, and those that convey what action an animal takes. Recent experiments in the songbird suggest that vocal-related BG circuitry receives two functionally distinct excitatory inputs. One input is from a cortical region that carries context information about the current “time” in the motor sequence. The other is an efference copy of motor commands from a separate cortical brain region that generates vocal variability during learning. Based on these findings, I propose here a general model of vertebrate BG function that combines context information with a distinct motor efference copy signal. The signals are integrated by a learning rule in which efference copy inputs gate the potentiation of context inputs (but not efference copy inputs) onto medium spiny neurons in response to a rewarded action. The hypothesis is described in terms of a circuit that implements the learning of visually guided saccades. The model makes testable predictions about the anatomical and functional properties of hypothesized context and efference copy inputs to the striatum from both thalamic and cortical sources. PMID:22754501

  3. First evidence for differential and sequential efferent effects of stimulus relevance and goal conduciveness appraisal.

    PubMed

    Aue, Tatjana; Flykt, Anders; Scherer, Klaus R

    2007-03-01

    In the context of a memory task, participants were presented with pictures displaying biological and cultural threat stimuli or neutral stimuli (stimulus relevance manipulation) with superimposed symbols signaling monetary gains or losses (goal conduciveness manipulation). Results for heart rate and facial electromyogram show differential efferent effects of the respective appraisal outcomes and provide first evidence for sequential processing, as postulated by Scherer's component process model of emotion. Specifically, as predicted, muscle activity over the brow and cheek regions marking the process of relevance appraisal occurred significantly earlier than facial muscle activity markers of goal conduciveness appraisal. Heart rate, in contrast, was influenced by the stimulus relevance manipulation only. PMID:17052833

  4. The efferent innervation of the genital chamber by an identified serotonergic neuron in the female cricket Acheta domestica.

    PubMed

    Elekes, K; Hustert, R

    1988-05-01

    The serotonergic innervation of the genital chamber of the female cricket, Acheta domestica, has been investigated applying anti-serotonin (5-HT) immunocytochemistry at both light- and electron-microscopic levels as well as using conventional electron microscopy. Whole mount and pre-embedding chopper techniques of immunocytochemistry reveal a dense 5-HT-immunoreactive network of varicose fibers in the musculature of the genital chamber. All of these immunoreactive fibers originate from the efferent serotonergic neuron projecting through the nerve 8v to the genital chamber (Hustert and Topel 1986; Elekes et al. 1987). At the electron-microscopic level, 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve terminals, which contain small (50-60 nm) and large (approximately 100 nm) agranular vesicles as well as granular vesicles (approximately 100 nm), contact the muscle fibers or the sarcoplasmic processes without establishing specialized neuromuscular connections. In addition to the 5-HT-immunoreactive axons, two types of immunonegative axons can also be found in the musculature. By use of conventional electron microscopy, three ultrastructurally distinct types of axon processes can be observed, one of which resembles 5-HT-immunoreactive axons. While the majority of the varicosities do not synapse on the muscle fibers, terminals containing small (50-60 nm) agranular vesicles occasionally form specialized neuromuscular contacts. It is suggested that the 5-HTergic innervation plays a non-synaptic modulatory role in the regulation circular musculature in the genital chamber of the cricket, while the musculature as a whole may be influenced by both synaptic and modulatory mechanisms. PMID:3383221

  5. Small RNA Derived from the Virulence Modulating Region of the Potato spindle tuber viroid Silences callose synthase Genes of Tomato Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Brosseau, Chantal; Giguère, Tamara; Sano, Teruo; Moffett, Peter; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) callose synthase genes CalS11-like and CalS12-like encode proteins that are essential for the formation of callose, a major component of pollen mother cell walls; these enzymes also function in callose formation during pathogen infection. This article describes the targeting of these callose synthase mRNAs by a small RNA derived from the virulence modulating region of two Potato spindle tuber viroid variants. More specifically, viroid infection of tomato plants resulted in the suppression of the target mRNAs up to 1.5-fold, depending on the viroid variant used and the gene targeted. The targeting of these mRNAs by RNA silencing was validated by artificial microRNA experiments in a transient expression system and by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Viroid mutants incapable of targeting callose synthase mRNAs failed to induce typical infection phenotypes, whereas a chimeric viroid obtained by swapping the virulence modulating regions of a mild and a severe variant of Potato spindle tuber viroid greatly affected the accumulation of viroids and the severity of disease symptoms. These data provide evidence of the silencing of multiple genes by a single small RNA derived from a viroid. PMID:26290537

  6. Small RNA Derived from the Virulence Modulating Region of the Potato spindle tuber viroid Silences callose synthase Genes of Tomato Plants.

    PubMed

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Brosseau, Chantal; Giguère, Tamara; Sano, Teruo; Moffett, Peter; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) callose synthase genes CalS11-like and CalS12-like encode proteins that are essential for the formation of callose, a major component of pollen mother cell walls; these enzymes also function in callose formation during pathogen infection. This article describes the targeting of these callose synthase mRNAs by a small RNA derived from the virulence modulating region of two Potato spindle tuber viroid variants. More specifically, viroid infection of tomato plants resulted in the suppression of the target mRNAs up to 1.5-fold, depending on the viroid variant used and the gene targeted. The targeting of these mRNAs by RNA silencing was validated by artificial microRNA experiments in a transient expression system and by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Viroid mutants incapable of targeting callose synthase mRNAs failed to induce typical infection phenotypes, whereas a chimeric viroid obtained by swapping the virulence modulating regions of a mild and a severe variant of Potato spindle tuber viroid greatly affected the accumulation of viroids and the severity of disease symptoms. These data provide evidence of the silencing of multiple genes by a single small RNA derived from a viroid. PMID:26290537

  7. Language lateralization in individuals with callosal agenesis: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Isabelle; Paquette, Natacha; Lepore, Franco; Rouleau, Isabelle; Sauerwein, Catherine H; Rosa, Christine; Leroux, Jean-Maxime; Gravel, Pierre; Valois, Katja; Andermann, Frederick; Saint-Amour, Dave; Lassonde, Maryse

    2011-06-01

    Since the seminal work of Broca in 1861, it is well established that language is essentially processed in the left hemisphere. However, the origin of hemispheric specialization remains controversial. Some authors posit that language lateralization is genetically determined, while others have suggested that hemispheric specialization develops with age. Tenants of the latter view have further suggested that the adult pattern of left hemispheric specialization is achieved by means of callosal inhibition of homologous speech areas in the right hemisphere during ontogeny. According to this hypothesis, one would expect language to develop bilaterally in the acallosal brain. A recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in one patient with agenesis of the corpus callosum suggests that this might indeed be the case (Riecker et al., 2007). However, given the large anatomic and functional variability in the population of subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum, this finding needs to be more extensively replicated. In the present study, we explored language lateralization in six individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum using an fMRI protocol which included a syntactic decision task and a sub-vocal verbal fluency task. Two neurologically intact control groups, one comparable to the acallosals in terms of IQ, age and education (n=6) and one group with a high IQ (n=5), performed the same tasks. No differences were found between language lateralization of the subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum and the control groups in the receptive speech task. However, for expressive speech, the groups differed with respect to frontal activations, with the acallosal participants showing a more bilateral pattern of activation than the high-IQ participants only. No differences were found for temporal regions. Overall, these results indicate that the corpus callosum is not essential for the establishment of lateralized language functions. PMID:21447350

  8. Olivocochlear efferent function: issues regarding methods and the interpretation of results

    PubMed Central

    Guinan Jr., John J.

    2014-01-01

    As studies of the olivocochlear (OC) efferent system have matured, issues have been identified that need to be taken into account in the design of new studies and in the interpretation of existing work. The need for high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), multiple alternations of conditions, and avoiding middle-ear-muscle activation have been previously highlighted. Less well-known issues include: Contralateral medial OC (MOC) effects may not be good proxies for ipsilateral (ipsi) MOC effects; MOC-induced changes in otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) may not accurately show MOC-induced changes in auditory-nerve (AN) responses; measuring OAE differences from before to after psychophysical trials yields the transient OAE change but not tonic MOC activation; tonic MOC activation may be measurable by several techniques including by OAE differences in trials in which the subject’s judgment was correct vs. trials that were incorrect; SNRs can be preserved by Bootstrap statistical tests; differences in task difficulty may outweigh differences in subject attention; lateral efferent effects are little understood and may be tied to MOC effects; to assess whether MOC strength predicts protection from acoustic trauma, prospective tests in humans are needed. PMID:25161612

  9. Proportional myoelectric control of a virtual object to investigate human efferent control.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Ferris, Daniel P

    2004-12-01

    We used proportional myoelectric control of a one-dimensional virtual object to investigate differences in efferent control between the proximal and distal muscles of the upper limbs. Eleven subjects placed one of their upper limbs in a brace that restricted movement while we recorded electromyography (EMG) signals from elbow flexors/extensors or wrist flexors/extensors during isometric contractions. By activating their muscles, subjects applied virtual forces to a virtual object using a real-time computer interface. The magnitudes of these forces were proportional to EMG amplitudes. Subjects used this proportional EMG control to move the virtual object through two tracking tasks, one with a static target and one with a moving target (i.show $132#e., a sine wave). We hypothesized that subjects would have better control over the virtual object using their distal muscles rather than using their proximal muscles because humans typically use more distal joints to perform fine motor tasks. The results indicated that there was no difference in subjects' ability to control virtual object movements when using either upper arm muscles or forearm muscles. These results suggest that differences in control accuracy between elbow joint movements and wrist joint movements are more likely to be a result of motor practice, proprioceptive feedback or joint mechanics rather than inherent differences in efferent control. PMID:15258714

  10. Functional role of efferents to the avian retina. II. Effects of reversible cooling of the isthmo-optic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, A L; Hughes, C P

    1976-03-01

    Efferents to the retina in the bird arise in the isthmo-optic nucleus of the caudal midbrain, and terminate on amacrine cells in the retina. The functional role of these efferents was studied by determining the receptive field properties of 107 optic tract fibers in the lightly anesthetized adult pigeon, and quantitating their responses to specific moving stimuli. While the recording from these fibers continued, the isthmo-optic nucleus was cooled by a thermoelectric cooling probe, and the response properties of the cells redetermined. Recording was maintained in half of the units long enough to observe recovery from cooling, and in several units the entire procedure was repeated. In 77 of the 107 units, responsiveness to all stimuli was decreased by removing efferent influences, whereas specific receptive field properties such as motion sensitivity or directionaltiy were not altered. All of the major receptive field types were affected in a similar fashion, irrespective of their position in the visual field. Responses to stimuli that did not involve the antagonistic surround were similarly affected by removal of the efferents, as were units were both weak and strong antagonistic surrounds. Efferents exert their influence on retinal ganglion cells by way of the amacrine cells on which they terminate. Data available on amacrines in Necturus indicates that they are inhibitory to ganglion cells. If amacrines have a similar role in the pigeon, then it may be stated that decreased activity in the centrifugal fibers leads to enhanced inhibition throughout the receptive fields of ganglion cells, and increased activity in the efferents produces disinhibition. PMID:1262546

  11. The Syndrome of Frontonasal Dysplasia, Callosal Agenesis, Basal Encephalocele, and Eye Anomalies – Phenotypic and Aetiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    We report ten sporadic cases of Brazilian patients with facial midline defects, callosal agenesis, basal encephalocele, and ocular anomalies. This very rare cluster of anomalies has been well reported before. However, only until recently it is recognized as a syndrome belonging to frontonasal dysplasia spectrum. The ten cases confirm a distinct clinical entity and help to define the phenotype more precisely than previously. Up to now etiology remains unknown, although we conjecture that it is due to a mutation in TGIF gene. PMID:15912188

  12. Laminar-dependent dendritic spine alterations in the motor cortex of adult rats following callosal transection and forced forelimb use.

    PubMed

    Adkins, DeAnna L; Bury, Scott D; Jones, Theresa A

    2002-07-01

    Previously, the authors found that partial denervation of the motor cortex in adult animals can enhance this region's neuronal growth response to relevant behavioral change. Rats with partial corpus callosum transections that were forced to rely on one forelimb for 18 days had increased dendritic arborization of layer V pyramidal neurons in the opposite motor cortex compared to controls. This was not found as a result of denervation alone or of forced forelimb use alone. However, it seemed possible that each independent manipulation (i.e., forced forelimb use alone and callosal transections alone) resulted in neural structural alterations that were simply not revealed in measurements of dendritic branch number and/or not inclusive of layer V dendrites. This possibility was assessed in the current study with a reexamination of the Golgi-Cox impregnated tissue generated in the previous study. Tissue was quantified from rats that received either partial transections of the rostral two-thirds of the corpus callosum (CCX) or sham operations (Sham) followed either by 18 days of forced use of one forelimb (Use) or unrestricted use of both forelimbs (Cont). Measurements of apical and basilar dendrites from pyramidal neurons of layer II/III and layer V were performed to detect spine addition resulting from either increased spine density or the addition of dendritic material. As hypothesized, significant spine addition was found following forced forelimb use alone (Sham+Use) and callosal transections alone (CCX+Cont). However, forced use primarily increased spines on layer II/III pyramidal neurons, whereas callosal transections primarily increased dendritic spines on layer V pyramidal neurons in comparison to Sham+Cont. A much more robust increase in layer V dendritic spines was found in animals with the combination of forced forelimb use and denervation (CCX+Use). In contrast to the effects of forced use alone, however, CCX+Use rats failed to show major net increases in

  13. Secreted Fungal Effector Lipase Releases Free Fatty Acids to Inhibit Innate Immunity-Related Callose Formation during Wheat Head Infection[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Blümke, Antje; Falter, Christian; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Sode, Björn; Bode, Rainer; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Feussner, Ivo; Voigt, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of the (1,3)-β-glucan cell wall polymer callose at sites of attempted penetration is a common plant defense response to intruding pathogens and part of the plant’s innate immunity. Infection of the Fusarium graminearum disruption mutant Δfgl1, which lacks the effector lipase FGL1, is restricted to inoculated wheat (Triticum aestivum) spikelets, whereas the wild-type strain colonized the whole wheat spike. Our studies here were aimed at analyzing the role of FGL1 in establishing full F. graminearum virulence. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy revealed that the Δfgl1 mutant strongly induced the deposition of spot-like callose patches in vascular bundles of directly inoculated spikelets, while these callose deposits were not observed in infections by the wild type. Elevated concentrations of the polyunsaturated free fatty acids (FFAs) linoleic and α-linolenic acid, which we detected in F. graminearum wild type-infected wheat spike tissue compared with Δfgl1-infected tissue, provided clear evidence for a suggested function of FGL1 in suppressing callose biosynthesis. These FFAs not only inhibited plant callose biosynthesis in vitro and in planta but also partially restored virulence to the Δfgl1 mutant when applied during infection of wheat spikelets. Additional FFA analysis confirmed that the purified effector lipase FGL1 was sufficient to release linoleic and α-linolenic acids from wheat spike tissue. We concluded that these two FFAs have a major function in the suppression of the innate immunity-related callose biosynthesis and, hence, the progress of F. graminearum wheat infection. PMID:24686113

  14. Endosidin 7 Specifically Arrests Late Cytokinesis and Inhibits Callose Biosynthesis, Revealing Distinct Trafficking Events during Cell Plate Maturation1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunsook; Díaz-Moreno, Sara M.; Davis, Destiny J.; Wilkop, Thomas E.; Bulone, Vincent; Drakakaki, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Although cytokinesis is vital for plant growth and development, our mechanistic understanding of the highly regulated membrane and cargo transport mechanisms in relation to polysaccharide deposition during this process is limited. Here, we present an in-depth characterization of the small molecule endosidin 7 (ES7) inhibiting callose synthase activity and arresting late cytokinesis both in vitro and in vivo in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ES7 is a specific inhibitor for plant callose deposition during cytokinesis that does not affect endomembrane trafficking during interphase or cytoskeletal organization. The specificity of ES7 was demonstrated (1) by comparing its action with that of known inhibitors such as caffeine, flufenacet, and concanamycin A and (2) across kingdoms with a comparison in yeast. The interplay between cell plate-specific post-Golgi vesicle traffic and callose accumulation was analyzed using ES7, and it revealed unique and temporal contributions of secretory and endosomal vesicles in cell plate maturation. While RABA2A-labeled vesicles, which accumulate at the early stage of cell plate formation, were not affected by ES7, KNOLLE was differentially altered by the small molecule. In addition, the presence of clathrin-coated vesicles in cells containing elevated levels of callose and their reduction under ES7 treatment further support the role of endocytic membrane remodeling in the maturing cell plate while the plate is stabilized by callose. Taken together, these data show the essential role of callose during the late stages of cell plate maturation and establish the temporal relationship between vesicles and regulatory proteins at the cell plate assembly matrix during polysaccharide deposition. PMID:24858949

  15. Synaptic activation of efferent neuromodulatory neurones in the locust Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Baudoux, S; Burrows, M

    1998-12-01

    The segmental ganglia of the locust contain efferent neuromodulatory neurones with cell bodies at the dorsal midline and axons that supply muscles and other tissue on both sides of the body. These are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurones. Intracellular recordings were made from pairs of known metathoracic efferent DUM neurones in locusts in which all nerves were intact and in isolated metathoracic ganglia. The 19 metathoracic, efferent DUM neurones were identified according to the nerve roots through which their axons emerge from the ganglion. The synaptic potentials in these DUM neurones have been analysed to investigate how these neurones are activated and how their spikes are controlled. The degree of correlation between the synaptic potentials in particular pairs of neurones was quantified using a correlation analysis. This allowed the population of DUM neurones to be divided into three subsets that also map onto an anatomical grouping based on the distribution of their axons in the lateral nerves: (i) DUM1 neurones (DUMDL and DUM1b); (ii) DUM3 and DUM3,4 neurones; and (iii) DUM3,4,5, DUM5b neurones and DUMETi. Individual neurones within each subset showed strong correlations between their synaptic potentials, in both intact locusts and isolated ganglia, and tended to spike at the same time. Neurones in different subsets had few synaptic potentials in common and tended to spike independently. The persistence of common synaptic potentials in neurones of the three subsets in isolated ganglia indicates that they are derived from neurones within the metathoracic ganglion. The DUM neurones that had many common synaptic potentials in a quiescent locust responded in similar ways to mechanosensory stimulation of different parts of the body. DUM3,4, 5 and DUM5 neurones gave the clearest and most consistent responses to stimulation of mechanoreceptors on either hind leg. DUM3 and DUM3, 4 neurones responded variably, but usually with a hyperpolarisation. DUM1

  16. Physiological characterization of vestibular efferent brainstem neurons using a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Leijon, Sara; Magnusson, Anna K

    2014-01-01

    The functional role of efferent innervation of the vestibular end-organs in the inner ear remains elusive. This study provides the first physiological characterization of the cholinergic vestibular efferent (VE) neurons in the brainstem by utilizing a transgenic mouse model, expressing eGFP under a choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT)-locus spanning promoter in combination with targeted patch clamp recordings. The intrinsic electrical properties of the eGFP-positive VE neurons were compared to the properties of the lateral olivocochlear (LOC) brainstem neurons, which gives rise to efferent innervation of the cochlea. Both VE and the LOC neurons were marked by their negative resting membrane potential <-75 mV and their passive responses in the hyperpolarizing range. In contrast, the response properties of VE and LOC neurons differed significantly in the depolarizing range. When injected with positive currents, VE neurons fired action potentials faithfully to the onset of depolarization followed by sparse firing with long inter-spike intervals. This response gave rise to a low response gain. The LOC neurons, conversely, responded with a characteristic delayed tonic firing upon depolarizing stimuli, giving rise to higher response gain than the VE neurons. Depolarization triggered large TEA insensitive outward currents with fast inactivation kinetics, indicating A-type potassium currents, in both the inner ear-projecting neuronal types. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of Kv4.3 and 4.2 ion channel subunits in both the VE and LOC neurons. The difference in spiking responses to depolarization is related to a two-fold impact of these transient outward currents on somatic integration in the LOC neurons compared to in VE neurons. It is speculated that the physiological properties of the VE neurons might be compatible with a wide-spread control over motion and gravity sensation in the inner ear, providing likewise feed-back amplification of abrupt and strong phasic

  17. Activity-dependent serotonergic excitation of callosal projection neurons in the mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Emily K.; Avesar, Daniel; Gulledge, Allan T.

    2014-01-01

    Layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs) in the mouse prefrontal cortex respond to serotonin (5-HT) according to their long-distance axonal projections; 5-HT1A (1A) receptors mediate inhibitory responses in corticopontine (CPn) L5PNs, while 5-HT2A (2A) receptors can enhance action potential (AP) output in callosal/commissural (COM) L5PNs, either directly (in “COM-excited” neurons), or following brief 1A-mediated inhibition (in “COM-biphasic” neurons). Here we compare the impact of 5-HT on the excitability of CPn and COM L5PNs experiencing variable excitatory drive produced by current injection (DC current or simulated synaptic current) or with exogenous glutamate. 5-HT delivered at resting membrane potentials, or paired with subthreshold depolarizing input, hyperpolarized CPn and COM-biphasic L5PNs and failed to promote AP generation in COM-excited L5PNs. Conversely, when paired with suprathreshold excitatory drive generating multiple APs, 5-HT suppressed AP output in CPn L5PNs, enhanced AP generation in COM-excited L5PNs, and generated variable responses in COM-biphasic L5PNs. While COM-excited neurons failed to respond to 5-HT in the presence of a 2A receptor antagonist, 32% of CPn neurons exhibited 2A-dependent excitation following blockade of 1A receptors. The presence of pharmacologically revealed 2A receptors in CPn L5PNs was correlated with the duration of 1A-mediated inhibition, yet biphasic excitatory responses to 5-HT were never observed, even when 5-HT was paired with strong excitatory drive. Our results suggest that 2A receptors selectively amplify the output of COM L5PNs experiencing suprathreshold excitatory drive, while shaping the duration of 1A-mediated inhibition in a subset of CPn L5PNs. Activity-dependent serotonergic excitation of COM L5PNs, combined with 1A-mediated inhibition of CPn and COM-biphasic L5PNs, may facilitate executive function by focusing network activity within cortical circuits subserving the most appropriate behavioral output

  18. The influence of tetrad shape and intersporal callose wall formation on pollen aperture pattern ontogeny in two eudicot species

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Béatrice; Nadot, Sophie; Dreyer, Leanne; Ressayre, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims In flowering plants, microsporogenesis is accompanied by various types of cytoplasmic partitioning (cytokinesis). Patterns of male cytokinesis are suspected to play a role in the diversity of aperture patterns found in pollen grains of angiosperms. The relationships between intersporal wall formation, tetrad shape and pollen aperture pattern ontogeny are studied. Methods A comparative analysis of meiosis and aperture distribution was performed within tetrads in two triporate eudicot species with contrasting aperture arrangements within their tetrads [Epilobium roseum (Onagraceae) and Paranomus reflexus (Proteaceae)]. Key Results and Conclusions Intersporal wall formation is a two-step process in both species. Cytokinesis is first achieved by the formation of naked centripetal cell plates. These naked cell plates are then covered by additional thick, localized callose deposits that differ in location between the two species. Apertures are finally formed in areas in which additional callose is deposited on the cell plates. The recorded variation in tetrad shape is correlated with variations in aperture pattern, demonstrating the role of cell partitioning in aperture pattern ontogeny. PMID:20685726

  19. Cell wall maturation of Arabidopsis trichomes is dependent on exocyst subunit EXO70H4 and involves callose deposition.

    PubMed

    Kulich, Ivan; Vojtíková, Zdeňka; Glanc, Matouš; Ortmannová, Jitka; Rasmann, Sergio; Žárský, Viktor

    2015-05-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf trichomes are single-cell structures with a well-studied development, but little is understood about their function. Developmental studies focused mainly on the early shaping stages, and little attention has been paid to the maturation stage. We focused on the EXO70H4 exocyst subunit, one of the most up-regulated genes in the mature trichome. We uncovered EXO70H4-dependent development of the secondary cell wall layer, highly autofluorescent and callose rich, deposited only in the upper part of the trichome. The boundary is formed between the apical and the basal parts of mature trichome by a callose ring that is also deposited in an EXO70H4-dependent manner. We call this structure the Ortmannian ring (OR). Both the secondary cell wall layer and the OR are absent in the exo70H4 mutants. Ecophysiological aspects of the trichome cell wall thickening include interference with antiherbivore defense and heavy metal accumulation. Ultraviolet B light induces EXO70H4 transcription in a CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1-dependent way, resulting in stimulation of trichome cell wall thickening and the OR biogenesis. EXO70H4-dependent trichome cell wall hardening is a unique phenomenon, which may be conserved among a variety of the land plants. Our analyses support a concept that Arabidopsis trichome is an excellent model to study molecular mechanisms of secondary cell wall deposition. PMID:25767057

  20. The Hyperactivity of Efferent Auditory System in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions Study

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Suzaily; Abdul Rahman, Abdul Hamid; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi; Zakaria, Mohd. Normani

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electrophysiological studies, which are mostly focused on afferent pathway, have proven that auditory processing deficits exist in patients with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, reports on the suppressive effect of efferent auditory pathway on cochlear outer hair cells among schizophrenia patients are limited. The present, case-control, study examined the contralateral suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in patients with schizophrenia. Methods Participants were twenty-three healthy controls and sixteen schizophrenia patients with normal hearing, middle ear and cochlear outer hair cells function. Absolute non-linear and linear TEOAEs were measured in both ears by delivering clicks stimuli at 80 dB SPL and 60 dB SPL respectively. Subsequently, contralateral suppression was determined by subtracting the absolute TEOAEs response obtained at 60 dBpe SPL during the absence and presence of contralateral white noise delivered at 65 dB HL. No attention tasks were conducted during measurements. Results We found no significant difference in absolute TEOAEs responses at 80 dB SPL, in either diagnosis or ear groups (p>0.05). However, the overall contralateral suppression was significantly larger in schizophrenia patients (p<0.05). Specifically, patients with schizophrenia demonstrated significantly increased right ear contralateral suppression compared to healthy control (p<0.05). Conclusion The present findings suggest increased inhibitory effect of efferent auditory pathway especially on the right cochlear outer hair cells. Further studies to investigate increased suppressive effects are crucial to expand the current understanding of auditory hallucination mechanisms in schizophrenia patients. PMID:26766950

  1. An evaluation of retrograde tracing methods for the identification of chemically distinct cochlear efferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Vetter, D E; Mugnaini, E

    1990-07-01

    We have compared retrograde labelling of rat olivocochlear neurons after unilateral cochlear injections of wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) and free HRP. After cochlear injection of WGA-HRP, labelling of nerve cell bodies in the brainstem can be explained not only as conventional retrograde labelling resulting from uptake by efferent nerve terminals synapsing on or near hair cells, but also as spurious labelling originating from tracer leakage, through the periotic duct and over the eighth nerve sheaths, into the cerebral-spinal fluid. Depending on the length of survival time, spurious labelling can involve small portions of the nucleus of the trapezoid body or the entire auditory brainstem and other non-auditory centers. On the contrary, moderate amounts of free HRP delivered to the cochlea do not lead to spurious labelling. With free HRP as the tracer of choice, we found that cochlear efferent cells were located not only in the ipsilateral LSO body and bilaterally within MVPO and RPO as already described by White and Warr, but also surrounding the ipsilateral LSO and in the ipsilateral LVPO. The allocation of these newly described olivocochlear neurons to the medial large cell or lateral small cell system is uncertain because they are located laterally in the brainstem and project ipsilaterally but are large spherical to fusiform or multipolar cells. A zinc salicylate-formol fixative and a metal intensified DAB reaction were found to be effective in visualizing retrogradely transported HRP in neurons and allowed immunocytochemical staining of the same sections with antisera to glutamic acid decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase. This double label protocol can be used to produce a neurochemical map of the OC systems. PMID:1702612

  2. Dependence of auditory spatial updating on vestibular, proprioceptive, and efference copy signals.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Daria; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz; MacNeilage, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Humans localize sounds by comparing inputs across the two ears, resulting in a head-centered representation of sound-source position. When the head moves, information about head movement must be combined with the head-centered estimate to correctly update the world-centered sound-source position. Spatial updating has been extensively studied in the visual system, but less is known about how head movement signals interact with binaural information during auditory spatial updating. In the current experiments, listeners compared the world-centered azimuthal position of two sound sources presented before and after a head rotation that depended on condition. In the active condition, subjects rotated their head by ∼35° to the left or right, following a pretrained trajectory. In the passive condition, subjects were rotated along the same trajectory in a rotating chair. In the cancellation condition, subjects rotated their head as in the active condition, but the chair was counter-rotated on the basis of head-tracking data such that the head effectively remained fixed in space while the body rotated beneath it. Subjects updated most accurately in the passive condition but erred in the active and cancellation conditions. Performance is interpreted as reflecting the accuracy of perceived head rotation across conditions, which is modeled as a linear combination of proprioceptive/efference copy signals and vestibular signals. Resulting weights suggest that auditory updating is dominated by vestibular signals but with significant contributions from proprioception/efference copy. Overall, results shed light on the interplay of sensory and motor signals that determine the accuracy of auditory spatial updating. PMID:27169504

  3. Afferent and efferent immunological pathways of the brain. Anatomy, function and failure.

    PubMed

    Carare, R O; Hawkes, C A; Weller, R O

    2014-02-01

    Immunological privilege appears to be a product of unique lymphatic drainage systems for the brain and receptor-mediated entry of inflammatory cells through the blood-brain barrier. Most organs of the body have well-defined lymphatic vessels that carry extracellular fluid, antigen presenting cells, lymphocytes, neoplastic cells and even bacteria to regional lymph nodes. The brain has no such conventional lymphatics, but has perivascular pathways that drain interstitial fluid (ISF) from brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the subarachnoid space to cervical lymph nodes. ISF and solutes drain along narrow, ∼100 nm-thick basement membranes within the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries to cervical lymph nodes; this pathway does not allow traffic of lymphocytes or antigen presenting cells from brain to lymph nodes. Although CSF drains into blood through arachnoid villi, CSF also drains from the subarachnoid space through channels in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone into nasal lymphatics and thence to cervical lymph nodes. This pathway does allow the traffic of lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells from CSF to cervical lymph nodes. Efferent pathways by which lymphocytes enter the brain are regulated by selected integrins on lymphocytes and selective receptors on vascular endothelial cells. Here we review: (1) the structure and function of afferent lymphatic drainage of ISF and CSF, (2) mechanisms involved in the efferent pathways by which lymphocytes enter the brain and (3) the failure of lymphatic drainage of the brain parenchyma with age and the role of such failure in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24145049

  4. Cognition and the corpus callosum: verbal fluency, visuospatial ability, and language lateralization related to midsagittal surface areas of callosal subregions.

    PubMed

    Hines, M; Chiu, L; McAdams, L A; Bentler, P M; Lipcamon, J

    1992-02-01

    Normal volunteers (28 women), 20-45 years old, completed tests of visuospatial ability, verbal fluency, and language lateralization, and the midsagittal surface areas of the splenium, isthmus, midregion, and genu of the corpus callosum were measured from inversion recovery magnetic resonance images. Multivariate statistics were used to analyze patterns of correlations. Verbal fluency correlated positively with the area of the splenium and with the area of a posterior callosal factor defined largely by the splenium. The posterior callosum, particularly the splenium, also correlated negatively with language lateralization. There were no other consistent brain-behavior relationships. These results are relevant to understanding factors involved in the development of cognitive characteristics that show sex differences and to understanding the neural basis of language lateralization and verbal abilities. PMID:1554435

  5. Lifelong strength training mitigates the age-related decline in efferent drive.

    PubMed

    Unhjem, Runar; Nygård, Mona; van den Hoven, Lene T; Sidhu, Simranjit K; Hoff, Jan; Wang, Eivind

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we documented age-related attenuation of efferent drive to contracting skeletal muscle. It remains elusive if this indication of reduced muscle strength is present with lifelong strength training. For this purpose, we examined evoked potentials in the calf muscles of 11 [71 ± 4 (SD) yr] strength-trained master athletes (MA) contrasted with 10 (71 ± 4 yr) sedentary (SO) and 11 (73 ± 6 yr) recreationally active (AO) old subjects, as well as 9 (22 ± 2 yr) young controls. As expected, MA had higher leg press maximal strength (MA, 185 ± 32 kg; AO, 128 ± 15 kg; SO, 106 ± 11 kg; young, 147 ± 22 kg, P < 0.01) and rate of force development (MA, 5,588 ± 2,488 N/s; AO, 2,156 ± 1,100 N/s; SO, 2,011 ± 825 N/s; young, 3,663 ± 1,140 N/s, P < 0.05) than the other groups. MA also exhibited higher musculus soleus normalized V waves during maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) [maximal V wave amplitude/maximal M wave during MVC (Vsup/Msup); 0.28 ± 0.15] than AO (0.13 ± 0.06, P < 0.01) and SO (0.11 ± 0.05, P < 0.01), yet lower than young (0.45 ± 0.12, P < 0.01). No differences were apparent between the old groups in H reflex recorded at rest or during MVC [maximal H reflex amplitude/maximal M wave during rest (Hmax/Mmax); maximal H reflex amplitude during MVC/maximal M wave during MVC (Hsup/Msup)], and all were lower (P < 0.01) than young. MA (34.4 ± 2.1 ms) had shorter (P < 0.05) H reflex latency compared with AO (36.4 ± 3.7 ms) and SO (37.3 ± 3.2 ms), but longer (P < 0.01) than young (30.7 ± 2.0 ms). Using interpolated twitch analysis, MA (89 ± 7%) had plantar flexion voluntary activation similar to young (90 ± 6%), and this was higher (P < 0.05), or tended to be higher (P = 0.06-0.09), than SO (83 ± 10%) and AO (84 ± 5%). These observations suggest that lifelong strength training has a protective effect against age-related attenuation of efferent drive. In contrast, no beneficial effect seems to derive from habitual recreational activity, indicating

  6. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Aedo, Cristian; Tapia, Eduardo; Pavez, Elizabeth; Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H.; Robles, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1–3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1–6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the chinchilla

  7. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Aedo, Cristian; Tapia, Eduardo; Pavez, Elizabeth; Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H; Robles, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger) were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1-3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1-6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the chinchilla cochlea

  8. Afferent and Efferent Aspects of Mandibular Sensorimotor Control in Adults who Stutter

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Ayoub; Prokopenko, Roman A.; Max, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Individuals who stutter show sensorimotor deficiencies in speech and nonspeech movements. For the mandibular system, we dissociated the sense of kinesthesia from the efferent control component to examine whether kinesthetic integrity itself is compromised in stuttering or whether deficiencies occur only when generating motor commands. Method We investigated 11 stuttering and 11 nonstuttering adults’ kinesthetic sensitivity threshold and kinesthetic accuracy for passive jaw movements as well as their minimal displacement threshold and positioning accuracy for active jaw movements. We also investigated the correlation with an anatomical index of jaw size. Results The groups showed no statistically significant differences on sensory measures for passive jaw movements. Although some stuttering individuals performed more poorly than any nonstuttering participants on the active movement tasks, between-group differences for active movements were also not statistically significant. Unlike fluent speakers, however, the stuttering group showed a statistically significant correlation between mandibular size and performance in the active and passive near-threshold tasks. Conclusions Previously reported minimal movement differences were not replicated. Instead, stuttering individuals’ performance varied with anatomical properties. These correlational results are consistent with the hypothesis that stuttering participants generate and perceive movements based on less accurate internal models of the involved neuromechanical systems. PMID:23816664

  9. Retinal afferents and efferents of an infrared sensitive snake, Crotalus viridis

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The retinal afferents and efferents were examined in Crotalus viridis. Retinofugal fibers were traced by injecting horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or tritiated leucine into the eye, or by removing the eye and staining degenerating axons with silver methods. Terminations were seen contralaterally in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the dorsal and ventral lateral geniculate nuclei (extensive), the pretectal nuclei, including the nucleus posterodorsalis (a very heavy input), the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, nucleus geniculatus pretectalis, and nucleus pretectalis, the superficial layers of the optic tectum, including the stratum zonale, the stratum opticum, the stratum griseum et fibrosum centrale and the upper portion of stratum griseum centrale, and the basal optic nucleus. Ipsilateral input reaches the intermediate portion of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, a small portion of the pretectal nucleus and nucleus posterodorsalis, and the basal optic nucleus (very minimally). Retinopedal fibers were traced with the HRP method. The cell bodies lie in the ventral thalamus within the nucleus of the ventral supraoptic decussation. These neurons project primarily to the contralateral retina, but some more rostrally located neurons project to the ipsilateral retina.

  10. Uncovering diversity in the development of central noradrenergic neurons and their efferents.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sabrina D; Plummer, Nicholas W; Jensen, Patricia

    2016-06-15

    Uncovering the mechanisms that underlie central noradrenergic neuron heterogeneity is essential to understanding selective subtype vulnerability to disease and environmental insult. Using recombinase-based intersectional genetic fate mapping we have previously demonstrated that molecularly distinct progenitor populations give rise to mature noradrenergic neurons differing in their anatomical location, axon morphology and efferent projection pattern. Here we review the findings from our previous study and extend our analysis of the noradrenergic subpopulation defined by transient developmental expression of Hoxb1. Using a combination of intersectional genetic fate mapping and analysis of a targeted loss of function mutation in Hoxb1, we have now uncovered additional heterogeneity based on the requirement of some noradrenergic neurons for Hoxb1 expression. By comparing the distribution of noradrenergic neurons derived from the Hoxb1 expression domain in wild-type and mutant mice, we demonstrate that Hoxb1 expression is required by a subset of neurons in the pons. Additional fate mapping, using a Hoxb1 enhancer element that drives Cre recombinase expression exclusively in rhombomere 4 of the hindbrain, reveals the existence of a subpopulation of noradrenergic neurons in the pons with more restricted axonal targets than the full Hoxb1-derived subpopulation. The unique projection profile of this newly defined subpopulation suggests that it may be functionally distinct. These analyses shed new light on the molecular determinants of noradrenergic identity in the pons and the overall complexity of the central noradrenergic system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26612521

  11. Uroguanylin Action in the Brain Reduces Weight Gain in Obese Mice via Different Efferent Autonomic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Folgueira, Cintia; Beiroa, Daniel; Callon, Aurelie; Al-Massadi, Omar; Barja-Fernandez, Silvia; Senra, Ana; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Casanueva, Felipe F; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Seoane, Luisa M; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    The gut-brain axis is of great importance in the control of energy homeostasis. The identification of uroguanylin (UGN), a peptide released in the intestines that is regulated by nutritional status and anorectic actions, as the endogenous ligand for the guanylyl cyclase 2C receptor has revealed a new system in the regulation of energy balance. We show that chronic central infusion of UGN reduces weight gain and adiposity in diet-induced obese mice. These effects were independent of food intake and involved specific efferent autonomic pathways. On one hand, brain UGN induces brown adipose tissue thermogenesis, as well as browning and lipid mobilization in white adipose tissue through stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. On the other hand, brain UGN augments fecal output through the vagus nerve. These findings are of relevance as they suggest that the beneficial metabolic actions of UGN through the sympathetic nervous system do not involve nondesirable gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as diarrhea. The present work provides mechanistic insights into how UGN influences energy homeostasis and suggests that UGN action in the brain represents a feasible pharmacological target in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26566631

  12. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart. PMID:25784543

  13. Morphological and ultrastructural study of the efferent ductules in the Chinese soft-shelled turtle Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad Yasir; Liu, Tengfei; Yang, Ping; Ahmed, Nisar; Zhang, Qian; Hu, Lisi; Hong, Chen; Chen, Qiusheng

    2016-02-01

    Comparative study of the turtle excurrent duct system increases our understanding the evolution of sperm motility and fertility maintenance in higher vertebrates. Therefore, in this study we observed the histology and ultrastructure organization of efferent ductules in the Pelodiscus sinensis using light and transmission electron microscopy. The efferent ductules are extra- testicular and 22-28 in number originate from rete testis. The epithelium is entirely composed of two types of cells, the predominant non-ciliated and ciliated cells. The ciliated cells have long cilia that protrude into the lumen to form a meshwork. These cells associated with clusters of mitochondria in the supranuclear cytoplasm and possess coated vesicles, vacuole, intracellular spaces, and junction complexes. Ciliated cells in the proximal portion of the ductules contain an endocytic apparatus with coated pits and tubules in the apical cytoplasm. Interdigitations and lipid droplets are predominantly present around the nuclei of these cells. The non-ciliated cells have clusters of mitochondria present in both the supranuclear and perinuclear cytoplasm whereas, the nuclei of these cells are lightly stained. Moreover, the contour of the epithelium towards lumen is irregular as it has a deep indentation. The apical cytoplasm goes deep into the lumen to form cytoplasmic processes. This is the first study to describe the detailed features of efferent ductules in Pelodiscus sinensis with, special focus on the morphology of ciliated cells, as these cells are involved in the mixing of luminal fluid and transport of spermatozoa towards the distal region. PMID:26700193

  14. Chemical Topography of Efferent Projections from the Median Preoptic Nucleus to Pontine Monoaminergic Cell Groups in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1995-01-01

    This study examined efferent output from the median preoptic nucleus (MNPO) to pontine noradrenergic and serotonergic cell groups using an anterograde tracing technique (Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, PHA-L) combined with glucose oxidase immunocytochemistry to serotonin (5-HT) or to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH). Injections of PHA-L into the ventral MNPO resulted in moderate axonal labeling within the region of the B7 and B8 serotonergic groups in the dorsal raphe. PHA-L labeled fibers and punctate processes were observed in close apposition to many of the 5-HT immunoreactive neurons in these regions. In contrast, sparse terminal labeling was found within the B5 group in the raphe pontis nucleus, and only trace fiber labeling observed in the B3 and B6 groups. Efferents from the MNPO also provided moderate innervation to the A6 and A7 noradrenergic groups. PHA-L labeled punctate processes were found most frequently in close apposition to DBH-immunoreactive neurons at mid- to caudal levels of the locus coeruleus. Some labeled axons were also present within the A7 and A5 groups. Additionally, a close apposition between labeled MNPO efferents and 5-HT fibers within the lateral parabrachial nucleus was observed. The results indicate the MNPO provides a topographic innervation of monoaminergic groups in the upper brainstem.

  15. Chemical Topography of Efferent Projections from the Median Preoptic Nucleus to Pontine Monoaminergic Cell Groups in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1995-01-01

    This study examined efferent output from the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) to pontine noradrenergic and serotonergic cell groups using an anterograde tracing technique (Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, PHA-L) combined with glucose oxidase immunocytochemistry to scrotonin (5-HT) or to dopamine-(beta)-hydroxylase (DBH). Injections of PHA-L into the ventral MNPO resulted in moderate axonal labeling within the region of the B7 and B8 serotonergic groups in the dorsal raphe. PHA-L labeled fibers and punctate processes were observed in close apposition to many of the 5-HT immunoreactive neurons in these regions, In contrast, sparse terminal labeling was found within the B5 group in the raphe pontis nucleus, and only trace fiber labeling observed in the B3 and B6 groups. Efferents from the MNPO also provided moderate innervation to the A6 and A7 noradrenergic groups. PHA-L labeled punctate processes were found most frequently in close apposition to DBH-immunorcactive neurons at mid- to caudal levels of the locus coeruleus. Some labeled axons were also present within the A7 and A5 groups. Additionally, a close apposition between labeled MNPO efferents and 5-HT fibers within the lateral parabrachial nucleus was observed, The results indicate the MNPO provides a topographic innerva- tion of monoaminergic groups in the upper brainstem.

  16. Subcortical connections of area V4 in the macaque

    PubMed Central

    Gattass, Ricardo; Galkin, Thelma W; Desimone, Robert; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2014-01-01

    Area V4 has numerous, topographically organized connections with multiple cortical areas, some of which are important for spatially organized visual processing, and others which seem important for spatial attention. Although the topographic organization of V4’s connections with other cortical areas has been established, the detailed topography of its connections with subcortical areas is unclear. We therefore injected retrograde and anterograde tracers in different topographical regions of V4 in nine macaques to determine the organization of its subcortical connections. The injection sites included representations ranging from the fovea to far peripheral eccentricities in both the upper and lower visual fields. The topographically organized connections of V4 included bidirectional connections with four subdivisions of the pulvinar, two subdivisions of the claustrum, and the interlaminar portions of the lateral geniculate nucleus, and efferent projections to the superficial and intermediate layers of the superior colliculus, the thalamic reticular nucleus, and the caudate nucleus. All of these structures have a possible role in spatial attention. The nontopographic, or converging, connections included bidirectional connections with the lateral nucleus of the amygdala, afferent inputs from the dorsal raphe, median raphe, locus coeruleus, ventral tegmentum and nucleus basalis of Meynert, and efferent projections to the putamen. Any role of these structures in attention may be less spatially specific. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:1941–1965, 2014. PMID:24288173

  17. The efference cascade, consciousness, and its self: naturalizing the first person pivot of action control

    PubMed Central

    Merker, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    The 20 billion neurons of the neocortex have a mere hundred thousand motor neurons by which to express cortical contents in overt behavior. Implemented through a staggered cortical “efference cascade” originating in the descending axons of layer five pyramidal cells throughout the neocortical expanse, this steep convergence accomplishes final integration for action of cortical information through a system of interconnected subcortical way stations. Coherent and effective action control requires the inclusion of a continually updated joint “global best estimate” of current sensory, motivational, and motor circumstances in this process. I have previously proposed that this running best estimate is extracted from cortical probabilistic preliminaries by a subcortical neural “reality model” implementing our conscious sensory phenomenology. As such it must exhibit first person perspectival organization, suggested to derive from formating requirements of the brain's subsystem for gaze control, with the superior colliculus at its base. Gaze movements provide the leading edge of behavior by capturing targets of engagement prior to contact. The rotation-based geometry of directional gaze movements places their implicit origin inside the head, a location recoverable by cortical probabilistic source reconstruction from the rampant primary sensory variance generated by the incessant play of collicularly triggered gaze movements. At the interface between cortex and colliculus lies the dorsal pulvinar. Its unique long-range inhibitory circuitry may precipitate the brain's global best estimate of its momentary circumstances through multiple constraint satisfaction across its afferents from numerous cortical areas and colliculus. As phenomenal content of our sensory awareness, such a global best estimate would exhibit perspectival organization centered on a purely implicit first person origin, inherently incapable of appearing as a phenomenal content of the sensory

  18. Differential efferent projections of the anterior, posteroventral, and posterodorsal subdivisions of the medial amygdala in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Bellver, Cecília; Cádiz-Moretti, Bernardita; Novejarque, Amparo; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The medial amygdaloid nucleus (Me) is a key structure in the control of sociosexual behavior in mice. It receives direct projections from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (AOB), as well as an important hormonal input. To better understand its behavioral role, in this work we investigate the structures receiving information from the Me, by analysing the efferent projections from its anterior (MeA), posterodorsal (MePD) and posteroventral (MePV) subdivisions, using anterograde neuronal tracing with biotinylated and tetrametylrhodamine-conjugated dextranamines. The Me is strongly interconnected with the rest of the chemosensory amygdala, but shows only moderate projections to the central nucleus and light projections to the associative nuclei of the basolateral amygdaloid complex. In addition, the MeA originates a strong feedback projection to the deep mitral cell layer of the AOB, whereas the MePV projects to its granule cell layer. The Me (especially the MeA) has also moderate projections to different olfactory structures, including the piriform cortex (Pir). The densest outputs of the Me target the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and the hypothalamus. The MeA and MePV project to key structures of the circuit involved in the defensive response against predators (medial posterointermediate BST, anterior hypothalamic area, dorsomedial aspect of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus), although less dense projections also innervate reproductive-related nuclei. In contrast, the MePD projects mainly to structures that control reproductive behaviors [medial posteromedial BST, medial preoptic nucleus, and ventrolateral aspect of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus], although less dense projections to defensive-related nuclei also exist. These results confirm and extend previous results in other rodents and suggest that the medial amygdala is anatomically and functionally compartmentalized. PMID:22933993

  19. Monocular distance estimation with optical flow maneuvers and efference copies: a stability-based strategy.

    PubMed

    de Croon, Guido C H E

    2016-02-01

    The visual cue of optical flow plays an important role in the navigation of flying insects, and is increasingly studied for use by small flying robots as well. A major problem is that successful optical flow control seems to require distance estimates, while optical flow is known to provide only the ratio of velocity to distance. In this article, a novel, stability-based strategy is proposed for monocular distance estimation, relying on optical flow maneuvers and knowledge of the control inputs (efference copies). It is shown analytically that given a fixed control gain, the stability of a constant divergence control loop only depends on the distance to the approached surface. At close distances, the control loop starts to exhibit self-induced oscillations. The robot can detect these oscillations and hence be aware of the distance to the surface. The proposed stability-based strategy for estimating distances has two main attractive characteristics. First, self-induced oscillations can be detected robustly by the robot and are hardly influenced by wind. Second, the distance can be estimated during a zero divergence maneuver, i.e., around hover. The stability-based strategy is implemented and tested both in simulation and on board a Parrot AR drone 2.0. It is shown that the strategy can be used to: (1) trigger a final approach response during a constant divergence landing with fixed gain, (2) estimate the distance in hover, and (3) estimate distances during an entire landing if the robot uses adaptive gain control to continuously stay on the 'edge of oscillation.' PMID:26740501

  20. Immunolocalization of Aquaporins 1 and 9 in the Ram Efferent Ducts and Epididymis.

    PubMed

    Schimming, B C; Pinheiro, Pff; de Matteis, R; Machado, C M; Domeniconi, R F

    2015-08-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are essential membrane protein channels for the transport of water across membranes. Fluid movement in the epididymis is important for modulation of the luminal environment, in which sperm mature and reside. This study was designed to understand the morphology and localization of AQPs in ram efferent ducts (ED) and epididymis. For this purpose, the epididymis of seven animals were removed for histologic and immunohistochemical analyses. AQP1 immunoreactivity was observed in the apex of the ED, and AQP9 was found adjacent to the nuclei of the epithelial cells of the ED. The epithelial lining of ram epididymis is pseudostratified columnar and presents principal, basal, apical and narrow cells. In the initial segment (IS), a moderate reaction for AQP1 was observed in the apical cytoplasm of epithelial cells. An intense reactivity for AQP1 was noted over the microvilli of principal cells and in spermatozoa in the caput. In the corpus and cauda, AQP1 was noted only over the endothelial cells of vascular channels located in intertubular spaces. A weak-to-moderate reaction for AQP9 was observed in the nuclei of epithelial cells in the IS, caput and corpus of the epididymis. In the cauda, an intense reaction to AQP9 was observed in the epithelial border. In the IS, caput and corpus, the reactivity for AQP9 differed from those observed in domestic animals. The cauda showed a pattern similar to that previously described. These results indicate that AQPs 1 and 9 have reversed locations and roles in rams, suggesting activity variations related with fluid and solute absorption throughout the epididymis. PMID:25976237

  1. Effects of hexavalent chromium on microtubule organization, ER distribution and callose deposition in root tip cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Melissa, Pelagia

    2012-04-01

    The subcellular targets of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] were examined in Allium cepa root tips with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cr(VI) exerted dose- and time-dependent negative effects on root growth rate, the mitotic index and microtubule (MT) organization during cell division cycle. Interphase MTs were more resistant than the mitotic ones, but when affected they were shorter, sparse and disoriented. The preprophase band of MTs became poorly organized, branched or with fragmented MTs, whilst neither a perinuclear array nor a prophase spindle was formed. Metaphase spindles converged to eccentric mini poles or consisted of dissimilar halves and were unable to correctly orient the chromosomes. Anaphase spindles were less disturbed, but chromatids failed to separate; neither did they move to the poles. At telophase, projecting, lagging or bridging chromosomes and micronuclei also occurred. Phragmoplasts were unilaterally developed, split, located at unexpected sites and frequently dissociated from the branched and misaligned cell plates. Chromosomal aberrations were directly correlated with MT disturbance. The morphology and distribution of endoplasmic reticulum was severely perturbed and presumably contributed to MT disassembly. Heavy callose apposition was also induced by Cr(VI), maybe in the context of a cellular defence reaction. Results indicate that MTs are one of the main subcellular targets of Cr(VI), MT impairment underlies chromosomal and mitotic aberrations, and MTs may constitute a reliable biomonitoring system for Cr(VI) toxicity in plants. PMID:21633932

  2. Subset of early radial glial progenitors that contribute to the development of callosal neurons is absent from avian brain

    PubMed Central

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The classical view of mammalian cortical development suggests that pyramidal neurons are generated in a temporal sequence, with all radial glial cells (RGCs) contributing to both lower and upper neocortical layers. A recent opposing proposal suggests there is a subgroup of fate-restricted RGCs in the early neocortex, which generates only upper-layer neurons. Little is known about the existence of fate restriction of homologous progenitors in other vertebrate species. We investigated the lineage of selected Emx2+ [vertebrate homeobox gene related to Drosophila empty spiracles (ems)] RGCs in mouse neocortex and chick forebrain and found evidence for both sequential and fate-restricted programs only in mouse, indicating that these complementary populations coexist in the developing mammalian but not avian brain. Among a large population of sequentially programmed RGCs in the mouse brain, a subset of self-renewing progenitors lack neurogenic potential during the earliest phase of corticogenesis. After a considerable delay, these progenitors generate callosal upper-layer neurons and glia. On the other hand, we found no homologous delayed population in any sectors of the chick forebrain. This finding suggests that neurogenic delay of selected RGCs may be unique to mammals and possibly associated with the evolution of the corpus callosum. PMID:26305942

  3. Subset of early radial glial progenitors that contribute to the development of callosal neurons is absent from avian brain.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-09-01

    The classical view of mammalian cortical development suggests that pyramidal neurons are generated in a temporal sequence, with all radial glial cells (RGCs) contributing to both lower and upper neocortical layers. A recent opposing proposal suggests there is a subgroup of fate-restricted RGCs in the early neocortex, which generates only upper-layer neurons. Little is known about the existence of fate restriction of homologous progenitors in other vertebrate species. We investigated the lineage of selected Emx2+ [vertebrate homeobox gene related to Drosophila empty spiracles (ems)] RGCs in mouse neocortex and chick forebrain and found evidence for both sequential and fate-restricted programs only in mouse, indicating that these complementary populations coexist in the developing mammalian but not avian brain. Among a large population of sequentially programmed RGCs in the mouse brain, a subset of self-renewing progenitors lack neurogenic potential during the earliest phase of corticogenesis. After a considerable delay, these progenitors generate callosal upper-layer neurons and glia. On the other hand, we found no homologous delayed population in any sectors of the chick forebrain. This finding suggests that neurogenic delay of selected RGCs may be unique to mammals and possibly associated with the evolution of the corpus callosum. PMID:26305942

  4. The renal response to electrical stimulation of renal efferent sympathetic nerves in the anaesthetized greyhound.

    PubMed

    Poucher, S M; Karim, F

    1991-03-01

    1. The effect of direct electrical stimulation of the renal efferent nerves upon renal haemodynamics and function was studied in greyhounds anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated. The left kidney was neurally and vascularly isolated, and perfused with blood from one of the femoral arteries at a constant pressure of 99 +/- 1 mmHg. Renal blood flow was measured with a cannulating electromagnetic flow probe placed in the perfusion circuit, glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance, urinary sodium excretion by flame photometry and solute excretion by osmometry. Beta-Adrenergic receptor activation was blocked by the infusion of dl-propranolol (17 micrograms kg-1 min-1). The peripheral ends of the ligated renal nerves were stimulated at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Hz. 2. At 0.5 Hz frequency only osmolar excretion was significantly reduced (10.3 +/- 3.2%, P less than 0.05, n = 6). Reductions in sodium excretion (53.6 +/- 8.5%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) and water excretion (26.9 +/- 8.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 6) and further reductions of osmolar excretion (20.7 +/- 3.7%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) were observed at 1.0 Hz; however, these were observed in the absence of significant changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Significant reductions were observed in glomerular filtration rate at 1.5 Hz (16.3 +/- 4.1%, P less than 0.02, n = 5) and in renal blood flow at 2.0 Hz (13.1 +/- 4.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 5). Further reductions in urine flow and sodium excretion were also observed at these higher frequencies. 3. These results clearly show that significant changes in renal tubular function can occur in the absence of changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate when the renal nerves are stimulated electrically from a zero baseline activity up to a frequency of 1.5 Hz. Higher frequencies caused significant changes in both renal haemodynamics and function. PMID:2023113

  5. Afferent and efferent components of the cardiovascular reflex responses to acute hypoxia in term fetal sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Giussani, D A; Spencer, J A; Moore, P J; Bennet, L; Hanson, M A

    1993-01-01

    afferent limb of this reflex. The bradycardia is mediated through a muscarinic pathway, as it is blocked by atropine. The femoral vasoconstriction is mediated through an alpha-adrenergic mechanism, mediated both neurally by a carotid chemoreflex and via catecholamines released directly from the adrenal medulla. Both these components are blocked by phentolamine. 7. The differences in survival between intact and denervated fetuses during hypoxia after phentolamine suggest that the carotid chemoreflex response to hypoxia involves mechanisms in addition to vagal efferents to the heart and alpha-adrenergic actions at peripheral blood vessels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8350271

  6. Individual differences in cortical connections of somatosensory cortex are associated with parental rearing style in prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Seelke, Adele M H; Perkeybile, Allison M; Grunewald, Rebecca; Bales, Karen L; Krubitzer, Leah A

    2016-02-15

    Early-life sensory experiences have a profound effect on brain organization, connectivity, and subsequent behavior. In most mammals, the earliest sensory inputs are delivered to the developing brain through tactile contact with the parents, especially the mother. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are monogamous and, like humans, are biparental. Within the normal prairie vole population, both the type and the amount of interactions, particularly tactile contact, that parents have with their offspring vary. The question is whether these early and pervasive differences in tactile stimulation and social experience between parent and offspring are manifest in differences in cortical organization and connectivity. To address this question, we examined the cortical and callosal connections of the primary somatosensory area (S1) in high-contact (HC) and low-contact (LC) offspring using neuroanatomical tracing techniques. Injection sites within S1 were matched so that direct comparisons between these two groups could be made. We observed several important differences between these groups. The first was that HC offspring had a greater density of intrinsic connections within S1 compared with LC offspring. Additionally, HC offspring had a more restricted pattern of ipsilateral connections, whereas LC offspring had dense connections with areas of parietal and frontal cortex that were more widespread. Finally, LC offspring had a broader distribution of callosal connections than HC offspring and a significantly higher percentage of labeled callosal neurons. This study is the first to examine individual differences in cortical connections and suggests that individual differences in cortical connections may be related to natural differences in parental rearing styles associated with tactile contact. PMID:26101098

  7. Afferent and efferent projections of the mesopallium in the pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro; Wild, J Martin

    2012-03-01

    The mesopallium is a thick cell plate occupying a substantial portion of the avian dorsal pallium, but its hodology is incompletely known. In pigeons we examined fiber connections of the frontodorsal (MFD) and frontoventral mesopallium (MFV), the ventrolateral mesopallium (MVL), the lateral (MIVl) and medial (MIVm) parts of the intermediate ventral mesopallium, and the caudal mesopallium (MC). MFV, MIVl, and MC connect reciprocally with secondary centers of the trigeminal, tectofugal, and auditory systems, respectively. MVL forms reciprocal connections with both the entopallial core and belt. MFV, MIVl, MVL, and MC receive thalamic inputs different from those of primary sensory pallial regions and have reciprocal connections with the caudolateral nidopallium (NCL) or arcopallium. MIVm has a strong reciprocal connection with the intermediate medial nidopallium. It receives afferents from the visual Wulst, rostral MC, posterior dorsointermediate thalamic nucleus, and caudal part of the posterior dorsolateral thalamic nucleus, is connected reciprocally with the arcopallium, and projects to NCL. MFD has reciprocal connections with the medial frontal nidopallium, arcopallium, posterior pallial amygdala, dorsolateral corticoid area, and projects to the medial part of medial striatum and hypothalamus. These results indicate that six subdivisions of the mesopallium have strong connections with corresponding portions of the nidopallium. In particular, the sensory mesopallial components of MFV, MIVl, MVL, and MC form parallel pathways to the one-way sensory streams in the nidopallium and make either feedback or feedforward circuits to the secondary centers of the nidopallium. PMID:21935938

  8. Endoscopy-assisted transanal repair of afferent limb obstruction and long efferent limb with ileopexy after ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Kawamura, Mikio; Kondo, Satoru; Kobayashi, Minako; Ohi, Masaki; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2016-05-01

    Afferent limb obstruction can be a persistent complication after restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. We present a case of afferent limb obstruction complicated by a long efferent limb of the ileal pouch that we successfully treated with side-to-side anastomosis of the afferent and efferent limbs. The procedure involved using a transanal endoscopic stapling device assisted by transanal endoscopy with a thin intestinal video endoscope. This allowed reliable, safe visualization of the lesion from the tight pouch-anal anastomosis and facilitated repair with an endoscopic stapling device. Because the technique was performed without enterotomy, it reduced the risks of contamination and leakage from transabdominal small bowel anastomosis. Laparotomy view also prevented of injury to the pouch itself and entrapment of the mesentery of the afferent and efferent limbs of the pouch between the stapler anvils. PMID:27117971

  9. Use of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions to investigate efferent and cochlear contributions to temporal overshoot1

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Schairer, Kim S.; Ellison, John C.; Fitzpatrick, Denis F.; Jesteadt, Walt

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral threshold for a tone burst presented in a long-duration noise masker decreases as the onset of the tone burst is delayed relative to masker onset. The threshold difference between detection of early- and late-onset tone bursts is called overshoot. Although the underlying mechanisms are unclear, one hypothesis is that overshoot occurs due to efferent suppression of cochlear nonlinearity [von Klitzing, R., and Kohlrausch, A. (1994). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 2192–2201]. This hypothesis was tested by using overshoot conditions to elicit stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs), which provide a physiological measure of cochlear nonlinearity. SFOAE and behavioral thresholds were estimated using a modified maximum-likelihood yes-no procedure. The masker was a 400-ms “frozen” notched noise. The signal was a 20-ms, 4-kHz tone burst presented at 1 or 200 ms after the noise onset. Behavioral overshoot results replicated previous studies, but no overshoot was observed in SFOAE thresholds. This suggests that either efferent suppression of cochlear nonlinearity is not involved in overshoot, or a SFOAE threshold estimation procedure based on stimuli similar to those used to study behavioral overshoot is not sensitive enough to measure the effect. PMID:19275317

  10. Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging Evaluation of Callosal Abnormalities in Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Chuanjun; Liu, Mei; Wang, Lina; Tian, Hongjun; Tang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Widespread white matter (WM) abnormalities have been found in patients with schizophrenia. Corpus callosum (CC) is the key area that connects the left and right brain hemispheres. However, the results of studies considering different subregions of the CC as regions of interest in patients with schizophrenia have been inconsistent. To obtain a more consistent evaluation of the diffusion characteristics change of the corpus callosum (CC) related to schizophrenia. A meta-analysis involving fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the CC of 729 schizophrenic subjects and 682 healthy controls from 22 studies was conducted. Overall FA values in the CC of the schizophrenic group were less than that of the healthy control group [weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.021,P< 0.001]. So were the FA values in the genus region (WMD = -0.019, P< 0.001) and the splenium region (WMD = -0.020, P< 0.001) of the CC respectively. The FA reduction was also significant in subjects with chronic schizophrenia (WMD = -0.032, P< 0.001) and first-episode schizophrenia (WMD = -0.014, P = 0.001). In present study, we demonstrated an overall FA decrease in the CC of schizophrenic patients. In the two subgroup analyses of the genu vs splenium region and chronic vs first-episode schizophrenia, the decrease of all groups was significant. Further studies with more homogenous populations and standardized DTI protocols are needed to confirm and extend these findings. PMID:27536773

  11. Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging Evaluation of Callosal Abnormalities in Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Chuanjun; Liu, Mei; Wang, Lina; Tian, Hongjun; Tang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Widespread white matter (WM) abnormalities have been found in patients with schizophrenia. Corpus callosum (CC) is the key area that connects the left and right brain hemispheres. However, the results of studies considering different subregions of the CC as regions of interest in patients with schizophrenia have been inconsistent. To obtain a more consistent evaluation of the diffusion characteristics change of the corpus callosum (CC) related to schizophrenia. A meta-analysis involving fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the CC of 729 schizophrenic subjects and 682 healthy controls from 22 studies was conducted. Overall FA values in the CC of the schizophrenic group were less than that of the healthy control group [weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.021,P< 0.001]. So were the FA values in the genus region (WMD = -0.019, P< 0.001) and the splenium region (WMD = -0.020, P< 0.001) of the CC respectively. The FA reduction was also significant in subjects with chronic schizophrenia (WMD = -0.032, P< 0.001) and first-episode schizophrenia (WMD = -0.014, P = 0.001). In present study, we demonstrated an overall FA decrease in the CC of schizophrenic patients. In the two subgroup analyses of the genu vs splenium region and chronic vs first-episode schizophrenia, the decrease of all groups was significant. Further studies with more homogenous populations and standardized DTI protocols are needed to confirm and extend these findings. PMID:27536773

  12. Individual differences in cortical connections of somatosensory cortex are associated with parental rearing style in prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Seelke, Adele M. H.; Perkeybile, Allison M.; Grunewald, Rebecca; Bales, Karen L.; Krubitzer, Leah A.

    2015-01-01

    Early life sensory experiences have a profound effect on brain organization, connectivity and subsequent behavior. In most mammals, the earliest sensory inputs are delivered to the developing brain through tactile contact with the parents, especially the mother. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are monogamous and, like humans, are biparental. Within the normal prairie vole population, both the type and amount of interactions, particularly tactile contact, that parents have with their offspring varies. The question is whether these early and pervasive differences in tactile stimulation and social experience between parent and offspring are manifest in differences in cortical organization and connectivity. To address this question we examined the cortical and callosal connections of the primary somatosensory area (S1) in high contact (HC) and low contact (LC) offspring using neuroanatomical tracing techniques. Injection sites within S1 were matched so that direct comparisons between these two groups could be made. We observed several important differences between these groups. The first was that HC offspring had a greater density of intrinsic connections within S1 compared to LC offspring. The HC offspring had a more restricted pattern of ipsilateral connections while LC offspring had dense connections with areas of parietal and frontal cortex that were more widespread. Finally, LC offspring had a broader distribution of callosal connections than HC offspring and a significantly higher percentage of callosal labeled neurons. To date, this is the first study that examines individual differences in cortical connections and suggests that they may be related to natural differences in parental rearing styles associated with tactile contact. PMID:26101098

  13. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  14. Sr36- and Sr5-Mediated Resistance Response to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Is Associated with Callose Deposition in Wheat Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; McCallum, B D; Fetch, T; Bakkeren, G; Saville, B J

    2015-06-01

    Race-specific resistance of wheat to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is primarily posthaustorial and often involves the induction of a hypersensitive response (HR). The aim of this study was to investigate host defense responses induced in interactions between P. graminis f. sp. tritici races and wheat lines carrying different race-specific stem rust resistance (Sr) genes. In incompatible interactions between wheat lines carrying Sr36 in three genetic backgrounds (LMPG, Prelude, or W2691) and avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici races MCCFC or RCCDM, callose accumulated within 24 h in wheat guard cells contacted by a P. graminis f. sp. tritici appressorium, and P. graminis f. sp. tritici ingress was inhibited following appressorium formation. Accordingly, the expression of transcripts encoding a callose synthase increased in the incompatible interaction between LMPG-Sr36 and avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici race MCCFC. Furthermore, the inhibition of callose synthesis through the infiltration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DDG) increased the ability of P. graminis f. sp. tritici race MCCFC to infect LMPG-Sr36. A similar induction of callose deposition in wheat guard cells was also observed within 24 h after inoculation (hai) with avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici race HKCJC on LMPG-Sr5 plants. In contrast, this defense response was not induced in incompatible interactions involving Sr6, Sr24, or Sr30. Instead, the induction of an HR and cellular lignification were noted. The manifestation of the HR and cellular lignification was induced earlier (24 hai) and was more extensive in the resistance response mediated by Sr6 compared with those mediated by Sr24 or Sr30. These results indicate that the resistance mediated by Sr36 is similar to that mediated by Sr5 but different from those triggered by Sr6, Sr24, or Sr30. Resistance responses mediated by Sr5 and Sr36 are prehaustorial, and are a result of very rapid recognition of molecules derived from avirulent isolates of

  15. The elusive concept of brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Barry

    2003-06-01

    Neurons and neural populations do not function as islands onto themselves. Rather, they interact with other such elements through their afferent and efferent connections in an orchestrated manner so as to enable different sensorimotor and cognitive tasks to be performed. The concept of functional connectivity and the allied notion of effective connectivity were introduced to designate the functional strengths of such interactions. Functional neuroimaging methods, especially PET and fMRI, have been used extensively to evaluate the functional connectivity between different brain regions. After providing a brief historical review of these notions of brain connectivity, I argue that the conceptual formulations of functional and effective connectivity are far from clear. Specifically, the terms functional and effective connectivity are applied to quantities computed on types of functional imaging data (e.g., PET, fMRI, EEG) that vary in spatial, temporal, and other features, using different definitions (even for data of the same modality) and employing different computational algorithms. Until it is understood what each definition means in terms of an underlying neural substrate, comparisons of functional and/or effective connectivity across studies may appear inconsistent and should be performed with great caution. PMID:12814595

  16. An abrupt developmental shift in callosal modulation of sleep-related spindle bursts coincides with the emergence of excitatory-inhibitory balance and a reduction of somatosensory cortical plasticity.

    PubMed

    Marcano-Reik, Amy Jo; Prasad, Tuhina; Weiner, Joshua A; Blumberg, Mark S

    2010-10-01

    Transecting the corpus callosum of postnatal day (P)1-6 rats disinhibits the production of spindle bursts (SBs) within primary somatosensory cortex (S1), most notably during periods of sleep-related myoclonic twitching. Here we investigated developmental changes in this callosally mediated disinhibition and its association with cortical plasticity. Recordings in P2-15 subjects revealed that callosotomy-induced disinhibition is a transient feature of early development that disappears abruptly after P6. This abrupt switch was accompanied by sharp decreases in myoclonic twitching and equally sharp increases in spontaneous SBs and in the number of GABAergic and glutamatergic presynaptic terminals in S1. Expression of the K+Cl- cotransporter 2 (KCC2) also increased across these ages. To determine whether these developmental changes are associated with alterations in cortical plasticity, pups were callosotomized at P1, P6, or P8, and tested over the subsequent week. Regardless of age, callosotomy immediately disrupted SBs evoked by forepaw stimulation. Over the next week, the P1 and P6 callosotomy groups exhibited full recovery of function; in contrast, the P8 group did not exhibit recovery of function, thus indicating an abrupt decrease in cortical plasticity between P6 and P8. Together, our data demonstrate that callosotomy-induced disinhibition is a transient phenomenon whose disappearance coincides with the onset of increased intrinsic connectivity, establishment of excitatory-inhibitory balance, and diminished plasticity in S1. Accordingly, our findings indicate that callosotomy-induced disinhibition of twitch-related SBs is a bioassay of somatosensory cortical plasticity and, in addition, support the hypothesis that myoclonic twitches, like retinal waves, actively contribute to cortical development and plasticity. PMID:20939660

  17. An abrupt developmental shift in callosal modulation of sleep-related spindle bursts coincides with the emergence of excitatory-inhibitory balance and a reduction of somatosensory cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Marcano-Reik, Amy Jo; Prasad, Tuhina; Weiner, Joshua A.; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Transecting the corpus callosum of postnatal day (P)1–6 rats disinhibits the production of spindle bursts (SBs) within primary somatosensory cortex (S1), most notably during periods of sleep-related myoclonic twitching. Here we investigated developmental changes in this callosally mediated disinhibition and its association with cortical plasticity. Recordings in P2–15 subjects revealed that callosotomy-induced disinhibition is a transient feature of early development that disappears abruptly after P6. This abrupt switch was accompanied by sharp decreases in myoclonic twitching and equally sharp increases in spontaneous SBs and in the number of GABAergic and glutamatergic presynaptic terminals in S1. Expression of the K+Cl− co-transporter 2 (KCC2) also increased across these ages. To determine whether these abrupt developmental changes are associated with alterations in cortical plasticity, pups were callosotomized at P1, P6, or P8, and tested over the subsequent week. Regardless of age, callosotomy immediately disrupted SBs evoked by forepaw stimulation. Over the next week, the P1 and P6 callosotomy groups exhibited full recovery of function; in contrast, the P8 group did not exhibit recovery of function, thus indicating an abrupt decrease in cortical plasticity between P6 and P8. Together, our data demonstrate that callosotomy-induced disinhibition is a transient phenomenon whose disappearance coincides with the onset of increased intrinsic connectivity, establishment of excitatory-inhibitory balance, and diminished plasticity in S1. Accordingly, our findings indicate that callosotomy-induced disinhibition of twitch-related SBs is a bioassay of somatosensory cortical plasticity and, in addition, support the hypothesis that myoclonic twitches, like retinal waves, actively contribute to cortical development and plasticity. PMID:20939660

  18. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Deletion in Efferent Olivocochlear Neurons Perturbs Afferent Synaptic Maturation and Reduces the Dynamic Range of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Tyler T.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Normal hearing requires proper differentiation of afferent ribbon synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) that carry acoustic information to the brain. Within individual IHCs, presynaptic ribbons show a size gradient with larger ribbons on the modiolar face and smaller ribbons on the pillar face. This structural gradient is associated with a gradient of spontaneous rates and threshold sensitivity, which is essential for a wide dynamic range of hearing. Despite their importance for hearing, mechanisms that direct ribbon differentiation are poorly defined. We recently identified adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) as a key regulator of interneuronal synapse maturation. Here, we show that APC is required for ribbon size heterogeneity and normal cochlear function. Compared with wild-type littermates, APC conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit decreased auditory brainstem responses. The IHC ribbon size gradient is also perturbed. Whereas the normal-developing IHCs display ribbon size gradients before hearing onset, ribbon sizes are aberrant in APC cKOs from neonatal ages on. Reporter expression studies show that the CaMKII-Cre used to delete the floxed APC gene is present in efferent olivocochlear (OC) neurons, not IHCs or SGNs. APC loss led to increased volumes and numbers of OC inhibitory dopaminergic boutons on neonatal SGN fibers. Our findings identify APC in efferent OC neurons as essential for regulating ribbon heterogeneity, dopaminergic terminal differentiation, and cochlear sensitivity. This APC effect on auditory epithelial cell synapses resembles interneuronal and nerve–muscle synapses, thereby defining a global role for APC in synaptic maturation in diverse cell types. Significance Statement This study identifies novel molecules and cellular interactions that are essential for the proper maturation of afferent ribbon synapses in sensory cells of the inner ear, and for normal hearing. PMID:26085645

  19. Action potentials in parasympathetic and sympathetic efferent fibres to the trachea and lungs of dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J. G.

    1966-01-01

    1. Action potentials were recorded from seventy-four single and twenty-nine small multifibre nerve strands efferent to the trachea and lungs of cats and dogs. From the pathway (vagal or sympathetic), spontaneous activity, conduction velocity and responses to various interventions the efferent fibres were classified in the following way. 2. Group I, vagal. These had a mean conduction velocity of 9·7 m/sec, and had a respiratory but seldom a cardiac rhythm. Their discharge was inhibited during hypertension caused by injections of adrenaline and during inflation of the lungs, but was increased during tracheal occlusion, stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors and irritation of the larynx. The fibres are thought to be constrictor to the airways. 3. Group II, sympathetic. These had a mean conduction velocity of 0·85 m/sec and usually had inspiratory and cardiac rhythms. Their discharge usually responded qualitatively as that of group I fibres to the various interventions, but with clear quantitative differences. They are divided into three subgroups on the basis of their responses to injections of adrenaline and to asphyxial stimuli. 4. Group III, vagal and sympathetic. These had a mean conduction velocity of 9·0 m/sec, very slow discharge rates and often an expiratory and cardiac modulation. They were activated during hypertension due to adrenaline and often by tracheal occlusion, chemoreceptor stimulation, laryngeal irritation and lung inflation. Their motor action is unknown. 5. Group IV, vagal and sympathetic. These had conspicuous cardiac rhythms resembling those of vascular baroreceptors, but their discharge could not be correlated with arterial blood pressure. Their mean conduction velocity was 6·6 m/sec. Some were active after combined vagotomy and sympathectomy. Together with some unclassified fibres, those of group IV are thought to be aberrant afferent nerves or collateral afferent branches, and possibly to subserve local reflexes. 6. The results are

  20. Complete lymph flow reconstruction: A free vascularized lymph node true perforator flap transfer with efferent lymphaticolymphatic anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Yoshimatsu, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Nana

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of primary lower extremity lymphedema (LEL) is challenging, and lymph node transfer (LNT) can be a choice of treatment for progressive LEL. However, LNT has a risk of donor site lymphedema and possible lymph node (LN) sclerosis due to efferent lymphatic vessel (ELV) obstruction. Here, we report the first case of complete lymph flow reconstruction with true perforator LNT with efferent lymphaticolymphatic anastomosis (ELLA) for a patient with primary LEL and severe lymphosclerosis. A 49-year-old female suffered from primary progressive unilateral left LEL refractory to conservative treatments with frequent episodes of cellulitis. A true perforator LN flap was selectively harvested from the left lateral thoracic region under indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography navigation and transferred to the left groin with perforator-to-perforator anastomosis. The ELV of the transplanted LN was supermicrosurgically anastomosed to the contralateral iliac lymphatic vessel that was subcutaneously transferred to the left groin. Postoperatively, the patient experienced no episode of cellulitis with reduced degree of compression treatment, and lymphedematous volume decreased from 306 to 264 in terms of LEL index. Postoperative ICG lymphography showed evidence of reconstructed lymph flow from the left foot to the left groin and to the right inguinal LN through the transplanted LN flap and the ELLA. There were no subjective or objective findings of donor site lymphedema of the left arm or the right back and the lower extremity. True perforator LN flap with ELLA is a safe and effective treatment and has the potential to be a useful therapeutic option for primary unilateral LEL. PMID:27449876

  1. Anterior callosal section is useful for the removal of large tumors invading the dorsal part of the anterior third ventricle: operative technique and results.

    PubMed

    Shiramizu, Hideki; Hori, Tomokatsu; Matsuo, Seigo; Niimura, Kaku; Yoshimoto, Haruko; Ishida, Atsushi; Asakuno, Keizoh; Yuzawa, Miki; Moriyama, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Large tumors invading the dorsal part of the anterior third ventricle are difficult to manage. The anterior transcallosal approach is usually used to manage these tumors. In our clinic, anterior callosal section was combined with the anterior interhemispheric (AIH) translamina terminalis approach for these tumors with excellent results. The AIH approach is useful for removing tumors in and around the anterior part of the third ventricle. However, AIH alone is insufficient for large tumors invading the dorsal part of the anterior third ventricle. In such situations, simple anterior callosal section enables the neurosurgeon to extirpate the caudal part of the tumors deeply hidden from operative field, sparing the foramen of Monro, fornix, etc. We treated four large tumors (malignant teratoma, recurrent chordoid glioma, recurrent papillary tumor of pineal region occupying the third ventricle, and paraventricular meningioma) without major complications. The malignant teratoma case exhibited no recurrence with >10 years follow-up. The chordoid glioma and papillary tumor of pineal region were totally removed. The meningioma was subtotally removed except only a small tumor around the bilateral anterior cerebral artery. This simple technique is a new way to manage difficult large lesions in and around the third ventricle. PMID:23568695

  2. Rice UDP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase1 Is Essential for Pollen Callose Deposition and Its Cosuppression Results in a New Type of Thermosensitive Genic Male Sterility[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongzhi; Zhao, Xiao; Shao, Zhe; Wei, Zhe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Lili; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Mengxiang; He, Ruifeng; He, Guangcun

    2007-01-01

    UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) catalyzes the reversible production of glucose-1-phosphate and UTP to UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate. The rice (Oryza sativa) genome contains two homologous UGPase genes, Ugp1 and Ugp2. We report a functional characterization of rice Ugp1, which is expressed throughout the plant, with highest expression in florets, especially in pollen during anther development. Ugp1 silencing by RNA interference or cosuppression results in male sterility. Expressing a double-stranded RNA interference construct in Ugp1-RI plants resulted in complete suppression of both Ugp1 and Ugp2, together with various pleiotropic developmental abnormalities, suggesting that UGPase plays critical roles in plant growth and development. More importantly, Ugp1-cosuppressing plants contained unprocessed intron-containing primary transcripts derived from transcription of the overexpression construct. These aberrant transcripts undergo temperature-sensitive splicing in florets, leading to a novel thermosensitive genic male sterility. Pollen mother cells (PMCs) of Ugp1-silenced plants appeared normal before meiosis, but during meiosis, normal callose deposition was disrupted. Consequently, the PMCs began to degenerate at the early meiosis stage, eventually resulting in complete pollen collapse. In addition, the degeneration of the tapetum and middle layer was inhibited. These results demonstrate that rice Ugp1 is required for callose deposition during PMC meiosis and bridges the apoplastic unloading pathway and pollen development. PMID:17400897

  3. Tie-dyed2 Encodes a Callose Synthase That Functions in Vein Development and Affects Symplastic Trafficking within the Phloem of Maize Leaves12[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Slewinski, Thomas L.; Baker, R. Frank; Stubert, Adam; Braun, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The tie-dyed2 (tdy2) mutant of maize (Zea mays) displays variegated green and yellow leaves. Intriguingly, the yellow leaf tissues hyperaccumulate starch and sucrose, the soluble sugar transported long distance through the phloem of veins. To determine the molecular basis for Tdy2 function, we cloned the gene and found that Tdy2 encodes a callose synthase. RNA in situ hybridizations revealed that in developing leaves, Tdy2 was most highly expressed in the vascular tissue. Comparative expression analysis with the vascular marker maize PINFORMED1a-yellow fluorescent protein confirmed that Tdy2 was expressed in developing vein tissues. To ascertain whether the defect in tdy2 leaves affected the movement of sucrose into the phloem or its long-distance transport, we performed radiolabeled and fluorescent dye tracer assays. The results showed that tdy2 yellow leaf regions were defective in phloem export but competent in long-distance transport. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy of tdy2 yellow leaf regions showed incomplete vascular differentiation and implicated a defect in cell-to-cell solute movement between phloem companion cells and sieve elements. The disruption of sucrose movement in the phloem in tdy2 mutants provides evidence that the Tdy2 callose synthase functions in vascular maturation and that the vascular defects result in impaired symplastic trafficking into the phloem translocation stream. PMID:22932757

  4. Cell Wall Maturation of Arabidopsis Trichomes Is Dependent on Exocyst Subunit EXO70H4 and Involves Callose Deposition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kulich, Ivan; Vojtíková, Zdeňka; Glanc, Matouš; Ortmannová, Jitka; Rasmann, Sergio; Žárský, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf trichomes are single-cell structures with a well-studied development, but little is understood about their function. Developmental studies focused mainly on the early shaping stages, and little attention has been paid to the maturation stage. We focused on the EXO70H4 exocyst subunit, one of the most up-regulated genes in the mature trichome. We uncovered EXO70H4-dependent development of the secondary cell wall layer, highly autofluorescent and callose rich, deposited only in the upper part of the trichome. The boundary is formed between the apical and the basal parts of mature trichome by a callose ring that is also deposited in an EXO70H4-dependent manner. We call this structure the Ortmannian ring (OR). Both the secondary cell wall layer and the OR are absent in the exo70H4 mutants. Ecophysiological aspects of the trichome cell wall thickening include interference with antiherbivore defense and heavy metal accumulation. Ultraviolet B light induces EXO70H4 transcription in a CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1-dependent way, resulting in stimulation of trichome cell wall thickening and the OR biogenesis. EXO70H4-dependent trichome cell wall hardening is a unique phenomenon, which may be conserved among a variety of the land plants. Our analyses support a concept that Arabidopsis trichome is an excellent model to study molecular mechanisms of secondary cell wall deposition. PMID:25767057

  5. Callosities, corns, and calluses.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, D.; Bentley, G.; Trevino, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    Inappropriate shoes, abnormal foot mechanics, and high levels of activity produce pressure and friction that lead to corns and calluses. Most lesions can be managed conservatively by proper footwear, orthoses, and, if necessary, regular paring. The lesions usually disappear when the causative mechanical forces are removed. Surgery is rarely indicated and should be specifically aimed at correcting the abnormal mechanical stresses. Images Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 6 Fig 7 PMID:8646101

  6. Assessment of the expression and role of the α1-nAChR subunit in efferent cholinergic function during the development of the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Roux, Isabelle; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; McIntosh, J Michael; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Hair cell (HC) activity in the mammalian cochlea is modulated by cholinergic efferent inputs from the brainstem. These inhibitory inputs are mediated by calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing α9- and α10-subunits and by subsequent activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. Intriguingly, mRNAs of α1- and γ-nAChRs, subunits of the "muscle-type" nAChR have also been found in developing HCs (Cai T, Jen HI, Kang H, Klisch TJ, Zoghbi HY, Groves AK. J Neurosci 35: 5870-5883, 2015; Scheffer D, Sage C, Plazas PV, Huang M, Wedemeyer C, Zhang DS, Chen ZY, Elgoyhen AB, Corey DP, Pingault V. J Neurochem 103: 2651-2664, 2007; Sinkkonen ST, Chai R, Jan TA, Hartman BH, Laske RD, Gahlen F, Sinkkonen W, Cheng AG, Oshima K, Heller S. Sci Rep 1: 26, 2011) prompting proposals that another type of nAChR is present and may be critical during early synaptic development. Mouse genetics, histochemistry, pharmacology, and whole cell recording approaches were combined to test the role of α1-nAChR subunit in HC efferent synapse formation and cholinergic function. The onset of α1-mRNA expression in mouse HCs was found to coincide with the onset of the ACh response and efferent synaptic function. However, in mouse inner hair cells (IHCs) no response to the muscle-type nAChR agonists (±)-anatoxin A, (±)-epibatidine, (-)-nicotine, or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) was detected, arguing against the presence of an independent functional α1-containing muscle-type nAChR in IHCs. In α1-deficient mice, no obvious change of IHC efferent innervation was detected at embryonic day 18, contrary to the hyperinnervation observed at the neuromuscular junction. Additionally, ACh response and efferent synaptic activity were detectable in α1-deficient IHCs, suggesting that α1 is not necessary for assembly and membrane targeting of nAChRs or for efferent synapse formation in IHCs. PMID:27098031

  7. How do the medial olivocochlear efferents influence the biomechanics of the outer hair cells and thereby the cochlear amplifier? Simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan; Verhulst, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The bottom-up signal pathway, which starts from the outer ear and leads to the brain cortices, gives the classic image of the human sound perception. However, there have been growing evidences in the last six decades for existence of a functional descending network whereby the central auditory system can modulate the early auditory processing, in a top-down manner. The medial olivocochlear efferent fibers project from the superior olivary complex at the brainstem into the inner ear. They are linked to the basal poles of the hair cells by forming synaptic cisterns. This descending network can activate nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR) that increase the membrane conductance of the outer hair cells and thereby modify the magnitude of the active force generated inside the cochlea. The aim of the presented work is to quantitatively investigate how the changes in the biomechanics of the outer hair cells, caused by the efferent activation, manipulate the cochlear responses. This is done by means of a frequency-domain biophysical model of the cochlea [12] where the parameters of the model convey physiological interpretations of the human cochlear structures. The simulations manifest that a doubling of the outer hair cell conductance, due to efferent activation, leads to a frequency-dependent gain reduction along the cochlear duct with its highest effect at frequencies between 1 kHz and 3.5 kHz and a maximum of approximately 10 dB gain reduction at 2 kHz. This amount of the gain inhibition and its frequency dependence reasonably agrees with the experimental data recorded from guinea pig, cat and human cochleae where the medial olivococlear efferents had been elicited by broad-band stimuli. The simulations also indicate that the efferent-induced increase of the outer hair cell conductance increases the best frequency of the cochlear responses, in the basal region. The presented simulations quantitatively confirm that activation of the medial olivocochlear efferents can

  8. Expression of Aquaporins in the Efferent Ductules, Sperm Counts, and Sperm Motility in Estrogen Receptor-α Deficient Mice Fed Lab Chow Versus Casein

    PubMed Central

    RUZ, RICARDO; GREGORY, MARY; SMITH, CHARLES E.; CYR, DANIEL G.; LUBAHN, DENNIS B.; HESS, REX A.; HERMO, LOUIS

    2006-01-01

    Estrogens play an important role in the male reproductive tract, and this is especially so for the efferent ductules, where α-estrogen receptors (ERα) have been localized. Mice deficient in ERα (αERKO mice) are infertile, and the effect appears to be due in part to retention of water at the level of the efferent ductules. In the present study, we examined the consequences of ERα deletion on the distribution of certain aquaporins (AQPs), water protein channels, in the efferent ductules and on sperm numbers and motility. In addition, the effects of feeding mice a regular lab chow diet, which contains phytoestrogens, known to affect male reproductive tract functions, and a casein diet, which lacks phytoestrogens, were also assessed. Light microscope immunolocalizations of AQP-1 and AQP-9 revealed dramatic reduction and patchier staining in αERKO mice with distal areas of the efferent ductules being more affected than proximal areas. No other changes in immunolocalizations were noted as a consequence of diet. Computer-assisted sperm analyses demonstrated a 62% reduction in cauda epididymal sperm/ml in αERKO mice fed lab chow, whereas 87% fewer sperm/ml were observed in αERKO mice fed casein, suggesting an enhanced role for sperm production and concentration in a diet containing phytoestrogens. All sperm motility parameters were altered to some degree in αERKO mice fed lab chow. Alterations in sperm motility parameters were also detected, but were less dramatic in αERKO mice fed casein. These data suggest that the decrease in AQP expression in the efferent ductules of αERKO mice contributes in part to water retention in this tissue, eventually leading to backflow of water into the testis, with subsequent decreases in sperm concentration and motility. The data also suggest that phytoestrogens, which are present in regular lab chow, can influence the male reproductive tract with and without the presence of ERα, promoting efferent ductule and epididymal

  9. Role of Efferent Sympathoadrenal Effects in Cooling-Induced Hemodynamic Perturbations in Rats: An Investigation by Spectrum Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yia-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Chen-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Chun; Lee, Po-Lei; Tung, Che-Se

    2015-10-31

    Cold stress may produce hemodynamic perturbations but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Spectral analysis was used in this study to explore that sympathoadrenal activation could be involved in mechanisms of hemodynamic perturbations to cooling. Conscious rats after treatment with a control vehicle (saline) compared with withdrawal of sympathetic influences by ganglion blocker hexamethonium (HEX) or chemical sympathectomy guanethidine (GUA) were challenged by stressful cooling as acute immersing all four extremities in ice water (4 ± 2°C) for 10 min. Plasma nitric oxide (NO) and the appearance of Dichroitic notch (DN) were measured in comparison between treatment groups throughout the experimental course. Hemodynamic indices were telemetrically monitored, and variability of blood pressure and heart rate (BPV; HRV) were assessed over a range of frequencies: very-low frequency (VLF: 0.02-0.2 Hz), low frequency (LF: 0.2-0.6 Hz), high frequency (HF: 0.6-3 Hz), normalized (n)LF, nHF, ratio LF/HF of HRV (LF/HF(HRV)), and total power (TP: ≤3 Hz). Results showed that the concomitant reciprocal changes of spectral powers existed between frequencies of BPV and HRV to the stressful cooling (i.e. VLF(BPV) versus VLF(HRV), LF(BPV) versus LF(HRV), and nLF(BPV) versus nLF(HRV)) which contribute to the underlying mechanisms of sympathetic efferent influences and myogenic cardiovascular responsiveness. Furthermore, compared with the control vehicle in the stressful cooling, HEX restrained the increase of the pressor, tachycardia and VLF(BPV), except that VLF(HRV) was reduced. GUA abolished pressor, however, restrained the increase of the tachycardia, VLF(BPV) and LF(BPV). In addition, GUA reversed the downward tendency of nLF(BPV) into an upward tendency and attenuated both nLF(HRV) and LF/HF(HRV). DN was virtually undetectable after HEX management but was apparently noticeable after GUA management. Finally, the increase of plasma NO after cooling was diminished

  10. Atomic force microscopy and laser confocal scanning microscopy analysis of callose fibers developed from protoplasts of embryogenic cells of a conifer.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2005-12-01

    Efficiency of novel fiber formation was much improved in protoplast culture of embryogenic cells (ECs) of a conifer, Larix leptolepis (Sieb. et Zucc.) Gord., by pre-culturing ECs in a medium containing a high concentration of glutamine (13.7 mM). The fibrillar substructures of large and elongated fibers of protoplasts isolated from Larix ECs were investigated by laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) after Aniline Blue staining and atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a micromanipulator without any pre-treatment. Fibers were composed of bundles of fibrils and subfibrils, whose diameters were defined as 0.7 and 0.17 mum, respectively, by image analysis after LCSM and AFM. These fibers were proven to be composed of callose by using specific degrading enzymes for beta-1,4-glucan and beta-1,3-glucan. PMID:16034590

  11. A Mammalian Conserved Element Derived from SINE Displays Enhancer Properties Recapitulating Satb2 Expression in Early-Born Callosal Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Akiko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Yan, Kuo; Tarabykin, Victor; Vigier, Lisa; Sumiyama, Kenta; Hirakawa, Mika; Nishihara, Hidenori; Pierani, Alessandra; Okada, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) are highly repeated sequences that account for a significant proportion of many eukaryotic genomes and are usually considered “junk DNA”. However, we previously discovered that many AmnSINE1 loci are evolutionarily conserved across mammalian genomes, suggesting that they may have acquired significant functions involved in controlling mammalian-specific traits. Notably, we identified the AS021 SINE locus, located 390 kbp upstream of Satb2. Using transgenic mice, we showed that this SINE displays specific enhancer activity in the developing cerebral cortex. The transcription factor Satb2 is expressed by cortical neurons extending axons through the corpus callosum and is a determinant of callosal versus subcortical projection. Mouse mutants reveal a crucial function for Sabt2 in corpus callosum formation. In this study, we compared the enhancer activity of the AS021 locus with Satb2 expression during telencephalic development in the mouse. First, we showed that the AS021 enhancer is specifically activated in early-born Satb2+ neurons. Second, we demonstrated that the activity of the AS021 enhancer recapitulates the expression of Satb2 at later embryonic and postnatal stages in deep-layer but not superficial-layer neurons, suggesting the possibility that the expression of Satb2 in these two subpopulations of cortical neurons is under genetically distinct transcriptional control. Third, we showed that the AS021 enhancer is activated in neurons projecting through the corpus callosum, as described for Satb2+ neurons. Notably, AS021 drives specific expression in axons crossing through the ventral (TAG1−/NPY+) portion of the corpus callosum, confirming that it is active in a subpopulation of callosal neurons. These data suggest that exaptation of the AS021 SINE locus might be involved in enhancement of Satb2 expression, leading to the establishment of interhemispheric communication via the corpus callosum, a eutherian

  12. Differential action for ethanol on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate and sympathetic efferent discharge in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Z.; Abdel-Rahman, A.R.A.; Wooles, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol (0.33, 0.66, or 1 g/kg) on baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and sympathetic efferent discharge (SED) were investigated in rats. The two higher doses of ethanol caused a progressive and significant increase in baseline SED and a slight increase in HR. The findings suggest that the sensitivity of the reflex control of SED was preserved whereas that of HR was impaired after acute ethanol administration. Since these findings were obtained in the same animals, the data suggest that acute ethanol has a differential action on reflex control of SED and HR. Further, the significant increase in SED after moderate and high doses of ethanol suggests an increased central sympathetic tone as recordings were made from preganglionic nerve fibers (splanchnic nerve). The absence of an increase in baseline MAP, in spite of a significant increase in baseline SED following acute ethanol injection, could be explained, at least in part, by an ethanol-evoked reduction in pressor responsiveness to phenylephrine, an ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist.

  13. Time-frequency analysis of stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions and their changes with efferent stimulation in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezina-Greene, Maria A.; Guinan, John J.

    2015-12-01

    To aid in understanding their origin, stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) were measured at a series of tone frequencies using the suppression method, both with and without stimulation of medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents, in anesthetized guinea pigs. Time-frequency analysis showed SFOAE energy peaks in 1-3 delay components throughout the measured frequency range (0.5-12 kHz). One component's delay usually coincided with the phase-gradient delay. When multiple delay components were present, they were usually near SFOAE dips. Below 2 kHz, SFOAE delays were shorter than predicted from mechanical measurements. With MOC stimulation, SFOAE amplitude was decreased at most frequencies, but was sometimes enhanced, and all SFOAE delay components were affected. The MOC effects and an analysis of model data suggest that the multiple SFOAE delay components arise at the edges of the traveling-wave peak, not far basal of the peak. Comparisons with published guinea-pig neural data suggest that the short latencies of low-frequency SFOAEs may arise from coherent reflection from an organ-of-Corti motion that has a shorter group delay than the traveling wave.

  14. The centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus--I: Efferents in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Júnior, Edmilson D; Da Silva, André V; Da Silva, Kelly R T; Haemmerle, Carlos A S; Batagello, Daniella S; Da Silva, Joelcimar M; Lima, Leandro B; Da Silva, Renata J; Diniz, Giovanne B; Sita, Luciane V; Elias, Carol F; Bittencourt, Jackson C

    2015-10-01

    The oculomotor accessory nucleus, often referred to as the Edinger-Westphal nucleus [EW], was first identified in the 17th century. Although its most well known function is the control of pupil diameter, some controversy has arisen regarding the exact location of these preganglionic neurons. Currently, the EW is thought to consist of two different parts. The first part [termed the preganglionic EW-EWpg], which controls lens accommodation, choroidal blood flow and pupillary constriction, primarily consists of cholinergic cells that project to the ciliary ganglion. The second part [termed the centrally projecting EW-EWcp], which is involved in non-ocular functions such as feeding behavior, stress responses, addiction and pain, consists of peptidergic neurons that project to the brainstem, the spinal cord and prosencephalic regions. However, in the literature, we found few reports related to either ascending or descending projections from the EWcp that are compatible with its currently described functions. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to systematically investigate the ascending and descending projections of the EW in the rat brain. We injected the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine into the EW or the retrograde tracer cholera toxin subunit B into multiple EW targets as controls. Additionally, we investigated the potential EW-mediated innervation of neuronal populations with known neurochemical signatures, such as melanin-concentrating hormone in the lateral hypothalamic area [LHA] and corticotropin-releasing factor in the central nucleus of the amygdala [CeM]. We observed anterogradely labeled fibers in the LHA, the reuniens thalamic nucleus, the oval part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the medial part of the central nucleus of the amygdala, and the zona incerta. We confirmed our EW-LHA and EW-CeM connections using retrograde tracers. We also observed moderate EW-mediated innervation of the paraventricular nucleus of the

  15. Role of retinal input on the development of striate-extrastriate patterns of connections in the rat.

    PubMed

    Laing, R J; Bock, A S; Lasiene, J; Olavarria, J F

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that retinal input plays an important role in the development of interhemispheric callosal connections, but little is known about the role retinal input plays on the development of ipsilateral striate-extrastriate connections and the interplay that might exist between developing ipsilateral and callosal pathways. We analyzed the effects of bilateral enucleation performed at different ages on both the distribution of extrastriate projections originating from restricted loci in medial, acallosal striate cortex, and the overall pattern of callosal connections revealed following multiple tracer injections. As in normal rats, striate-extrastriate projections in rats enucleated at birth consisted of multiple, well-defined fields that were largely confined to acallosal regions throughout extrastriate cortex. However, these projections were highly irregular and variable, and they tended to occupy correspondingly anomalous and variable acallosal regions. Moreover, area 17, but not area 18a, was smaller in enucleates compared to controls, resulting in an increase in the divergence of striate projections. Anomalies in patterns of striate-extrastriate projections were not observed in rats enucleated at postnatal day (P)6, although the size of area 17 was still reduced in these rats. These results indicate that the critical period during which the eyes influence the development of striate-extrastriate, but not the size of striate cortex, ends by P6. Finally, enucleation did not change the time course and definition of the initial invasion of axons into gray matter, suggesting that highly variable striate projections patterns do not result from anomalous pruning of exuberant distributions of 17-18a fibers in gray matter. PMID:22430936

  16. Central distribution of the efferent cells and the primary afferent fibers of the trigeminal nerve in Pleurodeles waltlii (Amphibia, Urodela).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, A; Muñoz, M

    1988-04-22

    As part of a study on the organization of the brainstem in a primitive group of vertebrates, the efferent cells and primary afferent fibers of the urodele amphibian Pleurodeles waltlii were examined by means of retrograde and anterograde axonal transport and anterograde degeneration. The trigeminal motor nucleus is located in the periventricular gray just medial to the sulcus limitans. Its rostral part is a band of pear-shaped cells lying parallel to the wall of the ventricle, whereas its caudal part is a round mass consisting of polygonal cells. In addition, a small group of scattered neurons is situated ventral to the rostral part of the nucleus. The primary afferent fibers enter the brainstem in the dorsal two-thirds of the trigeminal root. They diverge into a short ascending and a long descending tract. The former distributes its axons to the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus, which is an ill-defined cell group located at the ventrolateral edge of the periventricular gray. In the descending tract, the fibers of the ophthalmic nerve are predominantly located ventromedially, and those of the maxillomandibular nerve dorsolaterally. A fascicle of the ophthalmic nerve leaves the descending tract and, apparently, makes contact with the accessory abducens nucleus. The descending tract extends caudally into the three upper cervical segments of the spinal cord. The mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus consists of conspicuous large cells, which are scattered through the tectum of the mesencephalon. The cells with peripheral branches in the ophthalmic nerve are mainly located in the caudal half of the tectum, and those with peripheral branches in the maxillomandibular nerve in the rostral half. Collaterals of the central branches of the mesencephalic trigeminal system were traced to an area of the periventricular gray situated between the motor nucleus and the principal sensory nucleus of the trigeminus. PMID:2836480

  17. White Matter Compromise of Callosal and Subcortical Fiber Tracts in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukla, Dinesh K.; Keehn, Brandon; Lincoln, Alan J.; Muller, Ralph-Axel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increasingly viewed as a disorder of functional networks, highlighting the importance of investigating white matter and interregional connectivity. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter integrity for the whole brain and for corpus callosum, internal capsule, and middle…

  18. Connected Traveler

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  19. Altered effective connectivity within default mode network in major depression disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Li, Baojuan; Bai, Yuanhan; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Linchuan; Cui, Longbiao; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the neural basis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is important for the diagnosis and treatment of this mental disorder. The default mode network (DMN) is considered to be highly involved in the MDD. To find directed interaction between DMN regions associated with the development of MDD, the effective connectivity within the DMN of the MDD patients and matched healthy controls was estimated by using a recently developed spectral dynamic causal modeling. Sixteen patients with MDD and sixteen matched healthy control subjects were included in this study. While the control group underwent the resting state fMRI scan just once, all patients underwent resting state fMRI scans before and after two months' treatment. The spectral dynamic causal modeling was used to estimate directed connections between four DMN nodes. Statistical analysis on connection strengths indicated that efferent connections from the medial frontal cortex (MFC) to posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and to right parietal cortex (RPC) were significant higher in pretreatment MDD patients than those of the control group. After two-month treatment, the efferent connections from the MFC decreased significantly, while those from the left parietal cortex (LPC) to MFC, PCC and RPC showed a significant increase. These findings suggest that the MFC may play an important role for inhibitory conditioning of the DMN, which was disrupted in MDD patients. It also indicates that disrupted suppressive function of the MFC could be effectively restored after two-month treatment.

  20. Innervation of the cavernous body of the human efferent tear ducts and function in tear outflow mechanism

    PubMed Central

    PAULSEN, FRIEDRICH; HALLMANN, UTA; PAULSEN, JENS; THALE, ANDREAS

    2000-01-01

    The lacrimal sac and nasolacrimal duct are surrounded by a wide cavernous system of veins and arteries comparable to a cavernous body. The present study aimed to demonstrate the ultrastructure of the nervous tissue and the localisation of neuropeptides involved in the innervation of the cavernous body, a topic not previously investigated. Different S-100 protein antisera, neuronal markers (neuron-specific enolase, anti-200 kDa neurofilament), neuropeptides (substance P, neuropeptide Y, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide) and the neuronal enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase were used to demonstrate the distribution pattern of the nervous tissue. The ultrastructure of the innervating nerve fibres was also examined by means of standard transmission electron microscopy. The cavernous body contained specialised arteries and veins known as barrier arteries, capacitance veins, and throttle veins. Perivascularly, the tissue was rich in myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres in a plexus-like network. Small seromucous glands found in the region of the fundus of the lacrimal sac were contacted by nerve fibres forming a plexus around their alveoli. Many nerve fibres were positive for S-100 protein (S 100), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), anti-200 kDa neurofilament (RT 97), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) immunoreactivity was only demonstrated adjacent to the seromucous glands. Both the density of nerve fibres as well as the presence of various neuropeptides emphasises the neural control of the cavernous body of the human efferent tear ducts. By means of this innervation, the specialised blood vessels permit regulation of blood flow by opening and closing the lumen of the lacrimal passage as effected by the engorgement and subsidence of the cavernous body, at the same time regulating tear outflow. Related functions such as a role in the

  1. The PTI1-like kinase ZmPti1a from maize (Zea mays L.) co-localizes with callose at the plasma membrane of pollen and facilitates a competitive advantage to the male gametophyte

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Markus M; Pinto, Sheena; Kluth, Jantjeline; Wienand, Udo; Lorbiecke, René

    2006-01-01

    Background The tomato kinase Pto confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a gene for gene manner. Upon recognition of specific avirulence factors the Pto kinase activates multiple signal transduction pathways culminating in induction of pathogen defense. The soluble cytoplasmic serine/threonine kinase Pti1 is one target of Pto phosphorylation and is involved in the hypersensitive response (HR) reaction. However, a clear role of Pti1 in plant pathogen resistance is uncertain. So far, no Pti1 homologues from monocotyledonous species have been studied. Results Here we report the identification and molecular analysis of four Pti1-like kinases from maize (ZmPti1a, -b, -c, -d). These kinase genes showed tissue-specific expression and their corresponding proteins were targeted to different cellular compartments. Sequence similarity, expression pattern and cellular localization of ZmPti1b suggested that this gene is a putative orthologue of Pti1 from tomato. In contrast, ZmPti1a was specifically expressed in pollen and sequestered to the plasma membrane, evidently owing to N-terminal modification by myristoylation and/or S-acylation. The ZmPti1a:GFP fusion protein was not evenly distributed at the pollen plasma membrane but accumulated as an annulus-like structure which co-localized with callose (1,3-β-glucan) deposition. In addition, co-localization of ZmPti1a and callose was observed during stages of pollen mitosis I and pollen tube germination. Maize plants in which ZmPti1a expression was silenced by RNA interference (RNAi) produced pollen with decreased competitive ability. Hence, our data provide evidence that ZmPti1a plays an important part in a signalling pathway that accelerates pollen performance and male fitness. Conclusion ZmPti1a from maize is involved in pollen-specific processes during the progamic phase of reproduction, probably in crucial signalling processes associated with regions of callose deposition

  2. Severe form of radiculo - myelo - neuropathy with meningo - encephalitis secondary to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection: unusual corpus callosal lesions and serial magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Ramakrishna, Anil; Dekumoy, Paron; Kumar, Raju Ravi; Pakdee, Wallop; Saini, Jitender; Hegde, Vinay S

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with the symptoms of recurrent lower abdominal pain, malaise and loss of appetite of 3-week duration, followed by acute onset of generalized paresthesias, fever and headache which progressed over few days to quadriparesis, altered sensorium, urinary and fecal incontinence. He had consumed raw tongue, liver, gall bladder and testicles of monitor lizard (Varanus bengalensis). Blood picture showed eosinophilia and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed elevated protein and eosinophilia. Serum and CSF serology was positive for angiostrongyliasis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed focal hyperintense lesions in the corpus callosum and brainstem and an enhancing lesion in the cerebellum. Post-contrast T1-weighted axial images of spine showed evidence of cervical cord hyperintense lesions and root enhancement. Susceptibility weighted images/phase images showed unusual feature of multiple hemorrhagic lesions in the posterior fossa and supratentorial areas. Diffusion showed no restriction of corpus callosal lesions. Patient was treated with the high dose parenteral steroids with albendazole and at 6-month follow-up and had a remarkable recovery. PMID:24005735

  3. [Case of callosal disconnection syndrome with a chief complaint of right-hand disability, despite presence of left-hand diagonistic dyspraxia].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoko; Saida, Hisako; Yamamoto, Toru

    2009-04-01

    e report the case of 48-year-old right-handed male patient with an infarction affecting most part of the body and the splenium of the left half of the corpus callosum. Neuropsychological examination revealed typical signs of callosal disconnection including left-sided apraxia, diagonistic dyspraxia, left-sided agraphia, left-hand tactile anomia, left hemialexia, and right-sided constructional disability. Moreover, he complained of impairment in activities involving the right hand disability and agraphia. He could not stop behaving with his right hand when he had a vague idea. For example, he involuntarily picked up a tea bottle with his right hand when he had a desire to drink, although the action was not appropriate to that occasion. The imitation and utilization behavior did not imply this case, because his right hand behaviors were not exaggerated in response to external stimuli, such as the gestures of the examiner or the subjects in front of the patient. Unexpectedly, he complained about impairment of the activity of his right hand and was unaware of left hand apraxia or diagonistic dyspraxia; this trend continued for 6 months, at the time of this writing. We argue that the patient may have been subconsciouly aware of the symptoms of his left hand but had not verbalized them. PMID:19378819

  4. Experimental studies of gastric dysfunction in motion sickness: The effect of gastric and vestibular stimulation on the vagal and splanchnic gastric efferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niijima, A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The experiments were conducted in anaesthetized rats. In the first part of the experiments, the effect of CuSO4 on the afferent activity in the gastric branch of the vagus nerve was investigated. Gastric perfusion of CuSO4 solution (0.04 percent and 0.08 percent) provoked an increase in afferent activity. In the second part of the experiments, the reflex effects of gastric perfusion of CuSO4 solution, repetitive stimulation of the gastric vagus nerve, and caloric stimulation of the right vestibular apparatus (5-18 C water) on gastric autonomic outflow were investigated. The results of these experiments showed that these three different types of stimulation caused an inhibition in efferent activity of the gastric vagus nerve and a slight activation of the splanchnic gastric efferents. The summation of the effect of each stimulation was also observed. These results, therefore, provide evidence for a possible integrative inhibitory function of the vagal gastric center as well as an excitatory function of gastric sympathetic motoneurons in relation to motion sickness.

  5. Disruption of subcellular Arc/Arg 3.1 mRNA expression in striatal efferent neurons following partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Barker-Haliski, Melissa L.; Oldenburger, Katharina; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate-early gene Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) is provocative in the context of neuroplasticity because of its experience-dependent regulation and mRNA transport to and translation at activated synapses. Normal rats have more preproenkephalin-negative (ppe-neg; presumed striatonigral) neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA than ppe-positive (ppe-pos; striatopallidal) neurons, despite equivalent numbers of these neurons showing novelty-induced transcriptional activation of Arc. Furthermore, rats with partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine (METH) show impaired Arc mRNA expression in both ppe-neg and ppe-pos neurons relative to normal animals following response-reversal learning. In this study, Arc expression induced by exposure to a novel environment was used to assess transcriptional activation and cytoplasmic localization of Arc mRNA in striatal efferent neuron subpopulations subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Partial monoamine depletion significantly altered Arc expression. Specifically, basal Arc expression was elevated, but novelty-induced transcriptional activation was abolished. Without novelty-induced Arc transcription, METH-pretreated rats also had fewer neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA expression, with the effect being greater for ppe-neg neurons. Thus, METH-induced neurotoxicity substantially alters striatal efferent neuron function at the level of Arc transcription, suggesting a long-term shift in basal ganglia neuroplasticity processes subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Such changes potentially underlie striatally-based learning deficits associated with METH-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22978492

  6. The anatomy of the callosal and visual-association pathways in high-functioning autism: a DTI tractography study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cibu; Humphreys, Kate; Jung, Kwan-Jin; Minshew, Nancy; Behrmann, Marlene

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that many of the core behavioral impairments that characterize autism potentially emerge from poor neural synchronization across nodes comprising dispersed cortical networks. A likely candidate for the source of this atypical functional connectivity in autism is an alteration in the structural integrity of intra- and inter-hemispheric white matter (WM) tracts that form large-scale cortical networks. To test this hypothesis, in a group of adults with high-functioning autism (HFA) and matched control participants, we used diffusion tensor tractography to compare the structural integrity of three intra-hemispheric visual-association WM tracts, the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), the inferior fronto-occipito fasciculus (IFOF) and the uncinate fasciculus (UF), with the integrity of three sub-portions of the major inter-hemispheric fiber tract, the corpus callosum. Compared with the control group, the HFA group evinced an increase in the volume of the intra-hemispheric fibers, particularly in the left hemisphere, and a reduction in the volume of the forceps minor (F-Mi) and body of the corpus callosum. The reduction in the volume of the F-Mi also correlated with an increase in repetitive and stereotypical behavior as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Interview. These findings suggest that the abnormalities in the integrity of key inter- and intra-hemispheric WM tracts may underlie the atypical information processing observed in these individuals. PMID:20832784

  7. Cortical connections of striate and extrastriate visual areas in tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Lyon, D C; Jain, N; Kaas, J H

    1998-11-01

    The ipsilateral and contralateral cortical connections of visual cortex of tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) were investigated by placing restricted injections of fluorochrome tracers, wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, or biotinylated dextran amine into area 17 (V1), area 18 (V2), or the adjoining temporal dorsal area (TD). As previously reported, V1 was characterized by a widespread, patchy pattern of intrinsic connections; ipsilateral connections with V2, TD, and to a lesser extent, other areas of the temporal cortex; and contralateral connections with V1, V2, and TD. A surface-view of the myelin pattern in V1 revealed a patchwork of light and dark module-like regions. The ipsilateral connections with V2 and TD were roughly topographic, whereas heterotopic locations in V1 were callosally connected. Injections in V2 labeled as much as one third of V2 in a patchy pattern, and portions of ipsilateral V1 and TD in roughly topographic patterns. In addition, connections with several other visual areas in the temporal lobe were revealed. Contralaterally, most of the label was in V2, with some in V1 and TD. Injections in TD demonstrated connections within the region, and with adjoining portions of the temporal cortex, V2, and V1. There were sparse connections with an oval of densely myelinated cortex, which we have termed the temporal inferior area (TI). Callosal connections were concentrated in TD, but also included V2. The results provide further evidence for modular organizations within V1 and V2, and reveal for the first time the complete patterns of cortical connections of V2 and TD. The results are consistent with the proposal that at least three visual areas, the temporal anterior area, TA, the temporal dorsal area, TD, and the temporal posterior area, TP, exist along the rostrolateral border of V2 in tree shrews; suggest visual involvement of at least three other areas, the temporal inferior area, TI, the temporal anterior lateral area, and the temporal

  8. Inhibition and Ultraviolet-Induced Chemical Modification of UDP-Glucose:(1,3)-β-Glucan (Callose) Synthase by Chlorpromazine 1

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, Robert W.; Shao, Ai-Ping; Wasserman, Bruce P.

    1992-01-01

    UDP-glucose:(1,3)-β-glucan (callose) synthase (CS) from storage tissue of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was strongly inhibited by the phenothiazine drug chlorpromazine (CPZ). In the absence of ultraviolet irradiation, CPZ was a noncompetitive inhibitor with 50% inhibitory concentration values for plasma membrane and solubilized CS of 100 and 90 μm, respectively. Both the Ca2+- and Mg2+- stimulated components of CS activity were affected. CPZ inhibition was partially alleviated at saturating levels of Ca2+, but not Mg2+, suggesting that CPZ interferes with the Ca2+-binding site of CS. Binding experiments with [14C]CPZ, however, showed strong non-specific partitioning of CPZ into the plasma membrane, providing evidence that perturbation of the membrane environment is probably the predominant mode of inhibition. Ultraviolet irradiation at 254 nm markedly enhanced CPZ inhibition, with complete activity loss following exposure to 4 μm CPZ for 2 min. Inhibition followed a pseudo-first order mechanism with at least three CPZ binding sites per CS complex. Under these conditions, [3H]CPZ was covalently incorporated into plasma membrane preparations by a free radical mechanism; however, polypeptide labeling profiles showed labeling to be largely nonspecific, with many polypeptides labeled even at [3H]CPZ levels as low as 1 μm, and with boiled membranes. Although CPZ is one of the most potent known inhibitors of CS, its use as a photolabel will require a homogeneous CS complex or establishment of conditions that protect against the interaction of CPZ with specific binding sites located on various polypeptide components of the CS complex. PMID:16653219

  9. D-(/sup 3/H)aspartate retrograde labelling of callosal and association neurons of somatosensory areas I and II of cats

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaresi, P.; Fabri, M.; Conti, F.; Manzoni, T.

    1987-09-08

    Experiments were carried out on cats to ascertain whether corticocortical neurons of somatosensory areas I (SI) and II (SII) could be labelled by retrograde axonal transport of D-(/sup 3/H)aspartate (D-(/sup 3/H)Asp). This tritiated enantiomer of the amino acid aspartate is (1) taken up selectively by axon terminals of neurons releasing aspartate and/or glutamate as excitatory neurotransmitter, (2) retrogradely transported and accumulated in perikarya, (3) not metabolized, and (4) visualized by autoradiography. A solution of D-(/sup 3/H)Asp was injected in eight cats in the trunk and forelimb zones of SI (two cats) or in the forelimb zone of SII (six cats). In order to compare the labelling patterns obtained with D-(/sup 3/H)Asp with those resulting after injection of a nonselective neuronal tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was delivered mixed with the radioactive tracer in seven of the eight cats. Furthermore, six additional animals received HRP injections in SI (three cats; trunk and forelimb zones) or SII (three cats; forelimb zone). D-(/sup 3/H)Asp retrograde labelling of perikarya was absent from the ipsilateral thalamus of all cats injected with the radioactive tracer but a dense terminal plexus of anterogradely labelled corticothalamic fibers from SI and SII was observed, overlapping the distribution area of thalamocortical neurons retrogradely labelled with HRP from the same areas. D-(/sup 3/H)Asp-labelled neurones were present in ipsilateral SII (SII-SI association neurones) in cats injected in SI. In these animals a bundle of radioactive fibres was observed in the rostral portion of the corpus callosum entering the contralateral hemisphere. There, neurones retrogradely labelled with silver grains were present in SI (SI-SI callosal neurons).

  10. Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to illustrate a process of making connections, not between mathematics and other activities, but within mathematics itself--between diverse parts of the subject. Novel connections are still possible in previously explored mathematics when the material happens to be unfamiliar, as may be the case for a learner at any career stage.…

  11. [A case of spastic paraparesis with mental deterioration and markedly thin corpus callosum--callosal dysfunction demonstrated by magnetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Katayama, T; Sakamoto, N; Kuroda, K; Yahara, O; Ugawa, Y

    1998-05-01

    We have studied function of the corpus callosum in a patient with spastic paraparesis with mental deterioration and markedly thin corpus callosum using magnetic stimulation methods. In a 21-year-old woman with slowly progressive gait disturbance, neurological examination showed mental deterioration, euphoria, spastic paraparesis, bilateral Babinski's sign, and hyperesthesia caudal to the eighth thoracic level. No abnormalities were observed in electroencephalograms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain showed cerebral cortical atrophy, markedly thin corpus callosum, and dilated cavum septum pellucidum and cavum Vergae, but spinal cord MRIs showed no abnormalities. The lysosomal enzyme activities, whose reduction was known to cause leukodystrophy, were all normal. Very long chain fatty acid was not increased in her blood, which is against adrenoleukodystrophy. She had no anti-HTLV-1 virus antibody. Based on these clinical features and the results of biochemical analyses, we diagnosed this patient as having spastic paraplegia associated with hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (Nojima and Iwabuchi). We performed three studies on the central motor pathways in this patient. The latencies of responses recorded from upper or lower limb muscles were all within the normal range, despite that the thresholds were slightly increased. This suggests that axonal degeneration occurs in the central motor pathways, which is consistent with the autopsy findings of a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia associated with hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Connection between the bilateral motor cortices was investigated by magnetic stimulation of both motor cortices. The suppression of the motor cortex evoked by stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex through the corpus callosum was absent in this patient. Intracortical inhibition within the motor cortex was demonstrated to be normal by a paired-magnetic stimulation technique. Based on the results of these

  12. About connections.

    PubMed

    Rockland, Kathleen S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the attention attracted by "connectomics", one can lose sight of the very real questions concerning "What are connections?" In the neuroimaging community, "structural" connectivity is ground truth and underlying constraint on "functional" or "effective" connectivity. It is referenced to underlying anatomy; but, as increasingly remarked, there is a large gap between the wealth of human brain mapping and the relatively scant data on actual anatomical connectivity. Moreover, connections have typically been discussed as "pairwise", point x projecting to point y (or: to points y and z), or more recently, in graph theoretical terms, as "nodes" or regions and the interconnecting "edges". This is a convenient shorthand, but tends not to capture the richness and nuance of basic anatomical properties as identified in the classic tradition of tracer studies. The present short review accordingly revisits connectional weights, heterogeneity, reciprocity, topography, and hierarchical organization, drawing on concrete examples. The emphasis is on presynaptic long-distance connections, motivated by the intention to probe current assumptions and promote discussions about further progress and synthesis. PMID:26042001

  13. Comprehensive connectivity of the mouse main olfactory bulb: analysis and online digital atlas

    PubMed Central

    Hintiryan, Houri; Gou, Lin; Zingg, Brian; Yamashita, Seita; Lyden, Hannah M.; Song, Monica Y.; Grewal, Arleen K.; Zhang, Xinhai; Toga, Arthur W.; Dong, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the first open resource for mouse olfactory connectivity data produced as part of the Mouse Connectome Project (MCP) at UCLA. The MCP aims to assemble a whole-brain connectivity atlas for the C57Bl/6J mouse using a double coinjection tracing method. Each coinjection consists of one anterograde and one retrograde tracer, which affords the advantage of simultaneously identifying efferent and afferent pathways and directly identifying reciprocal connectivity of injection sites. The systematic application of double coinjections potentially reveals interaction stations between injections and allows for the study of connectivity at the network level. To facilitate use of the data, raw images are made publicly accessible through our online interactive visualization tool, the iConnectome, where users can view and annotate the high-resolution, multi-fluorescent connectivity data (www.MouseConnectome.org). Systematic double coinjections were made into different regions of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and data from 18 MOB cases (~72 pathways; 36 efferent/36 afferent) currently are available to view in iConnectome within their corresponding atlas level and their own bright-field cytoarchitectural background. Additional MOB injections and injections of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), and other olfactory cortical areas gradually will be made available. Analysis of connections from different regions of the MOB revealed a novel, topographically arranged MOB projection roadmap, demonstrated disparate MOB connectivity with anterior versus posterior piriform cortical area (PIR), and exposed some novel aspects of well-established cortical olfactory projections. PMID:22891053

  14. Activation of BK and SK channels by efferent synapses on outer hair cells in high-frequency regions of the rodent cochlea.

    PubMed

    Rohmann, Kevin N; Wersinger, Eric; Braude, Jeremy P; Pyott, Sonja J; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2015-02-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the brainstem olivary complex project to and inhibit outer hair cells (OHCs), refining acoustic sensitivity of the mammalian cochlea. In all vertebrate hair cells studied to date, cholinergic inhibition results from the combined action of ionotropic acetylcholine receptors and associated calcium-activated potassium channels. Although inhibition was thought to involve exclusively small conductance (SK potassium channels), recent findings have shown that BK channels also contribute to inhibition in basal, high-frequency OHCs after the onset of hearing. Here we show that the waveform of randomly timed IPSCs (evoked by high extracellular potassium) in high-frequency OHCs is altered by blockade of either SK or BK channels, with BK channels supporting faster synaptic waveforms and SK channels supporting slower synaptic waveforms. Consistent with these findings, IPSCs recorded from high-frequency OHCs that express BK channels are briefer than IPSCs recorded from low-frequency (apical) OHCs that do not express BK channels and from immature high-frequency OHCs before the developmental onset of BK channel expression. Likewise, OHCs of BKα(-/-) mice lacking the pore-forming α-subunit of BK channels have longer IPSCs than do the OHCs of BKα(+/+) littermates. Furthermore, serial reconstruction of electron micrographs showed that postsynaptic cisterns of BKα(-/-) OHCs were smaller than those of BKα(+/+) OHCs, and immunofluorescent quantification showed that efferent presynaptic terminals of BKα(-/-) OHCs were smaller than those of BKα(+/+) OHCs. Together, these findings indicate that BK channels contribute to postsynaptic function, and influence the structural maturation of efferent-OHC synapses. PMID:25653344

  15. Immunolocalization of estrogen and androgen receptors in the caput epididymidis of the fat sand rat (Psammomys obesus): Effects of seasonal variations, castration and efferent duct ligation.

    PubMed

    Menad, Rafik; Smaï, Souaâd; Moudilou, Elara; Khammar, Farida; Exbrayat, Jean-Marie; Gernigon-Spychalowicz, Thérèse

    2014-05-01

    The fat sand rat (Psammomys obesus) is a model to study seasonal reproductive cycle changes and several metabolic disorders. In order to show a possible involvement of estrogens in the male reproductive functions, the expression of estrogen receptors (ESR1 and ESR2) and androgen receptor (AR) were investigated in the caput epididymidis of fat sand rats during the breeding season, resting season, after castration, after castration followed by testosterone treatment, and after ligation of efferent ducts. In the breeding season, principal cells presented a strong immunostaining of AR in both nuclei and cytoplasm, a strong staining of ESR1, mainly in the apical zone, and a strong immunoexpression of ESR2, mainly in nuclei. In the resting season, a moderate immunostaining of AR in both cytoplasm and nuclei was observed. ESR1 staining showed a strong immunoreactivity in the nuclei. In contrast, the nuclei were negative for ESR2. After castration, a low and selective signal distribution was observed: the nuclei were moderately positive for AR and ESR2, and negative for ESR1. After castration and testosterone treatment, an androgen-dependence for AR and the restoration of ESR1 but not ESR2 immunoexpression were observed. After ligation of the efferent ducts, a considerable reduction of AR immunoreactivity was observed in contrast to ESR1 and ESR2, which gave a strong immunostaining signal. These results illustrate the complexity of the regulation of the androgen and estrogen receptor expression in the epididymis and argue for the coexistence of both androgenic and estrogenic pathways. PMID:24360974

  16. Excitatory cholinergic and purinergic signaling in bladder are equally susceptible to botulinum neurotoxin a consistent with co-release of transmitters from efferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary W; Aoki, K Roger; Dolly, J Oliver

    2010-09-01

    Mediators of neuromuscular transmission in rat bladder strips were dissected pharmacologically to examine their susceptibilities to inhibition by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and elucidate a basis for the clinical effectiveness of BoNT/A in alleviating smooth muscle spasms associated with overactive bladder. BoNT/A, BoNT/C1, or BoNT/E reduced peak and average force of muscle contractions induced by electric field stimulation (EFS) in dose-dependent manners by acting only on neurogenic, tetrodotoxin-sensitive responses. BoNTs that cleaved vesicle-associated membrane protein proved to be much less effective. Acetylcholine (ACh) and ATP were found to provide virtually all excitatory input, because EFS-evoked contractions were abolished by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, combined with either a desensitizing agonist of P2X(1) and P2X(3) or a nonselective ATP receptor antagonist. Both transmitters were released in the innervated muscle layer and, thus, persisted after removal of urothelium. Atropine or a desensitizer of the P2X(1) or P2X(3) receptors did not alter the rate at which muscle contractions were weakened by BoNT/A. Moreover, although cholinergic and purinergic signaling could be partially delineated by using high-frequency EFS (which intensified a transient, largely atropine-resistant spike in muscle contractions that was reduced after P2X receptor desensitization), they proved equally susceptible to BoNT/A. Thus, equi-potent blockade of ATP co-released with ACh from muscle efferents probably contributes to the effectiveness of BoNT/A in treating bladder overactivity, including nonresponders to anticholinergic drugs. Because purinergic receptors are known mediators of sensory afferent excitation, inhibition of efferent ATP release by BoNT/A could also help to ameliorate acute pain and urgency sensation reported by some recipients. PMID:20576797

  17. Connections of Auditory and Visual Cortex in the Prairie Vole (Microtus ochrogaster): Evidence for Multisensory Processing in Primary Sensory Areas

    PubMed Central

    Campi, Katharine L.; Bales, Karen L.; Grunewald, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    In prairie voles, primary sensory areas are dominated by neurons that respond to one sensory modality, but some neurons also respond to stimulation of other modalities. To reveal the anatomical substrate for these multimodal responses, we examined the connections of the primary auditory area + the anterior auditory field (A1 + AAF), the temporal anterior area (TA), and the primary visual area (V1). A1 + AAF had intrinsic connections and connections with TA, multimodal cortex (MM), V1, and primary somatosensory area (S1). TA had intrinsic connections and connections with A1 + AAF, MM, and V2. Callosal connections were observed in homotopic locations in auditory cortex for both fields. A1 + AAF and TA receive thalamic input primarily from divisions of the medial geniculate nucleus but also from the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGd), the lateral posterior nucleus, and the ventral posterior nucleus (VP). V1 had dense intrinsic connections and connections with V2, MM, auditory cortex, pyriform cortex (Pyr), and, in some cases, somatosensory cortex. V1 had interhemispheric connections with V1, V2, MM, S1, and Pyr and received thalamic input from LGd and VP. Our results indicate that multisensory integration occurs in primary sensory areas of the prairie vole cortex, and this may be related to behavioral specializations associated with its niche. PMID:19395525

  18. Connections of auditory and visual cortex in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster): evidence for multisensory processing in primary sensory areas.

    PubMed

    Campi, Katharine L; Bales, Karen L; Grunewald, Rebecca; Krubitzer, Leah

    2010-01-01

    In prairie voles, primary sensory areas are dominated by neurons that respond to one sensory modality, but some neurons also respond to stimulation of other modalities. To reveal the anatomical substrate for these multimodal responses, we examined the connections of the primary auditory area + the anterior auditory field (A1 + AAF), the temporal anterior area (TA), and the primary visual area (V1). A1 + AAF had intrinsic connections and connections with TA, multimodal cortex (MM), V1, and primary somatosensory area (S1). TA had intrinsic connections and connections with A1 + AAF, MM, and V2. Callosal connections were observed in homotopic locations in auditory cortex for both fields. A1 + AAF and TA receive thalamic input primarily from divisions of the medial geniculate nucleus but also from the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGd), the lateral posterior nucleus, and the ventral posterior nucleus (VP). V1 had dense intrinsic connections and connections with V2, MM, auditory cortex, pyriform cortex (Pyr), and, in some cases, somatosensory cortex. V1 had interhemispheric connections with V1, V2, MM, S1, and Pyr and received thalamic input from LGd and VP. Our results indicate that multisensory integration occurs in primary sensory areas of the prairie vole cortex, and this may be related to behavioral specializations associated with its niche. PMID:19395525

  19. Observations on the connectivity of the parvicellular reticular formation with respect to a vomiting center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic connections of the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRF) that have been demonstrated by fiber degeneration studies and studied by more recently introduced horseradish peroxidase retrograde cell labeling are reviewed in an attempt to delimit the connectivity of the region in the PCRF where electrical stimulation produced emesis. Evidence is presented that certain specific functional subdivisions in PCRF such as the salivatory nuclei and the cells which give rise to the vestibular efferent projections can be delimited. An attempt is made to differentiate the sources of brain stem afferent connections with the nucleus of the tractus solitarius, the vagal nucleus and the nucleus ambiguus complex. The literature bearing on the histochemistry of the brain stem is reviewed in a search for clues to possible unique histo- or immunochemical cytological subdivisions in the parvicellular reticular formation.

  20. The Importance of Lateral Connections in the Parietal Cortex for Generating Motor Plans

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Derrik E.; Oros, Nicolas; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence has highlighted the significant role of associative brain areas, such as the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in transforming multimodal sensory information into motor plans. However, little is known about how different sensory information, which can have different delays or be absent, combines to produce a motor plan, such as executing a reaching movement. To address these issues, we constructed four biologically plausible network architectures to simulate PPC: 1) feedforward from sensory input to the PPC to a motor output area, 2) feedforward with the addition of an efference copy from the motor area, 3) feedforward with the addition of lateral or recurrent connectivity across PPC neurons, and 4) feedforward plus efference copy, and lateral connections. Using an evolutionary strategy, the connectivity of these network architectures was evolved to execute visually guided movements, where the target stimulus provided visual input for the entirety of each trial. The models were then tested on a memory guided motor task, where the visual target disappeared after a short duration. Sensory input to the neural networks had sensory delays consistent with results from monkey studies. We found that lateral connections within the PPC resulted in smoother movements and were necessary for accurate movements in the absence of visual input. The addition of lateral connections resulted in velocity profiles consistent with those observed in human and non-human primate visually guided studies of reaching, and allowed for smooth, rapid, and accurate movements under all conditions. In contrast, Feedforward or Feedback architectures were insufficient to overcome these challenges. Our results suggest that intrinsic lateral connections are critical for executing accurate, smooth motor plans. PMID:26252871

  1. Device Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John; Roberts, Ruth; Morris, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have to take numerous factors/data into their therapeutic decisions in daily life. Connecting the devices they are using by feeding the data generated into a database/app is supposed to help patients to optimize their glycemic control. As this is not established in practice, the different roadblocks have to be discussed to open the road. That large telecommunication companies are now entering this market might be a big help in pushing this forward. Smartphones offer an ideal platform for connectivity solutions. PMID:25614015

  2. Connecting Node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Raboin, Jasen L.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    A paper describes the Octanode, a connecting node that facilitates the integration of multiple docking mechanisms, hatches, windows, and internal and external systems with the use of flat surfaces. The Octanode is a 26- faced Great Rhombicuboctahedron Archi medean solid with six octagonshaped panels, eight hexagon-shaped panels, and 12 square panels using three unique, simple, flat shapes to construct a spherical approximation. Each flat shape can be constructed with a variety of material and manufacturing techniques, such as honeycomb composite panels or a pocketed skinstringer configuration, using conventional means. The flat shapes can be connected together and sealed to create a pressurizable volume by the use of any conventional means including welding or fastening devices and sealant. The node can then be connected to other elements to allow transfer between those elements, or it could serve as an airlock. The Octanode can be manufactured on the ground and can be integrated with subsystems including hatches and ports. The node can then be transported to its intended location, whether on orbit or on surface. Any of the flat panels could be replaced by curved ones, turning the node into a copula. Windows may be placed on flat panes with optimal viewing angles that are not blocked by large connecting nodes. The advantage of using flat panels to represent a spherical approximation is that this allows for easier integration of subsystems and design features.

  3. Get Connected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jessica; Hagevik, Rita; Adkinson, Bennett; Parmly, Jilynn

    2013-01-01

    Technology can be both a blessing and a curse in the classroom. Although technology can provide greater access to information and increase student engagement, if screen time replaces time spent outside, then students stand to lose awareness and connectivity to the surrounding natural environment. This article describes how Google Earth can foster…

  4. Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2014-01-01

    "We used to send out books that looked like this," says Barbara Dreyer, as she holds the 500-page volume from one of the first-ever courses offered online by Connections Academy. "You could look at this information online, but, frankly, a lot of people were doing this," she adds, thumbing through the book's pages. Dreyer,…

  5. Learning Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, Regina D.; Richards, Patricia O.

    2005-01-01

    In this edition of Learning Connections, the authors show how technology can enhance study of weather patterns, reading comprehension, real-world training, critical thinking, health education, and art criticism. The following sections are included: (1) Social Studies; (2) Language Arts; (3) Computer Science and ICT; (4) Art; and (5) Health.…

  6. College Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Scalzo, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes Oakwood City School District's College Connection Study, which is now in its eighth year. The purpose of the study is to help the educators in the district learn how to effectively prepare students for success in the colleges of their choice. Teachers, administrators, and other staff members travel to colleges to conduct…

  7. The auditory cross-section (AXS) test battery: A new way to study afferent/efferent relations linking body periphery (ear, voice, heart) with brainstem and cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauter, Judith

    2002-05-01

    Several noninvasive methods are available for studying the neural bases of human sensory-motor function, but their cost is prohibitive for many researchers and clinicians. The auditory cross section (AXS) test battery utilizes relatively inexpensive methods, yet yields data that are at least equivalent, if not superior in some applications, to those generated by more expensive technologies. The acronym emphasizes access to axes-the battery makes it possible to assess dynamic physiological relations along all three body-brain axes: rostro-caudal (afferent/efferent), dorso-ventral, and right-left, on an individually-specific basis, extending from cortex to the periphery. For auditory studies, a three-level physiological ear-to-cortex profile is generated, utilizing (1) quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG); (2) the repeated evoked potentials version of the auditory brainstem response (REPs/ABR); and (3) otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Battery procedures will be explained, and sample data presented illustrating correlated multilevel changes in ear, voice, heart, brainstem, and cortex in response to circadian rhythms, and challenges with substances such as antihistamines and Ritalin. Potential applications for the battery include studies of central auditory processing, reading problems, hyperactivity, neural bases of voice and speech motor control, neurocardiology, individually-specific responses to medications, and the physiological bases of tinnitus, hyperacusis, and related treatments.

  8. The Responsive Amygdala: Treatment-induced Alterations in Functional Connectivity in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simons, LE; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-gender matched controls before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared to controls, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pre-treated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy controls from Time 1 to Time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity following an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  9. The responsive amygdala: treatment-induced alterations in functional connectivity in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simons, L E; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-09-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear, and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-sex matched control subjects before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared with control subjects, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pretreated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy control subjects from time 1 to time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores; and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity after an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  10. Aberrant structural and functional connectivity in the salience network and central executive network circuit in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Chen, Xingui; He, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Kai; Qiu, Bensheng

    2016-08-01

    Consistent structural and functional abnormities have been detected in the salience network (SN) and the central-executive network (CEN) in schizophrenia. SN, known for its critical role in switching CEN and default-mode network (DMN) during cognitively demanding tasks, is proved to show aberrant regulation on the interaction between DMN and CEN in schizophrenia. However, it has not been elucidated whether there is a direct alteration of structural and functional connectivity between SN and CEN. 22 schizophrenia patients and 21 healthy controls were recruited for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in present study. The results show that schizophrenia patients had lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in right inferior long fasciculus (ILF), left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and callosal body than healthy controls. Significantly reduced functional connectivity was also found between right fronto-insular cortex (rFIC) and right posterior parietal cortex (rPPC). FA in right ILF was positively correlated with the functional connectivity of rFIC-rPPC. Therefore, we proposed a disruption of structural and functional connectivity and a positive anatomo-functional relationship in SN-CEN circuit, which might account for a core feature of schizophrenia. PMID:27233217

  11. Connections of the superior colliculus with the tegmentum and the cerebellum in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1997-06-01

    Different tracer substances were injected into the superior colliculus (CoS) in order to study its afferents and efferents with the meso-rhombencephalic tegmentum, the precerebellar nuclei and the cerebellum in the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec. The overall pattern of tectal connectivity in tenrec was similar to that in other mammals, as, e.g. the efferents to the contralateral paramedian reticular formation. Similarly the origin of the cerebello-tectal projection in mainly the lateral portions of the tenrec's cerebellar nuclear complex corresponded to the findings in species with little binocular overlap. In comparison to other mammals, however, the tenrec showed a consistent projection to the ipsilateral inferior olivary nucleus, in addition to the classical contralateral tecto-olivary projection. The tenrec's CoS also appeared to receive an unusually prominent monoaminergic input particularly from the substantia nigra, pars compacta. There was a reciprocal tecto-parabigeminal projection, a distinct nuclear aggregation of parabigeminal neurons, however, was difficult to identify. The dorsal lemniscal nucleus did not show perikaryal labeling in contrast to the paralemniscal region. Similar to the cat but unlike the rat there were a few neurons in the nucleus of the central acoustic tract. Unlike the cat, but similar to the rat there was a distinct, predominantly ipsilateral projection to the magnocellular reticular field known to project spinalward. PMID:9220470

  12. Efferents from the lateral frontal cortex to spinomedullary target areas, trigeminal nuclei, and spinally projecting brainstem regions in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Lotter, G

    1996-08-12

    This study was done in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec, an insectivore with a very poorly differentiated neocortex. The cortical region, known to give rise to spinal projections, was injected with tracer, and the cortical efferents to brainstem and spinal cord were analyzed. Bulbar reticular fields, in addition, were identified according to their cells of origin and the laterality of their spinal projections after injection of tracer. Only few cortical fibers could be traced from the bulbar pyramid into the ipsilateral spinal cord, particularly to the lateral funiculus. The projections to the dorsal column nuclei and the classical spinally projecting brainstem regions were also weak. Faint projections were demonstrated to the nucleus of the posterior commissure and the nucleus of Darkschewitsch. In comparison to other mammals, there was no evidence that the contralateral cortico-bulbo-spinal pathway was strengthened, substituting for the almost non-existent contralateral corticospinal projection. Unlike the sensorimotor apparatus controlling limb and body movements, the brainstem regions controlling the head and neck received prominent cortical projections. Direct corticotrigeminal projections and indirect pathways were well represented. The projections to the trigeminal nuclei and the lateral reticular fields were clearly bilateral; those to the superior colliculus were predominantly ipsilateral. The corticobulbar fibers left the pyramid along its entire extent; the principal trigeminal nucleus and the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum were supplied by additional fibers of the corticotegmental tract. The lateral frontal cortex also projected densely to the dorsolateral hypothalamus, the periaqueductal gray, and the adjacent mesencephalic tegmentum, components of the emotional motor system. PMID:8841923

  13. The mammalian efferent vestibular system plays a crucial role in the high-frequency response and short-term adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Patrick P; Khan, Serajul I; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2015-12-01

    Although anatomically well described, the functional role of the mammalian efferent vestibular system (EVS) remains unclear. Unlike in fish and reptiles, the mammalian EVS does not seem to play a role in modulation of primary afferent activity in anticipation of active head movements. However, it could play a role in modulating long-term mechanisms requiring plasticity such as vestibular adaptation. We measured the efficacy of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) adaptation in α9-knockout mice. These mice carry a missense mutation of the gene encoding the α9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit. The α9 nAChR subunit is expressed in the vestibular and auditory periphery, and its loss of function could compromise peripheral input from the predominantly cholinergic EVS. We measured the VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) in 26 α9-knockout mice and 27 cba129 control mice. Mice were randomly assigned to one of three groups: gain-increase adaptation (1.5×), gain-decrease adaptation (0.5×), or no adaptation (baseline, 1×). After adaptation training (horizontal rotations at 0.5 Hz with peak velocity 20°/s), we measured the sinusoidal (0.2-10 Hz, 20-100°/s) and transient (1,500-6,000°/s(2)) VOR in complete darkness. α9-Knockout mice had significantly lower baseline gains compared with control mice. This difference increased with stimulus frequency (∼ 5% <1 Hz to ∼ 25% >1 Hz). Moreover, vestibular adaptation (difference in VOR gain of gain-increase and gain-decrease adaptation groups as % of gain increase) was significantly reduced in α9-knockout mice (17%) compared with control mice (53%), a reduction of ∼ 70%. Our results show that the loss of α9 nAChRs moderately affects the VOR but severely affects VOR adaptation, suggesting that the EVS plays a crucial role in vestibular plasticity. PMID:26424577

  14. Age-related Decline in Kv3.1b Expression in the Mouse Auditory Brainstem Correlates with Functional Deficits in the Medial Olivocochlear Efferent System

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; O’Neill, William E.; Frisina, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Kv3.1b channel protein is widely distributed in the mammalian auditory brainstem, but studies have focused mainly on regions critical for temporal processing, including the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) and anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Because temporal processing declines with age, this study was undertaken to determine if the expression of Kv3.1b likewise declines, and if changes are specific to these nuclei. Immunocytochemistry using an anti-Kv3.1b antibody was performed, and the relative optical density of cells and neuropil was determined from CBA/CaJ mice of four age groups. Declines in expression in AVCN, MNTB, and lateral superior olive (35, 26, and 23%) were found, but changes were limited to neuropil. Interestingly, cellular optical density declines were found in superior paraolivary nucleus, ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, and lateral nucleus of the trapezoid body (24, 29, and 26%), which comprise the medial olivocochlear (MOC) feedback system. All declines occurred by middle age (15 months old). No age-related changes were found in the remaining regions of cochlear nucleus or in the inferior colliculus. Contralateral suppression of distortion-product otoacoustic emission amplitudes of age-matched littermates also declined by middle age, suggesting a correlation between Kv3.1 expression and MOC function. In search of more direct evidence for such a correlation, Kv3.1b knockout mice were examined. Knockouts show poor MOC function as compared to +/+ and +/− genotypes. Thus, Kv3.1b expression declines in MOC neurons by middle age, and these changes appear to correlate with functional declines in efferent activity in both middle-aged CBA mice and Kv3.1b knockout mice. PMID:17453307

  15. The Cortical Connectivity of the Prefrontal Cortex in the Monkey Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yeterian, Edward H.; Pandya, Deepak N.; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Petrides, Michael

    2011-01-01

    One dimension of understanding the functions of the prefrontal cortex is knowledge of cortical connectivity. We have surveyed three aspects of prefrontal cortical connections: local projections (within the frontal lobe), the termination patterns of long association (post-Rolandic) projections, and the trajectories of major fiber pathways. The local connections appear to be organized in relation to dorsal (hippocampal origin) and ventral (paleocortical origin) architectonic trends. According to the proposal of a dual origin of the cerebral cortex, cortical areas can be traced as originating from archicortex (hippocampus) on the one hand, and paleocortex, on the other hand, in a stepwise manner (e.g., Sanides, 1969; Pandya and Yeterian, 1985). Prefrontal areas within each trend are connected with less architectonically differentiated areas, and, on the other hand, with more differentiated areas. Such organization may allow for the systematic exchange of information within each architectonic trend. The long connections of the prefrontal cortex with post-Rolandic regions seem to be organized preferentially in relation to dorsal and ventral prefrontal architectonic trends. Prefrontal areas are connected with post-Rolandic auditory, visual and somatosensory association areas, and with multimodal and paralimbic regions. This long connectivity likely works in conjunction with local connections to serve prefrontal cortical functions. The afferent and efferent connections of the prefrontal cortex with post-Rolandic regions are conveyed by specific long association pathways. These pathways as well appear to be organized in relation to dorsal and ventral prefrontal architectonic trends. Finally, although prefrontal areas have preferential connections in relation to dual architectonic trends, it is clear that there are interconnections between and among areas in each trend, which may provide a substrate for the overall integrative function of the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal

  16. Overexpression of the transcription factor RAP2.6 leads to enhanced callose deposition in syncytia and enhanced resistance against the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is their source of nutrients throughout their life. A transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that gene expression in the syncytium is different from that of the root with thousands of genes upregulated or downregulated. Among the downregulated genes are many which code for defense-related proteins. One gene which is strongly downregulated codes for the ethylene response transcription factor RAP2.6. The genome of Arabidopsis contains 122 ERF transcription factor genes which are involved in a variety of developmental and stress responses. Results Expression of RAP2.6 was studied with RT-PCR and a promoter::GUS line. During normal growth conditions the gene was expressed especially in roots and stems. It was inducible by Pseudomonas syringae but downregulated in syncytia from a very early time point on. Overexpression of the gene enhanced the resistance against H. schachtii which was seen by a lower number of nematodes developing on these plants as well as smaller syncytia and smaller female nematodes. A T-DNA mutant had a reduced RAP2.6 transcript level but this did not further increase the susceptibility against H. schachtii. Neither overexpression lines nor mutants had an effect on P. syringae. Overexpression of RAP2.6 led to an elevated expression of JA-responsive genes during early time points after infection by H. schachtii. Syncytia developing on overexpression lines showed enhanced deposition of callose. Conclusions Our results showed that H. schachtii infection is accompanied by a downregulation of RAP2.6. It seems likely that the nematodes use effectors to actively downregulate the expression of this and other defense-related genes to avoid resistance responses of the host plant. Enhanced resistance of RAP2.6 overexpression lines seemed to be due to enhanced

  17. Adaptive algorithms to map how brain trauma affects anatomical connectivity in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Emily L.; Prasad, Gautam; Babikian, Talin; Kernan, Claudia; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-12-01

    Deficits in white matter (WM) integrity occur following traumatic brain injury (TBI), and often persist long after the visible scars have healed. Heterogeneity in injury types and locations can complicate analyses, making it harder to discover common biomarkers for tracking recovery. Here we apply a newly developed adaptive connectivity method, EPIC (evolving partitions to improve connectomics) to identify differences in structural connectivity that persist longitudinally. This data comes from a longitudinal study, in which we scanned participants (aged 8-19 years) with anatomical and diffusion MRI in both the post-acute and chronic phases (1-6 months and 13-19 months post-injury). To identify patterns of abnormal connectivity, we trained a model on data from 32 TBI patients in the post-acute phase and 45 well-matched healthy controls, reducing an initial 68x68 connectivity matrix to a 14x14 matrix. We then applied this reduced parcellation to the chronic data in participants who had returned for their chronic assessment (21 TBI and 26 healthy controls) and tested for group differences. We found significant differences in two connections, comprising callosal fibers and long anterior-posterior fibers, with the TBI group showing increased fiber density relative to controls. Longitudinal analysis revealed that these were connections that were decreasing over time in the healthy controls, as is a common developmental phenomenon, but they were increasing in the TBI group. While we cannot definitively tell why this may occur with our current data, this study provides targets for longitudinal tracking, and poses questions for future investigation.

  18. DISSECTING HABITAT CONNECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    abstract

    Connectivity is increasingly recognized as an important element of a successful reserve design. Connectivity matters in reserve design to the extent that it promotes or hinders the viability of target populations. While conceptually straightforward, connectivity i...

  19. Connective Tissue Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Connective tissue is the material inside your body that supports many of its parts. It is the "cellular ... their work. Cartilage and fat are examples of connective tissue. There are over 200 disorders that impact connective ...

  20. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  1. Cortical chemoarchitecture shapes macroscale effective functional connectivity patterns in macaque cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Turk, Elise; Scholtens, Lianne H; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cortex is a complex system of-at the microscale level-interconnected neurons and-at the macroscale level-interconnected areas, forming the infrastructure for local and global neural processing and information integration. While the effects of regional chemoarchitecture on local cortical activity are well known, the effect of local neurotransmitter receptor organization on the emergence of large scale region-to-region functional interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we examined reports of effective functional connectivity-as measured by the action of strychnine administration acting on the chemical balance of cortical areas-in relation to underlying regional variation in microscale neurotransmitter receptor density levels in the macaque cortex. Linking cortical variation in microscale receptor density levels to collated information on macroscale functional connectivity of the macaque cortex, we show macroscale patterns of effective corticocortical functional interactions-and in particular, the strength of connectivity of efferent macroscale pathways-to be related to the ratio of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor densities of cortical areas. Our findings provide evidence for the microscale chemoarchitecture of cortical areas to have a direct stimulating influence on the emergence of macroscale functional connectivity patterns in the mammalian brain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1856-1865, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970255

  2. The hippocampal continuation (indusium griseum): its connectivity in the hedgehog tenrec and its status within the hippocampal formation of higher vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    2004-06-01

    The indusium griseum and its precallosal extension are usually considered poorly differentiated portions of the hippocampus. The connections of this so-called 'hippocampal continuation' (HCt) have only been analyzed so far in rodents, which show one of the least-developed HCt among mammals. In this study we have investigated the relatively well differentiated HCt of the small Madagascan hedgehog tenrec (Afrotheria) using histochemical and axonal transport techniques. The tenrec's HCt shows associative and commissural connections. It receives laminar specific afferents from the entorhinal cortex (collaterals from neurons projecting to the dentate area), the anterior and posterior piriform cortices as well as the supramammillary region. A few fibers also originate in the olfactory bulb and the dentate hilus. Among these input areas only the dentate hilus receives a significant reciprocal projection from the HCt. Additional HCt efferents are directed to the subcallosal septum (presumed septohippocampal nucleus), the olfactory tubercle and the islands of Calleja. With the exception of the supramammillary afferents and possible efferents to the supraoptic nucleus we failed, however, to demonstrate distinct thalamic and hypothalamic connections. A comparison of the connections of the HCt with those of the hippocampal subdivisions reveal some similarity between the HCt and the dentate area, but the overall pattern of connectivity does not permit a correlation of the HCt with the dentate area, let alone the cornu ammonis and the subiculum. This view is supported by histochemical findings in the tenrec (immunoreactivity to calcium binding proteins) as well as the rat (data taken from the literature). The HCt is therefore considered a region in its own right within the hippocampal formation. It may be tentatively correlated with the medial cortex of reptiles, while the dentate area and the cornu ammonis may have evolved de novo in mammals. PMID:15168114

  3. Two phenotypically distinct T cells are involved in ultraviolet-irradiated urocanic acid-induced suppression of the efferent delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.

    1987-09-01

    When UVB-irradiated urocanic acid, the putative photoreceptor/mediator for UVB suppression, is administered to mice it induces a dose-dependent suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1), of similar magnitude to that induced by UV irradiation of mice. In this study, the efferent suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity by UV-irradiated urocanic acid is demonstrated to be due to 2 phenotypically distinct T cells, (Thy1+, L3T4-, Ly2+) and (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-). The suppression is specific for HSV-1. This situation parallels the generation of 2 distinct T-suppressor cells for HSV-1 by UV irradiation of mice and provides further evidence for the involvement of urocanic acid in the generation of UVB suppression.

  4. Weakly connected neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1990-01-01

    A new neural network architecture is proposed based upon effects of non-Lipschitzian dynamics. The network is fully connected, but these connections are active only during vanishingly short time periods. The advantages of this architecture are discussed.

  5. A General Approach for Quantifying Nonlinear Connectivity in the Nervous System Based on Phase Coupling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; Yao, Jun; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Schouten, Alfred C; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2016-02-01

    Interaction between distant neuronal populations is essential for communication within the nervous system and can occur as a highly nonlinear process. To better understand the functional role of neural interactions, it is important to quantify the nonlinear connectivity in the nervous system. We introduce a general approach to measure nonlinear connectivity through phase coupling: the multi-spectral phase coherence (MSPC). Using simulated data, we compare MSPC with existing phase coupling measures, namely n : m synchronization index and bi-phase locking value. MSPC provides a system description, including (i) the order of the nonlinearity, (ii) the direction of interaction, (iii) the time delay in the system, and both (iv) harmonic and (v) intermodulation coupling beyond the second order; which are only partly revealed by other methods. We apply MSPC to analyze data from a motor control experiment, where subjects performed isotonic wrist flexions while receiving movement perturbations. MSPC between the perturbation, EEG and EMG was calculated. Our results reveal directional nonlinear connectivity in the afferent and efferent pathways, as well as the time delay (43 ± 8 ms) between the perturbation and the brain response. In conclusion, MSPC is a novel approach capable to assess high-order nonlinear interaction and timing in the nervous system. PMID:26404514

  6. MedlinePlus Connect

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus Connect? MedlinePlus Connect links health IT systems, patient portals and electronic health record (EHR) systems to relevant, ... care providers when they need it via their patient portal or EHR. How does MedlinePlus Connect work? MedlinePlus ...

  7. Cortical brain connectivity evaluated by graph theory in dementia: a correlation study between functional and structural data.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Curcio, Giuseppe; Altavilla, Riccardo; Scrascia, Federica; Giambattistelli, Federica; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Bramanti, Placido; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2015-01-01

    A relatively new approach to brain function in neuroscience is the "functional connectivity", namely the synchrony in time of activity in anatomically-distinct but functionally-collaborating brain regions. On the other hand, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a recently developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique with the capability to detect brain structural connection with fractional anisotropy (FA) identification. FA decrease has been observed in the corpus callosum of subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI, an AD prodromal stage). Corpus callosum splenium DTI abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas. This study aimed to investigate possible correlations between structural damage, measured by MRI-DTI, and functional abnormalities of brain integration, measured by characteristic path length detected in resting state EEG source activity (40 participants: 9 healthy controls, 10 MCI, 10 mild AD, 11 moderate AD). For each subject, undirected and weighted brain network was built to evaluate graph core measures. eLORETA lagged linear connectivity values were used as weight of the edges of the network. Results showed that callosal FA reduction is associated to a loss of brain interhemispheric functional connectivity characterized by increased delta and decreased alpha path length. These findings suggest that "global" (average network shortest path length representing an index of how efficient is the information transfer between two parts of the network) functional measure can reflect the reduction of fiber connecting the two hemispheres as revealed by DTI analysis and also anticipate in time this structural loss. PMID:25613102

  8. Chip connectivity verification program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Josh (Inventor); Patterson, George (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for testing electrical connectivity between conductive structures on a chip that is preferably layered with conductive and nonconductive layers. The method includes determining the layer on which each structure is located and defining the perimeter of each structure. Conductive layer connections between each of the layers are determined, and, for each structure, the points of intersection between the perimeter of that structure and the perimeter of each other structure on the chip are also determined. Finally, electrical connections between the structures are determined using the points of intersection and the conductive layer connections.

  9. 78 FR 55684 - ConnectED Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... policies and consider the most promising strategies for equipping K-12 schools for digital learning. The... devices to enrich the learning experience; as teachers increasingly integrate Web video and other digital... Program (BIP), Broadband Loan Program, Community Connect Program, and Distance Learning and...

  10. An update on the connections of the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex

    PubMed Central

    Yetnikoff, Leora; Lavezzi, Heather N.; Reichard, Rhett A.; Zahm, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    This review covers the intrinsic organization and afferent and efferent connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex, comprising the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area and retrorubral field, which house, respectively, the A9, A10 and A8 groups of nigrostriatal, mesolimbic and mesocortical dopaminergic neurons. In addition, A10dc (dorsal, caudal) and A10rv (rostroventral) extensions into, respectively, the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and supramammillary nucleus are discussed. Associated intrinsic and extrinsic connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex that utilize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and neuropeptides and various co-expressed combinations of these compounds are considered in conjunction with the dopamine-containing systems. A framework is provided for understanding the organization of masssive afferent systems descending and ascending to the midbrain dopaminergic complex from the telencephalon and brainstem, respectively. Within the context of this framework, the basal ganglia direct and indirect output pathways are treated in some detail. Findings from rodent brain are briefly compared with those from primates, including human. Recent literature is emphasized, including traditional experimental neuroanatomical and modern gene transfer and optogenetic studies. An attempt was made to provide sufficient background and cite a representative sampling of earlier primary papers and reviews so that people new to the field may find this to be a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject. PMID:24735820

  11. Development of tectal connectivity across metamorphosis in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Seth S; Simmons, Andrea Megela

    2010-01-01

    In the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), the process of metamorphosis culminates in the appearance of new visual and visuomotor behaviors reflective of the emergence of binocular vision and visually-guided prey capture behaviors as the animal transitions to life on land. Using several different neuroanatomical tracers, we examined the substrates that may underlie these behavioral changes by tracing the afferent and efferent connectivity of the midbrain optic tectum across metamorphic development. Intratectal, tectotoral, tectotegmental, tectobulbar, and tecto-thalamic tracts exhibit similar trajectories of neurobiotin fiber label across the developmental span from early larval tadpoles to adults. Developmental variability was apparent primarily in intensity and distribution of cell and puncta label in target nuclei. Combined injections of cholera toxin subunit β and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin consistently label cell bodies, puncta, or fiber segments bilaterally in midbrain targets including the pretectal gray, laminar nucleus of the torus semicircularis, and the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Developmentally stable label was observed bilaterally in medullary targets including the medial vestibular nucleus, lateral vestibular nucleus, and reticular gray, and in forebrain targets including the posterior and ventromedial nuclei of the thalamus. The nucleus isthmi, cerebellum, lateral line nuclei, medial septum, ventral striatum, and medial pallium show more developmentally variable patterns of connectivity. Our results suggest that even during larval development, the optic tectum contains substrates for integration of visual with auditory, vestibular, and somatosensory cues, as well as for guidance of motivated behaviors. PMID:21266803

  12. An update on the connections of the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex.

    PubMed

    Yetnikoff, L; Lavezzi, H N; Reichard, R A; Zahm, D S

    2014-12-12

    This review covers the intrinsic organization and afferent and efferent connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex, comprising the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area and retrorubral field, which house, respectively, the A9, A10 and A8 groups of nigrostriatal, mesolimbic and mesocortical dopaminergic neurons. In addition, A10dc (dorsal, caudal) and A10rv (rostroventral) extensions into, respectively, the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and supramammillary nucleus are discussed. Associated intrinsic and extrinsic connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex that utilize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and neuropeptides and various co-expressed combinations of these compounds are considered in conjunction with the dopamine-containing systems. A framework is provided for understanding the organization of massive afferent systems descending and ascending to the midbrain dopaminergic complex from the telencephalon and brainstem, respectively. Within the context of this framework, the basal ganglia direct and indirect output pathways are treated in some detail. Findings from rodent brain are briefly compared with those from primates, including humans. Recent literature is emphasized, including traditional experimental neuroanatomical and modern gene transfer and optogenetic studies. An attempt was made to provide sufficient background and cite a representative sampling of earlier primary papers and reviews so that people new to the field may find this to be a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject. PMID:24735820

  13. Stretch induced hyperexcitability of mice callosal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Anthony; Stebbings, Kevin A.; Llano, Daniel A.; Saif, Taher

    2015-01-01

    Memory and learning are thought to result from changes in synaptic strength. Previous studies on synaptic physiology in brain slices have traditionally been focused on biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate with experiments on mouse brain slices that central nervous system plasticity is also sensitive to mechanical stretch. This is important, given the host of clinical conditions involving changes in mechanical tension on the brain, and the normal role that mechanical tension plays in brain development. A novel platform is developed to investigate neural responses to mechanical stretching. Flavoprotein autofluoresence (FA) imaging was employed for measuring neural activity. We observed that synaptic excitability substantially increases after a small (2.5%) stretch was held for 10 min and released. The increase is accumulative, i.e., multiple stretch cycles further increase the excitability. We also developed analytical tools to quantify the spatial spread and response strength. Results show that the spatial spread is less stable in slices undergoing the stretch-unstretch cycle. FA amplitude and activation rate decrease as excitability increases in stretch cases but not in electrically enhanced cases. These results collectively demonstrate that a small stretch in physiological range can modulate neural activities significantly, suggesting that mechanical events can be employed as a novel tool for the modulation of neural plasticity. PMID:26300729

  14. Caldecott Connections to Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glandon, Shan

    This volume brings award-winning literature to all areas of the science curriculum. The lesson plan format includes the four stages of engagement, elaboration, exploration, and connection. Each story is followed by activities that make connections between literature, science, and the arts. Chapters include: (1) "Frog Went A-Courtin'," which…

  15. Reading and Writing Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Jana M., Ed.

    This collection of papers, from a conference on reading and writing connections held at the University of Illinois in October 1986, reflects the value of demonstrating connections between reading instruction and writing. The book shows practitioners how writing can be blended with reading instruction and how writing activities can be used not just…

  16. Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darley, Joy W.; Leapard, Barbara B.

    2010-01-01

    Algebraic thinking is a top priority in mathematics classrooms today. Because elementary school teachers lay the groundwork to develop students' capacity to think algebraically, it is crucial for teachers to have a conceptual understanding of the connections between arithmetic and algebra and be confident in communicating these connections. Many…

  17. Artificial limb connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Connection simplifies and eases donning and removing artificial limb; eliminates harnesses and clamps; and reduces skin pressures by allowing bone to carry all tensile and part of compressive loads between prosthesis and stump. Because connection is modular, it is easily modified to suit individual needs.

  18. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  19. Making the Internet Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    Provides information on commercial connections to the Internet via gateways as opposed to direct connection or through a modem. Hardware and software requirements are described; and commercial online services offering an Internet gateway are discussed, including America Online, CompuServe, Delphi, GEnie, and Prodigy. (LRW)

  20. Connections: Writing about Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Jane P.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a teaching method in which high school sophomores (1) read A. Munro's "Connection," a short story connecting the author to her family origins; (2) interview relatives about their personal history; and (3) compose vignettes based on the notes collected during a three-week period. Provides numerous questions and prompts used to help the…

  1. Broca's area - thalamic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bohsali, Anastasia A; Triplett, William; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Gullett, Joseph M; McGregor, Keith; FitzGerald, David B; Mareci, Thomas; White, Keith; Crosson, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Broca's area is crucially involved in language processing. The sub-regions of Broca's area (pars triangularis, pars opercularis) presumably are connected via corticocortical pathways. However, growing evidence suggests that the thalamus may also be involved in language and share some of the linguistic functions supported by Broca's area. Functional connectivity is thought to be achieved via corticothalamic/thalamocortical white matter pathways. Our study investigates structural connectivity between Broca's area and the thalamus, specifically ventral anterior nucleus and pulvinar. We demonstrate that Broca's area shares direct connections with these thalamic nuclei and suggest a local Broca's area-thalamus network potentially involved in linguistic processing. Thalamic connectivity with Broca's area may serve to selectively recruit cortical regions storing multimodal features of lexical items and to bind them together during lexical-semantic processing. In addition, Broca's area-thalamic circuitry may enable cortico-thalamo-cortical information transfer and modulation between BA 44 and 45 during language comprehension and production. PMID:25555132

  2. Covariant magnetic connection hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, F.

    2016-04-01

    > In the single fluid, non-relativistic, ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma description, magnetic field lines play a fundamental role by defining dynamically preserved `magnetic connections' between plasma elements. Here we show how the concept of magnetic connection needs to be generalized in the case of a relativistic MHD description where we require covariance under arbitrary Lorentz transformations. This is performed by defining 2-D magnetic connection hypersurfaces in the 4-D Minkowski space. This generalization accounts for the loss of simultaneity between spatially separated events in different frames and is expected to provide a powerful insight into the 4-D geometry of electromagnetic fields when .

  3. An autoradiographic analysis of the cortical connections of the pallidal and cerebellar zones within the feline motor thalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Wensel, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The feline motor thalamus relays both basal ganglia and cerebellar inputs to the motor cortex. This complex is classically subdivided into three nuclei: the ventroanterior nucleus (VA), the ventrolateral nucleus (VL), and the ventromedial nucleus (VM). Poor correlation between recognized patterns of cortical and subcortical connectivity and traditional boundaries used to distinguish these nuclei complicate the elucidation of the role they play in the elaboration of motor behavior. The recent demonstration of complementarity for the pallidothalamic and dentatothalamic projections to the motor thalamus of the cat provided the foundation for a revision of these nuclear borders to reflect differences in subcortical connectivity. Using a revised topography, this study analyzed the afferent and efferent connections of the feline VA and VL through the application of both anterograde and retrograde tracing techniques. The extent of the cerebellothalamic projection, as revealed by the bidirectional transport of WGA-HRP, was used to demarcate the boundary between VA and VL. Injections of tritiated amino acids into VA and VL allowed for the autoradiographic tracing of their cortical projections. Autoradiography was also used to demonstrate the distributions of corticothalamic projections from selected pericruciate and posterior parietal subfields to the motor thalamus.

  4. HIV-AIDS Connection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area The HIV-AIDS Connection AIDS was first recognized in 1981 and ... is there overwhelming scientific consensus that HIV causes AIDS? Before HIV infection became widespread in the human ...

  5. Can we measure connectivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Richard; Vericat, Damia; Cerda, Artemi; Brardinoni, Francesco; Batalla, Ramon; Masselink, Rens; Wittenberg, Lea; Nadal Romero, Estela; López-Tarazón, José; Estrany, Joan; Keesstra, Saskia

    2015-04-01

    Whilst the term 'connectivity' in hydrological and sediment-based research is becoming increasing well-known, it is neither used consistently in the existing literature, nor is it clear from that literature, that the connectivity of a landscape, or part of a landscape can be measured. However, it is argued that understanding how well critical source areas of water or sediment are connected to receiving surface waters, may be an essential step towards improvement of land management to mitigate flooding, soil erosion and water quality problems. The first part of this paper, therefore, explores what is currently meant by the term connectivity; addressing the differences between structural and functional, or process-based connectivity, specifically with reference to the movement of water and sediment through an ecosystem. We argue that most existing studies do not measure connectivity. Instead, they address only part of the story. Existing work may describe structural change in a landscape, which can perhaps elucidate the potential for connectivity to occur, or indeed the emergent spatial properties of an ecosystem, but it rarely quantifies the connectivity of an ecosystem in a process-based manner through time. Alternatively, a great deal of work describes fluxes of water and sediment at (sometimes multiple) points in a landscape and infers connectivity of the system via analysis of time series data; from rainfall peak to hydrograph peak or start of sediment flux until peak sediment flux within an event. Such data are doubtless useful to understand catchment function, but alone, they do not provide evidence that quantifies (for example) how well connected sediment sources are to the outlets of the catchments from which they flux. Finally, there are many examples of water and particularly sediment tracing studies, which attempt to link, either directly or indirectly water or sediment sources with their sinks (which might more usefully be termed temporary stores

  6. Nurturing Deep Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Rachael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the missing ingredient in school reform is soul, that is, deep connections among students, teachers, and administrators. Discusses five principles of leadership with soul: Personalize, pacing, permission, protection, and paradox. (PKP)

  7. Quick connect fastener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A quick connect fastener and method of use is presented wherein the quick connect fastener is suitable for replacing available bolts and screws, the quick connect fastener being capable of installation by simply pushing a threaded portion of the connector into a member receptacle hole, the inventive apparatus being comprised of an externally threaded fastener having a threaded portion slidably mounted upon a stud or bolt shaft, wherein the externally threaded fastener portion is expandable by a preloaded spring member. The fastener, upon contact with the member receptacle hole, has the capacity of presenting cylindrical threads of a reduced diameter for insertion purposes and once inserted into the receiving threads of the receptacle member hole, are expandable for engagement of the receptacle hole threads forming a quick connect of the fastener and the member to be fastened, the quick connect fastener can be further secured by rotation after insertion, even to the point of locking engagement, the quick connect fastener being disengagable only by reverse rotation of the mated thread engagement.

  8. NASA CONNECT: Atmospheric Detectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'The Measurement of All Things: Atmospheric Detectives' is the second of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'The Measurement of All Things: Atmospheric Detectives' students will learn how scientists use satellites, lasers, optical detectors, and wavelengths of light to measure the presence of certain gaseous elements, compounds, and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere.

  9. Probabilistic drug connectivity mapping

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of connectivity mapping is to match drugs using drug-treatment gene expression profiles from multiple cell lines. This can be viewed as an information retrieval task, with the goal of finding the most relevant profiles for a given query drug. We infer the relevance for retrieval by data-driven probabilistic modeling of the drug responses, resulting in probabilistic connectivity mapping, and further consider the available cell lines as different data sources. We use a special type of probabilistic model to separate what is shared and specific between the sources, in contrast to earlier connectivity mapping methods that have intentionally aggregated all available data, neglecting information about the differences between the cell lines. Results We show that the probabilistic multi-source connectivity mapping method is superior to alternatives in finding functionally and chemically similar drugs from the Connectivity Map data set. We also demonstrate that an extension of the method is capable of retrieving combinations of drugs that match different relevant parts of the query drug response profile. Conclusions The probabilistic modeling-based connectivity mapping method provides a promising alternative to earlier methods. Principled integration of data from different cell lines helps to identify relevant responses for specific drug repositioning applications. PMID:24742351

  10. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  11. Determination of effective brain connectivity from functional connectivity with application to resting state connectivities.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P A; Sarkar, S; Pandejee, Grishma Mehta; Henderson, J A

    2014-07-01

    Neural field theory insights are used to derive effective brain connectivity matrices from the functional connectivity matrix defined by activity covariances. The symmetric case is exactly solved for a resting state system driven by white noise, in which strengths of connections, often termed effective connectivities, are inferred from functional data; these include strengths of connections that are underestimated or not detected by anatomical imaging. Proximity to criticality is calculated and found to be consistent with estimates obtainable from other methods. Links between anatomical, effective, and functional connectivity and resting state activity are quantified, with applicability to other complex networks. Proof-of-principle results are illustrated using published experimental data on anatomical connectivity and resting state functional connectivity. In particular, it is shown that functional connection matrices can be used to uncover the existence and strength of connections that are missed from anatomical connection matrices, including interhemispheric connections that are difficult to track with techniques such as diffusion spectrum imaging. PMID:25122335

  12. Inert electrode connection

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, John D.; Woods, Robert W.; DeYoung, David H.; Ray, Siba P.

    1985-01-01

    An inert electrode connection is disclosed wherein a layer of inert electrode material is bonded to a layer of conductive material by providing at least one intermediate layer of material therebetween comprising a predetermined ratio of inert material to conductive material. In a preferred embodiment, the connection is formed by placing in a die a layer of powdered inert material, at least one layer of a mixture of powdered inert material and conductive material, and a layer of powdered conductive material. The connection is then formed by pressing the material at 15,000-20,000 psi to form a powder compact and then densifying the powder compact in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature of 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C.

  13. Optimum connection management scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Ivan

    2000-08-01

    Connection Management plays a key role in both distributed 'local' network-centric and 'globally' connected info- centric systems. The role of Connection Management is to provide seamless demand-based sharing of the information products. For optimum distributed information fusion performance, these systems must minimize communications delays and maximize message throughput, and at the same time take into account relative-sensors-targets geometrical constraints and data pedigree. In order to achieve overall distributed 'network' effectiveness, these systems must be adaptive, and be able to distribute data s needed in real- time. A system concept will be described which provides optimum capacity-based information scheduling. A specific example, based on a satellite channel, is used to illustrate simulated performance results and their effects on fusion systems performance.

  14. High-Tech Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blansfield, Karen C.

    1996-01-01

    Ways in which college alumni officers are using emerging technology to enhance regional programming and distance communication are described, including World Wide Web sites, electronic mail, and satellite and video technologies. Suggestions are made for getting started: defining goals, doing research, offering inexpensive connections, and…

  15. Our Cosmic Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Donna L.

    2005-01-01

    To help students understand the connection that Earth and the solar system have with the cosmic cycles of stellar evolution, and to give students an appreciation of the beauty and elegance of celestial phenomena, the Chandra X-Ray Center (CXC) educational website contains a stellar evolution module that is available free to teachers. In this…

  16. A School Connectivity Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donovan, Eamonn

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of school networking options and explores what speedier broadband technologies mean for education. Topics include Ethernet; wireless options for connection to the Internet; local area networks; wide area networks; phone lines; satellite access; cable modems; digital subscriber line (DSL); and funding networks through the…

  17. Long-Distance Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Transient populations, cultural diversity, language barriers, competing loyalties, and geographic separation are just some of the challenges international schools face in communicating and connecting with their alumni. And these issues are not going to get any easier as the sector grows. Communicating effectively with large, diverse groups of…

  18. A Connective Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goral, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Our increasingly hurried lifestyle, changes in family structure, and intense economic pressures place stress on children and families. Waldorf education provides an educational environment that alleviates this stress through a connective pedagogy that encompasses continuity of people, curriculum, and instruction; a reverence and respect for the…

  19. Making Connections through Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Julie; Nyberg, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Children do not always see a connection between themselves and other living things. Sometimes they do not even realize that they, too, are animals and represent a link in the food chain. By obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information (Scientific and Engineering Practice #8 in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" [NRC 2012,…

  20. Michigan-Ontario Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Explains the ramifications of connections between Michigan and Ontario, Canada over time. Focuses on six themes: (1) the Indian earth; (2) the arrival of Europeans; (3) the creation of the political boundary; (4) the problems of the nineteenth century; (5) the significance of the automobile; and (6) the current situation. (DB)

  1. MedlinePlus Connect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Web application provide responses in different formats. The Web application returns a link to a formatted MedlinePlus Connect response page. This page will include links to information relevant to the problem/diagnosis, medication, or lab test. For a diagnosis/problem code, the response page ...

  2. Smart Kids: SMART Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jennifer; And Others

    1991-01-01

    SMART (Science, Math, and Relevant Technology) Connections, an afterschool offshoot of a program addressing the scarcity of women in science, provides low-income children and children of color, both boys and girls, with hands-on science experience. Efforts continue to be made to ensure that the program works equally for boys as for girls. (CJS)

  3. CONNECT Special Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Kim; And Others

    Project CONNECT (Inmate Advocacy) was developed to provide counseling to inmates involved in the education programs at Fayette County Prison in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, before and immediately following their release. Twenty-one inmates who had been selected through a screening process received individual basic skills remediation in a classroom…

  4. From Connectivity to Interoperability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moressi, William J.; McFadden, C. Brown

    1989-01-01

    The Academic Computing Center at Winthrop College has gone beyond simple connectivity in linking its three local area networks to each other and the campus minicomputer. The environmental impact of the installation of bridges and gateways on systems, personnel, and end users is described. (MLW)

  5. Connections that Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Zannini, Lou

    2012-01-01

    What can parents and educators of gifted children do to help them build the connections that will allow them to thrive? In this article, the author suggests a few practical and simple things that parents and educators of gifted children might want to consider as they live and work with them day by day. He breaks those suggestions out into two…

  6. Connecting Males and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddy, Juanita Warren

    2011-01-01

    The problems facing males and reading continues to be a topic of concern and discussion in communities across the country. The author has interviewed school librarians and teachers, however, who are coordinating programs that are successfully connecting male students and reading. This article includes summaries of those interviews. The author has…

  7. Wedgethread pipe connection

    DOEpatents

    Watts, John D.

    2003-06-17

    Several embodiments of a wedgethread pipe connection are disclosed that have improved makeup, sealing, and non-loosening characteristics. In one embodiment, an open wedgethread is disclosed that has an included angle measured in the gap between the stab flank and the load flank to be not less than zero, so as to prevent premature wedging between mating flanks before the position of full makeup is reached, as does occur between trapped wedgethreads wherein the included angle is less than zero. The invention may be used for pipe threads large or small, as a flush joint, with collars, screwed into plates or it may even be used to reversibly connect such as solid posts to base members where a wide makeup torque range is desired. This Open wedgethread, as opposed to trapped wedgethreads, provides a threaded pipe connection that: is more cost-effective; can seal high pressure gas; can provide selectively a connection strength as high as the pipe strength; assures easy makeup to the desired position of full makeup within a wide torque range; may have a torque strength as high as the pipe torque strength; is easier to manufacture; is easier to gage; and is less subject to handling damage.

  8. High power connection system

    DOEpatents

    Schaefer, Christopher E.; Beer, Robert C.; McCall, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    A high power connection system adapted for automotive environments which provides environmental and EMI shielding includes a female connector, a male connector, and a panel mount. The female connector includes a female connector base and a snap fitted female connector cover. The male connector includes a male connector base and a snap fitted male connector cover. The female connector base has at least one female power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective female power terminal. The male connector base has at least one male power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective male power terminal. The female connector is covered by a cover seal and a conductive shroud. A pair of lock arms protrude outward from the front end of the male connector base, pass through the panel mount and interface with a lever of a lever rotatably connected to the shroud to thereby mechanically assist mating of the male and female connectors. Safety terminals in the male and female connectors provide a last-to-connect-first-to-break connection with an HVIL circuit.

  9. Connections across the Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicak, Charles J.; Bicak, Laddie J.

    1990-01-01

    Suggested is an approach to general biology which may be effective in sustaining student interest and infusing an appreciation for science. The goal of the approach is to foster life-long learning and capability to make connections and draw inferences. Examples using the levels of biotic organization are given. (CW)

  10. Making the Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    Enrollment marketing is not just about enrollment; it is about creating relationships and serving one's community or target audience for many years. In this article, the author states that the first step in building such relationships is making a connection, and that is what effective marketing is all about. Administrators, teachers and critical…

  11. The CORALS Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plankis, Brian; Klein, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    The Ocean, Reefs, Aquariums, Literacy, and Stewardship (CORALS) research program helps students connect global environmental issues to local concerns and personal choices. During the 18-week program, students strengthen their understanding of coral reef decline through a classroom aquarium activity, communicate with science experts, and create…

  12. Ventromedial hypothalamic expression of Bdnf is required to establish normal patterns of afferent GABAergic connectivity and responses to hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamitakahara, Anna; Xu, Baoji; Simerly, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) controls energy and glucose homeostasis through direct connections to a distributed network of nuclei in the hypothalamus, midbrain, and hindbrain. Structural changes in VMH circuit morphology have the potential to alter VMH function throughout life, however, molecular signals responsible for specifying its neural connections are not fully defined. The VMH contains a high density of neurons that express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a potent neurodevelopmental effector known to regulate neuronal survival, growth, differentiation, and connectivity in a number of neural systems. In the current study, we examined whether BDNF impacts the afferent and efferent connections of the VMH, as well as energy homeostatic function. Methods To determine if BDNF is required for VMH circuit formation, a transgenic mouse model was used to conditionally delete Bdnf from steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) expressing neurons of the VMH prior to the onset of establishing neural connections with other regions. Projections of SF1 expressing neurons were visualized with a genetically targeted fluorescent label and immunofluorescence was used to measure the density of afferents to SF1 neurons in the absence of BDNF. Physiological changes in body weight and circulating blood glucose were also evaluated in the mutant mice. Results Our findings suggest that BDNF is required to establish normal densities of GABAergic afferents onto SF1 neurons located in the ventrolateral part of the VMH. Furthermore, loss of BDNF from VMH SF1 neurons results in impaired physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that BDNF is required for formation and/or maintenance of inhibitory inputs to SF1 neurons, with enduring effects on glycemic control. PMID:26909317

  13. English and Film: Connecting Children to the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the processes behind drawing different kinds of inference from a single short film. It examines the range knowledge that groups of viewers are able to derive from listening to film sound, and from summarizing the work of a whole film, using the concepts of "aesthetic" and "efferent" reading set out by Louise…

  14. Strengthening connections: functional connectivity and brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Clare; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The ascendancy of functional neuroimaging has facilitated the addition of network-based approaches to the neuropsychologist’s toolbox for evaluating the sequelae of brain insult. In particular, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) mapping of resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) data constitutes an ideal approach to measuring macro-scale networks in the human brain. Beyond the value of iFC mapping for charting how the functional topography of the brain is altered by insult and injury, iFC analyses can provide insights into effects of experience-dependent plasticity at the macro level of large-scale functional networks. Such insights are foundational to the design of training and remediation interventions that will best facilitate recovery of function. In this review, we consider what is currently known about the origin and function of iFC in the brain, and how this knowledge is informative in neuropsychological settings. We then summarize studies that have examined experience-driven plasticity of iFC in healthy control participants, and frame these findings in terms of a schema that may aid in the interpretation of results and the generation of hypothesis for rehabilitative studies. Finally, we outline some caveats to the R-fMRI approach, as well as some current developments that are likely to bolster the utility of the iFC paradigm for neuropsychology. PMID:24496903

  15. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  16. Flexible swivel connection

    DOEpatents

    Hoh, J.C.

    1985-02-19

    A flexible swivel boot connector for connecting a first boot shield section to a second boot shield section, both first and second boot sections having openings therethrough, the second boot section having at least two adjacent accordian folds at the end having the opening, the second boot section being positioned through the opening of the first boot section such that a first of the accordian folds is within the first boot section and a second of the accordian folds is outside of the first boot, includes first and second annular discs, the first disc being positioned within and across the first accordian fold, the second disc being positioned within and across the second accordian fold, such that the first boot section is moveably and rigidly connected between the first and second accordian folds of the second boot section.

  17. Energy storage connection system

    DOEpatents

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  18. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  19. Piriform cortex efferents to the entorhinal cortex in vivo: kindling-induced potentiation and the enhancement of long-term potentiation by low-frequency piriform cortex or medial septal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, A; Racine, R J

    1997-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex receives input from many cortical areas and mediates the flow of information between these sites and the hippocampal formation. Long-term synaptic plasticity in cortical efferents to the entorhinal cortex may contribute to the transmission of neural activity to the hippocampus, as well as the storage of information, but little is known about plasticity in these pathways. We describe here the use of evoked field potential recordings from chronically implanted electrodes in the rat entorhinal cortex to investigate synaptic plasticity in the large piriform (olfactory) cortex projection to the superficial layers of the entorhinal cortex. Both kindling-induced potentiation and long-term potentiation (LTP) were tested. In addition, we attempted to modulate LTP induction by the co-induction of frequency potentiation and by the co-activation of the medial septum. Epileptogenic kindling stimulations of the piriform cortex (1-s, 60-Hz trains 3 times/day for 5 days) were found to result in a reliable potentiation of field responses evoked by piriform cortex test pulses. Non-epileptogenic tetanization of the piriform cortex with 400-Hz 16-pulse trains reliably resulted in LTP effects. These effects could be augmented by embedding brief LTP induction stimuli within 11-pulse, 15-Hz trains that alone produce only frequency potentiation. Co-activating the medial septum with 10-Hz trains, just prior to tetanization of the piriform cortex, augmented LTP of piriform cortex inputs to the entorhinal cortex in an input-specific manner. All potentiation effects were found to last for periods of weeks. These findings demonstrate that both epileptogenic and non-epileptogenic piriform cortex stimulation induces lasting potentiation of population field responses in the entorhinal cortex of the awake rat. The LTP effects were inducible in a graded manner and were sensitive to the temporal context of stimulation. The finding that low-frequency activation of the septum can

  20. Cross-hemispheric collaboration and segregation associated with task difficulty as revealed by structural and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Simon W; Cabeza, Roberto

    2015-05-27

    Although it is known that brain regions in one hemisphere may interact very closely with their corresponding contralateral regions (collaboration) or operate relatively independent of them (segregation), the specific brain regions (where) and conditions (how) associated with collaboration or segregation are largely unknown. We investigated these issues using a split field-matching task in which participants matched the meaning of words or the visual features of faces presented to the same (unilateral) or to different (bilateral) visual fields. Matching difficulty was manipulated by varying the semantic similarity of words or the visual similarity of faces. We assessed the white matter using the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure provided by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cross-hemispheric communication in terms of fMRI-based connectivity between homotopic pairs of cortical regions. For both perceptual and semantic matching, bilateral trials became faster than unilateral trials as difficulty increased (bilateral processing advantage, BPA). The study yielded three novel findings. First, whereas FA in anterior corpus callosum (genu) correlated with word-matching BPA, FA in posterior corpus callosum (splenium-occipital) correlated with face-matching BPA. Second, as matching difficulty intensified, cross-hemispheric functional connectivity (CFC) increased in domain-general frontopolar cortex (for both word and face matching) but decreased in domain-specific ventral temporal lobe regions (temporal pole for word matching and fusiform gyrus for face matching). Last, a mediation analysis linking DTI and fMRI data showed that CFC mediated the effect of callosal FA on BPA. These findings clarify the mechanisms by which the hemispheres interact to perform complex cognitive tasks. PMID:26019335

  1. Structural white-matter connections mediating distinct behavioral components of spatial neglect in right brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Vaessen, Maarten J; Saj, Arnaud; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Gschwind, Markus; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2016-04-01

    Spatial neglect is a neuropsychological syndrome in which patients fail to perceive and orient to stimuli located in the space contralateral to the lesioned hemisphere. It is characterized by a wide heterogeneity in clinical symptoms which can be grouped into distinct behavioral components correlating with different lesion sites. Moreover, damage to white-matter (WM) fiber tracts has been suggested to disconnect brain networks that mediate different functions associated with spatial cognition and attention. However, it remains unclear what WM pathways are associated with functionally dissociable neglect components. In this study we examined nine patients with a focal right hemisphere stroke using a series of neuropsychological tests and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to disentangle the role of specific WM pathways in neglect symptoms. First, following previous work, the behavioral test scores of patients were factorized into three independent components reflecting perceptual, exploratory, and object-centered deficits in spatial awareness. We then examined the structural neural substrates of these components by correlating indices of WM integrity (fractional anisotropy) with the severity of deficits along each profile. Several locations in the right parietal and frontal WM correlated with neuropsychological scores. Fiber tracts projecting from these locations indicated that posterior parts of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), as well as nearby callosal fibers connecting ipsilateral and contralateral parietal areas, were associated with perceptual spatial deficits, whereas more anterior parts of SLF and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) were predominantly associated with object-centered deficits. In addition, connections between frontal areas and superior colliculus were found to be associated with the exploratory deficits. Our results provide novel support to the view that neglect may result from disconnection lesions in distributed

  2. Cross-Hemispheric Collaboration and Segregation Associated with Task Difficulty as Revealed by Structural and Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although it is known that brain regions in one hemisphere may interact very closely with their corresponding contralateral regions (collaboration) or operate relatively independent of them (segregation), the specific brain regions (where) and conditions (how) associated with collaboration or segregation are largely unknown. We investigated these issues using a split field-matching task in which participants matched the meaning of words or the visual features of faces presented to the same (unilateral) or to different (bilateral) visual fields. Matching difficulty was manipulated by varying the semantic similarity of words or the visual similarity of faces. We assessed the white matter using the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure provided by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cross-hemispheric communication in terms of fMRI-based connectivity between homotopic pairs of cortical regions. For both perceptual and semantic matching, bilateral trials became faster than unilateral trials as difficulty increased (bilateral processing advantage, BPA). The study yielded three novel findings. First, whereas FA in anterior corpus callosum (genu) correlated with word-matching BPA, FA in posterior corpus callosum (splenium-occipital) correlated with face-matching BPA. Second, as matching difficulty intensified, cross-hemispheric functional connectivity (CFC) increased in domain-general frontopolar cortex (for both word and face matching) but decreased in domain-specific ventral temporal lobe regions (temporal pole for word matching and fusiform gyrus for face matching). Last, a mediation analysis linking DTI and fMRI data showed that CFC mediated the effect of callosal FA on BPA. These findings clarify the mechanisms by which the hemispheres interact to perform complex cognitive tasks. PMID:26019335

  3. Pulmonary chemoreflex and phrenic sympathetic efferents.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1993-11-01

    The pulmonary chemoreflex components such as reactions of phrenic sympathetic neuron (PhSN) activity, phrenic nerve activity, heart rate and blood pressure were tested in chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed cats. 10 micrograms to 160 micrograms phenylbiguanide (PBG) in 0.9% NaCl was injected into the pulmonary circulation. PBG injected into the right atrium (in 11 of 19 experiments) and into the pulmonary artery (in 5 of 8 experiments), evoked short-latency (1-1.4 sec) dose-dependent increase in PhSN activity accompanied by increase in blood pressure, and followed by decrease in these two variables. In all experiments, activity of the phrenic nerve was depressed, and bradycardia occurred after PBG injection. All responses to PBG injections into the pulmonary artery were abolished following bilateral vagotomy. In the same procedure related to the right atrium after vagotomy, the increases in PhSN activity and blood pressure were also abolished, although a decrease in heart rate, PhSN activity and in the amplitude of phrenic nerve discharges together with an increase in their frequency persisted. Our results suggest that short-latency increase in PhSN activity is a component of pulmonary chemoreflex. PMID:8272587

  4. Dense inhibitory connectivity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Elodie; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Summary The connectivity diagram of neocortical circuits is still unknown, and there are conflicting data as to whether cortical neurons are wired specifically or not. To investigate the basic structure of cortical microcircuits, we use a novel two-photon photostimulation technique that enables the systematic mapping of synaptic connections with single-cell resolution. We map the inhibitory connectivity between upper layers somatostatin-positive GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells in mouse frontal cortex. Most, and sometimes all, inhibitory neurons are locally connected to every sampled pyramidal cell. This dense inhibitory connectivity is found at both young and mature developmental ages. Inhibitory innervation of neighboring pyramidal cells is similar, regardless of whether they are connected among themselves or not. We conclude that local inhibitory connectivity is promiscuous, does not form subnetworks and can approach the theoretical limit of a completely connected synaptic matrix. PMID:21435562

  5. Impaired consciousness is linked to changes in effective connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex within the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Julia Sophia; Schurz, Matthias; Höller, Yvonne; Bergmann, Jürgen; Monti, Martin; Schmid, Elisabeth; Trinka, Eugen; Kronbichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic connectivity of the default mode network has been associated with the level of consciousness in patients with severe brain injury. Especially medial parietal regions are considered to be highly involved in impaired consciousness. To better understand what aspect of this intrinsic architecture is linked to consciousness, we applied spectral dynamic causal modeling to assess effective connectivity within the default mode network in patients with disorders of consciousness. We included 12 controls, 12 patients in minimally conscious state and 13 in vegetative state in this study. For each subject, we first defined the four key regions of the default mode network employing a subject-specific independent component analysis approach. The resulting regions were then included as nodes in a spectral dynamic causal modeling analysis in order to assess how the causal interactions across these regions as well as the characteristics of neuronal fluctuations change with the level of consciousness. The resulting pattern of interaction in controls identified the posterior cingulate cortex as the main driven hub with positive afferent but negative efferent connections. In patients, this pattern appears to be disrupted. Moreover, the vegetative state patients exhibit significantly reduced self-inhibition and increased oscillations in the posterior cingulate cortex compared to minimally conscious state and controls. Finally, the degree of self-inhibition and strength of oscillation in this region is correlated with the level of consciousness. These findings indicate that the equilibrium between excitatory connectivity towards posterior cingulate cortex and its feedback projections is a key aspect of the relationship between alterations in consciousness after severe brain injury and the intrinsic functional architecture of the default mode network. This impairment might be principally due to the disruption of the mechanisms underlying self-inhibition and neuronal

  6. Positive fast sealing union connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleber, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    Union connections are designed for connecting high pressure flexible hoses from gas storage manifolds to gas transport trailers. Connection uses O ring seals which can be quickly assembled and disassembled without use of wrenches, and which do not twist hose. Worn or damaged O rings are easily replaced.

  7. Recovery of cortical effective connectivity and recovery of consciousness in vegetative patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosanova, Mario; Gosseries, Olivia; Casarotto, Silvia; Boly, Mélanie; Casali, Adenauer G.; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Mariotti, Maurizio; Boveroux, Pierre; Tononi, Giulio; Laureys, Steven

    2012-01-01

    spontaneous electroencephalogram showed significant modifications. Measurements of effective connectivity by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography can be performed at the bedside while by-passing subcortical afferent and efferent pathways, and without requiring active participation of subjects or language comprehension; hence, they offer an effective way to detect and track recovery of consciousness in brain-injured patients who are unable to exchange information with the external environment. PMID:22226806

  8. Control line sealing connection

    SciTech Connect

    Tohill, H.O.

    1984-07-10

    A sealing connection for the passage of a fluid control line through adjoining members is claimed. The connection comprises a metallic tubular sealing element provided with tapered end portions, each end having internal frusto-conical surfaces and external frusto-conical surfaces in coaxial alignment with the bore through the element. The external frusto-conical surfaceas provide metal-to-metal sealing with aligned frusto-conical seating surfaces in opposed pockets formed in aligned portions of the control line at their respective openings at the adjoining surfaces of the adjoined member. The tubular sealing element is subjected to axial compression between the frusto-conical pocket seating surfaces when the adjoined members are bolted tightly together which results in deformation of its tapered end portions to provide metal-to-metal sealing with the adjoined members which is effective to seal against both internal and external fluid pressurization of the control line and without internally obstructing or restricting the control line. Secondary sealing is provided by elastomeric O-ring seals mounted in circumferential annular grooves formed in the exterior of the tubular sealing element.

  9. Underwater branch connection study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report was prepared with the object of developing guidelines for designing underwater connections of branch pipelines to main lines at existing tap valves and with hot taps in diver accessible water depths. The report considers ANSI Classes 600 and 900 branch pipelines of up to twelve inches in diameter that conform to API Specification 5L minimum. Loads due to gravity, buoyancy, intemal and external pressure, thermal expansion, hydrodynamics and random events are considered. External corrosion, temperature, cover, bottom conditions, stability, testing, commissioning, trenching, and pigging are also addressed. A general discussion of these issues is included in the body of the report. Methods of analysis are included in the appendices and in various references. Lotus 123'' spreadsheets that compute the expansion stresses resulting from pressure and temperature at points on a generic piping geometry are presented. A program diskette is included with the report. The report summarizes, and draws from, the results of a survey of the relevant practice and experience of fifteen gas pipeline operating companies. The survey indicates that most existing branch connections do not provide for pigging of the lateral lines, but that there is a growing consensus that cleaning and inspection pigging of lateral lines is desirable or necessary.

  10. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  11. Finding significantly connected voxels based on histograms of connection strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasenburg, Niklas; Pedersen, Morten Vester; Darkner, Sune

    2016-03-01

    We explore a new approach for structural connectivity based segmentations of subcortical brain regions. Connectivity based segmentations are usually based on fibre connections from a seed region to predefined target regions. We present a method for finding significantly connected voxels based on the distribution of connection strengths. Paths from seed voxels to all voxels in a target region are obtained from a shortest-path tractography. For each seed voxel we approximate the distribution with a histogram of path scores. We hypothesise that the majority of estimated connections are false-positives and that their connection strength is distributed differently from true-positive connections. Therefore, an empirical null-distribution is defined for each target region as the average normalized histogram over all voxels in the seed region. Single histograms are then tested against the corresponding null-distribution and significance is determined using the false discovery rate (FDR). Segmentations are based on significantly connected voxels and their FDR. In this work we focus on the thalamus and the target regions were chosen by dividing the cortex into a prefrontal/temporal zone, motor zone, somatosensory zone and a parieto-occipital zone. The obtained segmentations consistently show a sparse number of significantly connected voxels that are located near the surface of the anterior thalamus over a population of 38 subjects.

  12. Neurochemical phenotype of corticocortical connections in the macaque monkey: quantitative analysis of a subset of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive projection neurons in frontal, parietal, temporal, and cingulate cortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Nimchinsky, E. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The neurochemical characteristics of the neuronal subsets that furnish different types of corticocortical connections have been only partially determined. In recent years, several cytoskeletal proteins have emerged as reliable markers to distinguish subsets of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex of primates. In particular, previous studies using an antibody to nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32) have revealed a consistent degree of regional and laminar specificity in the distribution of a subpopulation of pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. The density of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons was shown to vary across corticocortical pathways in macaque monkeys. In the present study, we have used the antibody SMI-32 to examine further and to quantify the distribution of a subset of corticocortically projecting neurons in a series of long ipsilateral corticocortical pathways in comparison to short corticocortical, commissural, and limbic connections. The results demonstrate that the long association pathways interconnecting the frontal, parietal, and temporal neocortex have a high representation of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons (45-90%), whereas short corticocortical, callosal, and limbic pathways are characterized by much lower numbers of such neurons (4-35%). These data suggest that different types of corticocortical connections have differential representation of highly specific neuronal subsets that share common neurochemical characteristics, thereby determining regional and laminar cortical patterns of morphological and molecular heterogeneity. These differences in neuronal neurochemical phenotype among corticocortical circuits may have considerable influence on cortical processing and may be directly related to the type of integrative function subserved by each cortical pathway. Finally, it is worth noting that neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons are dramatically affected in the course of

  13. Fuel injection valve connection

    SciTech Connect

    Eshleman, E.S.; Field, M.J.; Penwright, J.L.

    1987-09-15

    A fuel injection valve connection is described which consists of a fuel injection valve having a cylindrical inlet fitting. The fitting has a threaded internal surface and a cylindrical external surface. A fuel connector has a projection with a threaded external surface that mates with the threaded internal surface of the fitting. The connector also has a sleeve with a cylindrical internal surface surrounding the fitting and an O-ring sealingly engaging the internal surface of the sleeve and the external surface of the fitting, whereby the valve may be rotated relative to the connector without breaking the sealing engagement between the valve and the connector, and wherein the connector also has a tab engageable with the injector to prevent unthreading of the valve from the connector.

  14. Optineurin: The autophagy connection.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hongyu; Yue, Beatrice Y J T

    2016-03-01

    Optineurin is a cytosolic protein encoded by the OPTN gene. Mutations of OPTN are associated with normal tension glaucoma and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that delivers cytoplasmic components to the lysosomes. It plays a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological roles. The optineurin protein is a selective autophagy receptor (or adaptor), containing an ubiquitin binding domain with the ability to bind polyubiquitinated cargoes and bring them to autophagosomes via its microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-interacting domain. It is involved in xenophagy, mitophagy, aggrephagy, and tumor suppression. Optineurin can also mediate the removal of protein aggregates through an ubiquitin-independent mechanism. This protein in addition can induce autophagy upon overexpression or mutation. When overexpressed or mutated, the optineurin protein also serves as a substrate for autophagic degradation. In the present review, the multiple connections of optineurin to autophagy are highlighted. PMID:26142952

  15. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains how our weather occurs, and why Solar radiation is responsible. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  16. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  17. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  18. Quick-Connect Nut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a specially-designed nut, called the Quick-Connect Nut, for quick and easy assembly of components in the harsh environment of space, as in assembly of International Space Station. The design permits nuts to be installed simply by pushing them onto standard bolts, then giving a quick twist. To remove, they are unscrewed like conventional nuts. Possible applications include the mining industry for erecting support barriers, assembling underwater oil drilling platforms, fire-fighting equipment, scaffolding, assembly-line machinery, industrial cranes, and even changing lug nuts on race cars. The speed of assembly can make the difference between life and death in different aspects of life on Earth.

  19. Power converter connection configuration

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2008-11-11

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  20. More features, greater connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Changes in our political infrastructure, the continuing frailties of our economy, and a stark growth in population, have greatly impacted upon the perceived stability of the NHS. Healthcare teams have had to adapt to these changes, and so too have the technologies upon which they rely to deliver first-class patient care. Here Sarah Hunt, marketing co-ordinator at Aid Call, assesses how the changing healthcare environment has affected one of its fundamental technologies - the nurse call system, argues the case for wireless such systems in terms of what the company claims is greater adaptability to changing needs, and considers the ever-wider range of features and functions available from today's nurse call equipment, particularly via connectivity with both mobile devices, and ancillaries ranging from enuresis sensors to staff attack alert 'badges'. PMID:26548128

  1. Mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Hetlevik, Siri Opsahl; Lilleby, Vibke; Molberg, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    The concept of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) as a separate connective tissue disease (CTD) has persisted for more than four decades. High titers of antibodies targeting the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) in peripheral blood are a sine qua non for the diagnosis of MCTD, in addition to distinct clinical features including Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), "puffy hands," arthritis, myositis, pleuritis, pericarditis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, population-based epidemiology data from Norway estimated the point prevalence of adult-onset MCTD to be 3.8 per 100,000 and the mean annual incidence to be 2.1 per million per year, supporting the notion that MCTD is the least common CTD. Little is known about the etiology of MCTD, but recent genetic studies have confirmed that MCTD is a strongly HLA (​human leukocyte antigen)-linked disease, as the HLA profiles of MCTD differ distinctly from the corresponding profiles of ethnically matched healthy controls and other CTDs. In the first section of this review, we provide an update on the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of MCTD and discuss the relationship between MCTD and the other CTDs. Then we proceed to discuss the recent advances in therapy and our current understanding of prognosis and prognostic factors, especially those that are associated with the more serious pulmonary and cardiovascular complications of the disease. In the final section, we discuss some of the key, unresolved questions related to anti-RNP-associated diseases and indicate how these questions may be approached in future studies. PMID:27421219

  2. Connectivity-Based Brain Parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; JaJa, Joseph; Jin, Yu; Hong, L. Elliot; Herskovits, Edward H.

    2016-01-01

    Defining brain structures of interest is an important preliminary step in brain-connectivity analysis. Researchers interested in connectivity patterns among brain structures typically employ manually delineated volumes of interest, or regions in a readily available atlas, to limit the scope of connectivity analysis to relevant regions. However, most structural brain atlases, and manually delineated volumes of interest, do not take voxel-wise connectivity patterns into consideration, and therefore may not be ideal for anatomic connectivity analysis. We herein propose a method to parcellate the brain into regions of interest based on connectivity. We formulate connectivity-based parcellation as a graph-cut problem, which we solve approximately using a novel multi-class Hopfield network algorithm. We demonstrate the application of this approach using diffusion tensor imaging data from an ongoing study of schizophrenia. Compared to a standard anatomic atlas, the connectivity-based atlas supports better classification performance when distinguishing schizophrenic from normal subjects. Comparing connectivity patterns averaged across the normal and schizophrenic subjects, we note significant systematic differences between the two atlases. PMID:26433899

  3. Stimulus-driven changes in sensorimotor behavior and neuronal functional connectivity application to brain-machine interfaces and neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rebesco, James M; Miller, Lee E

    2011-01-01

    Normal brain function requires constant adaptation as an organism interacts with the environment and learns to associate important sensory stimuli with appropriate motor actions. Neurological disorders may disrupt these learned associations, potentially requiring new functional pathways to be formed to replace the lost function. As a consequence, neural plasticity is a critical aspect of both normal brain function as well as the response to neurological injury. A brain-machine interface (BMI) represents a unique adaptive challenge to the nervous system. Efferent BMIs have been developed, which harness signals recorded from a tiny proportion of the motor cortex (M1) to effect control of an external device. There is also interest in the development of an afferent BMI that would supply information directly to the brain (e.g., the somatosensory cortex-S1) via electrical stimulation. If a bidirectional BMI that combined these interfaces were to be successful, new functional pathways would be necessary between the artificial inputs and outputs. Indeed, stimulation of S1 that is contingent upon the consequences of motor command signals recorded from M1 might form the basis for artificial Hebbian associations not unlike those driving learning in the normal brain. In this chapter, we review recent developments in both efferent and afferent BMIs, as well as experimental attempts to understand and mimic the Hebbian processes that give rise to plastic changes within the cortex. We have used a rat model to develop the computational and experimental tools necessary to describe changes in the way small networks of sensorimotor neurons interact and process information. We show that by repetitively pairing the recorded spikes of one neuron with electrical stimulation of another or by repetitively pairing electrical stimulation of two neurons, we can strengthen the inferred functional connection between the pair of neurons. We have also used the dual-stimulation protocol to enhance

  4. Family Connections: Building Connections among Home, School, and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikkers, Amy Garrett

    2013-01-01

    Recent research on parental involvement has explored connections between parental involvement in school and children's academic achievement. While many schools have active parent organizations and a base of parents who offer additional support, others struggle to make connections with their parents or community members. Even in places with active…

  5. Internet Connections: Understanding Your Access Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes levels of Internet connectivity, physical connections, and connection speeds. Compares options for connecting to the Internet, including terminal accounts, dial-up terminal accounts, direct connections through a local area network, and direct connections using SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) or PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol). (eight…

  6. Connecting node and method for constructing a connecting node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A connecting node comprises a polyhedral structure comprising a plurality of panels joined together at its side edges to form a spherical approximation, wherein at least one of the plurality of panels comprises a faceted surface being constructed with a passage for integrating with one of a plurality of elements comprising a docking port, a hatch, and a window that is attached to the connecting node. A method for manufacturing a connecting node comprises the steps of providing a plurality of panels, connecting the plurality of panels to form a spherical approximation, wherein each edge of each panel of the plurality is joined to another edge of another panel, and constructing at least one of the plurality of panels to include a passage for integrating at least one of a plurality of elements that may be attached to the connecting node.

  7. Uncommon Connections with Common Numerators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Lawrence M.; Guthrie, Joe A.

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate students who are pre-service teachers need to make connections between the college mathematics they are learning and the pre-college mathematics they will be teaching. Spanning a broad range of undergraduate curricula, this article describes useful lesser-known connections, explorations, and original proofs involving fractions. In…

  8. The Always-Connected Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    The Pew Internet and American Life project characterizes the millennials--the first generation to come of age in the new millennium--as the first "always-connected" generation. Significant aspects of culture are changing as a result. A changing world where all students are connected all the time has substantial educational implications. Despite…

  9. School Psychology Awareness: Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Andrea; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2011-01-01

    A day in the life of a student at school is filled with potential connections (relationships, linkages in learning, behavioral choices, etc.). Friendships with peers, relationships with teachers, acknowledgements from administrators, encouragement from coaches: These are all interpersonal connections that are essential not only to making school an…

  10. Making Connections to Teach Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Manuel G.; Bleicher, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Approaching reflection from the perspective of a teachable skill set implies that research may inform how to help students reflect. Employing a framework of making connections often used in reading comprehension, this study aimed to characterize how making connections between the service-learning experience (SLE) and prior experiences in similar…

  11. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  12. Diverless flowline connection system

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    The tie-in of flowlines and umbilicals to subsea trees and manifolds in deep water has traditionally been an expensive exercise. It generally requires the simultaneous presence of lay vessel and drill ship, or divers using a combination of rigging and gantries on the subsea structure. In recent years the development of a viable remote pull-in technique has become an important requirement for oil companies who are continuing to develop deeper and more marginal fields. The use of Remote Operated Vehicles (ROV`s) can not only provide the required costs savings, but eliminates the risks to man. Sonsub set out to design and build a system that was modular, could use the ROV for all subsea operations, and would only require minimal permanent subsea hardware support. These objectives were met with the completed system known as the Diverless Flowline Connection System (DFCS). The DFCS is capable of performing the tie-in of flowlines and umbilicals up to 18 in. O.D. The system is a light modular package that is easily handled and operated with any Work Class ROV in deepwater environments. The system has been extensively tested under a wide variety of conditions and is ready to perform the tie-in of two 13.5 in. and 6 in. flowline in the South China Sea in early 1996. In addition Sonsub have recently been contracted to perform the tie-in of 6 single bore flowlines ranging in size between 2.5 in. and 10 in., 14 multibore flowlines (2.5 in. and 8 in.) and 4 umbilicals in the North Sea off the coast of Norway.

  13. Array processor architecture connection network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor); Lundstrom, Stephen F. (Inventor); Shafer, Philip E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A connection network is disclosed for use between a parallel array of processors and a parallel array of memory modules for establishing non-conflicting data communications paths between requested memory modules and requesting processors. The connection network includes a plurality of switching elements interposed between the processor array and the memory modules array in an Omega networking architecture. Each switching element includes a first and a second processor side port, a first and a second memory module side port, and control logic circuitry for providing data connections between the first and second processor ports and the first and second memory module ports. The control logic circuitry includes strobe logic for examining data arriving at the first and the second processor ports to indicate when the data arriving is requesting data from a requesting processor to a requested memory module. Further, connection circuitry is associated with the strobe logic for examining requesting data arriving at the first and the second processor ports for providing a data connection therefrom to the first and the second memory module ports in response thereto when the data connection so provided does not conflict with a pre-established data connection currently in use.

  14. Practical lessons in remote connectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kouroubali, A.; Starren, J.; Barrows, R. C.; Clayton, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Community Health Information Networks (CHINs) require the ability to provide computer network connections to many remote sites. During the implementation of the Washington Heights and Inwood Community Health Management Information System (WHICHIS) at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (CPMC), a number of remote connectivity issues have been encountered. Both technical and non-technical issues were significant during the installation. We developed a work-flow model for this process which may be helpful to any health care institution attempting to provide seamless remote connectivity. This model is presented and implementation lessons are discussed. PMID:9357643

  15. Requirements for soldered electrical connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication is applicable to NASA programs involving solder connections for flight hardware, mission essential support equipment, and elements thereof. This publication sets forth hand and wave soldering requirements for reliable electrical connections. The prime consideration is the physical integrity of solder connections. Special requirements may exist which are not in conformance with the requirements of this publication. Design documentation contains the detail for these requirements, and they take precedence over conflicting portions of this publication when they are approved in writing by the procuring NASA installation.

  16. 33 CFR 156.130 - Connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operations unless it is: (1) A bolted or full threaded connection; or (2) A quick-connect coupling acceptable... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connection. 156.130 Section 156....130 Connection. (a) Each person who makes a connection for transfer operations shall: (1) Use...

  17. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. PMID:25883162

  18. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. PMID:25883162

  19. Retinal connectivity and primate vision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Martin, Paul R.; Grünert, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  20. Retinal connectivity and primate vision.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2010-11-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  1. Functional connectivity between the superficial and deeper layers of the superior colliculus: an anatomical substrate for sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Doubell, Timothy P; Skaliora, Irini; Baron, Jérôme; King, Andrew J

    2003-07-23

    The superior colliculus (SC) transforms both visual and nonvisual sensory signals into motor commands that control orienting behavior. Although the afferent and efferent connections of this midbrain nucleus have been well characterized, little is know about the intrinsic circuitry involved in sensorimotor integration. Transmission of visual signals from the superficial (sSC) to the deeper layers (dSC) of the SC has been implicated in both the triggering of orienting movements and the activity-dependent processes that align maps of different sensory modalities during development. However, evidence for the synaptic connectivity appropriate for these functions is lacking. In this study, we used a variety of anatomical and physiological methods to examine the functional organization of the sSC-dSC pathway in juvenile and adult ferrets. Axonal tracing in adult ferrets showed that, as in other species, sSC neurons project topographically to the dSC, providing a route for the transmission of visual signals to the multisensory output layers of the SC. We found that sSC axons terminate on dSC neurons that stain prominently for the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor, a subpopulation of which were identified as tectoreticulospinal projection neurons. We also show that the sSC-dSC pathway is topographically organized and mediated by monosynaptic excitatory synapses even before eye opening in young ferrets, suggesting that visual signals routed via the sSC may influence the activity of dSC neurons before the emergence of their multisensory response properties. These findings indicate that superficial- to deep-layer projections provide spatially ordered visual signals, both during development and into adulthood, directly to SC neurons that are involved in coordinating sensory inputs with motor outputs. PMID:12878701

  2. [Connective tissue diseases in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Peitz, J; Tantcheva-Poór, I

    2016-04-01

    In this article we provide a brief review of systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, and mixed connective tissue disease in adolescents. As skin manifestations often belong to the presenting symptoms and may have a significant impact on the quality of life, dermatologists play an important role in the management of patients with connective tissue diseases. Early diagnosis and therapy onset are crucial for the patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27000182

  3. Hestenes' Tetrad and Spin Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank; Morris, Randall

    2005-08-01

    Defining a spin connection is necessary for formulating Dirac's bispinor equation in a curved space-time. Hestenes has shown that a bispinor field is equivalent to an orthonormal tetrad of vector fields together with a complex scalar field. In this paper, we show that using Hestenes' tetrad for the spin connection in a Riemannian space-time leads to a Yang-Mills formulation of the Dirac Lagrangian in which the bispinor field Ψ is mapped to a set of SL(2, R)× U(1) gauge potentials F α K and a complex scalar field ρ. This result was previously proved for a Minkowski space-time using Fierz identities. As an application we derive several different non-Riemannian spin connections found in the literature directly from an arbitrary linear connection acting on the tensor fields ( F α K , ρ). We also derive spin connections for which Dirac's bispinor equation is form invariant. Previous work has not considered form invariance of the Dirac equation as a criterion for defining a general spin connection.

  4. Gray Matter Axonal Connectivity Maps

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Nesland, Travis; Rorden, Chris; Fridriksson, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Structural brain connectivity is generally assessed through methods that rely on pre-defined regions of interest (e.g., Brodmann’s areas), thus preventing analyses that are largely free from a priori anatomical assumptions. Here, we introduce a novel and practical technique to evaluate a voxel-based measure of axonal projections connecting gray matter tissue [gray matter axonal connectivity map (GMAC)]. GMACs are compatible with voxel-based statistical approaches, and can be used to assess whole brain, scale-free, gray matter connectivity. In this study, we demonstrate how whole-brain GMACs can be generated from conventional structural connectome methodology, describing each step in detail, as well as providing tools to allow for the calculation of GMAC. To illustrate the utility of GMAC, we demonstrate the relationship between age and gray matter connectivity, using voxel-based analyses of GMAC. We discuss the potential role of GMAC in further analyses of cortical connectivity in healthy and clinical populations. PMID:25798111

  5. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/service.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service To use the sharing features on this ... if you implement MedlinePlus Connect by contacting us . Web Service Overview The parameters for the Web service ...

  6. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/connect/service.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service To use the sharing features on this ... if you implement MedlinePlus Connect by contacting us . Web Service Overview The parameters for the Web service ...

  7. Visualizing Neuronal Network Connectivity with Connectivity Pattern Tables

    PubMed Central

    Nordlie, Eilen; Plesser, Hans Ekkehard

    2009-01-01

    Complex ideas are best conveyed through well-designed illustrations. Up to now, computational neuroscientists have mostly relied on box-and-arrow diagrams of even complex neuronal networks, often using ad hoc notations with conflicting use of symbols from paper to paper. This significantly impedes the communication of ideas in neuronal network modeling. We present here Connectivity Pattern Tables (CPTs) as a clutter-free visualization of connectivity in large neuronal networks containing two-dimensional populations of neurons. CPTs can be generated automatically from the same script code used to create the actual network in the NEST simulator. Through aggregation, CPTs can be viewed at different levels, providing either full detail or summary information. We also provide the open source ConnPlotter tool as a means to create connectivity pattern tables. PMID:20140265

  8. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  9. Continuously Connected With Mobile IP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems developed Cisco Mobile Networks, making IP devices mobile. With this innovation, a Cisco router and its connected IP devices can roam across network boundaries and connection types. Because a mobile user is able to keep the same IP address while roaming, a live IP connection can be maintained without interruption. Glenn Research Center jointly tested the technology with Cisco, and is working to use it on low-earth-orbiting research craft. With Cisco's Mobile Networks functionality now available in Cisco IOS Software release 12.2(4)T, the commercial advantages and benefits are numerous. The technology can be applied to public safety, military/homeland security, emergency management services, railroad and shipping systems, and the automotive industry. It will allow ambulances, police, firemen, and the U.S. Coast Guard to stay connected to their networks while on the move. In the wireless battlefield, the technology will provide rapid infrastructure deployment for U.S. national defense. Airline, train, and cruise passengers utilizing Cisco Mobile Networks can fly all around the world with a continuous Internet connection. Cisco IOS(R) Software is a registered trademark of Cisco Systems.

  10. Brain Connectivity and Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Emily L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Emerging hypotheses suggest that efficient cognitive functioning requires the integration of separate, but interconnected cortical networks in the brain. Although task-related measures of brain activity suggest that a frontoparietal network is associated with the control of attention, little is known regarding how components within this distributed network act together or with other networks to achieve various attentional functions. This review considers both functional and structural studies of brain connectivity, as complemented by behavioral and task-related neuroimaging data. These studies show converging results: The frontal and parietal cortical regions are active together, over time, and identifiable frontoparietal networks are active in relation to specific task demands. However, the spontaneous, low-frequency fluctuations of brain activity that occur in the resting state, without specific task demands, also exhibit patterns of connectivity that closely resemble the task-related, frontoparietal attention networks. Both task-related and resting-state networks exhibit consistent relations to behavioral measures of attention. Further, anatomical structure, particularly white matter pathways as defined by diffusion tensor imaging, places constraints on intrinsic functional connectivity. Lastly, connectivity analyses applied to investigate cognitive differences across individuals in both healthy and diseased states suggest that disconnection of attentional networks is linked to deficits in cognitive functioning, and in extreme cases, to disorders of attention. Thus, comprehensive theories of visual attention and their clinical translation depend on the continued integration of behavioral, task-related neuroimaging, and brain connectivity measures. PMID:23597177

  11. Parcellating connectivity in spatial maps

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Diane M.; Fei-Fei, Li

    2015-01-01

    A common goal in biological sciences is to model a complex web of connections using a small number of interacting units. We present a general approach for dividing up elements in a spatial map based on their connectivity properties, allowing for the discovery of local regions underlying large-scale connectivity matrices. Our method is specifically designed to respect spatial layout and identify locally-connected clusters, corresponding to plausible coherent units such as strings of adjacent DNA base pairs, subregions of the brain, animal communities, or geographic ecosystems. Instead of using approximate greedy clustering, our nonparametric Bayesian model infers a precise parcellation using collapsed Gibbs sampling. We utilize an infinite clustering prior that intrinsically incorporates spatial constraints, allowing the model to search directly in the space of spatially-coherent parcellations. After showing results on synthetic datasets, we apply our method to both functional and structural connectivity data from the human brain. We find that our parcellation is substantially more effective than previous approaches at summarizing the brain’s connectivity structure using a small number of clusters, produces better generalization to individual subject data, and reveals functional parcels related to known retinotopic maps in visual cortex. Additionally, we demonstrate the generality of our method by applying the same model to human migration data within the United States. This analysis reveals that migration behavior is generally influenced by state borders, but also identifies regional communities which cut across state lines. Our parcellation approach has a wide range of potential applications in understanding the spatial structure of complex biological networks. PMID:25737822

  12. Diverless remote operated flowline connections

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Slider, M.; Galle, G.

    1997-07-01

    The diverless remote horizontal connection for a major project in the South China Sea was performed using the ABB Vetco Gray GSR connector in conjunction with a pull-in tool. New, innovative methods were developed whereby the hubs provide axial and angular misalignment capabilities and an ROV can make and break the connection and replace the innovative magnetic sealing assembly. The significance of this achievement is assessed with a focus on the implemented design philosophies, the principles of operation, the overall system reliability, the operational cost reduction, and the full-scale testing results. Additional comments are made concerning the applicability of this technology in various other subsea applications.

  13. Nucleus of the solitary tract in the C57BL/6J mouse: Subnuclear parcellation, chorda tympani nerve projections, and brainstem connections

    PubMed Central

    Ganchrow, Donald; Ganchrow, Judith R; Cicchini, Vanessa; Bartel, Dianna L; Kaufman, Daniel; Girard, David; Whitehead, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) processes gustatory and related somatosensory information rostrally and general viscerosensory information caudally. To compare its connections with those of other rodents, this study in the C57BL/6J mouse provides a subnuclear cytoarchitectonic parcellation (Nissl stain) of the NST into rostral, intermediate, and caudal divisions. Subnuclei are further characterized by NADPH staining and P2X2 immunoreactivity (IR). Cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) labeling revealed those NST subnuclei receiving chorda tympani nerve (CT) afferents, those connecting with the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and reticular formation (RF), and those interconnecting NST subnuclei. CT terminals are densest in the rostral central (RC) and medial (M) subnuclei; less dense in the rostral lateral (RL) subnucleus; and sparse in the ventral (V), ventral lateral (VL), and central lateral (CL) subnuclei. CTb injection into the PBN retrogradely labels cells in the aforementioned subnuclei; RC and M providing the largest source of PBN projection neurons. Pontine efferent axons terminate mainly in V and rostral medial (RM) subnuclei. CTb injection into the medullary RF labels cells and axonal endings predominantly in V at rostral and intermediate NST levels. Small CTb injections within the NST label extensive projections from the rostral division to caudal subnuclei. Projections from the caudal division primarily interconnect subnuclei confined to the caudal division of the NST; they also connect with the area postrema. P2X2-IR identifies probable vagal nerve terminals in the central (Ce) subnucleus in the intermediate/caudal NST. Ce also shows intense NADPH staining and does not project to the PBN. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:1565–1596, 2014. PMID:24151133

  14. 46 CFR 98.30-27 - Connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... operations unless it is— (1) A bolted or full threaded connection; or (2) A quick-connect coupling accepted.... (a) Each person who makes a connection for a transfer operation shall— (1) Use suitable material in... less than four bolts in each temporary connection utilizing an American National Standards...

  15. Toward a Connected Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wraga, William G.

    2009-01-01

    One shortcoming of the academic curriculum is its tendency to emphasize the integrity of the separate subjects and to neglect, even ignore, connections between and among subjects as well as between students' academic experiences and those beyond school. Unfortunately, evidence indicates that recent high school students, who have completed more…

  16. Art and the Cosmic Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Whitney H.; Aiello, Monica Petty; Macdonald, Reeves; Asplund, Shari

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary unit described in this article utilizes "Art and the Cosmic Connection," a free program conceived of by artists Monica and Tyler Aiello and developed by the artists, scientists, and educators through NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs, to inspire learners to explore mysterious worlds in our solar…

  17. The Work/Leisure Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimeldorf, Martin; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Seven chapters in this special issue include "The Work/Leisure Connection" (McDaniels); "Changing Relations between Work and Leisure" (Godbey); "Wellness in the Leisure-Work Relationship" (McDowell); "Concept of Work: Updating a Point of View" (Hoyt); "A Working Future?" (Watts); "Beyond Career...Avoiding the Postretirement Blues" (Jackson); and…

  18. Quality Connection: Going the Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenney, Timothy R.; Roupas, Eva K.

    2003-01-01

    In 1999, Virginia Beach City Public Schools launched a completely new distance learning (DL) initiative, Quality Connection. Since that time, through perseverance and creative thinking, the program has become a model of technology as well as a highly successful method of delivering services to a wide variety of stakeholders. Not only do students…

  19. School Wellness Policy: Community Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambdin, Dolly; Erwin, Heather

    2007-01-01

    How can physical educators make connections to the larger community? This article discusses how physical educators can better inform community physical-activity leaders and coaches about appropriate instructional practices and how they can inform students about activities available in the community. It also offers suggestions for how to invite the…

  20. Teaching, Connecting & Empowering Today's Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Virginia R.

    2013-01-01

    Since career and technical education (CTE) is based historically on promoting technical, hands-on, real-world applications in numerous vocations, CTE educators are uniquely poised to offer more use of instructional technology in their classrooms. Many CTE educators have remarkable connections with industry partnerships, internships and learning…

  1. Connecting Slope, Steepness, and Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Courtney R.; Moore-Russo, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    All teachers, especially high school teachers, face the challenge of ensuring that students have opportunities to relate and connect the various representations and notions of mathematics concepts developed over the course of the pre-K-12 mathematics curriculum. NCTM's (2000) Representation Standard emphasizes the importance of students being…

  2. Connecting the Dots: Rediscovering Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camenga, Kristin A.; Yates, Rebekah B. Johnson

    2014-01-01

    The topic of continuity is typically not introduced until calculus and then reexamined in real analysis. Recognizing the connections between secondary school mathematics and the advanced mathematics studied at the college level allows teachers to better identify mathematical concepts in student ideas, motivate students by piquing their curiosity,…

  3. Connecting Remote Clusters with ATM

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, T.C.; Wyckoff, P.S.

    1998-10-01

    Sandia's entry into utilizing clusters of networked workstations is called Computational Plant or CPlant for short. The design of CPlant uses Ethernet to boot the individual nodes, Myrinet to communicate within a node cluster, and ATM to connect between remote clusters. This SAND document covers the work done to enable the use of ATM on the CPlant nodes in the Fall of 1997.

  4. Connecting the Dots in DAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Many institutions implement a distributed antenna system (DAS) as part of a holistic approach to providing better wireless coverage and capacity on campus. A DAS provides wireless service within a particular area or structure via a network of separate antenna nodes that are connected to a common source through fiber or coaxial cable. Because DAS…

  5. Gigabit Wireless for Network Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoedel, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Uninterrupted, high-bandwidth network connectivity is crucial for higher education. Colleges and universities increasingly adopt gigabit wireless solutions because of their fiber-equivalent performance, quick implementation, and significant return on investment. For just those reasons, Rush University Medical Center switched from free space optics…

  6. Caldecott Connections to Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glandon, Shan

    The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the U.S. artist of the most distinguished picture book for children. This activity book is based on the idea that connections with art teachers are a natural result of a focus on Caldecott Award literature,…

  7. Casing and tubing connection stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.P.

    1982-08-01

    By use of a simple theoretical analysis, the transverse stresses in couplings and pipe ends of API eight-round and buttress threaded connections caused by makeup and pressures have been calculated and tabulated. Stresses for 680 specified combinations of casing and tubing size, grade, and thread type are examined.

  8. Exploring the compassionate care connection.

    PubMed

    Burnell, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Although the word "compassion" is an integral component of nursing care, a clear conceptualization of the term is lacking. This article examines compassion from historical, biblical, and global perspectives; spiritual connections; and calls for research to help build our understanding of what compassion means and how to enter into other's suffering. PMID:20949867

  9. The Imagery-Creativity Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels-McGhee, Susan; Davis, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews historical highlights of the imagery-creativity connection, including early and contemporary accounts, along with notable examples of imagery in the creative process. It also looks at cross-modal imagery (synesthesia), a model of image-based creativity and the creative process, and implications for strengthening creativity by…

  10. Elementary Algebra Connections to Precalculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Boada, Roberto; Daire, Sandra Arguelles

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the attitudes of some precalculus students to solve trigonometric and logarithmic equations and systems using the concepts of elementary algebra. With the goal of enticing the students to search for and use connections among mathematical topics, they are asked to solve equations or systems specifically designed to allow…

  11. Critical Connections: Health and Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Shannon L.; Merlo, Caitlin L.; Basch, Charles E.; Wentzel, Kathryn R.; Wechsler, Howell

    2015-01-01

    Background: While it is a national priority to support the health and education of students, these sectors must better align, integrate, and collaborate to achieve this priority. This article summarizes the literature on the connection between health and academic achievement using the Whole School, Whole Community, and Whole Child (WSCC) framework…

  12. Preparing Administrators for Connected Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Tweed W.

    New technology, in the form of electronic connectivity, has opened up vast new arenas for educational development. Many administrators, however, have not been prepared for the sudden change brought about by such technology. The problem for school administrators is how to lead effectively without being overcome by the new information technologies.…

  13. Making Connections from Urban Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riel, Margaret

    1992-01-01

    Describes a cooperative-learning technique that uses a computer network and involves cooperation among teams separated by physical and social distances. Teachers' messages and students' work illustrate positive features of network connections for inner-city classrooms that are at-risk because of academic, physical, or economic conditions. (RLC)

  14. Reduced Prefrontal Connectivity in Psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Motzkin, Julian C.; Newman, Joseph P.; Kiehl, Kent A.; Koenigs, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Linking psychopathy to a specific brain abnormality could have significant clinical, legal, and scientific implications. Theories on the neurobiological basis of the disorder typically propose dysfunction in a circuit involving ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). However, to date there is limited brain imaging data to directly test whether psychopathy may indeed be associated with any structural or functional abnormality within this brain area. In this study, we employ two complementary imaging techniques to assess the structural and functional connectivity of vmPFC in psychopathic and non-psychopathic criminals. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we show that psychopathy is associated with reduced structural integrity in the right uncinate fasciculus, the primary white matter connection between vmPFC and anterior temporal lobe. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that psychopathy is associated with reduced functional connectivity between vmPFC and amygdala as well as between vmPFC and medial parietal cortex. Together, these data converge to implicate diminished vmPFC connectivity as a characteristic neurobiological feature of psychopathy. PMID:22131397

  15. National Assessment of Floodplain Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. N.; Scott, D.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Harvey, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of riverine floodplains, hydrologic connectivity describes the water mediated exchange of matter and energy between the river and its adjacent floodplain. As riverine networks shift from headwater streams to large river systems, flood events transition from short, periodic episodes to longer, sustained flood pulses. While these processes are important to biogeochemical processing, little has been done to quantify the relative influence of physiography on floodplain-river interactions across the nation's river network. This study examined flow data from over 14,000 USGS gaging stations across the United States. The threshold for flooding, analogous to bankful stage, was estimated using a breakpoint analysis of each gage's rating curve. Individual floods were then identified across each respective flow record, and a series of metrics were calculated to characterize floodplain connectivity. The distribution and timing of flood events was strongly correlated with basin size and prevailing hydro-climatic conditions (e.g. coastal, interior, and snowmelt systems). Analysis of cumulative flood duration was extended to the entire US stream network, and floodplain connectivity was quantified by the product of stream length and inundation duration. Initial results suggest that floodplain connectivity increases with stream order and highlights the importance of large river floodplains in the fate and transport of materials within riverine networks.

  16. The SOHO-Stellar Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    Objective was to conduct a variety of observing programs with the SUMER spectrometer on SOHO, in order to further the understanding of the solar-stellar connection. The program was a continuation of SOHO GO program NAG5-6124 of the previous year.

  17. Weaving Connections with Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jean

    1987-01-01

    By integrating the language arts across the curriculum, teachers and librarians can help students make connections between what they already know and new material. Teachers committed to this approach need to spend time planning, executing, and evaluating the process and to bring the following essential components to the classroom: (1) love and…

  18. Connecting to the Messy Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teitel, Lee

    2009-01-01

    The Massachusetts story is about persistence. Instead of jumping from one fad to the next, the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents (MASS) developed a comprehensive and focused plan and stuck to it for several years. It is clearly a story about people--the trust and connections that developed among networks of superintendents that…

  19. Preservice Teachers Map Compassion: Connecting Social Studies and Literacy through Nonfictional Animal Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Montgomery, Sarah E.; Vander Zanden, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Nonfiction stories of animal compassion were used in this literacy-social studies integrated lesson to address both efferent and aesthetic stances in transmediation of text from picture books to maps. Preservice early childhood and elementary teachers chose places from the nine recent children's stories, symbolizing them on a map while…

  20. Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Cindy

    2007-01-01

    The author remembers back to freshmen year when NCSSSMST was considered a jumbled acronym and a pain to utter. But now, two years down the line, and their conference debut in only a few months, she remembers the NCSSSMST motto, "foster, support, and advance the creative efforts of those specialized schools whose primary purpose is to attract…

  1. ConnectED: President Obama's Plan for Connecting All Schools to the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The White House, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Driven by new digital technologies, the future of learning is increasingly interactive, individualized, and full of real-world experiences and information. Unfortunately, the average school has about the same connectivity as the average American home, but serves 200 times as many users, and fewer than 20 percent of educators say their school's…

  2. Connections for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Collie, Jeffrey C.

    1999-01-01

    A connection for fuel cell assemblies is disclosed. The connection includes compliant members connected to individual fuel cells and a rigid member connected to the compliant members. Adjacent bundles or modules of fuel cells are connected together by mechanically joining their rigid members. The compliant/rigid connection permits construction of generator fuel cell stacks from basic modular groups of cells of any desired size. The connections can be made prior to installation of the fuel cells in a generator, thereby eliminating the need for in-situ completion of the connections. In addition to allowing pre-fabrication, the compliant/rigid connections also simplify removal and replacement of sections of a generator fuel cell stack.

  3. Catecholaminergic connectivity to the inner ear, central auditory and vocal motor circuitry in the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus

    PubMed Central

    Forlano, Paul M.; Kim, Spencer D.; Krzyminska, Zuzanna M.; Sisneros, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the neuroanatomical distribution of catecholaminergic (CA) neurons has been well documented across all vertebrate classes, few studies have examined CA connectivity to physiologically and anatomically identified neural circuitry that controls behavior. The goal of this study was to characterize CA distribution in the brain and inner ear of the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) with particular emphasis on their relationship with anatomically labeled circuitry that both produces and encodes social acoustic signals in this species. Neurobiotin labeling of the main auditory endorgan, the saccule, combined with tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence (TH-ir) revealed a strong CA innervation of both the peripheral and central auditory system. Diencephalic TH-ir neurons in the periventricular posterior tuberculum, known to be dopaminergic, send ascending projections to the ventral telencephalon and prominent descending projections to vocal-acoustic integration sites, notably the hindbrain octavolateralis efferent nucleus, as well as onto the base of hair cells in the saccule via nerve VIII. Neurobiotin backfills of the vocal nerve in combination with TH-ir revealed CA terminals on all components of the vocal pattern generator which appears to largely originate from local TH-ir neurons but may include diencephalic projections as well. This study provides strong evidence for catecholamines as important neuromodulators of both auditory and vocal circuitry and acoustic-driven social behavior in midshipman fish. This first demonstration of TH-ir terminals in the main endorgan of hearing in a non-mammalian vertebrate suggests a conserved and important anatomical and functional role for dopamine in normal audition. PMID:24715479

  4. The business case for connectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Dennis; Hirschheim, Rudy

    1991-01-01

    Information systems that provide competitive advantages to organizations can be broadly classified into those that improve the effectiveness of a business function and those that improve the reach of information in the organization. The latter, organizational connectivity systems, can be categorized as intraorganizational and interorganizational systems. Intraorganization systems provide connectivity to function areas within the business, while interorganizational systems support the exchange of business data between independent business units. These system are not confined to a single entity but span organizational boundaries which can be national or international in scope. A series of case studies was undertaken in an effort to better understand the issues and problems associated with providing an increased flow of information within and outside of an organization. Ten issues emerged from this study. In summary, it is necessary for firms to first consider how effective their internal communications systems are before launching projects that tie the organization to external systems.

  5. Correlating thalamocortical connectivity and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Sporns, Olaf

    2006-07-01

    The segregated regions of the mammalian cerebral cortex and thalamus form an extensive and complex network, whose structure and function are still only incompletely understood. The present letter describes an application of the concepts of complex networks and random walks that allows the identification of nonrandom, highly structured features of thalamocortical connections and their potential effects on dynamic interactions between cortical areas in the cat brain. Utilizing large-scale anatomical data sets of this thalamocortical system, we investigate uniform random walks in such a network by considering the steady state eigenvector of the respective stochastic matrix. It is shown that thalamocortical connections are organized in such a way as to guarantee strong correlation between the outdegree and occupancy rate (a stochastic measure potentially related to activation) of each cortical area. Possible organizational principles underlying this effect are identified and discussed.

  6. Pediatric Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Berard, Roberta A; Laxer, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric-onset mixed connective tissue disease is among the rare disease entities in pediatric rheumatology and includes features of arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Accurate recognition and diagnosis of the disease is paramount to prevent long-term morbidity. Advances in the genetic and immunologic understanding of the factors involved in the etiopathogenesis provide an opportunity for improvements in prognostication and targeted therapy. The development of a multinational cohort of patients with mixed connective tissue disease would be invaluable to provide more updated data regarding the clinical presentation, to develop a standardized treatment approach, disease activity and outcome tools, and to provide data on long-term outcomes and comorbidities. PMID:27032791

  7. The HELIOS Medical Connection Services.

    PubMed

    Jean, F C; Engelmann, U; Sauquet, D; Lavril, M; Schröter, A; Degoulet, P

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of the HELIOS software component that deals with integration of medical applications in health information networks. The problem of interoperability between health information systems based on different data exchange syntaxes is first discussed. A meta-model, relying on CEN TC251 recommendations, is then presented as a possible solution to this problem and a message description language including these recommendations is proposed. Using this meta-model, the Medical Connection Services that comprises a generic message processing automaton, a resource manager and a mapper is able either to interpret messages expressed in a given syntax (e.g., EDIFACT, ASTM) and map them to the application objects or to automate the translation of the messages in another syntax. Special focus is given on the position of the Medical Connection Services within the HELIOS integration strategy (i.e., through data, presentation and communication). The problem of semantic heterogeneity is then discussed. PMID:7882669

  8. A LISP-Ada connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworski, Allan; Lavallee, David; Zoch, David

    1987-01-01

    The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of using Ada for expert systems and the implementation of an expert-friendly interface which supports knowledge entry. In the Ford LISP-Ada Connection (FLAC) system LISP and Ada are used in ways which complement their respective capabilities. Future investigation will concentrate on the enhancement of the expert knowledge entry/debugging interface and on the issues associated with multitasking and real-time expert systems implementation in Ada.

  9. Connective stability of competitive equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the connective stability of nonlinear matrix systems described by the equation x-dot = A(t, x) x, where the matrix A(t, x) has time-varying nonlinear elements. The results obtained can be used to study the stability of competitive equilibrium in fields as diverse as economics and engineering, model ecosystems, and the arms race.-

  10. Performance evaluations of demountable electrical connections

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Buckles, W.E.; Daugherty, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Electrical conductors operating in cryogenic environments can require demountable connections along their lengths. The connections must have low resistance and high reliability and should allow ready assembly and disassembly. In this work, the performance of two types of connections has been evaluated. The first connection type is a clamped surface-to-surface joint. The second connection type is a screwed joint that incorporates male and female machine-thread components. The connections for copper conductors have been evaluated experimentally at 77 K. Experimental variables included thread surface treatment and assembly methods. The results of the evaluations are presented.

  11. A Choice Reaction Time Index of Callosal Anatomical Homotopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjardins, Sameul; Braun, Claude M. J.; Achim, Andre; Roberge, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Tachistoscopically presented bilateral stimulus pairs not parallel to the meridian produced significantly longer RTs on a task requiring discrimination of shapes (Go/no-Go) than pairs emplaced symmetrically on each side of the meridian in Desjardins and Braun [Desjardins, S., & Braun, C. M. J. (2006). Homotopy and heterotopy and the bilateral…

  12. Language and Development in FG Syndrome with Callosal Agenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCardle, Peggy; Wilson, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    The FG syndrome is characterized by unusual facies; sudden infant death; developmental delay; and abnormalities of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Serial evaluations of one case with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum found consistent patterns over time in specific language impairments in syntactic and…

  13. Language and development in FG syndrome with callosal agenesis.

    PubMed

    McCardle, P; Wilson, B

    1993-06-01

    The FG syndrome is characterized by unusual facies, sudden infant death, developmental delay, and abnormalities of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. No longitudinal data on development in surviving patients are currently available. Serial evaluations of a patient with FG syndrome, whose sole central nervous system anomaly was agenesis of the corpus callosum, showed a consistent pattern over time. Specific language impairments in syntactic and pragmatic-semantic areas are emerging. These findings represent the first detailed data on which expectations for children with the FG syndrome can be based. The findings also fit theoretical constructs on the function of the corpus callosum and may therefore be generalized to provide expectations for other patients with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum. Given the information gained from this case, it is clear that language intervention/consultation should be a pivotal service for such children, and that the speech-language pathologist should play a role in the development of an integrated educational services plan. PMID:7688382

  14. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/application.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application To use the sharing features on this ... please see our guidelines and instructions on linking. Web Application Overview The API for the Web application ...

  15. Connecting Related Rates and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article points out a simple connection between related rates and differential equations. The connection can be used for in-class examples or homework exercises, and it is accessible to students who are familiar with separation of variables.

  16. MedlinePlus Connect: Technical Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Technical Information Page MedlinePlus Connect Implementation Options Web Application How does it work? Responds to requests ... examples of MedlinePlus Connect Web Application response pages. Web Service How does it work? Responds to requests ...

  17. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/connect/application.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application To use the sharing features on this ... please see our guidelines and instructions on linking. Web Application Overview The API for the Web application ...

  18. LANDSCAPE CONNECTIVITY: DIFFERENT FUNCTIONS AT DIFFERENT SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Connectivity is more than corridors, and corridors are more than linear strips of habitat. ather, connectivity involves linkages of habitats, species, communities, and ecological processes at spatial scales ranging from fencerows to biomes, and at temporal scales ranging from dai...

  19. MedlinePlus Connect: How it Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/connect/howitworks.html MedlinePlus Connect: How it Works To use the sharing features on this ... Web service provide responses in different formats. How it looks depends on how it is implemented. Web ...

  20. DS-Connect: The Down Syndrome Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connect® is a powerful resource where people with Down syndrome and their families can: • Connect with researchers and ... interest in participating in certain clinical studies on Down Syndrome, including studies of new medications and other treatments. • ...

  1. Connectivity in Autism: A Review of MRI Connectivity Studies.

    PubMed

    Rane, Pallavi; Cochran, David; Hodge, Steven M; Haselgrove, Christian; Kennedy, David N; Frazier, Jean A

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects 1 in 50 children between the ages of 6 and 17 years. The etiology of ASD is not precisely known. ASD is an umbrella term, which includes both low- (IQ < 70) and high-functioning (IQ > 70) individuals. A better understanding of the disorder and how it manifests in individual subjects can lead to more effective intervention plans to fulfill the individual's treatment needs.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive investigational tool that can be used to study the ways in which the brain develops or deviates from the typical developmental trajectory. MRI offers insights into the structure, function, and metabolism of the brain. In this article, we review published studies on brain connectivity changes in ASD using either resting state functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging.The general findings of decreases in white matter integrity and in long-range neural coherence are well known in the ASD literature. Nevertheless, the detailed localization of these findings remains uncertain, and few studies link these changes in connectivity with the behavioral phenotype of the disorder. With the help of data sharing and large-scale analytic efforts, however, the field is advancing toward several convergent themes, including the reduced functional coherence of long-range intra-hemispheric cortico-cortical default mode circuitry, impaired inter-hemispheric regulation, and an associated, perhaps compensatory, increase in local and short-range cortico-subcortical coherence. PMID:26146755

  2. Simultaneous stability and sensitivity in model cortical networks is achieved through anti-correlations between the in- and out-degree of connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Juan C.; Houweling, Arthur R.; Tiesinga, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in rodent barrel cortex are characterized by stable low baseline firing rates. However, they are sensitive to the action potentials of single neurons as suggested by recent single-cell stimulation experiments that reported quantifiable behavioral responses in response to short spike trains elicited in single neurons. Hence, these networks are stable against internally generated fluctuations in firing rate but at the same time remain sensitive to similarly-sized externally induced perturbations. We investigated stability and sensitivity in a simple recurrent network of stochastic binary neurons and determined numerically the effects of correlation between the number of afferent (“in-degree”) and efferent (“out-degree”) connections in neurons. The key advance reported in this work is that anti-correlation between in-/out-degree distributions increased the stability of the network in comparison to networks with no correlation or positive correlations, while being able to achieve the same level of sensitivity. The experimental characterization of degree distributions is difficult because all pre-synaptic and post-synaptic neurons have to be identified and counted. We explored whether the statistics of network motifs, which requires the characterization of connections between small subsets of neurons, could be used to detect evidence for degree anti-correlations. We find that the sample frequency of the 3-neuron “ring” motif (1→2→3→1), can be used to detect degree anti-correlation for sub-networks of size 30 using about 50 samples, which is of significance because the necessary measurements are achievable experimentally in the near future. Taken together, we hypothesize that barrel cortex networks exhibit degree anti-correlations and specific network motif statistics. PMID:24223550

  3. MedlinePlus Connect: Technical Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... per request. Supports the HL7 Context-Aware Knowledge Retrieval (Infobutton) standard. Connects using HTTPS connections. A personal ... an alternate method of accessing MedlinePlus data. More Information How MedlinePlus Connect Works Demonstrations — Web application and ...

  4. Multicultural Environmental Education--Making Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaughan, Sharon

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Raptors Connecting Cultures (RCC), a multicultural environmental education program for Latino students. The RCC Program attempted to make connections between local ecology in eastern Pennsylvania and the students' home countries using the concept of migration as a link. Encourages the inclusion of contributions and connections from…

  5. The Acquisition of Causal Connectives in Turkish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksu, Ayhan

    The elicited speech of 26 Turkish children ranging in age from 2;0 to 4;6 was examined with respect to causality. The developmental sequence of the acquisition of causal connectives showed a progression from the use of no explicit connectives to the acquisition of connectives that are context-dependent. The next stage in this progression was the…

  6. Characterization of structural connections for multicomponent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Huckelbridge, Arthur A.

    1988-01-01

    This study explores combining Component Mode Synthesis methods for coupling structural components with Parameter Identification procedures for improving the analytical modeling of the connections. Improvements in the connection stiffness and damping properties are computed in terms of physical parameters so that the physical characteristics of the connections can be better understood, in addition to providing improved input for the system model.

  7. 46 CFR 64.33 - Pipe connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe connection. 64.33 Section 64.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.33 Pipe connection. Each pipe connection that is not a...

  8. Connectivity Changes in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Novellino, Fabiana; Quattrone, Aldo

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder of the central nervous system characterized by widespread alterations in several non-motor aspects such as mood, sleep, olfactory, and cognition in addition to motor dysfunctions. Advanced neuroimaging using functional connectivity reconstruction of the human brain has provided a vast knowledge on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disorder, but this, however, does not cover the overall inter-/intra-individual variability of PD phenotypes. The present review is aimed at discussing to what extent the evidence provided by group-based neuroimaging analysis in this field of study (using seed-based, network-based, or graph theory approaches) may be generalized. In particular, we summarized the literature on the application of resting-state functional connectivity studies to explore different neural correlates of motor and non-motor symptoms of PD and the neural mechanisms involved in treatment effects: effects of levodopa or deep brain stimulation. The lesson learnt from one decade of studies provides consistent evidence on the role of the altered communication between the striato-frontal pathways as a marker of PD-related motor degeneration, whereas in the non-motor domain, several missing pieces of a complex puzzle are provided. However, the main target is to present a new era of intelligent neuroimaging applications, where automated multivariate analysis of functional connectivity data may be used for moving from group-level statistical results to personalized predictions in a clinical setting. Although in its relative infancy, the evidence gathered so far suggests a new era of clinical neuroimaging is starting. PMID:27568202

  9. NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies' In this animation we see how the ear converts pressure waves into something the brain can perceive as 'sound' NASA engineers and scientists are trying to design airplanes to run as quietly as cars. In this program, students will learn the basics: what sound is, what makes sound, how sound affects us and the environment, and how we measure sound. They will also learn some of the techniques being used by NASA to reduce aircraft noise. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the creation, visualization, and measurement of sound.

  10. NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies' Brenda Sullivan, a psychoacoustician, explains how she researces peoples responses to noise with the help of binaural recordings made inside aircraft. NASA engineers and scientists are trying to design airplanes to run as quietly as cars. In this program, students will learn the basics: what sound is, what makes sound, how sound affects us and the environment, and how we measure sound. They will also learn some of the techniques being used by NASA to reduce aircraft noise. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the creation, visualization, and measurement of sound.

  11. Women's connectivity in extreme networks.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Pedro; Cao, Zhenfeng; Gabriel, Andrew; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Qi, Hong; Restrepo, Elvira M; Johnson, Daniela; Wuchty, Stefan; Song, Chaoming; Johnson, Neil

    2016-06-01

    A popular stereotype is that women will play more minor roles than men as environments become more dangerous and aggressive. Our analysis of new longitudinal data sets from offline and online operational networks [for example, ISIS (Islamic State)] shows that although men dominate numerically, women emerge with superior network connectivity that can benefit the underlying system's robustness and survival. Our observations suggest new female-centric approaches that could be used to affect such networks. They also raise questions about how individual contributions in high-pressure systems are evaluated. PMID:27386564

  12. Astrophysicists’ Conversational Connections on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Kim; Bowman, Timothy D.; Haustein, Stefanie; Peters, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Because Twitter and other social media are increasingly used for analyses based on altmetrics, this research sought to understand what contexts, affordance use, and social activities influence the tweeting behavior of astrophysicists. Thus, the presented study has been guided by three research questions that consider the influence of astrophysicists’ activities (i.e., publishing and tweeting frequency) and of their tweet construction and affordance use (i.e. use of hashtags, language, and emotions) on the conversational connections they have on Twitter. We found that astrophysicists communicate with a variety of user types (e.g. colleagues, science communicators, other researchers, and educators) and that in the ego networks of the astrophysicists clear groups consisting of users with different professional roles can be distinguished. Interestingly, the analysis of noun phrases and hashtags showed that when the astrophysicists address the different groups of very different professional composition they use very similar terminology, but that they do not talk to each other (i.e. mentioning other user names in tweets). The results also showed that in those areas of the ego networks that tweeted more the sentiment of the tweets tended to be closer to neutral, connecting frequent tweeting with information sharing activities rather than conversations or expressing opinions. PMID:25153196

  13. Astrophysicists' conversational connections on Twitter.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Kim; Bowman, Timothy D; Haustein, Stefanie; Peters, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Because Twitter and other social media are increasingly used for analyses based on altmetrics, this research sought to understand what contexts, affordance use, and social activities influence the tweeting behavior of astrophysicists. Thus, the presented study has been guided by three research questions that consider the influence of astrophysicists' activities (i.e., publishing and tweeting frequency) and of their tweet construction and affordance use (i.e. use of hashtags, language, and emotions) on the conversational connections they have on Twitter. We found that astrophysicists communicate with a variety of user types (e.g. colleagues, science communicators, other researchers, and educators) and that in the ego networks of the astrophysicists clear groups consisting of users with different professional roles can be distinguished. Interestingly, the analysis of noun phrases and hashtags showed that when the astrophysicists address the different groups of very different professional composition they use very similar terminology, but that they do not talk to each other (i.e. mentioning other user names in tweets). The results also showed that in those areas of the ego networks that tweeted more the sentiment of the tweets tended to be closer to neutral, connecting frequent tweeting with information sharing activities rather than conversations or expressing opinions. PMID:25153196

  14. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-15

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  15. Generalized magnetofluid connections in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Asenjo, Felipe A; Comisso, Luca

    2015-03-20

    The concept of magnetic connections is extended to nonideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamical plasmas. Adopting a general set of equations for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics including thermal-inertial, thermal electromotive, Hall, and current-inertia effects, we derive a new covariant connection equation showing the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved during the dissipationless plasma dynamics. These connections are intimately linked to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields, allowing the extension of the magnetic connection notion to a much broader concept. PMID:25839284

  16. Behavior of concentrically loaded CFT braces connections

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Maha M.; Ramadan, Hazem M.; Abdel-Mooty, Mohammed N.; Mourad, Sherif A.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete filled tubes (CFTs) composite columns have many economical and esthetic advantages, but the behavior of their connections is complicated. Through this study, it is aimed to investigate the performance and behavior of different connection configurations between concrete filled steel tube columns and bracing diagonals through an experimental program. The study included 12 connection subassemblies consisting of a fixed length steel tube and gusset plate connected to the tube end with different details tested under half cyclic loading. A notable effect was observed on the behavior of the connections due to its detailing changes with respect to capacity, failure mode, ductility, and stress distribution. PMID:25685491

  17. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-01

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  18. Learning Is about Making Connections. The Cross Papers Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, K. Patricia

    This paper discusses what is known about learning to date by emphasizing "connections" as necessary for learning. Knowledge about these connections can be placed into four categories: (1) neurological connections; (2) cognitive connections; (3) social connections; and (4) experiential connections. In terms of neurological connections, sensory…

  19. Evaluation of the Demonstration Sites in the ConnectEd Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Beverly; Bradby, Denise; Hartry, Ardice; Sipes, Laurel; Hall, Leslie; Tasoff, Shayna

    2009-01-01

    In California, the James Irvine Foundation created ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career to promote multiple pathways that link to the state's 15 major industry sectors. The ConnectEd Network of Schools, a demonstration project supported by Irvine, plays a critical role in expanding student options through multiple pathways and…

  20. Random geometric graphs with general connection functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Carl P.; Georgiou, Orestis

    2016-03-01

    In the original (1961) Gilbert model of random geometric graphs, nodes are placed according to a Poisson point process, and links formed between those within a fixed range. Motivated by wireless ad hoc networks "soft" or "probabilistic" connection models have recently been introduced, involving a "connection function" H (r ) that gives the probability that two nodes at distance r are linked (directly connect). In many applications (not only wireless networks), it is desirable that the graph is connected; that is, every node is linked to every other node in a multihop fashion. Here the connection probability of a dense network in a convex domain in two or three dimensions is expressed in terms of contributions from boundary components for a very general class of connection functions. It turns out that only a few quantities such as moments of the connection function appear. Good agreement is found with special cases from previous studies and with numerical simulations.

  1. Method for hermetic electrical connections

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, Saundra L.; Glass, S. Jill; Stone, Ronnie G.; Bond, Jamey T.; Susan, Donald F.

    2011-12-27

    A method of providing a hermetic, electrical connection between two electrical components by mating at least one metal pin in a glass-ceramic to metal seal connector to two electrical components, wherein the glass-ceramic to metal seal connector incorporates at least one metal pin encased (sealed) in a glass-ceramic material inside of a metal housing, with the glass-ceramic material made from 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16% Li.sub.2O, 2-8% Al.sub.2O.sub.3, 1-5% P.sub.2O.sub.5, 1-8% K.sub.2O, 0.5-7% B.sub.2O.sub.3, and 0-5% ZnO. The connector retains hermeticity at temperatures as high as 700.degree. C. and pressures as high as 500 psi.

  2. The Interaction-Activity Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    1996-01-01

    A review is presented of the numerous studies that have been undertaken to investigate the likely interaction-activity connection among galaxies. Both observational evidence and theoretical supporting models are reviewed. Some specific examples of "interactive" galaxies from the author's own research are presented: (a) the collision-induced AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) activity in the radio jet source 3C278; and (b) the collision-induced starburst activity in the spectacular "Cartwheel" ring galaxy. Some comments are offered concerning some of the more promising theoretical investigations that are now taking place. A few words of warning are also offered about the possible misinterpretation of putative collision-induced morphologies among some galaxy samples.

  3. The Flare-CME Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, Claire; Gallagher, P. T.; Lin, C.

    2009-05-01

    The connection between flares and CMEs has long been hypothesized and modelled. However, a full understanding of the processes at work remains ambiguous. A detailed study of the kinematical evolution of a CME was conducted using instruments on STEREO. Flare parameters, such as the motion of soft X-ray sources, imaged using RHESSI, and emission measure and plasma temperature measured from Mercury MESSENGER are presented in conjunction with the CME data to explain the evolution of the entire system. These results are then compared to a number of theoretical models to determine which of the many hypotheses are most probable for this event. CLR is supported by an SPD studentship and the ESA/Prodex grant administered by Enterprise Ireland.

  4. Connecting cognition and consumer choice.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Daniel M; Johnson, Eric J

    2015-02-01

    We describe what can be gained from connecting cognition and consumer choice by discussing two contexts ripe for interaction between the two fields. The first-context effects on choice-has already been addressed by cognitive science yielding insights about cognitive process but there is promise for more interaction. The second is learning and representation in choice where relevant theories in cognitive science could be informed by consumer choice, and in return, could pose and answer new questions. We conclude by discussing how these two fields of research stand to benefit from more interaction, citing examples of how interfaces of cognitive science with other fields have been illuminating for theories of cognition. PMID:25527275

  5. Real World Connections Through Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth; Lytle, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Learning Technologies Project (LTP) is a partner in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) educational technology program unit, an electronic community center that fosters interaction, collaboration, and sharing among educators, learners, and scientists. The goal of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Learning Technologies Project is to increase students' interest and proficiency in mathematics, science, and technology through the use of computing and communications technology and by using NASA's mission in aerospace technology as a theme. The primary components are: (1) Beginner's Guide to Aeronautics, including interactive simulation packages and teacher-created online activities. (2) NASA Virtual Visits, videoconferences (with online pre-post-conference activities) connecting students and teachers to NASA scientists and researchers.

  6. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  7. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Peng, Fang Zheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Ott, Jr., George W.

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  8. Unity connecting module in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is shown with Pressurized Mating Adapters 1 (left) and 2 (right) attached. Unity is scheduled to undergo testing of the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is the primary payload on mission STS-88, targeted to launch Dec. 3, 1998. Other testing includes the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  9. Evoked Effective Connectivity of the Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Entz, László; Tóth, Emília; Keller, Corey J.; Bickel, Stephan; Groppe, David M.; Fabó, Dániel; Kozák, Lajos R.; Eroőss, Loránd; Ulbert, István; Mehta, Ashesh D.

    2016-01-01

    The role of cortical connectivity in brain function and pathology is increasingly being recognized. While in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies have provided important insights into anatomical and functional connectivity, these methodologies are limited in their ability to detect electrophysiological activity and the causal relationships that underlie effective connectivity. Here, we describe results of cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP) mapping using single pulse electrical stimulation in 25 patients undergoing seizure monitoring with subdural electrode arrays. Mapping was performed by stimulating adjacent electrode pairs and recording CCEPs from the remainder of the electrode array. CCEPs reliably revealed functional networks and showed an inverse relationship to distance between sites. Coregistration to Brodmann areas (BA) permitted group analysis. Connections were frequently directional with 43% of early responses and 50% of late responses of connections reflecting relative dominance of incoming or outgoing connections. The most consistent connections were seen as outgoing from motor cortex, BA6–BA9, somatosensory (SS) cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and Broca's area. Network topology revealed motor, SS, and premotor cortices along with BA9 and BA10 and language areas to serve as hubs for cortical connections. BA20 and BA39 demonstrated the most consistent dominance of outdegree connections, while BA5, BA7, auditory cortex, and anterior cingulum demonstrated relatively greater indegree. This multicenter, large-scale, directional study of local and long-range cortical connectivity using direct recordings from awake, humans will aid the interpretation of noninvasive functional connectome studies. PMID:25044884

  10. Structural connectivity of the developing human amygdala.

    PubMed

    Saygin, Zeynep M; Osher, David E; Koldewyn, Kami; Martin, Rebecca E; Finn, Amy; Saxe, Rebecca; Gabrieli, John D E; Sheridan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    A large corpus of research suggests that there are changes in the manner and degree to which the amygdala supports cognitive and emotional function across development. One possible basis for these developmental differences could be the maturation of amygdalar connections with the rest of the brain. Recent functional connectivity studies support this conclusion, but the structural connectivity of the developing amygdala and its different nuclei remains largely unstudied. We examined age related changes in the DWI connectivity fingerprints of the amygdala to the rest of the brain in 166 individuals of ages 5-30. We also developed a model to predict age based on individual-subject amygdala connectivity, and identified the connections that were most predictive of age. Finally, we segmented the amygdala into its four main nucleus groups, and examined the developmental changes in connectivity for each nucleus. We observed that with age, amygdalar connectivity becomes increasingly sparse and localized. Age related changes were largely localized to the subregions of the amygdala that are implicated in social inference and contextual memory (the basal and lateral nuclei). The central nucleus' connectivity also showed differences with age but these differences affected fewer target regions than the basal and lateral nuclei. The medial nucleus did not exhibit any age related changes. These findings demonstrate increasing specificity in the connectivity patterns of amygdalar nuclei across age. PMID:25875758

  11. Brain Connectivity in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Rezazadeh, Iman; Frohlich, Joel; Loo, Sandra K.; Jeste, Shafali S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Many studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have different brain connectivity patterns compared to typically developing individuals. However, the results of more recent studies do not unanimously support the traditional view in which individuals with ASD have lower connectivity between distal brain regions and increased connectivity within proximal brain regions. In this review, we discuss different methods for measuring brain connectivity and how the use of different metrics may contribute to the lack of convergence of investigations of connectivity in ASD. Recent findings The discrepancy in brain connectivity results across studies may be due to important methodological factors such as the connectivity measure applied, the age of patients studied, the brain region(s) examined, and the time interval and frequency band(s) in which connectivity was analyzed. Summary We conclude that more sophisticated EEG analytic approaches should be utilized to more accurately infer causation and directionality of information transfer between brain regions, which may show dynamic changes of functional connectivity in the brain. Moreover, further investigations of connectivity with respect to behavior and clinical phenotype are needed to probe underlying brain networks implicated in core deficits of ASD. PMID:26910484

  12. Thermally effective, electrically isolating heat intercept connections

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1995-06-01

    Electrical and electronic equipment often require thermally effective beat intercept connections that provide electrical isolation. Such connections can be developed by clamping, with a thermal-interference fit, an electrically insulating cylindrical tube between a central disk and an outer ring. Heat flows radially through the disk-tube-ring assembly. Thermal effectiveness, i.e., {Delta}T for a given heat flux, and electrical isolation are controlled by tube geometry and material and by connection-assembly details. Connections of this type are being developed as cryogenic heat intercepts for electrical current leads that employ high-temperature superconductors. We discuss the design considerations and details of a beat intercept connection that transfers a 45-w thermal load at 60 K with a {Delta}T of {approx} 10 K while providing 7.5 kV electrical isolation. Prototype heat intercept connections have been evaluated for their thermal and electrical performance, and the results are presented.

  13. Changes in Effective Connectivity by Propofol Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Soddu, Andrea; Boly, Melanie; Boveroux, Pierre; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Gosseries, Olivia; Bonhomme, Vincent; Laureys, Steven; Noirhomme, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of propofol-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Recent fMRI studies have shown decreases in functional connectivity during unconsciousness induced by this anesthetic agent. Functional connectivity does not provide information of directional changes in the dynamics observed during unconsciousness. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in healthy humans during an auditory task, the changes in effective connectivity resulting from propofol induced loss of consciousness. We used Dynamic Causal Modeling for fMRI (fMRI-DCM) to assess how causal connectivity is influenced by the anesthetic agent in the auditory system. Our results suggest that the dynamic observed in the auditory system during unconsciousness induced by propofol, can result in a mixture of two effects: a local inhibitory connectivity increase and a decrease in the effective connectivity in sensory cortices. PMID:23977030

  14. Projective Connections and the Algebra of Densities

    SciTech Connect

    George, Jacob

    2008-11-18

    Projective connections first appeared in Cartan's papers in the 1920's. Since then they have resurfaced periodically in, for example, integrable systems and perhaps most recently in the context of so called projectively equivariant quantisation. We recall the notion of projective connection and describe its relation with the algebra of densities on a manifold. In particular, we construct a Laplace-type operator on functions using a Thomas projective connection and a symmetric contravariant tensor of rank 2 ('upper metric')

  15. Achieving climate connectivity in a fragmented landscape.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jenny L; Lawler, Joshua J; McRae, Brad H; Nuñez, Tristan A; Theobald, David M

    2016-06-28

    The contiguous United States contains a disconnected patchwork of natural lands. This fragmentation by human activities limits species' ability to track suitable climates as they rapidly shift. However, most models that project species movement needs have not examined where fragmentation will limit those movements. Here, we quantify climate connectivity, the capacity of landscape configuration to allow species movement in the face of dynamically shifting climate. Using this metric, we assess to what extent habitat fragmentation will limit species movements in response to climate change. We then evaluate how creating corridors to promote climate connectivity could potentially mitigate these restrictions, and we assess where strategies to increase connectivity will be most beneficial. By analyzing fragmentation patterns across the contiguous United States, we demonstrate that only 41% of natural land area retains enough connectivity to allow plants and animals to maintain climatic parity as the climate warms. In the eastern United States, less than 2% of natural area is sufficiently connected. Introducing corridors to facilitate movement through human-dominated regions increases the percentage of climatically connected natural area to 65%, with the most impactful gains in low-elevation regions, particularly in the southeastern United States. These climate connectivity analyses allow ecologists and conservation practitioners to determine the most effective regions for increasing connectivity. More importantly, our findings demonstrate that increasing climate connectivity is critical for allowing species to track rapidly changing climates, reconfiguring habitats to promote access to suitable climates. PMID:27298349

  16. Energetic cost of brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2013-01-01

    The brain's functional connectivity is complex, has high energetic cost, and requires efficient use of glucose, the brain's main energy source. It has been proposed that regions with a high degree of functional connectivity are energy efficient and can minimize consumption of glucose. However, the relationship between functional connectivity and energy consumption in the brain is poorly understood. To address this neglect, here we propose a simple model for the energy demands of brain functional connectivity, which we tested with positron emission tomography and MRI in 54 healthy volunteers at rest. Higher glucose metabolism was associated with proportionally larger MRI signal amplitudes, and a higher degree of connectivity was associated with nonlinear increases in metabolism, supporting our hypothesis for the energy efficiency of the connectivity hubs. Basal metabolism (in the absence of connectivity) accounted for 30% of brain glucose utilization, which suggests that the spontaneous brain activity accounts for 70% of the energy consumed by the brain. The energy efficiency of the connectivity hubs was higher for ventral precuneus, cerebellum, and subcortical hubs than for cortical hubs. The higher energy demands of brain communication that hinges upon higher connectivity could render brain hubs more vulnerable to deficits in energy delivery or utilization and help explain their sensitivity to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23898179

  17. Assembly design system based on engineering connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-05-01

    An assembly design system is an important part of computer-aided design systems, which are important tools for realizing product concept design. The traditional assembly design system does not record the connection information of production on the engineering layer; consequently, the upstream design idea cannot be fully used in the downstream design. An assembly design model based on the relationship of engineering connection is presented. In this model, all nodes are divided into two categories: The component and the connection. Moreover, the product is constructed on the basis of the connection relationship of the components. The model is an And/Or graph and has the ability to record all assembly schemes. This model records only the connection information that has engineering application value in the product design. In addition, this model can significantly reduce the number of combinations, and is very favorable for the assembly sequence planning in the downstream. The system contains a connection knowledge system that can be mapped to the connection node, and the connection knowledge obtained in practice can be returned to the knowledge system. Finally, VC++ 6.0 is used to develop a prototype system called Connect-based Assembly Planning (CAP). The relationship between the CAP system and the commercial assembly design system is also established.

  18. Reducing patient suffering through compassionate connected care.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Christina; Wojciechowski, Sharyl; McConville, Elizabeth; Drain, Maxwell

    2014-10-01

    Patient experience continues to play an increasingly critical role in quality outcomes and reimbursement. Nurse executives are tasked with helping direct-care nurses connect with patients to improve care experiences. Connecting with patients in compassionate ways to alleviate inherent patient suffering and prevent avoidable suffering is key to improving the patient experience. The Compassionate Connected Care framework identifies strategies for meeting the challenges of connecting with patients and reducing suffering. Methods integrate clinical, operational, cultural, and behavioral aspects of care to target patient needs based on condition. Caregivers learn to better express empathy and compassion to patients, and nurse leaders are better equipped to engage nurses at the bedside. PMID:25208270

  19. Synchronization from Second Order Network Connectivity Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liqiong; Beverlin, Bryce; Netoff, Theoden; Nykamp, Duane Q.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how network structure can influence the tendency for a neuronal network to synchronize, or its synchronizability, independent of the dynamical model for each neuron. The synchrony analysis takes advantage of the framework of second order networks, which defines four second order connectivity statistics based on the relative frequency of two-connection network motifs. The analysis identifies two of these statistics, convergent connections, and chain connections, as highly influencing the synchrony. Simulations verify that synchrony decreases with the frequency of convergent connections and increases with the frequency of chain connections. These trends persist with simulations of multiple models for the neuron dynamics and for different types of networks. Surprisingly, divergent connections, which determine the fraction of shared inputs, do not strongly influence the synchrony. The critical role of chains, rather than divergent connections, in influencing synchrony can be explained by their increasing the effective coupling strength. The decrease of synchrony with convergent connections is primarily due to the resulting heterogeneity in firing rates. PMID:21779239

  20. Drill pipe threaded nipple connection design development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saruev, A. L.; Saruev, L. A.; Vasenin, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the analysis of the behavior of the drill pipe nipple connection under the additional load generated by power pulses. The strain wave propagation through the nipple thread connection of drill pipes to the bottomhole is studied in this paper. The improved design of the nipple thread connection is suggested using the obtained experimental and theoretical data. The suggested connection design allows not only the efficient transmission of strain wave energy to a drill bit but also the automation of making-up and breaking-out drill pipes.

  1. Further advances in deepwater flowline connection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, J.R.; Cerqueira, M.B.; Silva, G.J.R.; Nagle, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    A diverless guidelineless flowline connection system, the so-called direct vertical connection, has been developed, and tested, which sharply decreases connection time, while allowing the lay-vessel itself to perform both flowline ends connections, thus dispensing with the use of auxiliary tools and making the operation more cost effective and reliable. This system has been designed to overcome problems associated with conventional pull-in systems, the lay-away method, ROV assisted pull-in systems and conventional vertical connections. The former have already been successfully used in Marlim field, in 25 wells located at water depths ranging from 740 m to 980 m. The direct vertical connection can now be considered a field proven method. Five import flowline connections have already been successfully performed in Albacora field manifold, installed at 620 m water depth. From now on, based on the excellent results achieved from those installations and previous tests, all deepwater Brazilian subsea trees and manifolds will be designed for direct vertical connection. Sixty six trees and six manifolds incorporating the direct vertical connection system are presently under fabrication in Brazil.

  2. Neural Field Dynamics with Heterogeneous Connection Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qubbaj, Murad R.; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2007-06-01

    Neural fields receive inputs from local and nonlocal sources. Notably in a biologically realistic architecture the latter vary under spatial translations (heterogeneous), the former do not (homogeneous). To understand the mutual effects of homogeneous and heterogeneous connectivity, we study the stability of the steady state activity of a neural field as a function of its connectivity and transmission speed. We show that myelination, a developmentally relevant change of the heterogeneous connectivity, always results in the stabilization of the steady state via oscillatory instabilities, independent of the local connectivity. Nonoscillatory instabilities are shown to be independent of any influences of time delay.

  3. Critical Connections: Health and Academics

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Shannon L; Merlo, Caitlin L; Basch, Charles E; Wentzel, Kathryn R; Wechsler, Howell

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND While it is a national priority to support the health and education of students, these sectors must better align, integrate, and collaborate to achieve this priority. This article summarizes the literature on the connection between health and academic achievement using the Whole School, Whole Community, and Whole Child (WSCC) framework as a way to address health-related barriers to learning. METHODS A literature review was conducted on the association between student health and academic achievement. RESULTS Most of the evidence examined the association between student health behaviors and academic achievement, with physical activity having the most published studies and consistent findings. The evidence supports the need for school health services by demonstrating the association between chronic conditions and decreased achievement. Safe and positive school environments were associated with improved health behaviors and achievement. Engaging families and community members in schools also had a positive effect on students' health and achievement. CONCLUSIONS Schools can improve the health and learning of students by supporting opportunities to learn about and practice healthy behaviors, providing school health services, creating safe and positive school environments, and engaging families and community. This evidence supports WSCC as a potential framework for achieving national educational and health goals. PMID:26440816

  4. Tweaking synchronization by connectivity modifications.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Paul; Peron, Thomas; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Natural and man-made networks often possess locally treelike substructures. Taking such tree networks as our starting point, we show how the addition of links changes the synchronization properties of the network. We focus on two different methods of link addition. The first method adds single links that create cycles of a well-defined length. Following a topological approach, we introduce cycles of varying length and analyze how this feature, as well as the position in the network, alters the synchronous behavior. We show that in particular short cycles can lead to a maximum change of the Laplacian's eigenvalue spectrum, dictating the synchronization properties of such networks. The second method connects a certain proportion of the initially unconnected nodes. We simulate dynamical systems on these network topologies, with the nodes' local dynamics being either discrete or continuous. Here our main result is that a certain number of additional links, with the relative position in the network being crucial, can be beneficial to ensure stable synchronization. PMID:27415259

  5. Tweaking synchronization by connectivity modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Paul; Peron, Thomas; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Natural and man-made networks often possess locally treelike substructures. Taking such tree networks as our starting point, we show how the addition of links changes the synchronization properties of the network. We focus on two different methods of link addition. The first method adds single links that create cycles of a well-defined length. Following a topological approach, we introduce cycles of varying length and analyze how this feature, as well as the position in the network, alters the synchronous behavior. We show that in particular short cycles can lead to a maximum change of the Laplacian's eigenvalue spectrum, dictating the synchronization properties of such networks. The second method connects a certain proportion of the initially unconnected nodes. We simulate dynamical systems on these network topologies, with the nodes' local dynamics being either discrete or continuous. Here our main result is that a certain number of additional links, with the relative position in the network being crucial, can be beneficial to ensure stable synchronization.

  6. The solar-coffee connection

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G.

    2000-04-01

    Coffee connoisseurs, when they quaff a cup of coffee or enjoy a jug of joe, don't generally consider the costs to the environment of their favorite beverage. But the fact is that traditional coffee production is hard on the environment, exacting a toll on the native forests and waterways of Central America and on the migratory birds of the western hemisphere. Coffee growing is the second greatest cause of rainforest destruction after cattle ranching, because a lot of trees are cut down to dry the freshly-picked coffee crop. But espresso-sipping environmentalists and an eco-conscious Joe Public can take comfort in a promising new connection between solar energy and rainforest-friendly coffee--solar-dried coffee. And they can take pleasure in it too, because solar-dried coffee, according to virtually everyone who tries it, is the best-tasting coffee made. Considering that coffee is the second most-traded commodity next to oil, and the second most popular beverage in the world next to water, consumed by billions of people, any new process that reduces the environmental damage occasioned by coffee-growing and processing is significant.

  7. Cross-Connections of Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Diana S.

    2002-02-01

    We are in desperate need of qualified chemistry teachers. Are the teachers who have biology, physics, or some psychology degrees qualified to teach chemistry? Have they taken enough chemistry to be prepared to teach outside their degree field? If remediation is necessary, what courses should be required? Attracting pre-service science teachers to the study of pure chemistry is not an easy task when more attractive course offerings are available. Maybe we should concentrate on cross-training in-service teachers by providing appropriate graduate courses to encourage them and bring them into the family. Many teachers with degrees outside the traditional discipline of chemistry have adequate backgrounds in the applications of chemistry. Requiring hours of undergraduate education before they enter the hallowed halls of the chemistry building as graduate students only serves to discourage a large segment of in-service teachers who wish to broaden their perspective. The National Science Education Standards make a compelling argument for connecting and integrating science courses for practicing teachers (3). We are at the crossroads. At a time when we so desperately need qualified chemistry teachers, shouldn't we be more open in our graduate teaching programs, inviting those with degrees in other disciplines to start on a graduate degree without insisting on undergraduate or survey coursework first? Many potential chemical education graduate students have a background in chemistry--it is just known by another name.

  8. Cortical attractor network dynamics with diluted connectivity.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Edmund T; Webb, Tristan J

    2012-01-24

    The connectivity of the cerebral cortex is diluted, with the probability of excitatory connections between even nearby pyramidal cells rarely more than 0.1, and in the hippocampus 0.04. To investigate the extent to which this diluted connectivity affects the dynamics of attractor networks in the cerebral cortex, we simulated an integrate-and-fire attractor network taking decisions between competing inputs with diluted connectivity of 0.25 or 0.1, and with the same number of synaptic connections per neuron for the recurrent collateral synapses within an attractor population as for full connectivity. The results indicated that there was less spiking-related noise with the diluted connectivity in that the stability of the network when in the spontaneous state of firing increased, and the accuracy of the correct decisions increased. The decision times were a little slower with diluted than with complete connectivity. Given that the capacity of the network is set by the number of recurrent collateral synaptic connections per neuron, on which there is a biological limit, the findings indicate that the stability of cortical networks, and the accuracy of their correct decisions or memory recall operations, can be increased by utilizing diluted connectivity and correspondingly increasing the number of neurons in the network, with little impact on the speed of processing of the cortex. Thus diluted connectivity can decrease cortical spiking-related noise. In addition, we show that the Fano factor for the trial-to-trial variability of the neuronal firing decreases from the spontaneous firing state value when the attractor network makes a decision. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Neural Coding". PMID:21875702

  9. 47 CFR 54.506 - Internal connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... necessary to transport information within one or more instructional buildings of a single school campus or... available for internal connections in non-instructional buildings of a school or school district, or in... instructional building of a school or to a non-administrative building of a library. Internal connections do...

  10. Quick-Connect Heavy-Duty Fastener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Attaching device combines fast connection and disconnection with high strength. T-shaped stud engages groove in receptacle after one-quarter turn. Further turning tightens nut on receptacle. Like quarter-turn attaching devices, connected and disconnected quickly. Like threaded devices, adjusted to desired preload, withstand high loads, and accommodate wide range of grip lengths.

  11. Supervision, Staff Development, and Evaluation Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Frank O.; Wood, Fred H.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the relationship between supervision, staff development, and teacher evaluation, discussing why educators must strive to make connections among the three, identifying important misunderstandings about them, and describing the purposes of each process and the similarities, differences, and connections between them. Together, they can be…

  12. Multiple Proof Approaches and Mathematical Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Zhonghong; O'Brien, George E.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most rewarding accomplishments of working with preservice secondary school mathematics teachers is helping them develop conceptually connected knowledge and see mathematics as an integrated whole rather than isolated pieces. To help students see and use the connections among various mathematical topics, the authors have paid close…

  13. Making Connections between Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew; McMaken, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Strengthening connections between research and practice is an important goal in education. Making the connection has both a supply side and a demand side but the demand is often ignored in education. The authors offer six hypotheses about why this situation occurs.

  14. School Library Media Program Connections for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookmark, 1991

    1991-01-01

    The 29 articles in this theme issue of "The Bookmark" focus on various aspects of school library media programs. The articles are as follows: (1) "School Library Media Program Connections for Learning" (Betty J. Morris); (2) "Humanity and Technology in the School of the Future" (Michael V. McGill); (3) "Community Connections in the 'New Compact'…

  15. Connected Knowledge in Science and Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohar, Anat

    2006-01-01

    While the traditional meaning of connected knowledge is valuable in some school subjects, it does not address the main activities of knowledge acquisition in subjects such as physics and mathematics. The goal of this article is to analyze the relationships between the concepts "learning for understanding" and "connected knowledge", a central theme…

  16. A Random Walk: Stumbling across Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Finding and designing tasks that allow for students to make connections among mathematical ideas is important for mathematics educators. One such task, which affords students the opportunity to make connections and engage with significant mathematical ideas through a variety of problem-solving approaches, is described in this article. Three…

  17. The Matrix Connection: Fibonacci and Inductive Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenstra, Tamara B.; Miller, Catherine M.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities (some involving graphing calculators) designed to guide students to discover several interesting properties of Fibonacci numbers. Then, we explore interesting connections between Fibonacci numbers and matrices; using this connection and induction we prove divisibility properties of Fibonacci numbers.

  18. Science and Mathematics--A Natural Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park Rogers, Meredith A.; Volkmann, Mark J.; Abell, Sandra K.

    2007-01-01

    Connections between science and mathematics seem natural. First, mathematics can be used in science to organize and analyze data in tables and graphs. Second, mathematics can help represent scientific phenomena and understand scientific concepts. Student learning should benefit when teachers make the connections between science and mathematics…

  19. Making Connections--The Big Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halyard, Rebecca A.

    1994-01-01

    Helping students to make essential connections of science content is often difficult, yet necessary to ensure a true understanding of science. A teacher offers insights on how pyruvic acid can be used to help students make connections in chemistry and biology. (ZWH)

  20. Making Connections: The Home Front Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessing, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Much of what students learn never appears to connect to their lives. They learn facts, they study events, and they read stories of others. Teachers need to help students make these associations, and sometimes that means expanding the curriculum. To help her language arts students make connections between their lives and the realities of life…

  1. Making Connections in the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Bobbie J.; Kidder, Stanley Q.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a strategy used in a meteorology course to increase its relevance to students' lives. Involves combining the lecture and laboratory portions of the course and including a Connections section in the lab report in which students comment on the connections they saw between the coursework, the laboratory exercises, and their own experience.…

  2. Connecting Functions in Geometry and Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steketee, Scott; Scher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    One goal of a mathematics education is that students make significant connections among different branches of mathematics. Connections--such as those between arithmetic and algebra, between two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry, between compass-and-straight-edge constructions and transformations, and between calculus and analytic…

  3. Reflections on Connecting through Outdoor Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen; Brinkman, Danielle; Wabano, Mary Jo; Young, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Connecting through outdoor adventure is a process that may or may not seem obvious. The word "connecting" resonates with a powerful and extensive implied meaning that the authors feel compelled to share. A recent collaborative research project between leaders from the Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve and researchers from Laurentian University…

  4. Making the Chromosome-Gene-Protein Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    Presents an exercise that demonstrates the chromosome-gene-protein connection using sickle-cell anemia, a genetic disease with a well-characterized molecular basis. Involves connecting changes in DNA to protein outcomes and tying them into the next generation by meiosis and gamete formation with genetic crosses. Motivates students to integrate…

  5. Connect the Book. George Washington's Teeth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    February celebrates both National Children's Dental Health Month and President's Day (February 21), so this month's "Connect the Book" column features a book with connections to both events. George Washington, the first President of the United States (1789-1797) and known as the "Father of Our Country," had a serious dental health problem that…

  6. Connecting Mathematical Knowledge: A Dialectical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmittau, Jean

    1993-01-01

    Based on the cognitive psychological theories of Vygotsky and Davydov, discusses the establishment of connections between mathematical elements, and the algorithmic rules that govern them, and children's spontaneous mathematical concepts. Presents examples that establish connections involving addition and subtraction, comparing numerical…

  7. Elders' Lifelong Connection with the Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Our interaction with nature does not end just because we age. People have a lifelong connection with the outdoor environment in varying degrees. For some, this participation may be subtle by simply watching others interact with the outdoor environment. For others, there is a deeper connection with nature through gardening, birding, exercise,…

  8. Lewis and Clark--Indiana Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Pamela J., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The state of Indiana has an important, recognized connection to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. That connection is reinforced with a National Signature Event in Clarksville (Indiana) during October 2003. Until the expedition party left its winter camp in May 1804, it remained in Indiana Territory, governed from Vincennes (Indiana) by William Henry…

  9. Physical Science Connected Classrooms: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Karen; Sanalan, Vehbi; Shirley, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Case-study descriptions of secondary and middle school classrooms in diverse contexts provide examples of how teachers implement connected classroom technology to facilitate formative assessment in science instruction. Connected classroom technology refers to a networked system of handheld devices designed for classroom use. Teachers were…

  10. An assessment of the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The CM-2 is an example of a connection machine. The strengths and problems of this implementation are considered as well as important issues in the architecture and programming environment of connection machines in general. These are contrasted to the same issues in Multiple Instruction/Multiple Data (MIMD) microprocessors and multicomputers.

  11. Building Cohesion in Positively Connected Exchange Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This research investigates the process through which individuals build cohesive relationships in positively connected exchange relations. Positive connections exist any time exchange in one relation must precede exchange in another. Such situations arise through gatekeeping, in generalized exchange contexts, and when resources diffuse across a…

  12. Water Treatment Technology - Cross-Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on cross connections provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on cross connections terminology and control devices. For each…

  13. Infinitesimal affine automorphisms of symplectic connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Daniel J. F.

    2016-08-01

    Conditions are given under which an infinitesimal automorphism of a torsion-free connection preserving a symplectic form is necessarily a symplectic vector field. An example is given of a compact symplectic nilmanifold admitting a flat symplectic connection and an infinitesimal automorphism that is not symplectic.

  14. Connecting Representations: Using Predict, Check, Explain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, George J.; Fueyo, Vivian; Vahey, Philip; Knudsen, Jennifer; Rafanan, Ken; Lara-Meloy, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Although educators agree that making connections with the real world, as advocated by "Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All" (NCTM 2014), is important, making such connections while addressing important mathematics is elusive. The authors have found that math content coupled with the instructional strategy of…

  15. 33 CFR 156.130 - Connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... material in joints and couplings to ensure a leak-free seal; (2) Use a bolt in at least every other hole, and in no case less than four bolts, in each temporary bolted connection that uses a flange that meets... chapter; (3) Use a bolt in each hole in each temporary bolted connection that uses a flange other than...

  16. Check & Connect. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Check & Connect" is a dropout prevention strategy that relies on close monitoring of school performance, as well as mentoring, case management, and other supports. The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) reviewed six studies on "Check & Connect" that were designed to assess the program's effectiveness. Four of these studies passed WWC relevance…

  17. The SOHO-Stellar Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    I discusses practical aspects of the so-called "solar-stellar" connection; namely, the fundamental principles, the tools at the disposal of the stellar astronomer, and a few recent examples of the connection in action. I provide an overall evolutionary context for coronal activity, calling attention to the very different circumstances of low mass main sequence stars like the Sun, which are active mainly early in their lives; compared with more massive stars, whose coronally active phase occurs near the end of their lives, during their brief incursion into the cool half of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as yellow and then red giants. On the instrumental slide, I concentrate primarily on spectroscopy, in the ultraviolet and X-ray bands where coronae leave their most obvious signatures. I present an early glimpse of the type of moderate resolution spectra we can expect from the recently launched Chandra observatory, and contemporaneous HST STIS high-resolution UV measurements of the CXO calibration star Capella (alpha Aur; G8 III + G1 III). I compare STIS spectra of solar-type dwarfs-zeta Dor (F7 V), an active coronal source; and alpha Cen A (G2 V), a near twin of the Sun-to a trace obtained with the SOHO SUMER imaging UV spectrometer. I also compare STIS line profiles of the active coronal dwarf to the corresponding features in the mixed-activity "hybrid-chromosphere" bright giant alpha TrA (K2 II) and the archetype "noncoronal" red giant Arcturus (alpha Boo; K2 III). The latter shows dramatic evidence for a "cool absorber" in its outer atmosphere that is extinguishing the "hot lines" (like Si IV lambda1393 and N V lambda1238) below about 1500 A, probably through absorption in the Si I lambda1525 and C I lambda1240 photoionization continua. The disappearance of coronae across the "Linsky-Haisch" dividing line near K1 III thus apparently is promoted by a dramatic overturning in the outer atmospheric structure, namely the coronae of the red giants seem to lie beneath

  18. Directional connectivity in hydrology and ecology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Laurel G; Choi, Jungyill; Nungesser, Martha K; Harvey, Judson W

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying hydrologic and ecological connectivity has contributed to understanding transport and dispersal processes and assessing ecosystem degradation or restoration potential. However, there has been little synthesis across disciplines. The growing field of ecohydrology and recent recognition that loss of hydrologic connectivity is leading to a global decline in biodiversity underscore the need for a unified connectivity concept. One outstanding need is a way to quantify directional connectivity that is consistent, robust to variations in sampling, and transferable across scales or environmental settings. Understanding connectivity in a particular direction (e.g., streamwise, along or across gradient, between sources and sinks, along cardinal directions) provides critical information for predicting contaminant transport, planning conservation corridor design, and understanding how landscapes or hydroscapes respond to directional forces like wind or water flow. Here we synthesize progress on quantifying connectivity and develop a new strategy for evaluating directional connectivity that benefits from use of graph theory in ecology and percolation theory in hydrology. The directional connectivity index (DCI) is a graph-theory based, multiscale metric that is generalizable to a range of different structural and functional connectivity applications. It exhibits minimal sensitivity to image rotation or resolution within a given range and responds intuitively to progressive, unidirectional change. Further, it is linearly related to the integral connectivity scale length--a metric common in hydrology that correlates well with actual fluxes--but is less computationally challenging and more readily comparable across different landscapes. Connectivity-orientation curves (i.e., directional connectivity computed over a range of headings) provide a quantitative, information-dense representation of environmental structure that can be used for comparison or detection of

  19. Directional connectivity in hydrology and ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Choi, Jungyill; Nungesser, Martha K.; Harvey, Judson W.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying hydrologic and ecological connectivity has contributed to understanding transport and dispersal processes and assessing ecosystem degradation or restoration potential. However, there has been little synthesis across disciplines. The growing field of ecohydrology and recent recognition that loss of hydrologic connectivity is leading to a global decline in biodiversity underscore the need for a unified connectivity concept. One outstanding need is a way to quantify directional connectivity that is consistent, robust to variations in sampling, and transferable across scales or environmental settings. Understanding connectivity in a particular direction (e.g., streamwise, along or across gradient, between sources and sinks, along cardinal directions) provides critical information for predicting contaminant transport, planning conservation corridor design, and understanding how landscapes or hydroscapes respond to directional forces like wind or water flow. Here we synthesize progress on quantifying connectivity and develop a new strategy for evaluating directional connectivity that benefits from use of graph theory in ecology and percolation theory in hydrology. The directional connectivity index (DCI) is a graph-theory based, multiscale metric that is generalizable to a range of different structural and functional connectivity applications. It exhibits minimal sensitivity to image rotation or resolution within a given range and responds intuitively to progressive, unidirectional change. Further, it is linearly related to the integral connectivity scale length—a metric common in hydrology that correlates well with actual fluxes—but is less computationally challenging and more readily comparable across different landscapes. Connectivity-orientation curves (i.e., directional connectivity computed over a range of headings) provide a quantitative, information-dense representation of environmental structure that can be used for comparison or detection of

  20. Connectivity: What is it good for?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Elsenbeer, H.

    2012-04-01

    In extensive areas of the Panama Canal watershed, large and frequent tropical storms hit clay-rich soils that feature a low saturated hydraulic conductivity at shallow depth. As a consequence, surface runoff occurs frequently, and extremely flashy catchment responses are common. Previous studies showed that in undisturbed forests of this region, overland flow tends to concentrate in flowlines which extend the channel network and therefore provide hydrological connectivity between hillslopes and streams. In this contribution we present our latest research which aims at explaining the development and dynamics of overland-flow connectivity and its impact on catchment runoff and suspended-sediment export. In an undisturbed headwater catchment we monitored on an event basis overland-flow occurrence in all flowlines and measured discharge and suspended-sediment concentration in several flowlines and at the catchment outlet. Under certain meteorological conditions all flowlines are connected to the channel network throughout their entire lengths. Because some flowlines originate near the catchment divide, extensive parts of the catchment are then hydrologically connected. It was for these high-connectivity situations that we measured the largest storm flows and sediment yields at the catchment outlet. Yet, both runoff volume and sediment yield varied up to an order of magnitude during the high-connectivity stage. This is because our connectivity data comprise just one feature of connectivity; that is, whether flow is connected or not. Hydrologic connectivity (at the soil surface), however, also entails other critical aspects such as the duration of a particular connectivity stage. Although promising, the effort required to monitor these aspects of connectivity is substantial. Moreover, it is not clear how such specific information can be transferred to other catchments. Therefore, besides more detailed investigations we advocate applying the established link between

  1. Brain Connectivity Analysis: A Short Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lang, E. W.; Tomé, A. M.; Keck, I. R.; Górriz-Sáez, J. M.; Puntonet, C. G.

    2012-01-01

    This short survey the reviews recent literature on brain connectivity studies. It encompasses all forms of static and dynamic connectivity whether anatomical, functional, or effective. The last decade has seen an ever increasing number of studies devoted to deduce functional or effective connectivity, mostly from functional neuroimaging experiments. Resting state conditions have become a dominant experimental paradigm, and a number of resting state networks, among them the prominent default mode network, have been identified. Graphical models represent a convenient vehicle to formalize experimental findings and to closely and quantitatively characterize the various networks identified. Underlying these abstract concepts are anatomical networks, the so-called connectome, which can be investigated by functional imaging techniques as well. Future studies have to bridge the gap between anatomical neuronal connections and related functional or effective connectivities. PMID:23097663

  2. Connected Knowledge in Science and Mathematics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Anat

    2006-10-01

    While the traditional meaning of connected knowledge is valuable in some school subjects, it does not address the main activities of knowledge acquisition in subjects such as physics and mathematics. The goal of this article is to analyze the relationships between the concepts “learning for understanding” and “connected knowledge”, a central theme in feminist epistemology. In learning for understanding, the learner forms multiple, intricate connections among the concepts she is studying in school, between school concepts and her everyday concepts, and between school concepts and their wider context. Viewing connected knowledge as tightly related to understanding has several important implications. It brings connected knowledge into the central learning activities that take place in school science and mathematics, and gives it a high status. It contributes to our understanding of gender-related patterns in thinking; and it may form a unifying theoretical framework for many studies and projects in the field of gender fair education.

  3. Connectiveness and civility in online learning.

    PubMed

    Rieck, Susan; Crouch, Laura

    2007-11-01

    As the classroom shifts from teacher-centered to learner-centered and from face-to-face to online, nursing faculty members are challenged to promote a sense of connectiveness and social interaction. Making connectiveness more elusive is the perception of rude, impolite, or unkind communication. The purpose of this descriptive-exploratory study was to examine perceptions of connectiveness and civility in online nursing courses. Ninety-six students in four nursing programs participated in the study. Strategies that promote connectiveness with peers are in-person activities whenever possible and discussion assignments that include social activities. Timely feedback when responding to questions and prompt grading are important for student-to-instructor connectiveness. Thirty-five percent of the students encountered rude or unkind communication with peers, and 60% reported incivility from instructors. Their suggestions for effective handling of rude communication included addressing the behavior privately, giving guidance about netiquette, and defining what constitutes rude behavior. PMID:17765016

  4. The Genetics of Soft Connective Tissue Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vanakker, Olivier; Callewaert, Bert; Malfait, Fransiska; Coucke, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, the field of hereditary connective tissue disorders has changed tremendously. This review highlights exciting insights into three prototypic disorders affecting the soft connective tissue: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, and cutis laxa. For each of these disorders, the identification and characterization of several novel but related conditions or subtypes have widened the phenotypic spectrum. In parallel, the vast underlying molecular network connecting these phenotypes is progressively being uncovered. Identification and characterization (both clinical and molecular) of new phenotypes within the connective tissue disorder spectrum are often key to further unraveling the pathways involved in connective tissue biology and delineating the clinical spectrum and pathophysiology of the disorders. Although difficult challenges remain, recent findings have expanded our pathophysiological understanding and may lead to targeted therapies in the near future. PMID:26002060

  5. Road Weather and Connected Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, P.; Boyce, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    On average, there are over 5.8 M vehicle crashes each year of which 23% are weather-related. Weather-related crashes are defined as those crashes that occur in adverse weather or on slick pavement. The vast majority of weather-related crashes happen on wet pavement (74%) and during rainfall (46%). Connected vehicle technologies hold the promise to transform road-weather management by providing improved road weather data in real time with greater temporal and geographic accuracy. This will dramatically expand the amount of data that can be used to assess, forecast, and address the impacts that weather has on roads, vehicles, and travelers. The use of vehicle-based measurements of the road and surrounding atmosphere with other, more traditional weather data sources, and create road and atmospheric hazard products for a variety of users. The broad availability of road weather data from mobile sources will vastly improve the ability to detect and forecast weather and road conditions, and will provide the capability to manage road-weather response on specific roadway links. The RWMP is currently demonstrating how weather, road conditions, and related vehicle data can be used for decision making through an innovative Integrated Mobile Observations project. FHWA is partnering with 3 DOTs (MN, MI, & NV) to pilot these applications. One is a mobile alerts application called the Motorists Advisories and Warnings (MAW) and a maintenance decision support application. These applications blend traditional weather information (e.g., radar, surface stations) with mobile vehicle data (e.g., temperature, brake status, wiper status) to determine current weather conditions. These weather conditions, and other road-travel-relevant information, are provided to users via web and phone applications. The MAW provides nowcasts and short-term forecasts out to 24 hours while the EMDSS application can provide forecasts up to 72 hours in advance. The three DOTs have placed readers and external

  6. Extra-adrenal myelolipoma presenting as efferent limb obstruction.

    PubMed

    Conley, Alexandria; Klein, Elizabeth; Edhayan, E; Berri, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Myelolipomas are rare benign lesions composed of mature adipose tissue and immature hematopoetic cells. The adrenal gland is the most common location for these lesions, but cases of extra-adrenal myelolipomas have been described. The predominant location for extra-adrenal myelolipomas is the retroperitoneum, and very few reported cases describe these lesions in the peritoneal cavity. Typically these lesions are incidental findings and asymptomatic, but occasionally can present with symptoms secondary to mass effect. We present the case of a 72 year old man presenting with a gastric outlet obstruction secondary to an epigastric mass. The mass was resected and pathology was consistent with myelolipoma. This case illustrates an atypical location and presentation of a myelolipoma. These are rare tumors with only 5 intra-abdominal myelolipomas reported in the literature. This article is a review of the surgical literature and a discussion on myelolipomas. Knowledge of these rare entities can help ensure proper management of these patients, which may include early surgical intervention. PMID:22888458

  7. Interrogating Texts: From Deferent to Efferent and Aesthetic Reading Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cheryl Hogue

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a revised version of transactional reading theory to explain how students classified as basic writers tend to employ counterproductive reading and thinking processes that inhibit them from full participation in academic life. Louise Rosenblatt proposes that readers have two main positions or purposes in reading--the efferent…

  8. Orexin neurons suppress narcolepsy via 2 distinct efferent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Emi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mieda, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    The loss of orexin neurons in humans is associated with the sleep disorder narcolepsy, which is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Mice lacking orexin peptides, orexin neurons, or orexin receptors recapitulate human narcolepsy phenotypes, further highlighting a critical role for orexin signaling in the maintenance of wakefulness. Despite the known role of orexin neurons in narcolepsy, the precise neural mechanisms downstream of these neurons remain unknown. We found that targeted restoration of orexin receptor expression in the dorsal raphe (DR) and in the locus coeruleus (LC) of mice lacking orexin receptors inhibited cataplexy-like episodes and pathological fragmentation of wakefulness (i.e., sleepiness), respectively. The suppression of cataplexy-like episodes correlated with the number of serotonergic neurons restored with orexin receptor expression in the DR, while the consolidation of fragmented wakefulness correlated with the number of noradrenergic neurons restored in the LC. Furthermore, pharmacogenetic activation of these neurons using designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADD) technology ameliorated narcolepsy in mice lacking orexin neurons. These results suggest that DR serotonergic and LC noradrenergic neurons play differential roles in orexin neuron–dependent regulation of sleep/wakefulness and highlight a pharmacogenetic approach for the amelioration of narcolepsy. PMID:24382351

  9. Detecting Functional Connectivity During Audiovisual Integration with MEG: A Comparison of Connectivity Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Frederick W.; Holroyd, Tom; Horwitz, Barry; Coppola, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In typical magnetoencephalography and/or electroencephalography functional connectivity analysis, researchers select one of several methods that measure a relationship between regions to determine connectivity, such as coherence, power correlations, and others. However, it is largely unknown if some are more suited than others for various types of investigations. In this study, the authors investigate seven connectivity metrics to evaluate which, if any, are sensitive to audiovisual integration by contrasting connectivity when tracking an audiovisual object versus connectivity when tracking a visual object uncorrelated with the auditory stimulus. The authors are able to assess the metrics' performances at detecting audiovisual integration by investigating connectivity between auditory and visual areas. Critically, the authors perform their investigation on a whole-cortex all-to-all mapping, avoiding confounds introduced in seed selection. The authors find that amplitude-based connectivity measures in the beta band detect strong connections between visual and auditory areas during audiovisual integration, specifically between V4/V5 and auditory cortices in the right hemisphere. Conversely, phase-based connectivity measures in the beta band as well as phase and power measures in alpha, gamma, and theta do not show connectivity between audiovisual areas. The authors postulate that while beta power correlations detect audiovisual integration in the current experimental context, it may not always be the best measure to detect connectivity. Instead, it is likely that the brain utilizes a variety of mechanisms in neuronal communication that may produce differential types of temporal relationships. PMID:25599264

  10. Detecting Functional Connectivity During Audiovisual Integration with MEG: A Comparison of Connectivity Metrics.

    PubMed

    Ard, Tyler; Carver, Frederick W; Holroyd, Tom; Horwitz, Barry; Coppola, Richard

    2015-08-01

    In typical magnetoencephalography and/or electroencephalography functional connectivity analysis, researchers select one of several methods that measure a relationship between regions to determine connectivity, such as coherence, power correlations, and others. However, it is largely unknown if some are more suited than others for various types of investigations. In this study, the authors investigate seven connectivity metrics to evaluate which, if any, are sensitive to audiovisual integration by contrasting connectivity when tracking an audiovisual object versus connectivity when tracking a visual object uncorrelated with the auditory stimulus. The authors are able to assess the metrics' performances at detecting audiovisual integration by investigating connectivity between auditory and visual areas. Critically, the authors perform their investigation on a whole-cortex all-to-all mapping, avoiding confounds introduced in seed selection. The authors find that amplitude-based connectivity measures in the beta band detect strong connections between visual and auditory areas during audiovisual integration, specifically between V4/V5 and auditory cortices in the right hemisphere. Conversely, phase-based connectivity measures in the beta band as well as phase and power measures in alpha, gamma, and theta do not show connectivity between audiovisual areas. The authors postulate that while beta power correlations detect audiovisual integration in the current experimental context, it may not always be the best measure to detect connectivity. Instead, it is likely that the brain utilizes a variety of mechanisms in neuronal communication that may produce differential types of temporal relationships. PMID:25599264

  11. The TANF/SSI connection.

    PubMed

    Wamhoff, Steve; Wiseman, Michael

    Interactions and overlap of social assistance programs across clients interest policymakers because such interactions affect both the clients' well-being and the programs' efficiency. This article investigates the connections between Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and TANF's predecessor, the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program. Connections between receipt of TANF and SSI are widely discussed in both disability policy and poverty research literatures because many families receiving TANF report disabilities. For both states and the individuals involved, it is generally financially advantageous for adults and children with disabilities to transfer from TANF to SSI. States gain because the federal government pays for the SSI benefit, and states can then use the TANF savings for other purposes. The families gain because the SSI benefits they acquire are greater than the TANF benefits they lose. The payoff to states from transferring welfare recipients to SSI was substantially increased when Congress replaced AFDC with TANF in 1996. States retained less than half of any savings achieved through such transfers under AFDC, but they retain all of the savings under TANF. Also, the work participation requirements under TANF have obligated states to address the work support needs of adults with disabilities who remain in TANF, and states can avoid these costs if adults have disabilities that satisfy SSI eligibility requirements. The incentive for TANF recipients to apply for SSI has increased over time as inflation has caused real TANF benefits to fall relative to payments received by SSI recipients. Trends in the financial incentives for transfer to SSI have not been studied in detail, and reliable general data on the extent of the interaction between TANF and SSI are scarce. In addition, some estimates of the prevalence of TANF receipt among SSI awardees are flawed because they fail to include adults

  12. Mapping hydrologic connectivity of geographically isolated wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, Ali; Creed, Irena

    2016-04-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are characterized as depressional landscape features completely surrounded by uplands. These small and typically circular landscape features represent a vast majority of wetlands in various landscapes in North America (98% of all wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region). Geographical isolation, however, does not imply the hydrological isolation. Although geospatial data (e.g., aerial photos) suggested that GIWs lack a persistent surface water connection, the groundwater connection between GIWs and navigable downstream waters can be substantial with large fluxes at the regional scales. The surface/subsurface connections among GIWs and between GIWs and navigable waters are difficult to map and quantify. This is intimately tied to the fact that an efficient incorporation of these small geometric features and characterization of the mechanisms behind these connectivities are challenging within grid-based simulators. We used a physically-based grid-free groundwater-surface water interaction and surface flow routing schemes to map and assess the watershed-scale GIWs connectivity within an extensively studied watershed at the Canadian prairie pothole region with high density of GIWs. The results showed that there is a persistent subsurface connectivity among GIWs and between GIWs and navigable waters. Surface connection was rare and only occurred during extreme events. The results of this paper have significant implications for developing scientifically grounded environmental policy for protection of GIWs within North American Prairie.

  13. NASA CONNECT: 'Glow with the Flow'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'Geometry and Algebra: Glow with the Flow' is the second of five programs in the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes teh 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and tehcnology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site adn register http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Geometry and Algebra: Glow with the Flow', students will learn about the force of drag and how NASA engineers use models and glowing paints to see how air flows over vehicles in a wind tunnel. Students will also discover how the blended wing body(BWB), a concept super jumbo jet that resembles a flying wing, will affect air travelers of the future. Students will observe NASA engineers using geometry and algebra when they measure and design models to be tested in wind tunnels. By conducting classroom and on-line activities, students will make connections between NASA research and the mathematics, science and technology they learn in their classroom.

  14. Altered functional connectivity in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jia, Fanlu; Siok, Wai Ting; Tan, Li Hai

    2016-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) is a speech disorder that impairs communication skills. Despite extensive research, the core causes of PDS are elusive. Converging evidence from task-induced neuroimaging methods has demonstrated the contributions of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum to PDS, but such task-state neuroimaging findings are often confounded by behavioral performance differences between subjects who stutter and normal controls. Here, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated functional connectivity within cerebellar-cortical and basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks in 16 adults who stutter and 18 age-matched fluent speakers. Seed-to-voxel analysis demonstrated that, compared to controls, adults who stutter showed alternations in functional connectivity of cerebellum to motor cortex as well as connectivity among different locals within cerebellum. Additionally, we found that functional connectivity within cerebellar circuits was significantly correlated with severity of stuttering. The alternations of functional connectivity within basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks were identified as the reduced connectivity of the putamen to the superior temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobules in adults who stutter. The abnormalities of resting state functional connectivity are assumed to affect language planning and motor execution critical for speaking fluently. Our findings may yield neurobiological cues to the biomarkers of PDS. PMID:26743821

  15. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  16. Unraveling the mysteries of proprietary connections

    SciTech Connect

    Klementich, E.F.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide some insight into the potential users of proprietary connections and to facilitate a rational selection process and procurement procedure. First, it must be noted that the standard and commonly used API casing connections [short, round thread casing and coupling (STC); long, round thread casing and coupling (LTC); buttress thread casing and coupling (BTC)] and API tubing connection EUE-8R (external upset ends, eight round thread tubing and coupling) can provide reliable service for the vast majority of well drilled and completed. Proprietary connections can and have been misapplied at considerable expense; for example, 9 5/8 drilling (intermediate/protective) casing. API BTC works more than adequately in drilling-mud environments. There is no need to use a proprietary connection for such service. In fact, pin nose metal-to-metal seal proprietary connections in this type of service can be less reliable than the API BTC connection since the metal-to-metal seal is much more damage prone than the thread seal of API BTC. Also, very reliable leak resistance, even to gas, is obtained with tin plated BTC couplings.

  17. Altered functional connectivity in persistent developmental stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Jia, Fanlu; Siok, Wai Ting; Tan, Li Hai

    2016-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) is a speech disorder that impairs communication skills. Despite extensive research, the core causes of PDS are elusive. Converging evidence from task-induced neuroimaging methods has demonstrated the contributions of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum to PDS, but such task-state neuroimaging findings are often confounded by behavioral performance differences between subjects who stutter and normal controls. Here, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated functional connectivity within cerebellar-cortical and basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks in 16 adults who stutter and 18 age-matched fluent speakers. Seed-to-voxel analysis demonstrated that, compared to controls, adults who stutter showed alternations in functional connectivity of cerebellum to motor cortex as well as connectivity among different locals within cerebellum. Additionally, we found that functional connectivity within cerebellar circuits was significantly correlated with severity of stuttering. The alternations of functional connectivity within basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks were identified as the reduced connectivity of the putamen to the superior temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobules in adults who stutter. The abnormalities of resting state functional connectivity are assumed to affect language planning and motor execution critical for speaking fluently. Our findings may yield neurobiological cues to the biomarkers of PDS. PMID:26743821

  18. Physiological integration of connected balsam poplar ramets.

    PubMed

    Adonsou, Kokouvi Emmanuel; DesRochers, Annie; Tremblay, Francine

    2016-07-01

    Clonal integration between ramets can be an ecological advantage of clonal plant species in environments where resources are patchily distributed. We investigated physiological integration among Populus balsamifera L. ramets under drought stress in order to demonstrate water sharing between connected ramets. Pairs of connected ramets were grown in separate pots in the greenhouse where half of ramets had the parental root connection severed and half were left intact. Drought stress was applied to one ramet, and growth, specific leaf area (SLA), net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential and carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) were measured after an 8-week growing period. Droughted ramets connected to watered ramets were able to maintain high gas exchange activity and water potential, similar to watered ramets. Leaf water potential and SLA results showed that the root connection was more beneficial for proximal compared with distal ramets. The parental root connection also allowed droughted ramets to discriminate more against (13)C compared with severed ramets. In conclusion, this study shows compelling evidence of physiological integration of connected P. balsamifera ramets through water sharing. PMID:26843209

  19. Low pore connectivity in natural rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    As repositories for CO2 and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  20. Functional connectivity hubs of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Liska, Adam; Galbusera, Alberto; Schwarz, Adam J; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2015-07-15

    Recent advances in functional connectivity methods have made it possible to identify brain hubs - a set of highly connected regions serving as integrators of distributed neuronal activity. The integrative role of hub nodes makes these areas points of high vulnerability to dysfunction in brain disorders, and abnormal hub connectivity profiles have been described for several neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of analogous functional connectivity hubs in preclinical species like the mouse may provide critical insight into the elusive biological underpinnings of these connectional alterations. To spatially locate functional connectivity hubs in the mouse brain, here we applied a fully-weighted network analysis to map whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e., the functional connectome) at a high-resolution voxel-scale. Analysis of a large resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) dataset revealed the presence of six distinct functional modules related to known large-scale functional partitions of the brain, including a default-mode network (DMN). Consistent with human studies, highly-connected functional hubs were identified in several sub-regions of the DMN, including the anterior and posterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, in the thalamus, and in small foci within well-known integrative cortical structures such as the insular and temporal association cortices. According to their integrative role, the identified hubs exhibited mutual preferential interconnections. These findings highlight the presence of evolutionarily-conserved, mutually-interconnected functional hubs in the mouse brain, and may guide future investigations of the biological foundations of aberrant rsfMRI hub connectivity associated with brain pathological states. PMID:25913701